Science.gov

Sample records for arthroscopic graftjacket repair

  1. Arthroscopic hip labral repair.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Faucet, Scott C; Briggs, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:23875153

  2. Modern concepts in arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Diduch, D R; Tadje, J P; Ferguson, R E; Edlich, R F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review recent advances in Bankart repair that allow it to be performed arthroscopically. Metallic implants in the form of staples, screws, or rivets were used initially, but problems with loosening of implants has prompted development of alternative devices and techniques. A modified form of the transglenoid suturing technique used in open Bankart repair has been used successfully but is associated with an increased risk of soft tissue complications. The use of absorbable tacks avoids some of the complications associated with this approach, but the ability to advance the capsule to reduce the volume is limited. Recently, the use of suture anchors has been described for arthroscopic Bankart lesion repair. However, the ability of these anchoring systems to advance and reduce the capsular volume is limited, and the arthroscopic techniques are technically demanding. One particularly innovative suture anchor system uses a bioabsorbable suture anchor with an integrated suture passing system. This self-contained implant allows multiple passes with suture through the capsule, followed by attachment to the glenoid with the bioabsorbable anchor. This procedure allows the capsule to be advanced by passing suture through before it is anchored to the glenoid, thereby reducing capsular volume to help restore shoulder stability. PMID:10847974

  3. Arthroscopic Repair of Collateral Ligaments in Metacarpophalangeal Joints

    PubMed Central

    Abernathie, Brenon L.; Lovy, Andrew J.; Koehler, Steven M.; Hausman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Although typically reported in thumb and small fingers, collateral ligament ruptures of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints have been described in all digits. Traditional open repair requires a dissection that violates the sagittal band and may result in increased scarring and decreased hand function. Arthroscopic repair of MCP collateral ligaments has not been previously described. We present a new technique for repairing MCP collateral ligaments arthroscopically. PMID:26052500

  4. Arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions with a bioknotless suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Yian, Edward; Wang, Conrad; Millett, Peter J; Warner, Jon J P

    2004-05-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of SLAP tears have improved with the development of arthroscopic shoulder surgery techniques. With types 2 and 4 tears, the goal is to restore stability to the labrum and biceps anchor and achieve healing to the glenoid. Suture repair with anchors is currently the repair technique of choice. The purpose of this article is to report a fast and simple method for arthroscopic SLAP repair that uses knotless suture anchors and obviates complex suture management and arthroscopic knot tying. PMID:15122149

  5. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using the Undersurface Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rubenis, Imants; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has traditionally been performed in the subacromial space from the bursal side of the tendon. The undersurface rotator cuff repair technique involves the arthroscope remaining in the glenohumeral joint, thus viewing the tendon from its undersurface during repair without a bursectomy or acromioplasty. Purpose: To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of undersurface rotator cuff repair with bursal-side repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted on 2 cohorts of patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with knotless suture anchors configured in a single-row formation using inverted mattress–style sutures from either the bursal side (n = 100) or undersurface (n = 165) of the supraspinatus tendon. Data were collected preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. At each time point, patients completed a modified L’Insalata questionnaire to assess patient-ranked pain scores and were clinically examined using standardized tests. Ultrasound examination was performed at 6 months and 2 years to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: At 2 years postoperatively, patients in both cohorts had significantly less pain and less difficulty with overhead activities compared with preoperative levels (P < .001). The type of repair performed (bursal or undersurface) did not affect the ability to perform overhead activities at 2 years. At 2 years, both groups also had similar retear rates (21% for bursal side, 23% for undersurface). The mean operative time for the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was 32 minutes when performed from the bursal side and 20 minutes when performed from the undersurface (P < .001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, whether performed from the subacromial space or glenohumeral joint, resulted in decreased levels of pain and difficulty with overhead activities at 2 years. The major difference between the 2 techniques was operative time, with the undersurface technique being performed significantly faster than the bursal-side repair technique. PMID:26535375

  6. Arthroscopic Saucerization and Repair of Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tear.

    PubMed

    Fields, Logan K; Caldwell, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    Meniscal tears are among the most commonly diagnosed knee injuries and often require surgical intervention. Understanding the types of meniscal tears and treatment options is paramount to caring for the young athlete. Sports medicine and arthroscopic physicians now recognize that meniscal preservation in the young athlete is essential to the long-term health and function of the knee. Although uncommon, the discoid lateral meniscus is more prone to injury because of its increased thickness and lack of blood supply. Because of the abnormal development, the peripheral attachments are frequently absent and instability often persists after a partial meniscectomy. If the instability is unrecognized during the initial treatment, a recurrence of pain and mechanical symptoms is likely and a subsequent subtotal meniscectomy may be the only treatment option. With increased awareness, arthroscopic saucerization accompanied by arthroscopically assisted inside-out meniscal repair is a preferable treatment option with an excellent outcome. PMID:26052498

  7. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  8. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears. PMID:26761928

  9. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  10. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to statistically significant midterm improvement in ROM and satisfactory midterm subjective outcome scores with low complication/failure rates in patients with average medium-sized rotator cuff tears with minimal fatty infiltration. Further work is required to evaluate radiographic healing rates with this technique and to compare outcomes following suture anchor repair. Level of Evidence: Level IV PMID:26980983

  11. [Arthroscopic repair of partial subcapularis tendon lesions. Simplified approach].

    PubMed

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Sánchez Martin, Alfredo; Aznar, Carlos Verdú

    2008-01-01

    We present a technical variation for arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. Sutures of isolated partial subscapularis tendon avulsions can be passed and fixed securely through an isolated anterolateral portal just over the rotator interval (mono-tunnel technique). Primarily a shoulder free of fixation devices is needed. Patient on a beach chair position or lateral decubitus without traction is advised. The best view can be obtained from a posterior portal with the shoulder on 75 degrees forward elevation and 90 degrees medial rotation. In a shoulder 30 degrees adducted at a good view can be also obtained from the antero-lateral portal. This working portal alone allows joint and tendon inspection, introduction of round burrs and devices needed for working on bone bed receptor. A titanium anchor of 5 mm with doubled non-absorbable suture is used, it can be passed through tendon with the Artropierce and an all-inside arthroscopic knot tying is done by just one tunnel thus minimizing the potential of injury of the coracohumeral ligament complex. This technique allows the surgeon to perform subscapularis tendon repair easily with reproducible good results in 7 cases of isolated partial tendon avulsions in this serie. We also recommend it in combination with other rotator cuff repairing techniques. PMID:18979983

  12. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  13. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. Results There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360° labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6–31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. Conclusion We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to preinjury status. PMID:20616950

  14. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L; Krych, Aaron J; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-12-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  15. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  16. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Brian B; Crall, Timothy S; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  17. T-Fix anchor sutures for arthroscopic meniscal repair.

    PubMed

    Escalas, F; Quadras, J; Cáceres, E; Benaddi, J

    1997-01-01

    The results of arthroscopically repaired meniscal tears with the T-Fix system in a short-term follow-up of 6 months was assessed in a non-comparative, prospective study. The T-Fix device consists of a short, rigid Delrin T attached to a braided, non-absorbable, polyester suture which is preloaded inside and deployed through a delivery (spinal) needle. The T grabs inside the tissue and provides an anchor for the suture. Twenty menisci in 20 patients (mean age 29 years) were repaired. Sports-related injuries were documented in 18 patients. In 15 patients, meniscus tears were repaired 6 months or more after injury. Half of the patients had isolated meniscus injuries. Associated injuries included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), medial or lateral collateral ligament ruptures. These were not treated at the time of meniscal surgery except for an ACL reconstruction. All tears were longitudinal and positioned mainly in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. A total of 70 T-Fixes were used with an average of 3 per patient (range 2-7). Only 4 T-Fixes (6%) were unsuccessfully placed, and this occurred early on in the series in 4 patients. In 90% of the patients, the postoperative activity levels returned to preoperative levels, and the clinical symptoms had either resolved or were experienced at a higher level of activity. The T-Fix device was relatively easy to use and could be reliably placed in the meniscus. Postoperatively, there were no complications directly associated with the device. However, further studies are needed to confirmed these results in a long-term follow-up in a larger patient population. PMID:9228311

  18. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree.

  19. Arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Matsui, Kentaro; Stone, James W; Glazebrook, Mark A; Kennedy, John G; Guillo, Stephane; Calder, James D; Karlsson, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Although several arthroscopic procedures for lateral ligament instability of the ankle have been reported recently, it is difficult to augment the reconstruction by arthroscopically tightening the inferior extensor retinaculum. There is also concern that when using the inferior extensor retinaculum, this is not strictly an anatomical repair since its calcaneal attachment is different to that of the calcaneofibular ligament. If a ligament repair is completed firmly, it is unnecessary to add argumentation with inferior extensor retinaculum. The authors describe a simplified technique, repair of the lateral ligament alone using a lasso-loop stitch, which avoids additionally tighten the inferior extensor retinaculum. In this paper, it is described an arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair using lasso-loop stitch alone for lateral instability of the ankle that is likely safe for patients and minimal invasive. Level of evidence Therapeutic study, Level V. PMID:25982624

  20. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline. PMID:26251931

  1. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability With All-Soft Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hélder; Vuurberg, Gwen; Gomes, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Ripoll, Pedro L; Reis, Rui Luís; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Niek van Dijk, C

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic and arthroscopically assisted techniques have been increasingly used to reconstruct the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Besides permitting the treatment of several comorbidities, arthroscopic techniques are envisioned to lower the amount of surgical aggression and to improve the assessment of anatomic structures. We describe our surgical technique for arthroscopic, two-portal ankle ligament repair using an all-soft knotless anchor, which is made exclusively of suture material. This technique avoids the need for classic knot-tying methods. Thus it diminishes the chance of knot migration caused by pendulum movements. Moreover, it avoids some complications that have been related to the use of metallic anchors and some currently available biomaterials. It also prevents prominent knots, which have been described as a possible cause of secondary complaints. PMID:27073785

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability With All-Soft Knotless Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hélder; Vuurberg, Gwen; Gomes, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Ripoll, Pedro L.; Reis, Rui Luís; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Niek van Dijk, C.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic and arthroscopically assisted techniques have been increasingly used to reconstruct the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Besides permitting the treatment of several comorbidities, arthroscopic techniques are envisioned to lower the amount of surgical aggression and to improve the assessment of anatomic structures. We describe our surgical technique for arthroscopic, two-portal ankle ligament repair using an all-soft knotless anchor, which is made exclusively of suture material. This technique avoids the need for classic knot-tying methods. Thus it diminishes the chance of knot migration caused by pendulum movements. Moreover, it avoids some complications that have been related to the use of metallic anchors and some currently available biomaterials. It also prevents prominent knots, which have been described as a possible cause of secondary complaints. PMID:27073785

  3. Glenoid osteolysis after arthroscopic labrum repair with a bioabsorbable suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Spoliti, Marco

    2007-02-01

    Bioabsorbable suture anchors are commonly used for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff and labrum lesions. They provide soft-tissue attachment to bone. They have been introduced to avoid complications such as artefacts on MRI scans, commonly seen with metal anchors. However, bioabsorbable implants may lead to other problems such as local osteolysis, cyst formation, soft tissue inflammation and release of implant fragments into the joint space. The author describes the case of a professional female volleyball player, who presented osteolysis of the superior pole of the glenoid after arthroscopic repair of a SLAP lesion with a PLLA suture anchor. This is the first reported case of glenoid osteolysis after arthroscopic insertion of a bioabsorbable suture anchor. The author feels that the cause of osteolysis was a biological response to mechanical stress. PMID:17441667

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  5. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Materials and methods Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. Results The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Conclusion Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results. PMID:25983476

  6. Arthroscopic Double-Row Anterior Stabilization and Bankart Repair for the “High-Risk” Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Cathal J.; Fabricant, Peter D.; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion. PMID:24749044

  7. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-01-01

    Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods. PMID:20697485

  8. Arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent shoulder instability: A retrospective study of 86 cases.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João P; Mendes, António; Prado, Miguel H; Moro, Olga P; Miró, Rafael L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair in 86 patients, who met the inclusion criteria of at least one episode of shoulder dislocation, with a minimum follow-up of one year. Outcome was measured by the use of Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score. At the end of our study, the recurrence rate was 7%. Young age (p = 0.016) and ligamentous laxity (p = 0.003) were associated with recurrence. Arthroscopic Bankart repair is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes. Patients with younger age or with ligamentous laxity were at the greatest risk of recurrence. PMID:27053840

  9. Current Arthroscopic Concepts in Repairing Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial-Sided Avulsions.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Felder, Jerrod; Elliott, Michael; Brunkhorst, Joseph; Miller, Mark; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-09-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are extremely rare and most commonly occur in the trauma setting. They can lead to instability, pain, diminished function, and eventual arthrosis. Several techniques of arthroscopic PCL repair for tibial-sided bony avulsions have been described in the literature; however, no single technique has emerged as the gold standard to predictably restore posterior knee stability, PCL function, and knee biomechanics. The authors believe that the best results will come from procedures that re-create the normal human anatomy and knee kinematics. In this article, 3 arthroscopic methods of PCL avulsion repairs performed at 2 academic institutions are analyzed. The techniques described here provide good options for the treatment of these injuries. PMID:26375528

  10. Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions: Clinical and anatomic follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Trantalis, John N.; Sohmer, Stephen; More, Kristie D.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Wong, Ben; Dyke, Corinne H.; Thornton, Gail M.; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical and anatomic outcome of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions. Materials and Methods: The senior author performed isolated repairs of 25 type II SLAP lesions in 25 patients with a mean age of 40.0 ± 12 years. All tears were repaired using standard arthroscopic suture anchor repair to bone. All patients were reviewed using a standardized clinical examination by a blinded, independent observer, and using several shoulder outcome measures. Patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram at a minimum of 1-year postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores. In addition, a Fisher's exact test was used. Results: At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002). Twenty-two out of the 25 patients (88%) stated that they would have surgery again. Of the 21 patients who had postoperative magnetic resonance imaging arthrographys (MRAs), 9 patients (43%) demonstrated dye tracking between the labrum bone interface suggestive of a recurrent tear and 12 patients (57%) had a completely intact repair. There was no significant difference in ASES, SST, and patient satisfaction scores in patients with recurrent or intact repairs. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes. However, MRA imaging demonstrated 43% of patients with recurrent tears. MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome. PMID:26288536

  11. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

    2014-04-22

    Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author's practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique. PMID:25002932

  12. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%.

  13. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (χ = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years. PMID:20182868

  14. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  15. HAGL lesion occurring after successful arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Schippinger, G; Vasiu, P S; Fankhauser, F; Clement, H G

    2001-02-01

    Recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability following surgical repair may be associated with implant failure and an array of capsulolabral pathology including separation of the labrum (Bankart lesion), humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion), and capsular rupture. We detail a previously unreported case of a HAGL lesion occurring in a shoulder with an intact arthrosopic Bankart repair following an additional traumatic event. Anatomic repair of this subsequent injury resulted in an excellent outcome. The patient returned to his high-demand ski racing activities without any shoulder limitation. PMID:11172253

  16. Arthroscopic all-inside repair of Palmer type 1B triangular fibrocartilage complex tears: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon Key; Cho, Hyung Lae; Jung, Kwang Am; Jo, Jae Yeong; Ku, Jung Hoei

    2008-01-01

    Arthroscopic repair of peripheral dorso-ulnar triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions is now a preferred method. Both outside-in and inside-out techniques are commonly performed for repairing Palmer type 1B TFCC tear. But these techniques have disadvantages of making an additional skin incision to tie knots subcutaneously over the capsule. We performed an arthroscopic all-inside repair technique of Palmer type 1B TFCC tears, which is a modified method of the outside-in technique using a spinal needle. This all-inside technique is as simple as previously described arthroscopic techniques and also has advantages of vertical mattress suture and no additional incision. We recommend this technique as a useful alternative to the others for repairing Palmer type 1B TFCC tear. PMID:17668185

  17. The Combined “Double Pulley”–Simple Knot Technique for Arthroscopic Shoulder Posterior Labral Repair and Capsular Shift

    PubMed Central

    Parnes, Nata; Carey, Paul; Morman, Monica; Carr, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability is more prevalent than traditionally believed. Surgical repairs of posterior shoulder instability have overall good success rates. However, in elite overhead and throwing athletes, a low rate of return to the preinjury level of play after repair remains a challenge. The 2 goals of posterior shoulder stabilization surgery are secure fixation of the labrum to the glenoid and retensioning of the posterior capsulolabral complex. Recent studies have shown significant advantages of arthroscopic anatomic repair over open nonanatomic techniques. We report a combined double pulley–simple knot technique for arthroscopic fixation of posterior labral tears and capsular shift. The technique incorporates several advantages of this hybrid fixation method. PMID:27069863

  18. Arthroscopic management of recalcitrant stiffness following rotator cuff repair: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mather, Richard C; Hsu, Andrew R; Ferry, Amon T; Romeo, Anthony A; Nicholson, Gregory P; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff repair surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the world but limited literature exists for guidance of optimal management of post-operative arthrofibrosis following cuff repair. The purpose of this study is to report the results of arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, manipulation under anesthesia, and aggressive physical therapy in patients with recalcitrant postoperative stiffness after rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients who had recalcitrant arthrofibrosis following either an arthroscopic (62%), open (28%), or mini-open (10%) rotator cuff repair were included in study. The average age at the time of index cuff repair surgery was 49.8 years (range 24−70 years). Sixteen patients (55%) were involved in worker's compensation claims. The mean time from the date of index operation to lysis of adhesions was 9.7 months (range 4.2−36.2 months), and the mean time from lysis of adhesion to most recent follow-up 18.2 months (range 4.1−43.7 months). Post-operative evaluation was performed using American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score (ASES), Visual Analog Score (VAS), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) on 18 (62%), while range of motion (ROM), dynamometer strength testing, and Constant-Murley Scoring were performed on 13 (45%). Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: Prior to arthroscopic lysis of adhesions, mean forward active elevation (FE) was 103.8°, (range 60-145° (SD 26.3) and external rotation at the side (ERS) was 25.3°, (range 5-70° SD 15.1°). Post-operatively, at the most recent follow-up, FE was significantly improved to 158.3°, (range 110−180° SD 22.3°), and ERS improved to 58.9°, (range 15−90° SD 18.6°) in both cases. Involvement in a worker's compensation claim resulted in a lower ASES, VAS, and SANE score, but there was no statistically significant difference in motion. Conclusion: Arthroscopic capsular release, lysis of adhesions, and manipulation under anesthesia is a safe, reliable method of treating persistent stiffness following rotator cuff repair. PMID:23682175

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the Suretac device. Part I: Clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Miller, M D; Marks, P; Fu, F H

    1995-02-01

    Although arthroscopic Bankart repair has become an accepted surgical stabilization technique for anterior shoulder instability, the failure rate remains unacceptably high. Little information is available concerning healing of the Bankart repair. The purpose of this article is to clarify this issue by analyzing a cohort of 15 patients who underwent a "second-look" arthroscopy to evaluate and treat pain or recurrent instability following arthroscopic Bankart repair with the Suretac device (Acufex Microsurgical, Mansfield, MA). "Second-look" arthroscopy was performed at an average of 9 months following the index surgical procedure. The reasons for this second surgery were recurrent instability in 7, pain in 6, and pain and stiffness in 2. In the 7 patients with recurrent instability, the Bankart repair was found to be completely healed in 3 (43%), partially healed in 1 (14%), and had recurred in 3 (43%); however, 6 of 7 were observed to have lax capsular tissue. In 4 of these cases, retrospective review of the index surgical procedure showed that a technical error had been made during the repair. Two cases had biopsy of the repair site on "second-look" at 6 to 8 months, and this showed residual polyglyconate polymer debris surrounded by a histiocytic infiltrate. In the remaining 8 cases with stable shoulders, the Bankart repair had completely healed in 5 cases (62.5%) and partially healed in 3 cases (37.5%). The higher failure rate with this approach compared with open approaches appears to result from improper patient selection and errors in surgical technique. There is some question concerning healing strength of the Bankart repair, although complete healing of the Bankart does not seem to be a prerequesite for shoulder stability. Success of the procedure might be expected to improve by selecting only patients with unidirectional, posttraumatic, anterior instability who are found to have a discrete Bankart lesion and well-developed ligamentous tissue. PMID:7727007

  20. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIRS OF COMPLETE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Benegas, Eduardo; de Santis Prada, Flavia; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shoulder functional results and the retear rate of arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).Methods: Prospective case series with single-row arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff augmented with PRP. Only cases of isolated supraspinatus tears with retraction of less than 3 cm were included in this series. The PRP used was obtained by apheresis. It was applied on liquid consistency in its activated form, with the addition of autologous thrombin. Patients were evaluated after 12 months of the surgical procedure. The Constant-Murley, UCLA and VAS scales were used, and the retear rate was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Fourteen patients were evaluated (14 shoulders). The mean Constant-Murley score was 45.64 ± 12.29 before the operation and evolved to 80.78 ± 13.22 after the operation (p < 0.001). The UCLA score increased from 13.78 ± 5.66 to 31.43 ± 3.9 (p < 0.001). The patients’ pain level decreased from a median of 7.5 (p25% = 6, p75% = 8) to 0.5 (p25% = 0, p75% = 3) (p = 0.0013) according to the VAS score. None of the patients presented complete retear. Three patients (21.4%) showed partial retear, without transfixation. Only one patient developed complications (adhesive capsulitis). Conclusion: Patients submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair augmented with PRP showed significant functional improvement and none of them had complete retearing. PMID:27047894

  1. Modified cruciate suture technique for arthroscopic meniscal repair: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2007-09-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the procedure of choice whenever a reparable tear is diagnosed. The cruciate suture for arthroscopic meniscal repair is a type of the outside-in technique. It has advantages like: (1) its ultimate tension load (UTL) is 1.6 times higher than the UTL of the vertical suture (gold standard), (2) it holds the circumferential collagen fibers of the meniscus in a three-dimensional plane compared to the vertical and horizontal sutures which hold the circumferential fibers of the meniscus in a two-dimensional plane, (3) simple instrumentation, (4) could withstand not only distraction forces on the repaired meniscal tear but also, shear forces because of the oblique orientation of the cruciate suture limbs. It has disadvantages like: being difficult to perform and time-consuming. A modified technique is presented in this study which has the following advantages; (1) less time-consuming, (2) performed through a smaller skin incision, (3) a sliding knot is used to tie the cruciate suture. PMID:17295040

  2. Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior Repair: Prognostic Factors Associated with Failure

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Nho, Shane J.; McGill, Kevin C.; Grumet, Robert C.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to report on any prognostic factors that had a significant effect on clinical outcomes following arthroscopic Type II SLAP repairs. Methods. Consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic Type II SLAP repair were retrospectively identified and invited to return for follow-up examination and questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed to determine associations between potential prognostic factors and failure of SLAP repair as defined by ASES of less than 50 and/or revision surgery. Results. Sixty-two patients with an average age of 36 ± 13 years met the study criteria with a mean followup of 3.3 years. There were statistically significant improvements in mean ASES score, forward elevation, and external rotation among patients. Significant associations were identified between ASES score less than 50 and age greater than 40 years; alcohol/tobacco use; coexisting diabetes; pain in the bicipital groove on examination; positive O'Brien's, Speed's, and/or Yergason's tests; and high levels of lifting required at work. There was a significant improvement in ASES at final followup. Conclusions. Patients younger than 20 and overhead throwers had significant associations with cases requiring revision surgery. The results from this study may be used to assist in patient selection for SLAP surgery. PMID:23585969

  3. Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair: “Modified Outside-In Technique”

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Siatiri, Nasim; Sarvi, Ali; Kivi, Mohsen Mardani; Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the introduction of different techniques for meniscal repair, no single procedure is superior in all situations. The new method for meniscal repair named “modified outside-in technique” aims to achieve higher primary fixation strength by an alternative suture technique as well as avoid disadvantages of outside-in, inside-out, and all-inside suture procedures. Additionally, the mid-term results of surgically treated patients with meniscal injuries by our new technique were evaluated. Methods: The current prospective study included 66 patients who underwent meniscal repair by the modified outside-in technique. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form was completed pre- and post-operatively. At final follow-up, Lysholm score was completed and patients were questioned about their return to previous sport activities. Clinical success was defined as lack of swelling and joint line tenderness, absence of locking, negative McMurray test and no need for meniscectomy. Patients’ satisfaction was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were followed for 26±1.7 months. Results: Clinical success was achieved in 61 patients (92.4%) and 5 candidates required meniscectomy (7.6%). IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation Form score increased significantly from 54.2±12.7 preoperatively to 90.8±15.6 postoperatively (P<0.001). Lysholm score was excellent and good in 49 (80.3%) patients and fair in 12 (19.7%). Patients’ satisfaction averaged at 8.35±1 (6-10). Neurovascular injury, synovitis and other knot-related complications were not reported. Conclusions: The modified outside-in technique has satisfactory functional and clinical outcomes. We believe that this procedure is associated with better clinical and biomechanical results; however, complementary studies should be performed to draw a firm conclusion in this regard. PMID:26110176

  4. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  5. Arthroscopic repair of acetabular chondral delamination with fibrin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tzaveas, Alexandros P; Villar, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular chondral delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but disrupted from the subchondral bone. Excision of chondral flaps is the usual procedure for this type of lesion. However, we report 19 consecutive patients in whom the delaminated chondral flap was re-attached to the underlying subchondral bone with fibrin adhesive. We used the modified Harris hip score for assessment of pain and function. Improvement in pain and function was found to be statistically significant six months and one year after surgery. No local or general complications were noted. Three patients underwent further surgery for unrelated reasons. In each, the area of fibrin repair appeared intact and secure. Our results suggest that fibrin is a safe agent to use for acetabular chondral delamination. PMID:20235074

  6. Effect of a Sleep Aid in Analgesia after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan; Hwang, Ilseon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and safety of a sleep aid for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods Seventy-eight patients were prospectively assigned to either the zolpidem group (multimodal analgesia+zolpidem; 39 patients) or the control group (multimodal analgesia; 39 patients). Self-rated pain levels were assessed twice a day using a visual analog scale (VAS). The need for additional rescue analgesic, duration of functional recovery, and adverse effects were assessed for the first 5 days after surgery. Results The mean number of times that additional rescue analgesic was required during 5 days after surgery was 2.1±2.0 in the zolpidem group and 3.3±2.8 in the control group, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery, although the zolpidem group had lower VAS pain scores than the control group. Additionally, there were no significant differences in duration of functional recovery and adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusion The use of zolpidem for analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provided a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesic without increasing adverse effects. Nevertheless, mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery did not differ between the zolpidem group and the control group. PMID:25837184

  7. Arthroscopic assessment for patellar injuries and novel suture repair of patellar fracture in a cat.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Lara; Johnson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A 4 yr old spayed female domestic shorthair was evaluated for an acute, nonweight-bearing, left hind limb lameness. Following 2 wk of conservative management without clinical improvement, the patient was referred for further examination. The stifle was palpably enlarged with suspected periarticular fibrosis. Radiographs showed a lateral longitudinal patellar fracture as well as a medial patellar luxation. Arthroscopic examination of the stifle and repair of the patellar fracture and luxation were performed with an excellent clinical outcome. Nine weeks postoperatively, the owners reported that the cat was using the leg normally inside, and re-examination revealed no pain or crepitus with manipulation of the limb. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported use of arthroscopy as a diagnostic tool and of suture reduction for fracture repair in the management of feline patellar injury. PMID:23690486

  8. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  9. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  10. Systematic Review of All-Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Sanrong; Wang, Yule; Qin, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes of all-arthroscopic repair versus mini-open repair in patients with rotator cuff repair was conducted. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were screened and included from systematic literature search for electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL library was conducted from 1969 and 2015. A total of 18 comparative studies including 4 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Pooled results indicate that there was no difference in the functional outcomes, range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and short-form 36 (SF-36) subscales. However, Constant-Murley functional score was found to be significantly better in patients with mini-open repair. However, the results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to small size and small number of studies contributing to analysis in some of the outcomes. All-arthroscopic and mini-open repair surgical techniques for the management of rotator cuff repair are associated with similar outcomes and can be used interchangeably based on the patient and rotator tear characteristics. PMID:26947557

  11. Systematic Review of All-Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Sanrong; Wang, Yule; Qin, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears undergoing all-arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes of all-arthroscopic repair versus mini-open repair in patients with rotator cuff repair was conducted. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were screened and included from systematic literature search for electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL library was conducted from 1969 and 2015. A total of 18 comparative studies including 4 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Pooled results indicate that there was no difference in the functional outcomes, range of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and short-form 36 (SF-36) subscales. However, Constant-Murley functional score was found to be significantly better in patients with mini-open repair. However, the results of the review should be interpreted with caution due to small size and small number of studies contributing to analysis in some of the outcomes. All-arthroscopic and mini-open repair surgical techniques for the management of rotator cuff repair are associated with similar outcomes and can be used interchangeably based on the patient and rotator tear characteristics. PMID:26947557

  12. Hip Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Labral Repair in a Patient With Rheumatoid Arthritis With a 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Mitsui, Hiroto; Tawada, Kaneaki; Murakami, Satona; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    The arthroscopic surgical procedures reported previously for a rheumatic hip joint have been primarily performed as diagnostic procedures. Only a few studies have reported the success of arthroscopic surgery in hip joint preservation. We encountered a special case in which joint remodeling was seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological drugs after hip arthroscopic synovectomy and labral repair. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with rheumatism, which was controlled with tocilizumab, prednisolone, and tacrolimus. The hip joint showed Larsen grade 3 destruction, and the Harris Hip Score was 55 points. Because of the patient's strong desire to undergo a hip preservation operation, we performed hip arthroscopic synovectomy and repair of a longitudinal labral tear. After 2.5 years, the joint space had undergone rebuilding with improvement to Larsen grade 2, and the Harris Hip Score had improved to 78 points; the patient was able to return to work with the use of 1 crutch. It is possible to perform hip arthroscopic surgery for rheumatoid arthritis with a hip preservation operation with biological drugs. PMID:25276611

  13. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  14. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  15. Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization With an Iliac Bone Graft and Capsular Repair: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Goede, Fabian; Struck, Melena; Wellmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Several surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Many authors have performed posterior bone block procedures with good results not only in the presence of glenoid bone loss or dysplasia but also in the case of capsular hyperlaxity and poor soft-tissue quality. Open techniques often require an extensive approach with the disadvantage of a poor cosmetic result and possible insufficiency of the deltoid muscle. Furthermore, the treatment of concomitant pathologies and the correct placement of the bone graft are difficult. Therefore we describe an all-arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac bone graft and capsular repair that is intended to improve the pre-existing open procedure. The key steps of the operation are the precise placement and screw fixation of the bone block at the posterior glenoid under arthroscopic control and the subsequent posterior capsular refixation and plication using 2 suture anchors to create an extra-articular graft position. PMID:23766993

  16. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  17. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  18. Arthroscopic labral repair in the hip: surgical technique and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian T; Weiland, Daniel E; Schenker, Mara L; Philippon, Marc J

    2005-12-01

    Hip pain can be caused by multiple pathologies. Injuries to the acetabular labrum are the most common pathologic findings identified at the time of hip arthroscopy. Five causes of labral tears have been identified; these include trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, dysplasia, and degeneration. Studies have shown the function and the importance of the labrum. To restore function of the labrum, new surgical techniques, such as suture anchor repair, have been described. The goal of arthroscopic treatment of a torn labrum is to relieve pain by eliminating the unstable flap tear that causes hip discomfort. The goals of these treatments are to maintain the function of the hip joint and decrease the development of premature arthrosis. PMID:16376242

  19. Arthroscopic Anterior and Posterior Labral Repair After Traumatic Hip Dislocation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shindle, Michael K.; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2010-01-01

    With the improvements in flexible instrumentation, hip arthroscopy is being increasingly used to treat a variety of hip pathology, including labral tears. However, up to this point, there has not been a case report of an anterior and a posterior labral tear successfully repaired arthroscopically. We present a case report of a 27-year-old male firefighter who presented to our institution with an anterior and posterior labral tear, as well as a cam lesion and loose body, following a traumatic hip dislocation. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate that both anterior and posterior labral tears can be repaired using hip arthroscopy. Anterior and posterior labral tears can be caused by a traumatic hip dislocation, and both can be successfully repaired using arthroscopic techniques. PMID:21886540

  20. Application of Pain Quantitative Analysis Device for Assessment of Postoperative Pain after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Nagura, Issei; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Takase, Fumiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kokubu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The PainVision™ system was recently developed for quantitative pain assessment. Here, we used this system to evaluate the effect of plexus brachialis block on postoperative pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods : Fifty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. First 26 cases received no plexus brachialis block (control group), and the next 29 cases received the plexus brachialis block before surgery (block group). Patients completed the visual analog scale at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery, and the intensity of postoperative pain was assessed with PainVision™ at 16 hours. The postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents was also recorded. Results : The pain intensity at 16 hours after surgery assessed by PainVision™ was significantly lower in the block group than in the control group (block, 252.0 ± 47.8, control, 489.0 ± 89.1, P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the VAS values at 16 hours between the 2 groups (block, 4.3 ± 0.6, control, 5.7 ± 0.4, P = N.S.). The pain intensity and VAS at 16 hours after surgery were highly correlated (r = 0.59, P = 0.006 in the block group and r = 0.62, P = 0.003 in the control group). The effect size of the assessment by PainVision™ was bigger than that of VAS (r=0.31 in VAS and 0.51 in Pain vision). Conclusion : The PainVision™ system could be useful to evaluate postoperative pain because it enables the quantification and comparison of pain intensity independent of individual pain thresholds. PMID:26157522

  1. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  2. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears : Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative. PMID:26694070

  3. The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

    2007-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre-operatively. Conclusion Based upon the number available, we found no statistical difference in outcome between the two groups, indicating that either procedure is efficacious in the treatment of small and medium size rotator cuff tears. Level of Evidence Type III PMID:18053153

  4. Magnetic resonance appearance of bioabsorbable anchor screws for double row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs

    PubMed Central

    Pawaskar, Aditya C; Kekatpure, Aashay; Cho, Nam-Su; Rhee, Yong-Girl; Jeon, In-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the bioabsorbable, anchor related postoperative changes in rotator cuff surgery, which has become more popular recently. The purpose of the present study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to analyze the degradation of bioabsorbable anchors and to determine the incidences and characteristics of early postoperative reactions around the anchors and their mechanical failures. Materials and Methods: Postoperative MRIs of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were retrospectively analyzed. The tissue reactions around the bioanchors included fluid accumulations around the anchor, granulation tissue formation and changes in the condition of the surrounding osseous structure. The condition of the bioanchor itself was also examined, including whether the bioanchor failed mechanically. In the case of mechanical failure, the location of the failure was noted. Serial MRIs of 18 patients were available for analysis. Results: The total number of medial row bioanchors was 124, while that of the lateral row was 338. A low signal intensity rim suggestive of sclerosis surrounded all lateral row bioanchors. Ninety three lateral row bioanchors (27%) showed a rim with signal intensity similar to or less than that of surrounding bone, which was granulation tissue or foreign body reaction (FBR). Similar signal intensity was seen around nine medial row bioanchors (7%). Fluid accumulation was seen around 4 lateral row bioanchors (1%) and around 14 medial row bioanchors (11%). Five lateral row bioanchors showed the breakage, while there was none in the medial row bioanchors. There were nine cases with a cuff re-tear (4.5%). There was no evidence of affection of glenohumeral articular surfaces or of osteolysis around any bioanchor. In serial MRI, there was no change in appearance of the bioanchors, but the granulation tissue or FBR around four bioanchors and the fluid around one bioanchor showed a decrease in successive MRI. Conclusion: This study highlights the normal and adverse reactions to Bioabsorbable anchors that surgeons can expect to see on MRI after rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26015604

  5. A Meta-Analysis of Arthroscopic versus Open Repair for Treatment of Bankart Lesions in the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Liu, Shubin

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment for Bankart lesion remains controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients managed with open Bankart repair versus arthroscopic Bankart repair. Material/Methods After systematic review of online databases, a total of 11 trials with 1022 subjects were included. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using the PEDro critical appraisal tool, and non-RCTs were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa (NO) quality assessment tool. Outcomes of shoulder stability, range of motion (ROM), functional scales, and surgical times were analyzed. Results Data synthesis showed significant differences between the two strategies, with regards to stability of the shoulder (P=0.008, RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.98), and ROM (P<0.001, SMD=−0.47, 95% CI: −0.72 to −0.22). Conclusions Open Bankart repair produced a more stable shoulder but had a relatively poor shoulder motion, compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair, for the treatment of Bankart lesion. PMID:26446430

  6. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  7. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the Suretac device for traumatic anterior shoulder instability in athletes.

    PubMed

    Cole, B J; Romeo, A A; Warner, J J

    2001-07-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of anterior shoulder instability in the athlete has evolved tremendously over the past decade. Currently, most techniques include the use of suture and suture anchors. However, the variety of arthroscopic instruments and techniques that are available shows the complexity of intra-articular tissue fixation, which includes anchor placement, suture passing, and knot tying. Stabilization using the Suretac device (Acufex Microsurgical, Mansfield, MA) simplifies tissue fixation by eliminating the need for arthroscopic suture passing and intra-articular knot tying. However, a successful outcome is highly dependent on accurate patient selection. Preoperative evaluation, examination under anesthesia, and the pathoanatomy defined by a thorough arthroscopic examination suggest the most effective treatment strategy. The ideal candidate for shoulder stabilization using the Suretac device is an athlete with a relatively pure traumatic anterior instability pattern with detachment pathology (e.g., Bankart lesion) and minimal capsular deformation. PMID:11888136

  8. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients.

  9. Arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair in the treatment of chronic scapho-lunate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Mathoulin, Christophe L

    2013-05-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called "SLAC" wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new "all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair" with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17-63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3-24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18-43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p < 0.001); while the mean difference between the post-and pre-operative flexion was 11.14° (SEM = 1.3°; p < 0.0001) with flexion and radial deviation reaching 84.3% and 95.72% respectively of the unaffected wrist. The mean difference for the VAS score was -5.46 (SEM = 0.19; p < 0.0001). The mean post-operative grip strength of the affected side was 38.42 ± 10.27 kg (range 20-60 kg) as compared with mean pre-operative grip strength of 24.07 ± 10.51 kg (range 8-40 kg) (p < 0.0001). The mean post-operative grip strength of the operated side was 93.4% of the unaffected side. The DISI was corrected in all cases on post-operative radiographs. The mean difference between the post-and pre-operative SL angles was -8.95° (SEM = 1.28°; p < 0.0001). The mean post-operative DASH score was 8.3 ± 7.82 as compared with mean pre-operative DASH score of 46.04 ± 16.57 (p < 0.0001). There was a negative co-relation between the overall DASH score and the post-operative correction of the DISI deformity with a lower DASH score associated with increasing SL angles. Discussion The dorsal portion of the scapholunate ligament is critical for the stability scapholunate articulation, largely due to its attachment to the dorsal capsule. We have recently conducted a multi-centric anatomical study with international collaboration demonstrating the critical importance of this dorsal scapholunate complex. The all arthroscopic capsulo-ligamentous repair technique provides reliable results in addition to avoiding postoperative stiffness. The overall results at a mean follow-up period of more than 2 years in our series of young, active patients appear to be encouraging. PMID:24436807

  10. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Intratendinous Partial-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are being diagnosed more often because of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with articular and bursal side tears, there have been few studies about evaluating the clinical and structural outcomes after intratendinous tear repair. Methods: From 2008 to 2012, 33 consecutive patients with intratendinous PTRCTs underwent arthroscopic repair. All of them were retrospectively evaluated. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and constant scores were evaluated before operation and at the final follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was determined using MRI according to Sugaya's classification. Results: At the 2-year follow-up, the average UCLA score increased from 16.7 ± 1.9 to 32.5 ± 3.5, and the constant score increased from 66.2 ± 10.5 to 92.4 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001). Twenty seven patients received follow-up MRI examinations at an average of 15.2 months after surgery. Of these 27 patients, 22 (81.5%) had a healed tendon, and five patients had partial tears. There was no association between functional and anatomic results. Conclusions: For intratendinous PTRCT, clinical outcomes and tendon healing showed good results at a minimum 2-year after arthroscopic repair. PMID:26021507

  11. Arthroscopic Management of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears in Major League Baseball Pitchers: The Lateralized Footprint Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Jones, Kristofer; Maher, Patrick; Altchek, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in professional baseball players have been uniformly poor. We conducted a study to investigate return-to-play data and functional performance using a novel arthroscopic repair technique. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would result in a high rate of return to professional pitching and favorable functional outcomes. We identified 6 consecutive Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who underwent surgical repair of full-thickness rotator cuff injuries using the lateralized footprint repair technique. At most recent follow-up, patients were evaluated to determine their ability to return to athletic activity. Functional outcomes were also assessed using player performance statistics. By mean follow-up of 66.7 months (range, 23.2-94.6 months), 5 (83%) of the 6 pitchers had returned to their preinjury level of competition for at least 1 full season. Despite the high rate of return to MLB play, few pitchers resumed pitching productivity at their preoperative level; mean number of innings pitched decreased from 1806.5 to 183.7. A slight performance reduction was also found in a comparison of preoperative and postoperative pitching statistics. Of note, the return rate was higher for players over age 30 years than for those under 30 years. Overhead athletes require a delicate balance of shoulder mobility and stability to meet functional demands. Anatomical adaptations at the glenohumeral joint should be considered when performing rotator cuff repair in these patients in order to preserve peak functional performance. This novel repair technique affords a high rate of return to MLB play, though elite overhead throwers should be counseled that pitching productivity might decrease after surgery. PMID:26991564

  12. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis compared with repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions in patients older than 35 years.

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with biceps repair for isolated type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions in patients older than 35 years. The authors identified isolated type II SLAP lesions that were surgically managed over a 5-year period. Minimum 2-year follow-up data were available for 22 patients who underwent biceps repair (repair group) and for 15 patients who underwent a primary biceps tenodesis (tenodesis group). Mean age at surgery was 45.2±5.5 years in the repair group and 52.0±8.0 years in the tenodesis group. In the repair group, functional outcome improved from baseline to final follow-up using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) (47.5 to 87.4, respectively; P<.0001) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scores (18.5 to 31.2, respectively; P<.0001). In the tenodesis group, similar findings were observed for the ASES (43.4 to 89.9, respectively; P<.0001) and UCLA scores (19.0 to 32.7, respectively; P<.0001). No difference was found in functional outcome between the groups. Full range of motion recovery was delayed by approximately 3 months in the repair group compared with the tenodesis group (P=.0631). Two patients in the repair group required a secondary capsular release. Seventy-seven percent of patients in the repair group and 100% of patients in the tenodesis group were satisfied and returned to normal activity (P=.0673). In the current study, individuals older than 35 years with an isolated type II SLAP lesion had a shorter postoperative recovery, a more predictable functional outcome, and a higher rate of satisfaction and return to activity with a biceps tenodesis compared with a biceps repair. Based on these observations, biceps tenodesis is preferable to biceps repair for isolated type II SLAP lesions in nonoverhead athletes older than 35 years. PMID:24762158

  13. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: arthroscopic needling versus complete calcium removal and rotator cuff repair. A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; GAROFALO, RAFFAELE; CONTI, MARCO; TAFURI, SILVIO; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to verify the differences in the clinical outcomes of two arthroscopic techniques used to treat calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: needling versus complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair. Methods from September 2010 to September 2012, 40 patients with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were arthroscopically treated by the same surgeon using one of the two following techniques: needling (Group 1) and complete removal of the calcium deposit and tendon repair with suture anchors (Group 2). Both groups followed the same rehabilitation program. The two groups were compared at 6 and 12 months of follow-up for the presence of residual calcifications and for the following clinical outcomes: Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form (ASES) shoulder score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results all the clinical scores (Constant, ASES, UCLA, SST and VAS scores) improved significantly between baseline and postoperative follow-up, both at 6 and at 12 months. No differences at final follow-up were found between the two groups. Conclusions both the techniques were effective in solving the symptoms of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder. Clinical scores improved in both groups. Residual calcifications were found in only a few cases and were always less than 10 mm. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26904521

  14. Arthroscopic Meniscal Root Repair Using a Ceterix NovoStitch Suture Passer

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Andrew J.; Stuart, Michael J.; Levy, Bruce A.; McCarthy, Mark A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal root injuries can compromise knee function and lead to early degenerative changes if not appropriately treated. Numerous techniques have been described; however, the technical difficulties in performing these repairs are well known. Furthermore, the relative strengths of various repair techniques have been examined. This article describes a single–working portal meniscal root repair technique using a double-locking loop suture configuration with a novel suture-passing device that offers a strong, reproducible repair construct. PMID:25473622

  15. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair [the UK Rotator Cuff Surgery (UKUFF) randomised trial].

