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1

Arthroscopic subscapularis repair.  

PubMed

As the largest and most powerful rotator cuff muscle, the subscapularis plays a critical role in proper shoulder function. The diagnosis of subscapularis tears is made based on history and physical examination and confirmed with imaging studies. Historically, subscapularis tears have been addressed in an open fashion. Recent literature has demonstrated successful all-arthroscopic repair of isolated subscapularis tears and anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. Successful arthroscopic treatment follows several critical steps: patient positioning, portal placement, obtaining adequate visualization and working space, identifying and mobilizing the subscapularis tendon, preparation of the tendon edge and lesser tuberosity, appropriate anchor placement, suture passage, and finally, secure knot-tying and fixation. Excellent functional and clinical outcomes following these steps have been demonstrated by various investigators. Additional research is needed, however, because direct comparison between all-arthroscopic and open subscapularis repair is limited, and neither technique has proved to be superior. PMID:24486754

Kuntz, Andrew F; Raphael, Ibrahim; Dougherty, Michael P; Abboud, Joseph A

2014-02-01

2

Arthroscopic Volar Capsuloligamentous Repair  

PubMed Central

Background?The palmar aspect of the capsuloligamentous complex of the wrist is relatively inaccessible to surgery through an open approach. An all-inside arthroscopic suturing technique is presented that allows suturing of the palmar scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligaments or plication of the space of Poirier. Methods?Eight palmar scapholunate ligaments and four major tears of the volar capsuloligamentous complex of the wrist due to a perilunate dislocation have been repaired. Results?No complications occurred during or after the procedure. It was not possible to separate the effects of the palmar repair from the disparate treatment of the associated pathology. Conclusions?The technique described allows one to suture the palmar aspects of the SL and LT ligaments safely and to repair the space of Poirier structures without need for any special equipment.

del Pinal, Francisco

2013-01-01

3

Arthroscopic Hip Labral Repair  

PubMed Central

Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature.

Philippon, Marc J.; Faucet, Scott C.; Briggs, Karen K.

2013-01-01

4

Arthroscopic Transosseous-Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Rotator cuff repair techniques continue to evolve in an effort to improve repair biomechanics, maximize the biologic environment for tendon healing, and ultimately improve patient outcomes. The arthroscopic transosseous-equivalent technique was developed to replicate the favorable tendon-bone contact area for healing seen in open transosseous tunnel repair. In this technical note and accompanying video, we present our all-arthroscopic transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair technique with a focus on technical pearls.

Lavery, Kyle P.; Rasmussen, Jeffrey F.; Dhawan, Aman

2013-01-01

5

Arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

The arthroscopic approach for rotator cuff repair is extensively used worldwide. Different repairing procedures have evolved with the aim of restoring anatomy and function of rotator cuff tendon. Several studies have analyzed biomechanical factors to understand their influence on tendon to bone healing and improve repair configurations. From a biomechanical point of view, single-row anchor techniques are not able to restore all of the original footprint of the rotator cuff, and result in circumferential tension around the tendon. Transosseus simple suture repairs may have greater potential for healing at the tendon-bone interface, because they allow a larger insertion site area and better pressure characteristics. Biomechanically, double-row suture anchor repair increases the area of contact and the initial fixation strength, decreases the load for each suture loop, knot and anchor, and decreases the stress at each suture-cuff contact point. To optimize healing, transosseous-equivalent techniques have been developed. The oblique suture bridges allow greater pressurized contact, low profile, and interconnection between fixation points that permits to shear load. Clinical studies showed equivalent clinical results of single- and double-row suture anchor repair. However, to date, there are no randomized controlled trials on transosseous or transosseous-equivalent techniques for rotator cuff repair. Clearly, studies of higher levels of evidence, including large randomized trials, should be conducted. Future trials should use validated functional and clinical outcomes, adequate methodology, and be sufficiently powered. PMID:21986052

Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Franceschi, Francesco; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

2012-01-01

6

ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair  

PubMed Central

The arthroscopic treatment of the “bony Bankart lesion” continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the “transosseous bony Bankart repair,” which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface.

Myer, Daniel M.; Caldwell, Paul E.

2012-01-01

7

Arthroscopic Capsular Repair in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

The role of capsular repair in the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement remains poorly defined. Some surgeons rarely repair the capsule, whereas others perform repairs routinely. There is little direct clinical evidence to guide surgeon decision making. When capsular repairs are performed, the procedure requires adequate visualization and careful suture placement either to re-establish the patient's normal capsular volume or to plicate a redundant capsule in a hip with hyperlaxity preoperatively. We present our preferred technique for arthroscopic capsular repair.

Chow, Roxanne M.; Engasser, William M.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

2013-01-01

8

ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair.  

PubMed

The arthroscopic treatment of the "bony Bankart lesion" continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the "transosseous bony Bankart repair," which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface. PMID:23766995

Myer, Daniel M; Caldwell, Paul E

2012-12-01

9

All-Inside Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair With Meniscal Cinch  

PubMed Central

The number of commercially available all-arthroscopic meniscal repair devices has increased in recent years. Although inside-out vertical mattress sutures have been considered the gold standard in the past, recent biomechanical studies have shown that some all-arthroscopic repair devices provide comparable strength. To successfully use these devices, surgeons must understand proper insertion technique. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate this technique for the Meniscal Cinch (Arthrex, Naples, FL).

Goradia, Vipool K.

2013-01-01

10

Arthroscopic Recognition and Repair of the Torn Subscapularis Tendon  

PubMed Central

Although the subscapularis has historically received less attention than posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, repair of a torn subscapularis tendon is critically important to restoring anatomy and achieving the best functional outcome possible. Arthroscopic repair begins with proper recognition of the tear. A systematic approach can then be used to arthroscopically repair all types of subscapularis tendon tears, from partial tears to full-thickness tears, as well as those which are retracted and have adhesions medially. Subscapularis footprint restoration can be accomplished with a variety of repair techniques that must be matched to the extent of the tear and mobility of the tendon.

Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

2013-01-01

11

Arthroscopic recognition and repair of the torn subscapularis tendon.  

PubMed

Although the subscapularis has historically received less attention than posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, repair of a torn subscapularis tendon is critically important to restoring anatomy and achieving the best functional outcome possible. Arthroscopic repair begins with proper recognition of the tear. A systematic approach can then be used to arthroscopically repair all types of subscapularis tendon tears, from partial tears to full-thickness tears, as well as those which are retracted and have adhesions medially. Subscapularis footprint restoration can be accomplished with a variety of repair techniques that must be matched to the extent of the tear and mobility of the tendon. PMID:24400185

Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

2013-01-01

12

Repair of peripheral meniscal tears: open versus arthroscopic technique.  

PubMed

Tears in the peripheral vascular zone of 71 menisci in 68 knees were repaired by us from 1978 to 1986. The meniscus repair was done by open arthrotomy in 26 cases and by arthroscopic techniques in 45 cases. We have assessed the relative efficacies of open and arthroscopic repair techniques. The results were compared in knees with and without anterior cruciate laxity. The indications for meniscal repair included unstable peripheral detachments and longitudinal tears of the outer third of the meniscus. Open repair was performed by a posteromedial arthrotomy incision. Arthroscopic repair was done using the double-lumen guide system with a limited posterior incision for retrieval of needles. We have found that the arthroscopic technique is easier to perform than the open repair because some tears are too far inside the rim to lend themselves to open suture. The average follow-up is 4 years, 2 months, with a range of 2-10 years. There have been no neurologic or vascular injuries from either technique. Twenty-five patients have had a repeat arthroscopy. The overall failure rate was 9.8%. The difference between the failure rate of 11% in the open-repair group and 8.8% in the arthroscopic repair group was not statistically significant. The failure rate in anterior cruciate-stable knees was 8% versus a 13% failure in cruciate-deficient knees. We conclude that both open and arthroscopic meniscus repair techniques are safe and effective with few complications in both stable and unstable knees. Anterior cruciate ligament stability is ideal, but it is not mandatory for a successful result. PMID:2009124

Hanks, G A; Gause, T M; Sebastianelli, W J; O'Donnell, C S; Kalenak, A

1991-01-01

13

Open versus Two Forms of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

There have been technologic advances in the methods for repairing torn rotator cuffs. We compared the clinical and structural outcomes of three different forms of rotator cuff repair with up to 24 months’ followup. We wished to assess how surgical technique affected clinical outcomes and see how these correlated to repair integrity. Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (1) an open technique (n = 49); (2) arthroscopic knotted (n = 53); or (3) arthroscopic knotless (n = 57) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. Ultrasound studies were performed with a validated protocol at 6 months and 2 years postsurgery. Clinical outcomes were similar with the exception that the arthroscopic groups had, on average, 20% better American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores than the open group at 6 months and 2 years. Retear correlated with tear size and operation time and occurred more frequently after open repair (39%) than after arthroscopic knotted (25%) and arthroscopic knotless (16%) repair. An intact cuff on ultrasound corresponded to better results for supraspinatus strength, patient outcomes, and rotator cuff functional ability. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Millar, Neal L.; Wu, Xiao; Tantau, Robyn; Silverstone, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

14

Arthroscopic Labral Repair in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

Labral repair has become an essential technique in the arthroscopic surgical management of femoroacetabular impingement. Several clinical studies suggest that labral repair results in superior patient outcomes in comparison to labral debridement alone. The repair procedure requires accurate evaluation of labral tissue quality, precise placement of sutures and anchors, and careful re-tensioning of the labrum. We present our preferred technique for labral repair.

Chow, Roxanne M.; Owens, Christopher J.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

2013-01-01

15

Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using a Suture Bridge Technique: Is the Repair Integrity Actually Maintained?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Suture bridge repair has been recognized to have superior biomechanical characteristics, as shown in previous biomechanical studies. However, it is not clear whether the tendon heals better in vivo after suture bridge repair.Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results and repair integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a suture bridge technique for patients with rotator cuff tears.Study Design: Case

Nam Su Cho; Bong Gun Lee; Yong Girl Rhee

2011-01-01

16

Patient Satisfaction after Arthroscopic Repair of Acetabular Labral Tears  

PubMed Central

Background Acetabular labral tear is a main cause of hip pain and disability, often requiring surgical treatment. Improvements of hip arthroscopic technique have produced positive outcomes after labral repair with arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction after arthroscopic repair of acetabular labral tear. Methods We interviewed 21 patients (10 men and 11 women; mean age, 36 years [range, 22 to 57 years]) with acetabular labral tears that had been repaired arthroscopically in terms of satisfaction of the procedure. In addition, clinical outcome was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS) score, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index, and Harris hip score, and radiologic outcome was assessed using serial radiography. The patients were followed for 24-50 months. Results The mean Harris hip score was 73 points (range, 64 to 84 points) preoperatively and 83 points (range, 66 to 95 points) postoperatively. Fifteen hips (71%) were rated excellent and good. The mean WOMAC osteoarthritis index and VAS scores were improved at final follow-up. UCLA activity at the latest follow-up improved in 16 patients. The Tonnis grade of osteoarthritis at the latest follow-up did not change in all patients. Eighteen of the patients (86%) were satisfied with the procedure. Conclusions High rate of satisfaction after arthroscopic repair of acetabular labral tears is an encouraging outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of labral tears might be a useful technique in patients with hip pathologies, such as femoroacetabular impingement with labral tears.

Ha, Yong-Chan; Shin, Yong-Eun

2014-01-01

17

Free Biceps Tendon Autograft to Augment Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while one is performing rotator cuff surgery. A subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides a source of autograft to augment rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. Two techniques are presented to augment rotator cuff repairs with a free biceps tendon autograft. This is a novel idea in an attempt to improve healing rates and long-term results of rotator cuff repairs of all sizes.

Obma, Padraic R.

2013-01-01

18

Arthroscopic Glenoid Labral Repair With an Oblique Mattress Configuration  

PubMed Central

There have been several arthroscopic techniques described in the literature regarding the passage of sutures for an arthroscopic glenoid labral repair. With simple suture passage when tying knots, there is a concern of internal knot impingement, especially in the posterosuperior labrum. On the other hand, with simple suture passage with knotless technology, there is a concern of leaving the anchor hole exposed in the glenohumeral joint space, especially with anchors that are degradable over time. Whereas a horizontal mattress configuration may address these 2 issues in most cases, there is the issue of tissue cut-through with the labral tissue fibers being in the same plane as the horizontal mattress sutures. The purpose of this report is to describe the oblique mattress configuration, which allows the passage of suture through multiple labral tissue planes, covers up the anchor holes with labral tissue, and maintains the knots away from the articular surface if knots are tied.

Adams, Christopher R.

2013-01-01

19

Rapidly progressive osteoarthritis after arthroscopic labral repair in patients with hip dysplasia.  

PubMed

Recent reports of poor clinical outcomes after arthroscopic surgery in hips with marked dysplasia have emerged. Arthroscopic resection of the hypertrophic labrum in cases of dysplasia, especially in the absence of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO), has been implicated. Some patients will refuse PAO because it is a major open procedure, opting for a less invasive arthroscopic procedure. We present the cases of 2 young adults with marked dysplasia who had rapidly progressive osteoarthrosis despite arthroscopic labral repair. Though perhaps beneficial as an isolated procedure in borderline or mild dysplasia cases, arthroscopic hip surgery, even labral repair, may best be performed with PAO in cases with more severe dysplasia. Albeit attractive as a less invasive labral-preserving surgery, arthroscopic labral repair not only may fail to provide symptomatic improvement but may compromise or preclude a later PAO if rapidly progressive osteoarthrosis ensues. Hip arthroscopy may best be performed concurrently with or after PAO but not proceeding PAO in patients requiring both procedures. PMID:23107251

Matsuda, Dean K; Khatod, Monti

2012-11-01

20

Factors Affecting Healing Rates After Arthroscopic Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were developed to improve initial biomechanical strength of repairs to improve healing rates. Despite biomechanical improvements, failure of healing remains a clinical problem.Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical results after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with ultrasound to determine postoperative repair integrity and the effect of various factors on tendon healing.Study Design: Case series; Level

Robert Z. Tashjian; Anthony M. Hollins; Hyun-Min Kim; Sharlene A. Teefey; William D. Middleton; Karen Steger-May; Leesa M. Galatz; Ken Yamaguchi

2010-01-01

21

Functional outcome after open and arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability  

PubMed Central

Purpose Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Materials and methods In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Results Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occured earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20° or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. Conclusion In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations.

2009-01-01

22

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players  

PubMed Central

Background Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. Results There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360° labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6–31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. Conclusion We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to preinjury status.

Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

2009-01-01

23

Arthroscopic repair of delaminated acetabular articular cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement.  