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew J; Cooper, Cushla D; Campbell, Marion K; Rees, Jonathan L; Moser, Jane; Beard, David J; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Gray, Alastair; Dawson, Jill; Murphy, Jacqueline; Bruhn, Hanne; Cooper, David; Ramsay, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uncertainty exists regarding the best management of patients with degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair in patients aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. DESIGN Two parallel-group randomised controlled trial. SETTING Nineteen teaching and district general hospitals in the UK. PARTICIPANTS Patients (n = 273) aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. INTERVENTIONS Arthroscopic surgery and open rotator cuff repair, with surgeons using their usual and preferred method of arthroscopic or open repair. Follow-up was by telephone questionnaire at 2 and 8 weeks after surgery and by postal questionnaire at 8, 12 and 24 months after randomisation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) at 24 months was the primary outcome measure. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the shoulder was made at 12 months after surgery to assess the integrity of the repair. RESULTS The mean OSS improved from 26.3 [standard deviation (SD) 8.2] at baseline to 41.7 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (SD 8.0) at baseline to 41.5 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for open surgery. When effect sizes are shown for the intervention, a negative sign indicates that an open procedure is favoured. For the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no statistical difference between the groups, the difference in OSS score at 24 months was -0.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452] and the CI excluded the predetermined clinically important difference in the OSS of 3 points. There was also no statistical difference when the groups were compared per protocol (difference in OSS score -0.46, 95% CI -5.30 to 4.39; p = 0.854). The questionnaire response rate was > 86%. At 8 months, 77% of participants reported that shoulder problems were much or slightly better, and at 24 months this increased to 85%. There were no significant differences in mean cost between the arthroscopic group and the open repair group for any of the component resource-use categories, nor for the total follow-up costs at 24 months. The overall treatment cost at 2 years was £2567 (SD £176) for arthroscopic surgery and £2699 (SD £149) for open surgery, according to intention-to-treat analysis. For the per-protocol analysis there was a significant difference in total initial procedure-related costs between the arthroscopic group and the open repair group, with arthroscopic repair being more costly by £371 (95% CI £135 to £607). Total quality-adjusted life-years accrued at 24 months averaged 1.34 (SD 0.05) in the arthroscopic repair group and 1.35 (SD 0.05) in the open repair group, a non-significant difference of 0.01 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.10). The rate of re-tear was not significantly different across the randomised groups (46.4% and 38.6% for arthroscopic and open surgery, respectively). The participants with tears that were impossible to repair had the lowest OSSs, the participants with re-tears had slightly higher OSSs and the participants with healed repairs had the most improved OSSs. These findings were the same when analysed per protocol. CONCLUSION In patients aged > 50 years with a degenerative rotator cuff tear there is no difference in clinical effectiveness or cost-effectiveness between open repair and arthroscopic repair at 2 years for the primary outcome (OSS) and all other prespecified secondary outcomes. Future work should explore new methods to improve tendon healing and reduce the high rate of re-tears observed in this trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN97804283. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 19, No. 80. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:26463717

  16. The effect of platelet enriched plasma on clinical outcomes in patients with femoroacetabular impingement following arthroscopic labral repair and femoral neck osteoplasty

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, Russell; Kenney, Raymond; Giordano, Brian; Mohr, Karen; Cabrera, Jennifer; Snibbe, Jason

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcome of patients treated with and without platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection while undergoing arthroscopic labral repair and femoral neck osteoplasty for femoral acetabular impingement. Patients were randomized at the time of surgery to receive either an intra-articular injection of 5 cc of PRP, or an equal volume of 0.9% normal saline. All patients underwent arthroscopic labral repair and osteoplasty of the femoral neck and, at the conclusion of the case, received the injection. One week following surgery, thigh circumference (measured 10 cm distal to the tip of the greater trochanter) and the presence of ecchymosis of the thigh were recorded. Clinical outcome scores, including Non-Arthritic Hip Score, Modified Harris Hip Score and Hip Outcome Score were collected prior to surgery at 1, 3, 6 and a minimum of 12 months post-operatively. Thirty-five patients were enrolled into this study. Twenty patients received a PRP injection and 15 received a saline injection. Thigh circumference was compared pre-operatively and 1 week post-operatively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Ecchymosis was compared between the two groups at 1 week post-operatively. Four of the 20 patients in the PRP group and 10 of the 15 in the placebo group demonstrated bruising on the lateral thigh. This was compared with a Chi-Square test and found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). There was no significant difference in any of the outcome scores between the two groups. An intra-articular injection of PRP after labral repair did not improve the clinical outcome up to 1 year post-operatively in patients undergoing arthroscopic labral repair and osteoplasty of the femoral neck. Level of evidence is level I study. PMID:27011833

  17. Synovial Fluid Lubricant Properties Are Transiently Deficient After Arthroscopic Articular Cartilage Defect Repair With Platelet-Enriched Fibrin Alone and With Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Murray J.; Temple-Wong, Michele M.; Adams, Matthew S.; Tom, Matthew; Schumacher, Barbara L.; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Goodrich, Laurie R.; Chu, Constance R.; Sah, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Following various types of naturally occurring traumatic injury to an articular joint, the lubricating ability of synovial fluid is impaired, with a correlated alteration in the concentration and/or structure of lubricant molecules, hyaluronan, and proteoglycan-4 (PRG4). However, the effect of arthroscopic cartilage repair surgery on synovial fluid lubricant function and composition is unknown. Hypothesis: Arthroscopic treatment of full-thickness chondral defects in horses with (1) platelet-enriched fibrin or (2) platelet-enriched fibrin + mesenchymal stem cells leads to equine synovial fluid with impaired lubricant function and hyaluronan and PRG4 composition. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Equine synovial fluid was aspirated from normal joints at a preinjury state (0 days) and at 10 days and 3 months following fibrin or fibrin + mesenchymal stem cell repair of full-thickness chondral defects. Equine synovial fluid samples were analyzed for friction-lowering boundary lubrication of normal articular cartilage (static and kinetic friction coefficients) and concentrations of hyaluronan and PRG4, as well as molecular weight distribution of hyaluronan. Experimental groups deficient in lubrication function were also tested for the ability of exogenous high–molecular weight hyaluronan to restore lubrication function. Results: Lubrication and biochemical data varied with time after surgery but generally not between repair groups. Relative to preinjury, kinetic friction was higher (+94%) at 10 days but returned to baseline levels at 3 months, while static friction was not altered. Correspondingly, hyaluronan concentration was transiently lower (−64%) and shifted toward lower molecular weight forms, while PRG4 concentration was increased (+210%) in 10-day samples relative to preinjury levels. Regression analysis revealed that kinetic friction decreased with increasing total and high–molecular weight hyaluronan. Addition of high–molecular weight hyaluronan to bring 10-day hyaluronan levels to 2.0 mg/mL restored kinetic friction to preinjury levels. Conclusion: Following arthroscopic surgery for cartilage defect repair, synovial fluid lubrication function is transiently impaired, in association with decreased hyaluronan concentration. This functional deficiency in synovial fluid lubrication can be counteracted in vitro by addition of high–molecular weight hyaluronan. Clinical Relevance: Synovial fluid lubrication is deficient shortly after arthroscopic cartilage repair surgery, and supplementation with high–molecular weight hyaluronan may be beneficial. PMID:25530978

  18. Arthroscopic Technique for Chondrolabral Capsular Preservation During Labral Repair and Acetabular Osteoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; McCormick, Frank; Martin, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional techniques for acetabular osteoplasty in femoral acetabular impingement have required surgical detachment of the labrum at the chondrolabral junction. Such approaches compromise labral blood flow and contribute to a limited ability for healing at the chondrolabral junction. In this technical note and accompanying video, we present a technique for preservation of the chondrolabral junction during labral repair and acetabular osteoplasty. We elevate the chondrolabral complex subperiosteally off the acetabular rim, and the acetabular shelf is then contoured under fluoroscopic guidance. The labrum is then repaired and reconstituted to a new anatomic footprint. We find this technique to be advantageous because it preserves the blood flow to the labrum, thereby maximizing healing potential. Outcome studies are warranted to further elucidate the functional and outcome benefits of this surgical technique. PMID:24265986

  19. Infusion Methods for Continuous Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain Control after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Gyeong Jo; Yoon, Ji Uk; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Seung Hoon; Ri, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32). A perineural catheter was inserted into the interscalene brachial plexus (ISBP) using ultrasound (US) and nerve stimulation, and 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered. After the operation, group C received a continuous infusion of 4 ml/h, and a 4 ml bolus with a lockout interval of 60 min. Group I received only a 4 ml bolus, and the lockout interval was 30 min. Postoperative pain by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and the forearm muscle tone by the manual muscle test (MMT) were checked and evaluated at the following timepoints: preoperative, and postoperative 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Supplemental opioid requirements, total consumed dose of local anesthetic, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results Sixty-four patients completed the study and the postoperative values such as operation time, time to discharge, and operation site were comparable. There were no differences in NRS scores and supplemental opioid requirements between the two groups. The MMT scores of group I at 4 and 12 h after surgery were significantly higher than those of group C (P < 0.05). The total consumed dose of local anesthetic was significantly lower in group I than in group C (P < 0.05). The adverse effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions The bolus-only administration of 0.2% ropivacaine provided a similar analgesic effect with a lower total volume of local anesthetic and decreased motor weakness compared to combined infusion. Therefore, bolus-only administration is an effective postoperative analgesic method in ISBPB with perineural catheterization after rotator cuff repair. PMID:26175882

  20. Tissue anchor use in arthroscopic glenohumeral surgery.

    PubMed

    Diduch, David R; Scanelli, John; Tompkins, Marc; Milewski, Matthew D; Carson, Eric; Ma, Shen-Ying Richard

    2012-07-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has become the mainstay of treatment of several common glenohumeral pathologies such as tears of the rotator cuff and labrum. Arthroscopic rotator cuff and labral repair provide outcomes comparable to those achieved with traditional open techniques, with the benefits of smaller incisions and less soft-tissue disruption. Development and improvement of tissue anchors and arthroscopic instrumentation has been integral to the increased popularity of arthroscopic glenohumeral repairs. Current anchors can be categorized by design and material composition. Awareness of the advantages and limitations of these implants may influence anchor selection. PMID:22751165

  1. Ultrasound evaluation of the distal migration of the long head of biceps tendon following tenotomy in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Karataglis, D; Papadopoulos, P; Boutsiadis, A; Fotiadou, A; Ditsios, K; Hatzokos, I; Christodoulou, A

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates the position of the long head of biceps tendon using ultrasound following simple tenotomy, in patients with arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears. In total, 52 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years (45 to 75) underwent arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff and simple tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon. At two years post-operatively, ultrasound revealed that the tendon was inside the bicipital groove in 43 patients (82.7%) and outside in nine (17.3%); in six of these it was lying just outside the groove and in the remaining three (5.8%) it was in a remote position with a positive Popeye Sign. A dynamic ultrasound scan revealed that the tenotomised tendons had adhered to the surrounding tissues (autotenodesis).The initial condition of the tendon influenced its final position (p < 0.0005). The presence of a Popeye sign was statistically influenced by the pre-operative co-existence of supraspinatus and subscapularis tears (p < 0.0001). It appears that the natural history of the tenotomised long head of biceps tendon is to tenodese itself inside or just outside the bicipital groove, while its pre-operative condition and coexistent subscapularis tears play a significant role in the occurrence of a Popeye sign. PMID:23109635

  2. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  3. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  4. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  5. Comparison between open and arthroscopic-assisted foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex repair for post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A; Cozzolino, R; Fairplay, T; Badur, N

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective functional outcomes after foveal reattachment of proximal or complete ulnar-sided triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions by two surgical procedures: an open technique or an arthroscopically assisted repair. The study was done prospectively on 49 wrists affected by post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability. Twenty-four patients were treated with the open technique (Group 1) and 25 by the arthroscopically assisted technique (Group 2). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a clear foveal detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 67% of the cases. Arthroscopy showed a positive ulnar-sided detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (positive hook test) in all cases. Distal radio-ulnar joint stability was obtained in all but five patients at a mean follow-up of 6 months. Both groups had improvement of all parameters with significant differences in wrist pain scores, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and Patient-Rated Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaire scores. There were no significant post-operative differences between the two groups in the outcome parameters except for the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, which was significantly better in Group 2 (p < 0.001). PMID:23962870

  6. Greater auricular nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior-inferior and posterior-inferior labral tear repair using beach-chair positioning and a standard universal headrest.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Foad, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is a common treatment for numerous different pathologies. An iatrogenic nerve injury that occurs during shoulder arthroscopy is more common than previously recognized. However, though many nerve pathologies are increasingly being recognized, reported cases of greater auricular nerve injury are limited. For instance, a case of greater auricular nerve palsy was reported in only 2 series that used a horseshoe headrest. One set of authors discontinued and recommended against use of this headrest, and the other recommended a headrest redesign. Here we report on a case of greater auricular nerve palsy that occurred after the patient's anterior-inferior and posterior-inferior labral tear was arthroscopically repaired using beach-chair positioning and a standard universal headrest. The palsy resulted in numbness and dysesthesia, which lessened gradually over 3 months after surgery and was completely resolved by 6 months. PMID:25844590

  7. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures. PMID:21035419

  8. Editorial Commentary: "Arthroscop*".

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-08-01

    Bibliometric analysis methods demonstrate that Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery is ranked number 1 among journals publishing arthroscopic and related research. PMID:26239787

  9. Arthroscopic technique of interposition arthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; du Toit, Donald F; de Beer, Joe F

    2006-05-01

    Arthroscopic glenohumeral interposition arthroplasty is performed with the patient placed in the lateral decubitus position. Standard posterior, anterior, and anterosuperior portals are created, a routine diagnostic arthroscopy is performed, and the joint is débrided with the use of an arthroscopic shaver. An arthroscopic burr is used to resect prominent osteophytes, to alter the version of the glenoid if necessary, and to create microfractures on the glenoid surface. Next, 3 absorbable sutures are passed percutaneously with a 30 degrees angled suture grasper from 3 different sites posteriorly through the posterior capsular-labral tissue and into the anterior portal cannula, where they are isolated by means of the suture saver kit. The prepared interposition membrane/tissue (GRAFTJACKET Regenerative Tissue Matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN) is tagged with the 3 sutures in the anterior cannula before it is introduced into the joint. Three additional sutures are attached to the membrane anteriorly at 1, 3, and 5 o'clock positions and are isolated with suture savers. The membrane is next introduced into the joint through the anterior cannula and is aligned with the glenoid rim. The anterior sutures are rerouted through the anterior capsular-labral tissue with a 70 degrees angled suture grasper, and they are retrieved through the anterior cannula. Intra-articular nonsliding knots are used anteriorly to anchor the interposition tissue to the anterior glenoid labrum and capsule. The posterior sutures are knotted intra-articularly, or they may be tied extra-articularly; the proximal and distal posterior sutures are retrieved subcutaneously out through the skin tract of the posterior portal and are knotted with the suture present in this portal, with the use of nonsliding knots. Stability of the interposition tissue is assessed by movement of the glenohumeral joint through its entire range of motion. The postoperative protocol consists of early passive exercises, active exercises after 3 weeks, and muscle-strengthening exercises after 6 weeks. PMID:16651174

  10. EVALUATION OF ANATOMICAL INTEGRITY USING ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION, AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY USING THE CONSTANT & MURLEY SCORE, OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flavio de Oliveira; Alves, Freitas José Marcio; Watanabe, Fábio Nagato; Nobre, Leonardo Oliveira; De Almeida Neto, Manoel Augusto; Mendes Da Silva, Marcos André

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and anatomical results from surgical treatment via arthroscopy in cases of complete rupture of the rotator cuff, using ultrasound images and the Constant and Murley functional index to investigate the correlation between them. Methods: 100 patients (110 shoulders) were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 48.8 ± 33.28 months (12 to 141 months). The mean age was 60.25 ± 10.09 (36 to 81 years). Rupture of the supraspinal tendon alone occurred in 85 cases (77%), and in association with the infraspinatus in 20 cases (18%) and subscapularis in four shoulders (4%). An association of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis lesions was found in one shoulder (1%). The lesions were classified according to DeOrio and Cofield scores as small/medium in 85 shoulders (77%) and large/extensive in 25 (23%). The clinical results were assessed in accordance with the Constant and Murley criteria. The ultrasound results relate to reports issued by different radiologists. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation, Kruskal-Wallis correlation and logistic regression (significance: p < 0.05). Results: The mean Constant evaluation was 85.3 ± 10.06 in the normal shoulders and 83.96 ± 8.67 in the operated shoulders (p = 0.224). Excellent and good results were found in 74 shoulders (67%), satisfactory and moderate results in 32 (29%) and poor results in four (4%). The ultrasound evaluation showed 38 shoulders with re-rupture (35%) and absence of rupture in 71 (65%). Among the 74 shoulders (67%) with excellent/good results, 22 (30%) presented re-rupture in the ultrasound report (p = 0.294). Among the four shoulders (4%) with poor results, two (50%) presented reports of intact tendons (p = 0.294). Conclusion: There was no statistically valid correlation between the ultrasound diagnosis and the clinical evaluation of results among the patients who underwent arthroscopic repair to treat full tear lesions of the rotator cuff. The clinical results from the complete rotator cuff repairs via arthroscopy presented a high level of functional recovery (Constant 83.96), compared with the contralateral shoulder. The postoperative ultrasound reports presented a high percentage of re-rupture (35%). Postoperative strength was greater among the patients aged under 60 years (p = 0.002) and in cases of lesions less than or equal to 3 cm (p = 0.003).

  11. Arthroscopic Hip Labral Reconstruction and Augmentation Using Knotless Anchors

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Mark O.; Moreira, Brett; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical stability is the primary function of the acetabular labrum. It provides a hip suction seal and optimal joint function. Labral tears are a common reason for hip arthroscopy, to improve patient function and to prevent long-term degenerative arthropathy. Arthroscopic labral repair has shown significantly better outcomes in return to premorbid activity levels when compared with labral debridement. Injury to the acetabular labrum is a challenge and can lead to long-term complications. In this scenario, arthroscopic labral reconstruction has shown good results regarding patient subjective and objective outcomes. We describe a technique for complete arthroscopic labral reconstruction using tensor fascia lata allograft. PMID:26870649

  12. Why arthroscopic partial meniscectomy?

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2015-09-01

    "Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy versus Sham Surgery for a Degenerative Meniscal Tear" published in the New England Journal of Medicine on December 26, 2013 draws the conclusion that arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy provides no significant benefit over sham surgery in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear and no knee osteoarthritis. This result argues against the current practice of performing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since the number of APM performed has been increasing, the information provided by this study should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. PMID:26488013

  13. The "arthroscopic impingement test".

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Kann, S; Maddox, L M

    1994-04-01

    Arthroscopic acromioplasty is an effective technique to treat refractory impingement syndrome of the shoulder; however, it is a technically demanding procedure and failure due to inadequate acromial resection has been reported. The purpose of this study was to describe a more reliable technique of arthroscopic acromioplasty ("arthroscopic impingement test") that allows determination of subacromial space available (SSA) during shoulder flexion after acromioplasty. During a 2-year period, 70 consecutive patients (group I) underwent arthroscopic acromioplasty by a conventional technique and 50 consecutive patients (group II) underwent the modified technique. Both groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, chronicity of symptoms, incidence of workman's compensation cases, side of surgery, and operative findings. In group I, four patients (6%) failed due to inadequate acromioplasty and at time of revision were found to have 0 mm SSA at 120 degrees flexion (contact of cuff on acromion). After revision acromioplasty, SSA at 120 degrees flexion was measured as > 3 mm, and impingement symptoms resolved postoperatively. In group II, there were no failures and SSA after initial acromioplasty was found to average 13 mm at 0 degree 10 mm at 45 degrees, 8 mm at 90 degrees, and 6 mm at 120 degrees flexion. In four cases, the "arthroscopic impingement test" determined that there was inadequate SSA at 120 degrees (< 3 mm) after initial acromioplasty, and these were revised by further acromioplasty at time of surgery. It was concluded that the "arthroscopic impingement test" improves reliability of arthroscopic acromioplasty by verifying adequate acromial resection in a position of impingement. PMID:8003154

  14. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

    2014-01-01

    After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

  15. Arthroscopic partial wrist fusion.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Cheong

    2008-12-01

    The wide intraarticular exposure of the wrist joint under arthroscopic view provides an excellent ground for various forms of partial wrist fusion. Combining with percutaneous fixation technique, arthroscopic partial wrist fusion can potentially generate the best possible functional outcome by preserving the maximal motion pertained with each type of partial wrist fusion because the effect of extraarticular adhesion associated with open surgery can be minimized. From November 1997 to May 2008, the author had performed 12 cases of arthroscopic partial wrist fusion, including scaphotrapeziotrapezoid fusion in 3, scaphoidectomy and 4-corner fusion in 4, radioscapholunate fusion in 3, radiolunate fusion in 1, and lunotriquetral fusion in 1 case. Through the radiocarpal or midcarpal joint, the corresponding articular surfaces were denuded of cartilage using arthroscopic burr and curette. Carpal bones involved in the fusion process were then transfixed with K wires percutaneously after alignment corrected and confirmed under fluoroscopic control. Autogenous cancellous bone graft or bone substitute were inserted and impacted to the fusion site through cannula under direct arthroscopic view. Final fixation could be by multiple K wires or cannulated screw system. Early mobilization was encouraged. Surgical complications were minor, including pin tract infection, skin burn, and delay union in 1 case. Uneventful radiologic union was obtained in 9 cases, stable fibrous union in 2, and nonunion in 1. The average follow-up period was 70 months. Symptom was resolved or improved, and functional motion was gained in all cases. All surgical scars were almost invisible, and aesthetic outcome was excellent. PMID:19060685

  16. Arthroscopic management of instability of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Snyder, S J; Strafford, B B

    1993-09-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation in the young athlete may be difficult to treat and, without proper care, usually results in recurrent episodes of instability. By permitting direct visualization of all intraarticular pathology, the arthroscope assists in the diagnosis and helps to determine appropriate therapeutic interventions. Numerous techniques have been developed for arthroscopic reconstruction of unstable shoulders. These can be classified according to the type of fixation employed. The categories include metal devices such as staples or screws, absorbable devices, and suture-based methods, both anterior and transglenoid. An anterior suture anchor method using a new suture passing device known as a Shuttle Relay (Linvatec Corp, Largo, Fla), which allows the surgeon to incorporate non-absorbable mattress sutures in the repair, is described in detail. PMID:8234081

  17. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna O; Winson, Ian G

    2015-03-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a good option for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. The surgical technique involving the use of a standard 4.5-mm arthroscope is described. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals are used. Joint surfaces except the lateral gutter are prepared to point bleeding with motorized burr, abraider, and curettes. Rigid fixation is achieved with cannulated screws. The postoperative regime includes 12 weeks protection, staged from non-weight bearing through partial to full weight bearing. Advantages compared with the open procedure include shorter hospital stay and shorter time to union with similar or better union rates. PMID:25726484

  18. Arthroscopic acromioplasty. Current status.

    PubMed

    Altchek, D W; Carson, E W

    1997-04-01

    Impingment is a chronic syndrome characterized by microtrauma, which causes progressive injury to the rotator cuff tendon. In recent years, arthro- scopic subacromial decompression/acromioplasty has been frequently used for the treatment of impingement syndrome and is quickly becoming the preferred surgical treatment when conservative modalities fail. Arthroscopic acromioplasty offers many benefits over open acromioplasty, including better cosmesis, lessened preoperative morbidity, a more complete intraoperative examination, and a hastened, early rehabilitation program. PMID:9113712

  19. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  20. Arthroscopic and open management of posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2014-09-01

    Posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) is the most common cause of residual instability following a simple elbow dislocation. PLRI may result from trauma or iatrogenic injury to the radial ulnohumeral ligament during treatment for other conditions, such as lateral epicondylitis. PLRI can be identified through a combination of history and physical examination, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging arthrography. Once diagnosed, surgery is necessary to correct persistent instability. Instability can be confirmed arthroscopically through several findings, including subluxation of the radial head on the capitellum and the arthroscopic "drive through sign of the elbow." Acute repairs, both open and arthroscopic, heal with excellent patient outcomes. In the chronic setting, graft reconstruction may be required. This report describes arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament and open reconstruction with associated outcomes. A high index of suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnosis this condition in patients with lateral elbow pain and feelings of instability. PMID:25077750

  1. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication.

  2. All-Arthroscopic Patch Augmentation of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Yanke, Adam B.; Trenhaile, Scott W.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of massive rotator cuff tears remains challenging, with failure rates ranging from 20% to 90%. Multiple different arthroscopic and open techniques have been described, but there is no current gold standard. Failure after rotator cuff repair is typically multifactorial; however, failure of tendon-footprint healing is often implicated. Patch augmentation has been described as a possible technique to augment the biology of rotator cuff repair in situations of compromised tendon quality and has shown promising short-term results. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation. PMID:24400198

  3. Arthroscopic Management of Elbow Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fink Barnes, Leslie A; Parsons, Bradford O; Hausman, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Several types of elbow fractures are amenable to arthroscopic or arthroscopic-assisted fracture fixation, including fractures of the coronoid, radial head, lateral condyle, and capitellum. Other posttraumatic conditions may be treated arthroscopically, such as arthrofibrosis or delayed radial head excision. Arthroscopy can be used for assessment of stability or intra-articular fracture displacement. The safest portals are the midlateral (soft spot portal), proximal anteromedial, and proximal anterolateral. Although circumstances may vary according to the injury pattern, a proximal anteromedial portal is usually established first. Arthroscopy enables a less invasive surgical exposure that facilitates visualization of the fracture fragments in select scenarios. PMID:26498553

  4. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique.

  5. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  6. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments.

    PubMed

    Guillo, S; Takao, M; Calder, J; Karlson, Jon; Michels, Frederick; Bauer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Chronic ankle instability secondary to lateral ligament insufficiency is common after sports injury. Many surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of the lateral ankle ligament complex. They can be classified into repair or reconstruction, and non-anatomical or anatomical. A few authors have recently published innovative techniques for arthroscopic ankle ligament management. This paper describes the arthroscopic techniques enabling anatomical lateral ligament reconstruction using gracilis autograft or allograft for chronic ankle instability. This technique and the steps have been developed by the Ankle Instability Group to make this a reproducible procedure. The purpose of this presentation is to document the technique in the future with a view to a clinical study investigating the results of such surgery in a cohort of suitable patients with chronic ankle instability. Level of evidence V. PMID:26408309

  7. Scaffolds for tendon and ligament repair: review of the efficacy of commercial products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jimin; Xu, Jiake; Wang, Allan; Zheng, Minghao

    2009-01-01

    Driven by market demand, many biological and synthetic scaffolds have been developed during the last 15 years. Both positive and negative results have been reported in clinical applications for tendon and ligament repair. To obtain data for this review, multiple electronic databases were used (e.g., Pubmed and ScienceDirect), as well as the US FDA website and the reference lists from clinical trials, review articles and company reports, in order to identify studies relating to the use of these commercial scaffolds for tendon and ligament repair. The commercial names of each scaffold and the keywords 'tendon' and 'ligament' were used as the search terms. Initially, 378 articles were identified. Of these, 47 were clinical studies and the others were reviews, editorials, commentaries, animal studies or related to applications other than tendons and ligaments. The outcomes were reviewed in 47 reports (six on Restore, eight on Graftjacket, four on Zimmer, one on TissueMend, five on Gore-Tex, six on Lars, 18 on Leeds-Keio and one study used both Restore and Graftjacket). The advantages, disadvantages and future perspectives regarding the use of commercial scaffolds for tendon and ligament treatment are discussed. Both biological and synthetic scaffolds can cause adverse events such as noninfectious effusion and synovitis, which result in the failure of surgery. Future improvements should focus on both mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Nanoscaffold manufactured using electrospinning technology may provide great improvement in future practice. PMID:19105781

  8. Arthroscopic management of popliteal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Amite; Chahar, Deepak; Pathrot, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of popliteal cyst is controversial. Owing to high failure rates in open procedures, recent trend is towards arthroscopic decompression and simultaneous management of intraarticular pathology. We retrospectively analysed clinical results of symptomatic popliteal cysts after arthroscopic management at 24 month followup. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of hospital database for patients presenting with pathology suggestive of a popliteal cyst from June 2007 to December 2012 was done. Twelve cases of popliteal cyst not responding to NSAIDS and with Rauschning and Lindgren Grade 2 or 3 who consented for surgical intervention were included in the study. All patients underwent arthroscopic decompression using a posteromedial portal along with management of intraarticular pathologies as encountered. Furthermore, the unidirectional valvular effect was corrected to a bidirectional one by widening the cyst joint interface. The results were assessed as per the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria. Results: All patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months (range 24-36 months). It revealed that among the study group, six patients achieved Grade 0 status while five had a minimal limitation of range of motion accompanied by occasional pain (Grade 1). One patient had a failure of treatment with no change in the clinical grading. Conclusion: Arthroscopic approach gives easy access to decompression with the simultaneous management of articular pathologies. PMID:27053804

  9. Arthroscopic proficiency: methods in evaluating competency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current paradigm of arthroscopic training lacks objective evaluation of technical ability and its adequacy is concerning given the accelerating complexity of the field. To combat insufficiencies, emphasis is shifting towards skill acquisition outside the operating room and sophisticated assessment tools. We reviewed (1) the validity of cadaver and surgical simulation in arthroscopic training, (2) the role of psychomotor analysis and arthroscopic technical ability, (3) what validated assessment tools are available to evaluate technical competency, and (4) the quantification of arthroscopic proficiency. Methods The Medline and Embase databases were searched for published articles in the English literature pertaining to arthroscopic competence, arthroscopic assessment and evaluation and objective measures of arthroscopic technical skill. Abstracts were independently evaluated and exclusion criteria included articles outside the scope of knee and shoulder arthroscopy as well as original articles about specific therapies, outcomes and diagnoses leaving 52 articles citied in this review. Results Simulated arthroscopic environments exhibit high levels of internal validity and consistency for simple arthroscopic tasks, however the ability to transfer complex skills to the operating room has not yet been established. Instrument and force trajectory data can discriminate between technical ability for basic arthroscopic parameters and may serve as useful adjuncts to more comprehensive techniques. There is a need for arthroscopic assessment tools for standardized evaluation and objective feedback of technical skills, yet few comprehensive instruments exist, especially for the shoulder. Opinion on the required arthroscopic experience to obtain proficiency remains guarded and few governing bodies specify absolute quantities. Conclusions Further validation is required to demonstrate the transfer of complex arthroscopic skills from simulated environments to the operating room and provide objective parameters to base evaluation. There is a deficiency of validated assessment tools for technical competencies and little consensus of what constitutes a sufficient case volume within the arthroscopy community. PMID:23631421

  10. Arthroscopic Anterior Capsular Reconstruction of the Hip for Recurrent Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Garabekyan, Tigran; McConkey, Mark; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic anterior instability of the hip is typically iatrogenic in nature and poses a challenging problem for the orthopaedist. With early recognition, capsular repair and plication are often effective in restoring stability. Cases involving multiple instability episodes or those with delayed presentation, however, may have patulous and deficient capsular tissue precluding successful capsulorrhaphy. Capsular reconstruction may play an important role in restoring stability in these difficult cases. We present an arthroscopic technique for iliofemoral ligament reconstruction, with Achilles tendon allograft, to address instability of the hip due to anterior capsular deficiency. PMID:26870651

  11. Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis: a new arthroscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, R; Leyes, M

    2011-01-01

    Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is considered an aggressive and technically demanding procedure that can be used to treat severe deformities of the hindfoot, and it is rarely performed. The indications for ankle arthroscopy are increasing, and arthroscopic tibiotalar arthrodesis is a common and successful procedure, but arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis has not been previously reported in the literature. A case of extensive talus necrosis with severe hindfoot deformity treated by means of an arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is presented. PMID:20411375

  12. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  13. Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

  14. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  15. Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction of the Hip Using Semitendinosus Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, John M.; Cregar, William M.; Martin, Timothy J.; Vemula, S. Pavan; Gupta, Asheesh; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    The labrum of the hip is recognized as being important to the stability of the hip and a major cause of hip pain. Damage to the labrum may result in increased joint stress and articular damage. Labral damage is often treated through various methods, among them simple stitch repair, base refixation, and debridement. Labral reconstruction becomes necessary when the labrum is too damaged to salvage, which renders labral repair improbable and labral debridement ineffective. In contrast to other methods that have been described for this treatment, our technique uses a semitendinosus allograft as a graft source, allowing for arthroscopic hip labral reconstruction. This technique has many advantages and is easily reproducible. It has shown promising results in patients with labral damage. The purpose of this article is to detail the step-by-step surgical technique of labral reconstruction using a semitendinosus allograft, in addition to the indications, pearls, and pitfalls of the technique. PMID:26759770

  16. The response of tenocytes to commercial scaffolds used for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, R D; Carr, A; Dakin, S G; Snelling, S J; Yapp, C; Hakimi, O

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repairs of rotator cuff tears have high re-tear rates and many scaffolds have been developed to augment the repair. Understanding the interaction between patients' cells and scaffolds is important for improving scaffold performance and tendon healing. In this in vitro study, we investigated the response of patient-derived tenocytes to eight different scaffolds. Tested scaffolds included X-Repair, Poly-Tape, LARS Ligament, BioFiber (synthetic scaffolds), BioFiber-CM (biosynthetic scaffold), GraftJacket, Permacol, and Conexa (biological scaffolds). Cell attachment, proliferation, gene expression, and morphology were assessed. After one day, more cells attached to synthetic scaffolds with dense, fine and aligned fibres (X-Repair and Poly-Tape). Despite low initial cell attachment, the human dermal scaffold (GraftJacket) promoted the greatest proliferation of cells over 13 days. Expression of collagen types I and III were upregulated in cells grown on non-cross-linked porcine dermis (Conexa). Interestingly, the ratio of collagen I to collagen III mRNA was lower on all dermal scaffolds compared to synthetic and biosynthetic scaffolds. These findings demonstrate significant differences in the response of patient-derived tendon cells to scaffolds that are routinely used for rotator cuff surgery. Synthetic scaffolds promoted increased cell adhesion and a tendon-like cellular phenotype, while biological scaffolds promoted cell proliferation and expression of collagen genes. However, no single scaffold was superior. Our results may help understand the way that patients' cells interact with scaffolds and guide the development of new scaffolds in the future. PMID:26855160

  17. The response of tenocytes to commercial scaffolds used for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, R D; Carr, A; Dakin, S G; Snelling, S J; Yapp, C; Hakimi, O

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repairs of rotator cuff tears have high re-tear rates and many scaffolds have been developed to augment the repair. Understanding the interaction between patients' cells and scaffolds is important for improving scaffold performance and tendon healing. In this in vitro study, we investigated the response of patient-derived tenocytes to eight different scaffolds. Tested scaffolds included X-Repair, Poly-Tape, LARS Ligament, BioFiber (synthetic scaffolds), BioFiber-CM (biosynthetic scaffold), GraftJacket, Permacol, and Conexa (biological scaffolds). Cell attachment, proliferation, gene expression, and morphology were assessed. After one day, more cells attached to synthetic scaffolds with dense, fine and aligned fibres (X-Repair and Poly-Tape). Despite low initial cell attachment, the human dermal scaffold (GraftJacket) promoted the greatest proliferation of cells over 13 days. Expression of collagen types I and III were upregulated in cells grown on non-cross-linked porcine dermis (Conexa). Interestingly, the ratio of collagen I to collagen III mRNA was lower on all dermal scaffolds compared to synthetic and biosynthetic scaffolds. These findings demonstrate significant differences in the response of patient-derived tendon cells to scaffolds that are routinely used for rotator cuff surgery. Synthetic scaffolds promoted increased cell adhesion and a tendon-like cellular phenotype, while biological scaffolds promoted cell proliferation and expression of collagen genes. However, no single scaffold was superior. Our results may help understand the way that patients' cells interact with scaffolds and guide the development of new scaffolds in the future. PMID:26815643

  18. Arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, D J; O'Carroll, P F

    1982-01-01

    In the first 1000 arthroscopic operations performed by one surgeon 136 patients had two or more procedures, making a total of 1168 during the 1000 operations. The indications for operation were internal mechanical derangements in 565 patients, anterior knee pain in 246, disorders of the synovium in 77, ligament injuries in 63, and degenerative joint disease in 49. Complications included fracture of instruments in the knee in five patients, haemarthrosis in 10, deep vein thrombosis in three, and synovial fistula in one. In no patient was the wound infected. A total of 26 different operations was performed. PMID:6812832

  19. Arthroscopic resection of talocalcaneal coalitions.

    PubMed

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Phisitkul, Phinit; Saltzman, Charles L; Barg, Alexej; Amendola, Annunziato

    2011-03-01

    Excision of symptomatic talocalcaneal coalitions, after failure of an adequate conservative treatment, is a widely accepted surgical treatment when less than 50% of the subtalar joint is involved and in the absence of degenerative changes to the subtalar or surrounding tarsal joints. Favorable results have been reported in 80% to 100% of patients with open resection. The traditional medial incision to the subtalar joint provides excellent exposure of the middle facet but inadequate visualization of the posterior facet. Other common disadvantages of the traditional open technique include (1) risk of incisional neuroma formation, (2) risk of superficial wound infection and delayed wound healing, and (3) prolonged hospitalization for wound management and pain control. Prone ankle/subtalar arthroscopy has been reported to yield excellent results in the treatment of numerous hindfoot pathologies, with the advantage of reducing postoperative pain, hospital stay, infection rates, wound complications, and recovery time. A posterior arthroscopic technique for posterior-facet talocalcaneal coalition excision has been developed in an attempt to reduce the complications of the traditional open resection. Possible disadvantages of the arthroscopic procedure may include (1) longer learning curve, (2) increased surgical time, (3) possible tibial neurovascular bundle damage, and (4) difficulties in using interposition material. PMID:21353172

  20. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. PMID:24510522

  1. Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

    2006-02-01

    Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to create a tunnel from the acromioclavicular joint, under the deltoid, to the anterior portal. The ends of the braided suture and the tendon sutures are grasped by the clamp and pulled out the acromioclavicular joint incision. The limbs of the braided suture and the tendon suture that pass medial to the coracoid are shuttled through the hole in the clavicle using the looped suture that was previously passed through the clavicle. The acromioclavicular joint is reduced by pushing down on the distal clavicle with a bone tamp while simultaneously lifting the acromion upward by superiorly loading the humerus at the elbow. Once the acromioclavicular joint is reduced or slightly over-reduced, the braided suture is tied down securely. The acromioclavicular joint should remain reduced even after the manual reduction maneuver is released. The semitendinosus allograft is tensioned around the distal end of the clavicle and sutured to itself with a nonabsorbable suture. The released coracoacromial ligament is retrieved from the clavicular incision and sutured to the distal clavicle and semitendinosus allograft. The incision is closed in standard fashion, and a sling is applied. PMID:16458813

  2. [Complications related to implants in arthroscopic shoulder surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O; Wilmes, P; Brogard, P; Seil, R

    2008-11-01

    With the increase in shoulder arthroscopies are increased complications related to shoulder implants frequently used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and shoulder stabilisation. The biggest problem is malpositioning of the suture anchor, which might lead to persistent pain, serious cartilage damage, decreased range of motion, and failure of the reconstruction, resulting in revision surgery. Especially in osteoporotic bone, it is important to choose an implant that provides sufficient mechanical strength. Other possible complications are related to the sutures of the anchor. Suture damage or accidental removal of the sutures from the anchor could leave them useless in situ. Tangling of the sutures, especially in massive reconstructions of the rotator cuff, can lead the surgeon to switch to an open technique. Compared with metal implants, bioabsorbable implants have advantages concerning possible revision surgery. However, implant costs, anchor hole enlargement, and possible higher failure rates compared with metallic implants should be considered. A rare but serious complication is allergic reaction to the implant. PMID:18813907

  3. A Simple Technique for Capsular Repair After Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Capsulotomy is typically performed during arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. As the frequency of hip arthroscopy continues to expand rapidly, increased attention is being paid to the implications of interportal capsulotomy and the need for repair. To minimize the risk of postoperative instability, capsular closure has been recommended to restore the anatomy and biomechanical function of the capsule. We present a reliable, efficient, and effective method for arthroscopic closure of the interportal capsulotomy after hip arthroscopy. PMID:26870655

  4. Arthroscopic Allograft Cartilage Transfer for Osteochondral Defects of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyong S.; Ryan, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondral defects is well established but has had mixed results in larger lesions and revision operations. Particulated allograft cartilage transfer may provide an arthroscopic option for lesions that would otherwise have been treated through open approaches or osteotomies. The procedure is performed under noninvasive distraction with standard arthroscopic portals. PMID:26052496

  5. Return to Elite Level of Play and Performance in Professional Golfers After Arthroscopic Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Justin T.; Saroki, Adriana J.; Briggs, Karen K.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip conditions, such as femoroacetabular impingement and labral injury, can cause pain and limit the ability to play sports at a professional level. Purpose: To evaluate performance metrics of professional golfers prior to arthroscopic hip surgery and after surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study included professional golfers who underwent arthroscopic hip surgery. Primary outcome variables were greens in regulation and driving distance. Metrics were recorded for 2 years prior to arthroscopic hip surgery and 1, 2, and 5 years after arthroscopy. Results: A consecutive cohort of 20 male professional golfers (27 hips) from 2000 to 2011 underwent arthroscopic hip surgery by a single surgeon. All players were on the PGA Tour with a mean age of 38 years (range, 26-54 years). Eleven hips had labral repair and 16 had labral debridements. Four hips required microfracture of a chondral lesion. All players returned to play at a mean of 4.7 months (range, 1 month to 2 years). The mean number of years played after surgery was 5.72. There was no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative greens in regulation (P = .227). The mean distance per golf drive was significantly longer at 1 and 2 years postoperative compared with prior to surgery (P < .01), and driving distance at 5 years was also longer than preoperative (P = .008). Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of chondrolabral dysfunction due to femoroacetabular impingement in the professional golfer allowed the golfer to return to the same skill level prior to surgery. Mean driving distance was found to increase after arthroscopy, demonstrating not only a return but also an improvement in driving performance from prior level of play. PMID:27141515

  6. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  7. Creating and Closing the T-Capsulotomy for Improved Visualization During Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement through an arthroscopic approach has gained widespread popularity in recent years. Although outcomes are generally favorable, one of the most common reasons for failure is incomplete resection of cam lesions of the femoral neck. As a result, the T-capsulotomy has been introduced as a method for improving access to the femoral head-neck junction, which is not always visible through a standard interportal capsulotomy. The T-capsulotomy has the benefits of improving arthroscopic visualization of the femoral neck, reducing overall fluoroscopy exposure for the patient and surgeon, and facilitating capsular plication. We present a reliable and efficient method for creating and repairing the T-capsulotomy. We routinely perform this technique in patients with cam lesions that are too large or too distal to safely visualize and decompress through an interportal capsulotomy. PMID:26870654

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Talar Body Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Nicholas B.; Lutz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Talar fractures can be severe injuries with complications leading to functional disability. Open reduction–internal fixation remains the treatment of choice for displaced talar fractures. Arthroscopic evaluation of the fracture and articular surfaces can play an important role in the treatment of these fractures. Arthroscopic reduction–internal fixation (ARIF) is increasingly used for certain intra-articular fracture types through the body. The minimally invasive nature of ARIF and high accuracy are enviable attributes of an evolving technique. This technical note describes arthroscopic evaluation of 2 intra-articular talar head fractures, using posterior portals, with ARIF performed in 1 case and excision of the fracture fragments in the other case. PMID:24904775

  9. Arthroscopic Scapulothoracic Decompression for Snapping Scapula Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Michael; Kasik, Connor; Dietzel, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Snapping scapula syndrome at the superomedial corner of the scapula can lead to significant shoulder dysfunction. Bursectomy with or without partial scapulectomy is currently the most beneficial primary method of treatment in patients in whom nonoperative therapy fails. Arthroscopic access to the scapulothoracic space is simple and reproducible with the technique described in this report. The bursal tissue can be cleared, optimizing visualization of the scapulothoracic space and the anatomic structures. Arthroscopic decompression of the scapulothoracic bursa and resection of the superomedial corner of the scapula are highlighted in a video example. PMID:26870637

  10. Arthroscopic Scapulothoracic Decompression for Snapping Scapula Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saper, Michael; Kasik, Connor; Dietzel, Douglas

    2015-12-01

    Snapping scapula syndrome at the superomedial corner of the scapula can lead to significant shoulder dysfunction. Bursectomy with or without partial scapulectomy is currently the most beneficial primary method of treatment in patients in whom nonoperative therapy fails. Arthroscopic access to the scapulothoracic space is simple and reproducible with the technique described in this report. The bursal tissue can be cleared, optimizing visualization of the scapulothoracic space and the anatomic structures. Arthroscopic decompression of the scapulothoracic bursa and resection of the superomedial corner of the scapula are highlighted in a video example. PMID:26870637

  11. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean time to return to play was 6.7 months after surgery. However, only 25% (2 out of 8) players had achieved their pre-injury singles rank or better by 18 months post operatively. In total, three players returned to their pre-injury singles ranking, with their peak singles ranking being attained at a mean of 2.5 years post operatively. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that in professional female tennis players, a high return to play rate following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is also associated with a prolonged and often incomplete return to previous level of performance. Thus, counselling the patient to this fact is important to manage their expectations.

  12. Arthroscopically Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer in Beach-Chair Position

    PubMed Central

    Jermolajevas, Viktoras; Kordasiewicz, Bartlomiej

    2015-01-01

    Irreparable rotator cuff tears remain a surgical problem. The open technique of latissimus dorsi (LD) tendon transfer to replace the irreparable rotator cuff is already well known. The aim of this article is to present a modified arthroscopically assisted LD tendon transfer technique. This technique was adopted to operate on patients in the beach-chair position with several improvements in tendon harvesting and fixation. It can be divided into 6 steps, and only 1stepLD muscle and tendon releaseis performed open. The advantages of the arthroscopic procedure are sparing of the deltoid muscle, the possibility of repairing the subscapularis tendon, and the ability to visualize structures at risk while performing tendon harvesting (radial nerve) and passing into the subacromial space (axillary nerve). It is performed in a similar manner to standard rotator cuff surgerythe beach-chair position does not need any modification, and no sophisticated equipment for either the open or arthroscopic part of the procedure is necessary. Nevertheless, this is a challenging procedure and should only be attempted after training, as well as extensive practice. PMID:26759777

  13. Arthroscopically Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer in Beach-Chair Position.

    PubMed

    Jermolajevas, Viktoras; Kordasiewicz, Bartlomiej

    2015-08-01

    Irreparable rotator cuff tears remain a surgical problem. The open technique of latissimus dorsi (LD) tendon transfer to "replace" the irreparable rotator cuff is already well known. The aim of this article is to present a modified arthroscopically assisted LD tendon transfer technique. This technique was adopted to operate on patients in the beach-chair position with several improvements in tendon harvesting and fixation. It can be divided into 6 steps, and only 1step-LD muscle and tendon release-is performed open. The advantages of the arthroscopic procedure are sparing of the deltoid muscle, the possibility of repairing the subscapularis tendon, and the ability to visualize structures at risk while performing tendon harvesting (radial nerve) and passing into the subacromial space (axillary nerve). It is performed in a similar manner to standard rotator cuff surgery-the beach-chair position does not need any modification, and no sophisticated equipment for either the open or arthroscopic part of the procedure is necessary. Nevertheless, this is a challenging procedure and should only be attempted after training, as well as extensive practice. PMID:26759777

  14. Arthroscopic Bankart-Bristow-Latarjet (2B3) Procedure: How to Do It and Tricks To Make it Easier and Safe.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Mercier, Numa; Old, Jason

    2010-07-01

    The all-arthroscopic technique that the authors propose combines a Bristow-Latarjet procedure with a Bankart repair. This combined procedure provides a triple blocking of the shoulder (the so-called 2B3 procedure): (1) the labral repair recreates the anterior bumper and protects the humeral head from direct contact with the coracoid bone graft (Bumper effect); (2) the transferred coracoid bone block compensates for anterior glenoid bone loss (Bony effect); and (3) the transferred conjoined tendon creates a dynamic sling that reinforces the weak anteroinferior capsule by lowering the inferior part of the subscapularis when the arm is abducted and externally rotated (Belt or sling effect). The procedure combines the theoretic advantages of the Bristow-Latarjet procedure and the arthroscopic Bankart repair, eliminating the potential disadvantages of each. The extra-articular positioning of the bone block together with the labral repair and capsule retensioning allows the surgeon to perform a nearly anatomic shoulder repair. This novel procedure allows the surgeon to extend the indications of arthroscopic shoulder reconstruction to the subset of patients with recurrent anteroinferior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss and capsular deficiency. It is an attractive surgical option to treat patients with a previous failed capsulolabral repair for which the surgical solutions are limited. PMID:20497813

  15. Arthroscopic Treatment of Hip Chondral Defects With Bone Marrow Stimulation and BST-CarGel

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Marc; Mas, Jesús; Pelfort, Xavier; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Microfracture, the current standard of care for the treatment of non-degenerative chondral lesions in the hip joint, is limited by the poor quality of the filling fibrocartilaginous tissue. BST-CarGel (Piramal Life Sciences, Laval, Quebec, Canada) is a chitosan-based biopolymer that, when mixed with fresh, autologous whole blood and placed over the previously microfractured area, stabilizes the blood clot and enhances marrow-triggered wound-healing repair processes. BST-CarGel has been previously applied in the knee, with statistically significant greater lesion filling and superior repair tissue quality compared with microfracture treatment alone. In this report we describe the application of BST-CarGel for the arthroscopic treatment of hip chondral lesions. Our preliminary data suggest that our BST-CarGel procedure provides high-quality repair tissue and therefore may be considered a safe, cost-efficient therapeutic choice for the treatment of hip chondral defects. PMID:25973370

  16. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  17. Arthroscopically Assisted Treatment of Acute Dislocations of the Acromioclavicular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sepp; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Imhoff, Andreas B.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted treatments for dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint combine the advantages of exact and visually controlled coracoid tunnel placement with the possibility of simultaneous treatment of concomitant injuries. The clinical results of previous arthroscopically assisted techniques have been favorable at midterm and long-term follow-up. The presented surgical technique combines the advantages of arthroscopically positioned coracoclavicular stabilization with an additional suture cord cerclage of the acromioclavicular joint capsule for improved horizontal stability. PMID:26870646

  18. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluation of an All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Patel, Ronak M.; Nair, Rueben; Deshmane, Prashant P.; Harnden, Galen; Terry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a well-recognized cause of shoulder pain in the adult population and can be managed surgically with tenotomy or tenodesis. Purpose: To compare the biomechanical strength of an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique that places the LHB distal to the bicipital groove in the suprapectoral region with a more traditional mini-open subpectoral tenodesis. This study also evaluates the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent biceps tenodesis using the all-arthroscopic technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: For the biomechanical evaluation of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, in which the biceps tendon is secured to the suprapectoral region distal to the bicipital groove with an interference screw, 14 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders (7 matched pairs) were used to compare load to failure and displacement at peak load with a traditional open subpectoral location. For the clinical evaluation, 49 consecutive patients (51 shoulders) with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years who underwent an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score preoperatively and at last follow-up, as well as the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Score at last follow-up. Results: On biomechanical evaluation, there was no significant difference in peak failure load, displacement at peak load, or displacement after cyclic testing between the arthroscopic suprapectoral and mini-open subpectoral groups. In the clinical evaluation, the mean preoperative ASES score was 65.4, compared with 87.1 at last follow-up. The mean UCLA score at last follow-up was 30.2. Forty-eight (94.1%) patients reported satisfaction with the surgery. In subgroup analysis comparing patients who had a rotator cuff repair or labral repair at time of tenodesis with patients who did not have either of these procedures, there were no significant differences in UCLA or ASES scores. Conclusion: The excellent biomechanical strength as well as the high rate of satisfaction after surgery and high ASES and UCLA postoperative scores make this technique a novel option for treatment of biceps tendon pathology. PMID:26535276

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with a bioabsorbable anchor.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Snyder, Stephen J; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Fanelli, Gregory C; Savoie, Felix H

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of a poly-l-lactic acid biodegradable suture anchor for arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with a prospective multicenter study. Inclusion criteria were one or more episodes of traumatic dislocation or multiple posttraumatic subluxations as a manifestation of unidirectional anterior instability. Exclusion criteria were significant glenoid bone deficiency, large Hill-Sachs lesions, rotator cuff tears, multidirectional instability, posterior labrum tears, or biceps ruptures. Fifty-seven patients were followed up for a mean of 24 months. Postoperative apprehension tests were negative in all but two. Motion improved from 155 degrees preoperatively to a mean of 175 degrees postoperatively. Four patients had postoperative instability symptoms (two dislocators and two with subluxations). Postoperative radiographs demonstrated no lytic or resorptive bone changes from the suture anchors. The mean postoperative Rowe score was 93. The biodegradable suture anchor achieved good clinical results when used for arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with no material-related adverse events. PMID:14671514

  20. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. PMID:26726987

  1. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  2. Arthroscopic Approach to Osteochondral Defects, Impingement, and Instability.

    PubMed

    Walker, Roger; Kunkle, William Aaron; Carreira, Dominic S

    2015-10-01

    Osteochondral defects, impingement, and instability of the ankle are common injuries in athletes. In this article, we review these diagnoses and their treatment options, with a focus on arthroscopic approaches. The treatment options continue to evolve, supported by innovation and outcome studies. In this article, we describe the advantages and disadvantages of both open and arthroscopic treatments using published evidence. PMID:26409590

  3. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  4. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of SLAP lesions through the O’Brien portal☆

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Fabiano; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Rocha, Ricardo Dantas; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; da Costa, Miguel Pereira; Filho, Romulo Brasil; Junior, Antonio Carlos Tenor

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional results from arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions through the portal described by O’Brien. Methods A retrospective evaluation was conducted on 19 shoulders in 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions through the O’Brien portal between November 2007 and January 2012. Results Nineteen shoulders in 18 patients were evaluated: 16 male patients (84.2%) and three female patients (15.7%). The patients’ ages ranged from 27 to 40 years (mean of 34.3 years). There were 12 patients (63.1%) with injuries on the right shoulder, six (31.5%) with injuries on the left shoulder and one (5.2%) with bilateral injury. In relation to dominance, 13 patients (68.4%) presented the injury on the dominant limb and five (26.3%) were affected on the non-dominant limb. We observed that nine cases (47.3%) had SLAP lesions alone and 10 cases (52.6%) were related to glenohumeral instability. There was one case (5.2%) of recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation, but this patient chose not to undergo a new surgical intervention. According to the UCLA and ASES scales translated and adapted to the Portuguese language, 96% of the results were good or excellent. Conclusion The approach for treating SLAP lesions through the portal described by O’Brien et al. is easy to reproduce, with a high rate of good and excellent results and a low complication rate. PMID:26229936

  5. Arthroscopic-Assisted Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction Using the TightRope Device With Allograft Augmentation: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Trenhaile, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations remains challenging, especially in the revision setting. Most commonly, Rockwood type I and II injuries are managed nonoperatively whereas type IV, V, and VI injuries are managed with surgery. Type III separations are more controversial, with evidence supporting both nonoperative and operative treatment options. Multiple different arthroscopic techniques have been described; however, there is no current gold standard. AC joint reconstruction with the TightRope device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) with the patient in the lateral decubitus position is a method of restoring joint stability that allows for a minimally invasive, low-profile fixation construct using a single drill hole through the clavicle. Allograft augmentation of this fixation construct helps to eliminate the stress risers potentially created by this device while increasing overall repair construct stability. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic AC joint reconstruction using a TightRope device with allograft augmentation. PMID:26759765

  6. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores. PMID:27073783

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of bilateral humeral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Hardy, P; Decrette, E; Jeanrot, C; Colom, A; Lortat-Jacob, A; Benoit, J

    2000-04-01

    A 37-year-old woman with a renal transplant was treated by arthroscopic debridement for bilateral steroid-induced humeral head osteonecrosis. Radiologically, the right shoulder had been categorized as stage III and the left as stage IV according to Arlet and Ficat. Relief of pain and improved range of motion were obtained especially on the right shoulder. Arthroscopy is an efficient procedure for treatment of humeral head osteonecrosis in the renal transplant recipient including radiological stages III with episodes of locking. PMID:10750016

  8. [Arthroscopic treatment of the ulnar impaction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C

    2006-11-01

    The ulnar impaction syndrome is due to hyperpressure in the ulnocarpal joint. It occurs most frequently following distal radial fractures with shortening, but can also be secondary to a primitive length discrepancy between a short radius and a long ulna (positive ulnar variance). Symptoms and clinical findings, even though characteristic, are not specific. Standard X rays show a positive ulnar variance, and sometimes a hyperpressure cyst in the lunate. CT arthroscan and MRI studies demonstrate indirect signs of hyperpressure. If medical treatment fails to improve the condition, the choice surgical technique is arthroscopic, allowing debridement of the TFCC central tear, and shortening of the horizontal aspect of the ulnar head. PMID:17361891

  9. Arthroscopic decompression for subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. J.; Lee, J. W.; Kim, B. S.

    1997-01-01

    Arthroscopic decompression and cuff debridement was performed on 47 cases in 45 consecutive patients with either stage II or stage III impingement syndrome: 19 with no actual tear of the cuff (stage II); 13 with a partial thickness tear (stage IIIa); 10 with complete tear less than 3 cm long (stage IIIb); and 5 with complete tear longer than 3 cm (stage IIIc). Patients were classified into impingement syndrome without tear (Group I), impingement syndrome with partial thickness tear (Group II), and impingement syndrome with full thickness tear (Group III). Group I had 19 cases, group II had 13 cases, and group III had 15 cases. Patients were followed up for an average of 39.3 months (24 approximately 62 months). In group I, postoperative UCLA ratings improved in 18 cases (95%) to satisfactory result rate. In group II, 11 patients (85%) had improvement to satisfactory result rate. In group III, 12 cases (80%) had improvement to satisfactory result rate. The arthroscopic subacromial decompression and rotator cuff debridement was effective in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. PMID:9170017

  10. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  11. Arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Roussignol, X

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopy has become indispensable for performing tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis. Now in 2015, it is the gold-standard surgical technique, and open surgery is reserved only for cases in which arthroscopy is contraindicated: material ablation after consolidation failure, osteophytes precluding a work chamber, excentric talus, severe malunion, bone defect requiring grafting, associated midfoot deformity, etc. The first reports of arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis date from the early 1990s. Consolidation rates were comparable to open surgery, but with significantly fewer postoperative complications: infection, skin necrosis, etc. Arthroscopy was for many years reserved to moderate deformity, with frontal or sagittal deviation less than 10°. The recent literature, however, seems to extend indications, the only restriction being the surgeon's experience. Tibiotalar arthrodesis on a posterior arthroscopic approach remains little used. And yet the posterior work chamber is much larger, and initial series showed consolidation rates similar to those of an anterior approach. The surgical technique for posterior tibiotalar arthrodesis was described by Van Dijk et al., initially using a posterior para-Achilles approach. This may be hampered by posterior osteophytes or ankylosis of the subtalar joint line (revision of non-consolidated arthrodesis, sequelae of calcaneal thalamus fracture) and is now used only by foot and ankle specialists. Posterior double tibiotalar-subtalar arthrodesis, described by Devos Bevernage et al., is facilitated by transplantar calcaneo-talo-tibial intramedullary nailing. PMID:26797006

  12. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures. PMID:26229905

  13. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  14. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  15. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through the Latrobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Dissemination of outcome data is planned through both national and international conferences and formal publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12614000812695). PMID:26685030

  16. Arthroscopic Anatomic Reconstruction of the Lateral Ligaments of the Ankle With Gracilis Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Guillo, Stéphane; Archbold, Pooler; Perera, Anthony; Bauer, Thomas; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are common; if conservative treatment fails and chronic instability develops, stabilization surgery is indicated. Numerous surgical procedures have been described, but those that most closely reproduce normal ankle lateral ligament anatomy and kinematics have been shown to have the best outcomes. Arthroscopy is a common adjunct to open ligament surgery, but it is traditionally only used to improve the diagnosis and the management of any associated intra-articular lesions. The stabilization itself is performed open because standard anterior ankle arthroscopy provides only partial visualization of the anterior talofibular ligament from above and the calcaneofibular ligament attachments cannot be seen at all. However, lateral ankle endoscopy can provide a view of this area that is superior to open surgery. We have developed a technique of ankle endoscopy that enables anatomic positioning of the repair or fixation of the graft. In this article we describe a safe and reproducible arthroscopic anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments of the ankle using a gracilis autograft. The aim of this procedure is to obtain a more physiological reconstruction while maintaining all the advantages of an arthroscopic approach. PMID:25473613

  17. A navigation system for shoulder arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tyryshkin, K; Mousavi, P; Beek, M; Ellis, R E; Pichora, D R; Abolmaesumi, P

    2007-10-01

    The general framework and experimental validation of a novel navigation system designed for shoulder arthroscopy are presented. The system was designed to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the human shoulder. Prior to surgery, a surface model of the shoulder was created from computed tomography images. Intraoperatively, optically tracked arthroscopic instruments were calibrated. The surface model was then registered to the patient using tracked freehand ultrasound images taken from predefined landmark regions on the scapula. Three-dimensional models of the surgical instruments were displayed, in real time, relative to the surface model in a user interface. Laboratory experiments revealed only small registration and calibration errors, with minimal time needed to complete the intraoperative tasks. PMID:18019466

  18. [Arthroscopic studies of the stifle of dogs].

    PubMed

    Fehr, M; Behrends, I; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    1996-04-01

    Diagnosis by arthroscopy and arthrotomy of 36 dogs with stifle lesions (18 left, 18 right) assessed by physical and radiological examination were compared. 48 of 68 observations during arthrotomy had been diagnosed before by arthroscopy (accuracy 70.6%). Arthroscopical diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament rupture (ACL) (n = 11), partial ACL (n = 11), avulsion of m. extensor digitorum longum (n = 2) and immune-mediated arthritis (n = 2) confirmed the diagnosis by arthrotomy in all patients. Arthroscopy failed to detect meniscal lesions in 50% (18 of 36). Nine of 20 normal medial and lateral meniscus, eight of 14 medial and one of two lateral meniscal lesions were detected by arthroscopy. Six meniscal tears (two transverse, two longitudinal, one bucket-handle type, one caudal horn) were not diagnosed. These results indicate that other known human portals have to be proven or new portals have to be evaluated. PMID:8650682

  19. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure.

  20. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures. PMID:26796120

  1. Whole-Organ Arthroscopic Knee Score (WOAKS)

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Gunter; Mückley, Thomas; Klinger, Hans M; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2008-01-01

    Background To describe a semi-quantitative score for multi-feature, whole-organ evaluation of the knee in osteoarthritis based on the results of arthroscopic evaluation. Methods This was a study of 1,199 patients who were suffering from knee pain for over 3 months (range 3 to 48 months) and had undergone arthroscopy. The mean age of patients was 49.8 (range 17 to 85) years old. Cartilage lesions were graded according to the ICRS protocol (grade 0 to 4 and for osteophytes "grade 5"). Meniscus lesions were classified regarding to the extent of resection which was needed (grade 0: intact meniscus, grade 1: partial meniscectomy, grade 2: subtotal meniscectomy, and grade 3: total meniscectomy). The whole grade of cartilage lesions was calculated as the sum of ICRS grades in all joint surfaces (bearing and non-bearing margin). The whole grade of meniscus lesions was calculated as the sum of the points for medial and lateral meniscus surgery. The Whole-Organ Arthroscopic Knee Score (WOAKS) was the sum of the cartilage and meniscus score. Results The mean knee osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) of all patients was 67.3 ± 26.0 (range 21 to 128) points. The WOAKS was significantly associated (p = 0.001) with patient age (R = 0.399), the subjective complaints (R = 0.630) in KOOS, and the radiological grade of OA (R = 0.731). Conclusion The good correlation between the WOAKS and the subjective complaints as well as the radiological grade of OA suggests that the score can be used as an instrument for description of the "whole organ" knee. This score may be useful for clinical or epidemiological studies in the future. PMID:19025645

  2. Arthroscopic reconstruction of chronic AC joint dislocations by transposition of the coracoacromial ligament augmented by the Tight Rope device: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hamid; Friedmann, Svenja; Trger, Markus; Lobenhoffer, Philipp; Agneskirchner, Jens D

    2009-01-01

    We present a new arthroscopic technique for chronic AC joint dislocations with coracoacromial ligament transposition and augmentation by the Tight Rope device (Arthrex, Naples, USA). First the glenohumeral joint is visualised to repair concomitant lesions, such as SLAP lesions, if needed. Once the rotator interval is opened and the coracoid is identified, the arthroscope is moved to an additional anterolateral portal. A 1.5 cm incision is made 2 cm medial to the AC joint. After drilling a 4 mm hole with a cannulated drill through the clavicle and coracoid a Tight Rope is inserted, the clavicule is reduced and stabilized with the implant. The arthroscope is moved to the subacromial space and a partial bursectomy is performed to visualise the CA ligament and lateral clavicle. The CA ligament is armed with a strong braided suture using a Lasso stitch and dissected from the undersurface of the acromion. It is then reattached to the distal part of the clavicle by transosseous suture fixation after abrasion of its undersurface. Although this combined arthroscopic procedure of AC joint augmentation with a Tight Rope combined with a ligament transposition is technically demanding, it is a safe method to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligaments and achieve a sufficient reduction of the clavicle without the need of further implant removal or autologous tendon transplantation. PMID:18836701

  3. Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure. PMID:23960367

  4. Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: An Evidence Update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with knee pain as a result of osteoarthritis or degenerative meniscal injury may seek treatment through arthroscopic surgery. How effective arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy is for relieving pain and improving patients’ functional outcomes is uncertain. Objectives To conduct an evidence update of an evidence-based analysis (EBA) conducted in 2005 to determine if arthroscopic debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee or for meniscal injury from degenerative causes improve patient outcomes. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, and all EBM databases, for studies published from January 1, 2005, to February 4, 2014. Review Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted, limited to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effectiveness of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy. Quality assessment of the body of literature was conducted using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Results A total of 8 RCTs were identified, 2 from the original EBA plus 6 that were published since that time. The studies included patients with a range of indications for treatment and severity of osteoarthritis. Moderate-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus placebo (e.g., sham surgery). Low-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus usual care (e.g., physical therapy). Limitations Heterogeneity across the study populations, interventions, and reported measures limited the ability to calculate a summary effect estimate; however, all studies demonstrated consistency in their findings. Conclusions The evidence does not show the superiority of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or with meniscal injury from degenerative causes. PMID:26330895

  5. Arthroscopic management of septic arthritis: stages of infection and results.

    PubMed

    Stutz, G; Kuster, M S; Kleinstück, F; Gächter, A

    2000-01-01

    Seventy-six patients with septic arthritis (78 affected joints) were treated with a combination of arthroscopic irrigation, debridement, and antibiotic therapy according to the tested bacterial sensitivity. There were 62 knee, 10 shoulder, 5 ankle joints, and 1 hip joint. No antibiotics were added to the irrigating solution. The arthroscopic and radiological stage of infection, treatment, and outcome in these patients was analyzed. The patients were classified into three groups according to initial stage of joint infection (stage I: 21 patients, 22 joints; stage II: 43 patients, 44 joints; stage III: 12 patients, 12 joints). Causes of infection were: hematogenous dissemination in 54%, postoperative wound infection in 28% (17% after open, 11% after arthroscopic procedures). Other causes were: 10% intra-articular steroid injections, 3% diagnostic punctures, and 3% open traumatic injury of the joint. In 78% of the infected joints the causative organism could be identified: Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism found (42%), followed by streptococci (15%), pneumococci (6%), Escherichia coli (4%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (3%), Borrelia burgdorferi (3%), and others in 5%. In the stage I group only one patient needed repeated arthroscopic irrigation, in the stage II group 52%, and in the stage III group 75%. Open revision for eradication of the infection was necessary in one joint with stage II and in two joints with stage III infection (3%). Two joints of the stage III group needed additional surgery after successful treatment of the infection. The combination of arthroscopic irrigation and systemic antibiotic therapy was able to cure 91% of the affected joints. Open revision was necessary in 4% of joints. The number of arthroscopic procedures and the efficacy of treatment depended on the initial stage of the infection. It is concluded that an arthroscopic staging of the initial joint infection has prognostic and therapeutic consequences. PMID:11061294

  6. RESULTS FROM FILLING “REMPLISSAGE” ARTHROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Benegas, Eduardo; Prada, Flávia de Santis; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Sunada, Edwin Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical result from the filling (“remplissage”) technique in association with Bankart lesion repair for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Nine patients (10 shoulders), with a mean follow-up of 13.7 months, presented traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. All of them had a Bankart lesion, associated with a Hill-Sachs lesion showing the “engaging” sign. The Hill-Sachs lesion defect was measured and showed an average bone loss of 17.3% (7.7% to 26.7%) in relation to the diameter of the humeral head. All the cases underwent arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion, together with filling of the Hill-Sachs lesion by means of tenodesis of the infraspinatus. Results: The Rowe score ranged from 22.5 (10 to 45) before the operation to 80.5 (5 to 100) after the operation (p > 0.001). The UCLA score ranged from 18.0 (8 to 29) to 31.1 (21 to 31) (p > 0.001). The measurements of external and internal rotation at abduction of 90° after the operation were 63.5° (45° to 90°) and 73° (50° to 92°) respectively. Two patients presented recurrence (one with dislocation and the other with subluxation). None of the patients presented pain in the region of the infraspinatus tendon after the operation. Conclusion: Over the short term, the filling (“remplissage”) arthroscopic technique produced improvements in functional scores and a low complication rate when used for treating glenohumeral instability associated with Hill-Sachs lesions.

  7. Arthroscopically Assisted Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations: Anatomic AC Ligament Reconstruction With Protective Internal Bracing—The “AC-RecoBridge” Technique

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Maier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An arthroscopically assisted technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is presented. This pathology-based procedure aims to achieve anatomic healing of both the acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC) and the coracoclavicular ligaments. First, the acromioclavicular joint is reduced anatomically under macroscopic and radiologic control and temporarily transfixed with a K-wire. A single-channel technique using 2 suture tapes provides secure coracoclavicular stabilization. The key step of the procedure consists of the anatomic repair of the ACLC (“AC-Reco”). Basically, we have observed 4 patterns of injury: clavicular-sided, acromial-sided, oblique, and midportion tears. Direct and/or transosseous ACLC repair is performed accordingly. Then, an X-configured acromioclavicular suture tape cerclage (“AC-Bridge”) is applied under arthroscopic assistance to limit horizontal clavicular translation to a physiological extent. The AC-Bridge follows the principle of internal bracing and protects healing of the ACLC repair. The AC-Bridge is tightened on top of the repair, creating an additional suture-bridge effect and promoting anatomic ACLC healing. We refer to this combined technique of anatomic ACLC repair and protective internal bracing as the “AC-RecoBridge.” A detailed stepwise description of the surgical technique, including indications, technical pearls and pitfalls, and potential complications, is given. PMID:26052493

  8. Recent advances and perspectives on arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cash, J D

    1991-10-01

    The goal of surgical stabilization of the unstable glenohumeral joint is to produce a stable yet mobile joint that can return to preinjury function. Open surgical procedures (in particular, the Bankart procedure) have evolved to a point where stability and mobility are being attained with a low complication rate, but the rate of return to preinjury function, particularly in overhead athletes, has not been ideal. Arthroscopic stabilization is an attractive alternative to open procedures, particularly in those patients who have a history of traumatic and unidirectional recurrent dislocations with a labral detachment. A variety of techniques for reattaching a detached labro-ligamentous complex have been described. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the efficacy of these procedures fully, particularly in light of the good results now being obtained with the open Bankart procedure. Longer-term studies have shown a higher rate of recurrence of dislocation with the arthroscopic technique than with the open technique. Arthroscopic stabilization offers the potential advantages of shorter hospitalization, less traumatic treatment of the soft tissues, more thorough examination of the glenohumeral joint and subacromial bursa, and greater cosmesis. It could also provide a means by which selective stabilization of those initial anterior dislocations that might be prone to recurrence could be performed. Long-term follow-up and randomized studies comparing open and arthroscopic techniques are needed to further define the best role of arthroscopic shoulder stabilization and to determine which of the several techniques described provides the best results with the fewest complications. PMID:1934102

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Ozmeric, Ahmet; Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Kocadal, Onur; Kara, Talip; Pepe, Murad; Gozel, Serap

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by the presence of metaplastic cartilage nodules originating from the synovia, bursa and tendon sheaths. Although it is extremely rare in the ankle joint, malignant transformation is possible. The choice of treatment is usually open surgery for excision of loose bodies and synovectomy. Limited data is available concerning arthroscopic approaches. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 28-year-old male patient was evaluated for pain and swelling of the right ankle joint. Based on the findings of physical examination and radiographic investigations, arthroscopic surgery was performed due to ankle impingement syndrome. A diagnosis of synovial osteochondromatosis was made following the pathological survey. DISCUSSION Synovial chondromatosis is slowly progressive and is considered to be a self-limiting situation. Treatment strategies are decided on according to the patient's complaints, age and disease stage. Open or arthroscopic surgery. can be performed. Some advantages of arthroscopic surgery are wide visualization areas, easy access to areas difficult to reach, lower morbidity, no necessity for casting and immobilization, early rehabilitation and quick recovery period. CONCLUSION In conclusion, arthroscopic management can be successful in selected patients with synovial osteochondromatosis localized to the ankle joint. PMID:25460460

  10. Bankart arthroscopic procedure: comparative study on use of double or single-thread anchors after a 2-year follow-up☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; França, Flávio de Oliveira; de Lago e Santos, Flávio Márcio; Aragão, Alan Arruda; Barros, Marcos Knoll

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the use of anchors with double and single-thread loading in the single-row Bankart arthroscopic procedure. Methods 252 patients (258 shoulders) underwent Bankart arthroscopic surgery with evaluation after a minimum follow-up of 2 years. They underwent repairs either using anchors with single loading of a high-resistance non-absorbable braided thread (206 shoulders; group AS) or using double loading of thread with the same characteristics (52 shoulders; group AD). The patients were evaluated using the UCLA and Carter-Rowe scales. The patients’ return to sports activity and recurrences were also compared. Results There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the surgical failure rate (group AS 5.8%; group AD 7.7%; p = 0.62). Group AS presented a better mean Carter-Rowe score (group AS 94.4; group AD 88.6; p < 0.05) and greater return to the same sports level (group AS 79.1; group AD 72.1; p < 0.05). Conclusion Use of anchors with double thread loading did not show any clinical advantage for arthroscopic repair of traumatic anterior shoulder instability, in relation to use of single-thread anchors, over a 2-year follow-up. PMID:26229884

  11. Failure of anterior shoulder instability repair caused by eyelet cutout of absorbable suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian

    2004-05-01

    Repair of soft tissue to bone is increasingly frequently performed using absorbable suture anchors. If a repair fails clinically, it is often impossible to identify the cause of failure at repeat surgery. We report on 2 cases of recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair. In reoperation in these cases, all sutures were correctly knotted around the labrum but were intact and torn out of the anchor eyelets. No sign of anchor displacement (3 anchors in each patient) was seen. This is the first clinical report of unambiguous structural suture anchor failure. These observations emphasize the sensitivity of Bankart repair to weak links in the repair chain, which must be avoided. PMID:15122143

  12. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  13. Outcomes of Open Subacromial Decompression after Failed Arthroscopic Acromioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Anand; Eranki, Vivek; Malal, Joby; Nimon, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To prospectively assess the effectiveness of revision with open subacromial decompression in patients who had a previous unsatisfactory outcome with the arthroscopic procedure. Methods. 11 patients were identified for the study, who did not demonstrate expected improvement in symptoms after arthroscopic acromioplasty. All patients underwent structured rehabilitation. Functional evaluation was conducted using the Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, shoulder rating questionnaire. Results. M : F was 7 : 4. The mean age was 57 years. The average shoulder score improved from 49.6 preoperatively to 56 postoperatively at an average followup of 16 months. Two patients showed deterioration in their shoulder scores after revision while the rest showed only marginal improvement. All except one patient stated that they would opt for surgery again if given a second chance. Conclusion. In the group of patients that fail to benefit from the arthroscopic decompression, only a marginal improvement was noted after revision with open decompression. PMID:22649740

  14. Osteonecrosis of the Knee after Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Il Jin; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle is known as an uncommon complication after arthroscopic meniscectomy. The lesion of osteonecrosis can be irreversible, thus early detection of the disease is crucial for treatment. A 50-year-old male patient without known risk factors of osteonecrosis developed increasing knee pain after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed rapid progression of osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed after 9 months of conservative therapy. The patient is now free from pain during daily activities. It might be important to remind that if the patient's pain after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is severe than expected, clinical doctors should pay attention to the possibility of ongoing osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle. PMID:24032105

  15. Arthroscopic management of tibial plateau fractures: special techniques.

    PubMed

    Perez Carro, L

    1997-04-01

    Arthroscopic assessment and treatment of tibial plateau fractures has gained popularity in recent years. This article describes some maneuvers to facilitate the management of these fractures with the arthroscope. We use a 14-mm rounded curved periosteal elevator to manipulate fragments within the joint instead of using a probe. To facilitate visualization of fractures, we describe the use of loop sutures around the meniscus to retract the meniscus when there is a tear in the meniscus. We suggest the use of the arthroscope for directly viewing the interosseous space to be sure that any internal fixation devices remain outside the articular space. The use of these tactics will allow a faster, more accurate reduction with less radiation exposure in patients with displaced tibial plateau fractures. PMID:9127091

  16. CO2 laser arthroscopy-through the arthroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick, James G.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedists have been among the last of the specialists to utilize lasers in surgery. Even today, laser usage in orthopedics is almost exclusively limited to arthroscopy procedures. Although other types of lasers have been approved for use in orthopedics, nearly all laser-assisted arthroscopic procedures have involved the carbon dioxide laser in the knee. These techniques involve skills and problems not previously encountered. In an attempt to simplify the usage and circumvent some of the problems, we describe a means of laser energy delivery through the arthroscope.

  17. The HU knot: a new sliding knot for arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Hachisuka, Hiroki; Natsu, Koji; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2005-08-01

    Sliding knots are commonly used in arthroscopic knot tying. The Surgical knot as a hand-tied knot is very secure. We found that the Surgical knot could be used as a sliding knot. We have modified the Surgical knot to include a self-locking loop. A new sliding knot for arthroscopic surgery, the HU knot, is described. By tensioning the loop strand, the self-locking loop creates a snug knot without sliding backward. The HU knot provides great security. PMID:16086569

  18. Hoffa's fat pad tumours like: results of the arthroscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Abid, Hatim; Nassreddine, Hammou; Bensaad, Soufiane; Mohammed, Elidrissi; Mohammed, Shimi; Abdelhalim, Elibrahimi; Abdelmajid, Elmrini

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort study to increase awareness in orthopaedic community of this rare but interesting disease which is often misdiagnosed as meniscal pathology and to analyze present results of arthroscopic resection in seven patients. we retrospectively reviewed records from 2008-2012 and identified 7 patients with symptomatic Hoffa's fat pad impingement. The diagnosis was made by clinical exam, MRI imaging and verified arthroscopically. Of the 7 patients 2 were excluded due to receiving open resection. The remaining five underwent arthroscopic resection. Lysholm and American knee society scores were obtained pre and post operative and at final follow up. There was a significant improvement in their symptoms and function after the surgery at an average follow-up of 14 months. The one poor result was because of paresthesia over the distribution of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve after open resection. tumours like of the fat pad should be treated by arthroscopic resection because of less residual pain and less complication was found using arthroscopy. In case of high volume of tumours only open excision can provide complete excision. PMID:26430484

  19. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Mariana Korbage; de Cillo, Mario Sergio Paulillo; Bittar, Cinthia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Cezar, Caroliny Nociti Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess pain and function of the ankle in patients with injuries up to 1.5 cm diameter by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score after arthroscopic treatment. Methods: The AOFAS scale was applied before and after arthroscopy, as well as the degree of subjective satisfaction of ambulatory patients. Patients with type I osteochondral injuries, acute trauma, using plaster, presenting lesions in other joints of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment that would prevent the application of the satisfaction questionnaire were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t test with Welch correction, Mann Whitney test, and ANOVA, with Kruskal Wallis test and Dun test, considering p value lower than 0.05. Results: There was an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment in 52 (94.5%) patients. The mean values of AOFAS score in 55 patients was 77.32 ± 6.67 points preoperative and 93.10± 8.24 points postoperative, with a mean variation of 15.8 points, p<0.001. Patients with stage II, III and IV injuries showed an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment, p<0.001. No difference was found between medial and lateral injuries, p >0.05. Conclusion: Patients with stage II, III or IV osteochondral injuries of the talus of up to 1.5 cm diameter, whether medial or lateral, showed a significant improvement after arthroscopic treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study.

  20. Systematic arthroscopic investigation of the bovine stifle joint.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M G; Brehm, W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a protocol for arthroscopic exploration of the bovine stifle joint using craniomedial, caudolateral and caudomedial approaches. An anatomic and arthroscopic study using 26 cadaveric limbs from 13 non-lame adult dairy cows was performed. The craniomedial approach was created between the middle and medial patellar ligaments to investigate the cranial pouches of the stifle joint. The inter-condylar eminence, the proximal aspect of the medial femoral trochlear ridge and the lateral aspect of the lateral femoral condyle were used as starting points for systematic examination of the medial femorotibial, the femoropatellar and the lateral femorotibial joints, respectively. The observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surfaces of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges, cruciate ligaments, menisci, and the meniscotibial ligaments. The arthroscopic portal for the caudomedial femorotibial pouch was about 6-8 cm caudal to the medial collateral ligament. The proximal and distal caudolateral femorotibial pouches were explored 3 cm and 1.5 cm caudal to the ipsilateral collateral ligament, respectively. The observed structures were the caudal aspect of femoral condyles, menisci, caudal cruciate ligament, popliteal tendon and the meniscofemoral ligament. Restricted joint size and risk of common peroneal nerve damage were the major limitations for exploration of the caudal femorotibial compartments. The study described the arthroscopic portals and normal intra-articular anatomy of the bovine stifle joint but further investigations are warranted to validate these techniques in clinical cases. PMID:26549490

  1. Arthroscopic treatment of popliteus tendon dysfunction following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Allardyce, T J; Scuderi, G R; Insall, J N

    1997-04-01

    Following total knee arthoplasty, the popliteus tendon may cause a "snap" when it rolls over a retained lateral femoral condylar osteophyte or when it subluxates over the posterior condyle of the femoral component. When this condition is painful and fails to respond to conservative treatment, arthroscopic release of the popliteus tendon has been beneficial. PMID:9113555

  2. Dorsal Wrist Capsular Tears in Association with Scapholunate Instability: Results of an Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Adeline Cambon; Kerfant, Nathalie; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Tandara, Andrea A.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the association of dorsal wrist capsular avulsion with scapholunate ligament instability and to evaluate the results of an arthroscopy-assisted repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years suffering from chronic dorsal wrist pain. They underwent a wrist arthroscopy with an evaluation of the scapholunate ligament complex from the radiocarpal and midcarpal compartments. An avulsion of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (DICL) from the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) was visible from the radiocarpal compartment in all cases, while the SLIL was intact. The DICL tear was repaired with an arthroscopy-assisted dorsal capsuloplasty. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by the QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and by a clinical and radiological examination. Results Preoperatively, all patients had reduced flexion and radial deviation of the affected wrist. On the lateral radiograph, 5 of the 10 patients showed an increase of the scapholunate angle (60 to 85°). The scapholunate instability was graded as Messina–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) II in five cases and as grade IIIB in five cases. A tear of the ulnar part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was found in seven cases. At a mean followup of 16 months, the wrist range of motion (ROM), the grip strength, the QuickDASH, and the VAS of pain improved significatively. The scapholunate angle was normalized in all cases. Discussion Isolated tears of the DICL at its insertion from the dorsal part of the SLIL can be associated with scapholunate instability in the absence of an injury to the SLIL. The diagnosis is made arthroscopically. The arthroscopic dorsal capsuloplasty is a minimally invasive technique that provides short-term satisfactory results. Further studies are needed to determine whether repair of the DICL tear could prevent secondary destabilization of the scapholunate ligament complex. Level of evidence IV (case series) Diagnosis PMID:24436810

  3. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  4. Arthroscopic management of trapeziometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Menon, J

    1996-10-01

    Open partial trapeziectomy and interpositional arthroplasty have proven to be effective in ameliorating the symptoms of carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb. Surgical technique of arthroscopic partial resection of the trapezium and interpositional arthroplasty is described. Thirty-three interpositional arthroplasties were carried out arthroscopically. Autogenous tendon graft. Gortex (WL Gore & Associates, Inc. Flagstaff, AZ) and fascia lata allograft were used as interpositional material; 87.8% of patients got relief from pain. Average postoperative pinch strength was 11 lbs. No ligament reconstruction was required because the capsule was left intact. The procedures were done on an outpatient basis and all patients were discharged the same day. There were no complications associated with radial sensory nerve. PMID:8902133

  5. Arthroscopic removal of giant loose bodies in the glenohumeral joint

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Bulent; Mutlu, Serhat; Komur, Baran; Mutlu, Harun

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Loose bodies within the joint because of any cause have the potential for continued growth. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 41-year-old man had suffered multiple recurrent dislocations of his left shoulder, accompanied with pain. His anterior apprehension and relocation tests were positive, but no other sign was noted on physical examination. On magnetic resonance imaging and at arthroscopy, two giant loose bodies were seen. They were in the axillary recess and were removed arthroscopically. DISCUSSION Most authors recommend surgical removal of the cartilaginous loose bodies to ameliorate the symptoms. Furthermore, the majority of authors recommend a synovectomy to decrease the risk of recurrence. Depending on the size of the chondral loose bodies, removal can be performed via an arthrotomy, arthroscopy with mini-open arthrotomy, or arthroscopy. CONCLUSION The source of the loose body should be determined carefully. Other lesions may be associated with the loose body. Arthroscopic treatment is a good option for removing the loose body. PMID:24973527

  6. Arthroscopic Lysis of Arthrofibrosis of the Fifth Tarsometatarsal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Loss of motion of the fifth tarsometatarsal joint can be a cause of lateral foot pain after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation or fracture of the fifth metatarsal tubercle. Arthroscopic lysis of the joint can be an effective surgical treatment with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue trauma and early vigorous mobilization of the joint. The lysis can be extended to the fourth tarsometatarsal joint and the adjacent tendons if indicated. PMID:26870650

  7. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  8. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus. PMID:26697294

  9. Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Fixation Using a Modified Sugaya Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesions in the setting of anterior shoulder instability has had successful long-term results. Key factors such as patient positioning, portal placement, visualization, mobilization of bony/soft tissues, and anatomic reduction and fixation are crucial to yield such results. We present a modified Sugaya technique that is reproducible and based on such key principles. This technique facilitates ease of anchor and suture placement to allow for anatomic reduction and fixation. PMID:24265994

  10. Arthroscopic approaches and intraarticular anatomy of the equine elbow.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A J

    1990-01-01

    Periarticular anatomy and techniques for arthroscopic access to the equine elbow were studied in six joints from cadavers. Caudomedial and craniolateral approaches were evaluated subsequently in 11 anesthetized horses. The caudomedial approach was made between the flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris muscle bellies. Most of the caudal articular surfaces of the humeral condyles, the caudal perimeter of the radius, and the trochlear notch and portions of the anconeal process of the ulna could be identified. The voluminous caudal joint capsule cul-de-sac proximal to the anconeal process was readily entered. A 70 degree arthroscope allowed examination of more of the joint recesses and articular surfaces of the olecranon fossa than a 25 degree arthroscope. A second portal for intraarticular instrument manipulation was made caudal and slightly proximal to the arthroscope entry. Entry more proximal than the level of the radiohumeral articulation carried significant risk of damage to the ulnar nerve and collateral ulnar artery and vein. For examination of the cranial regions of the elbow, a craniolateral portal was established cranial to the lateral collateral ligament. An instrument portal was made through the muscle bellies of the extensor carpi radialis or common digital extensor muscles. The cranial articular surfaces of the humeral condyles were readily exposed by extension of the elbow. The weight-bearing articular surface of the radius could not be seen. Eight horses were euthanatized without recovery from anesthesia and the elbows were dissected for examination. Three horses were allowed to recover from anesthesia and were euthanatized on days 3, 30, and 60.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2333691

  11. SLAP Repairs With Combined Procedures Have Lower Failure Rate Than Isolated Repairs in a Military Population

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Brian R.; Arroyo, William; Heida, Kenneth; Burks, Robert; Pallis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injuries to the superior glenoid labrum represent a significant cause of shoulder pain among active patients. The physical requirements of military service may contribute to an increased risk of injury. Limited data are available regarding the success of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repairs in an active military population. Purpose: To quantify the rate of clinical failure and surgical revision after isolated and combined SLAP repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All consecutive active-duty servicemembers undergoing arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions at a single institution between 2006 and 2012 were identified. Patients with less than 2-year clinical follow-up and nonmilitary status were excluded. Demographic variables, surgical variables, and occupational outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and confirmed with the US Army Physical Disability Agency database. Failure was defined as subsequent revision surgery or medical discharge with persistent shoulder complaints. Results: A total of 192 patients with SLAP repair were identified with a mean follow-up of 50.0 months (SD, 17.0 months). Isolated SLAP repair occurred in 31.3% (n = 60) versus 68.8% (n = 132) with concomitant procedures. At final follow-up, 37.0% (n = 71) of patients reported some subjective activity-related shoulder pain. Postoperative return to duty occurred in 79.6% (n = 153), and only 20.3% (n = 39) were discharged with continuing shoulder disability. The combined rotator cuff repair (96%; P = .023) and anteroinferior labral repair group (88%; P = .056) had a higher rate of functional return than isolated SLAP repair (70%). Thirty-one (16.1%) patients were classified as surgical failure and required revision. Of these, the majority of patients undergoing biceps tenodesis (76%) returned to active duty, as compared with revision SLAP repair (17%). Lower demand occupation and the presence of combined shoulder injuries (P = .011 and .016, respectively) were significantly associated with a lower risk of medical discharge and revision surgery, respectively. Conclusion: Favorable outcomes can be anticipated in the majority of military servicemembers after arthroscopic SLAP repair, particularly with combined shoulder injuries. Revision surgery occurred in 16% of patients after primary SLAP repair. Clinical Relevance: Isolated repair of unstable SLAP lesions and/or increased upper extremity demands are associated with higher failure rates in this population. PMID:26535389

  12. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video. PMID:26697301

  13. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  14. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone

    PubMed Central

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  15. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  16. The Effect of Arthroscopic Rotator Interval Closure on Glenohumeral Volume.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Brent A; Rosenzweig, Seth D; Sheppard, Evan D; Jennings, Jonathan K; Thompson, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    The role of rotator interval in shoulder pathology and the effect of its closure are not well understood. In addition, the effect of rotator interval closure on intra-articular glenohumeral volume (GHV) remains unknown. We conducted a study to quantify the GHV reduction obtained with an arthroscopic rotator interval closure and to determine whether medial and lateral interval closures resulted in different degrees of volume reduction. We dissected 8 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 64.4 years) to the level of the rotator cuff. Volumetric measurements were taken before and after medial and lateral rotator interval closure incorporating the superior glenohumeral ligament and the upper portion of the subscapularis. Arthroscopic closure of the rotator interval with 2 sutures reduced GHV by a mean of 45%. More volume reduction resulted with use of a single lateral interval closure stitch than with use of a single medial stitch (35% vs 24%; P < .02). Arthroscopic rotator interval closure with 2 plication stitches is a powerful tool in reducing intracapsular volume of the shoulder and may be a useful adjunct in restoring glenohumeral stability. If a single plication stitch is preferred, a lateral stitch (vs a medial stitch) can be used for a significantly larger reduction in shoulder volume. PMID:26047004