PubMed

Lesions to articular cartilage can be difficult to treat and directly impact surgical outcome in hip arthroscopy. This article describes a direct cartilage suture repair technique for a young, active individual with full-thickness acetabular cartilage delamination. Lesions of this type are commonly seen with femoroacetabular impingement. A 17-year-old boy presented with bilateral hip pain greater in the right than left. Arthroscopic intervention for the right hip included direct cartilage repair for the cartilage lesion, osteoplasty for femoroacetabular impingement, repair for an anterior labral tear, capsular plication for iliofemoral ligament laxity, and psoas lengthening. Twelve weeks postoperatively, a standard capsular plication, osteoplasty, and chondroplasty were performed on the left hip. At follow-up, the patient reported feeling 95% normal. He noted that the right and left hips were essentially the same. Symptoms consisted of stiffness after prolonged sitting and mild pain following sports. The patient reported being pain free 90% of the time, with pain 2/10 at worst. He scored a 96 on the modified Harris Hip Score, 93 on the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living subscale, and 81 on the Hip Outcome Score Sports subscale. Overall, the patient was satisfied with the outcome. The direct cartilage repair, in addition to osteoplasty, anterior superior labral repair, iliofemoral capsular plication, and psoas lengthening, produced an excellent outcome in this young, active patient. PMID:19750994

Sekiya, Jon K; Martin, RobRoy L; Lesniak, Bryson P

2009-09-01

24

Outcomes After Arthroscopic Repair of Type-II SLAP Lesions  

PubMed Central

Background: To our knowledge, there has been no prospective study on the results of arthroscopic repair of superior labrum-biceps anchor complex (SLAP) tears with use of modern techniques. The purpose of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the minimum two-year results for patients with type-II SLAP tears that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor fixation. Methods: Forty-seven patients with symptomatic type-II SLAP tears were evaluated preoperatively and at least two years postoperatively with use of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and L'Insalata outcomes instruments and physical examination. The study group included thirty-nine male and eight female patients with a mean age of thirty-six years; thirty-four of the forty-seven patients were athletes. Patients with rotator cuff tears requiring repair or concomitant shoulder instability were excluded. Results: At an average of 2.7 years, the median ASES and L'Insalata scores were 97 and 93, respectively, compared with baseline scores of 62 and 65 (p < 0.05). The median patient-reported satisfaction rating was 9 (of 10); forty-one patients (87%) rated the outcome as good or excellent. The median patient-reported satisfaction rating was significantly higher for patients with a discrete traumatic etiology than for those with an atraumatic etiology (9 compared with 7); however, there was no significant difference between these groups in terms of the ASES or L'Insalata outcome scores. Overall, twenty-five (74%) of the thirty-four athletes were able to return to their preinjury level of competition, whereas eleven (92%) of the twelve athletes who reported a discrete traumatic event were able to return to their previous level of competition. There were five complications, including four cases of refractory postoperative stiffness. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that favorable outcomes can be anticipated in the majority of patients after arthroscopic SLAP lesion repair. While only three of four patients overall may be capable of returning fully to their previous level of competition, patients with a distinct traumatic etiology have a greater likelihood of a successful return to sports. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Voos, James E.; Williams, Riley J.; Altchek, David W.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Allen, Answorth A.

2009-01-01

25

Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Tears of the Supraspinatus: Does the Tendon Really Heal?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Good functional results have been reported for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears, but the rate of tendon-to-bone healing is still unknown. Our hypothesis was that arthroscopic repair of full-thickness supraspinatus tears achieves a rate of complete tendon healing equivalent to those reported in the literature with open or mini-open techniques. Methods: Sixty-five consecutive shoulders with a chronic full-thickness

PASCAL BOILEAU; NICOLAS BRASSART; DUNCAN J. WATKINSON; MICHEL CARLES; ARMODIOS M. HATZIDAKIS; SUMANT G. KRISHNAN

26

Posterosuperior suture granuloma impingement after arthroscopic SLAP repair using suture anchors: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arthroscopic refixation of the glenoid labrum has become a standard treatment of type II SLAP lesions although postoperative\\u000a results are not uniformly good due to factors which are yet unclear. We present the case of an active overhead athlete with\\u000a an intraarticular posterosuperior impingement syndrome arising from a suture granuloma formation complicating the postoperative\\u000a course after arthroscopic SLAP repair. The

Adeleke Ifesanya; Markus Scheibel

2008-01-01

27

Surgical pearls and pitfalls for effective and reproducible arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common orthopedic procedure. This can be a technically challenging and frustrating procedure without adherence to basic principles and guidelines. The authors aim to present a concise treatment strategy for preoperative evaluation, surgical intervention, and postoperative care to achieve secure, anatomic, and reproducible repairs. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(7):472-476.]. PMID:24992053

Johnson, Darren L; Lembach, Mark; Mair, Scott; Johnson, Darren L

2014-07-01

28

Efficacy of arthroscopically placed pain catheter adjacent to the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair  

PubMed Central

Background Rotator-cuff surgery is well recognized to be a painful procedure. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an arthroscopically placed perineural catheter at the scapular notch to provide a continuous block of the suprascapular nerve (continuous arthroscopically assisted suprascapular nerve block [ca-SSNB]) following arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (ARCR). Materials and methods This level II, prospective, randomized, controlled trial without postoperative blinding included 40 patients, who had a 48-hour pain pump, with 0.2% ropivacaine infusion and a continuous rate of 3 mL/hour, placed via an arthroscopically placed catheter following ARCR with arthroscopic release of the superior transverse ligament: 21 patients had a ca-SSNB, and 19 patients had a continuous subacromial bursal block (SAB). The visual analog scale (at 6 hours and on the first, second, and third postoperative days) and the total number of additional pain-reduction attempts during the 3 postoperative days were calculated. Results The respective visual analog scale scores (mm) obtained from the ca-SSNB and SAB groups were 62.4 and 67.6 (P=0.73) before surgery, 9.1 and 19.4 (P=0.12) at 6 hours after surgery, 24.4 and 44.6 (P=0.019) on the first postoperative day, 19.4 and 40.4 (P=0.0060) on the second postoperative day, and 18.5 and 27.8 (P=0.21) on the third postoperative day. Total additional pain-reduction attempts recorded for the ca-SSNB and SAB groups during the 3 postoperative days were 0.3 times and 1.2 times (P=0.0020), respectively. Conclusion ca-SSNB was highly effective in controlling postoperative pain after ARCR.

Yamakado, Kotaro

2014-01-01

29

Arthroscopic Repair of Combined Bankart and SLAP Lesions: Operative Techniques and Clinical Results  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate the clinical results and operation technique of arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, all of which had an anterior-inferior Bankart lesion that continued superiorly to include separation of the biceps anchor in the patients presenting recurrent shoulder dislocations. Methods From May 2003 to January 2006, we reviewed 15 cases with combined Bankart and SLAP lesions among 62 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations who underwent arthroscopic repair. The average age at surgery was 24.2 years (range, 16 to 38 years), with an average follow-up period of 15 months (range, 13 to 28 months). During the operation, we repaired the unstable SLAP lesion first with absorbable suture anchors and then also repaired Bankart lesion from the inferior to superior fashion. We analyzed the preoperative and postoperative results by visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) and Rowe shoulder scoring systems. We compared the results with the isolated Bankart lesion. Results VAS for pain was decreased from preoperative 4.9 to postoperative 1.9. Mean ASES and Rowe shoulder scores were improved from preoperative 56.4 and 33.7 to postoperative 91.8 and 94.1, respectively. There were no specific complication and no significant limitation of motion more than 10 degree at final follow-up. We found the range of motions after the arthroscopic repair in combined lesions were gained more slowly than in patients with isolated Bankart lesions. Conclusions In recurrent dislocation of the shoulder with combined Bankart and SLAP lesion, arthroscopic repair using absorbable suture anchors produced favorable clinical results. Although it has technical difficulty, the concomitant unstable SLAP lesion should be repaired in a manner that stabilizes the glenohumeral joint, as the Bankart lesion can be repaired if the unstable SLAP lesion is repaired first.

Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Choon Key; Hwang, Tae Hyok; Park, Jong Won

2010-01-01

30

Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Impingement syndrome following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuffs using double row suture anchor has not been widely reported. This is the first such case where anchoring has resulted in impingement syndrome.

2009-01-01

31

Arthroscopic Double-Row Anterior Stabilization and Bankart Repair for the "High-Risk" Athlete  

PubMed Central

In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion.

Moran, Cathal J.; Fabricant, Peter D.; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A.

2014-01-01

32

Arthroscopic Transtendon Repair of Partial-Thickness Articular-Side Tears of the Rotator CuffAnatomical and Clinical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The precise results of arthroscopic transtendon repair of partial-thickness articular-side tears of the rotator cuff remain to be reported.Hypothesis: Arthroscopic transtendon repair is useful in patients with Ellman grade 3 (>6 mm) partial-thickness articular-side tears of the supraspinatus tendon.Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study and case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods: In 43 cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 80 years; range,

Junji Ide; Satoshi Maeda; Katsumasa Takagi

2005-01-01

33

Simultaneous Rotator Cuff Repair and Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis Using Lateral Row Anchor  

PubMed Central

Treatment of concomitant long head of the biceps pathology in the setting of rotator cuff repair is often required. When a tenodesis of the biceps is used, additional anchors and surgical dissection are typically required. This adds additional surgical time, morbidity of additional surgical dissection, and additional anchor load and cost. We describe a novel technique for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis that uses the anterior lateral row anchor of a double-row rotator cuff repair to simultaneously secure the biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff tear. This technique provides a simple, reproducible, cost-effective means of performing a simultaneous biceps tenodesis and double-row rotator cuff repair.

Levy, Jonathan C.

2012-01-01

34

Systematic Review of Arthroscopic Versus Open Repair for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Dislocations  

PubMed Central

Context: It remains unknown if arthroscopic repair of recurrent anterior shoulder instability is as effective as open repair. Objective: The purpose of this study is to analyze the literature to provide clinical recommendations regarding the most appropriate therapeutic intervention for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Study Design: Systematic review of level I and II studies. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and secondary references from 1967 to March 2010 were appraised for studies that met the inclusion criteria. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria were English-language level I or level II trials involving the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Exclusion criteria included non-English-language studies; level III, IV, or V studies; and trials examining treatment of first-time shoulder dislocation, posterior shoulder dislocation, or diagnoses other than recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. Data Extraction: Included studies underwent quality appraisal independently by each author identifying strengths, weaknesses, and biases. Results: Four randomized controlled trials compared the use of arthroscopic and open repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. These studies show no statistically significant difference between the 2 operative approaches. No long-term follow-up data describing the effects of either surgical approach are available at this time. Each investigation had weaknesses in study design that decreased the validity of its findings. Conclusions: While limited, the available evidence from randomized controlled trials does not show a statistically significant difference in redislocation rates, return to activity, and functional outcomes between the arthroscopic and open repair groups. Range of motion is marginally better following arthroscopic treatment when compared with open repair. Recommendations on the optimal surgical intervention cannot be provided.

Godin, Jonathan; Sekiya, Jon K.

2011-01-01

35

Results of repair of peripheral tears in the triangular fibrocartilage complex using an arthroscopic suture technique.  

PubMed

We present the results of an arthroscopic suture technique for repairing peripheral tears (Palmer type 1 b) of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The 20 patients included in this study were 15-59 years of age; the most common mechanism of injury was a fall on a hyperextended wrist. After diagnosis of the tear in the TFCC we debrided the synovitis and repaired the tears by an arthroscopic suture technique. At follow up 23-59 months postoperatively, range of movement (sum of flexion-extension) was 90% (range 53%-108%) and grip strength was 83% (range 18%-122%) when compared with the uninjured side. All patients returned to work, though three changed occupations. The arthroscopic suture technique of peripheral TFCC repair produced seven excellent, seven good, four fair, and two poor results (grading based on a Mayo modification of the Green and O'Brien wrist score). As our results are comparable to others, we think that the technique described could be used in the repair of peripheral tears of the TFCC. PMID:10614755

Haugstvedt, J R; Husby, T

1999-12-01

36

Arthroscopic meniscal repair with an absorbable screw: results and surgical technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a new method for arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair using a biodegradable cannulated screw (Clearfix meniscal screw) were assessed in a medium-term follow-up prospective study. The Clearfix meniscal screw system consists of delivery cannulae, screw driver, and screw implants. After tear debridement, a screw is located on the driver and passed through the cannula to the insertion site,

Michael E. Hantes; Elias S. Kotsovolos; Dimitrios S. Mastrokalos; Joerg Ammenwerth; Hans H. Paessler

2005-01-01

37

Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group:\\u000a median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years).\\u000a The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but\\u000a different in age. After

Leonardo OstiRocco; Rocco Papalia; Angelo Del Buono; Vincenzo Denaro; Nicola Maffulli

2010-01-01

38

Open versus Two Forms of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

There have been technologic advances in the methods for repairing torn rotator cuffs. We compared the clinical and structural outcomes of three different forms of rotator cuff repair with up to 24 months’ followup.\\u000a We wished to assess how surgical technique affected clinical outcomes and see how these correlated to repair integrity. Three\\u000a cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic

Neal L. Millar; Xiao Wu; Robyn Tantau; Elizabeth Silverstone; George A. C. Murrell

2009-01-01

39

The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author's practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique. PMID:25002932

Vopat, Bryan G; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

2014-04-22

40

The Global Percutaneous Shuttling Technique Tip for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

Vopat, Bryan G.; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L.; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

2014-01-01

41

Analysis of the functional results of arthroscopic Bankart repair in posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder  

PubMed Central

Background: The Bankart lesion represents the most common form of labro-ligamentous injury in patients with traumatic dislocations of the shoulder leading to shoulder instability. We report the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion in 50 patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty five patients with posttraumatic anterior dislocation of shoulder were treated by arthroscopic repair from Jan 2005 to Nov 2008. Fifty patients, with an average age of 26.83 years (range 18-45 years), were reviewed in the study. The average followup period was 27 months (range 24-36 months). University of California Los Angeles shoulder rating scale was used to determine the outcome after surgery. The recurrence rates, range of motion, as well as postoperative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results: Thirty six patients (72.0%) had excellent results, whereas seven patients (14.0%) had good results. The mean pre- and postoperative range of external rotation was 80.38° and 75.18°, respectively. Eighty-six percent patients had stability compared with the normal sided shoulder and were able to return to sports. There were no cases of redislocation observed in this study; however, three cases had mild laxity of the joint. Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent postoperative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

Mishra, Amit; Sharma, Pulak; Chaudhary, Deepak

2012-01-01

42

Arthroscopic Repair of the Floating Posterior-Inferior Glenohumeral Ligament Lesion  

PubMed Central

We present our technique for diagnosis and arthroscopic repair of a floating posterior-inferior glenohumeral ligament avulsion injury. A high degree of suspicion based on the patient's history, along with careful examination, should alert the surgeon to the existence of this lesion. By use of an anterolateral viewing portal and precisely placed posterior working portals, the lesion is repaired through suture anchor fixation to the humeral head and glenoid rim in a carefully sequenced fashion to achieve appropriate tension and restore the anatomy.

Baran, Sean; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

2013-01-01

43

HAGL Lesion Occurring After Successful Arthroscopic Bankart Repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability following surgical repair may be asso- ciated with implant failure and an array of capsulolabral pathology including separation of the labrum (Bankart lesion), humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion), and capsular rupture. We detail a previously unreported case of a HAGL lesion occurring in a shoulder with an intact arthrosopic Bankart repair following

Gert Schippinger; Peter S. Vasiu; Hans G. Clement

44

HAGL lesion occurring after successful arthroscopic Bankart repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability following surgical repair may be associated with implant failure and an array of capsulolabral pathology including separation of the labrum (Bankart lesion), humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion), and capsular rupture. We detail a previously unreported case of a HAGL lesion occurring in a shoulder with an intact arthrosopic Bankart repair following an

Gert Schippinger; Peter S. Vasiu; Florian Fankhauser; Hans G. Clement

2001-01-01

45

Arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair for chronic ankle instability with a suture anchor technique.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair for chronic ankle instability using a bioabsorbable anchor with 2 sutures. We evaluated the results of 28 ankles treated with arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair using bioabsorbable anchors with a FiberWire and TigerWire suture (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) placed on the fibula from March 2008 to January 2009. Average follow-up was 15.9 months (range, 13-25 months). Patients were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot ankle score and stress radiographs. Mean AOFAS hindfoot ankle score was 92.48 ± 6.14 at last follow-up compared to the mean preoperative score of 60.78 ± 16.38 (P=.041). Mean postoperative anterior draw test score difference between 2 ankles was 0.61 ± 0.75 compared to the mean preoperative score difference of 3.59 ± 0.68 (P=.00). There was a 14% complication rate, including 3 cases of portal site irritation and 1 case of superficial infection. Stress radiographs revealed 3 cases of anterior displacement >3 mm compared to the other side. All patients returned to their previous activity level.Arthroscopic ligament reconstruction for chronic lateral ankle instability using suture anchors is effective in returning patients to their preinjury function levels. Good clinical results were obtained with some minor complications. This minimally invasive technique is a reasonable alternative to other open surgical procedures for chronic ankle instability. PMID:21469637

Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Kyung Tai; Park, Jun Sic; Lee, Young Koo

2011-04-01

46

Prognostic Factors of Arthroscopic Pull-out Repair for a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus (MRT) decreases peak contact pressure by restoring hoop tension and is expected to prevent progression to osteoarthritis.Purpose: The purposes of this study were (1) to report the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of arthroscopic pull-out repair of the MRT and (2) to identify prognostic factors of poor

Hong-Kyo Moon; Yong-Gon Koh; Yong-Chan Kim; Young-Sik Park; Seung-Bae Jo; Sae-Kwang Kwon

2012-01-01

47

Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization With an Iliac Bone Graft and Capsular Repair: A Novel Technique  

PubMed Central

Several surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Many authors have performed posterior bone block procedures with good results not only in the presence of glenoid bone loss or dysplasia but also in the case of capsular hyperlaxity and poor soft-tissue quality. Open techniques often require an extensive approach with the disadvantage of a poor cosmetic result and possible insufficiency of the deltoid muscle. Furthermore, the treatment of concomitant pathologies and the correct placement of the bone graft are difficult. Therefore we describe an all-arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac bone graft and capsular repair that is intended to improve the pre-existing open procedure. The key steps of the operation are the precise placement and screw fixation of the bone block at the posterior glenoid under arthroscopic control and the subsequent posterior capsular refixation and plication using 2 suture anchors to create an extra-articular graft position.

Smith, Tomas; Goede, Fabian; Struck, Melena; Wellmann, Mathias

2012-01-01

48

HAGL lesion occurring after successful arthroscopic Bankart repair.  

PubMed

Recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability following surgical repair may be associated with implant failure and an array of capsulolabral pathology including separation of the labrum (Bankart lesion), humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion), and capsular rupture. We detail a previously unreported case of a HAGL lesion occurring in a shoulder with an intact arthrosopic Bankart repair following an additional traumatic event. Anatomic repair of this subsequent injury resulted in an excellent outcome. The patient returned to his high-demand ski racing activities without any shoulder limitation. PMID:11172253

Schippinger, G; Vasiu, P S; Fankhauser, F; Clement, H G

2001-02-01

49

Arthroscopic Lateral Meniscus Root Repair With Soft Suture Anchor Technique  

PubMed Central

Meniscus root tear leads to circumferential hoop tension loss and increases femorotibial contact force, which causes irreversible cartilage degeneration. Biomechanical studies have shown that meniscus root repair provides better femorotibial contact force than meniscectomy. Many techniques for meniscus root repair have been published in recent years. The soft suture anchor is widely used in the glenoid labral repair. It is a small low-profile soft anchor. This article presents a new and simple technique of lateral meniscus root repair using the small soft anchor, which results in an anatomic and more vertical anchor position. It avoids instrument-related complications, such as cartilage delamination, material reaction, metal retention, and hard suture anchor pullout.

Prasathaporn, Niti; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

2013-01-01

50

Arthroscopic repair of peripheral avulsions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: a multicenter study.  

PubMed

A multicenter study to assess arthroscopic reconstruction of the peripheral attachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex was undertaken. A total of 44 patients (45 wrists) from three institutions were reviewed. Twenty-seven of the 45 wrists had associated injuries, including distal radius fracture (4), partial or complete rupture of the scapholunate (7), lunotriquetral (9), ulnocarpal (2), or radiocarpal (2) ligaments. There were two fractured ulnar styloids and one scapholunate accelerated collapse (SLAC) wrist deformity. The peripheral tears were repaired using a zone-specific repair kit. The patients were immobilized in a munster cast, allowing elbow flexion and extension, but no pronation or supination for 4 weeks, followed by 2 to 4 weeks in a short arm cast or VersaWrist splint. All patients were reexamined independently 1 to 3 years postoperatively by a physician, therapist, and registered nurse. The results were graded according to the Mayo modified wrist score. Twenty-nine of the 45 wrists were rated excellent. 12 good, 1 fair, and 3 poor. Overall, 42 of the 45 patients (93%) rated as satisfactory and returned to sports or work activities. One patient had chronic pain, and two patients had ulnar nerve symptoms, although motion was normal in all, and their grip strength was at least 75% of the opposite hand. Arthroscopic repair of peripheral tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a satisfactory method of repairing these injuries. PMID:9043608

Corso, S J; Savoie, F H; Geissler, W B; Whipple, T L; Jiminez, W; Jenkins, N

1997-02-01

51

Arthroscopic meniscus repair in the ACL-deficient knee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1985 and 1995, 45 patients underwent closed meniscus repair. There were 30 men and 15 women with a mean age of 32.5 years. In 23 patients, the anterior cruciate ligament was intact (group 1) whereas it was deficient in 22 patients (group 2). All patients were managed with the same postoperative program of partial weight bearing, immediate motion and

F. Steenbrugge; W. Van Nieuwenhuyse; R. Verdonk; K. Verstraete

2005-01-01

52

Arthroscopic Suture Bridge Repair Technique for Full Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of our study is to evaluate the clinical results of arthroscopic suture bridge repair for patients with rotator cuff tears. Methods Between January 2007 and July 2007, fifty-one shoulders underwent arthroscopic suture bridge repair for full thickness rotator cuff tears. The average age at the time of surgery was 57.1 years old, and the mean follow-up period was 15.4 months. Results At the last follow-up, the pain at rest improved from 2.2 preoperatively to 0.23 postoperatively and the pain during motion improved from 6.3 preoperatively to 1.8 postoperatively (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The range of active forward flexion improved from 138.4° to 154.6°, and the muscle power improved from 4.9 kg to 6.0 kg (p = 0.04 and 0.019, respectively). The clinical results showed no significant difference according to the preoperative tear size and the extent of fatty degeneration, but imaging study showed a statistical relation between retear and fatty degeneration. The average Constant score improved from 73.2 to 83.79, and the average University of California at Los Angeles score changed from 18.2 to 29.6 with 7 excellent, 41 good and 3 poor results (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively). Conclusions The arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tears may be an operative method for which a patient can expect to achieve clinical improvement regardless of the preoperative tear size and the extent of fatty degeneration.

Yi, Jin Woong; Cho, Nam Su; Cho, Seung Hyun

2010-01-01

53

Long term results of arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability  

PubMed Central

Background The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Methods Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004 - 2008). Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.0001). Data from the UCLA scale showed a Pre and Post Operative Mean of 20.2 ± 5.0 and 32.4 ± 4.6 respectively (p < 0.0001). 34 had excellent post-operative scores, 35 had good scores, 1 had fair score and 3 had poor scores. 75% of the patients returned to sports while 7.6% developed a recurrence of shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Conclusion Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

2011-01-01

54

Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior Repair: Prognostic Factors Associated with Failure  

PubMed Central

Background. The purpose of this study was to report on any prognostic factors that had a significant effect on clinical outcomes following arthroscopic Type II SLAP repairs. Methods. Consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic Type II SLAP repair were retrospectively identified and invited to return for follow-up examination and questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed to determine associations between potential prognostic factors and failure of SLAP repair as defined by ASES of less than 50 and/or revision surgery. Results. Sixty-two patients with an average age of 36 ± 13 years met the study criteria with a mean followup of 3.3 years. There were statistically significant improvements in mean ASES score, forward elevation, and external rotation among patients. Significant associations were identified between ASES score less than 50 and age greater than 40 years; alcohol/tobacco use; coexisting diabetes; pain in the bicipital groove on examination; positive O'Brien's, Speed's, and/or Yergason's tests; and high levels of lifting required at work. There was a significant improvement in ASES at final followup. Conclusions. Patients younger than 20 and overhead throwers had significant associations with cases requiring revision surgery. The results from this study may be used to assist in patient selection for SLAP surgery.

Frank, Rachel M.; Nho, Shane J.; McGill, Kevin C.; Grumet, Robert C.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

2013-01-01

55

Prospective randomised comparison of arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair of the supraspinatus tendon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The aim of the study was to evaluate whether arthroscopic (ASC) repair of rotator cuff ruptures causes less postoperative\\u000a pain and better range of motion (ROM) in the early postoperative period than a mini-open (MO) technique.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Inclusion criteria were a rupture of the supraspinatus tendon with retraction with a maximum to the apex of the humeral head\\u000a and minor fatty

Philip Kasten; Christoph Keil; Thomas Grieser; Patric Raiss; Nikolaus Streich; Markus Loew

56

Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique  

PubMed Central

Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and musculotendinous junction in 20 cases (66.7%; p = 0.006). Conclusions Suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear showed improved clinical results. Cuff integrity after repair did not affect clinical results. Age of over 60 years and size of cuff tear larger than 1 cm were factors influencing rotator cuff retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique.

Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

2013-01-01

57

Validation of the western ontario rotator cuff index in patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is described as being a successful procedure. These results are often derived from clinical general shoulder examinations, which are then classified as 'excellent', 'good', 'fair' or 'poor'. However, the cut-off points for these classifications vary and sometimes modified scores are used. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed to improve quality of life. Therefore, disease specific health-related quality of life patient-administered questionnaires are needed. The WORC is a quality of life questionnaire designed for patients with disorders of the rotator cuff. The score is validated for rotator cuff disease, but not for rotator cuff repair specifically. The aim of this study is to investigate reliability, validity and responsiveness of WORC in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods/Design An approved translation of the WORC into Dutch is used. In this prospective study three groups of patients are used: 1. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; 2. Disorders of the rotator cuff without rupture; 3. Shoulder instability. The WORC, SF-36 and the Constant Score are obtained twice before therapy is started to measure reliability and validity. Responsiveness is tested by obtaining the same tests after therapy.

2011-01-01

58

Autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: single-stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.  

PubMed

Autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis is a novel, single-staged arthroscopic cartilage repair technique using microdrilling and atelocollagen or fibrin gel application under carbon dioxide insufflation. Atelocollagen is a highly purified type I collagen obtained following the treatment of skin dermis with pepsin and telopeptide removal, making it nonimmunogenic. In this procedure, atelocollagen mixed with fibrinogen and thrombin in a 2-way syringe can maintain the shape of the articular surface approximately 5 minutes after application due to the reaction between the thrombin and fibrinogen. Carbon dioxide insufflation facilitates the application of the gel under dry conditions. Ten patients (mean age, 38 years) with symptomatic chondral defects in the knee who were treated arthroscopically with microdrilling and atelocollagen application were retrospectively analyzed. All defects were International Cartilage Repair Society grade III or IV and were 2 to 8 cm(2) in size intraoperatively. For the clinical assessment, Lysholm score was assessed preoperatively and at 2-year follow-up. All patients underwent morphological magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5-Tesla at 1-year follow-up. Mean Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue score at 1-year follow-up was 70.4 ± 20.2 (range, 15-95). The Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue score for patellar lesions was similar to that of lesions in other locations: 73.3 ± 11.7 vs 68.1 ± 25.5, respectively. This technique had encouraging clinical results at 2-year follow-up. Morphological magnetic resonance imaging shows good cartilage defect filling, and the biochemical magnetic resonance imaging suggests hyaline-like repair tissue. PMID:23672920

Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Bilagi, Praveen; Stelzeneder, David

2013-05-01

59

Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.  

PubMed

Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted. PMID:24382874

Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

2014-01-01

60

A Load-Sharing Rip-Stop Fixation Construct for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Despite advancements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques, achieving tendon-to-bone healing can be difficult in the setting of poor-quality tendon. Moreover, medial tendon tears or tears with lateral tendon loss may preclude standard techniques. Rip-stop suture configurations have been shown to improve load to failure compared with simple or mattress stitch patterns and may be particularly valuable in these settings. The purpose of this report is to describe a technical modification of a rip-stop rotator cuff repair that combines the advantages of a rip-stop suture (by providing resistance to tissue cutout) and a double row of load-sharing suture anchors (minimizing the load per anchor and therefore the load per suture within each anchor).

Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

2012-01-01

61

Arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair: a prospective, randomized study with 24-month follow-up.  