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Jose Carlos Garcia; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim; Junior, Ivaldo Angelo Cintra; Mattos, Carlos Augusto; Myrrha, Jesely Pereira

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate patients undergoing arthroscopic release of a stiff elbow, with discussion of the technique, possible difficulties and risks. Methods: Twenty-four elbow arthroscopy procedures were performed. All the patients were evaluated using goniometry before the operation and six months afterwards and were rated using the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Fifteen men and nine women underwent surgery (14 right elbows and ten left elbows). Their mean age was 34.58 years and length of follow-up, 38.41 months. Their mean gain of range of motion was 43.3° and of MEPS, 85.4. Conclusion: Arthroscopic release might enable better intra-articular viewing and enhance the options for changing strategy during surgery, reducing surgical trauma and enabling early rehabilitation. This technique can reach similar or better results than open surgery. The disadvantages of arthroscopy are the long learning curve and higher cost of the procedure. Neurovascular complications are reported with both techniques. To avoid such problems, the protocol for portal construction must be rigorously followed. Arthroscopic release was shown to be a safe and effective option for achieving range-of-motion gains in cases of post-traumatic stiff elbow. PMID:27042641

  18. The Results of All-Inside Meniscus Repair Using the Viper Repair System Simultaneously with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Kwang Mee; Cho, Hang Hwan; Espinosa, Johnsel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Meniscus tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. It is essential to repair meniscal tears as much as possible to prevent early osteoarthritis and to gain additional stability in the knee joint. We evaluated the results of arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System (Arthrex) on meniscus tears simultaneously with ACL reconstruction. Methods Nineteen out of 22 patients who were treated with arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System for meniscus tear associated with ACL rupture were evaluated. ACL reconstructions were performed at the same period. The mean follow-up period was 16.5 months (range, 12 to 24 months). The clinical results of the meniscus repair were evaluated by symptoms (such as catching or locking), tenderness, effusion, range of motion limitation, and the McMurray test. Clinical success was defined by negative results in all five categories. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was evaluated. Objective results were evaluated with secondary look arthroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results were categorized as completely repaired, incompletely repaired, and failure by Henning's classification. The results of second-look arthroscopy were evaluated with the criteria of meniscal healing. Results The clinical success rate was 95.4% and the HSS scores were 93.9 ± 5.4 at the final follow-up. According to Henning's classification, 15 out of 18 cases showed complete healing (83.3%) and two cases (11.1%) showed incomplete healing. Seventeen out of 18 cases that underwent second-look arthroscopy showed complete healing (94.4%) according to the criteria of meniscal healing. Only one case showed failure and the failure was due to a re-rupture at the sutured area. Complications of ACL reconstruction or meniscus repair were not present. Conclusions The results demonstrate that arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System is an effective treatment method when it is performed simultaneously with ACL reconstruction. PMID:26217463

  19. Osteoarthritis Classification Scales: Interobserver Reliability and Arthroscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Ross, James R.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Garofoli, Elizabeth A.; Harris, David; Patel, Kushal; Pearson, David; Schutzman, Jake; Tarabichi, Majd; Ying, David; Albright, John P.; Allen, Christina R.; Amendola, Annunziato; Anderson, Allen F.; Andrish, Jack T.; Annunziata, Christopher C.; Arciero, Robert A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Baker, Champ L.; Bartolozzi, Arthur R.; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bechler, Jeffery R.; Berg, Jeffrey H.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Brophy, Robert H.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Butler V, J. Brad; Campbell, John D.; Carpenter, James E.; Cole, Brian J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Cox, Charles L.; Creighton, R. Alexander; Dahm, Diane L.; David, Tal S.; DeBerardino, Thomas M.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Frederick, Robert W.; Ganley, Theodore J.; Gatt, Charles J.; Gecha, Steven R.; Giffin, James Robert; Hame, Sharon L.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Harner, Christopher D.; Harris, Norman Lindsay; Hechtman, Keith S.; Hershman, Elliott B.; Hoellrich, Rudolf G.; Hosea, Timothy M.; Johnson, David C.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Jones, Morgan H.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Kamath, Ganesh V.; Klootwyk, Thomas E.; Lantz, Brett A.; Levy, Bruce A.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Maiers, G. Peter; Mann, Barton; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; Mathien, Gregory M.; McAllister, David R.; McCarty, Eric C.; McCormack, Robert G.; Miller, Bruce S.; Nissen, Carl W.; O’Neill, Daniel F.; Owens, LTC Brett D.; Parker, Richard D.; Purnell, Mark L.; Ramappa, Arun J.; Rauh, Michael A.; Rettig, Arthur; Sekiya, Jon K.; Shea, Kevin G.; Sherman, Orrin H.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Stuart, Michael J.; Svoboda, LTC Steven J.; Taft, Timothy N.; Tenuta, COL Joachim J.; Tingstad, Edwin M.; Vidal, Armando F.; Viskontas, Darius G.; White, Richard A.; Williams, James S.; Wolcott, Michelle L.; Wolf, Brian R.; York, James J.; Carey, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is commonly diagnosed and monitored with radiography. However, the reliability of radiographic classification systems for osteoarthritis and the correlation of these classifications with the actual degree of confirmed degeneration of the articular cartilage of the tibiofemoral joint have not been adequately studied. Methods: As the Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) Group, we conducted a multicenter, prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients undergoing revision surgery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We followed 632 patients who underwent radiographic evaluation of the knee (an anteroposterior weight-bearing radiograph, a posteroanterior weight-bearing radiograph made with the knee in 45° of flexion [Rosenberg radiograph], or both) and arthroscopic evaluation of the articular surfaces. Three blinded examiners independently graded radiographic findings according to six commonly used systems—the Kellgren-Lawrence, International Knee Documentation Committee, Fairbank, Brandt et al., Ahlbäck, and Jäger-Wirth classifications. Interobserver reliability was assessed with use of the intraclass correlation coefficient. The association between radiographic classification and arthroscopic findings of tibiofemoral chondral disease was assessed with use of the Spearman correlation coefficient. Results: Overall, 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.61 to 0.65) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.56). Similarly, the 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had higher correlation with arthroscopic findings of chondral disease (Spearman rho = 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.39) compared with anteroposterior radiographs (Spearman rho = 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.32). With respect to standards for the magnitude of the reliability coefficient and correlation coefficient (Spearman rho), the International Knee Documentation Committee classification demonstrated the best combination of good interobserver reliability and medium correlation with arthroscopic findings. Conclusions: The overall estimates with the six radiographic classification systems demonstrated moderate (anteroposterior radiographs) to good (45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs) interobserver reliability and medium correlation with arthroscopic findings. The International Knee Documentation Committee classification assessed with use of 45° posteroanterior flexion weight-bearing radiographs had the most favorable combination of reliability and correlation. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25031368

  20. Bridging Suture Repair for Acetabular Chondral Carpet Delamination

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirose, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular chondral carpet delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but deboned from the subchondral bone, without a disruption at the chondrolabral junction. Arthroscopic anatomic repair of delaminated cartilage is challenging. We propose that a combination of microfracture and use of stitches to press the delaminated cartilage against the subchondral bone using a suture limb offers an effective method to provide an environment for cartilage repair. This article describes the technique of bridging suture repair for carpet delamination in detail; the technique enables the surgeon to stabilize the delaminated acetabular cartilage. Intra-articular soft anchors and an acetabular rim knotless anchor footprint provide a stable repair for delaminated cartilage. This technique is especially helpful in cases with acetabular cartilage carpet delamination. PMID:26759774

  1. Inside-Out Trans-Arthroscopic Drain Application During Knee Joint Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Gian M; Preiss, Stefan; Harder, Laurent P; Naal, Florian D

    2015-12-01

    Although knee joint arthroscopy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide, there is no consensus on how to apply a drain in the joint if it is decided to use one. Therefore we describe a simple technique to safely apply a drain intra-articularly under full arthroscopic control, avoiding placement of the drain through the arthroscopic portal. PMID:26870639

  2. Hypospadias repair

    MedlinePlus

    Hypospadias repair is surgery to correct a defect in the opening of the penis that is present at birth. ... Hypospadias repair is done most often when boys are between 6 months and 2 years old. The surgery is ...

  3. Craniosynostosis repair

    MedlinePlus

    Craniosynostosis repair is surgery to correct a problem that causes the bones of a child's skull to grow together ( ... not feel pain. Traditional surgery is called open repair. It includes these steps: The most common place ...

  4. Arthroscopically Assisted Mini-Invasive Management of Perilunate Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Chen, Shan-Lin; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of perilunate dislocations and fracture-dislocations treated with arthroscopically assisted mini-invasive reduction and fixation. Methods Between June 2012 and May 2014, 24 patients who had a dorsal perilunate dislocation or fracture-dislocation were treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous fixation. The mean follow-up was 14.8 months (range 6–32 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated on the basis of range of motion; grip strength; Mayo Wrist Score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire; and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score. Radiographic evaluations included time to scaphoid union, carpal alignments, and any development of arthritis. Results The range of flexion-extension motion of the injured wrist averaged 86% of the values for the contralateral wrist. The grip strength of the injured wrist averaged 83% of the values for the contralateral wrists. The mean QuickDASH score was 6, and the mean PRWE score was 10. According to the Mayo Wrist Scores, overall functional outcomes were rated as excellent in 13 patients (54%), good in 6 (25%), fair in 4 (17%), and poor in 1 (4%). Scaphoid nonunion developed in one patient. Reduction obtained during the operation was maintained within normal ranges in all patients. Arthritis had not developed in any patient at final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopically assisted mini-invasive reduction with percutaneous fixation is a reliable and favorable alternative in the treatment of perilunate injuries according to our early follow-up results. Level of Evidence: Level IV, Therapeutic. PMID:25945293

  5. [The use of the Ho: YAG laser in arthroscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Du, L; Gu, G; Chen, X

    1995-10-01

    From May 1993 to April 1994 we had performed 72 cases (total 84 joints) of arthroscopic operations with holmium laser. It included 12 bilateral knees, and single joints in the shoulder, elbow, wrist and ankle. We performed partial menisectomy, chondroplasy, partial synovectomy and lateral retinacular release. The energy used was from 1 to 12kJ depending the complexity of the operations. All these cases had been followed up 6 to 16 months. The function of the joints was good, only two cases had joint effusion. The rate of good and excellent results was 97%. PMID:8731890

  6. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity. PMID:26407736

  7. Rupture of the biceps tendon after arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Faulks, Craig; Fine, Kenneth; Malin, Edward; Shaffer, Benjamin; Connell, Marc

    2004-07-01

    The use of thermal energy in the shoulder to tighten capsular tissues through collagen denaturation is well established. Although reported complication rates are low, the natural history of thermal manipulation to both target and collateral tissue is poorly defined. We report two cases of biceps tendon rupture after arthroscopic capsular shrinkage. Both patients were young, athletic men with normal long head biceps tendons at the time of surgery. Each patient experienced a complete tear of the long head with distal muscle retraction, resulting in a "Popeye" deformity, at 3 months postoperatively. One patient elected further surgery with biceps tenodesis. Both patients have returned to their athletic activities with minimal functional deficits. PMID:15243432

  8. Suture-bridge subscapularis tendon repair technique using low anterior portals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Jun-Suk; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Kumar, Praveen; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    A suture-bridge technique has been introduced to facilitate fixation procedures and to achieve increased holding strength in posterosuperior rotator cuff. Based on biomechanical studies, this technique has been suggested as an effective method that could optimize rotator cuff tendon-footprint contact area and mean pressure, as well as holding strength. In this technique, the suture-bridge creation is adapted for arthroscopic subscapularis repair to attain the ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. To obtain enough working portals and space, two accessory portals were made on the anterior aspect of the shoulder and use an elevator to retract the conjoined tendons and deltoid muscle. This technique could be useful for the repair of subscapularis tears, which are not easily approached using other arthroscopic techniques. From a biomechanical point of view, the subscapularis tendon could be restored more ideally using the suture-bridge technique. PMID:20890701

  9. (Dry) arthroscopic partial wrist arthrodesis: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    del Piñal, F; Tandioy-Delgado, F

    2014-10-01

    One of the options for performing a partial wrist arthrodesis is the arthroscopic technique. As a first advantage arthroscopy allows us to directly assess the state of the articular surface of the carpal bones and define the best surgical option during the salvage operation. Furthermore, it allows performance of the procedure with minimal ligament damage and minimal interference with the blood supply of the carpals. These will (presumably) entail less capsular scarring and more rapid healing. Lastly, there is cosmetic benefit by reducing the amount of external scarring. The procedure has a steep learning curve even for accomplished arthroscopists but can be performed in a competitive manner to the open procedure if the dry technique is used. The aim of this paper is to present the technical details, tricks and tips to make the procedure accessible to all hand specialists with an arthroscopic interest. As it is paramount that the surgeon is acquainted with the "dry" technique, some technical details about it will also be presented. PMID:25290275

  10. Local Anaesthetic Infusion with Elastomeric Pump After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Little, Kevin; Pillai, Anand; Fazzi, Umberto; Storey, Neil

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of extended local anaesthesia for postoperative pain has previously been reported, and has several advantages over other methods, including ease of placement, safety, reliability, lower cost and effective analgesia. We present our experience with a portable elastomeric infusion device in patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression, and make a case for its potential to allow same-day discharge. PATIENTS AND METHODS Forty patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression were followed-up. At the end of the procedure, an epidural catheter connected to a portable elastomeric local anaesthetic infusion system was inserted into the subacromial space. All patients were electively admitted for overnight stay postoperatively and assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) to evaluate their level of pain. RESULTS No patient reported severe pain at any stage. None of the patients required any parenteral opiate analgesia with the pump in situ. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the use of this elastomeric infusion device following shoulder surgery allows safe and early discharge of patients with decreased need for parenteral opiate analgesia. PMID:17535622

  11. Does arthroscopic subacromial decompression improve quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, A; Wilson, J; Paul, E; Roy, B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There has been a significant rise in the volume of subacromial decompression surgery performed in the UK. This study aimed to determine whether arthroscopic subacromial decompression improves health related quality of life in a cost effective manner. Methods Patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery for impingement were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. The Oxford shoulder score and the EQ-5D™ instruments were completed prior to and following surgery. A cost–utility analysis was performed. Results Eighty-three patients were eligible for the study with a mean follow-up duration of 15 months (range: 4–27 months). The mean Oxford shoulder score improved by 13 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11–15 points). The mean health utility gain extrapolated from the EQ-5D™ questionnaire improved by 0.23 (95% CI: 0.16–0.30), translating to a minimum cost per QALY of £5,683. Conclusions Subacromial decompression leads to significant improvement in function and quality of life in a cost effective manner. This provides justification for its ongoing practice by appropriately trained shoulder surgeons in correctly selected patients. PMID:26263808

  12. Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction of the Hip Using Iliotibial Band Allograft and Front-to-Back Fixation Technique

    PubMed Central

    White, Brian J.; Herzog, Mackenzie M.

    2016-01-01

    Labral repair has been shown to be an effective treatment option with excellent early outcomes; however, in cases of severe labral damage or when the labral tissue is too large or diminutive, labral repair may be less effective. The purpose of this article is to present a modified technique for hip labral reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft tissue and a front-to-back fixation technique. The described technique is modified from the original report of a technique for arthroscopic labral reconstruction. The front-to-back technique allows the surgeon to make a graft that is longer than necessary and cut excess graft after front-to-back fixation, resulting in the correct graft size and a reproducible procedure. Allograft tissue offers several advantages, including the ability to control graft thickness and length, as well as the ability to eliminate donor-site morbidity. This procedure adds to the available techniques for treatment of labral pathology by providing a labral reconstruction technique using allograft tissue. PMID:27073784

  13. Stable Meniscal Tears Left In Situ at the Time of Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rothermich, Marcus A; Cohen, Jared A; Wright, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Meniscal tears can be incidentally encountered at the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In these cases, the surgeon has several treatment options that include benign neglect, debridement, trephination, and repair. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature studying the various treatment options for meniscal tears discovered at the time of ACL reconstruction. This systematic review included eight articles that had relevant data regarding benign neglect compared with debridement, trephination, or repair of incidentally encountered meniscal tears. Combined data from these studies resulted in a total of 646 meniscal tears treated with benign neglect with follow-up information available. Importantly, there were differences in reoperation rates between medial and lateral meniscal tears left in situ. However, stable medial and lateral meniscal tears treated with benign neglect did not have different subjective or objective outcomes than those treated with surgical intervention. This systematic review concludes that when stable meniscal tears are encountered at the time of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, benign neglect can be used for a successful outcome. PMID:25927355

  14. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  15. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial. PMID:24692441

  16. Repair Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-07-09

    Maintaining the integrity of its genetic blueprint is of central importance for a living cell and the organism of which it is a part. To preserve the function of the genetic material within the cell and to ensure its accurate transmission to future generations, numerous mechanisms have evolved to repair errors and damage in DNA. As an example of the cellular resources devoted to this end, consider that of 1709 proteins encoded by the first bacterial genome to be sequenced, that of Haemophilus influenzae, at least 45 function in DNA repair mechanisms. The complementary, double-stranded structure of DNA, a crucial feature that allows it to be readily replicated, also facilitates its repair. The objects of repair range from mismatched bases resulting from errors in DNA replication to base damage and even gross distortion of the DNA structure by physical and chemical agents. In a few instances damage is directly reversed. Most repair mechanisms, however, first remove the damaged region together with a segment of the DNA strand in which it occurred and then resynthesize that segment correctly using the complementary strand as a template. Depending on the component initially removed or recognized, these mechanisms have been categorized as base excision, nucleotide (oroligonucleotide) excision, and mismatch repair. When the damage cannot be so simply repaired, a mechanism of recombinational repair, requiring interaction with another copy of the genome, may intervene.

  17. Can arthroscopic revision surgery for shoulder instability be a fair option?

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Silvana; Garofalo, Raffaele; Tafuri, Silvio; Cesari, Eugenio; Rose, Giacomo Delle; Castagna, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of arthroscopic capsuloplasty in the treatment of failed primary arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability. Methods: we retrospectively examined at a minimum of 3-years follow-up 22 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment between 1999 and 2007 who had recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a post-surgical failure. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate which variable could influence the definitive result and clinical outcomes at final follow-up. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: we observed after revision surgery an overall failure rate of 8/22 (36.4%) including frank dislocations, subluxations and also apprehension that seriously inhibit the patient's quality of life. No significant differences were observed in the examined parameters. Conclusions: according to our outcomes we generally do not recommend an arthroscopic revision procedure for failed instability surgery. PMID:25332940

  18. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

  19. The “Flying Swan” Technique: A Novel Method for Anterior Labral Repair Using a Tensioned Suture Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Susan; Wallace, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair is an effective technique for most cases of traumatic shoulder instability. However, patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions frequently have multiple episodes of subluxation or dislocation and a high recurrence rate after surgery, even with modern methods of labral repair. One reason may be failure of biological healing of the labrum due to an inadequate “footprint” of contact between the capsulolabral tissue and the glenoid bone. We have developed a technique that facilitates a tensioned suture bridge between suture anchors that may improve the results of labral repair in patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions. PMID:24749030

  20. Arthroscopic three-point double-row repair for acute bony Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Cheon; Rhee, Kwang Jin; Shin, Hyun Dae

    2009-01-01

    After mobilizing anteroinferior osseous Bankart lesion from the glenoid neck, a suture anchor loaded with differently colored non-absorbable braided sutures is placed on the medial edge in the glenoid neck along the rim fracture through the anterior-inferior trans-subscapularis tendon portal. Two same-colored suture limbs on the anchor are then pulled through the labrum using PDS suture shuttling simultaneously. These steps are repeated for the others suture limbs. The two same-color suture limbs located inferiorly are retrieved using the trans-subscapularis tendon portal. Both suture strands are threaded through the eyelet of a PushLock anchor on the distal end of the driver. The anchor is advanced into the pilot hole completely. These steps are repeated for a second anchor at the upper edge of the fracture in the glenoid rim using the anterior portal. This technique confers effective, firm fixation of the bony Bankart lesion by three-point fixation without the suture material crossing the glenoid cavity. PMID:18998108

  1. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  2. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  3. [Arthroscopic meniscectomy in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees].

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, K

    1995-01-01

    Results of 107 meniscectomies in 100 patients with long-lasting ACL deficiency are presented. Meniscectomy aggravates symptoms of ACL deficiency, worsening function of the knee. Bucket handle tear was observed most often--45 cases (36 displaced ones). The patients were reevaluated 3 years after surgery on an average using Tegner scale and pivot shift test. Tegner scale assessment rendered 62 per cent of excellent and good results, 32 per cent fair and poor results. Pivot shift was found in 21 patients prior to meniscectomy and in 37 patients at the follow-up examination; 18 patients were directed for ACL reconstruction. Arthroscopic meniscectomy in ACL deficient knee in most of the cases does not impair knee function if the activity level required is low. Evident pivot shift test, tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and chondromalacia patellae are among unfavorable prognostic signs. PMID:7671747

  4. Arthroscopic Capsule Reconstruction in the Hip Using Iliotibial Band Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Christiano A.C.; Sawyer, Gregory A.; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft. PMID:25973378

  5. Early rehabilitation after arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Frańczuk, Bogusław; Fibiger, Wojciech; Kukiełka, Radosław; Jasik-Tyrkalska, Bozena; Trabka, Rafał

    2004-08-30

    Background. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the results of early rehabilitation after arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, based on identical rehabilitation methods applied two weeks later. Material and methods. The research involved 30 persons, randomly divided into two groups. Each group received an identical, 12-week program of rehabilitation, differing only in the time of commencement after surgery. We analyzed the range of movement of the knee joint, the circumferences of the knee and hip, and the strength of the flexor and extensor muscle groups in the knee. Results and Conclusions. The outcome for rehabilitation of the knee is not dependent on the time when the rehabilitation process is commenced. However, in view of the occurrence of a greater number of complications when early rehabilitation is applied, individual adjustment of the timing for commencement of rehabilitation procedures would seem to be the optimal solution. PMID:17675968

  6. Arthroscopy of the subtalar joint and arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P

    2006-01-01

    Subtalar arthroscopy has become a valuable adjunct to the tools used in lower extremity surgery. For the past 25 years, ankle arthroscopy has been in vogue for treating a variety of conditions. Subtalar arthroscopy has more treatment limitations and is more technically difficult to perform than ankle arthroscopy because of the anatomic confines and structure of the subtalar joint. Most procedures are performed on the posterior aspect of the subtalar joint. The subtalar joint is composed of three articulations (posterior, middle, and anterior facets) and is surrounded by a variety of intra-articular and extra-articular ligaments, whose anatomy must be fully understood before attempting this procedure. Subtalar arthroscopy may be indicated for diagnostic purposes and for débridement of synovial impingement syndromes in the sinus tarsi. It may be used to examine loose bodies or osteochondral lesions, to address fractures of the lateral process of the talus, and to evaluate subtalar instability to determine appropriate stabilization methods. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis also has gained credibility over the past 10 years as an acceptable surgical procedure. Arthroscopic evaluation of subtalar instability is useful in planning the appropriate stabilization. Subtalar arthroscopy is usually performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position without traction. Anterior and posterior portals as well as an accessory anterior portal are usually necessary to perform all of the above procedures. Because of the limited confines of the joint, care must be taken to prevent any articular cartilage damage. When performing subtalar arthroscopy in conjunction with ankle arthroscopy, the subtalar arthroscopy should be performed first to avoid excessive extravasation from the ankle arthroscopy, which could obscure entry to the subtalar joint. Complications of subtalar arthroscopy are similar to those encountered in ankle arthroscopy, such as damage to the sural and superficial peroneal nerves. PMID:16958488

  7. Interactive stereotaxic teleassistance of remote experts during arthroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Undt, Gerhard; Schicho, Kurt; Wanschitz, Felix; Watzinger, Franz; Murakami, Kenichiro; Czerny, Christian; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the technical setup for stereotaxic telesurgical assistance for arthroscopic procedures. It also outlines the current state, limitations, and feasibility of this technical development. Teleassistance or teleconsultation implemented in endoscopic or arthroscopic procedures have not yet been reported. In this study, 7 computer-assisted arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint were supported by extramural experts via interactive stereotaxic teleconsultation from distant locations. The external experts were supplied with close to real-time video, audio, and stereotaxic navigation data directly from the operation site. This setup allows the surgeons and external experts to interactively determine portals, target structures, and instrument positions relative to the patient's anatomy and to discuss any step of the procedures. Optoelectronic tracking interfaced to computer- based navigation technology allowed precise positioning of instruments for single or multiple temporomandibular joint punctures. The average error of digitizing probe measurements was 1.3 mm (range, 0.0 to 2.5 mm) and the average standard deviation was 0.7 mm (range, 0.4 to 0.9 mm). Evaluation of the reliability and accuracy of this technique suggests that it is sufficient for controlled navigation, even inside the small temporomandibular joint, a fact that encourages further applications for arthroscopy in general. The minimum requirement for high-quality video transmission for teleassisted procedures are integrated services digital network (ISDN) connections. Conventional ISDN-based videoconferencing can be combined with computer-aided intraoperative navigation. Transmission control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP)-based stereotaxic teleassistance data transmission via ATM or satellite seem to be promising techniques to considerably improve the field of arthroscopy. PMID:12426549

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging arthrography following type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior repair: interobserver and intraobserver reliability

    PubMed Central

    Kurji, Hafeez M; Ono, Yohei; Nelson, Atiba A; More, Kristie D; Wong, Ben; Dyke, Corinne; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2015-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic repair of type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions is a common surgical procedure. However, anatomic healing following repair has rarely been investigated. The intraobserver and interobserver reliability of magnetic resonance imaging arthrography (MRA) following type II SLAP repair has not previously been investigated. This is of particular interest due to recent reports of poor clinical results following type II SLAP lesion repair. Purpose To evaluate the MRA findings following arthroscopic type II SLAP lesion repair and determine its intraobserver and interobserver reliability. Study design Cohort study (diagnosis), Level of Evidence, 2. Methods Twenty-five patients with an isolated type II SLAP lesion (confirmed via diagnostic arthroscopy) underwent standard suture anchor-based repair. At a mean of 25.2 months post-operatively, patients underwent a standardized MRA protocol to investigate the integrity of the repair. MRAs were independently reviewed by two radiologists and a fellowship trained shoulder surgeon. The outcomes were classified as healed SLAP repair or re-torn SLAP repair. Results On average, 54% of MRAs were interpreted as healed SLAP repairs while 46% of MRAs were interpreted as having a re-torn SLAP repair. Overall, only 43% of the studies had 100% agreement across all interpretations. The intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 while the interobserver reliability between readers ranged from 0.13 to 0.44 (Table 1). Conclusion The intraobserver agreement of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP repair was substantial to excellent. However, the interobserver agreement of MRA was poor to fair. As a result, the routine use of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP lesion repair should be utilized with caution. A global evaluation of the patient, including detailed history and physical examination, is paramount in determining the cause of failure and one should not rely on MRA alone. PMID:26604841

  9. A modified Mason-Allen technique for rotator cuff repair using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, Markus Thomas; Habermeyer, Peter

    2003-03-01

    An adequate restoration of the muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for a successful outcome after rotator cuff reconstruction. We describe a suture grasping technique for rotator cuff repair using suture anchors that can be performed either arthroscopically or during open rotator cuff refixation. The technique we use is a combination of a mattress and a single suture, thus representing the principles of a Mason-Allen suture technique. The modified Mason-Allen technique for suture anchor repair is easy to perform and provides excellent initial fixation strength allowing durable osteofibroblastic integration of the reinserted cuff. PMID:12627162

  10. Surgical Dislocation of the Hip Versus Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoro-acetabular Impingment

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy J.; Stake, Christine E.; Bitar, Youssef El; Lindner, Dror; Botser, Itamar; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) can be treated by arthroscopy or by surgical dislocation of the hip. Advocates of each have suggested advantages of each technique. To date, there have been no studies that directly compare these two treatment modalities, using patient-reported outcomes (PRO), in a single surgeon design. The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare outcomes of patients receiving surgical hip dislocation to arthroscopic treatment for FAI, using a matched-pair analysis. Our hypothesis is the arthroscopic group will demonstrate improved clinical outcomes when compared to patients receiving open surgical dislocation. Methods: During the study period between January 2008 and August 2011, data was prospectively collected on all patients <30 years of age treated for FAI. Patients were given the choice of open dislocation versus arthroscopic treatment. Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, Tonnis grade >1, and previous hip surgery were excluded. The patients in the surgical dislocation cohort were pair-matched in a 1:2 ratio to patients treated arthroscopically, based on age within 2 years, gender, workers’ compensation status and diagnosis of FAI. PRO tools, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score – Sport Specific Subscale (HOS - SSS) and Hip Outcome Score - Activity of Daily Living (HOS - ADL), were obtained in all patients pre-operatively and post-operatively at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years, and at latest follow up. Alpha angles were measured pre and post- surgery for both groups. Revision surgery and complications were recorded for each group. Results: Ten patients were included in the surgical dislocation group, and 20 pair-matched patients were included in the arthroscopic group. 100% patient follow-up was obtained at mean 24.8 months in the open group and 25.5 months in the arthroscopic group. Preoperative mHHS, NAHS, HOS-ADL and HOS-SSS were similar between the two groups. Both the arthroscopic group and the surgical dislocation group had significant postoperative improvement at 3 months, 1 year and final follow-up for all scores. In comparing the two groups, the ΔHOS-SSS was significantly higher in the arthroscopic group at final follow-up, improving 42.8 points versus 23.5 in the surgical dislocation (p=0.047). The arthroscopic group also had significantly better NAHS at 3 months (88.1 vs. 75.3, p=0.016) and at final follow-up. (94.2 vs. 85.7, p=0.01). Nine out of 10 patients in the dislocation group had good/excellent results, and 19 out of 20 patients in the arthroscopic group had good/excellent results. Patient satisfaction for the open group was 8.1, and 9.2 in the arthroscopic group (p=0.07). Both groups showed a significant decrease in the alpha angle postoperatively, from 58° to 40° in the dislocation group, and 57° to 40° in the arthroscopic group, with no difference between the groups (p=0.775). The dislocation group had 8 patients undergo hardware removal, and two required hip arthroscopy for continued pain. Conclusion: This is the first study to directly compare surgical dislocation to arthroscopic management of FAI in single surgeon design. Favorable results were shown with both approaches, with significant improvement in all PRO measures and high patient satisfaction ratings. However, arthroscopic treatment of FAI showed greater improvement in the HOS-SSS and a higher absolute NAHS score at 2 year follow-up.

  11. REHABILITATION AFTER HIP ARTHROSCOPY AND LABRAL REPAIR IN A HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Kolber, Morey J.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) has been implicated in the etiology of acetabular labral tears. The rehabilitation of younger athletes following arthroscopic surgery for FAI and labral tears is often complex and multifactorial. A paucity of evidence exists to describe the rehabilitation of younger athletes who have undergone arthroscopic hip surgery. Case Presentation: This case report describes a four-phase rehabilitation program for a high school football player who underwent hip arthroscopy with a labral repair and chondroplasty. Outcomes: The player returned to training for football 16 weeks later and at the 4 month follow-up was pain free with no signs of FAI. Discussion: There is little evidence regarding the rehabilitation of younger athletes who undergo arthroscopic hip surgery. This case study described a four phase rehabilitation program for a high school football player who underwent hip arthroscopy and labral repair. The patient achieved positive outcomes with a full return to athletic activity and football. The overall success of these patients depends on the appropriate surgical procedure and rehabilitation program. Key Words: Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI), hip, hip impingement Level of evidence: 4-Case report PMID:22530192

  12. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY USING SUTURING OF THE LESION AT THE OPENED MARGIN OF THE GLENOID CAVITY

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Duarte, Clodoaldo; Botelho, Vinícius; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical results from patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability that was treated surgically through arthroscopic viewing, using bioabsorbable anchors and a technique for remove the cartilage of the anterior glenoid rim for repairing a Bankart lesion. Method: Between March 2006 and October 2008, 27 shoulders in 27 patients with a diagnosis of traumatic anterior shoulder instability were operated. The patients’ mean age was 28 years and they had had between two and 25 previous episodes of dislocation. The patients were predominantly male (24; 89%). The minimum length of follow-up was 24 months and the mean was 36 months. None of the patients had previously undergone surgery on the affected shoulder or had any significant bone lesion at the glenoid margin. The postoperative clinical assessment was done using the Rowe scale. To measure the preoperative and postoperative joint range of motion, we used the method described by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Results: According to the Rowe criteria, 25 patients (93%) achieved excellent results and two (7%) had poor results. None of the patients presented good or fair results. Twenty-three patients were satisfied with the results obtained (85%), and returned to their activities without limitations, while four patients (15%) had some degree of limitation. There was recurrence of instability in two patients (7%). Conclusion: Treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability through arthroscopic viewing using a technique for remove the cartilage of the anterior glenoid rim for repairing a Bankart lesion provided excellent results for 93% of the patients operated.

  13. Anatomical Considerations of the Suprascapular Nerve in Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tom, James A.; Shah, Mitesh P.; Lee, Dan J.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Amin, Nirav H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. When using the double interval slide technique for arthroscopic repair of chronic large or massive rotator cuff tears, the posterior interval release is directed toward the scapular spine until the fat pad that protects the suprascapular nerve is reached. Injury to the suprascapular nerve can occur due to the nerve's proximity to the operative field. This study aimed to identify safe margins for avoiding injury to the suprascapular nerve. Materials and Methods. For 20 shoulders in ten cadavers, the distance was measured from the suprascapular notch to the glenoid rim, the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and the lateral border of the acromion. Results. From the suprascapular notch, the suprascapular nerve coursed an average of 3.42 cm to the glenoid rim, 5.34 cm to the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and 6.09 cm to the lateral border of the acromion. Conclusions. The results of this study define a safe zone, using anatomic landmarks, to help surgeons avoid iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve when employing the double interval slide technique in arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff. PMID:24724030

  14. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  15. Undescended testicle repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  16. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores were found. PMID:25995757

  17. Arthroscopic Assessment of Stifle Synovitis in Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jeffrey P.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Sutherland, Brian J.; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Ramaker, Megan A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy. PMID:24892866

  18. Correlation among Radiographic, Arthroscopic and Pain Criteria for the Diagnosis of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bedarakota, Dhanraj; Vidyasagar, JVS; Rapur, Sivaprasad; Karra, Madhulatha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disorder leading to functional impairment and dependency in older adults. Early detection and intervention is of paramount importance in decreasing the morbidity. Radiography is the first investigation of choice for OA patients presenting with knee pain. But, there is a high degree of discordance between clinical and radiographic findings. Arthroscopy aids in accurate diagnosis of OA knee. Aim In view of the conflicting reports in the literature the present study was undertaken to report the correlation among radiographic, arthroscopic and pain findings in knee OA patients to facilitate early and precise diagnosis. Materials and Methods Twenty eight cases (14 males and 14 females) of primary OA knee (7 each from radiographic grade 1 to 4) were screened and selected for the study. Spearmans rank correlation coefficients (Rho/r estimate) were calculated to determine the relationship between pain, radiographic and arthroscopic grades in patients with knee OA. Results Among 28 patients, 10.71% had grade 1, 14.28% had grade 2, 25% had grade 3 and 50% had grade 4 arthroscopic findings. Overall Spearmans correlation coefficient (r) for radiographic and arthroscopic grades was 0.8077, 0.8212 for radiographic and pain grades and 0.7634 for arthroscopic and pain grades. Correlation coefficient could not be calculated for individual grades in isolation which would otherwise represent the factual correlation. The Mean arthroscopic grade for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were 1.57, 3.42, 3.57,4.0 respectively and the Mean pain grades for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were1.57, 2.57,3.28, 3.57 respectively. Radiological findings were found to lag behind the arthroscopic findings significantly. Conclusion Arthroscopic findings represent the exact extent and degree of the pathology of OA knee. Kellgren-Lawrence grading read with conventional Antero-posterior standing radiographs of knee underscores the arthroscopic findings significantly in grades 1, 2 and 3. Radiological and clinical findings (Apleys pain grading) in combination should be considered in concluding the final diagnosis and treatment of OA knee. Improvised criteria for precise diagnosis have to be evolved. PMID:26816954

  19. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  20. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  1. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-01-01

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  2. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty. PMID:27082884

  3. Arthroscopic chondral cyst excision in a stiff Perthes' hip.

    PubMed

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Nagda, Taral V

    2007-08-01

    Persistent hip stiffness in Perthes' disease indicates a poor prognosis and is a therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a stiff Perthes' hip that was nonresponsive to prolonged nonsurgical treatment. Imaging revealed Catterall group IV Perthes' disease in an advanced reossification stage, with a focal defect in the weight-bearing area of the capital femoral epiphysis. A focal, compressible chondral elevation was detected on hip arthroscopy; on incision, flocculent fluid was released. After the cyst was excised, microfracture revascularization of the chondral defect was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patient had immediate pain relief, correction of deformity, and restoration of painless range of motion; this has continued for 4 years since surgery was performed. Persistence of an unhealed necrotic segment in Perthes' disease has traditionally been associated with osteochondritis dissecans; however, in this case, the unhealed and nonossified segment produced an elevated painful chondral cyst that caused spasm and stiffness of the hip. Although 2 distinct types of chondral lesions have been described in Perthes' disease, stiffness arising because of these lesions has not been reported. Patients with this unusual third type of chondral lesion of the capital femoral epiphysis, which causes persistent stiffness in Perthes' hip, may be identified and successfully treated with the use of arthroscopic techniques. PMID:17681219

  4. Arthroscopic lens distortion correction applied to dynamic cartilage loading.

    PubMed

    Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Magnotta, Wincent A; Martin, James A; Pedersen, Douglas R

    2007-01-01

    It is difficult to study the deformation of articular cartilage because it is an inhomogenous material with depth dependent constituents. In many experimental studies, cartilage is assumed to behave homogeneously and is subjected to only static or quasi-static loads. In this study, a thick walled, mechanically active culture device (TRIAX) was used to apply cyclic loading to cartilage explants at physiological stress levels. An arthroscope was fitted into the wall of the TRIAX to monitorand record the cyclic compressive behavior of the cartilage and to measure depth dependent cartilage strains. A common concern with arthroscopy systems is that the images obtained are radially distorted about a central point ("fisheye" view); therefore it is necessary to correct this distortion in order to accurately quantify distances between objects within the images. To do this, an algorithm was developed which used a calibration pattern to create an image transform. Digital video of the cyclic cartilage compression was recorded, and the distortion algorithm was applied to the images to measure the cartilage as it deformed. This technique will provide valuable and practical insight into cartilage mechanics and viability (via calcein AM-stained chondrocytes) during multiday cyclic loading of living cartilage explants. The implementation of an arthroscopy system provides the advantage of bringing microscope-level resolution into a cartilage compression device to allow for digital visualization of the entire explant at the whole-tissue level. PMID:17907430

  5. A new soft transglenoidal suture anchor for arthroscopic labrum fixation.

    PubMed

    Landsiedl, Franz; Wlk, Matthias V; Petje, Gerd; Aigner, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    Inherent in most transglenoidal suture stabilization techniques of unstable shoulders is the unreliable fixation of posterior knots on the fascia. The transglenoidal suture anchor (TSA) technique overcomes this disadvantage. The TSA is a 1.5-cm loop of a No. 3 braided polyester thread with 5 knots. The loop is loaded with 1 or 2 sutures. Using a transglenoidal shuttle suture, it is pulled into a transglenoidal drill hole from the back in a retrograde fashion. The anchor is stopped at the posterior cortex of the glenoid by the knot. Using an arthroscopic suture passer technique (Bird Beak; Arthrex, Naples, FL) sutures are applied in the anterior-inferior part of the capsule, tied with a self-locking sliding knot, and secured with 2 or 3 additional throws. Two or 3 TSAs with 1 or 2 threads per anchor are used in most cases. The ultimate failure load of 10 samples of the anchor was tested with porcine scapulae. It was more than 156 N in every case. This technique enables the surgeon to use up to 4 anchors in the unstable shoulder with 1 or 2 sutures per anchor. The anchors are inexpensive. No problems are encountered in case of revision. There is no abrasion in the eyelet of the anchor as with metallic anchors and no synovitis as with some absorbable anchors. PMID:15483554

  6. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-05-18

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  7. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  8. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  9. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  10. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  11. Enhancement of KTP/532 laser disc decompression and arthroscopic microdiscectomy with a vital dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Anthony T.

    1993-07-01

    Currently, the clinical indications and results of arthroscopic microdiscectomy and laser disc decompression come close to, but do not exceed, the results of classic discectomy or microdiscectomy for the whole spectrum of surgical disc herniations. However, as minimally invasive techniques continue to evolve, results can be expected to equal or be potentially superior to conventional surgery. This exhibit demonstrates how the use of a vital dye can enhance standard arthroscopic microdiscectomy techniques and, when used in conjunction with KTP/532 laser disc decompression, allows for better arthroscopic visualization, documentation, and extraction of nucleus pulposus, ultimately expanding the current limiting criteria for minimally invasive techniques. When proper patient selection is combined with good clinical indications, the surgical results are rather dramatic, often achieving immediate relief of sciatica in the operating room.

  12. [Arthroscopic evaluation and treatment of the disorder resulted from open meniscectomy of the knee].

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Xu, Q; Zhou, W

    1995-10-01

    Between 1989 and 1994, twenty four cases of knee disorders caused by open meniscectomy had undergone the second operation by arthroscopic procedures. The results of retrospective study indicated that main reasons of early disorders following meniscectomy were locking of remanent posterior horn, tears of remanent meniscus and injuries of fat pad and the cause of late disorders were single compartment osteoarthritis and genu varum/valgum caused by meniscectomy. In early cases, the arthroscopic reshape or removal of meniscal remanents and partial resection of fat pads could get satisfactory results. In late cases of osteoarthritis with genu varum/valgum, arthroscopic debridement, high osteotomy of tibia or knee replacement should be carried out as means of treatment. PMID:8731888

  13. DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Nigel; Rose, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is essential to the health of the individual and to the reproductive success of a species. Transmission of genetic information is in a selective balance between two opposing forces, the maintenance of genetic stability versus elimination of mutational change and loss of evolutionary potential. Caenorhabditis elegans provides many advantages for the study of DNA surveillance and repair in a multicellular organism. Several genes have been identified by mutagenesis and RNA interference that affect DNA damage checkpoint and repair functions. Many of these DNA damage response genes also play essential roles in DNA replication, cell cycle control, development, meiosis and mitosis. To date, no obvious DNA damage-induced checkpoint has been described in C. elegans somatic cells. In contrast, the DNA damage response in the germ line is characterized by two spatially separate checkpoints; mitotic germ nuclei proliferation arrest and apoptosis of damaged meiotic nuclei. Both of these responses are regulated by checkpoint genes including mrt-2, hus-1, rad-5 and cep-1, the C. elegans ortholog of the human tumour suppressor p53. The germ line DNA damage checkpoints in C. elegans provide an excellent model in which to study the genes required to maintain genomic stability and to test compounds which might have tumor suppressing properties. In addition to single gene studies, integration of data from high-throughput screens has identified genes not previous implicated in the DNA damage response and elucidated novel connections between the different repair pathways. Most of the genes involved are conserved between worms and humans, and in humans, are associated with either oncogenesis or tumor-suppression. Thus, studies of the physical and functional interactions of the components of the repair pathways in C. elegans will provide information about human repair disorders and cancer predisposition. PMID:18050489

  14. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  15. A New Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Shuzou; Ono, Teruyasu; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kisimoto, Tetsurou

    2014-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair have been treated with debridement, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, partial repair, muscle-tendon transfer, and joint prosthesis, among other techniques. However, the treatment results have not been satisfactory compared with those of small- to medium-sized rotator cuff tears; each procedure has its merits and demerits, and currently, there is no single established method. For massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair, the arthroscopic patch graft procedure has been reported as an effective surgical procedure, and this procedure is chosen as the first-line treatment in our department. In this procedure, suture anchors are generally used to fix the patch graft to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. However, tendon-to-bone healing is frequently difficult to achieve, and bone-to-bone healing seems more advantageous for the repair of the rotator cuff attachment site. To improve the results of treatment, a new patch graft procedure was developed, in which the iliotibial ligament with bone was collected at Gerdy's tubercle and the bone was anchored to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. With this procedure, excellent results were obtained, although only short-term results are available at present. The technique and its results so far are reported. PMID:25126505

  16. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Hiroki; Inui, Hiroaki; Komai, Masahiko; Nobuhara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI) area (ball sign), injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity. PMID:26618017

  17. Outcomes are favorable after arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus.

    PubMed

    Goh, Graham Seow Hng; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Mitra, Amit Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the talus has resulted in outcomes as good as, or better than, those after arthrotomy. We noted a lack of prospective studies investigating the outcomes of arthroscopic treatment. As such, we conducted a prospective study investigating the functional outcomes, pain scores, patient satisfaction, and expectation scores of patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of OCD of the talus, hypothesizing that these patients would have good outcomes and satisfaction. A total of 61 patients underwent arthroscopic chondroplasty, removal of loose bodies, and microfracture for OCD of the talus and completed ≥1 year of follow-up. We evaluated patients pre- and postoperatively at 6 and 12 months using the Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale for pain, and Medical Outcomes Study short-form 36 questionnaires. We also evaluated the patients' expectations and satisfaction. The mean Ankle-Hindfoot score improved significantly from 53.0 ± 14.3 points preoperatively to 77.8 ± 19.1 at 6 months and 83.1 ± 18.3 at 12 months after arthroscopic treatment (p < .001). The overall scores at the final follow-up visit were excellent for 30 (49%), good for 6 (10%), fair for 18 (30%), and poor for 7 (11%). The patients also experienced significant improvement in the visual analog scale score and physical component score of the short-form 36 questionnaire (p < .001). Of the 61 patients, 67% had their expectations fulfilled and 74% were satisfied with their surgery at 12 months of follow-up. Arthroscopic treatment of OCD of the talus continues to be a successful procedure to alleviate pain and loss of function. It is also associated with improvements to quality of life and good patient satisfaction. PMID:25441271

  18. Advanced imaging and arthroscopic management of shoulder contracture after birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2012-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques applied to the pediatric glenohumeral joint have advanced understanding of the anatomic changes that occur secondary to muscular imbalance after brachial plexus birth palsy. A better understanding of the progression and timing of glenohumeral dysplasia has also increased awareness and vigilance of this problem. Early detection of glenohumeral joint subluxation is now possible, allowing for prompt treatment with closed, arthroscopic, or open joint reduction with and without tendon transfers. Dynamic ultrasound imaging, Botox, and arthroscopic techniques have expanded treatment options, providing minimally invasive methods to successfully manage glenohumeral joint dysplasia. PMID:23101604

  19. Arthroscopic Management of a Posterior Femoral Condyle (Hoffa) Fracture: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Wagih, Ahmad M.