PubMed

This prospective, randomized study was performed to evaluate the results of mini-open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a comparative case series of patients followed for 24 months. A total of 125 patients were randomized to mini-open (Group I) or arthroscopic (Group II) rotator cuff repair at the time of surgical intervention. The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) index, and muscle strength were measured to evaluate the clinical results, while magnetic resonance arthrography was used at 24-month follow-up to investigate the postoperative rotator cuff integrity. Fifty-three patients in Group I and 55 patients in Group II were available for evaluation at 24-month follow-up. At 24-month follow-up, the UCLA score, the ASES index, and muscle strength were statistically significantly increased in both groups postoperatively, while no significant difference was detected between the 2 groups. Intact rotator cuffs were investigated in 42 patients in Group I and 35 in Group II, and there was a significant difference in postoperative structural integrity between the two groups (P < 0.05). When analysis was limited to the patients with full-thickness tear, the muscle strength of the shoulder was significantly better in Group II, and the retearing rate was significantly higher in Group II. Based on the results obtained from this study, it can be indicated that arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repair displayed substantially equal outcomes, except for higher retearing rate in the arthroscopic repair group. While for patients with full-thickness tear, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair displayed better shoulder strength and significantly higher retearing rate as compared to mini-open rotator cuff repair at 24-month follow-up. PMID:23812851

Zhang, Zhenxiang; Gu, Beibei; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Lixian; Li, Qingsong

2014-08-01

62

Transtendon arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular surface tears of the supraspinatus: results at 2 years  

Microsoft Academic Search

Partial-thickness articular tears of the supraspinatus represent a not uncommon event in shoulder pathology, but their treatment\\u000a remains controversial. We believe that these lesions must be treated with surgical repair: we hereby describe our technique\\u000a of transtendon arthroscopic repair. We have treated 33 patients with an average age of 53.3 years (range 34–69). The average\\u000a follow-up was 33 months (range

R. Castricini; N. Panfoli; R. Nittoli; S. Spurio; O. Pirani

2009-01-01

63

Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulator  

PubMed Central

We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson's disease (PD) with deep brain stimulator (DBS) using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG) normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS.

Gandhi, Ranju; Chawla, Reeta

2014-01-01

64

Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulator.  

PubMed

We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson's disease (PD) with deep brain stimulator (DBS) using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG) normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS. PMID:25024475

Gandhi, Ranju; Chawla, Reeta

2014-05-01

65

Arthroscopic Posterior Labral Repair and Capsular Shift With a Lateralized Posterior Portal  

PubMed Central

Arthroscopic techniques for posterior shoulder subluxation with labral injuries in athletes have shown good results. The difficulty with the procedure is gaining appropriate access to the posteroinferior quadrant of the glenoid at a steep enough angle that allows for safe anchor placement. Various portals have been described that can be used as accessory portals for anchor placement. Although the use of additional portals to create appropriate access to the joint is always encouraged, preoperative planning can minimize the need for their use. The video shows a simple technique for posterior labral repair with capsular plications through a lateralized posterior portal in the lateral decubitus position. This technique allows the surgeon to address posterior labral tears and capsular laxity without the need for accessory portals.

Ciccone, William J.

2013-01-01

66

Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.  

PubMed

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

2014-02-01

67

Arthroscopic Repair of "Peel-Off" Lesion of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament at the Femoral Condyle  

PubMed Central

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral “peel-off” injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint.

Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

2014-01-01

68

Early Results of Concurrent Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff and Type II Superior Labral Anterior Posterior Tears  

PubMed Central

Background: Recent reports on concurrent arthroscopic rotator cuff and type II superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repair have raised concerns over postoperative stiffness and patient satisfaction. However, it is unclear if the observed stiffness relates to the repair of degenerative SLAP tears in older adults, the surgical technique, the postoperative rehabilitation, or to a combination of these factors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome and repair integrity of concurrent arthroscopic rotator cuff and type II SLAP repair. Study Design: Case series. Methods: Of 11 patients identified, 7 had a full-thickness rotator cuff tear and 4 had a high-grade partial thickness tear that was completed. A cannula placed through the rotator cuff tear improved the trajectory for posterior suture anchor placement during SLAP repair. Postoperative rehabilitation employed continuous passive motion to prevent stiffness. Results: At minimum of 1-year follow-up, mean yes responses on the Simple Shoulder Test improved from 5.4 to 10.7 (out of 12; P < .01), and mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved from 40 to 87 (out of 100; P < .01). Mean forward elevation improved from 148° to 161° (P < .01) and external rotation from 58° to 67° (P < .01). Magnetic resonance imaging, obtained at most recent follow-up in 10 patients, demonstrated a healed SLAP tear in all patients and a persistent rotator cuff defect in 1 patient. Conclusions: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can be successfully combined with type II SLAP repair in relatively young patients who have sustained traumatic injury to their shoulders. Allowing early passive motion may help prevent postoperative stiffness without compromising rotator cuff healing.

Strickland, Justin P.; Fleckenstein, Cassie M.; Ducker, Al; Hasan, Samer S.

2010-01-01

69

Longitudinal evaluation of cartilage repair tissue after microfracture using T2-mapping: a case report with arthroscopic and MRI correlation.  

PubMed

A man sustained a left knee injury which led to full-thickness chondral defects of the trochlear groove and lateral femoral condyle. Both areas were treated with microfractures and evaluated at 5 months and 2 years with standard MRI scans, T2 relaxation maps, and arthroscopy. At 5-months post-microfracture repair, the patient complained of recurrent anterior knee pain. While standard MRI imaging was inconclusive with regards to a potential recurrent defect at the trochlear groove microfracture area, T2 relaxation maps established the integrity of the surface layer which was confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation. At 2 years, imaging studies revealed repair tissue loss with low T2 values at the trochlear repair site. The failure of the trochlear site and the integrity of the lateral femoral condyle repair sites were confirmed by arthroscopy. This case report is the first one to provide a correlation of T2 mapping MRI findings with arthroscopic confirmation in the context of microfracture repairs. The study provides evidence for the clinical utility of T2 relaxation maps for the postoperative assessment of microfractures and raises the potential for T2 mapping MRI as a tool to evaluate these repair procedures. PMID:20505925

Oneto, José M Mejía; Ellermann, Jutta; LaPrade, Robert F

2010-11-01

70

Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsulo-Ligamentous Repair in the Treatment of Chronic Scapho-Lunate Ligament Tears  

PubMed Central

Introduction?Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called “SLAC” wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new “all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair” with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods?We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results?There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72?±?11.33 years (range 17–63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42?±?6.33 months (range 3–24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74?±?7.05 months (range 18–43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM?=?1.27°; p?arthroscopic capsulo-ligamentous repair technique provides reliable results in addition to avoiding postoperative stiffness. The overall results at a mean follow-up period of more than 2 years in our series of young, active patients appear to be encouraging.

Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

2013-01-01

71

Clinical and structural evaluation of arthroscopic double-row suture-bridge rotator cuff repair: early results of a novel technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Assessment of repair integrity and clinical outcome after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears in double-row suture-bridge\\u000a technique with the use of a new knotless suture-anchor system.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The first treated 25 patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the suture-bridge technique using a novel knotless\\u000a anchor and chain-link suture system were evaluated. Patients with isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tears were selected.

H. El-Azab; S. Buchmann; K. Beitzel; S. Waldt; Andreas B. Imhoff

2010-01-01

72

The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up  

PubMed Central

Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre-operatively. Conclusion Based upon the number available, we found no statistical difference in outcome between the two groups, indicating that either procedure is efficacious in the treatment of small and medium size rotator cuff tears. Level of Evidence Type III

Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

2007-01-01

73

Effectiveness of Subacromial Anti-Adhesive Agent Injection after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Prospective Randomized Comparison Study  

PubMed Central

Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair generally has a good clinical outcome but shoulder stiffness after surgery due to subacromial adhesion is one of the most common and clinically important complications. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) has been reported to be an anti-adhesive agent in a range of surgical procedures. However, there are few reports of the outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of the shoulder. This study examined whether a subacromial injection of HA/carboxymethylated cellulose (CMC) affected the postoperative shoulder stiffness and healing of rotator cuff repair, as well as the safety of an injection. Methods Between January 2008 and May 2008, 80 consecutive patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The patients were assigned randomly to the HA/CMC injection group (n = 40) or control group (n = 40). All patients were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, passive range of motion at 2, 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery, and the functional scores at 6, 12 months postoperatively. Cuff healing was also evaluated using CT arthrography or ultrasonography at 6 or 12 months after surgery. Results The HA/CMC injection group showed faster recovery of forward flexion at 2 weeks postoperatively than the control group but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.09). There were no significant difference in pain VAS, internal rotation, external rotation and functional scores between two groups at each follow-up period. The functional scores improved 6 months after surgery in both groups but there were no differences between the two groups. The incidence of unhealed rotator cuff was similar in the two groups. There were no complications related to an injection of anti-adhesive agents including wound problems or infections. Conclusions A subacromial injection of an anti-adhesive agent after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair tended to produce faster recovery in forward flexion with no adverse effects on cuff healing. However, its anti-adhesive effects after rotator cuff repair should be considered carefully with further studies.

Oh, Chung Hee; Oh, Joo Han; Kim, Sae Hoon; Cho, Jae Hwan; Yoon, Jong Pil

2011-01-01

74

Risk factors for shoulder re-dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair  

PubMed Central

Background Recent studies have shown effective clinical results after arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR) but have shown several risk factors for re-dislocation after surgery. We evaluated whether patients are at a risk for re-dislocation during the first year after ABR, examined the recurrence rate after ABR, and sought to identify new risk factors. Methods We performed ABR using bioabsorbable suture anchors in 102 consecutive shoulders (100 patients) with traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Average patient age and follow-up period was 25.7 (range, 14–40) years and 67.5 (range, 24.5–120) months, respectively. We evaluated re-dislocation after ABR using patient telephone interviews (follow-up rate, 100%) and correlated re-dislocation with several risk factors. Results Re-dislocation after ABR occurred in nine shoulders (8.8%), of which seven sustained re-injuries within the first year with the arm elevated at 90° and externally rotated at 90°. Of the remaining 93 shoulders without re-dislocation, 8 had re-injury under the same conditions within the first year. Thus, re-injury within the first year was a risk for re-dislocation after ABR (P < 0.001, chi-squared test). Using multivariate analysis, large Hill-Sachs lesions (odds ratio, 6.77, 95% CI, 1.24–53.6) and <4 suture anchors (odds ratio, 9.86, 95% CI, 2.00–76.4) were significant risk factors for re-dislocation after ABR. Conclusions The recurrence rate after ABR is not associated with the time elapsed and that repair strategies should augment the large humeral bone defect and use >3 anchors during ABR.

2014-01-01

75

Arthroscopic Percutaneous Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear Including Biceps Long Head: A 2-Year Follow-up  

PubMed Central

Background To report the results of an arthroscopic percutaneous repair technique for partial-thickness tears of the anterosuperior cuff combined with a biceps lesion. Methods The inclusion criteria were evidence of the upper subscapularis tendon tear and an articular side partial-thickness tear of the supraspinatus tendon, degeneration of the biceps long head or degenerative superior labrum anterior-posterior, above lesions treated by arthroscopic percutaneous repair, and follow-up duration > 24 months after the operation. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, constant score, the pain level on a visual analogue scale, ranges of motion and strength were assessed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) age of the 20 enrolled patients was 56.0 ± 7.7 years. The forward flexion strength increased from 26.3 ± 6.7 Nm preoperatively to 38.9 ± 5.1 Nm at final follow-up. External and internal rotation strength was also significantly increased (14.2 ± 1.7 to 19.1 ± 3.03 Nm, 12.3 ± 3.2 to 18.1 ± 2.8 Nm, respectively). Significant improvement was observed in ASES and constant scores at 3 months, 1 year and the time of final follow-up when compared with preoperative scores (p < 0.001). The mean subjective shoulder value was 86% (range, 78% to 97%). Conclusions The implementation of complete rotator cuff repair with concomitant tenodesis of the biceps long head using arthroscopic percutaneous repair achieved full recovery of normal rotator cuff function, maximum therapeutic efficacy, and patient satisfaction.

Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Seo, Eun-Min; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Sun-Chang; Lee, Jae-Won

2012-01-01

76

Four-Quadrant Approach to Capsulolabral Repair: An Arthroscopic Road Map to the Glenoid.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Advancing technology, improved instrumentation, and a desire to address intra-articular pathology with a minimally invasive approach have driven the expansion of arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the past 2 decades. Proponents cite greatly improved visuali...

A. A. Romeo M. T. Provencher S. J. Nho S. T. Seroyer

2010-01-01

77

The Factors Affecting the Clinical Outcome and Integrity of Arthroscopically Repaired Rotator Cuff Tears of the Shoulder  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and anatomic results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and to analyze the factors affecting the integrity of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. Methods One hundred sixty-nine consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, had a postoperative MRI evaluation and were followed for at least two years were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 57.6 years (range, 38 to 74 years) and the mean follow-up period was 39 months (range, 24 to 83 months). Results The rotator cuff was completely healed in 131 (77.5%) out of 169 shoulders and recurrent tears occurred in 38 shoulders (22.5%). At the last follow-up visit, the mean score for pain during motion was 1.53 (range, 0 to 4) in the completely healed group and 1.59 (range, 0 to 4) in the group with recurrent tears (p = 0.092). The average elevation strength was 7.87 kg (range, 4.96 to 11.62 kg) and 5.25 kg (range, 4.15 to 8.13 kg) and the mean University of California at Los Angeles score was 30.96 (range, 26 to 35) and 30.64 (range, 23 to 34), respectively (p < 0.001, p = 0.798). The complete healing rate was 87.8% in the group less than 50 years of age (49 shoulders), 79.4% in the group over 51 years but less than 60 years of age (68 shoulders), and 65.4% in the group over 61 years of age (52 shoulders, p = 0.049); it was 96.7% in the group with small-sized tears (30 shoulders), 87.3% in the group with medium-sized tears (71 shoulders), and 58.8% in the group with large-sized or massive tears (68 shoulders, p = 0.009). All of the rotator cuffs with a global fatty degeneration index of greater than two preoperatively had recurrent tears. Conclusions Arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears led to a relatively high rate of recurrent defects. However, the minimum two-year follow up demonstrated excellent pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform the activities of daily living, despite the structural failures. The factors affecting tendon healing were the patient's age, the size and extent of the tear, and the presence of fatty degeneration in the rotator cuff muscle.

Cho, Nam Su

2009-01-01

78

Transtendon arthroscopic repair of high grade partial-thickness articular surface tears of the rotator cuff with biceps tendon augmentation: technical note and preliminary results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Partial articular surface of the rotator cuff tendon tears has been recognized as a source of treatable shoulder pain and\\u000a a precursory pathology for full-thickness tendon tears. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a possible surgical method of\\u000a treatment. Recent data have shown that the treating partial-thickness rotator cuff repairs with transtendon technique shows\\u000a good clinical outcome. The use of this

Jong-Hun Ji; Mohamed Shafi; Jae-Jung Jeong; Yeon Soo Lee; Edward G. McFarland; Tae-Kwen Kim; Jun-Young Chung

79

Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results  

PubMed Central

Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3?years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40?months in the SR group and 38.9?months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that leakage of the contrast medium is due to an incomplete tendon-to-bone sealing, which is not a re-tear. This phenomenon could have important medicolegal implications. Level of evidence III. Treatment study: Case–control study.

2013-01-01

80

Arthroscopic all-inside repair for a tear of posterior root of the medial meniscus: a technical note.  

PubMed

This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to repair a tear of posterior root of the medial meniscus. Cartilage at the insertion area of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PHMM) was removed using a curved curette inserted through an anteromedial portal. A metal anchor loaded with two FiberWires (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was placed at the insertion area of the PHMM through a high posteromedial portal. A PDS suture was passed the PHMM by curved suture hook through the anteromedial portal. Two limbs of the PDS were then used to pass two limbs of the FiberWire through the meniscus. The same procedure was repeated for the second FiberWire suture. The sutures were tied, achieving secure fixation of the posterior meniscal root at the anatomic insertion. PMID:18633598

Choi, Nam-Hong; Son, Kyung-Mo; Victoroff, Brian N

2008-09-01

81

[Arthroscopic capsulo-labral repair and refixation with Mitek anchor in anterior shoulder instability].  

PubMed

From May 1992 to September 1995, 38 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability underwent arthroscopic stabilization. The arthroscopic stabilization was performed by capsular shifting and labral refixation using Mitek anchors, based on the Wolf procedure. Immediately after operation active assisted shoulder mobilization was initiated (elevation 60 degrees, external rotation 20 degrees less than contralateral shoulder). After a mean follow-up of 24 months (12-42 months) 30 patients were evaluated by means of the Rowe Score. Excellent and good results were achieved in 90% (n = 27) of patients and 80% had no restriction in sports activities. In 4 of the patients (13%) redislocation occurred. Analysis of the recurrence revealed no adequate trauma in two patients with preoperative multidirectional laxity. One had a trauma and the fourth showed no compliance in the early postoperative period. Compared to the open Bankart operation the described procedure shows a slightly higher rate of redislocations. However, the approach is less invasive and the subscapularis tendon with its proprioception remains intact. PMID:9381773

Speck, M; Hertel, R

1997-01-01

82

Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study.  

PubMed

The study included 100 patients who underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients suffered about a rotator cuff tear that was repaired arthroscopically with a suture anchor technique. Immediately postoperatively, patients were randomly allocated to one of two different postoperative physiotherapy regimens: passive self-assisted range of motion exercise (controls: 46 patients) versus passive self-assisted range of motion exercise associated with use of continuous passive motion (CPM) for a total of 2 h per day (experimental group: 54 patients), for 4 weeks. After this time, all the patients of both groups underwent the same physical therapy protocol. An independent examiner assessed the patients at 2.5, 6 and 12 months particularly about pain with the VAS scale (0-10) and the range of motion (ROM). Our findings show that postoperative treatment of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with passive self-assisted exercises associated with 2-h CPM a day provides a significant advantage in terms of ROM improvement and pain relief when compared to passive self-assisted exercise alone, at the short-term follow-up. No significant differences between the two groups were observed at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:20383685

Garofalo, Raffaele; Conti, Marco; Notarnicola, Angela; Maradei, Leonardo; Giardella, Antonio; Castagna, Alessandro

2010-05-01

83

Modes of failure of knotted and knotless suture anchors in an arthroscopic bankart repair model with the capsulolabral tissues intact.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess failure modes of knotless and knotted anchors in a Bankart repair model with the capsulolabral soft tissues intact. Previous reports used a model stripped of soft tissues. In 8 matched pairs of cadaver shoulders, a Bankart lesion was repaired arthroscopically using either 2 Bio-SutureTak anchors (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) or 2 Bioknotless anchors (Mitek, Westwood, Massachusetts). The shoulders were mounted with the repaired capsulolabral tissues attached to a custom sinusoidal clamp, and were tested in cyclic loading (20-80 N, 100 cycles, 0.5 mm/s) and then load to failure (1.25 mm/s). Cut-through at the suture-tissue interface (23/32 anchors) was more common than pullout at the anchor-bone interface (9/32) as a mode of failure (P = .02). Failure at the suture-tissue interface occurred in 10/16 knotted and 13/16 knotless anchors. Mean (SD) ultimate load of knotted vs knotless anchors was 125.3 (67.4) N and 96.9 (95.1) N, respectively. Mean (SD) stiffness of knotted vs knotless anchors was 20.9 (6.4) N/mm and 19.8 (8.6)N/mm, respectively. We concluded that both knotted and knotless anchors fail most often at the suture-tissue interface. The tested model with the capsulolabral tissues intact is distinct from previous models, which tested the anchor-bone interface only. PMID:21720601

Ranawat, Anil S; Golish, S Raymond; Miller, Mark D; Caldwell, Paul E; Singanamala, Naveen; Treme, Gehron; Costic, Ryan; Hart, Joseph M; Sekiya, Jon K

2011-03-01

84

Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Humeral Avulsion of the Glenohumeral Ligament With Associated Teres Minor Avulsion  

PubMed Central

Humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) has recently gained more recognition as a cause of shoulder instability. Posterior HAGL lesions, being much more infrequent than anterior disruptions, have only recently been documented as a notable cause of posterior instability. We detail the treatment of a previously unreported case of a posterior HAGL variant lesion consisting of a bony avulsion with involvement of the teres minor tendon. Arthroscopic fixation was facilitated by use of a “sheathless” arthroscopic approach with a 70° arthroscope and suture anchor.

Smith, Patrick A.; Nuelle, Clayton W.; Bradley, James P.

2014-01-01

85

Arthroscopic Intratendinous Repair of the Delaminated Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear in Overhead Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A distinct type of partial-thickness rotator cuff tear has been observed in overhead athletes, characterized by partial failure of the undersurface of the posterior supraspinatus and anterior infraspinatus tendons with intratendinous delamination. We present a technique of percutaneous intratendinous repair using nonabsorbable mattress sutures designed for the management of articular-side delaminated partial-thickness tears. After tear evaluation and preparation, the torn

Stephen F. Brockmeier; Christopher C. Dodson; Seth C. Gamradt; Struan H. Coleman; David W. Altchek

2008-01-01

86

Arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair using a new refixation device  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate complications and clinical results after meniscus refixation using a new all-inside technique. Type of Study: Prospective clinical study. Methods: This study reports clinical results of 37 patients after refixation of an unstable bucket-handle meniscus tear using a new all-inside technique (Mitek Meniscal Repair System; Mitek, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany). Twenty tears were located in the peripheral third (red

Heinz Laprell; Volker Stein; Wolf Petersen

2002-01-01

87

Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Bony Bankart Lesion Using a Low Anterior Portal  

PubMed Central

We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques.

Brand, Jefferson C.; Westerberg, Paul

2012-01-01

88

Arthroscopic repair of a chondrolabral lesion associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation.  

PubMed

Chondrolabral lesions are uncommon after anteroinferior glenohumeral dislocations. This report describes a new dual-lesion complex that involved an avulsion of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum and a flap tear of the adjacent articular cartilage [glenoid labral tear and articular cartilage flap (GLAF) lesion]. The chondral component involved a large undermined region of the anterior half of the lower glenoid articular cartilage, and the labral component involved an avulsion from the 2.30-6 o'clock position on the glenoid. The labral tear was reconstructed with 3 suture anchors to form a neo-labrum in an attempt to overlap and stabilize the periphery of the chondral flap. A meniscal repair device was used to place a mattress stitch in the cartilage periphery to further stabilize the flap. This technique resulted in a secure repair without any chondral damage, and this remained intact on an MRI performed at a 3-month follow-up. A final 12-month follow-up showed complete recovery, as assessed by the Oxford shoulder instability score and Rowe score, and by a return to the pre-injury sporting level. PMID:20221586

Page, Richard; Bhatia, Deepak N

2010-12-01

89

Arthroscopic intratendinous repair of the delaminated partial-thickness rotator cuff tear in overhead athletes.  

PubMed

A distinct type of partial-thickness rotator cuff tear has been observed in overhead athletes, characterized by partial failure of the undersurface of the posterior supraspinatus and anterior infraspinatus tendons with intratendinous delamination. We present a technique of percutaneous intratendinous repair using nonabsorbable mattress sutures designed for the management of articular-side delaminated partial-thickness tears. After tear evaluation and preparation, the torn rotator cuff undersurface is held in a reduced position with a grasper through an anterolateral rotator interval portal while viewing intra-articularly. Two spinal needles are then placed percutaneously through the full thickness of the torn and intact rotator cuff. A polydioxanone suture is passed through each needle, retrieved out the anterior portal, and used to shuttle a single nonabsorbable No. 2 suture through the tissue, creating a mattress suture. Multiple mattress sutures can be placed as dictated by tear size and morphology, with suture retrieval and knot securing then proceeding in the subacromial space. We have adopted this approach with the goals of anatomically re-establishing the rotator cuff insertion and sealing the area of intratendinous delamination while preventing significant alteration to the anatomy of the rotator cuff insertion, which could lead to motion deficits, internal impingement, and potential tear recurrence. PMID:18657747

Brockmeier, Stephen F; Dodson, Christopher C; Gamradt, Seth C; Coleman, Struan H; Altchek, David W

2008-08-01

90

Biomechanical evaluation of rotator cuff repairs in a sheep model: Suture anchors using arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches compared with transosseous sutures using traditional modified Mason-Allen stitches  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe optimal method for rotator cuff repair of the shoulder is not yet known. The aim of this study was to compare the time-dependent biomechanical properties of the traditional open transosseous suture technique and modified Mason-Allen stitches (group 1) versus the double-loaded suture anchors technique and so-called arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches (group 2) in rotator cuff repair.

Hans-Michael Klinger; Gottfried H. Buchhorn; Gabert Heidrich; Enrico Kahl; Mike H. Baums

2008-01-01

91

Protocol for the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Study (UKUFF): a randomised controlled trial of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

This protocol describes a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic and open surgery in the management of rotator cuff tears. This trial began in 2007 and was modified in 2010, with the removal of a non-operative arm due to high rates of early crossover to surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:155-60. PMID:24845913

Carr, A J; Rees, J L; Ramsay, C R; Fitzpatrick, R; Gray, A; Moser, J; Dawson, J; Bruhn, H; Cooper, C D; Beard, D J; Campbell, M K

2014-05-01

92

Comparison of Analgesic Efficacy between Single Interscalene Block Combined with a Continuous Intra-bursal Infusion of Ropivacaine and Continuous Interscalene Block after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of a continuous interscalene block (CISB) by comparing it with that of a single interscalene block combined with a continuous intra-bursal infusion of ropivacaine (ISB-IB) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods Patients who had undergone CISB (CISB group; n = 25) were compared with those who had undergone ISB-IB (ISB-IB group; n = 25) for more than 48 hours after surgery. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, motor and/or sensory deficit, supplementary analgesics and adverse effects were recorded. Results There were no significant differences between the postoperative VAS of the CISB and ISB-IB groups, except at 1 hour after surgery. Their supplementary analgesics of the two groups were similar. Transient motor weakness (52%) and sensory disturbance (40%) of the affected arm were observed in patients in the CISB group. The catheters came out accidentally in 22% of the CISB group but in only 4% of the ISB-IB group. Conclusions ISB-IB provides similar analgesia to CISB. However, the ISB-IB group had a lower incidence of neurological deficits and better catheter retention.

Oh, Joo Han; Kim, Sae Hoon; Lee, Pyung-Bok; Lee, Joon-Woo; Lee, Seok Jae

2009-01-01

93

Arthroscopic repair of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus with opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: surgical technique.  

PubMed

Simultaneous repair of a radial tear at the tibial attachment site of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus under special circumstances requiring tibial valgus osteotomy is technically difficult. First, most patients who need an osteotomy have a narrowed medial tibiofemoral joint space. In such a situation, the pull-out suture technique is more difficult to perform than in a normal joint space. Second, pulling out suture strands that penetrate the posterior horn of the medial meniscus to the anterior tibial cortex increases the risk of transection during osteotomy. We performed a meniscus repair combined with an opening wedge tibial valgus osteotomy without complications and present our technique as a new method for use in selective cases necessitating both meniscus repair of a complete radial tear and opening wedge tibial osteotomy. PMID:19634730

Jung, Kwang Am; Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Su Chan; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Song, Moon Bok; Lee, Choon Key

2009-07-01

94

ORV Arthroscopic Reduction and Internal Fixation of Tibial Eminence Fractures  

PubMed Central

Tibial eminence fractures are an uncommon but well-described avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament. Treatment principles are based on the amount and pattern of fracture displacement. Management has evolved from closed reduction and immobilization to arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation followed by early rehabilitation. Various fixation methods have evolved, ranging from arthroscopic reduction and percutaneous screw fixation to arthroscopic suture repair. We present a technique for arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation using a cannulated drill bit and high-strength suture. This technique facilitates anatomic reduction with uncomplicated tunnel placement and suture passing in an effort to allow strong fixation and early rehabilitation.

Myer, Daniel M.; Purnell, Gregory J.; Caldwell, Paul E.; Pearson, Sara E.

2013-01-01

95

Are Platelet-Rich Products Necessary during the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Platelet-rich products (PRP) are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Results Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, ?1.82 to 3.27, P?=?0.58), ASES scale (?2.89, 95% CI, ?6.31 to 0.53, P?=?0.1), UCLA scale (?0.79, 95% CI, ?2.20 to 0.63, P?=?0.28), SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, ?0.01 to 0.69, P?=?0.05), and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P?=?0.08). Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P?=?0.03) after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P?=?0.42). Conclusion In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. Level of Evidence Level II

Zhang, Qiang; Ge, Heng'an; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Cheng, Biao

2013-01-01

96

Arthroscopic Treatment of Calcific Tendonitis  

PubMed Central

Calcific tendonitis, or calcifying tendonitis, is a common disorder characterized by the multifocal accumulation of basic calcium phosphate crystals within the rotator cuff tendons. In most cases, the multifocal calcifications are located 1 to 2 cm from the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon on the greater tuberosity. The initial treatment should be nonoperative including oral anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. If this is unsuccessful, arthroscopic debridement of the deposit is effective. The technique used is an arthroscopic localization and debridement without associated subacromial decompression. The rotator cuff should be evaluated for partial- and full-thickness tears before and after the debridement of calcifications. If a partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear is identified, it should be treated in a fashion consistent with those without associated calcium deposits. In our hands, tears 5 mm or greater in depth are repaired using a tendon-to-tendon or tendon-to-bone technique. Tears with less depth are debrided and then left alone. Arthroscopic debridement of calcific tendonitis can yield excellent functional results and high patient satisfaction.

Barber, F. Alan; Cowden, Courtney H.

2014-01-01

97

Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis.  