    2015-01-01

    Unicondylar fractures of the lower end of the femur are uncommon injuries that usually occur in the sagittal plane. A coronal (tangential) plane fracture, first described by Hoffa in 1904, is unusual. It is an intrinsically unstable type of intra-articular fracture that warrants operative fixation, usually by an open technique. A simple method for the treatment of lateral femoral condyle coronal fractures with arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal fixation by cannulated screws is reported. Managing fractures of the posterior femoral condyle with arthroscopic reduction and fixation with cannulated screws is simple and effective and could be reproducible with good results and a good prognosis. PMID:26759766

  20. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  1. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Mills, Simon Peter; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  2. The modified racking hitch(MRH) knot: a new sliding knot for arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Biren V; Ishak, Charbel; Iesaka, Kazuho; Jazrawi, Laith M; Kummer, Frederic J; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2007-01-01

    Sliding knots are commonly used in arthroscopic surgery and can be problematic in terms of strength and loop security. A new sliding knot for arthroscopic surgery, a modified racking hitch (MRH) knot, is described. The knot is essentially a modified cow's hitch knot that includes two self-locking loops. By tensioning the loop strands, a snug knot is created without backward sliding and provides excellent knot and loop security. In laboratory testing, the MRH knot provided comparable strength and security to other sliding knots. Experience gained from approximately 5 years of clinical use has added to the promise of the useful application of the MRH knot in arthroscopy. PMID:18081550

  3. Use of a Bone Graft Drill Harvester to Create the Fenestration During Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratna, Malin D.; Ek, Eugene T.; Hoy, Gregory A.; Chehata, Ash

    2015-01-01

    The Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, or ulnohumeral arthroplasty, was described in 1978 as a method of treating elbow arthritis by creating a fenestration in the olecranon fossa. This fenestration diminishes the likelihood of recurrent spurs in the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa, without loss of structural bony strength. Arthroscopic techniques have now been developed to perform this procedure. We describe an efficient method of creating the fenestration between the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa during an arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty, or Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, that also reduces the amount of residual bone debris produced during the resection. PMID:26697312

  4. Use of a Bone Graft Drill Harvester to Create the Fenestration During Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wijeratna, Malin D; Ek, Eugene T; Hoy, Gregory A; Chehata, Ash

    2015-10-01

    The Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, or ulnohumeral arthroplasty, was described in 1978 as a method of treating elbow arthritis by creating a fenestration in the olecranon fossa. This fenestration diminishes the likelihood of recurrent spurs in the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa, without loss of structural bony strength. Arthroscopic techniques have now been developed to perform this procedure. We describe an efficient method of creating the fenestration between the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa during an arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty, or Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, that also reduces the amount of residual bone debris produced during the resection. PMID:26697312

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the patella: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sandokji, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign tumor-like bone lesion. This report concerns a 43 year-old male patient diagnosed with a primary aneurysmal bone cyst of his right patella. His main presentation was anterior knee pain. The patient was treated with arthroscopic excisional biopsy of the cyst and curettage, followed by filling the cavity with bone cement at a second stage. During the 5-year follow-up, the patient remained symptom free, with a normal range of motion. The arthroscopic approach is a less-invasive procedure with low morbidity and enabled us to determine which site should be going through. PMID:25901136

  6. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels resulted in significantly greater stiffness than repair with suture anchors. Load to failure and gap formation were not significantly different. PMID:26779555

  7. The role of osteonecrosis in canine coronoid dysplasia: arthroscopic and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Mariee, I C; Gröne, A; Theyse, L F H

    2014-06-01

    Coronoid dysplasia (CD) or medial coronoid disease is part of canine elbow dysplasia and eventually results in osteoarthrosis. Although CD was originally attributed to disturbed endochondral ossification, more recent data point to the subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to assess dysplastic bone and cartilage of dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the treatment of CD. Arthroscopic findings and histopathology of bone and cartilage removed from elbow joints with CD were compared. The most common arthroscopic finding was fragmentation with softening of the subchondral bone of the central part of the medial coronoid process. In dogs without obvious fragmentation, CD was characterised by bone softening and chondromalacia. During arthroscopic intervention dysplastic bone and cartilage were collected for histopathological assessment. Forty-five slices of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded bone and cartilage samples were stained using haematoxylin and eosin and evaluated. Histopathological findings primarily consisted of osteonecrosis of subchondral bone with necrosis within the marrow spaces. Histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were characterised by fibrillation, chondrocyte clone formation, and focal cartilage necrosis. The pathology was found primarily in the subchondral bone and not in the articular cartilage. Vascular compromise may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis in CD. PMID:24797106

  8. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  9. A novel technique of arthroscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Shuji; Kita, Keisuke; Natsu-ume, Takashi; Hamada, Masayuki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new arthroscopic excision technique for a symptomatic os trigonum. With the patient lying in a prone position, a posterolateral portal just lateral to the Achilles tendon, at the 5-mm level proximal to the tip of the fibula, is used for the arthroscope and an accessory posterolateral portal just posterior to the peroneal tendon at the same level is used for instruments. The synovial tissues are then debrided with a power shaver through the accessory posterolateral portal for better visualization. An elevator is used to release the fibrous tissue between the os trigonum and the talus. The os trigonum is completely excised with a grasper to visualize the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Radiographic control is helpful to check the position of the arthroscope if it happens to be inserted into the ankle joint as a result of the reduced subtalar joint space. Postoperatively, no immobilization is necessary, and full weight-bearing is allowed as tolerated. Three of us have performed 11 procedures with excellent results and no cases of complications. This arthroscopic excision technique for the symptomatic os trigonum is a safe and effective procedure. PMID:18182212

  10. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  11. Brain repair.

    PubMed

    Compston, A

    1995-02-01

    Significant improvements in the treatment of common neurological diseases can be expected over the next few years from the application of advances now occurring in the basic neurosciences. In many disorders of the central nervous system, disability accumulates as a result of the degenerative process and its failure to repair. In part, this is because with differentiation, cells in the adult nervous system lose the ability to proliferate and migrate. A family of growth factors orchestrates proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival of neurones and glia; because certain of these growth factors also protect from injury cells which they support during development, there should soon be opportunities for limiting damage following a variety of insults and for rescuing degenerating neurones and glia. The discovery that axon regeneration is actively inhibited, perhaps in order to maintain stability in the complex systems and circuits that are established during development, suggests new strategies for enhancing axonal regeneration in spinal and head injury. Recruiting cells that are capable of restoring glial-neuronal interactions into areas of damage will be an important part of the brain repair strategy but it may prove possible to restore complex cellular arrangements through cell implantation only. Grafted neurones survive, produce appropriate neurotransmitters, form connections and restore some behaviours, but their relative inability to grow limits the degree of structural and functional repair that can be achieved: nevertheless, nerve cell implantation is now being used in the management of certain neurodegenerative diseases of the human central nervous system. There are also prospects for increasing the remyelination which occurs following acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, through the combination of immunological treatments that limit the disease process, growth factors that recruit oligodendrocytes and implantation of glial progenitors into demyelinated areas. PMID:7852914

  12. Frozen shoulder after simple arthroscopic shoulder procedures: What is the risk?

    PubMed

    Evans, J P; Guyver, P M; Smith, C D

    2015-07-01

    Frozen shoulder is a recognised complication following simple arthroscopic shoulder procedures, but its exact incidence has not been reported. Our aim was to analyse a single-surgeon series of patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD; group 1) or ASD in combination with arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) excision (group 2), to establish the incidence of frozen shoulder post-operatively. Our secondary aim was to identify associated risk factors and to compare this cohort with a group of patients with primary frozen shoulder. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 200 consecutive procedures performed between August 2011 and November 2013. Group 1 included 96 procedures and group 2 104 procedures. Frozen shoulder was diagnosed post-operatively using the British Elbow and Shoulder Society criteria. A comparative group from the same institution involved 136 patients undergoing arthroscopic capsular release for primary idiopathic frozen shoulder. The incidence of frozen shoulder was 5.21% in group 1 and 5.71% in group 2. Age between 46 and 60 years (p = 0.002) and a previous idiopathic contralateral frozen shoulder (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the development of secondary frozen shoulder. Comparison of baseline characteristics against the comparator groups showed no statistically significant differences for age, gender, diabetes and previous contralateral frozen shoulder. These results suggest that the risk of frozen shoulder following simple arthroscopic procedures is just over 5%, with no increased risk if the ACJ is also excised. Patients aged between 46 and 60 years and a previous history of frozen shoulder increase the relative risk of secondary frozen shoulder by 7.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1 to 28.3)and 18.5 (95% CI 7.4 to 46.3) respectively. PMID:26130353

  13. Open Rotator Cuff Tear Repair Using Deltopectoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guity, Mohammad Reza; Eraghi, Amir Sobhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the open repair of rotator cuff tears via the deltopectoral approach in patients unable to afford arthroscopic repair costs. Methods: We evaluated 80 consecutive patients who were treated for full-thickness rotator cuff tears by open repair through the deltopectoral approach. There were 48 men and 32 women at a mean age of 60.1 years (range, 35-80 years). Preoperative and postoperative clinical assessments were performed with the Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, modified University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and pain visual analog scale. Results: The mean follow-up period was 30.6 months (range, 18-48 months). At final follow-up visits, the ASES, Constant score, and modified UCLA score were found to have improved significantly from 33.56, 39.24, and 13.0 to 85.64, 81.46, and 32.2, respectively (P <0.01). Pain, as measured on a visual analog scale, was improved significantly (P <0.01). The mean time for recovering the full range of motion was 2.5 months. Postoperative pain at 48 hours and at 6 weeks was relatively low. There were no cases of intractable stiffness. Conclusion: The deltopectoral approach for open rotator cuff repair produced satisfactory results and reduces rate of shoulder stiffness and postoperative pain. PMID:26622080

  14. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  15. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  16. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  17. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  18. Arthroscopic Bioabsorbable Screw Fixation of Unstable Osteochondritis Dissecans in Adolescents: Clinical Results, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Second-Look Arthroscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Keun Churl; Kim, Kwang Mee; Jeong, Ki Joon; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in adolescent patients with unstable lesions causing pain. Methods The study included 11 patients (10 males and 1 female) with OCD who underwent arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation between July 2007 and February 2014 and were available for follow-up for more than 12 months. The mean age at diagnosis was 16.3 years (range, 11 to 19 years), and the average follow-up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 91 months). Clinical results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee score, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score measured before surgery and at follow-up. Functional evaluation was made using the Tegner activity scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopy were performed at the 12-month follow-up. Results Between the preoperative assessment and follow-up, improvements were seen in the KOOS (range, 44.9 to 88.1), Lysholm knee score (range, 32.6 to 82.8), and IKDC score (range, 40.8 to 85.6). The Tegner activity scale also improved from 2.8 to 6.1. Based on postoperative MRI, there were eight Dipaola grade I cases and three grade II cases. No complications due to fixation failure developed in any case. Second-look arthroscopy at 12 months postoperatively revealed that the lesion was covered with cartilage in all cases. Conclusions For unstable OCD lesions causing pain in adolescents, arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation provided favorable outcomes with reduced pain and restoration of movement. Therefore, it should be considered as an effective treatment for OCD. PMID:26929800

  19. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  20. ARTHROSCOPIC SUBACROMIAL DECOMPRESSION: ACROMIOPLASTY VERSUS BURSECTOMY ALONE-DOES IT REALLY MATTER? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Donigan, Jonathan A; Wolf, Brian R

    2011-01-01

    Background Subacromial impingement is a common disorder mat in some cases results in surgical management. Arthroscopic subacromial bursectomy alone or in combination with acromioplasty are treatment options when non-operative measures fail. Methods A systematic review of all level-I and level-II studies regarding subacromial bursectomy and acromioplasty for impingement was performed. Medline publications were reviewed for appropriate studies. Results A total of six studies that met inclusion criteria were identified. However, only one randomized study was identified that directly compared the treatments in question. Additionally, only one prospective study of subacromial bursectomy was identified. A comparison of similar outcome measures revealed bursectomy alone provided similar results to bursectomy with acromioplasty. Discussion Limited high-level studies are available regarding arthroscopic treatment of subacromial impingement. Data available currently suggests that bursectomy alone provides similar outcomes to bursectomy with acromioplasty. PMID:22096430

  1. Osteoid osteoma (OO) of the coracoid: a case report of arthroscopic excision and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Said, Hatem Galal

    2015-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) of the coracoid is a rare entity that may present with variable symptoms from shoulder leading to delay in diagnosis and treatment. We present the clinical and radiological findings and management of one such case along with a review of similar cases reported in the literature. There was a delay of 2 years in diagnosis, which was later confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The lesion was accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. “OO” should be included in the differential diagnosis of shoulder pain in young patients not responding to long-term conservative treatment. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery.

  2. Arthroscopic Microfracture Technique for Cartilage Damage to the Lateral Condyle of the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Minami, Ginjiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the use of arthroscopic microfracture to treat a 10-year-old female patient with extensive damage to the cartilage of the lateral condyle of the tibia before epiphyseal closure, resulting in good cartilage recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a defect in part of the load-bearing surface of the articular cartilage of the condyle articular of the tibia. The patient was diagnosed with damage to the lateral condyle cartilage of the tibia following meniscectomy, and arthroscopic surgery was performed. The cartilage defect measured approximately 20 × 20 mm, and microfracture was performed. Arthroscopy performed four months postoperatively showed that the cartilage defect was completely covered with fibrous cartilage, and the patient was allowed to resume sports activities. Four years postoperatively, she has had no recurrence of pain or hydrarthrosis. PMID:26345523

  3. A simplified arthroscopic bone graft transfer technique in chronic glenoid bone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nebelung, Wolfgang; Reichwein, Frank; Nebelung, Sven

    2016-06-01

    In severe shoulder instability, chronic glenoid bone deficiency is a challenge for arthroscopic shoulder surgeons. This paper presents a new all-arthroscopic technique of iliac crest bone graft transfer for those patients. Transportation through the rotator interval and repositioning into the glenoid defect is achieved by use of a tracking suture, while fixation of the graft is performed by biodegradable or titanium double-helix screws. Overall, the feasibility and reproducibility of this new reconstruction technique in recreating the bony and soft tissue anatomy of the antero-inferior glenoid could be demonstrated. So far, preliminary outcomes of 24 patients operated on using this technique are promising. Level of evidence Case series with no comparison group, Level IV. PMID:24803016

  4. An Arthroscopic Technique for Long Head of Biceps Tenodesis With Double Knotless Screw

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wei-Ren; Ling, Florence Y.; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Kai-Chen; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a frequently performed procedure during shoulder arthroscopy for the treatment of degenerative, traumatic, or inflammatory lesions of the LHB tendon. Arthroscopic techniques for LHB tenodesis using knotless screw techniques offer the advantage of circumventing the need for arthroscopic knot tying. In 2012 Song and Williams described a novel tenodesis technique that does not require any knot-tying procedures by using a knotless anchor. However, a single-anchor configuration may not offer adequate stabilization of the LHB tendon. Therefore we propose a modified method that uses a double knotless anchor that offers advantages over the single knotless anchor, such as an increase in the contact area between the tendon and bone to facilitate tendon-to-bone healing and strengthening of the tenodesis construct. PMID:26759780

  5. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  6. International trends in arthroscopic hip preservation surgery—are we treating the same patient?

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Frank, Rachel M.; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.; Harris, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the entire arthroscopic hip preservation literature to answer the question, ‘Across the world, are we treating the same patient?’ There are significant differences in arthroscopic hip preservation publications, subjects and techniques based on both continent and country published. A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed with PRISMA guidelines using three publicly available databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting arthroscopic hip preservation were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Statistics were calculated using Student's t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, chi-squared and two-proportion Z-tests. There were 134 studies included in the analysis (10 752 subjects; 11 007 hips; 51% female; mean 37.6 years of age; mean 27.2 months length of follow-up), which had a low Modified Coleman Methodology Score (mean 32.4; poor). North America published the largest number of studies (58%) and the most subjects (55%) and hips (56%). Australia (22%) and Europe (18%) operated on subjects with some amount of osteoarthritis most commonly. North America (2.7%) and Europe (2.0%) operated on subjects with dysplasia or borderline dysplasia most commonly. The Modified Harris Hip Score was the most frequently utilized outcome score (24% of studies). The quantity and quality of arthroscopic hip preservation literature is significantly increasing with time. Several significant differences in study, subject and surgical technique demographics between continents and countries were identified. Deficiencies in use of clinical outcome scores and definitions of treated pathologies preclude complete subject comparisons and serve as an impetus for future study quality improvements. PMID:27011812

  7. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Esposito, John G; Ono, Yohei; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC) separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH)” OR “acromioclavicular* (text)” OR “coracoclavicular* (text)” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH)” OR “Arthroscop* (text)” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence IV Results A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26.8% of patients. Conclusion Arthroscopic AC reconstruction techniques carry a distinct complication profile. The TightRope/Endobutton techniques, when performed acutely, provide good radiographic outcomes at the expense of hardware irritation. In contrast, graft reconstructions in patients with chronic AC separations demonstrated a high risk for loss of reduction. Fractures of the coracoid/clavicle remain a significant complication occurring predominately with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. PMID:25914562

  8. Functional Outcomes After Arthroscopic Scapulothoracic Bursectomy and Partial Superomedial Angle Scapulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Granger, Erin K.; Barney, Jacob K.; Partridge, Deveree R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic scapulothoracic bursectomy with partial superomedial angle scapulectomy has been described as a treatment for persistent scapulothoracic bursitis with varying results. Purpose: To evaluate patients after arthroscopic scapulothoracic bursectomy utilizing validated functional outcome instruments. Study Design: Case series. Methods: Fifteen patients underwent arthroscopic scapulothoracic bursectomy and partial superomedial angle scapulectomy. Thirteen patients were available for review at a mean 27-month follow-up (range, 13-65 months). Patients were evaluated preoperatively with a history, physical examination evaluating medial scapula border tenderness and crepitus, pain visual analog scale (VAS) score, and the simple shoulder test (SST). Postoperatively, patients were evaluated with all preoperative questionnaires as well as a satisfaction survey and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. Results: SST scores improved significantly from a mean 7.7 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 10.3 ± 2.3 postoperatively (P = .03). VAS pain scores reduced significantly from 6.5 ± 2.2 preoperatively to 2.3 ± 2.4 postoperatively (P < .001). Ninety-two percent (12/13) of patients were satisfied, and 92% (12/13) stated they would have the surgical procedure performed again. The mean ASES postoperative score was 80.1 (range, 38-100). The 2 clinical failures (ASES scores <50) had either a workers’ compensation claim with persistent medial border tenderness or ongoing rotator cuff disease. Despite lower ASES scores, these patients were still satisfied with the procedure and would undergo it again. Conclusion: Arthroscopic scapulothoracic bursectomy with partial superomedial angle scapulectomy provides significant improvements in pain and functional outcomes. Even in patients at risk for poorer clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction and willingness to undergo the surgical procedure again was still high. PMID:26535249

  9. Suprascapular nerve palsy after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergi; Peidro, Lluis; Méndez, Anna; Calvo, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow and Latarjet procedures have become popular among orthopaedic surgeons thanks to the development of new instruments that allow the use of arthroscopic techniques to treat cases of glenohumeral instability with bone defects or capsular deficiency. Nonetheless, several complications have been reported after Latarjet procedures, including neurological injuries. This report describes surgical damage to the suprascapular nerve, an unusual complication. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V. PMID:24839042

  10. The effect of warmed inspired gases on body temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kim, Hong Soon; Chang, Young Jin; Yun, Soon Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Perioperative hypothermia can develop easily during shoulder arthroscopy, because cold irrigation can directly influence core body temperature. The authors investigated whether active warming and humidification of inspired gases reduces falls in core body temperature and allows redistribution of body heat in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly assigned to receive either room temperature inspired gases using a conventional respiratory circuit (the control group, n = 20) or inspired gases humidified and heated using a humidified and electrically heated circuit (HHC) (the heated group, n = 20). Results Core temperatures were significantly lower in both groups from 30 min after anesthesia induction, but were significantly higher in the heated group than in the control group from 75 to 120 min after anesthesia induction. Conclusions In this study the use of a humidified and electrically heated circuit did not prevent core temperature falling during arthroscopic shoulder surgery, but it was found to decrease reductions in core temperature from 75 min after anesthesia induction. PMID:23904934

  11. Arthroscopic Technique for the Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Simon; Haro, Marc S.; Riff, Andrew; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Open synovectomy remains the treatment of choice for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the hip but has shown modest results compared with the treatment of other joints. Recent advances in hip arthroscopy permit a thorough evaluation of the joint surfaces, improved access, and decreased postoperative morbidity. We describe an arthroscopic synovectomy technique for PVNS of the hip. The use of additional arthroscopic portals and creation of a large capsulotomy enable successful visualization and extensive synovectomy of the entire synovial lining of the hip. The T-capsulotomy enables extensive soft-tissue retraction for complete exposure. The midanterior portal enables use of an arthroscopic grasper and shaver to directly access and excise the synovial lining of the peripheral compartment while avoiding damage to the medial and lateral retinacular vessels. Technical innovations in hip arthroscopy have enhanced visualization in the central and peripheral compartments, as well as instrument management and diagnostic evaluation of the capsule, therefore allowing enhanced management of PVNS of the hip. PMID:25973372

  12. Functional Outcome Following Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction with Rigid Fix: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Shervegar, Satish; Nagaraj, Prashanth; Grover, Amit; DJ, Niranthara Ganesh; Ravoof, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background: No uniform consensus exists to decide type of fixation for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Hypothsis: There is similar functional outcome after rigid fix compared to other methods of fixation which has been published. Study design: Retrospective observational study. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons using femoral Rigid fix cross-pin and interference screw tibial fixation. The evaluation methods were clinical examination, IKDC scores, Lysholm and pre injury and post reconstruction Tegner score. Patients were followed up from minimum of 6 months to 4 year seven months. Results: C In our study of sample size 50 we found that mean age of patients was 30.8 Years with male preponderance. Mean post operative IKDC and Lysholm score has been 75.6 and 84.4 respectively. Mean Tegner pre-injury score and post reconstruction score has been 5.4 and 4.26. Box plot comparison of pre injury and post operativeTegner score reveals a statistically significant difference with respect to paired t test P<0.001. Conclusions: Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with femoral rigid fix cross pins and tibial interference screws results in comparable short term to midterm functional results compared to other types of fixation PMID:26550591

  13. Arthroscopic management of proximal tibial fractures: technical note and case series presentation

    PubMed Central

    BENEA, HOREA; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; MARTIN, ARTUR; BARDAS, CIPRIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The purpose of this article is to describe a new surgical method of arthroscopy assisted treatment of intraarticular proximal tibial fractures (ARIF – arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation), analyzing its efficiency and safety on a series of patients. Tibial plateau fractures affect the proximal tibial metaphyseal and articular surface, representing 1.2% of all fractures and up to 8% of all fractures in elderly. Patients and method Our case series consists of 6 patients with Schatzker types I-III tibial plateau fractures, treated in the Orthopedic and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca from July 2012 to August 2014. Patients included in the study presented Schatzker type I-III tibial plateau fracture. Results The results obtained with the arthroscopic method were excellent in 5 cases (mean Rasmussen score 27.60 points) and good in 1 case (mean score 23.75). The radiological consolidation appeared after a mean of 12 weeks. No major complication was noted. Conclusions Diagnosis and treatment of associated lesions, shortening of hospitalization length and postoperative rehabilitation, but also the lower rate of complications, can make arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation the method of choice for the operative treatment of selected Schatzker I-III types of proximal tibial fractures. PMID:26528076

  14. Time and cost savings in arthroscopic subacromial decompression: the use of bipolar versus monopolar radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, G. N.; Elsorafy, Kareem

    2008-01-01

    There is currently an increased interest in the use of electro surgery in arthroscopy. Since the introduction of the bipolar arthroscopic radiofrequency (RF) wand, it has started to replace the classic Bovie monopolar probe on the assumption that the new technology provides multifunctional devices, combining both tissue removal and haemostasis into one instrument. The more efficient tissue ablation and precise haemostasis achieved with these instruments should result in a significant reduction in the operative time and cost. We ran a prospective comparative randomised study to test this hypothesis. Forty patients underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression, randomised into two groups. The group treated with bipolar RF was associated with an average operative time saving of 8 min (P < 0.0001) and an average cost saving of £83 (€111) per case (P < 0.003), compared to monopolar RF. Bipolar RF is the instrument of choice in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, as it saves time and money. PMID:18414860

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with minimum follow up of six years

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with six to nine years of follow up. METHODS: From August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients underwent arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis refractory to conservative treatment. An interscalene catheter was used for postoperative analgesia, before the procedure. All were in stage II, with a minimum follow up of six years. The mean age was of 52.9 years old (range, 39 to 66), with female predominance (90%) and six left shoulders. The time between the onset of symptoms and surgery varied from six to 20 months. There were four patients in the primary form (40%) and six in the secondary (60%). RESULTS: In the preoperative evaluation, the mean active anterior elevation was 92°, 10.5° of external rotation, and internal rotation level L5. Postoperatively, the mean active elevation was 149°, 40° of external rotation and internal level T12, respectively. Thus, the average gains were 57° in forward active elevation, 29.5° in external rotation and six spinous processes, these values being statistically significant (p <0.001). According to the Constant functional score (arc of movements), the value increased from 13.8 (preoperative mean) to 32 points (postoperative mean). CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder refractory to conservative treatment allows effective gain of range of motion of this joint. Level of Evidence IV, Retrospective Study (Case Series). PMID:27069406

  16. ASSESMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC ELBOW SYNOVECTOMY OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Ortiz, Rodrigo Tormin; Mariz Pinto, Eduardo César Moreira; Checchia, Sergio Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review functional outcomes of arthroscopic elbow synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Between May 1999 and December 2005, 15 patients were submitted to elbow synovectomy using an arthroscopic approach. Three cases were bilateral, totaling 18 elbows. There were two male and 13 female patients. The mean age was 44 years and five months. The mean time of previous diagnosis was six years and eight months. All patients reported preoperative pain, and on seven elbows, instability was present. The mean preoperative values for joint motion were: flexion, 118°; extension, −24°, supine, 80°, and; prone, 71°. Result: The mean postoperative follow-up time was 39 months. The mean postoperative joint motion was 133° for flexion, −20° for extension, 84° supine, and 78° prone. On nine elbows (50%) an improved postoperative range of motion was reported, reaching functional levels. Twelve cases (66.6%) showed pain resolution or improvement to a level not interfering on the activities of daily life. According to Bruce's assessment method, the results were as follows: seven excellent, three good, two fair and six poor results, with an average of 85.5 points. Synovitis recurrence was found in six cases (33.3%), and evolution to osteoarthrosis was found in four (22.2%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic elbow synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis leads to pain improvement in 66.6% of the cases; however, it does not cause a significant range of motion improvement.

  17. Arthroscopic Reduction and Internal Fixation for Fracture of the Lateral Process of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sugiyama, Hajime; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the lateral process of the talus (LPT) are relatively rare. We describe arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation for a type I fracture of the LPT according to the Hawkins classification. Preoperative computed tomography is necessary to evaluate the type and displacement of the LPT fracture because this type of fracture is often overlooked on a plain radiograph. The ankle is approached through a standard medial portal as the working portal and an anterolateral portal as the viewing portal. A 2.7-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Hematoma and soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver, and the anterior and lateral aspects of the talar process are visualized. Fracture reduction is obtained by pushing the lateral fragment of the lateral process medially and is fixed temporally with a 1.1-mm guidewire from the medial portal under both arthroscopy and fluoroscopy. A headless compression screw is inserted through the guidewire. Arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation for a type I LPT fracture can be easily accomplished, and return to daily and sports activities can be achieved in a relatively short time. PMID:25973380

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Yucel, Bulent; Mutlu, Serhat; Tuna, Serkan; Mutlu, Harun; Komur, Baran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis is a mono-articular arthropathy rarely seen in diarthrodial joints. The classic treatment for synovial chondromatosis is open arthrotomy, synovectomy and complete removal of the free fragments. With recent advances in arthroscopic techniques and methods, the indications for arthroscopic treatment have been extended. Presentation of case A 33-year old female presented with complaints of pain in the right shoulder. On the radiological examination, there were seen to be multiple calcified radio-opaque lesions filling all area of the glenohumeral joint. On computed tomography (CT) examination, again multiple radio-opaque free fragments were determined. Arthroscopy was applied to the right shoulder. The free fragments were completely removed. Approximately 33 free fragments, ranging in size from 0.5 to 1.3 cm, were removed. Discussion Cases of synovial chondromatosis in the shoulder have been rarely reported in literature. Generally the disease is self-limiting. Clinically, symptoms are generally not specific. Restrictions in the joint range of movement occur associated with the mechanical effect of the free fragments and in periods of active use, local pain and swelling may be seen in the shoulder. Simple removal of the free fragments, others have stated that removal with synovectomy is necessary to prevent recurrence of the cartilaginous metaplastic focus. Recurrence rates vary from 0 to 31%. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgery can be successfully applied in the treatment of synovial chondromatosis. The advantages of the method include good visualisation during surgery, low morbidity and early healing. PMID:26005571

  19. Biceps Tenoscopy in Arthroscopic Treatment of Primary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dirk; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.

    2014-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis (PSC) of the shoulder is a rare condition and usually necessitates operative therapy. Arthroscopic partial synovectomy with removal of loose osteochondromas may be regarded as the current surgical treatment of choice. However, involvement of the biceps tendon sheath (BTS) occurs in almost half of the patients and required additional open surgery in all previously reported cases. We successfully performed tenoscopy of the BTS and long head of the biceps tendon during arthroscopic treatment of PSC in a 26-year-old male competitive wrestler. Biceps tenoscopy enabled minimally invasive partial (teno)synovectomy and removal of all osteochondromas within the BTS. The symptoms of PSC fully subsided within 2 postoperative weeks. There were no functional restrictions at the 3-month follow-up examination. These preliminary results support the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of biceps tenoscopy as a complement in arthroscopic treatment of PSC of the shoulder, dispensing with the need for additional open surgery. The spectrum of indications for biceps tenoscopy has still to be defined. Conceivable indications are proposed. This first report of a diagnostic and interventional biceps tenoscopy entails a detailed step-by-step description of the surgical technique. PMID:25264517

  20. Arthroscopic sternoclavicular joint resection arthroplasty: atechnical note and illustrated case report.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Lee, Jared T; Campbell, Kevin J; Millett, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values. PMID:24749040

  1. Arthroscopic tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with intramedullary nail with fins: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Hitoshi; Horii, Tomoko; Sugimoto, Naoya; Hoshino, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the ankle has several advantages compared with open arthrodesis, including a smaller skin incision, less damage to the soft tissue around the joint, a lower risk of skin necrosis and infection, a lower incidence of postoperative infection and swelling, and better preservation of the contour of the surface of the joint, which maintains a larger contact area between the talus and tibia. We successfully performed arthroscopic arthrodesis of the tibiotalocalcaneal joints with intramedullary nails with fins in 9 ankles of 8 patients. Solid fusion was attained in all cases, except for 1 case of nonunion at the subtalar joint. We also corrected the alignment in 1 patient with a varus deformity. The fixation was strong, even in the case of poor bone quality, such as occurs in rheumatoid arthritis. The intramedullary nails with fins allowed for appropriate compression for bone consolidation without loss of rotational stability. Arthroscopic tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis, a less-invasive technique than conventional open surgery, is effective treatment, especially in patients with poor skin conditions secondary to diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus. PMID:21641830

  2. ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE: SURGICAL TECHNIQUE AND EVALUATION OF CLINICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Júnior, José Carlos; Paccola, Ana Maria Ferreira; Tonoli, Cristiane; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    To describe a specific surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and evaluate its preliminary results. Methods: Ten shoulders of nine patients were operated using a technique with portals differing from the already-known techniques, which did not use traction and made use of materials available within the public healthcare system. Results: Among the ten shoulders of nine patients, eight were right shoulders and two were left shoulders. The mean age was 69.5 years. The UCLA score increased from 11.7 to 26.1 points over the postoperative follow-up of 16.6 months. The SF-36 questionnaire score was 122.9 and the raw pain scale value was 88%. Conclusion: Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN in accordance with the described technique is reproducible and less traumatic than the open techniques. The patients achieved improvements in many of the parameters evaluated, particularly with regard to pain. Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN may be a therapeutic option for pathological compression of the SSN.

  3. [Newly designed needle scope system for arthroscopic surgery by double-channel sheath method].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, M

    1989-01-01

    We have been studying applicational arthroscopic surgery for temporomandibular joint diseases. Reported below is a newly designed system of diagnostic/operating arthroscopy. This prototype has an external diameter of 1.7 mm. The angle of vision is 60 degrees in air and 45 degrees in water. The effective length with the outer cannula set on is either 90 mm or 50 mm. The most important achievement of this device is that it enables the usage of two types of different sized outer cannula in the same arthroscope: a round single-channel sheath (external diameter 2.0 mm) and an oval double-channel sheath (3.8 X 2.0). The single-channel sheath can easily be replaced with the double-channel sheath by using internal and external guiding needles. This device can be used not only for diagnostic arthroscopy but also for arthroscopic surgery. In particular, it has a hole for surgical device insertion which enables parallel insertion of device. This makes it easy to always observe the advancing edge of surgical device and the manipulation can therefore be greatly improved. PMID:2489190

  4. Arthroscopic Hemitrapeziectomy for First Carpometacarpal Arthritis: Results at 7-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Leak, Robert S.; Culp, Randall W.; Osterman, A. Lee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy combined with thermal capsular plication and temporary K-wire fixation in patients with painful thumb basal joint due to either osteoarthritis or posttraumatic arthritis. There were 18 thumbs that were evaluated in this retrospective study of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy of the distal trapezium in addition to a pancapsular thermal shrinkage at an average of 7.6-year follow-up. No patient has required further surgery. A subjective improvement in pain, pinch activities, strength, and range of motion (ROM) was noted in all patients, and no patient had further surgery on their thumb. On exam, no patient had a first carpal–metacarpal grind or laxity. Total ROM of the thumb axis decreased by 20%, but all patients could oppose to the fifth finger. Grip strength remained unchanged, key pinch improved from 8 to 11 lbs, and tip pinch improved from 4 to 5 lbs. Radiographs showed a metacarpal subsidence of 1.8 mm (0–4 mm). Four complications were noted: two cases of dorsal radial nerve neuritis, one rupture of the flexor pollicis longus, and one prolonged hematoma. Results demonstrate that arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy and capsular shrinkage for first carpometacarpal arthritis is an effective technique that provides high patient satisfaction, a functional pain-free thumb, and a reliable rate of return to activity. PMID:18820976

  5. Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  6. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  7. EVALUATION OF RESULTS AND COMPLICATIONS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SUTURE OF SLAP LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Soares, André Lopes; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications from arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions. Methods: Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions between July 1995 and May 2008 were evaluated. The procedures were performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fernandinho Simonsen Wing, Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Associated lesions were seen in 68 of the 71 patients evaluated (96%), and the other three (4%) had SLAP lesions alone. Results: The associated lesions most frequently found in the patients under 40 years of age were labral lesions (69%), while in patients aged 40 years or over, impact syndrome with or without rotator cuff injury was the most commonly associated condition (71.4%). According to the UCLA method, 79% of our results (56 cases) were good or excellent. Postoperative complications occurred in 15 cases (21%); among these, the most common was the presence of residual pain (46.6%), followed by adhesive capsulitis (33.3%). Conclusions: There was a great association between SLAP lesions and other shoulder lesions, which varied according to the patients' age groups. Arthroscopic suturing of the SLAP lesions provided excellent results in the majority of the cases, but complications occurred in 21%.

  8. Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the shoulder: Fourteen-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martín, Antonio; Pérez-Hidalgo, Santiago

    2011-04-01

    Shoulder arthrodesis is indicated in infections, brachial paralysis, irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis without indication of prosthesis, rescue after arthroplasty, or after surgery for cancer. Arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional. Our aim is presenting our result after 14 years of follow-up of one patient. We present a case report of a 17-year-old male patient. He suffered fracture of left scapula (type V, Ideberg), fracture of left clavicle (type I, Craig), and fracture of left distal ulna. We realized osteosynthesis of clavicle (plate and screws) with the aim of treating this floating shoulder. Electromyography showed partial axonotmesis of axilar nerve. After 7 months of follow-up, axonotmesis was still present. We realized arthroscopic shoulder arthrodesis (three cannulated screws). Fourteen years later, shoulder movement was as follows: Flexion, 0-90°; maximum abduction, 40° with shoulder atrophy; Constant, 47 points; and UCLA, 17 points, without pain. Arthrodesis with screws reaches a subjective benefit in 82% of patients. Percentage of pseudarthrosis is less than in patients treated with plates, although the risks of infections, fractures, and material removal are greater than in patients treated with plates. Shoulder arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional, but it allows minimal surgical aggression. PMID:21897586

  9. Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the shoulder: Fourteen-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Martín, Antonio; Pérez-Hidalgo, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder arthrodesis is indicated in infections, brachial paralysis, irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis without indication of prosthesis, rescue after arthroplasty, or after surgery for cancer. Arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional. Our aim is presenting our result after 14 years of follow-up of one patient. We present a case report of a 17-year-old male patient. He suffered fracture of left scapula (type V, Ideberg), fracture of left clavicle (type I, Craig), and fracture of left distal ulna. We realized osteosynthesis of clavicle (plate and screws) with the aim of treating this floating shoulder. Electromyography showed partial axonotmesis of axilar nerve. After 7 months of follow-up, axonotmesis was still present. We realized arthroscopic shoulder arthrodesis (three cannulated screws). Fourteen years later, shoulder movement was as follows: Flexion, 0-90°; maximum abduction, 40° with shoulder atrophy; Constant, 47 points; and UCLA, 17 points, without pain. Arthrodesis with screws reaches a subjective benefit in 82% of patients. Percentage of pseudarthrosis is less than in patients treated with plates, although the risks of infections, fractures, and material removal are greater than in patients treated with plates. Shoulder arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional, but it allows minimal surgical aggression. PMID:21897586

  10. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee: systematic review and meta-analysis of benefits and harms

    PubMed Central

    Thorlund, J B; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M; Lohmander, LS

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Pain and physical function. Data sources Systematic searches for benefits and harms were carried out in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2014. Only studies published in 2000 or later were included for harms. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials assessing benefit of arthroscopic surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for patients with or without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis were included. For harms, cohort studies, register based studies, and case series were also allowed. Results The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small difference in favour of interventions including arthroscopic surgery compared with control treatments for pain (effect size 0.14, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.26). This difference corresponds to a benefit of 2.4 (95% confidence interval 0.4 to 4.3) mm on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scale. When analysed over time of follow-up, interventions including arthroscopy showed a small benefit of 3–5 mm for pain at three and six months but not later up to 24 months. No significant benefit on physical function was found (effect size 0.09, −0.05 to 0.24). Nine studies reporting on harms were identified. Harms included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. Conclusions The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time and absent at one to two years after surgery. Knee arthroscopy is associated with harms. Taken together, these findings do not support the practise of arthroscopic surgery for middle aged or older patients with knee pain with or without signs of osteoarthritis. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014009145. PMID:26383759

  11. Arthroscopic surgery for global versus focal pincer femoroacetabular impingement: are the outcomes different?

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Burchette, Raoul J.; Sehgal, Bantoo

    2015-01-01

    To determine outcomes from arthroscopic surgery for global pincer femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), a large multicenter prospective study investigating arthroscopic surgical outcomes was performed with minimum 2-year follow-up. Global (center-edge angle 40+ degrees) and Focal (center-edge angle 25–39 degrees) cohorts were based on pre-operative radiographs. Pre-operative and intra-operative findings, surgical procedures, post-operative nonarthritic hip score (NAHS) and satisfaction (5-point Likert scale), complications and conversion arthroplasties were compared. A nested case–control study was also performed. The Global cohort consisted of 15 patients (18 hips) of mean age 37.2 years. Pre-operative NAHS was 51.5 and 74.1 at 24+ months post-surgery. The change in NAHS was significant (P = 0.01). Mean satisfaction was 4.2. There was one total hip arthroplasty (THA) conversion (5.6%), no revision surgeries or complications. The Focal cohort consisted of 125 patients (129 hips) of mean age 39.8 years. Pre-operative NAHS was 54.8 and 77.8 at 24+ months post-surgery. The change in NAHS was significant (P < 0.0001). Mean satisfaction was 4.2. There were eight THA conversions (6.2%), three complications (2.3%) and two revision surgeries (1.5%). Cohort comparisons revealed no statistically significant difference in NAHS (P = 0.30), satisfaction (P = 0.92) or THA conversion rate (P = 0.91). The nested case–control study found mean post-operative change in NAHS was +22.2 and +20.4, respectively, at 24+ months (P = 0.76). Arthroscopic treatment of global pincer FAI is a safe and effective procedure. With outcomes comparable to those observed in the arthroscopic treatment of lesser focal deformities, arthroscopic surgery provides a less invasive option for the treatment of global pincer FAI. PMID:27011813

  12. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  13. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  15. [Technique of distal biceps tendon repair using a limited anterior approach].

    PubMed

    Loitz, D; Klonz, A; Reilmann, H

    2002-09-01

    From May 1999 to November 2001 an anatomical attachment of a ruptured distal biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity was performed through a limited anterior approach in 8 male patients with an age of 37 to 47 years. Through a small incision in the cubital fossa (3-4 cm) the remaining synovial sheet of the biceps tendon was followed to insert absorbable anchor hooks into the radial tuberosity. The distal biceps tendon then was anatomically reattached. Instruments for arthroscopic Bankart-repair were used. There were no specific complications like neurovascular damage or significant functional impairment. The contour of the biceps muscle was restored in all cases. 3 out of 7 patients developed mild heterotopic ossifications without functional deficits. In our experience the presented technique is a possible minimal invasive procedure of distal biceps tendon repair without major complications and with good functional results. PMID:12232743

  16. The Double-Pulley Anatomic Technique for Type II SLAP Lesion Repair

    PubMed Central

    Parnes, Nata; Ciani, Mario; Carr, Brian; Carey, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The annual incidence and number of repairs of SLAP lesions in the United States are constantly increasing. Surgical repairs of type II SLAP lesions have overall good success rates. However, a low satisfaction rate and low rate of return to preinjury level of play remain a challenge with elite overhead and throwing athletes. Recent anatomic studies suggest that current surgical techniques over-tension the biceps anchor and the superior labrum. These studies suggest that restoration of the normal anatomy will improve clinical outcomes and sports performance. We present a “double-pulley” technique for arthroscopic fixation of type II SLAP lesions. In this technique the normal anatomy is respected by preserving the mobility of the articular aspect of the superior labrum while reinforcing the biceps anchor and its posterior fibers medially. PMID:26900552

  17. Eardrum repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... onto the eardrum. This graft is used to repair the tear. For problems with the small bones ( ... will use an operating microscope to view and repair the chain of small bones using plastic devices ...

  18. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal detachment repair is eye surgery to place a retina back into its normal position. The retina is the light-sensitive ... of tissue around it. This article describes the repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. These occur due to ...

  19. Testicular torsion repair

    MedlinePlus

    Testicular torsion repair is surgery to untangle a spermatic cord. The spermatic cord is the collection of blood vessels in the ... people will get general anesthesia for testicular torsion repair surgery. This will make you asleep and pain- ...

  20. Hydrocele repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the scrotum. This is called an inguinal hernia. If a hydrocele persists past the first six ... of life, it should be surgically repaired. Inguinal hernia in infants is usually repaired within the first ...

  1. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  2. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Inguinal hernia repair is surgery to repair a hernia in your groin. A hernia is tissue that bulges out of a weak ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed ... and supported with sutures (stitches), and sometimes mesh. This ...