PubMed

Calcific tendonitis, or calcifying tendonitis, is a common disorder characterized by the multifocal accumulation of basic calcium phosphate crystals within the rotator cuff tendons. In most cases, the multifocal calcifications are located 1 to 2 cm from the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon on the greater tuberosity. The initial treatment should be nonoperative including oral anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. If this is unsuccessful, arthroscopic debridement of the deposit is effective. The technique used is an arthroscopic localization and debridement without associated subacromial decompression. The rotator cuff should be evaluated for partial- and full-thickness tears before and after the debridement of calcifications. If a partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear is identified, it should be treated in a fashion consistent with those without associated calcium deposits. In our hands, tears 5 mm or greater in depth are repaired using a tendon-to-tendon or tendon-to-bone technique. Tears with less depth are debrided and then left alone. Arthroscopic debridement of calcific tendonitis can yield excellent functional results and high patient satisfaction. PMID:24904767

Barber, F Alan; Cowden, Courtney H

2014-04-01

98

Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Tenodesis: Loop-Suture Technique  

PubMed Central

With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis.

Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

2013-01-01

99

Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management  

PubMed Central

After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management.

Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

2014-01-01

100

Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management.  

PubMed

After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

2014-07-18

101

"V"ictory transosseous equivalent suture configuration for arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repairs of iatrogenically completed PASTA lesions and full-thickness "U"-shaped tears.  

PubMed

The cost of numerous anchors in rotator cuff surgery is high from both an economic standpoint as well as a physiologic one. More anchors means increased cost and increased surgical time; additionally, the greater number of anchors placed, the greater the expense on the native bone that they inevitably replace. It is therefore in the surgeon's and patient's best interest to use the appropriate number of anchors, no more and no less, with the appropriate number being that which allows for strong, stable fixation with minimal gap formation and maximal healing potential and recovery. The transosseous equivalent repair technique described herein uses a single double-loaded bioabsorbable suture anchor placed along the medial border of the rotator cuff foot print and the humeral head articular cartilage margin followed by 1 pushlock (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) anchor placed laterally on the vertical aspect of the greater tuberosity. It is designed for small to medium "U"-shaped tears and for iatrogenically completed partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsions of moderate to large size, the so-called PASTA lesion. The use of selective knot placement allows for the conversion of a linear construct into a "V" configuration, optimizing repair strength and allowing for earlier rehabilitation while maximizing the healing biology seen with increased footprint contact dimensions and less repair gap formation. PMID:19824586

Lewicky, Yuri M

2009-10-01

102

Femoroacetabular impingement: an arthroscopic solution.  

PubMed

Young adults with hip pain secondary to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are rapidly being recognised as an important cohort of orthopaedic patients. Interest in FAI has intensified over the last decade since its recognition as a precursor to arthritis of the hip and the number of publications related to the topic has increased exponentially in the last decade. Although not all patients with abnormal hip morphology develop osteoarthritis (OA), those with FAI-related joint damage rapidly develop premature OA. There are no explicit diagnostic criteria or definitive indications for surgical intervention in FAI. Surgery for symptomatic FAI appears to be most effective in younger individuals who have not yet developed irreversible OA. The difficulty in predicting prognosis in FAI means that avoiding unnecessary surgery in asymptomatic individuals, while undertaking intervention in those that are likely to develop premature OA poses a considerable dilemma. FAI treatment in the past has focused on open procedures that carry a potential risk of complications. Recent developments in hip arthroscopy have facilitated a minimally invasive approach to the management of FAI with few complications in expert hands. Acetabular labral preservation and repair appears to provide superior results when compared with debridement alone. Arthroscopic correction of structural abnormalities is increasingly becoming the standard treatment for FAI, however there is a paucity of high-level evidence comparing open and arthroscopic techniques in patients with similar FAI morphology and degree of associated articular cartilage damage. Further research is needed to develop an understanding of the natural course of FAI, the definitive indications for surgery and the long-term outcomes. PMID:24187347

Fayad, T E; Khan, M A; Haddad, F S

2013-11-01

103

Synovial cyst formation resulting from nonabsorbable meniscal repair devices for meniscal repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several arthroscopic meniscal repair techniques and devices have been developed during the past decade. The Mitek Meniscal Repair System (Mitek, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany) is one of these devices. We report a case of synovial cyst formation after medial meniscus repair with a nonabsorbable Mitek Meniscal Repair System. The cyst in the right knee developed 5 months after the meniscus repair.

Atsuo Nakamae; Masataka Deie; Masanori Yasumoto; Kenji Kobayashi; Mitsuo Ochi

2004-01-01

104

Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is indicated for the treatment of severe biceps tendonopathy, partial- or full-thickness tendon tears, or biceps instability typically associated with rotator cuff tear, although there has been considerable debate on tenotomy versus tenodesis. We advocate tenodesis, for the following reasons: to re-establish the resting muscle length so as to avoid scaring and spasm, to allow biceps use

Anthony A Romeo; Augustus D Mazzocca; Joseph C Tauro

2004-01-01

105

Arthroscopic treatment for malunions of the proximal humeral greater tuberosity  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article was to report an arthroscopic treatment method for greater tuberosity malunion. Eight patients with malunion of the greater tuberosity were treated by arthroscopic acromioplasty, detachment of rotator cuff, tuberoplasty of the greater tuberosity and repair of the rotator cuff. On the basis of the UCLA rating scale, the overall score increased from 11.1 (range 9–14) to 30.2 (range 25–35) postoperatively, with one excellent result, six good results, and one poor result. All patients had less pain than preoperatively. Full activity level was achieved in two patients, five patients had only slight functional restriction, and one patient had mild limitation in activities of daily living. Seven patients returned to their previous occupations without restrictions. One patient did not return to work because of residual upper extremity weakness. We conclude that arthroscopic tuberoplasty is a good method for the treatment of greater tuberosity malunion.

Calvo, Angel; Domingo, Javier; Cuenca, Jorge; Herrera, Antonio

2009-01-01

106

Popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic cystectomy of a popliteal cyst.  

PubMed

A case of popliteal artery aneurysm after arthroscopic cystectomy of a popliteal cyst is an uncommon complication, and no case has been reported. We present a case of pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery after arthroscopic cystectomy of a popliteal cyst 2 months after surgery. Open excision of the pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery pin-point repair were done. At 30 months' follow-up, both the tibialis posterior and dorsalis pedis pulsations were felt equally on both sides with normal sensations over the limb. Retrospectively reviewing the case, we found that the relation of the popliteal artery and popliteal cyst on preoperative magnetic resonance images can predict the complication of pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery. It is better not to shave the lateral aspect of the cyst while performing arthroscopic cystectomy when magnetic resonance images show that the popliteal artery is close to the cyst. PMID:19732646

Kp, Venkatesh; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Nha, Kyung Wook; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Jun-Ho; Jegal, Hyuk

2009-09-01

107

Arthroscopic and open management of posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.  

PubMed

Posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) is the most common cause of residual instability following a simple elbow dislocation. PLRI may result from trauma or iatrogenic injury to the radial ulnohumeral ligament during treatment for other conditions, such as lateral epicondylitis. PLRI can be identified through a combination of history and physical examination, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging arthrography. Once diagnosed, surgery is necessary to correct persistent instability. Instability can be confirmed arthroscopically through several findings, including subluxation of the radial head on the capitellum and the arthroscopic "drive through sign of the elbow." Acute repairs, both open and arthroscopic, heal with excellent patient outcomes. In the chronic setting, graft reconstruction may be required. This report describes arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament and open reconstruction with associated outcomes. A high index of suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnosis this condition in patients with lateral elbow pain and feelings of instability. PMID:25077750

O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

2014-09-01

108

Arthroscopic absorbable suture fixation for tibial spine fractures.  

PubMed

The purpose of this technical note and accompanying video is to describe a modified arthroscopic suture fixation technique to treat tibial spine avulsion fractures. Twenty-one patients underwent arthroscopic treatment for tibial spine avulsion with our technique; they were clinically and biomechanically evaluated at 2 years' follow-up and showed optimal clinical and radiographic outcomes. Repair with this arthroscopic technique provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the anterior cruciate ligament: suture methods based on the avulsed bone fragment are technically impossible, but sutures through the base of the ligament itself provide secure fixation, reducing the risks of comminution of the fracture fragment and eliminating the time for hardware removal. This arthroscopic technique restores the length and the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treating patients, including young patients, with low hardware costs in comparison to sutures using anchors or other hardware. PMID:24749022

Verdano, Michele Arcangelo; Pellegrini, Andrea; Lunini, Enricomaria; Tonino, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Francesco

2014-02-01

109

Arthroscopic Absorbable Suture Fixation for Tibial Spine Fractures  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this technical note and accompanying video is to describe a modified arthroscopic suture fixation technique to treat tibial spine avulsion fractures. Twenty-one patients underwent arthroscopic treatment for tibial spine avulsion with our technique; they were clinically and biomechanically evaluated at 2 years' follow-up and showed optimal clinical and radiographic outcomes. Repair with this arthroscopic technique provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the anterior cruciate ligament: suture methods based on the avulsed bone fragment are technically impossible, but sutures through the base of the ligament itself provide secure fixation, reducing the risks of comminution of the fracture fragment and eliminating the time for hardware removal. This arthroscopic technique restores the length and the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treating patients, including young patients, with low hardware costs in comparison to sutures using anchors or other hardware.

Verdano, Michele Arcangelo; Pellegrini, Andrea; Lunini, Enricomaria; Tonino, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Francesco

2013-01-01

110

Arthroscopic autograft reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: Exploration of technical feasibility in cadaveric shoulder specimens.  

PubMed

Failure of primary arthroscopic Bankart repair in anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability is low, but in some cases revision surgery is required. Revision procedures show good to excellent results but typically are done open and do not respect the anatomical functionality of the joint capsule. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to explore the feasibility of a completely arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament using a hamstring autograft. PMID:23858294

Bouaicha, Samy; Moor, Beat K

2013-01-01

111

All-Arthroscopic Patch Augmentation of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique  

PubMed Central

Surgical management of massive rotator cuff tears remains challenging, with failure rates ranging from 20% to 90%. Multiple different arthroscopic and open techniques have been described, but there is no current gold standard. Failure after rotator cuff repair is typically multifactorial; however, failure of tendon-footprint healing is often implicated. Patch augmentation has been described as a possible technique to augment the biology of rotator cuff repair in situations of compromised tendon quality and has shown promising short-term results. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation.

Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Yanke, Adam B.; Trenhaile, Scott W.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.

2013-01-01

112

Arthroscopic Hybrid Fixation of a Tibial Eminence Fracture in Children  

PubMed Central

The treatment of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) avulsion fracture is controversial, especially in skeletally immature patients, because of concerns about physeal damage. To reduce the risk of physeal injury, an arthroscopic technique was performed. A bioabsorbable suture anchor was inserted through anteromedial portals and fixed to a bioabsorbable suture anchor at the center of the fracture bed; it was then passed through the threads at the ACL avulsion fragment and tied with the ACL substance. After this, the avulsion fragment was repaired by an all-inside technique between the distal portion of the ACL and the transverse ligament and periosteum by a suture hook. The arthroscopic hybrid technique using a suture anchor with an all-inside repair is more rigid and safe. In addition, this physeal-sparing fixation is possible in immature patients.

Kim, Jong In; Kwon, Jae Ho; Seo, Dong Hyun; Soni, Shaishav M.; Munoz, Michael; Nha, Kyung Wook

2013-01-01

113

Arthroscopic Fixation of Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tears  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subacromial decompression and debridement of partial-thickness bursal-sided rotator cuff tears are often reported with a high rate of unsatisfactory outcomes. We describe an arthroscopic procedure to repair partial-thickness bursal-sided rotator cuff tears without converting to a full-thickness tear in patients with a normal articular-sided rotator cuff and an A0B2 or A0B3 pattern of tear (minimum thickness of 25% to 75%).

Andrew B. Wolff; David P. Magit; Seth R. Miller; Jeff Wyman; Paul M. Sethi

2006-01-01

114

Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the shoulder.  

PubMed

Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) rarely affects the shoulder. Fewer than 30 cases have been reported in the English and French language literature. In those patients, PVNS was treated by open surgery involving total or local synovectomy, sometimes associated with total shoulder replacement, cuff tear repair, or arthroplastic head resection. The authors report 2 cases of PVNS of the shoulder treated arthroscopically and discuss the advantages and limitations of this technique in the treatment of shoulder PVNS. PMID:11154374

Mahieu, X; Chaouat, G; Blin, J L; Frank, A; Hardy, P

2001-01-01

115

National Trends in Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

Background: Recent publications suggest that arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repairs have had comparable clinical results, although each technique has distinct advantages and disadvantages. National hospital and ambulatory surgery databases were reviewed to identify practice patterns for rotator cuff repair. Methods: The rates of medical visits for rotator cuff pathology, and the rates of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, were examined for the years 1996 and 2006 in the United States. The national incidence of rotator cuff repairs and related data were obtained from inpatient (National Hospital Discharge Survey, NHDS) and ambulatory surgery (National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, NSAS) databases. These databases were queried with use of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) procedure codes for arthroscopic (ICD-9 codes 83.63 and 80.21) and open (code 83.63 without code 80.21) rotator cuff repair. We also examined where the surgery was performed (inpatient versus ambulatory surgery center) and characteristics of the patients, including age, sex, and comorbidities. Results: The unadjusted volume of all rotator cuff repairs increased 141% in the decade from 1996 to 2006. The unadjusted number of arthroscopic procedures increased by 600% while open repairs increased by only 34% during this time interval. There was a significant shift from inpatient to outpatient surgery (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The increase in national rates of rotator cuff repair over the last decade has been dramatic, particularly for arthroscopic assisted repair.

Colvin, Alexis Chiang; Egorova, Natalia; Harrison, Alicia K.; Moskowitz, Alan; Flatow, Evan L.

2012-01-01

116

Arthroscopic Augmentation With Subscapularis Tendon in Anterior Shoulder Instability With Capsulolabral Deficiency  

PubMed Central

The treatment of chronic shoulder instability with poor quality of the anterior capsulolabral tissue is still controversial. In these cases the Latarjet procedure is certainly more effective in preventing recurrence than an arthroscopic capsular repair. However, several studies have reported a variety of severe complications related to the Latarjet procedure because of the use of bone augmentation and hardware implantation; moreover, the arthroscopic version of the Latarjet procedure is technically difficult and potentially dangerous because of the proximity of neurovascular structures. The aim of this report is to describe an innovative arthroscopic technique consisting of an augmentation of the anterior capsulolabral tissue using the articular portion of the subscapularis tendon and knotless suture anchors paired with high-strength tape for its fixation to the anterior glenoid edge. In the absence of severe bone deficiency of the anterior glenoid edge, this procedure can minimize arthroscopic technique failures, restoring the anterior capsulolabral wall without any significant reduction of shoulder functionality.

Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo

2013-01-01

117

All-Arthroscopic Iliotibial Band Autograft Harvesting and Labral Reconstruction Technique  

PubMed Central

The labrum is essential for stability, movement, and prevention of arthritis in the hip. In cases of labral damage where repair of a labral tear is not possible, reconstruction can be a useful alternative. Several different autografts have been used, including the iliotibial band (ITB), the ligamentum teres capitis, and the gracilis tendon. Authors have reported both open and arthroscopic techniques for reconstruction with good preliminary results. However, an all-arthroscopic labral reconstruction technique including the graft harvest and reconstruction portions of a labral reconstruction procedure using an ITB autograft has not been previously described. We describe a technique for an all-arthroscopic labral reconstruction performed using a novel method for arthroscopic harvest of the ITB. The decreased invasiveness of our described technique for labral reconstruction may potentially minimize scarring, bodily disfigurement, infection, and postoperative pain associated with the graft harvesting incision.

Deshmane, Prashant P.; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Patel, Ronak M.; Han, Brian; Terry, Michael A.

2012-01-01

118

Arthroscopic placement of a modified Mason-Allen stitch.  

PubMed

Recent studies have shown all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs to have comparable clinical results to mini-open or open repairs. Previous drawbacks to arthroscopic repair have included not being able to place a modified Mason-Allen stitch with a suture anchor technique. We present a technique using the Arthrex Scorpion device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) to place a modified Mason-Allen stitch arthroscopically via a double-loaded FiberWire metal suture anchor (Arthrex). The Scorpion suture passer places a stitch from inferior to superior through the torn rotator cuff. The suture is grabbed and reloaded into the Scorpion device. The device is then turned upside down, and a horizontal stitch is placed from superior to inferior. The stitch is retrieved again and reloaded a third time. The last pass is placed so that the final stitch passes anterior to the inferior suture but beyond the previously placed horizontal mattress stitch. This effectively reproduces the described biomechanically superior modified Mason-Allen stitch. PMID:17084306

Tao, Stanley S; Kaltenbach, Jeremy

2006-11-01

119

[Arthroscopic extra-articular Bankart procedure].  

PubMed

The arthroscopic extraarticular Bankart procedure tries to imitate the open Bankart procedure. An anterior-inferior transmuscular approach through the subscapular muscle permits to implant self-locking tacks into the anterior inferior third of the glenoid rim. The extraarticular location of the implants makes a superomedial capsular shift possible, if required. A total of 257 arthroscopic repairs following traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation have been carried out between 1992 and 1996. 177 patients were treated only with bioabsorbable Suretac device. Clinical and radiological follow up was possible in 165 patients. According to the Rowe score 69.7% were classified as excellent, 10.9% as good, 9.7% fair and 9.7% poor. Postoperative complications: the recurrence rate was 9.7%, allergic reactions representing a foreign body reaction to the synthetic material were seen in 5 cases (3%) and a frozen shoulder in 6 cases 3.6%). 61% of the patients involved in overhead or contact sports returned to their preoperative sport activities. PMID:9779429

Golser, K; Wambacher, M; Hausberger, K; Krallinger, F; Wischatta, R; Kinigadner, M; Sperner, G

1998-08-01

120

Regeneration of a discoid meniscus after arthroscopic saucerization.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented to the clinic with recurrent knee pain after meniscal repair and saucerization at age 3. The finding of a regenerated discoid meniscus was confirmed arthroscopically and radiographically. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature to confirm regeneration of a discoid meniscus after saucerization. The case has significant implications for management of pediatric discoid meniscus tears and patient counseling, and is encouraging in terms of the potential for repair and regeneration of meniscal tissue, particularly in the very young pediatric population. PMID:23431543

Stein, Matthew I; Gaskins, Roger B; Nalley, Charles C; Nofsinger, Charles

2013-01-01

121

Arthroscopic Ligamentum Teres Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

The ligamentum teres (LT) has been studied since the 19th century, and its anatomy and biomechanical function have been well described. Recent advancements in hip arthroscopy have caused increased awareness of LT pathology. Previous reports have estimated the incidence of LT tears during hip arthroscopy to be 4% to 51%, and LT tears have been estimated to be the third most common reason for hip pain in athletes. Biomechanical studies have shown the LT's role in stability of the hip. Despite the growing body of literature on LT anatomy and function, its role as a causative factor in hip pain and hip instability has yet to be clearly defined, and the treatment of LT tears remains controversial. However, in certain cases where hip subluxation and overt instability are related to a traumatic full-thickness tear of the LT, reconstruction of the ligamentum has been suggested. We describe a technique for arthroscopic LT reconstruction using either a semitendinosus autograft or allograft in the supine position.

Lindner, Dror; Sharp, Kinzie G.; Trenga, Anthony P.; Stone, Jennifer; Stake, Christine E.; Domb, Benjamin G.

2012-01-01

122

Meniscal Repair  

PubMed Central

The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well.

Yoon, Kyoung Ho

2014-01-01

123

Meniscal repair.  

PubMed

The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

Yoon, Kyoung Ho; Park, Keun Ho

2014-06-01

124

Arthroscopic management of shoulder instabilities: anterior, posterior, and multidirectional.  

PubMed

Arthroscopy is considered a relatively new technique for the surgical repair of an unstable shoulder. Shoulder arthroscopy has grown in popularity and is considered the gold standard for treating carefully selected patients. Despite its increasing popularity, the procedure has a significant learning curve and has resulted in early higher recurrence rates when compared with patients treated with open techniques. With the addition of newer instrumentation, the refinement of techniques, and additional capsular plication and tensioning, outcomes for patients treated with shoulder arthroscopy should continue to improve. A major distinguishing feature in selecting appropriate candidates for shoulder arthroscopy is whether there have been significant bone changes resulting from dislocation recurrence. Recurrent anterior dislocation may create an anterior glenoid rim fracture, erosion loss from multiple recurrences, and an impression defect on the posterior aspect of the humeral head. The loss of contact area between the "ball and cup" may compromise the results of techniques that restore the anatomic restraints of soft tissues. Early intervention is becoming recognized as an important factor in patient selection for arthroscopic treatment. Imaging studies after traumatic injuries include radiographs, CT scans, possible articular contrast studies, and MRIs. These studies can identify and quantify rim fractures and the remaining articular contact in patients with recurrent subluxations, allowing for earlier appropriate intervention. Patients with significant bone loss may be best treated with an open procedure that allows grafting of the deficiency. Arthroscopic techniques to repair fractures or graft deficiencies continue to evolve. Rim fractures can be anatomically repaired with a suture anchor technique when recognized early. Rim erosion from chronic recurrent dislocations may require a combination of soft-tissue reattachment and coracoid grafting. Humeral head defects may require either soft-tissue or bone grafting to avoid engagement with the anterior edge of the glenoid. These techniques require arthroscopic skill and experience and are currently being performed as open procedures. In the future, it is likely that arthroscopy will be involved in the entire spectrum of treatment for shoulder instability. PMID:20415377

Abrams, Jeffrey S; Bradley, James P; Angelo, Richard L; Burks, Robert

2010-01-01

125

Does arthroscopic knee surgery work?  

PubMed

A recent randomized trial from the Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study Group was published in the New England Journal of Medicine and attempted to determine the efficacy of partial meniscectomy without osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to either arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or sham surgery. The authors concluded that the clinical outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were no better than those after the sham surgical procedure. However, there are several important limitations of this trial that make it difficult to generalize to the 700,000 arthroscopic partial meniscectomies performed in the United States each year. In this small sample of 146 patients, patients with traumatic meniscal tears and locking symptoms-those most likely to benefit from a partial meniscectomy-were excluded. In addition, although patients with radiographic arthritis were excluded, most of the patients in the study had degenerative changes at the time of arthroscopy. Therefore it is difficult to determine whether the patients were symptomatic from their chondral degeneration or their degenerative meniscal tear. In our opinion this study does not change the role of surgery in current clinical practice. The primary indication for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy remains symptoms of well-localized joint line pain with acute onset and mechanical symptoms such as catching or locking that have failed comprehensive nonoperative management. PMID:24642108

Krych, Aaron J; Carey, James L; Marx, Robert G; Dahm, Diane L; Sennett, Brian J; Stuart, Michael J; Levy, Bruce A

2014-05-01

126

Arthroscopic Suture Bridge Fixation of Tibial Intercondylar Eminence Fractures  

PubMed Central

Tibial intercondylar eminence fractures that are displaced and non-reducible require open or arthroscopically assisted repair. Ideally, fracture reduction and fixation would be performed with a technique that has low morbidity, allows easy visualization and reduction, provides firm fixation, does not violate the proximal tibial physis, avoids metal hardware, and does not require a second procedure for implant removal. The suture bridge technique, used in the shoulder for rotator cuff tears and greater tuberosity fracture repair, has the ability to produce high contact pressures with rigid fixation. We describe an all-inside and all-epiphyseal arthroscopic suture bridge technique for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture repair performed with PushLock anchors (Arthrex, Naples, FL). One or 2 anchors preloaded with No. 2 FiberWire (Arthrex) are placed in the posterior fracture bed, followed by fracture reduction. The suture limbs are shuttled through and around the anterior cruciate ligament and over the fracture fragment in crossing fashion and are secured by use of additional anchors placed at the anteromedial and anterolateral fracture margin. The anchors are placed obliquely to avoid the proximal tibial physis in the pediatric population. Anatomic reduction and secure fixation allow more aggressive rehabilitation and faster restoration of joint function.

Sawyer, Gregory A.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Anderson, Brett C.; Schiller, Jonathan

2013-01-01

127

Arthroscopic Osteosynthesis of Femoral Head Malunion  

PubMed Central

We present the case of a femoral head malunion with lateral cephalic femoroacetabular impingement managed by arthroscopic osteotomy/takedown, bone grafting, internal fixation, and cephaloplasty. The treatment rationale and surgical technique are presented. A successful outcome at 3 years was obtained with radiographic evidence of union without osteonecrosis. Even beyond acute femoral head osteosynthesis, arthroscopic surgery may enhance the ability to treat femoral head malunions. Moreover, arthroscopic osteosynthesis may address lateral cephalic FAI, a previously unreported condition.

Matsuda, Dean K.

2013-01-01

128

Ultrasound evaluation of mechanical injury of bovine knee articular cartilage under arthroscopic control.  

PubMed

A local cartilage injury can trigger development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Surgical methods have been developed for repairing cartilage injuries. Objective and sensitive methods are needed for planning an optimal surgery as well as for monitoring the surgical outcome. In this laboratory study, the feasibility of an arthroscopic ultrasound technique for diagnosing cartilage injuries was investigated. In bovine knees (n = 7) articular cartilage in the central patella and femoral sulcus was mechanically degraded with a steel brush modified for use under arthroscopic control. Subsequently, mechanically degraded and intact adjacent tissue was imaged with a high frequency (40 MHz) intravascular ultrasound device operated under arthroscopic guidance. After opening the knee joint, mechanical indentation measurements were also conducted with an arthroscopic device at each predefined anatomical site. Finally, cylindrical osteochondral samples were extracted from the measurement sites and prepared for histological analysis. Quantitative parameters, i.e., reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering (AIB), and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated from the ultrasound signals. The reproducibilities (sCV %) of the measurements of ultrasound parameters were variable (3.7% to 26.1%). Reflection and roughness parameters were significantly different between mechanically degraded and adjacent intact tissue (p < 0.05). Surface fibrillation of mechanically degraded tissue could be visualized in ultrasound images. Furthermore, R and IRC correlated significantly with the indentation stiffness. The present results are encouraging; however, further technical development of the arthroscopic ultrasound technique is needed for evaluation of the integrity of human articular cartilage in vivo. PMID:21244982

Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Puhakka, Jani; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka; Töyräs, Juha

2011-01-01

129

Arthroscopic-Assisted First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: This is the first report of a succesful first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis using great toe arthroscopy and percutaneous internal fixation. The surgical trauma associated with open operative arthrodesis can be minimized using minimally invasive techniques under arthroscopic control. The authors describe the principles of the surgery and discuss the advantages compared with traditional surgery.Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and

L. Perez Carro; B. Busta Vallina

1999-01-01

130

Arthroscopic treatment of transchondral talar dome fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen cases of transchondral talar dome fractures treated arthroscopically at the Naval Hospital in Oak land, California, were reviewed. Roentgenograms and results from clinical examination were assessed pre operatively and at regular intervals postoperatively. Clinical followup of 18 months was obtained in all cases (range, 18 to 36 months; mean, 26 months). All lesions were treated with arthroscopic excision of

Kent Van Buecken; Robert L. Barrack; A. Herbert Alexander; Janika P. Ertl

1989-01-01

131

Arthroscopic Centralization of an Extruded Lateral Meniscus  

PubMed Central

Extrusion of the lateral meniscus has been reported after posterior root tear or radial tear, partial meniscectomy, and meniscoplasty of discoid meniscus. It has also been shown to be associated with the development of osteoarthritis. This technical note describes a new arthroscopic technique to centralize and stabilize the mid body of the lateral meniscus to restore and maintain the lateral meniscus function by repairing/preventing extrusion of the meniscus. A JuggerKnot Soft Anchor (Biomet, Warsaw, IN), loaded with a MaxBraid suture (Biomet), was placed on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, just anterior to the popliteal hiatus, through a midlateral portal. A Micro Suture Lasso Small Curve with Nitinol Wire Loop (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to pass 2 limbs of the MaxBraid suture through the meniscus at the margin between the meniscus and the capsule. Another anchor was inserted on the lateral edge of the lateral tibial plateau, 1 cm anterior to the first anchor, and the same procedure was repeated. The sutures were then tied by use of a self-locking sliding knot, achieving centralization and secure stabilization of the lateral meniscus.

Koga, Hideyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Horie, Masafumi; Nakamura, Tomomasa; Okawa, Atsushi; Sekiya, Ichiro

2012-01-01

132

[The acetabular labrum. Arthroscopic diagnosis and therapy of degenerate and traumatic lesions].  

PubMed

The acetabular labrum makes a vital contribution to the stability of the hip joint. Hip arthroscopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of labral pathology. Lesions that would otherwise have gone unrecognised are now amenable to resection and in some cases repair. Symptomatic relief is generally good after treatment of traumatic tears but patients with co-existing articular cartilage degeneration do less well. The long-term results of arthroscopic surgery for the acetabular labrum are awaited. PMID:16322970

Costa, M L; Villar, R N

2006-01-01

133

Arthroscopic Removal of Calcium Deposits of the Rotator Cuff: A 7-year Follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Calcium deposits within the tendons of the rotator cuff are common and usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic cases that do not respond to nonoperative measures need removal of the calcium deposits.Purpose: In this study, the results of arthroscopic removal of the calcium deposits within the rotator cuff, without rotator cuff repair, are evaluated after a minimum 7-year follow-up. This may help

Mohamed Taha El Shewy

2011-01-01

134

The Intracapsular Atraumatic Arthroscopic Technique for Closure of the Hip Capsule  

PubMed Central

The hip joint capsule is a critical static stabilizer of the hip. During hip arthroscopy, the capsule is breached to gain exposure to treat femoroacetabular impingement lesions. There have been recent concerns regarding hip instability after hip arthroscopy, and relatively few techniques have been described for atraumatic arthroscopic closure of the hip capsule. We describe an atraumatic, inside-out, 2-portal technique to repair the capsule.