  3. Needle Assisted Arthroscopic Clysis of the Medial Collateral Ligament of the Knee: a Simple Technique to Improve Exposure in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinning; Selby, Ronald M.; Newman, Ashley; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    During knee arthroscopy, narrowness and tightness maybe encountered in the medial compartment that does not allow sufficient visualization or instrumentation. When this occurs, our team has found it helpful to perform a percutaneous clysis of the deep portion of the medial collateral ligament with a spinal needle. With the knee positioned in 10° to 20° of flexion and a valgus stress is applied. A spinal needle (18 Gauge) is passed percutaneously through the medial collateral ligament between the tibial plateau and undersurface of the medial meniscus. Several passes are made with the spinal needle with the bevel of the needle angled to selectively divide the fibers while keeping the medial collateral ligament under tension. Then with controlled valgus force, the medial compartment will progressively open allowing improved visualization to the posteromedial corner of the knee. This increase in space gives an enhanced visual field and further allows more room for arthroscopic instrumentation. PMID:24416482

  4. Comparison of Three Methods to Quantify Repair Cartilage Collagen Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Keir A.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Schnabel, Lauren V.; Mohammed, Hussni O.; Potter, Hollis G.; Bradica, Gino; Castiglione, Emme; Pownder, Sarah L.; Satchell, Patrick W.; Saska, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if the noninvasive or minimally invasive and nondestructive imaging techniques of quantitative T2-mapping or multiphoton microscopy (MPM) respectively, could detect differences in cartilage collagen orientation similar to polarized light microscopy (PLM). It was hypothesized that MRI, MPM, and PLM would all detect quantitative differences between repair and normal cartilage tissue. Methods: Osteochondral defects in the medial femoral condyle were created and repaired in 5 mature goats. Postmortem, MRI with T2-mapping and histology were performed. T2 maps were generated and a mean T2 value was calculated for each region of interest. Histologic slides were assessed using MPM with measurements of autocorrelation ellipticity, and by PLM with application of a validated scoring method. Collagen orientation using each of the 3 modalities (T2-mapping, MPM, and PLM) was measured in the center of the repair tissue and compared to remote, normal cartilage. Results: MRI, MPM, and PLM were able to detect a significant difference between repair and normal cartilage (n = 5). The average T2 value was longer for repair tissue (41.43 9.81 ms) compared with normal cartilage (27.12 14.22 ms; P = 0.04); MPM autocorrelation ellipticity was higher in fibrous tissue (3.75 1.17) compared with normal cartilage (2.24 0.51; P = 0.01); the average PLM score for repair tissue was lower (1.6 1.02) than the score for remote normal cartilage (4.4 0.42; P = 0.002). The strongest correlation among the methods was between MRI and PLM (r = ?0.76; P = 0.01), followed by MPM and PLM (r = ?0.58; P = 0.08), with the weakest correlation shown between MRI and MPM (r = 0.35; P = 0.31). Conclusion: All 3 imaging methods quantitatively measured differences in collagen orientation between repair and normal cartilage, but at very different levels of resolution. PLM is destructive to tissue and requires euthanasia, but because MPM can be used arthroscopically, both T2-mapping and MPM can be performed in vivo, offering nondestructive means to assess collagen orientation that could be used to obtain longitudinal data in cartilage repair studies. PMID:26069654

  5. Morphologic and histologic changes in canine temporomandibular joint tissues following arthroscopic guided neodymium:YAG laser exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bradrick, J.P.; Eckhauser, M.L.; Indresano, A.T. )

    1989-11-01

    A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam was introduced by a quartz fiber passed arthroscopically into the superior joint space of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of five mongrel dogs, with one joint serving as a control without laser wounds. Immediate postoperative death and examination of the disc grossly and histologically revealed different patterns for contact and noncontact burn wounds. The wounds exhibited signs of thermal coagulation necrosis similar to those reported in other tissues. The potential implications of the adaptation of the Nd:YAG laser to TMJ arthroscopic surgery are discussed.

  6. Acute acromioclavicular dislocation: a cheaper, easier and all-arthroscopic system. Is it effective in nowadays economical crisis?

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergi; Dada, Michelle; Santos, Simon; Lozano, Lluis; Alemany, Xavier; Peidro, Lluis

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to show an effective, easier and cheaper way to reduce acute acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation type III and V (Rockwood classification). Numerous procedures have been described for surgical management of acromioclavicular joint disruption. Newest devices involve an arthroscopic technique that allows nonrigid anatomic fixation of the acromioclavicular joint. Arthroscopically assisted treatment of acute AC joint dislocation is advantageous because it provides good clinical results and few complications. It also allows reviewing glenohumeral associated lesions. This surgical technique requires no specific implants to achieve a correct AC reduction. Actually, economical advantages are very important factors to decide the use of determinate surgical techniques. PMID:26280870

  7. Arthroscopic lysis and lavage for internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Waseem A.; Givol, Navot; Yahalom, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic tool for various intra-articular disorders, especially internal derangement (ID) of the TMJ. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a standardized arthroscopic procedure for the treatment of two stages of ID; early/intermediate stage and intermediate/late stage. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of 78 patients (99 joints) treated by arthroscopic lysis and lavage in the authors’ department during a 5-year period. Patients were diagnosed preoperatively as suffering from ID of the TMJ. The results were stratified according to the stage of ID. Three outcome variables were used to assess efficacy of treatment: Maximal interincisal opening (MIO), level of pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), and frequency of intermittent locking episodes. In addition, complications were reported. Results: Mean MIO of the group of patients with intermediate/late stage ID increased from 27 ± 4.7 mm preoperatively to 38 ± 5.4 mm postoperatively (P < 0.0001). For the group of patients with early/intermediate stage ID, mean MIO did not change significantly after arthroscopy (39.1 ± 6.2 mm compared to 41.4 ± 5 mm, P = 0.06), however, subjective evaluation of pain on a VAS decreased from 7.2 ± 1.2 preoperatively to 3.4 ± 2.2 postoperatively (P < 0.0001), and 80% of the patients (25 of 31) denied experiencing intermittent locking episodes after treatment (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic lysis and lavage is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for the treatment of both mild and advanced stages of ID.

  8. Extracapsular approach for arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: clinical and radiographic results and complications☆

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Júnior, Antero Camisa; Lima, Ezequiel Moreno Ungaretti; Gyboski, Diego Paulo; Martins, Lucas Schirmer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results and complications relating to patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement by means of an extracapsular approach. Methods Between January 2011 and March 2012, 49 patients (50 hips) underwent arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement, performed by the hip surgery team of the Orthopedic Hospital of Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul. Forty patients (41 hips) fulfilled all the requirements for this study. The mean follow-up was 29.1 months. The patients were assessed clinically by means of the Harris Hip score, as modified by Byrd (MHHS), the Non-Arthritic Hip score (NAHS) and the internal rotation of the hip. Their hips were also evaluated radiographically, with measurement of the CE angle, dimensions of the joint space, alpha angle, neck-head index, degree of arthrosis and presence of heterotopic ossification of the hip. Results Out of the 41 hips treated, 31 (75.6%) presented good or excellent clinical results. There was a mean postoperative increase of 22.1 points for the MHHS, 21.5 for the NAHS and 16.4̊ for the internal rotation of the hip (p < 0.001). Regarding the radiographic evaluation, correction to normal values was observed for the alpha angle and neck-head index, with a mean postoperative decrease of 32.9̊ and mean increase of 0.10, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement by means of an extracapsular approach presented satisfactory clinical and radiographic results over a mean follow-up of 29.1 months, with few complications. PMID:26401501

  9. Arthroscopic and imaging findings after traumatic hip dislocation in patients younger than 25 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, James D.; Abtahi, Amir M.; Beckmann, James T.; Maak, Travis G.; Aoki, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify intra-articular pathology and loose bodies during arthroscopic examination of young patients after hip dislocation and to correlate arthroscopic findings with preoperative imaging. Twelve hips in 12 patients (eight males, four females; mean age 16.3 years, range 11–25 years) underwent hip arthroscopy after traumatic hip dislocation. Medical records, imaging studies and intra-operative images were reviewed to determine the damage to the hip joint, acetabular morphology, including labral and/or cartilage injury and presence of loose bodies. Imaging findings were compared with arthroscopic findings and treatment. All 12 patients underwent arthroscopy, which was performed an average of 59 (range 1–359, median 17.5) days after dislocation. Ten patients had posterior hip dislocations and two patients had obturator dislocations. All patients underwent closed reduction as initial management, with one incongruent reduction. Eleven patients had computed tomography scans and four patients had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three patients having both modalities. Loose bodies were identified in 6/12 (50%) patients on pre-operative imaging and in 8/12 (67%) patients at arthroscopy. The two patients with unidentified loose bodies on imaging did not have a preoperative MRI. Five patients had acetabular cartilage injuries and three patients had femoral-sided cartilage injuries. Eight patients had labral injuries at arthroscopy. Intra-articular injuries and loose bodies are common in adolescent and young adult patients undergoing arthroscopy following traumatic hip dislocation. Further studies are needed to determine whether arthroscopy after traumatic dislocation may play a role in hip preservation following these injuries.

  10. Arthroscopic Resection of a Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor in the Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Han, Youngshin; Lee, Malrey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath is surgical therapy, but surgical recurrence rates were reported to be as high as 50% in some cases. Therefore, complete radical excision of the lesion is the treatment of choice. If the tumor originates from the joint, it is important to perform capsulotomy. Here, the authors report the first case of successful treatment of a localized intra-articular giant cell tumor in the wrist by arthroscopic resection. A 28-year-old right-handed woman visited the clinic because of left wrist ulnar-side pain, which had been aggravated during the previous 15 days. Vague ulnar-side wrist pain had begun 2 years ago. When the authors examined the patient, the wrist showed mild swelling on the volo-ulnar aspect and the distal radioulnar joint, as well as volar joint line tenderness. She showed a positive result on the ulnocarpal stress test and displayed limited range of motion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intra-articular mass with synovitis in the ulnocarpal joint. Wrist arthroscopy was performed using standard portals under regional anesthesia. The arthroscopic findings revealed a large, well-encapsulated, yellow lobulated soft-tissue mass that was attached to the volar side of the ulnocarpal ligament and connected to the extra-articular side. The mass was completely excised piece by piece with a grasping forceps. Histopathologic examination revealed that the lesion was an intra-articular localized form of a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic and had full range of motion in her left wrist, and no recurrence was found in magnetic resonance imaging follow-up evaluations. The authors suggest that the arthroscopic excision of intra-articular giant cell tumors, as in this case, may be an alternative method to open excisions, with many advantages. PMID:26496348

  11. A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF ISOKINETIC VERSUS ISOTONIC REHABILITATION PROGRAM AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC MENISCECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Koutras, Georgios; Letsi, Magdalini; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Gigis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although both isotonic and isokinetic exercises are commonly used in the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic meniscectomy no studies have compared their effect on strength recovery and functional outcomes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two rehabilitation programs (isotonic and isokinetic) on muscle strength and functional performance after partial knee meniscectomy. A secondary purpose was to assess the correlation between isokinetic strength deficits and hop test performance deficits. Methods: Twenty male patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy volunteered for the study. Both isotonic and isokinetic training were performed with the same equipment thereby blinding subjects to the mode of exercise. Main outcome measures were collected on the 14th and 33rd postoperative days and included isokinetic strength of the knee extensors and flexors, functional performance (single, triple, and vertical hopping) and the Lysholm questionnaire. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to assess the effects of the independent variables on the isokinetic variables, functional tests, and Lysholm score. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between isokinetic strength deficits and functional performance deficits. Results: Isokinetic measures, functional tests, and the Lysholm score all increased between initial and final assessment (p≤0.003). However, there were no group or group*time effects on any of the outcome variables (p≥0.33). Functional tests were better predictors of isokinetic deficits in the 14th compared to the 33rd postoperative day. Conclusion: No differences were found in the outcomes of patients treated using an isokinetic and an isotonic protocol for rehabilitation after arthroscopic meniscectomy. More than half of patients did not meet the 90% criterion in the hop tests for safe return to sports five weeks after meniscectomy. There were correlations between the hop tests and isokinetic deficits two weeks after meniscectomy but not at the fifth week. Level of evidence: 1b PMID:22319678

  12. Femoroacetabular impingement in 45 professional athletes: associated pathologies and return to sport following arthroscopic decompression

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, Mara; Briggs, Karen; Kuppersmith, David

    2007-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) occurs when an osseous abnormality of the proximal femur (cam) or acetabulum (pincer) triggers damage to the acetabular labrum and articular cartilage in the hip. Although the precise etiology of FAI is not well understood, both types of FAI are common in athletes presenting with hip pain, loss of range-of-motion, and disability in athletics. An open surgical approach to decompressing FAI has shown good clinical outcomes; however, this highly invasive approach inherently may delay or preclude a high level athlete’s return to play. The purpose of this study was to define associated pathologies and determine if an arthroscopic approach to treating FAI can allow professional athletes to return to high-level sport. Hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport. Between October 2000 and September 2005, 45 professional athletes underwent hip arthroscopy for the decompression of FAI. Operative and return-to-play data were obtained from patient records. Average time to follow-up was 1.6 years (range: 6 months to 5.5 years). Forty two (93%) athletes returned to professional competition following arthroscopic decompression of FAI. Three athletes did not return to play; however, all had diffuse osteoarthritis at the time of arthroscopy. Thirty-five athletes (78%) remain active in professional sport at an average follow-up of 1.6 years. Arthroscopic treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport. PMID:17479250

  13. Treatment of tibial eminence fractures with arthroscopic suture fixation technique: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanhao; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yanjie; Wang, Zhanchao

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to investigate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic suture fixation in treating tibial eminence fracture with a retrospective study design of two years’ follow-up. Methods: A total of 33 patients with imaging evidence of tibial eminence avulsion fractures who underwent arthroscopic surgery between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. The inclusion criteria for the study were a displaced tibial eminence avulsion fracture and anterior knee instability of grade II or higher inskeletally mature patients. These patients were treated with arthroscopic suture fixation and followed with a mean period of 24 months. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained 3 months postoperatively to assess fracture healing. At 24 months after surgery, all patients were evaluated by an independent orthopaedic professor with clinical examination like anteroposterior laxity (Lachman-Noulis and anterior drawer tests) and Rolimeter knee tester (Aircast, Vista, CA). Knee range of motion was evaluated actively and passively with a goniometer. Knee function was evaluated by the Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Knee radiographs in standing anteroposterior, standing lateral, and Merchant views were examined for alignment, joint space narrowing, and degenerative knee changes. Results: No major complication like infection, deep venous thrombosis, or neurovascular deficit happened peri-operatively. At the final follow-up, there were no symptoms of instability and no clinical signs of ACL deficiency. Radiographs showed that all fractures healed 3 months post-operative, but at the last follow-up, there was one person with degenerative changes like joint space narrowing in radiographs. Anterior translation of the tibia was 0.47 mm on average (0 to 2.5 mm) compared with the uninjured side. Range-of-motion measurement showed a mean extension deficit of 1.5° (0° to 5°) and a mean flexion deficit of 2.7° (0° to 10°) compared with the unaffected side. The mean Lysholm score was 96 (85 to 100), and the mean IKDC score was 94 (80 to 100). Overall, the IKDC grade was A (normal) in 24 patients (58%), B (nearly normal) in 8 patients (33%), and C (abnormal) in 1 patient (8%). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated tibial eminence fractures in adults can be effectively treated with arthroscopic suture fixation. PMID:26550328

  14. Arthroscopic Excision of Juxta-articular Osteoid Osteoma of the Calcaneum

    PubMed Central

    Tauheed, Mohammed; Korula, Ravi Jacob; Shankarnarayanan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the foot is a rare condition particularly of the calcaneum. This condition is difficult to diagnose and is more difficult to treat particularly if it involves deeper part of the joints. We present an arthroscopic technique to deal with a case of juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneum using two portals: the anterolateral portal for instrumentation and the anterior anterolateral portal for visualization of the subtalar joint. Because this approach is minimally invasive, it offers early recovery and reduced morbidity compared with the conventional techniques. PMID:27073769

  15. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Alvaro G.; Santschi, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  16. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint : Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by arthroscopy. The use of the osteochondral autograft transfer system (OATS), implantation of membranes with or without autologous bone marrow transfer and possibly with growth factors or implantation of stem cells are carried out in combination with arthroscopic mini-open procedures. The results from the literature are discussed and compared with own results after arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the talus. PMID:26810230

  17. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A.; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  18. Comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone removed via an arthroscopic-assisted arthrotomy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Alvaro G; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2015-02-01

    A 16-year-old American paint horse gelding was presented for evaluation of a left forelimb lameness grade III/V. Radiographs and computed tomography revealed a comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone involving the entire articulation with the distal radius and the proximal aspect of the articulation with the ulnar carpal bone. Multiple fragments were present in the palmar pouch of the antebrachiocarpal joint. An arthroscopic-assisted open approach was necessary to remove all fractured fragments. Subsequently the horse was re-admitted for lameness and was treated successfully with antibiotics and long-term supportive bandaging. PMID:25694665

  19. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays the progression of traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:26640626

  20. Arthroscopic discectomy and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine: A report of ipsilateral 2-portal approach

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Said G.; Schwartz, Jeremy A.; Marsolais, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard approach to the thoracic disc is through thoracotomy. The video-assisted thoracoscopic approach has been used as an alternative to the open approach for nearly 20 years, and more recently, extracavitary, posterolateral approaches have been introduced. Both the transthoracic procedures involve deflating the lung for access to the spine, and postoperative thoracic drainage is necessary; postoperative morbidity can be significant. The retropleural procedures are in their infancy, but the published results are promising. The purpose of this study is to introduce the posterolateral arthroscopic thoracic decompression and fusion procedure, which is extrapleural, less disruptive to normal anatomy, and cost-effective. Methods Fifteen consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic decompression and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine were prospectively studied according to the hospital's institutional review board protocol. The Short Form 36 and visual analog scale questionnaires were completed preoperatively and postoperatively. Paired t tests were used for statistical analysis. The patient was placed in the prone position on a radiolucent table, and instrumentation was performed under fluoroscopic control. Two portals were developed ipsilaterally (one for the arthroscope and the other for instruments) on the side of disc herniation, and a single portal was used on the contralateral side. Various instruments were used for disc excision and exploration of the spinal canal. Fusion was accomplished with bilateral corticocancellous dowels obtained from the iliac crests. Infiltration of the access channel and facet injections of the contiguous joints were performed with bupivacaine, for immediate postoperative pain control. Results Fifteen patients with a mean age of 54 years were followed up for 28 months postoperatively. The overall back pain score decreased from 7.2 (SD, 1.5) to 3 (SD, 2) after the procedure (P < .005). Eleven patients were satisfied with their current lifestyle postoperatively as opposed to one preoperatively. Two patients had reoccurrences. Hospital stay averaged 18.5 hours. The operating room cost and the cost of hospital stay was 51.9% of the cost of anterior open discectomy. Conclusions The extrapleural, biportal, ipsilateral arthroscopic approach for the decompression and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine is feasible, cost-effective, less traumatic, and associated with minimal complications. The best results were obtained in patients with single-level thoracic disc herniation. The technique is applicable for most thoracic disc herniations. PMID:25694878

  1. Arthroscopic debridement and biological resurfacing of the glenoid in glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Joe F; Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; Du Toit, Donald F

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the intermediate-term results of an arthroscopic procedure to debride and resurface the arthritic glenoid, in a middle-aged population, using an acellular human dermal scaffold. Between 2003 and 2005, thirty-two consecutive patients underwent an arthroscopic debridement and biological glenoid resurfacing for glenohumeral arthritis. The diagnoses included primary osteoarthrosis (28 patients), arthritis after arthroscopic reconstruction for anterior instability (1 patient) and inflammatory arthritis (3 patients). All shoulders were assessed clinically using the Constant and Murley score, and results graded according to Neer's criteria. Statistical analysis was performed to determine significant parameters and associations. A significant improvement (P < 0.0001) in each parameter of the subjective evaluation component (severity of pain, limitation in daily living and recreational activities) of the Constant score was observed. The Constant and Murley score increased significantly (P < 0.0001) from a median of 40 points (range 26-63) pre-operatively to 64.5 (range 19-84) at the final assessment. Overall, the procedure was considered as "successful outcome" in 23 patients (72%) and as a "failure" in 9 patients (28%). According to Neer's criteria, the result was categorized as excellent in 9 (28%), satisfactory in 14 (44%) and unsatisfactory in 9 (28%). Within the unsatisfactory group, there were five conversions to prosthetic arthroplasty. A standard magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 22 patients in the successful outcome group; glenoid cartilage was identified in 12 (thick in 5, intermediate in 1, thin in 6) and could not be identified in 10 patients (complete/incomplete loss in 5, technical difficulties in 5). Overall, five complications included transient axillary nerve paresis, foreign-body reaction to biological material, inter-layer dissociation, mild chronic non-specific synovitis and post-traumatic contusion. Dominance of affected extremity and generalized disease (diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, generalized osteoarthritis) was associated with an unsatisfactory outcome (P < 0.05). Arthroscopic debridement and biological resurfacing of the glenoid is a minimally invasive therapeutic option for pain relief, functional improvement and patient satisfaction, in glenohumeral osteoarthritis, in the intermediate-term. PMID:20480357

  2. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  3. Arthroscopically assisted fixation of the lesser trochanter fracture: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Aditya; Raz, Guy; Bosley, Belinda; Ludger, Gerdesmeyer; Al Muderis, Munjed

    2014-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the lesser trochanter in adolescents are uncommon. This injury is a result of a sudden forceful contraction of the iliopsoas tendon. It usually occurs during vigorous sport activity. Historically, these injuries were treated non-operatively, with guarded results, including weak hip flexor strength and non-union, hindering return to competitive sport. We report a series of three arthroscopically assisted fracture fixations performed by the senior author, using cannulated screw fixation in two cases and an anchor in one case. Mobilization was commenced immediately following surgery, allowing weight bearing as tolerated using crutches for 4 weeks, thereafter unaided walking was allowed. Patients were assessed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 1-year post-operatively. Radiographs were utilized to confirm full union. All three patients were able to mobilize unaided by 4 weeks post-operatively and two of the three patients returned to competitive sport at 3 months. Near—anatomical union was achieved in all cases. No complications were noted during surgery and the peri-operative period in our series. The utilization of arthroscopic reduction and fixation of avulsion of the lesser trochanter results in good fixation and allows a faster recovery with a return to sports activity, and therefore, we suggest it as a viable treatment option for such injuries. PMID:27011799

  4. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yujie; Yuan, Bangtuo; Shen, Xuezhen; Qu, Feng; Wang, Jiangtao; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Juanli; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect. Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV. Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression. PMID:25563318

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION: FIRST EPISODE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Botelho, Vinicius; Duarte, Clodoaldo; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical results obtained of patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment following a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Between August 2000 and October 2008, 14 shoulders of 14 patients were treated by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of Santa Casa Hospital, São Paulo. Thirteen patients (93%) were male and one (7%) was female; their ages ranged from 17 to 41 years, with a mean of 28 years. All of the patients evaluated were regularly practicing a sports activity (which required physical vigor of the upper limbs). The time that had elapsed between the trauma and the surgical treatment ranged from seven to 60 days, with a mean of 20 days. The surgical procedure was performed with arthroscopic viewing, with the patient positioned in lateral decubitus. Fixation of the labral-ligamentous complex was achieved using bioabsorbable anchors. The postoperative clinical assessment was made using Rowe and UCLA criteria. Joint mobility was measured according to the guidance from ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons). The length of postoperative follow-up ranged from 24 to 120 months, with a mean of 45 months. Results: All the patients achieved satisfactory results, (85% excellent and 15% good), as shown by UCLA, while 100% of the results were excellent according Rowe. The “grip test” was negative for all the patients. Conclusion: Surgical treatment after a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation seems to be a good therapeutic option for young active patients who practice sports activities. PMID:27042625

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review☆

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40–90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9–3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to −20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities. PMID:26535210

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, Jos Maria; Teixeira, Joo Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100 of flexion and 30 extension. The range of active motion was 40-90. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9-3 and its arc of active motion was 110 to -20 of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities. PMID:26535210

  8. Ligamentum teres injuries - an observational study of a proposed new arthroscopic classification

    PubMed Central

    Porthos Salas, Antonio; O’Donnell, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Ligamentum teres (LT) Injuries or tears have been said to be a common cause of groin discomfort and pain, and they have been identified in 8–51% of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Currently, in the literature there exist three arthroscopic classifications for LT injuries and tears: the first classification was established by Gray and Villar, Botser and Domb proposed the second one which they called a descriptive classification according to the degree of partial thickness LT tears and more recently the last classification by Cerezal et al. (RadioGraphics 2010; 30:1637–51), where they take into account the one by Gray and Villar but adding an avulsion fracture and absence of the LT. We propose a new classification, which also takes into account, observed LT pathologies, as well as the possible pathological mechanism of LT tears, and offer a guide to treatment. This classification is based on direct arthroscopic observation and dynamic rotational maneuvers of the hip under distraction. This classification incorporates those pathologies, which have been observed as a result of this more focused examination of the LT.

  9. Arthroscopic Bone Grafting of Deep Acetabular Cysts Using a Curved Delivery Device

    PubMed Central

    Garabekyan, Tigran; Chadayammuri, Vivek; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular intraosseous cysts are frequently encountered in patients with dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement. Small cysts are typically addressed by removing the cyst lining and stimulating healing via microfracture or abrasion chondroplasty. In contrast, larger cysts involving 1-3 cm3 frequently require additional fortification with bone graft material to facilitate osseous ingrowth and cyst healing. Previous arthroscopic reports have described the use of rim trimming to access the extra-articular side of the cyst, with subsequent use of straight metal cannulas for delivery of bone graft material. The downsides of this technique include the requirement for rim trimming, which may be ill advised in patients with normal coverage or dysplasia, as well as the creation of a second breach in the cyst wall, precluding pressurization of the bone graft material. We describe an arthroscopic technique using a curved delivery device allowing for deeper penetration into the cyst cavity through the articular side and greater delivery of bone graft material. PMID:27073770

  10. Direct “Cystoscopic” Approach for Arthroscopic Decompression of an Intraosseous Ganglion of the Lunate

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Deepak N.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts (IOGs) are uncommon lesions of the carpal bones and can present with persistent pain and stiffness of the wrist. Surgical decompression is recommended, and a variety of approaches to decompress symptomatic IOGs of the wrist have been described. We describe an arthroscopic approach that can be performed with only 2 portals and offers excellent access for visualization and instrumentation. The procedure involves creating a 3.2-mm tunnel into the lunate cyst; this is performed through the dorsal non-articular surface of the lunate, under direct vision, and the position is confirmed with fluoroscopy. A 2.4-mm arthroscope is passed through the drill hole, and a direct “cystoscopic” view of the IOG is obtained. Biopsy of the cyst contents is performed under direct vision, and small-joint shavers and burrs are used for effective debridement. Advantages of this technique are actual visualization of the pathology, complete intracystic debridement, and simultaneous treatment of any coexistent intra-articular pathology. In addition, the minimal 3.2-mm lunate tunnel access maintains the structural integrity of the lunate and reduces the need for additional bone graft supplementation. PMID:26258034

  11. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  12. Massive bone loss from fungal infection after anterior cruciate ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muscolo, D Luis; Carbo, Lisandro; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Makino, Arturo

    2009-09-01

    Although there are numerous reports of septic pyogenic arthritis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is limited information regarding the outcomes of fungal infection. We determined the outcomes of six patients with mycotic infection after regular ACL reconstruction. There were four males and two females with a mean age of 33 years. We determined the number of procedures performed, bone loss originating to control infection, and final reconstruction in these patients. An average of five arthroscopic lavage procedures had been performed at the referring centers. Fungal infection was diagnosed based on pathologic samples; five infections were the result of mucormycosis and one was Candida. After final débridement, the mean segmental bone loss was 12.8 cm. All patients were treated with intravenous antifungal coverage and cement spacers before final reconstruction. At final followup, all patients were free of clinical infection. Three had reconstruction with an allograft-prosthesis composite, two with hemicylindrical allografts, and one with an intercalary allograft arthrodesis. Despite the extremely unusual presentation of this complication, surgeons should be aware of potential and catastrophic consequences of this severe complication after ACL reconstruction. PMID:19190972

  13. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Mei-Dan O; Mann G; Steinbacher G; Ballester SJ; Cugat RB; Alvarez PD

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft.

  14. Safety and analgesic efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine in arthroscopic knee surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Riddhi; Dehran, Maya; Chandralekha; Trikha, Anjan; Nag, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 agonist has been used as an adjuvant analgesic in vascular, bariatric, and thoracic surgery. We assessed the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine as an analgesic adjunct to local anesthetic infiltration for control of postoperative pain in arthroscopic knee surgery. Settings and Design: This was a randomized control study performed in a Tertiary Care Hospital. Materials and Methods: Forty-five adult patients scheduled for anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were randomized into three groups. Group B (bupivacaine group) received bupivacaine intraarticularly and normal saline by the intravenous route. Group D (dexmedetomidine group) received Intravenous dexmedetomidine and normal saline intraarticularly. Group BD (bupivacaine + dexmedetomidine group) received a combination of intravenous dexmedetomidine and intraarticular bupivacaine. Patient's cardiorespiratory parameters, time to first rescue, total rescue analgesic consumption in first 24 h, visual analog scale for pain were assessed. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Chi-square test. Results: The time to first request for rescue analgesia was significantly prolonged in Group D and Group BD patients (P < 0.05) compared to Group B. Total rescue analgesic consumption was least in Group BD. Group D and Group BD patients had lower heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure values. Conclusion: Intravenous dexmedetomidine in combination with intraarticular bupivacaine decreased perioperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. However, monitoring and vigilance are essential if dexmedetomidine is used as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen in view of its hemodynamic side effects. PMID:26712980

  15. Efficacy of intraarticular dexamethasone for postoperative analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Dhurjoti Prosad; Biswas, Chaitali; Haldar, Purba; Ghosh, Sujata; Piplai, Gautam; Rudra, Jati Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: In an attempt to improve the recovery and early rehabilitation after arthroscopic knee surgery, various medications have been administered via intra-articular route to prolong the duration and improve the quality of postoperative analgesia. Among the potentially effective substances, steroids like dexamethasone could be of particular interest. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients undergoing elective knee arthroscopy were randomly assigned to one of the following groups containing 25 patients each. Group D patients received 8 mg (2 mL) of dexamethasone added to 18 mL of 0.25% levobupivacaine intra-articularly, (total volume 20 mL). Group L patients received 18 mL of 0.25% levobupivacaine and 2 mL of isotonic saline (20 mL in total) intra-articularly. Analgesic effect was evaluated by measuring pain intensity visual analogue scale score and duration of analgesia. Results: A longer delay was observed between intra-articular injection of study medication and first requirement of supplementary analgesic in Group D (10.24 ± 2.8 hours) compared with Group L (5.48 ± 1.6 h). Total consumption of diclofenac sodium in first 24 h in postoperative period was significantly less in Group D. No significant side effects were noted. Conclusion: Dexamethasone, used as adjunct to levobupivacaine in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery, improves the quality and prolongs the duration of postoperative analgesia. PMID:25190949

  16. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  17. Subtalar arthroscopy using a 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope: indication, technical experience, and results.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mashfiqul A; Chong, Keen Wai; Yeo, William; Rao, Mohana S; Rikhraj, Inderjeet S

    2010-08-01

    The subtalar joint is complex. With the advent of smaller diameter arthroscopes, subtalar arthroscopy has become an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool for subtalar joint disorders. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients who underwent arthroscopy for subtalar joint disorders using a 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope. In this prospective study, 6 patients who underwent subtalar arthroscopy from September 2008 to January 2009 in the authors' institution were included. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores were recorded preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mean +/- SD age was 45.5 +/- 16.2 years (range, 27.5-63.2). Postoperative diagnosis included arthrofibrosis, osteoarthritis, and osteochondral disease of the subtalar joint. Mean +/- SD AOFAS scores improved from 49.67 +/- 18.83 (range, 22-76) to 67.33 +/- 14.92 (range, 53-91) at 3 months (P = .03) and 75 +/- 19.74 (range, 54-100) at 6 months (P = .004). Subtalar arthroscopy using the 2.4-mm zero-degree arthroscope shows promising results in the diagnosis and treatment of subtalar pathologies. Patients have a significant improvement in their AOFAS hindfoot scores as early as 3 months and continue to improve subsequently. Usage of the zero-degree arthroscope allows the "instrumentation hand" to maneuver more easily in space and perform the operative procedure without getting in the way of the "camera hand." It can also save on inventory costs for centers that already have the zero-degree arthroscope. The role of specialized imaging is still unclear. Diagnosis of sinus tarsi syndrome should be historical with direct visualization of the joint revealing exact etiology. PMID:20530192

  18. Repairs of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and the host composite structure.

  19. Biomechanical testing of a new knotless suture anchor compared with established anchors for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Matthias F; Froehlich, Valerie; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    Various suture anchors are available for rotator cuff repair. For arthroscopic application, a knotless anchor was developed to simplify the intra-operative handling. We compared the new knotless anchor (BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC; DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) with established absorbable and titanium suture anchors (UltraSorbtrade mark and Super Revo 5mmtrade mark; ConMed Linvatec, Utica, NY). Each anchor was tested on 6 human cadaveric shoulders. The anchors were inserted into the greater tuberosity. An incremental cyclic loading was performed. Ultimate failure loads, anchor displacement, and mode of failure were recorded. The anchor displacement of the BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC (15.3 +/- 5.3 mm) after the first cycle with 75 N was significantly higher than with the two other anchors (Super Revo 2.1 +/- 1.6 mm, UltraSorb: 2.7 +/- 1.1 mm). There was no significant difference in the ultimate failure loads of the 3 anchors. Although the Bioknotlesstrade mark RC indicated comparable maximal pullout strength, it bares the risk of losing contact between the tendon-bone-interface due to a significantly higher system displacement. Therefore, gap formation between the bone and the soft tissue fixation jeopardizes the repair. Bioknotlesstrade mark RC should be used in the lateral row only when a double row technique for rotator cuff repair is performed, and is not appropriate for rotator cuff repair if used on its own. PMID:18396417

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  1. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Hoburg, Arnd; Wilde, Sophie; Schatka, Imke; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months. Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA) were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation. Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18) years), who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%). Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9) points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%). All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for hardware removal. Further clinical studies with larger patient cohorts and a control group are needed to further confirm these preliminary results. PMID:26816668

  2. Hiatal hernia repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the stomach into the esophagus. Hiatal hernia repair is surgery to repair a bulging of stomach tissue through the muscle ... diaphragm) into the chest (hiatal hernia). Hiatal hernia repair may be recommended when the patient has: severe ...

  3. Hypospadias repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your child had hypospadias repair to fix a birth defect in which the urethra does not end at the tip of the penis. The urethra ... bladder to outside the body. The type of repair that was done depends on how severe the ...

  4. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  5. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

  6. Transfer of arthroscopic skills from computer simulation training to the operating theatre: a review of evidence from two randomised controlled studies

    PubMed Central

    Boutefnouchet, Tarek; Laios, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is paucity in the research on transfer validity of arthroscopic simulator training. The aim of this article is to determine whether skills derived from arthroscopic simulation are transferrable to the operating theatre and retained over time. Methods: A systematic review with rigorous criteria to identify the highest level of evidence available was carried out. The studies were critically appraised with narrative data synthesis. Results: Twenty-one studies on arthroscopic simulation were identified. Only two studies were randomised controlled trials. The first article demonstrated improved performance of basic knee arthroscopic tasks following a fixed period of training. The second article showed improved performance of arthroscopic tasks and no deterioration in the levels of skills following a period of six months. In addition, the two studies succeeded in demonstrating the importance of 3D motion analysis using computer simulators in the assessment of technical skills. Components of evaluation such as time to task completion, distance travelled by instruments and incidence of instruments collisions were associated with the highest validity and reliability of assessment. This systematic review highlighted the limitations of these two randomised studies. Discussion: Evidence from the two trials suggests that knee arthroscopy simulator training can result in improved performance. This review helped highlight the contribution of the two studies in terms of internal validity and consistency of using arthroscopic skills training. Further level I studies are however required to demonstrate the evidence for transfer and predictive validity of computer simulation as a training instrument.

  7. Suture button suspensionplasty after arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy for treatment of thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christopher A; Zlotolow, Dan A; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-10-01

    A myriad of techniques for reconstruction of the arthritic thumb carpometacarpal joint have been described. In the modern era, there has been a push, driven by both clinicians and patients, for more rapid rehabilitation after these procedures. A majority of the historically described techniques require pinning of the thumb ray for 4 weeks. Suture button placement between the thumb and index ray metacarpals has been shown in biomechanical studies to effectively resist subsidence of the thumb ray. We describe a novel technique of using a suture button for suspensionplasty of the thumb ray after arthroscopic partial trapeziectomy. This technique allows for early mobilization and may offer a potential improvement on current techniques. Early results of use of this technique are encouraging, but well-conducted follow-up studies are necessary. PMID:20887938

  8. Arthroscopic tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis in neurological pathologies: outcomes after at least one year of follow up.

    PubMed

    Mencière, Maxime-Louis; Ferraz, Linda; Mertl, Patrice; Vernois, Joël; Gabrion, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    The main complications of open tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis are wound healing disorders and nonunion. Our hypothesis was that arthroscopy and interlocking intramedullary nailing decrease these complications. We retrospectively reviewed six patients (mean age: 58 years; mean preoperative Kitaoka score: 51/100) having undergone arthroscopic tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nailing between January and November 2011 for equinus deformity of the hindfoot and subtalar instability of neurological origin. Postoperative pain disappeared completely in four cases, one patient presented some pain associated with projection of the proximal locking screw head under the skin and the remaining patient presented fibular tendinitis that resolved after infiltration of anti-inflammatory drugs. The mean postoperative Kitaoka score was 64/100. None of the patients presented any wound healing complications or nonunion. The observed incidence of wound complications and bone consolidation disorders after tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis was lower than the ones reported for open tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Level of clinical evidence IV: retrospective case series. PMID:26984662

  9. Cerebral tissue oxygen saturation during arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair and lateral decubitus position.

    PubMed

    Meex, Ingrid; Genbrugge, Cornelia; De Deyne, Cathy; Jans, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is a common procedure and can be performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position (LDP) or beach chair position (BCP). Although the BCP is associated with better visualization and less bleeding, it has also been associated with hemodynamic changes and consequently cerebral hypoperfusion. Devastating events reported after surgery in the BCP were attributed to a combination of the upright position and hypotension. Besides position and blood pressure, ventilator management and type of anesthesia should be taken into account. Near infrared spectroscopy might be able to provide an early warning sign of cerebral hypoperfusion during shoulder surgery in the BCP. It was therefore recommended to continuously monitor cerebral oxygenation in patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the BCP, to potentially prevent devastating outcomes. However, more clinical research on the safe lower limits of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation is needed for this recommendation to gain broad acceptance. PMID:26103737

  10. Arthroscopic Superior Capsular Reconstruction for Treatment of Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Alan M.; Adams, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears have been troublesome entities to treat, especially in younger patients. Few good options exist, leaving most patients in recent years receiving a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty carries serious risks, a limited lifespan, and no other viable options should it fail. Recent biomechanical studies have shown that the superior capsule is critical to containing the glenohumeral joint reduced, allowing the larger muscles like the deltoid and pectoralis major to function properly. The superior capsular reconstruction is an anatomic reconstruction of the superior capsule to restore the normal restraint to superior translation that occurs with a deficient rotator cuff. The technique described in this article is an arthroscopic reconstruction of the superior capsule with dermal allograft. PMID:26870638

  11. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF THE LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Pires, Davi Calixto; Neto, Jose da Mota; Rossato, Luis Henrique; Checchia, Sergio Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from patients with lateral epicondylitis following surgical treatment using the arthroscopy technique. Methods: Twenty patients underwent surgery using the arthroscopic technique. Their ages ranged from 19 to 54 years (average of 41 years and eight months). Twelve (60%) of them were female and eight (40%) were male. The minimum follow-up period was 12 months and the maximum was 48 months, with an average of 20 months. All the cases were refractory to conservative treatment (rest and physiotherapy), with previous clinical treatment times ranging in duration from six to 136 months. To evaluate the results, we used the criteria of the American Medical Association (AMA), as modified by Bruce. Results: We obtained 13 excellent results (65%) and seven moderate results (13%), with just one complication (reflex sympathetic dystrophy). This was the only patient who reported dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of the lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using arthroscopy was a good option for 65% of the cases.

  12. Anatomical reference point for harvesting a flexor graft during arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Lopes, Clécio; Arantes, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Victor Lapenda; Pinto, Dilamar Moreira; Gonçalves, Marcelo Carvalho Krause; Gonçalves, Romeu Carvalho Krause

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of a vascular network adjacent to the insertion of the pes anserinus, so that it could be used as an anatomical reference point to facilitate harvesting flexor grafts for arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty patients with ACL tears who were going to undergo ACL reconstruction using the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles as grafts were selected randomly. During the harvesting of these tendons, the presence or absence of this anatomical reference point was noted. Results All the patients presented a vascular network of greater or lesser diameter. Conclusion The vascular network seems to be a good reference point during harvesting of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, for facilitating graft harvesting. PMID:26229911

  13. Hypotensive bradycardic events during shoulder arthroscopic surgery under interscalene brachial plexus blocks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seok Young

    2012-01-01

    Sudden, profound hypotensive and bradycardic events (HBEs) have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. Although HBEs may be associated with the adverse effects of interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in the sitting position, the underlying mechanisms responsible for HBEs during the course of shoulder surgery are not well understood. The basic mechanisms of HBEs may be associated with the underlying mechanisms responsible for vasovagal syncope, carotid sinus hypersensitivity or orthostatic syncope. In this review, we discussed the possible mechanisms of HBEs during shoulder arthroscopic surgery, in the sitting position, under ISBPB. In particular, we focused on the relationship between HBEs and various types of syncopal reactions, the relationship between HBEs and the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, and the new contributing factors for the occurrence of HBEs, such as stellate ganglion block or the intraoperative administration of intravenous fentanyl. PMID:22474545

  14. Loop Biceps Tenotomy: An Arthroscopic Technique for Long Head of Biceps Tenotomy

    PubMed Central

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Bihel, Thomas; Dubois, Elodie; Teboul, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon is frequently involved in shoulder pathologies, often in relation to inflammatory or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff. Biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove and tenotomy are the main treatment options. Tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon is a simpler and quicker procedure than tenodesis, and it does not require the use of implants. However, retraction of the biceps tendon, leading to Popeye deformity, and biceps muscle cramps are common complications after tenotomy. Therefore we propose an arthroscopic technique for tenotomy that limits the risk of Popeye deformity. This procedure consists of creating a loop at the severed end of the biceps tendon, which prevents the tendon from retracting into the bicipital groove. PMID:25264503

  15. Loop biceps tenotomy: an arthroscopic technique for long head of biceps tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Bihel, Thomas; Dubois, Elodie; Teboul, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon is frequently involved in shoulder pathologies, often in relation to inflammatory or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff. Biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove and tenotomy are the main treatment options. Tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon is a simpler and quicker procedure than tenodesis, and it does not require the use of implants. However, retraction of the biceps tendon, leading to Popeye deformity, and biceps muscle cramps are common complications after tenotomy. Therefore we propose an arthroscopic technique for tenotomy that limits the risk of Popeye deformity. This procedure consists of creating a loop at the severed end of the biceps tendon, which prevents the tendon from retracting into the bicipital groove. PMID:25264503

  16. "Relaxed" biceps proximal tenodesis: an arthroscopic technique with decreased residual tendon tension.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Philippe; Benedetto, Ivan; Maqdes, Ali; Lima, Sara; Moraiti, Constantina

    2014-10-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) at the upper part of the bicipital groove has been related to persistent postoperative bicipital pain. This is possibly due to the inflammation of the remaining tendon within the groove. This, in turn, could be attributed to the continual mechanical stress placed on the tendon in the narrow bicipital groove. Theoretically, should the LHB be more "relaxed," the mechanical stress applied on it would be diminished. On the basis of this rationale, we present an arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, according to which the tendon is fixed at the entrance of the bicipital groove, using a bioabsorbable screw, relaxed by 5 mm. In this lax position, the residual LHB tension is expected to be decreased compared with the initial tension, whereas no cosmetic deformity (Popeye sign) or impaired muscular performance is anticipated. PMID:25473621

  17. “Relaxed” Biceps Proximal Tenodesis: An Arthroscopic Technique With Decreased Residual Tendon Tension

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Philippe; Benedetto, Ivan; Maqdes, Ali; Lima, Sara; Moraiti, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) at the upper part of the bicipital groove has been related to persistent postoperative bicipital pain. This is possibly due to the inflammation of the remaining tendon within the groove. This, in turn, could be attributed to the continual mechanical stress placed on the tendon in the narrow bicipital groove. Theoretically, should the LHB be more “relaxed,” the mechanical stress applied on it would be diminished. On the basis of this rationale, we present an arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, according to which the tendon is fixed at the entrance of the bicipital groove, using a bioabsorbable screw, relaxed by 5 mm. In this lax position, the residual LHB tension is expected to be decreased compared with the initial tension, whereas no cosmetic deformity (Popeye sign) or impaired muscular performance is anticipated. PMID:25473621

  18. Graft infection following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Wee, James; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) is a rare complication and associated with severe morbidity. Its risk factors include (1) concomitant procedures during the reconstruction, (2) previous knee surgery, (3) allograft usage, (4) peri-operative wound contamination, and (5) presence of intra-articular foreign bodies. We present a series of 3 men and one woman aged 22 to 35 years who developed septic arthritis following ACL reconstruction. The risk factors identified were local infection (n=2), previous ipsilateral knee surgery (n=2), and the use of an allograft (n=1). All patients underwent emergency knee washout and debridement with graft retention within 24 hours, together with a course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. All the patients achieved eradication of their infections (with intact ACL grafts) and satisfactory functional outcome at a mean follow-up of 32 (range, 25-45) months. PMID:24781628

  19. Hip Arthroscopic Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation for Treating Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takanori; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Watanuki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Akinori; Uchida, Soshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoral head is not a common source of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy is becoming a more frequent indication for intra-articular pathologies of the hip. Osteochondral autologous transplantation is a promising technique that theoretically can reconstruct osteochondral lesions of the femoral head. We describe our technique for arthroscopic antegrade osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of OCD of the femoral head. The advantages of this technique include that it is a less invasive method with the ability to assess and treat intra-articular pathologies associated with OCD of the femoral head at same time. Case series and outcomes after this technique are not currently reported in the literature; however, it could be a less invasive method and provide favorable clinical outcomes for patients with OCD lesions of the femoral head. PMID:26870645

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  1. Prediction of post-operative pain following arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is increasingly performed as a day case procedure. Optimal post-operative pain relief remains a challenge due to considerable variations in the level of pain experienced between individuals. Our aim was to examine whether the preoperative electrical pain threshold was a strong predictor of elevated postoperative pain levels following arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) surgery. Methods: Forty consenting patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade 1-2 presenting for elective ASD surgery were recruited. Patients’ electrical pain thresholds were measured preoperatively using a PainMatcher® (Cefar Medical AB, Lund, Sweden) device. Following surgery under general anaesthesia, the maximum pain experienced at rest and movement was recorded using a visual analogue scale until the end of postoperative day four. Results: In univariate analyses (t-test), the postoperative pain experienced (Area Under Curve) was significantly greater in patients with a low pain threshold as compared with a high pain threshold at both rest (mean 12.5, S.E. 1.7 v mean 6.5, S.E.1.2. P=0.008) and on movement (mean 18.7, S.E. 1.5 v mean 14.1, S.E.1.4. P=0.031). In multivariate analyses, adjusting for additional extra analgesia, the pain experienced postoperatively was significantly greater in the low pain threshold group both at rest (mean difference 4.9, 95% CI 1.5 to 8.4, P=0.007) and on movement (mean difference 4.1, 95%CI 0.03 to 8.2, P=0.049). Conclusions: Preoperative pain threshold can predict postoperative pain level following ASD of the shoulder. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01351363 Level of Evidence: II PMID:24358863

  2. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David; Baker, Andrew R.; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Kim, Myung-Sun; Ricchetti, Eric T.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy. Methods Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks. Results The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed. Conclusions This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy. PMID:26808837

  3. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Brian M; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O'Donnell, John M

    2016-04-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  4. Computer-Simulated Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: Effects of Distraction on Resident Performance.

    PubMed

    Cowan, James B; Seeley, Mark A; Irwin, Todd A; Caird, Michelle S

    2016-03-01

    Orthopedic surgeons cite "full focus" and "distraction control" as important factors for achieving excellent outcomes. Surgical simulation is a safe and cost-effective way for residents to practice surgical skills, and it is a suitable tool to study the effects of distraction on resident surgical performance. This study investigated the effects of distraction on arthroscopic knee simulator performance among residents at various levels of experience. The authors hypothesized that environmental distractions would negatively affect performance. Twenty-five orthopedic surgery residents performed a diagnostic knee arthroscopy computer simulation according to a checklist of structures to identify and tasks to complete. Participants were evaluated on arthroscopy time, number of chondral injuries, instances of looking down at their hands, and completion of checklist items. Residents repeated this task at least 2 weeks later while simultaneously answering distracting questions. During distracted simulation, the residents had significantly fewer completed checklist items (P<.02) compared with the initial simulation. Senior residents completed the initial simulation in less time (P<.001), with fewer chondral injuries (P<.005) and fewer instances of looking down at their hands (P<.012), compared with junior residents. Senior residents also completed 97% of the diagnostic checklist, whereas junior residents completed 89% (P<.019). During distracted simulation, senior residents continued to complete tasks more quickly (P<.006) and with fewer instances of looking down at their hands (P<.042). Residents at all levels appear to be susceptible to the detrimental effects of distraction when performing arthroscopic simulation. Addressing even straightforward questions intraoperatively may affect surgeon performance. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e240-e245.]. PMID:26811955

  5. Arthroscopic Fixation of Comminuted Glenoid Fractures Using Cannulated Screws and Suture Anchors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bangtuo; Qi, Wei; Li, Chunbao; Shen, Xuezhen; Guo, Qi; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Jiangtao; Li, Hongliang; Lu, Xi; Liu, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic fixation of comminuted glenoid fractures using cannulated screws and suture anchors.We retrospectively review 11 cases of closed comminuted glenoid fractures treated at our institution from August 2010 to May 2013. The 11 patients, 8 males and 3 females, had a mean age of 41 years (range: 27-55 years). The mechanisms of injury were traffic accidents in 9 cases and falls from height in 2 cases. The mean time from injury to surgery was 12 days (range: 3-28 days). All glenoid fractures were confirmed on x-ray and computed tomography. The major fracture fragments were fixed with cannulated screws and the small fragments were fixed with suture anchors.All surgical wounds healed with primary closure and no complications including infection and neurovascular damage were observed. All 11 patients were followed up for a mean of 21 months (range: 14-29 months). Bone union was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 10 months. At the last follow-up, range of motion of the shoulder joint was significantly improved (P < 0.05). Both ASES scores (41.4 ± 24.9, 87.3 ± 13.8) and Rowe scores (28.2 ± 18.6, 93.2 ± 11.2) were significantly increased after the surgery (P < 0.01), indicating significantly improved function and stability of the shoulder joint.Arthroscopic fixation using cannulated screws and suture anchors is feasible for the treatment of comminuted glenoid fractures. This method is minimally invasive and provides good functional recovery with a lower risk of complications. PMID:26656324

  6. Arthroscopic surgical tools: A source of metal particles and possible joint damage

    PubMed Central

    Pedowitz, Robert A.; Billi, Fabrizio; Kavanaugh, Aaron; Colbert, Andrew; Liu, Sen; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our goals were (1) to characterize metal micro-particles created by standard arthroscopic instruments, and (2) to examine the in-vitro cellular responses induced by those particles, including possible synergistic effects with local anesthetic. Methods We applied standard surgical tools to 16 foam bone blocks immersed in saline (plus 3 non-instrumented controls). Eight specimens had four minutes of exposure to a 4.0 mm full radius shaver rotating forward at 6,000 RPM. In the other blocks, four holes were created with a 3.0 mm drill via a sleeve. Particles were isolated onto silicon wafers by density gradient ultra-centrifugation, and SEM analyzed a minimum of 1000 particles per wafer. Metal particles were then isolated and purified. Aliquots of sterilized micro-particles were applied to cultured bovine chondrocytes (+/- local anesthetic) and to cultured human or bovine synoviocytes. Chondrocyte viability was assessed with live/dead cell assay by flow cytometry. Synoviocyte responses were assessed with qPCR. Results Stainless steel or aluminum particles were found in each sample (same composition as surgical instruments). Average particle size was 1 to 2 μm (range 50 nm to 20 μm). Chondrocyte exposure (1 hour) to metal debris induced a small but statistically significant increase in cell death, without any synergistic effect of local anesthetic. Proinflammatory chemokines were consistently upregulated in both human and bovine synoviocytes exposed to metallic micro-particles for 3, 24, and 48 hours. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that metallic microdebris is liberated by common arthroscopic instruments, at scales much smaller than previously recognized. These particles are bioactive as demonstrated by the in-vitro synoviocyte responses initiated by metallic micro-particles. Clinical Relevance Our findings suggest that metallic micro-particles could induce intra-articular damage via a synoviocyte-mediated cytokine response if their concentrations reach clinically significant levels. PMID:23910000

  7. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Brian M.; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O’Donnell, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  8. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  9. Salvage Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer for a Failed Achilles Repair: Endoscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Sérgio; Caetano, Rubén; Corte-Real, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer is a well-established treatment option in failed Achilles tendon (AT) repair and has been routinely performed as an open procedure. We detail the surgical steps needed to perform an arthroscopic transfer of the FHL for a chronic AT rupture. The FHL tendon is harvested as it enters in its tunnel beneath the sustentaculum tali; a tunnel is then drilled in the calcaneus as near to the AT footprint as possible. By use of a suture-passing device, the free end of the FHL is advanced to the plantar aspect of the foot. After adequate tension is applied to the construct, the tendon is fixed in place with an interference screw in an inside-out fashion. This minimally invasive approach is a safe and valid alternative to classic open procedures with the obvious advantages of preserving the soft-tissue envelope and using a biologically intact tendon. PMID:26697296

  10. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  11. Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Postoperative Assisted Radiotherapy for Treating Diffuse Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee: An observational retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Xiaofei; Lin, Jianning; Ji, Wei; Ruan, Dike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective observational study aims to explore the treatment procedure and outcomes of arthroscopically assisted radiotherapy for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee joint. Methods: From September 2006 to August 2011, 28 diffuse PVNS patients were diagnosed and treated under arthroscopy. Twenty six underwent post-operative radiotherapy. All patients were followed up, and the average follow-up period was 54 months (range: 24 to 72 months). Results: All 26 patients who received external radiotherapy showed no recurrence at post-operative follow-up; The Lysholm knee joint function score increased from 54.3±9.0 at pre-operation to 71.2±6.7 at post-operation (paired t-test, t = −13.35, P< 0.01). Conclusions: Arthroscopic synovectomy is an ideal treatment for PVNS of the knee. Adjuvant post-operative external radiotherapy prevents the recurrence of diffuse PVNS. PMID:26430437

  12. Arthroscopic Burring of Exposed Cement Following Curettage and Cavity Filling Cementation for Chondroblastoma of the Proximal Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hoon; Chae, In-Jung; Han, Seung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia is difficult to treat because of its epiphyseal predilection. This condition can be treated by curettage, which results in immediate restoration of stability and a reduced recurrence rate, followed by cement filling of the bone defect. Nevertheless, contact with cement can damage articular cartilage, potentially leading to severe knee osteoarthritis. Most previous reports regarding this complication described patients with giant cell tumors of the proximal tibia. We present here a patient who underwent arthroscopic treatment for cement exposure caused by articular cartilage loss of the tibial plateau, which occurred after initial curettage and cementation for chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic treatment of this condition. PMID:25750896

  13. Arthroscopic burring of exposed cement following curettage and cavity filling cementation for chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hoon; Chae, In-Jung; Han, Seung-Beom; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-03-01

    Chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia is difficult to treat because of its epiphyseal predilection. This condition can be treated by curettage, which results in immediate restoration of stability and a reduced recurrence rate, followed by cement filling of the bone defect. Nevertheless, contact with cement can damage articular cartilage, potentially leading to severe knee osteoarthritis. Most previous reports regarding this complication described patients with giant cell tumors of the proximal tibia. We present here a patient who underwent arthroscopic treatment for cement exposure caused by articular cartilage loss of the tibial plateau, which occurred after initial curettage and cementation for chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic treatment of this condition. PMID:25750896

  14. Timpani Repair and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, F. Michael

    1980-01-01

    Rather than focusing on specific brands of timpani, these guidelines for repair cover mechanical problems of a general nature: pedals, dents, unclear tone, and squeaking. Preventive maintenance is discussed. (Author/SJL)

  15. Planning Maintenance and Repairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of school facility design as an aid to efficiently repairing and maintaining facility systems. Also presents details on facility design's influence in properly maintaining mechanical and electrical systems. (GR)

  16. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one ...

  17. Easily repairable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a simple class of distribution networks which withstand damage by being repairable instead of redundant. Instead of asking how hard it is to disconnect nodes through damage, we ask how easy it is to reconnect nodes after damage. We prove that optimal networks on regular lattices have an expected cost of reconnection proportional to the lattice length, and that such networks have exactly three levels of structural hierarchy. We extend our results to networks subject to repeated attacks, in which the repairs themselves must be repairable. We find that, in exchange for a modest increase in repair cost, such networks are able to withstand any number of attacks. We acknowledge support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, BCG and EU FP7 (Growthcom).

  18. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... your belly (abdominal cavity) that pushes through a hole in the abdominal wall at the belly button. ... Strong stitches will be used to repair the hole or weak spot caused by the umbilical hernia. ...

  19. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) Pipe diameter sizes range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.). The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. An evaluation of potential repair methods clearly indicates that the project should continue to focus on the development of a repair process involving the use of GMAW welding and on the development of a repair process involving the use of fiber-reinforced composite liners.

  20. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You had a fracture (break) in the femur, also called the thigh bone, in your leg. You may have needed surgery to repair ... surgeon will make a cut to open your fracture. Your surgeon will then use special metal devices ...

  1. Outcome of Simultaneous Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Kumari Mahapatra, Amita; Priyadarshi, Ashok; Singha Das, Dibya; Palo, Nishit; Ranjan Biswal, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiligamentous injuries of knee are a complex problem in orthopaedics. Combined ACL-PCL injuries are uncommon, usually associated with knee dislocations. Extremity vascular status is essential because of possible arterio-venous compromise. These complex injuries require a systematic evaluation and treatment. Single setting simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction or a staged approach can be adopted to treat these cases. Objectives: To evaluate functional outcome of simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft in multiligamentous knee injuries. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 20 patients with combined ACL-PCL injuries who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic ACL-PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Evaluation of functional outcome was by IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores. Results: In 20 patients, mean age 34 years, return to full-time work and to full sports was 8 weeks and 6.2 months respectively. All patients had full range of motion except 2 patients with < 5 degrees flexion loss; 90% had negative Lachmann test; 95% had negative pivot shift and 10% patients had mild posterior drawer at 90 degrees (1+) at final follow up. Mean IKDC score was 90 (range 81 - 94); mean Tegner activity score was 7 and mean Lysholm knee score was 89. 85% returned to preinjury activity level and a 90% satisfaction rate. Conclusions: Simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstructions using hamstring tendon for combined ACL and PCL injuries is a clinically effective, safe, time saving and cost-effective procedure with better patient compliance and reproducible for a timely return of motion, strength, and function with favorable outcome.

  2. Short-term evaluation of arthroscopic management of tennis elbow; including resection of radio-capitellar capsular complex

    PubMed Central

    Babaqi, AbdulRahman A.; Kotb, Mohammed M.; Said, Hatem G.; AbdelHamid, Mohamed M.; ElKady, Hesham A.; ElAssal, Maher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been controversy regarding the pathogenesis and treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Different surgical techniques for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis prescribed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term outcomes of arthroscopic management including resection of the radio-capitellar capsular complex, using different validated scores. Methods In this study, arthroscopic resection of a capsular fringe complex was done beside debridement of the undersurface of Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis (ECRB). Thirty-one patients with recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis for a minimum of 6 months had surgery. In all patients, a collar-like band of radio-capitellar capsular complex was found to impinge on the radial head and subluxate into the radio-capitellar joint with manipulation under direct vision. Outcomes were assessed using Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI), the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), and the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), beside visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and satisfaction criteria. Results After arthroscopic surgery, overall satisfaction was extremely positive, over the 31 patients, 93.5% of the patients are satisfied. The mean score for pain improved from 8.64 to 1.48 points. The total PRTEE improved from 55.53 to 10.39 points. The mean MEPI score was improved from 61.82 to 94.10 points. DASH score also improved from 24.46 to 4.81 points. All improvements are statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion Arthroscopic release of ECRB in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis is a reproducible method with a marked improvement in function within a short period, with special consideration for resection of radio-capitellar capsular complex. PMID:25104891

  3. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. PMID:26638062

  4. Unilateral cleft lip repair.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Raj M; Warren, Stephen M

    2014-04-01

    Modern cleft surgery requires four-dimensional and functional anatomic understanding of the cleft (and noncleft) lip, nose, and alveolus. Some techniques for nasolabial repair rely more on precise anatomic geometry, whereas others afford the surgeon a more flexible design. Consistent anthropometry enables accurate assessment and reporting of long-term outcomes; such reports are needed to guide perioperative care, delineate optimal repair principles, and resolve ongoing controversies. PMID:24607186

  5. Proximal Hamstring Repair Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Margaret Ann; Singh, Hardeep; Obopilwe, Elifho; Charette, Ryan; Miller, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal hamstring repair for complete ruptures has become a common treatment. There is no consensus in the literature about postoperative rehabilitation protocols following proximal hamstring repair. Some protocols describe bracing to prevent hip flexion or knee extension while others describe no immobilization. There are currently no biomechanical studies evaluating proximal hamstring repairs; nor are there any studies evaluating the effect of different hip flexion angles on these repairs. Hypothesis: As hip flexion increases from 0° to 90°, there will be a greater gap with cyclical loading. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Proximal hamstring insertions were detached from the ischial tuberosity in 24 cadavers and were repaired with 3 single-loaded suture anchors in the hamstring footprint with a Krakow suture technique. Cyclic loading from 10 to 125 N at 1 Hz was then performed for 0°, 45°, and 90° of hip flexion for 1500 cycles. Gap formation, stiffness, yield load, ultimate load, and energy to ultimate load were compared between groups using paired t tests. Results: Cyclic loading demonstrated the least amount of gap formation (P < .05) at 0° of hip flexion (2.39 mm) and most at 90° of hip flexion (4.19 mm). There was no significant difference in ultimate load between hip flexion angles (326, 309, and 338 N at 0°, 45°, and 90°, respectively). The most common mode of failure occurred with knot/suture failure (n = 17). Conclusion: Increasing hip flexion from 0° to 90° increases the displacement across proximal hamstring repairs. Postoperative bracing that limits hip flexion should be considered. Clinical Relevance: Repetitive motion involving hip flexion after a proximal hamstring repair may cause compromise of the repair. PMID:26665049

  6. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  7. Photoaging and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Shinichi; Takahashi, Yoshito

    2008-06-01

    The incidence of sunlight-induced skin changes (photoaged skin, skin carcinogenesis) increases with increasing age and it is thought to be associated with an accumulation of mutations in skin cells. These mutations are mainly caused by UV exposure. The reactive oxygen species produced in UV-exposed skin can cause various kinds of DNA damages e.g., 8-oxoguanine, which are primarily repaired by the base excision repair (BER) system. In addition, UV can directly cause DNA damages; cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP), both of which can be repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. There have been several reports showing an age-related reduction in the DNA repair capacity in the NER, BER, and other repair systems, which contributes to the phenotypes of aging. To clarify the mechanism of skin aging, we examined the NER of skin fibroblasts from healthy donors of different ages. In a host cell reactivation assay, the cells from elderly donors exhibited a significant decline in the ability to restore transfected reporter DNA damaged by UV. In contrast, the ability to remove CPD and 6-4PP declined little with age, as assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA expression of DNA repair synthesis-related genes was markedly decreased in the cells from elderly subjects as compared with those from young subjects. These results imply that the age-sensitive step took place after the damage excision in the NER, and that there is an impairment of the latter step of the NER in aging. Based on our data, as well as other reports, the reduced post-UV DNA repair capacity in aging resulting in an accumulation of UV-induced DNA damage is thus considered to be associated with the phenotypes of photoaged skin. PMID:17920816

  8. Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Laura; Peetz, Michael; Ratzer, Erick

    1998-01-01

    Background and Objective: Paraesophageal hernias are uncommon yet potentially lethal conditions. Their repair has now been facilitated by laparoscopic technology. We present a series of 20 patients with paraesophageal hernias repaired laparoscopically. Methods: Twenty patients with paraesophageal hernias had laparoscopic repairs. Eighteen patients had primary repair of their hiatal defect. Two required mesh reinforcement. Fifteen patients had a fundoplication procedure performed concomitantly. Results: Long-term follow-up is available on 17 patients. There was no in-hospital morbidity or mortality. Average length of stay was 2.3 days. One patient recurred in the immediate postoperative period. There were no other recurrences. The only death in the series occurred in the oldest patient 18 days postoperatively. He had been discharged from the hospital and died of cardiac failure. No patients have had complications from a paraesophageal hernia postoperatively. Conclusion: Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias is possible. Preoperative work-up should include motility evaluation to assess esophageal peristalsis as the majority of these will need a concomitant anti-reflux procedure. This data helps the surgeon to determine whether or not a complete or partial wrap should be done. Repair of the diaphragmatic defect can be accomplished in the majority of patients without the use of prosthetic material with excellent results. PMID:9876752

  9. Arthroscopic-Assisted Treatment of a Reversed Hill-Sachs Lesion: Description of a New Technique Using Cerament

    PubMed Central

    Bark, S.; Renken, F.; Schulz, A. P.; Paech, A.; Gille, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Impaction fractures of the anterior aspect of the humeral head, the reversed Hill-Sachs lesion, are common in posterior shoulder dislocation. We present a new technique to address these lesions arthroscopic-assisted with the use of a bone substitute. Methods. We report the case of a 45-year-old male with a reversed Hill-Sachs lesion after posterior shoulder dislocation. Initially a glenohumeral arthroscopy is performed to address concomitant intra-articular injuries. Guided by the k-wire a cannulated sizer was inserted for reduction of the fracture under arthroscopic visualization. For reduction of the impacted part of the humeral head the subcortical defect was filled with an injectable bone substitute (Cerament) to prevent secondary dislocation. Results. X-ray at follow-up 6 months after the index procedure documents the bony remodeling of the bone substitute. At that time the patient was pain-free (VAS 0) and satisfied with the outcome (Constant score: 78, Rand-36 score: 84, Rowe score: 81) with a good ROM. Conclusions. In conclusion, arthroscopic-assisted reconstruction of reversed Hill-Sachs lesions with an injectable bone substitute is feasible and may provide patients with all the benefits of an anatomic reconstruction with decreased risks related to open surgery. PMID:25688315

  10. Comparative analysis on arthroscopic sutures of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries in relation to the degree of osteopenia☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Atti, Vinícius; Agostini, Daniel Cecconi; Valin, Márcio Rangel; de Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries, according to the patient's degree of osteopenia. Method 138 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries between 2003 and 2011 were analyzed. Those operated from October 2008 onwards formed a prospective cohort, while the remainder formed a retrospective cohort. Also from October 2008 onwards, bone densitometry evaluation was requested at the time of the surgical treatment. For the patients operated before this date, densitometry examinations performed up to two years before or after the surgical treatment were investigated. The patients were divided into three groups. Those with osteoporosis formed group 1 (n = 16); those with osteopenia, group 2 (n = 33); and normal individuals, group 3 (n = 55). Results In analyzing the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores of group 3 and comparing them with group 2, no statistically significant difference was seen (p = 0.070). Analysis on group 3 in comparison with group 1 showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.027). Conclusion The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries seem to be influenced by the patient's bone mineral density, as assessed using bone densitometry. PMID:26229899

  11. Reappraisal of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1981-04-01

    In every case of acute injury involving the nerve, the surgeon must decide whether a primary repair of an elective early secondary repair is the treatment of choice. In a clean-cut nerve without defect, immediate primary repair, using trunk-to-trunk coaptation with epineurial sutures, offers an optimal solution. In the periphery of the median and the ulnar nerves, in which motor and sensory fascicles are already separated, fascicular dissection is performed, and coaptation of fascicle groups should be done. In medical centers with excellent facilities, such nerve repair will give good results even in very severe lesions. This repair can be performed also as a delayed primary procedure. If there is a nerve defect, a primary grafting procedure must be considered. We do not recommend this as a routine procedure because the nerve grafts might be lost if a complication occurs. The decision to perform a planned early secondary repair is an equally good alternative, especially in cases of a nerve defect, severe concomitant injuries, or both. In case of a combined nerve and tendon lesion in the carpal tunnel, the nerve repair can be performed at a later procedure without exposing the repaired flexor tendons, thus avoiding adhesion between tendons and nerves. If a decision is made in favor of an early secondary repair, the two stumps can be approximated by stitches to prevent retraction, if this can be achieved without tension. Approximation under tension in case of a larger defect would damage the two stumps and create an even larger defect. Marking the nerve ends by sutures is not necessary because exploration with always start in normal tissue, exposing the nerves from the proximal or the distal segments. Early secondary repair is performed during the third week, or later if this is demanded by local conditions. When indicated, plastic surgical procedures can eliminate constricting scars and provide an optimal soft tissue environment. After exploration and preparation of the two stumps, the surgeon must decide whether direct suturing or a nerve graft is indicated. If after very limited mobilization and slight flexion the nerve stumps cannot be coapted easily, a nerve graft should be used. The quality of motor recovery decreases steadily after a 6 month delay of repair. Late secondary repairs or reoperation of failure of primary repair should be performed within this time limit, although this does not mean that motor recovery cannot occur after a longer time interval. Useful motor recovery was achieved in certain cases after 18 months or more. Obviously the results might have been better if the time interval had been shorter. If a patient is seen with a nerve lesion after a long time interval, nerve repair is still indicated if sensibility is the main functional objective. In other long-standing cases, the nerve repair is combined with tendon transfer or capsulorrhaphy. After a particularly long time interval or in old patients, only palliative surgery is indicated. PMID:7233326

  12. The FasT-Fix Repair Technique for Ramp Lesion of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-ping; Song, Bin; Yang, Rui; Tan, Weiquan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to repair the peripheral attachment lesion of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. The operation was performed under arthroscopy using a standard anterior portal. Surgical Technique A FasT-Fix needle was inserted obliquely close to the tibial plateau and the first implant was inserted into the joint capsule depending on its bending angle underneath the meniscus. The second implant was inserted through 1/3 periphery of the meniscus into the meniscocapsular area. The pre-tied self-sliding knot was tensioned to achieve secure fixation of the posterior meniscal peripheral attachment at the original attachment point. Materials and Methods From August 2011 to February 2014, 23 knees were diagnosed as ramp lesion, underwent meniscal repair using FasT-Fix technique. Results All patients were followed up for average 14 months. The Lysholm score improved from preoperative 64.4±4.52 to postoperative 91.2±4.60. Conclusions We believe that the FasT-Fix technique via the standard anterior portal can be a more convenient and less traumatic alternative for repair of the peripheral attachment lesion of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus in the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee. PMID:25750895

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buono, Angelo Del; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is effective in the short term as an adjuvant treatment to reduce local inflammation, postoperative joint swelling, and recovery time, as well as to induce pain relief. Sixty-six patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for repair of small to medium rotator cuff tears were randomly divided into 2 groups with a block randomization procedure. Thirty-two patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and application of pulsed electromagnetic fields postoperatively; 34 patients underwent rotator cuff repair and placebo treatment (placebo group). All patients had the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At 3 months from the index procedure, visual analog scale, range of motion, and University of California at Los Angeles and Constant scores were significantly better in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group than in the placebo group (P<.05). Three patients in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 7 patients in the placebo group had mild to moderate capsulitis (P=.2). Severe capsulitis occurred in 1 patient in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 2 patients in the placebo group (P=.6). At the last follow-up (minimum, 2 years), clinical and functional outcomes were further improved in both groups, with no significant intergroup differences. Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is safe and reduces postoperative pain, analgesic use, and stiffness in the short term. At 2 years, no difference was seen in outcomes in patients who did or did not undergo treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. PMID:25760511

  14. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  15. Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, John A.; Brandel, Eric; Chahine, Nadeen O.; Sgaglione, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This review traces the genealogy of the field of articular cartilage repair from its earliest attempts to its present day vast proliferation of research advances. Prior to the 1980s there was only sporadic efforts to regenerate articular cartilage as it was considered to be incapable of regeneration based on historical dogma. The first flurry of reports documented the use of various cell types ultimately leading to the first successful demonstration of autologous chondrocyte transplantation which was later translated to clinical use and has resulted in the revised axiom that cartilage regeneration is possible. The current field of cartilage repair is multifaceted and some of the 1980s’ vintage concepts have been revisited with state of the art technology now available. The future of the field is now poised to undertake the repair of whole cartilage surfaces beyond focal defects and an appreciation for integrated whole joint health to restore cartilage homeostasis. PMID:26069673

  16. 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy for assessment of cartilage repair tissue: volumetric characterisation and correlation to established classification systems.

    PubMed

    Schöne, M; Männicke, N; Somerson, J S; Marquaß, B; Henkelmann, R; Mochida, J; Aigner, T; Raum, K; Schulz, R M

    2016-01-01

    Objective and sensitive assessment of cartilage repair outcomes lacks suitable methods. This study investigated the feasibility of 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify cartilage repair outcomes volumetrically and their correlation with established classification systems. 32 sheep underwent bilateral treatment of a focal cartilage defect. One or two years post-operatively the repair outcomes were assessed and scored macroscopically (Outerbridge, ICRS-CRA), by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MOCART), and histopathology (O'Driscoll, ICRS-I and ICRS-II). The UBM data were acquired after MRI and used to reconstruct the shape of the initial cartilage layer, enabling the estimation of the initial cartilage thickness and defect volume as well as volumetric parameters for defect filling, repair tissue, bone loss and bone overgrowth. The quantification of the repair outcomes revealed high variations in the initial thickness of the cartilage layer, indicating the need for cartilage thickness estimation before creating a defect. Furthermore, highly significant correlations were found for the defect filling estimated from UBM to the established classification systems. 3D visualisation of the repair regions showed highly variable morphology within single samples. This raises the question as to whether macroscopic, MRI and histopathological scoring provide sufficient reliability. The biases of the individual methods will be discussed within this context. UBM was shown to be a feasible tool to evaluate cartilage repair outcomes, whereby the most important objective parameter is the defect filling. Translation of UBM into arthroscopic or transcutaneous ultrasound examinations would allow non-destructive and objective follow-up of individual patients and better comparison between the results of clinical trials. PMID:26853622

  17. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, and produce modified schedules quickly. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  18. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, produce modified schedules, quickly, and exhibits 'anytime' behavior. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. We also show the anytime characteristics of the system. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  19. Patients with shoulder impingement remain satisfied 6 years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) is a common procedure for treatment of shoulder impingement, few long term results have been published. In this prospective study, we determined whether the high degree of patient satisfaction at 6 months postoperatively reported by us earlier remained at the 6-year follow-up. Patients and methods We originally reported high patient satisfaction 6 months after ASD for shoulder impingement in 50 prospectively studied patients using the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Patients with associated shoulder disorders were excluded. The surgeons were experienced shoulder arthroscopists. 6 years after surgery, the DASH questionnaire and the VAS were sent to these 50 patients. 2 patients had other medical problems of the upper extremity that affected the DASH and VAS scores, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and another refused to participate. Thus, 46 patients with a mean age of 55 (33–78) years were included in this 6-year evaluation. Results The considerable improvement in both the DASH score and the VAS that was observed 6 months after surgery persisted or had even improved 6 years after surgery. Interpretation Properly selected patients with shoulder impingement treated with ASD remain satisfied 6 years after surgery. PMID:21999621

  20. Arthroscopic shoulder surgery with three different laser systems: an evaluation of laser applications.

    PubMed

    Vangsness, C T; Smith, C F

    1995-12-01

    Twelve cadaveric shoulder arthroscopies were performed to evaluate the use of lasers as an adjunctive tool in arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The three most common lasers historically used in orthopedic surgery were examined: Holmium:YAG, Neodymium:YAG, and the CO2. The following parameters were evaluated for each laser system: (1) ease of use of the laser system and handpiece; (2) ability to excise and trim bursae, synovium, ligament, tendon, bone, and articular cartilage; and (3) ability to contract ligaments and capsule by heat transfer. None of these lasers efficiently cut bone, whereas all three systems readily debrided the soft tissues around the shoulder. The free-beam Ho:YAG and CO2 systems heat contracted soft tissues with more control than the contact Nd:YAG. The fiberoptic delivery system of the Neodymium:YAG and Holmium:YAG laser performed well in the saline arthroscopy, and the CO2 delivery system was cumbersome. Overall, the CO2 system removed tissue better than the others, but its difficult use favored the Holmium laser as the best overall current laser system for shoulder arthroscopy. PMID:8679031

  1. Functional Outcome in Athletes at Five Years of Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Devgan, Ashish; Magu, N. K.; Siwach, R. C.; Rohilla, Rajesh; Sangwan, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to analyze the functional outcome in competitive level athletes at 5 years after ACL reconstruction with regard to return to sports and the factors or reasons in those who either stopped sports or showed a fall in their sporting levels. Methods. 48 competitive athletes who had undergone arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction with a minimum follow up of at least 5 years were successfully recalled and were analyzed. Results. 22 patients had returned to the preinjury levels of sports and 18 showed a decrease in their sporting levels. Of the 18 patients, 12 referred to fear of reinjuring the same or contra-lateral knee as the prime reason for the same while 6 patients reported persisting knee pain and instability as reasons for a fall in their sporting abilities. The difference in the scores of these groups was statistically significant. 8 patients out of the 48 had left sports completely due to reasons other than sports, even though they had good knee outcome scores. Conclusion. Fear of reinjury and psychosocial issues that are relevant to the social milieu of the athlete are very important and affect the overall results of the surgery with respect to return to sports. PMID:24977065

  2. Utility of arthroscopic guided synovial biopsy in understanding synovial tissue pathology in health and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Wechalekar, Mihir D; Smith, Malcolm D

    2014-01-01

    The synovium is the soft tissue lining diarthrodial joints, tendon sheaths and bursae and is composed of intimal and subintimal layers. The intimal layer is composed of type A cells (macrophages) and type B cells (fibroblasts); in health, the subintima has few inflammatory cells. The synovium performs several homeostatic functions and is the primary target in several inflammatory arthritides. Inflammatory states are characterised by thickening of the synovial lining, macrophage recruitment and fibroblast proliferation, and an influx of inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, monocytes and plasma cells. Of the various methods employed to perform synovial biopsies arthroscopic techniques are considered the “gold standard”, and have an established safety record. Synovial biopsy has been of critical importance in understanding disease pathogenesis and has provided insight into mechanisms of action of targeted therapies by way of direct evidence about events in the synovial tissue in various arthritides. It has been very useful as a research tool for proof of concept studies to assess efficacy and mechanisms of new therapies, provide tissue for in vitro studies, proteomics and microarrays and allow evaluation for biomarkers that may help predict response to therapy and identify new targets for drug development. It also has diagnostic value in the evaluation of neoplastic or granulomatous disease or infection when synovial fluid analysis is non-contributory. PMID:25405084

  3. Arthroscopic Visualization of Abnormal Movement of Discoid Lateral Meniscus With Snapping Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Harato, Kengo; Niki, Yasuo; Nagashima, Masaki; Masumoto, Ko; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori

    2015-06-01

    Discoid lateral meniscus with snapping phenomenon is a rare pathologic condition. The purpose of this article is to present an arthroscopic technique for the treatment of discoid lateral meniscus with snapping phenomenon. The patient is placed in the supine position for confirmation of snapping. As the patient's knee bends, it can be confirmed by arthroscopy that the posterior horn of the discoid lateral meniscus moves posteriorly and the central portion of the discoid lateral meniscus moves anteriorly at the same time with snapping at deep flexion angles. The anterior segment of the discoid lateral meniscus is found to be redundant and is often folded. On the contrary, as the patient's knee extends, the central portion is returned to the original position accompanied by snapping at nearly full extension. After excision of the central portion, the movement of the meniscus is evaluated again and the disappearance of the snapping phenomenon can be confirmed. Although it includes limitations, this application is easy and would certainly help surgeons to treat snapping knee with discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:26258036

  4. [Arthroscopically assisted techniques for treatment of acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint injuries].

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Imhoff, A B; Martetschläger, F

    2015-05-01

    Acute and chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is frequently encountered in the routine clinical practice. This injury can lead to significant impairment of shoulder girdle function. Therapy based on the severity of injury is recommended to re-establish correct shoulder function. The static radiographic Rockwood classification is used to define the degree of dislocation but the clinical aspects and functional x-ray imaging of horizontal AC joint instability should also be considered for selection of the appropriate procedure. Rockwood grades I and II injuries are treated non-operatively with early functional exercise. The approach for Rockwood grade III injuries should be individual and patient-specific, with non-surgical procedures for low functional requirement patients with a high risk for surgical interventions. For patients with high demands on shoulder function surgery is recommended. A detailed diagnostic assessment frequently reveals Rockwood grade III injuries to be type IV injuries. Rockwood types IV and V AC joint dislocations require surgery for sustained stability. Treatment of acute injuries is recommended within 1-3 weeks after trauma but there is no clear evidence of a cut-off for the presence of chronic injuries. Various surgical techniques have been described in the literature. This article presents an arthroscopically assisted technique that addresses both vertical and horizontal instability of the AC joint. PMID:25964020

  5. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space.

    PubMed

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  6. C-reactive protein changes in the uncomplicated course of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Calvisi, V; Lupparelli, S

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of septic arthritis following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is often elusive and can only be confirmed by joint aspiration, although arthrocentesis carries a risk for superinfection. C-reactive protein (CRP) may prove a useful laboratory test to substantiate clinical suspicion. The present study investigated the post-operative variations of CRP in 58 patients (age range 15-52, median age 25) undergoing ACL reconstruction with either bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or hamstring tendon (HT) who did not develop infection at 6 months follow-up. CRP titre was determined on the 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th post-operative day by immunoprecipitation in patients divided according to the type of autograft (BPTB: 13 patients; HT: 45 patients). Mean CRP significantly increased on the 1st post-operative day, peaked on the 3rd day and decreased on the 7th day, while levels on the 15th and 30th days did not differ from baseline. The trend of CRP changes did not differ in relation to the type of autograft. The results of our study suggest that close clinical surveillance may be advisable when CRP levels deviate from the reference values 2 weeks after surgery. In these circumstances, suspicion of septic arthritis warrants aspiration and culturing in order to avert a diagnostic delay. PMID:18831927

  7. The use of calcaneal anatomic plate in arthroscopically-assisted open reduction and internal fixation of intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qingsong; Duan, Deyu; Yan, Lijun

    2006-01-01

    To discuss and evaluate the method and effect of using calcaneal anatomic plate in treatment of intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus with assistant of arthroscope, 86 intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus in 78 patients were reduced by open reduction, and rigid fixation was made with calcaneal anatomic plate under assistant of arthroscope. The average follow-up duration was 18 months (range 12-30 months). The effect of treatment was evaluated according to AOFAS and X-ray before and after operation. The results showed that 86 patients have obtained satisfactory reduction according to X-ray, and there was significant difference before and after operation (P < 0. 01), the total excellent and fine rate was 91.86%. Treating intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus with calcaneal anatomic plate under arthroscope may provide more chance to achieve anatomical reconstruction, which can lead to satisfied recovery of function and few complication. PMID:16961281

  8. The arthroscopic drainage, irrigation, and débridement of late, acute total hip arthroplasty infections: average 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hyman, J L; Salvati, E A; Laurencin, C T; Rogers, D E; Maynard, M; Brause, D B

    1999-12-01

    We present our experience with arthroscopy for the treatment of late, acute periprosthetic hip infections in 8 consecutive patients, treated from 1989 to 1994. After a hip aspiration confirmed the presence of bacterial infection, all patients underwent prompt arthroscopic treatment, which consisted of drainage, lavage, and debridement. Postoperatively, patients were given 2 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, followed by long-term oral antibiotic suppression. At a mean follow-up of 70 months (range, 29-104 months), no recurrence of infection occurred. No progressive radiographic loosening was noted. Based on this initial study, we believe that arthroscopic irrigation and debridement can benefit well-selected patients who suffer late, acute hip periprosthetic infections. Effective treatment requires early diagnosis, prompt arthroscopic debridement, well-fixed components, a sensitive microorganism, and patient tolerance to and compliance with the antibiotic therapy. PMID:10614878

  9. Cleft lip and palate repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orofacial cleft; Craniofacial birth defect repair; Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty ... these conditions at birth. Most times, cleft lip repair is done when the child is 6 to ...

  10. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  11. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the bone, ... The bone is placed in proper position and screws, pins, or plates are attached to or in ...

  12. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... term outcome of open or endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. N Engl J Med . 2010 May 20;362( ... 20484396 . Greenhalgh RM, Powell JT. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. N Engl J Med . 2008 Jan 31;358( ...

  13. Imperforate anus repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for passage of stool. Complete absence of an anal opening requires emergency surgery for the newborn. Surgical ... for several months before attempting the more complex anal repair. The anal repair involves an abdominal incision, ...

  14. Automotive Body Repair Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Armond, Jack; And Others

    Designed to provide a model curriculum and guidelines, this manual presents tasks that were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary auto body repair curriculum. The tasks are divided into ten major component areas of instruction: metalworking and fiberglass, painting, frame and suspension, glass and trim,

  15. DNA excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Michael G.; Sancar, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light from the sun causes the formation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA that have the potential to lead to mutation and cancer. In humans, pyrimidine dimers are removed from the genome in the form of ~30 nt-long oligomers by concerted dual incisions. Though nearly 50 y of excision repair research has uncovered many details of UV photoproduct damage recognition and removal, the fate of the excised oligonucleotides and, in particular, the ultimate fate of the chemically very stable pyrimidine dimers remain unknown. Physiologically relevant UV doses introduce hundreds of thousands of pyrimidine dimers in diploid human cells, which are excised from the genome within ~24 h. Once removed from the genome, “where do all the dimers go?” In a recent study we addressed this question. Although our study did not determine the fate of the dimer itself, it revealed that the excised ~30-mer is released from the duplex in a tight complex with the transcription/repair factor TFIIH. This finding combined with recent reports that base and oligonucleotide products of the base and double-strand break repair pathways also make stable complexes with the cognate repair enzymes, and that these complexes activate the MAP kinase and checkpoint signaling pathways, respectively, raises the possibility that TFIIH-30-mer excision complexes may play a role in signaling reactions in response to UV damage. PMID:22825251

  16. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R.; Peter, William H.

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  17. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  18. Repairing damaged platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.E.; Kwok, P.H.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-10-01

    This paper introduces a unique method for strengthening of platforms and replacing damaged members. Extending the life of existing infrastructure is approved means of decreasing cash expenditures for new platforms and facilities. Platforms can be affected by corrosion, overloading and fatigue. The renovation and repair of existing offshore installations is an important part of offshore engineering. The basis behind this paper is an April, 1993 incident in the Arabian Gulf. A vessel broke loose from its moorings in a severe storm and collided with a wellhead platform. The collision severely damaged the platform buckling seven major support members and cracking joints throughout the structure. In view of the significant damage, there was an urgent need to repair the structure to avoid any further damage from potentially sever winter storm conditions. Various means of repair and their associated costs were evaluated: traditional dry hyperbaric welding, adjacent platforms, grouted clamped connections, and mechanical pipe connectors. The repair was completed using an innovative combination of clamps and wet welding to attach external braces to the structure.

  19. Auto Repair Gets Technical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiger, Jim; Shoemaker, Byrl

    1989-01-01

    Rapid advances in automotive technology and the growth of the automotive service industry have created opportunities in car repair, parts supply, and body work. Certification is the best way for vocational educators to ensure that their programs prepare students for work in the automotive industry. (JOW)

  20. Laboratory For Telerobotic Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Bejczy, Antal K.; Das, Hari; Zak, Haya

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory telerobotic system performs such complicated tasks as picking up tools, removing thermal blanket, and replacing screws. Human operator in control room operates remote robot with aid of video monitors, torque and force displays, and force feedback. System used to perform research and to develop telerobotic-repair capabilities equal to those of human operator.

  1. Basic Book Repair Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Abraham A.

    This book addresses some common preservation techniques that invariably become necessary in library and archival collections of any size. The procedures are described in chronological sequence, and photographs show the techniques from the viewpoint of the person actually doing the work. The recommended repair methods can be accomplished using…

  2. Basic Book Repair Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Abraham A.

    This book addresses some common preservation techniques that invariably become necessary in library and archival collections of any size. The procedures are described in chronological sequence, and photographs show the techniques from the viewpoint of the person actually doing the work. The recommended repair methods can be accomplished using

  3. Automotive Body Repair Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Armond, Jack; And Others

    Designed to provide a model curriculum and guidelines, this manual presents tasks that were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary auto body repair curriculum. The tasks are divided into ten major component areas of instruction: metalworking and fiberglass, painting, frame and suspension, glass and trim,…

  4. Repairing Holes in Pressure Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Paul Bruce Y.; Capriloa, Laurie J.; Corocado, Alexander R.; Gibbins, Martin N.; Horne, Robert B.

    1987-01-01

    Patches and easy-to-use tools yield pressure-tight seal. Repairer lifts patch from repair kit with hook-and-pile-tipped tool and positions it over puncture hole. With tool, even gloved repairer easily manipulates patch without damaging it.

  5. Lawn and Garden Equipment Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack; And Others

    This publication is designed to supplement the Comprehensive Small Engine Rapair guide by covering in detail all aspects of lawn and garden equipment repair not included in general engine repair or the repair of other small engines. It consists of instructional materials for both teachers and students, written in terms of student performance using…

  6. Cleft lip repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of the mouth (palate). ... Cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair are indicated for: Repair of physical deformity Nursing, feeding, or speech problems resulting from cleft lip or palate

  7. MR imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears: a review of signs and their relation to arthroscopic classification.

    PubMed

    Aydingz, Ustn; Firat, Ahmet K; Atay, O Ahmet; Doral, M Nedim

    2003-03-01

    Our objective was to review the MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and assess the relevance of these signs to the arthroscopic classification of displaced meniscal tears. Forty-five menisci in 42 patients who had a diagnosis of bucket-handle tear either on MR imaging or on subsequent arthroscopy (in which Dandy's classification of meniscal tears was used) were retrospectively analyzed for MR imaging findings of double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), fragment within the intercondylar notch, absent bow tie, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs. Arthroscopy, which was considered as the gold standard, revealed 41 bucket-handle tears (either diagnosed or not diagnosed by MR imaging) in 38 patients (33 males, 5 females). There was a statistically significant male preponderance for the occurrence of meniscal bucket-handle tears. Overall, sensitivity and positive predictive value of MR imaging for the detection of meniscal bucket-handle tears were calculated as 90%. Common MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears in arthroscopically proven cases of such tears were the fragment in the notch and absent bow tie signs (98% frequency for each). Double-PCL, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs, however, were less common (32, 29, 29, and 27%, respectively). An arthroscopically proven bucket-handle tear was found in all patients who displayed at least three of the six MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears. The presence of three or more MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears is highly suggestive of this condition. PMID:12594567

  8. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS ON THE RESULT FOR ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF SUTURE BETWEEN SMOKING AND NON-SMOKING PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Zampieri, Rodrigo; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Roveda, Gilberto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively analyze the results from arthroscopic rotator cuff suture between smoking and non-smoking patients. Methods: A group of 286 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of primary rotator cuff injuries between June 12, 2002, and May 14, 2008, was analyzed. The patients included in the study were evaluated using the UCLA scale, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months and average of 56.52 months. The variables studied were age, sex, side operated, dominance, profile of cigarette use and UCLA index. Results: This study evaluated a total of 205 patients. Mean age (p = 0.289) and sex (p = 0.124) were analyzed statistically between the smoking and non-smoking patients and the two groups were considered to be similar. The average UCLA score for the non-smoking patients (143) was 34 (32 to 35). The average UCLA score for the smoking patients (51) was 33 (29 to 35). There was no statistically significant difference in UCLA score (p = 0.123) between the smoking and non-smoking patients. For the purposes of statistical analysis, we grouped the small and medium tears (107) and compared these with the large and extensive tears (80), between smokers and non-smokers. There was no statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the small and medium tears (p = 818). There was a statistically significant difference using the Mann-Whitney test regarding the large and extended tears, between the smoking and non-smoking patients, such that the non-smokers showed better UCLA scores (p = 0.038). Conclusion: The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries are inferior among smoking patients. PMID:27027006

  9. [The value of anti-inflammatory effectiveness of Apranax 550 and Voltaren 50 after knee joint arthroscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Tylman, D; Kwiatkowski, K; Dymara, A

    1995-01-01

    The results are presented of the study of the effectiveness of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (Apranax, Voltaren) on the basis of observation of 60 patients in a double blind trial after knee joint arthroscopic operations. The administration of Apranax 550 or Voltaren 50 within the period of 10 days after the operation decreased significantly the incidence of inflammatory reactions. Apranax 550 was acting more rapidly and more effectively in elimination of clinical signs and symptoms of inflammation, and the patients were not reporting any adverse effects. PMID:9638216

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non-operative treatments only. Conclusions Arthroscopic debridement of degenerative articular cartilage and resection of degenerative meniscal tears in addition to non-operative treatments for knee OA is not an economically attractive treatment option compared with non-operative treatment only, regardless of willingness-to-pay value. Trial registration number NCT00158431. PMID:26758265

  11. Complications of Distal Biceps Repair.

    PubMed

    Garon, Mark Tyson; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Modern techniques to repair the distal biceps tendon include one-incision and 2-incision techniques that use transosseous sutures, suture anchors, interference screws, and/or cortical buttons to achieve a strong repair of the distal biceps brachii. Repair using these techniques has led to improved functional outcomes when compared with nonoperative treatment. Most complications consist of neuropraxic injuries to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, posterior interosseous nerve, stiffness and weakness with forearm rotation, heterotopic ossification, and wound infections. Although complications certainly affect outcomes, patients with distal biceps repairs report a high satisfaction rate after repair. PMID:26772952

  12. Assessing outcomes following arthroscopic labral debridement—what can the IHOT-33 reveal?

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Maureen K.; Green, Marlon; McCarthy, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    As the complexity of arthroscopic procedures continues to increase, assessing the success of these procedures is of utmost importance to determine appropriate treatment plans for patients. This study compares outcome scores on the International Hip Outcome Tool (IHOT-33) using an analysis of its four subscales to scores on the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS) in patients following hip arthroscopy. Patients who had undergone hip arthroscopy between 1 and 5 years ago were assessed using both the IHOT-33 and MHHS at their most recent follow-up visit. Total scores for each outcome measure were calculated. A composite score for each of the IHOT subscales was calculated by averaging the total points in each section. Total score on the MHHS was compared with total score on the IHOT-33 and its four subscales using separate wilcoxin signed ranks tests. In total, 44 patients met our inclusion criteria with an average follow-up of 24.8 ± 18.8 months. MHHS total score was greater than IHOT-33 total score (P = 0.04). Comparisons between MHHS total score and the IHOT-33 subscales revealed reductions in sport (P = 0.001) and social (P = 0.004), but no difference in symptoms (P = 0.74) and job (P = 0.84). Our findings demonstrated that scores on the MHHS are inflated when compared with scores on the IHOT-33 for patients following hip arthroscopy. Subscale analysis revealed that the reductions in IHOT-33 scores exist in the sport and recreational domain and social, emotional, lifestyle domain compared with the MHHS. Our results suggest that analysing the subscales of the IHOT-33 would provide a more thorough understanding of functional limitations in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011832

  13. Optical design and evaluation of a 4 mm cost-effective ultra-high-definition arthroscope

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Yu, Lu; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    High definition and magnification rigid endoscope plays an important role in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and diagnosis. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation methods of a high definition rigid endoscope, specifically an arthroscope, with a large depth of field (DOF). The incident heights and exit angles of the sampled rays on the relay lens are controlled during the optimization process to ensure an effective field view (70°) and a normal ray path within the limited lens diameter of 2.7 mm. The lens is set up as a multi-configuration system with two extreme and one middle object distances to cover a large DOF. As a result, an entrance pupil of 0.3 mm is achieved for the first time, to bring the theoretical resolution to 23.1 lps/mm in the object space at a working distance of 20 mm, with the wavelength of 0.532 um. The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves approach diffraction limit, and the values are all higher than 0.3 at 160 line pairs/mm (lps/mm) in the image space. Meanwhile, stray light caused by total internal reflection on the inner wall of the rod lenses and the objective lens is eliminated. The measured resolution in the object space at a 20 mm working distance is 22.3 lps/mm, and test results show that other performance characteristics also fulfill design requirements. The relay lenses are designed with only one type of the spacer and two types of lenses to greatly reduce the fabrication and assembly cost. The design method has important research and application values for lens systems used in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and industrial non-destructive testing area. PMID:25136495

  14. Ankle fracture configuration following treatment with and without arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation

    PubMed Central

    Angthong, Chayanin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report ankle fracture configurations and bone quality following arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal-fixation (ARIF) or open reduction and internal-fixation (ORIF). METHODS: The patients of ARIF (n = 16) or ORIF (n = 29) to treat unstable ankle fracture between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Baseline data, including age, sex, type of injury, immediate postoperative fracture configuration (assessed on X-rays and graded by widest gap and largest step-off of any intra-articular site), bone quality [assessed with bone mineral density (BMD) testing] and arthritic changes on X-rays following surgical treatments were recorded for each group. RESULTS: Immediate-postoperative fracture configurations did not differ significantly between the ARIF and ORIF groups. There were anatomic alignments as 8 (50%) and 8 (27.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.539) respectively. There were acceptable alignments as 12 (75%) and 17 (58.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.341) respectively. The arthritic changes in follow-up period as at least 16 wk following the surgeries were shown as 6 (75%) and 10 (83.3%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.300) respectively. Significantly more BMD tests were performed in patients aged > 60 years (P < 0.001), ARIF patients (P = 0.021), and female patients (P = 0.029). There was no significant difference in BMD test t scores between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Ankle fracture configurations following surgeries are similar between ARIF and ORIF groups, suggesting that ARIF is not superior to ORIF in treatment of unstable ankle fractures. PMID:27114933

  15. A longitudinal study of impact and early stance loads during gait following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Mills, Peter M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-09-22

    People following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. High impact loading and peak loading early in the stance phase of gait may play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis. This was a secondary analysis of longitudinal data to investigate loading-related indices at baseline in an APM group (3 months post-surgery) and a healthy control group, and again 2 years later (follow-up). At baseline, 82 participants with medial APM and 38 healthy controls were assessed, with 66 and 23 re-assessed at follow-up, respectively. Outcome measures included: (i) heel strike transient (HST) presence and magnitude, (ii) maximum loading rate, (iii) peak vertical force (Fz) during early stance. At baseline, maximum loading rate was lower in the operated leg (APM) and non-operated leg (non-APM leg) compared to controls (p ≤ 0.03) and peak Fz was lower in the APM leg compared to non-APM leg (p ≤ 0.01). Over 2 years, peak Fz increased in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg and controls (p ≤ 0.01). Following recent APM, people may adapt their gait to protect the operated knee from excessive loads, as evidenced by a lower maximum loading rate in the APM leg compared to controls, and a reduced peak Fz in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg. No differences at follow-up may suggest an eventual return to more typical gait. However, the increase in peak Fz in the APM leg may be of concern for long-term joint health given the compromised function of the meniscus. PMID:25169661

  16. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  17. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  18. Prokaryotic Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  19. Meniscal Repair of Degenerative Horizontal Cleavage Tears Using Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Tamiko; Kimura, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently, the treatment options available for patients with horizontal degenerative cleavage tears of the meniscus are limited. These tears are considered an indication for partial or subtotal meniscectomy because when the tear is located within an avascular area, it is difficult to induce healing. However, meniscectomy is not ideal because it disrupts the normal anatomical structure and function of the meniscus. Purpose: To examine the clinical and arthroscopic outcomes following meniscal repair of degenerative horizontal cleavage tears using fibrin clots. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Vertical sutures were placed in the meniscal tear, and the cleft was filled with fibrin clots before the sutures were tightened. We repaired 18 menisci in 18 consecutive eligible patients using a previously described technique. Three patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury who underwent simultaneous ACL reconstruction and 5 patients who did not undergo follow-up arthroscopy within 12 months were excluded. The remaining 10 menisci in 10 patients were evaluated in this study. The mean age of the patients was 35.8 ± 16.5 years, and the mean postoperative follow-up time was 40.8 ± 5.4 months. Pre- and postoperative Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores, and Tegner activity levels were compared. The arthroscopy findings were evaluated at a mean postoperative time of 6.7 ± 2.9 months. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved significantly from 69.3 ± 16.3 points preoperatively to 95.4 ± 3.6 points postoperatively (P < .005). The mean IKDC subjective score also improved significantly from 26.5% ± 19.0% preoperatively to 87.8% ± 7.5% postoperatively (P < .001). The Tegner activity level recovered to the preinjury level in 6 patients and to 1 level below the preinjury level in 4 patients. The follow-up arthroscopies showed complete healing in 7 patients (70%) and incomplete healing in 3 patients (30%). Conclusion: Meniscal repair of degenerative horizontal cleavage tears using fibrin clots resulted in improved Lysholm and IKDC subjective scores, but the complete healing rate on follow-up arthroscopy was only 70%. Clinical Relevance: If we are to prevent osteoarthritis, we should minimize resection and restore the contact area of the meniscus to preserve the original shape. PMID:26535282

  20. Repairing damaged structures

    SciTech Connect

    Perano, A.C.

    1980-08-01

    While Grace Platform was being installed, damage was sustained to jacket members, varying from metal rubbing to denting and puncturing by a falling section of pile follower. Because the 12-legged jacket is in a water depth in excess of 300 ft it was necessary to use a remote controlled vehicle in order to establish a preliminary damage report to determine whether the structural integrity of the jacket with the damaged braces required repair, reinforcing, removal, or just to be left as they were. From information gathered on videotapes, it was possible to direct the divers to all questionable areas and to study each in detail. From the sketches, photographs and accompanying report, there was sufficient information and data for the designers of the platform to conduct an investigation and analysis of the areas in question. The analysis was performed using storm and seismic loading conditions. The results obtained determined damaged members. All parties concerned with the damage investigation agreed upon which structures needed to be repaired and under what conditions the repairs would take place.

  1. COMPREHENSIVE POST‐ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF A MIDDLE‐AGED ADULT WITH GLENOHUMERAL OSTEOARTHRITIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Thomas; Millett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management (CAM) is a new glenohumeral debridement procedure developed as a joint preserving alternative to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The procedure consists of several arthroscopic components including: A. scar tissue and chondral debridement, B. synovectomy, C. inferior humeral osteoplasty, D. capsular release, E. axillary nerve decompression, and F. tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. In this case, an active, middle age patient who failed physical therapy treatment and corticosteroid injections was evaluated and diagnosed with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Anterior‐ posterior (AP) and axillary radiographs showed grade IV changes of the articular cartilage, confirming the diagnosis. The patient was not an ideal candidate for TSA because of her age, activity level, and concern for implant survival; therefore surgical intervention was performed using the CAM procedure. After the surgery, the patient demonstrated increased joint space as shown using radiographic imaging. The patient underwent intensive postoperative rehabilitation with a heavy emphasis on joint range of motion (ROM) and capsular mobility. By eight weeks she achieved 85% active ROM compared to her uninvolved shoulder, and a 55% improvement on the Pennsylvania Shoulder Score. Radiographic imaging provided an understanding of the severity of the arthritic changes present in this patient, identified the limited potential of continued conservative management, and showed structural changes that may be correlated with improved function following the surgical intervention. For patients less than 55 years of age diagnosed with severe glenohumeral osteoarthritis, the CAM procedure and intensive, motion focused therapy presents a promising treatment combination. Level of Evidence: IIIb PMID:23439911

  2. Mid-Long Term Results in the Arthroscopic Selective Capsular Release and Manipulation Treatment of Frozen Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Kilinc, Eray; Akman, Senol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to present mid-long term functional outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic selective capsular release and manipulation for frozen shoulder refractory to conservative treatment. Methods: Between 2006 and 2012, 32 patients presented to our clinic with the diagnosis of frozen shoulder. 24 shoulders of 22 patients treated with arthroscopic selective capsular release and manipulation were included in the study. Functional results were analyzed with Constant shoulder score. The mean follow-up was 4.3 years (range 1-7 years). Results: We detected an average increase in passive range of motion in flexion 72°, abduction 90°, abduction-internal rotation 33°, and abduction-external rotation 38°, adduction-external rotation at 37° compared to the preoperative status. Constant shoulder score increased by an average of 44 points after surgery. Eighteen (82%) patients were satisfied with the operation. Three of four patients whose symptoms persisted had resistant diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Frozen shoulder is one of the most well-known causes of shoulder pain and disability. Although surgery has a good rate of success it does not help in all cases. Unsatisfactory results may be experienced in patients who have diabetes mellitus as a confounding factor.

  3. In vitro and in situ characterization of arthroscopic loop security and knot security of braided polyblend sutures: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lucas C; Chong, Alexander; Livermore, Ryan W; Prohaska, Daniel J; Doyon, Amanda N; Wooley, Paul H

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate biomechanical performance during destructive testing of several different suture materials in various arthroscopic knot configurations under both in vitro and in situ conditions. Surgeons of different levels of experience tied the knots. Three different arthroscopic knots (static surgeon's, Weston, Tennessee slider) with 3 reverse half-hitches on alternating posts were tested using Fiberwire, ForceFiber, Orthocord, and Ultrabraid suture materials under both in vitro and in situ (blood plasma at 37°C) conditions. Three surgeons of different experience levels tied the knots on a post 30 mm in circumference. A single load-to-failure test was performed. There were no significant in vitro-in situ differences for Ultrabraid in the different knot configurations or with the different experience levels. Surgeon B (intermediate experience) showed no significant differences between test conditions for any knot configuration or suture material. With Tennessee slider knots, surgeon C (least experience) showed significantly lower clinical failure load under both test conditions and had a higher percentage of complete knot slippage. Surgeon B had no knot slippage with use of Fiberwire. Both the aqueous environment and the surgeon's familiarity with certain knots have an effect on knot security. PMID:25844588

  4. Evaluation of Contrast Extravasation as a Diagnostic Criterion in the Evaluation of Arthroscopically Proven HAGL/pHAGL Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Maldjian, Catherine; Khanna, Vineet; Bradley, James; Adam, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The validity of preoperative MRI in diagnosing HAGL lesions is debated. Various investigations have produced mixed results with regard to the utility of MRI. The purpose of this investigation is to apply a novel method of diagnosing HAGL/pHAGL lesions by looking at contrast extravasation and to evaluate the reliability of such extravasation of contrast into an extra-articular space as a sign of HAGL/pHAGL lesion. Methods. We utilized specific criteria to define contrast extravasation. We evaluated these criteria in 12 patients with arthroscopically proven HAGL/pHAGL lesion. We also evaluated these criteria in a control group. Results. Contrast extravasation occurred in over 83% of arthroscopically positive cases. Contrast extravasation as a diagnostic criterion in the evaluation of HAGL/pHAGL lesions demonstrated a high interobserver degree of agreement. Conclusions. In conclusion, extra-articular contrast extravasation may serve as a valid and reliable sign of HAGL and pHAGL lesions, provided stringent criteria are maintained to assure that the contrast lies in an extra-articular location. In cases where extravasation is not present, the J sign, though nonspecific, may be the only evidence of subtle HAGL and pHAGL lesions. Level of Evidence. Level IV, Retrospective Case-Control series. PMID:25530880

  5. Arthroscopic assistance does not improve the functional or radiographic outcome of unstable intra-articular distal radial fractures treated with a volar locking plate: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Uchiyama, S; Komatsu, M; Hashimoto, S; Kobayashi, Y; Sakurai, T; Kato, H

    2015-07-01

    There is no consensus on the benefit of arthroscopically assisted reduction of the articular surface combined with fixation using a volar locking plate for the treatment of intra-articular distal radial fractures. In this study we compared the functional and radiographic outcomes of fluoroscopically and arthroscopically guided reduction of these fractures. Between February 2009 and May 2013, 74 patients with unilateral unstable intra-articular distal radial fractures were randomised equally into the two groups for treatment. The mean age of these 74 patients was 64 years (24 to 92). We compared functional outcomes including active range of movement of the wrist, grip strength and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores at six and 48 weeks; and radiographic outcomes that included gap, step, radial inclination, volar angulation and ulnar variance. There were no significant differences between the techniques with regard to functional outcomes or radiographic parameters. The mean gap and step in the fluoroscopic and arthroscopic groups were comparable at 0.9 mm (standard deviation (SD) 0.7) and 0.7 mm (SD 0.7) and 0.6 mm (SD 0.6) and 0.4 mm (SD 0.5), respectively; p = 0.18 and p = 0.35). Arthroscopic reduction conferred no advantage over conventional fluoroscopic guidance in achieving anatomical reduction of intra-articular distal radial fractures when using a volar locking plate. PMID:26130352

  6. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  7. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  8. Posterolateral Knee Reconstruction Versus Repair

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mark; Ridley, TJ; Bollier, Matthew; Cook, Shane; Wolf, Brian; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent literature has shown that posterolateral corner injuries of the knee have poor results when treated with repair, when compared to reconstruction. Our study sought to compare outcomes of posterolateral knee injuries treated with repair versus reconstruction and report results from our institution, with the hypothesis that acute repairs have comparable results to reconstructions. Methods We identified patients with posterolateral knee reconstruction or repair from January 1, 2000 to March 1, 2012. Patients returned for outcome measures, clinical exam and varus stress radiographs. Further, each patient underwent a chart review. Varus stress radiographs were obtained in 20 control knees, with no history of knee trauma, to our two cohort groups. Results 26 knees in 25 patients (17 reconstructions and 9 repairs) were evaluated in clinic at mean of 42 months postoperatively for repairs and 38 months postoperatively for reconstructions. Average IKDC scores for reconstruction and repair were 68 and 71, respectively. Average Lysholm scores for these groups were 83 for reconstructions and 83 for repairs. No statistically significant differences existed. Average varus gapping at zero degrees was 8.21 and 8.84 millimeters (mm) for reconstructions and repairs, respectively. Average varus gapping at 20 degrees knee flexion was 11.25 mm for reconstructions and 10.34 mm for repairs. No statistically significant differences were observed in varus gapping between the two groups. Each patient chart was reviewed for complications. There were 2 failures in the 44 patient reconstruction group (4.7%) and 2 failures in the 18 patient repair group (11.1%). We noted a high rate (10/19 patients) of primarily distally-based injuries in our repair group. All failures were treated with revision reconstructions. Conclusion We found low failure rates in both groups. All knees in the repair group were operated within three weeks of injury. Our repair knees had a high rate of distally based avulsion and, were felt to have acceptable tissue that could be successfully repaired. We recommend posterolateral knee repair in cases with distally based avulsions that can be operatively treated within 3 weeks of injury, and have good tissue quality at the time of surgery. Level of Evidence IV PMID:26361440

  9. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening situation. The indications for a diaphragmatic hernia repair include: chest X-rays showing diaphragmatic hernia severe breathing difficulty (respiratory distress) shortly after birth ...

  10. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  11. 49 CFR 193.2617 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2617 Repairs. (a) Repair work on components must be performed... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs. 193.2617 Section 193.2617 Transportation... repaired. (b) For repairs made while a component is operating, each operator shall include in...

  12. [Use of cultured human autologous bone marrow stem cells in repair of a rotator cuff tear: preliminary results of a safety study].

    PubMed

    Havlas, V; Kotaška, J; Koníček, P; Trč, T; Konrádová, Š; Kočí, Z; Syková, E

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Rotator cuff tears are one of the most frequent shoulder disorders which are often associated with pain and interfere with proper arm function. In order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of using cultured human autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) applied to the suture site during arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, a prospective clinical study was designed and started recently at the authors' department. Its primary goal was to evaluate the safety of using cultured human MSCs, the secondary goal then was to study a therapeutic effect of their application. Preliminary results of the study on a limited number of patients are presented here. MATERIAL AND METHODS Ten patients who met the indication criteria for arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear were included in the study. In addition, they also had to meet inclusion and lack exclusion criteria. According to the protocol, their bone marrow was harvested at 3 to 4 weeks before surgery. Subsequently, an arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff tear was performed and an suspension of cultured MSCs was applied to the suture site at the end of the procedure. The isolation of MSCs from bone marrow and their cultivation was carried out by the company Bioinova, Ltd. The patients were followed up at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months post-operatively. Their clinical assessment included physical examination of the shoulder, pain intensity evaluation according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjective questionnaires for Constant and University of California (UCLA) scores. All patients underwent MRI examination at 6 post-operative months to evaluate the quality of rotator cuff reconstruction. The findings were compared with the pre-operative results. RESULTS A final evaluation was made in eight patients of 10. Two patients were excluded from the study because their exclusion criteria were fulfilled. The evaluated patients showed significantly better clinical outcomes as early as 6 weeks after surgery; also all pre-operative scores were improved at 3 and 6 months. The average values at 6 months post-operatively were: 0 points for the VAS score, 32 for the UCLA score and 84 for the Constant score. The MRI findings at 6 months after surgery showed fully healed and well-integrated tissue of the rotator cuff tendon attachment in all eight patients. No adverse effects of therapy were recorded during the follow-up period. DISCUSSION The use of autologous stem cells and growth factors in the treatment of tendons, muscles and cartilage is currently the topic of many experimental studies on animal models. Its utilisation in human clinical trials has been reported only marginally; the relevant studies have so far used only suspensions of non-cultured mononuclear cells. Our study, although on a smallsize patient group, provides evidence that human cultured autologous MSCs can safely be used for tissue repair in the indications mentioned above. CONCLUSIONS Our preliminary short-term results show that using human cultured autologous MSCs in the treatment of rotator cuff tears is safe. However, further research is needed, particularly with regard to the effectiveness of the method. Key words: rotator cuff tear, arthroscopic repair, mesenchymal stem cells, tendon, cell therapy. PMID:26317295

  13. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  14. Major Appliance Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smreker, Eugene; Calvert, King

    This module is a comprehensive text on basic appliance repair, designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in this growing field. Ensuring a firm grounding in electrical knowledge, the module contains 13 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) major appliance repair orientation; (2) safety and first aid; (3) fundamentals of…

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is surgery to fix a widened part in your aorta. This is called an aneurysm. The ... Open surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm is sometimes ... is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  16. Cobbler's Technique for Iridodialysis Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pandav, Surinder Singh; Gupta, Parul Chawla; Singh, Rishi Raj; Das, Kalpita; Kaushik, Sushmita; Raj, Srishti; Ram, Jagat

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel “Cobbler's technique” for iridodialysis repair in the right eye of a patient aged 18 years, with a traumatic iridodialysis secondary to open globe injury with an iron rod. Our technique is simple with easy surgical maneuvers, that is, effective for repairing iridodialysis. The “Cobbler's technique” allows a maximally functional and cosmetic result for iridodialysis. PMID:26957855

  17. Pipe inspection and repair system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schempf, Hagen (Inventor); Mutschler, Edward (Inventor); Chemel, Brian (Inventor); Boehmke, Scott (Inventor); Crowley, William (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-module pipe inspection and repair device. The device includes a base module, a camera module, a sensor module, an MFL module, a brush module, a patch set/test module, and a marker module. Each of the modules may be interconnected to construct one of an inspection device, a preparation device, a marking device, and a repair device.

  18. Instructional Guide for Autobody Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    The curriculum guide was developed to serve as a statewide model for Virginia auto body repair programs. The guide is designed to 1,080 hours of instruction in eleven blocks: orientation, introduction, welding and cutting, techniques of shaping metal, body filler and fiberglass repairs, body and frame, removing and replacing damaged parts, basic…

  19. Triple labrum tears repaired with the JuggerKnot™ soft anchor: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek; Pietrzak, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The 2-year outcomes of patients undergoing repair of triple labrum tears using an all-suture anchor device were assessed. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients (17 male, one female; mean age 36.4 years, range: 14.2-62.3 years) with triple labrum tears underwent arthroscopic repair using the 1.4 mm JuggerKnot Soft Anchor (mean number of anchors 11.5, range: 9-19 anchors). Five patients had prior surgeries performed on their operative shoulder. Patients were followed for a mean of 2.0 years (range: 1.6-3.0 years). Constant–Murley shoulder score (CS) and Flexilevel scale of shoulder function (FLEX-SF) scores were measured, with preoperative and final postoperative mean scores compared with a paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed at final postoperative. Results: Overall total CS and FLEX-SF scores increased from 52.9 ± 20.4 to 84.3 ± 10.7 (P < 0.0001) and from 29.3 ± 4.7 to 42.0 ± 7.3 (P < 0.0001), respectively. When divided into two groups by whether or not glenohumeral arthrosis was present at the time of surgery (n = 9 each group), significant improvements in CS and FLEX-SF were obtained for both groups (P < 0.0015). There were no intraoperative complications. All patients, including contact athletes, returned to their preinjury level of sports activity and were satisfied. MRI evaluation revealed no instances of subchondral cyst formation or tunnel expansion. Anchor tracts appeared to heal with fibrous tissue, complete bony healing, or combined fibro-osseous healing. Conclusion: Our results are encouraging, demonstrating a consistent healing of the anchor tunnels through arthroscopic treatment of complex labrum lesions with a completely suture-based implant. It further demonstrates a meaningful improvement in patient outcomes, a predictable return to activity, and a high rate of patient satisfaction. Level of Evidence: Level IV case series. PMID:26288537

  20. Arthroscopic-Assisted Management of Unstable Distal-Third Clavicle Fractures: Conoid Ligament Reconstruction and Fracture Cerclage With Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment is usually indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. These unstable injuries have shown a rate of nonunion that oscillates around 30% to 45% when managed conservatively, and surgical strategies often require a second operation for implant removal. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted technique for the treatment of Neer type IIB unstable distal-third clavicle fractures that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, and implant irritation. This technique increases the load to failure of the construct by means of adding a synthetic conoid ligament reconstruction with a nonrigid suspension device, and it allows the diagnosis and treatment of associated glenohumeral injuries. Our technique incorporates a fracture interfragmentary fixation with sutures, thus avoiding a second operation for implant removal. PMID:26870642

  1. Pseudogout in the temporomandibular joint with imaging, arthroscopic, operative, and pathologic findings. Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Amir; Sadow, Peter M; Keith, David A

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a destructive painful condition in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that proved to be calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposits at subsequent biopsy examination. The patient presented with the chief complaints of pain and limitation that had not resolved with splint therapy, medications, and habit control. Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed internal derangement without reduction. Right TMJ arthroscopy with manipulation of the jaw under anesthesia showed unique findings of fronds of synovial tissue in the posterior joint space and areas of white matter. Because there was no long-term improvement in her clinical symptoms, she subsequently underwent arthroplasty of the right joint, with the white material clearly seen at surgery, and the biopsy examination confirmed the clinical and arthroscopic impression of pseudogout. The presentation, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of pseudogout of the TMJ are discussed. PMID:25843817

  2. Arthroscopic-Assisted Management of Unstable Distal-Third Clavicle Fractures: Conoid Ligament Reconstruction and Fracture Cerclage With Sutures.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2015-12-01

    Surgical treatment is usually indicated for the management of Neer type IIB fractures of the distal third of the clavicle. These unstable injuries have shown a rate of nonunion that oscillates around 30% to 45% when managed conservatively, and surgical strategies often require a second operation for implant removal. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted technique for the treatment of Neer type IIB unstable distal-third clavicle fractures that overcomes the issues related to open surgery, metal hardware, and implant irritation. This technique increases the load to failure of the construct by means of adding a synthetic conoid ligament reconstruction with a nonrigid suspension device, and it allows the diagnosis and treatment of associated glenohumeral injuries. Our technique incorporates a fracture interfragmentary fixation with sutures, thus avoiding a second operation for implant removal. PMID:26870642

  3. Arthroscopic correction for concomitant cam impingement in a patient with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with pain in the right hip. Radiological examination showed idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) combined with a cam lesion. Findings on physical examination were consistent for femoroacetabular impingement. At surgery, we performed isolated arthroscopic correction for the cam lesion but did not use other treatment options such as hip arthroplasty or osteotomies for the ONFH. At the latest follow-up evaluation 3 years after surgery, findings indicted a satisfactory outcome, with a Harris hip score of 93.2 (compared with 76.4 before surgery), no joint-space narrowing, and no collapse of the femoral head. It is important to accurately diagnose the status of idiopathic ONFH and to consider another possible pathogenesis when a patient with idiopathic ONFH has hip pain even without femoral-head collapse. PMID:26773875

  4. Posterior approach for arthroscopic treatment of posterolateral impingement syndrome of the ankle in a top-level field hockey player.

    PubMed

    Lohrer, Heinz; Arentz, Sabine

    2004-04-01

    A case history of a 25-year-old field hockey player, a member of the German National Field Hockey Team, is presented. The patient could not remember any specific ankle injury, but since the World Indoor Championship in February 2003, he experienced significant but diffuse pain around the posterior ankle, especially while loading the forefoot in hockey training and competition. For 2 months, the patient was unable to run. Conservative treatment failed, and surgery was performed. Posterior ankle arthroscopy revealed a frayed posterior intermalleolar ligament and meniscoid-like scar tissue at the posterolateral ankle, indicating a posterolateral soft tissue ankle impingement syndrome. A concomitant inflammation of the posterolateral ankle and subtalar synovium was present. After arthroscopic resection and early functional aftertreatment, the patient returned to full high-level sports ability within 2 months. PMID:15067292

  5. TPS Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Scott Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures efforts NASA went through in the aftermath of Columbia for the Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He describes his role as the lead astronaut on this effort, and covered all of the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL), KC 135 (reduced gravity aircraft), Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF), vacuum chamber and 1 G testing that was done in order to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski also discusses how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.

  6. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent study reported a large increase in the number of meniscal procedures from 2000 to 2011 in Denmark. We examined the nation-wide distribution of meniscal procedures performed in the private and public sector in Denmark since different incentives may be present and the use of these procedures may differ from region to region. Setting We included data on all patients who underwent an arthroscopic meniscal procedure performed in the public or private sector in Denmark. Participants Data were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register on patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscus surgery as a primary or secondary procedure in the years 2000 to 2011. Hospital identification codes enabled linkage of performed procedures to specific hospitals. Primary and secondary outcome measures Yearly incidence of meniscal procedures per 100 000 inhabitants was calculated with 95% CIs for public and private procedures for each region. Results Incidence of meniscal procedures increased at private and at public hospitals. The private sector accounted for the largest relative and absolute increase, rising from an incidence of 1 in 2000 to 98 in 2011. In 2011, the incidence of meniscal procedures was three times higher in the Capital Region than in Region Zealand. Conclusions Our study identified a large increase in the use of meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark. The increase was particularly conspicuous in the private sector as its proportion of procedures performed increased from 1% to 32%. Substantial regional differences were present in the incidence and trend over time of meniscal procedures. PMID:25712820

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral defects of the talus: double-blind randomized controlled multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Blankevoort, Leendert; de Haan, Rob J; Sierevelt, Inger N; Meuffels, Duncan E; d'Hooghe, Pieter RN; Krips, Rover; van Damme, Geert; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteochondral talar defects usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing. Although this is mostly successful, early sport resumption is difficult to achieve, and it can take up to one year to obtain clinical improvement. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) may be effective for talar defects after arthroscopic treatment by promoting tissue healing, suppressing inflammation, and relieving pain. We hypothesize that PEMF-treatment compared to sham-treatment after arthroscopy will lead to earlier resumption of sports, and aim at 25% increase in patients that resume sports. Methods/Design A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted in five centers throughout the Netherlands and Belgium. 68 patients will be randomized to either active PEMF-treatment or sham-treatment for 60 days, four hours daily. They will be followed-up for one year. The combined primary outcome measures are (a) the percentage of patients that resume and maintain sports, and (b) the time to resumption of sports, defined by the Ankle Activity Score. Secondary outcome measures include resumption of work, subjective and objective scoring systems (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society – Ankle-Hindfoot Scale, Foot Ankle Outcome Score, Numeric Rating Scales of pain and satisfaction, EuroQol-5D), and computed tomography. Time to resumption of sports will be analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Discussion This trial will provide level-1 evidence on the effectiveness of PEMFs in the management of osteochondral ankle lesions after arthroscopy. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR1636) PMID:19591674

  8. A system for the registration of arthroscopic images to magnetic resonance images of the knee: for improved virtual knee arthroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengliang; Amati, Giancarlo; Gullick, Nicola; Oakley, Stephen; Hurmusiadis, Vassilios; Schaeffter, Tobias; Penney, Graeme; Rhode, Kawal

    2009-02-01

    Knee arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that is routinely carried out for the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies of the knee joint. A high level of expertise is required to carry out this procedure and therefore the clinical training is extensive. There are several reasons for this that include the small field of view seen by the arthroscope and the high degree of distortion in the video images. Several virtual arthroscopy simulators have been proposed to augment the learning process. One of the limitations of these simulators is the generic models that are used. We propose to develop a new virtual arthroscopy simulator that will allow the use of pathology-specific models with an increased level of photo-realism. In order to generate these models we propose to use registered magnetic resonance images (MRI) and arthroscopic video images collected from patients with a variety of knee pathologies. We present a method to perform this registration based on the use of a combined X-ray and MR imaging system (XMR). In order to validate our technique we carried out MR imaging and arthroscopy of a custom-made acrylic phantom in the XMR environment. The registration between the two modalities was computed using a combination of XMR and camera calibration, and optical tracking. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) registration errors were computed and shown to be approximately 0.8 and 3 mm, respectively. Further to this, we qualitatively tested our approach using a more realistic plastic knee model that is used for the arthroscopy training.

  9. Analgesic efficacy of three different dosages of intra-articular morphine in arthroscopic knee surgeries: Randomised double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; Banerjee, Sumantra; Prasad, Arunima; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay; Trikha, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Arthroscopic knee surgery is a common procedure and may cause enough pain to delay rehabilitation. Intra-articular (IA) morphine is a known modality for post-operative pain relief. However, the optimal dose of IA morphine has not been studied. The current study has been conducted to find out the optimal dosage of IA morphine when administered with 0.25% bupivacaine. Methods: Sixty adult patients of either sex, aged between 18 and 60 years, undergoing diagnostic/therapeutic knee arthroscopic surgery were included in the study and randomised into three groups. All patients underwent surgery under subarachnoid block. After the surgical closure, 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1 mg, 3 mg and 5 mg of morphine as additive was injected intra-articularly in Group A, B and C patients, respectively. Post-operative pain assessment was performed with visual analogue scale score in the 1st, 2nd, 6th, 12th and 24th post-operative hour. The common complications were also recorded. Results: There was statistically significant analgesia in Group B and C than Group A in the 1st and 2nd post-operative hour; while at the 24th post-operative hour, Group C had statistically significant analgesia than the other two groups. Time to first rescue analgesia was statistically significantly less and consumption of supplemental analgesia was significantly higher in Group A than the other two groups. Conclusion: IA dose of 3 mg and 5 mg morphine with 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine provided adequate analgesia. However, 3 mg morphine group patients had fewer side effects than 5 mg group patients although the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:26644611

  10. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Results: Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P < 0.05). Mean operation time was 235.27 ± 58.88 min in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P < 0.05). Posterior drawer test were negative in 15 cases, slight positive in 2 with improved tibial inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion: Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good. PMID:25419349

  11. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Santos, Pedro Doenux; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Cohen, Carina; Giora, Taís Stedile Busin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over. Methods Between 1998 and 2009, 168 patients underwent operations. Five cases were excluded. The remaining 163 patients were stratified according to their age group: 65–69 years (49.1%), 70–74 (26.4%) and 75 years and over (24.5%). Their mean age was 71 years (range: 65–83). There were 63 male patients (38.7%). The mean length of time with pain, from the onset of symptoms to the surgery, was 23 months (range: 2 days to 240 months). Sixty-two patients (38%) reported histories of trauma and 26 (16%) reported that their pain worsened through exertion. Results From the UCLA criteria, 80.4% of the results were excellent, 16% good, 1.8% fair and 1.8% poor. Complications occurred in 11%. The final clinical result did not show any correlation with age progression, injury size or tendons affected. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.001) between the presence of trauma and larger injuries. The length of time between the onset of symptoms and the surgical procedure had a significant relationship (p < 0.027) with the postoperative results: the longer this time was, the worse the results were. Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over presented excellent and good results in 96.4% of the cases, according to the UCLA assessment, with a low complication rate. Advanced age did not show any influence on the postoperative clinical evolution, but the earlier the surgical treatment was instituted, the better the results were. PMID:26229935

  12. Reoperations after tricuspid valve repair: re-repair versus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Young; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Background Data demonstrating results of reoperation after initial tricuspid valve repair are scarce. We evaluated outcomes of tricuspid reoperations after tricuspid valve repair and compared the results of tricuspid re-repair with those of tricuspid valve replacement (TVR). Methods From 1994 to 2012, 53 patients (56±15 years, male:female =14:39) underwent tricuspid reoperations due to recurrent tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after initial repair. Twenty-two patients underwent tricuspid re-repair (TAP group) and 31 patients underwent TVR (TVR group). Results Early mortality occurred in 6 patients (11%). Early mortality and incidence of postoperative complications were similar between the 2 groups. There were 14 cases of late mortality including 9 cardiac deaths. Five- and 10-year free from cardiac death rates were 82% and 67%, respectively, without any intergroup difference. Recurrent TR (> moderate) developed in 6 TAP group patients and structural valve deterioration occurred in 1 TVR group patient (P=0.002). Isolated tricuspid valve surgery (P=0.044) and presence of atrial fibrillation during the follow-up (P=0.051) were associated with recurrent TR after re-repair. However, the overall tricuspid valve-related event rates were similar between the 2 groups with 5- and 10-year rates of 61% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Tricuspid valve reoperation after initial repair resulted in high rates of operative mortality and complications. Long-term event-free rate was similar regardless of the type of surgery. However, great care might be needed when performing re-repair in patients with atrial fibrillation and those who had isolated tricuspid valve disease due to high recurrence of TR after re-repair. PMID:26904221

  13. All-Arthroscopic Reconstruction of the Acetabular Labrum by Capsular Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; Alpaugh, Kyle; McCormick, Frank; Martin, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    The acetabular labrum plays an important role in hip joint stability and articular cartilage maintenance. As such, reconstitution of the labral complex is ideal. In cases in which the labrum is too degenerative to allow adequate reconstruction with current repair techniques, a capsular augmentation is a novel technique that can be used to restore the labral structure. Use of capsular augmentation enables preservation of the donor-tissue blood supply with local tissue transfer, without adding significant complexity to the procedure or significant donor-site morbidity. PMID:26052488

  14. How to repair an episiotomy.

    PubMed

    Steen, Mary; Cummins, Bernie

    2016-02-17

    Rationale and key points Skilful repair of an episiotomy is an important aspect of maternal health care. It is essential that midwives and doctors have the knowledge and skills to undertake this procedure in a safe and effective manner. ▶ An episiotomy should be repaired promptly to reduce blood loss and prevent infection. ▶ Repair of an episiotomy is undertaken in three stages: repair of the vaginal mucosa, repair of the muscle layer and repair of the skin layer. ▶ Adequate pain relief should be provided before suturing. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Why a rectal examination is recommended before and following repair of an episiotomy. 2. What you would do to improve your suturing skills. 3. The factors that may prevent or delay an episiotomy from healing. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26884039

  15. DNA Repair Deficiency in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby causing Huntington’s disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage may be linked with the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutation in the WRN protein leads to the premature aging disease Werner syndrome, a disorder that features neurodegeneration. In this article we review the evidence linking deficiencies in the DNA repair pathways with neurodegeneration. PMID:21550379

  16. Scalp repair using tissue expanders.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, E Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Repair of scalp defects is often challenging, because without careful planning, excision of the defect may leave unsatisfactory cosmesis. Contemporary techniques in hair restoration surgery allow creation of natural and undetectable results, but these techniques are often unsuitable for repairing large scarred areas of hair loss. However, by using older techniques of scalp reduction and tissue expansion, excision of many large scarring defects can be accomplished. Combining older methods with modern hair restoration surgery permits the satisfactory treatment of many previously untreatable conditions. This article focuses on tissue expansion as an adjunct to repairing large scalp defects. PMID:24017990

  17. Arthroscopic Lamina-Specific Double-Row Fixation for Large Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2014-01-01

    Delamination is a commonly observed finding at the time of rotator cuff repair, but few studies have described the surgical techniques used for delaminated rotator cuff tears (RCTs) or their clinical outcomes. We developed a technique using a combination of a double row and an additional row, which we call lamina-specific double-row fixation, for large delaminated RCTs. The lamina-specific double-row technique is performed using an additional row (lamina-specific lateral row) of suture anchors placed between the typical medial and lateral rows of suture anchors. The technique is performed as follows: (1) medial-row sutures are passed through the inferior (articular-side) and superior (bursal-side) layers in a mattress fashion; (2) lamina-specific lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the inferior layer; and (3) lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the superior layer. We believe that this technique offers the following advantages: (1) creation of a larger area of contact between the inferior layer and the footprint, (2) higher initial fixation strength of the articular-side components of the repaired rotator cuff tendon, and (3) an adaptation between the superficial and inferior layers. This technique represents an alternative option in the operative treatment of large delaminated RCTs. PMID:25685671

  18. Lateral foot pain following open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture of the fifth metatarsal tubercle: treated by arthroscopic arthrolysis and endoscopic tenolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of fracture of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal which was managed by tension band wiring and bone grafting. It was complicated by symptomatic fibrosis of the operated site involving the cubometatarsal joint, peroneus brevis tendon, peroneus tertius tendon and the long extensor tendon to the fifth toe. This was successfully managed by arthroscopic lysis of the involved joint and tendons. PMID:24744074

  19. The Analgesic Effects of Morphine and Tramadol Added to Intra-articular Levobupivacaine-Tenoxicam Combination for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery on Postoperative Pain; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru Gelici; Hanci, Ayse; Ulufer Sivrikaya, Gulcihan; Dobrucali, Hale; Turkoglu Kilinc, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic knee surgery is commonly performed as an outpatient procedure and is often associated with postoperative pain. Objectives: We aimed to compare the effects of intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-tramadol and levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-morphine combinations on postoperative pain in patients undergoing elective arthroscopic knee surgery. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 ASA I-II patients undergoing elective arthroscopic meniscectomy under general anesthesia were enrolled. The participants were randomly allocated to three groups to receive the following intra-articular medications after completion of the surgery and before deflation of the tourniquet: Group S, 20 mL of saline; Group T, 35 mg of levobupivacaine, 20 mg of tenoxicam, and 100 mg of tramadol in 20 mL saline; and Group M, 35 mg of levobupivacaine, 20 mg of tenoxicam, and 4 mg of morphine in 20 mL saline. Visual analogue scale values at rest (VASr) and at active flexion of knee (VASa) at postoperation hours 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24, duration of analgesia, total analgesic consumption, and number of rescue analgesia at 24 hours were evaluated. Results: VASr and VASa were significantly higher in group S in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group T and Group M than in Group S (P < 0.05). The difference between group T and group M was also significant (P < 0.05). Number of rescue analgesia and total analgesic consumption at postoperative hour 24 was significantly fewer in group M compared with other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-morphine combination provides effective pain relief, longer analgesic duration, and less analgesic requirement when compared with intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-tramadol combination and saline after knee arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26161321

  20. 49 CFR 195.422 - Pipeline repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.422 Pipeline repairs. (a) Each operator shall, in repairing its pipeline systems, insure that the repairs are made in a safe manner and are made so as to prevent damage to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipeline repairs. 195.422 Section...