Asopa, Vipin; Singh, Parminder J.

2014-01-01

135

Direct Arthroscopic Distal Clavicle Resection  

PubMed Central

Degenerative change involving the acromioclavicular (AC) is frequently seen as part of a normal aging process. Occasionally, this results in a painful clinical condition. Although AC joint symptoms commonly occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology, they may occur in isolation. Treatment of isolated AC joint osteoarthritis is initially non-surgical. When such treatment fails to provide lasting relief, surgical treatment is warranted. Direct (superior) arthroscopic resection of the distal (lateral) end of the clavicle is a successful method of treating the condition, as well as other isolated conditions of the AC joint. The following article reviews appropriate patient evaluation, surgical indications and technique.

Lervick, Gregory N

2005-01-01

136

Arthroscopic surgery of the knee.  

PubMed Central

In the first 1000 arthroscopic operations performed by one surgeon 136 patients had two or more procedures, making a total of 1168 during the 1000 operations. The indications for operation were internal mechanical derangements in 565 patients, anterior knee pain in 246, disorders of the synovium in 77, ligament injuries in 63, and degenerative joint disease in 49. Complications included fracture of instruments in the knee in five patients, haemarthrosis in 10, deep vein thrombosis in three, and synovial fistula in one. In no patient was the wound infected. A total of 26 different operations was performed.

Dandy, D J; O'Carroll, P F

1982-01-01

137

Arthroscopic Posterior Bone Block Procedure: A New Technique Using Suture Anchor Fixation  

PubMed Central

We present a novel all-arthroscopic technique of posterior shoulder stabilization that uses suture anchors for both bone block fixation and capsulolabral repair. The bone graft, introduced inside the glenohumeral joint through a cannula, is fixed with 2 suture anchors. The associated posteroinferior capsulolabral repair places the bone block in an extra-articular position. In this article we present the detailed arthroscopic technique performed in a consecutive series of 15 patients and report the early results. We also report the positioning, healing, and remodeling of the bone block using postoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography. The benefits of this new technique are as follows: (1) it is all arthroscopic, preserving the posterior deltoid and posterior rotator cuff muscles; (2) it is accurate, resulting in appropriate bone block positioning; (3) it is efficient, allowing for consistent bone graft healing; (4) it is anatomic, both restoring the glenoid bone stock and repairing the injured posterior labrum; and (5) it is safe, limiting hardware-related complications and eliminating the risk of injury to vital structures associated with drilling or screw insertion from posterior to anterior. We believe that this technique is advantageous because it does not use screws for fixation and may be safer for the patient.

Boileau, Pascal; Hardy, Marie-Beatrice; McClelland, Walter B.; Thelu, Charles-Edouard; Schwartz, Daniel G.

2013-01-01

138

Arthroscopic Treatment of Talar Body Fractures  

PubMed Central

Talar fractures can be severe injuries with complications leading to functional disability. Open reduction–internal fixation remains the treatment of choice for displaced talar fractures. Arthroscopic evaluation of the fracture and articular surfaces can play an important role in the treatment of these fractures. Arthroscopic reduction–internal fixation (ARIF) is increasingly used for certain intra-articular fracture types through the body. The minimally invasive nature of ARIF and high accuracy are enviable attributes of an evolving technique. This technical note describes arthroscopic evaluation of 2 intra-articular talar head fractures, using posterior portals, with ARIF performed in 1 case and excision of the fracture fragments in the other case.

Jorgensen, Nicholas B.; Lutz, Michael

2014-01-01

139

Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction With Gracilis Autograft  

PubMed Central

Despite growing interest in hip arthroscopy and labral preservation, some patients have severely damaged, degenerative, or deficient labrums and may be candidates for arthroscopic labral reconstruction. The ligamentum teres has been used as a graft source for open hip labral grafting, and the iliotibial band has been used in the arthroscopic setting. We present an alternative method of hip labral reconstruction using the gracilis autograft, which does not require post-harvest manipulation. Arthroscopic techniques for graft tensioning and labrum-graft overlap are introduced that may facilitate restoration of labral function in patients with otherwise non-salvageable labrums.

Matsuda, Dean K.

2012-01-01

140

Application of optical coherence tomography enhances reproducibility of arthroscopic evaluation of equine joints  

PubMed Central

Background Arthroscopy is widely used in various equine joints for diagnostic and surgical purposes. However, accuracy of defining the extent of cartilage lesions and reproducibility in grading of lesions are not optimal. Therefore, there is a need for new, more quantitative arthroscopic methods. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising tool introduced for quantitative detection of cartilage degeneration and scoring of the severity of chondral lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-investigator agreement and inter-method agreement in grading cartilage lesions by means of conventional arthroscopy and with OCT technique. For this aim, 41 cartilage lesions based on findings in conventional and OCT arthroscopy in 14 equine joints were imaged, blind coded and independently ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) scored by three surgeons and one PhD-student. Results The intra- and inter-investigator percentages of agreement by means of OCT (68.9% and 43.9%, respectively) were higher than those based on conventional arthroscopic imaging (56.7% and 31.7%, respectively). The intra-investigator Kappa coefficients were 0.709 and 0.565 for OCT and arthroscopy, respectively. Inter-investigator Kappa coefficients were 0.538 and 0.408 for OCT and arthroscopy, respectively. Conclusions OCT can enhance reproducibility of arthroscopic evaluation of equine joints.

2014-01-01

141

Meniscus repair in the anterior cruciate deficient knee  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1979 to 1986, isolated repair of a peripheral vascular zone meniscal tear was performed in 22 pa tients (23 menisci) who had ACL insufficiency. For various reasons none of these patients underwent re pair or reconstruction of their ACL. The meniscus repair was done by open arthrotomy in 12 cases and by arthroscopic techniques in 11 cases. The purpose

Gregory A. Hanks; Trenton M. Gause; John A. Handal; Alexander Kalenak

1990-01-01

142

Functional outcome of arthroscopic assisted fixation of distal radius fractures  

PubMed Central

Background: Many studies in literature have supported the role of wrist arthroscopy as an adjunct to the stable fixation of unstable intraarticular distal radial fractures. This article focuses on the surgical technique, indications, advantages, and results using wrist arthroscopy to assess articular reduction and evaluates the treatment of carpal ligament injuries and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injuries in conjunction with the stable fixation of distal radial fractures. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 27 patients (16 males and 11 females), who underwent stable fixation of intraarticular distal radial fractures with arthroscopic evaluation of the articular reduction and repair of associated carpal injuries. As per the AO classification, they were 9 C 1, 12 C2, 2 C3, 3 B 1, and 1 B2 fractures. The final results were evaluated by modified Mayo wrist scoring system. The average age was 41 years (range: 18-68 years). The average followup was of 26 months (range 24-52 months). Results: Five patients needed modification of the reduction and fixation after arthroscopic joint evaluation. Associated ligament lesions found during the wrist arthroscopy were TFCC tears (n=17), scapholunate ligament injury (n=8), and luno-triquetral ligament injury (n=1). Five patients had combined injuries i.e. included TFCC tear, scapholunate and/or lunotriquetral ligament tear. There were 20 excellent, 3 good, and 4 fair results using this score. Conclusion: The radiocarpal and mid carpal arthroscopy is a useful adjunct to stable fixation of distal radial fractures.

Khanchandani, Prakash; Badia, Alejandro

2013-01-01

143

[Arthroscopic fracture management in proximal humeral fractures].  

PubMed

Arthroscopy has become increasingly more established in the treatment of proximal humeral fractures. In addition to the known advantages of minimally invasive surgery fracture and implant positioning can be optimized and controlled arthroscopically and relevant intra-articular concomitant pathologies (e.g. biceps tendon complex and rotator cuff) can be diagnosed and treated. Arthroscopic techniques have proven to be advantageous in the treatment of various entities of greater tuberosity fractures, lesser tuberosity fractures (suture bridging technique) and subcapital humeral fractures (arthroscopic nailing). This article presents an overview on innovative arthroscopic modalities for treating proximal humeral fractures, describes the surgical techniques and the advantages compared to open procedures as well as initial clinical results. PMID:23515643

Lill, H; Katthagen, C; Jensen, G; Voigt, C

2013-04-01

144

Arthroscopic Synovectomy in Rheumatoid Arthritis of Wrist  

PubMed Central

The wrist is the most commonly involved region of the upper extremity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Because the wrist joint becomes involved early during the disease course and its involvement rapidly progresses, and because the disabilities associated with progressive RA are significant, early and adequate treatment must be introduced to prevent disease progression. Various treatment methods can be employed to treat RA wrists based on radiological and clinical findings. Arthroscopic synovectomy is recommended for pain relief and functional recovery in early stage RA, and is also helpful in advanced staged RA with Larsen stage III. However, arthroscopic synovectomy is not recommended as an effective method of treatment for all patients with advanced radiographic changes. Nevertheless, arthroscopic synovectomy may delay the need for complex surgery, such as wrist arthrodesis or total wrist arthroplasty in selective cases. Although arthroscopic synovectomy of the wrist cannot improve grip strength or range of motion, it can reduce wrist pain and improve function, and thus facilitate return to work.

Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Kwang-Am

2007-01-01

145

Arthroscopic Technique for Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

With an increasing understanding of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and advancement of the surgical treatment in patients with FAI, various techniques have been published. Successful outcome after arthroscopic hip surgery depends on appropriately reshaping the bony architecture to allow for improved range of motion before impingement symptoms occur, with special attention to preserve the labrum and restore its function. We present our surgical technique for the arthroscopic treatment of FAI.

Jackson, Timothy J.; Stake, Christine E.; Trenga, Anthony P.; Morgan, Julie; Domb, Benjamin G.

2013-01-01

146

Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.  

PubMed

Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to create a tunnel from the acromioclavicular joint, under the deltoid, to the anterior portal. The ends of the braided suture and the tendon sutures are grasped by the clamp and pulled out the acromioclavicular joint incision. The limbs of the braided suture and the tendon suture that pass medial to the coracoid are shuttled through the hole in the clavicle using the looped suture that was previously passed through the clavicle. The acromioclavicular joint is reduced by pushing down on the distal clavicle with a bone tamp while simultaneously lifting the acromion upward by superiorly loading the humerus at the elbow. Once the acromioclavicular joint is reduced or slightly over-reduced, the braided suture is tied down securely. The acromioclavicular joint should remain reduced even after the manual reduction maneuver is released. The semitendinosus allograft is tensioned around the distal end of the clavicle and sutured to itself with a nonabsorbable suture. The released coracoacromial ligament is retrieved from the clavicular incision and sutured to the distal clavicle and semitendinosus allograft. The incision is closed in standard fashion, and a sling is applied. PMID:16458813

Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

2006-02-01

147

Single row rotator cuff repair with modified technique  

PubMed Central

Rotator cuff tear is a common medical condition. We introduce various suture methods that can be used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, review the single row rotator cuff repair method with modified technique, and introduce the Ulsan-University (UU) stich. We compare the UU stitch with the modified Mason-Allen (MA) suture method. The UU stitch configuration is a simple alternative to the modified MA suture configuration for rotator cuff repair.

Ko, Sang-Hun; Shin, Seung-Myeong

2012-01-01

148

Arthroscopic Treatment of Iliotibial Band Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Lateral knee pain in athletes is commonly seen in the sports medicine clinic, and the diagnosis of iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is frequently made. Although conservative management including rest from activity, equipment modification, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and physical therapy is the mainstay of treatment initially, refractory cases do exist. Multiple surgical techniques have been described including an arthroscopic technique. Arthroscopic release of the ITB attachment to the lateral femoral epicondyle and resection of the lateral synovial recess for recalcitrant ITB syndrome comprise a valid option that can have a good outcome. This option avoids the complications associated with open surgery and allows for a complete arthroscopic knee examination. Division or lengthening of the ITB band itself is not a necessary step in this technique.

Cowden, Courtney H.; Barber, F. Alan

2013-01-01

149

Arthroscopical and histological study of cartilaginous lesions treated by mosaicplasty  

PubMed Central

Aim. The aim of our study was to assess macro– and microscopically the knee cartilaginous lesions outcome treated by mosaicplasty. Material and method Our study included 32 patients which underwent mosaicplasty for nondegenerative cartilaginous lesions of the knee and a second look arthroscopy. In 21 patients, minibiopsies from the repaired lesion were performed under arthroscopic control (from the cartilaginous region of the transplanted osteocartilaginous grafts and from the spaces between grafts). All repaired lesions were carefully examined during arthroscopy and all harvested minifragments were studied by optical microscopy (staining method – hematoxylin eosin). Results Macroscopically, the articular surface of the repaired cartilaginous lesions was smooth and congruent to the adjacent surfaces. The aspect and resistance to compression of grafted area was similar to those of the normal surrounding cartilage. The transferred cartilage maintained its height, being at the level of the neighboring cartilage. One year postoperatively, the limits of the cartilaginous autografts were still visible. Two years postoperatively, these limits were no longer visible. Microscopically, the region of the former lesion was constituted mainly by viable hyaline cartilage. Fibrous cartilaginous tissue was visualized in the spaces between the grafts. Conclusions The second look arthroscopy showed that after mosaicplasty the repaired articular surface was smooth, leveled, homogenous and congruent to adjacent cartilage. The spaces between grafts are progressively covered by fibrous cartilaginous tissue with a more textured and uneven surface. Mosaicplasty is a biological surgical technique which restores the normal osteocartilaginous architecture of the most part of the grafted area. The transplanted osteocartilaginous cylindrical grafts maintain its viability and mechanical properties.

Cirstoiu, CF; Badila, AE

2010-01-01

150

Isokinetic rehabilitation after arthroscopic meniscectomy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the effects in humans of early (2 weeks) and delayed (6 weeks) isokinetic strength training in the recovery of muscle strength following an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. The peak torque developed in the quadriceps and hamstrings and the torque developed at a knee angle of 1.05 rad were evaluated in 16 subjects, pre-operatively (pre-op), and 2, 6, and 10 weeks post-operatively (post-op), on an isokinetic device at four different velocities (1.05, 2.09, 3.14, and 4.19 rad.s-1). The fatigue characteristics of the muscles were evaluated by having the subject perform 15 maximal contractions at 3.14 rad.s-1. Training was done on the same device (three times a week for 1-2 months), beginning either 2 or 6 weeks post-op. A repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated a time effect but no differences between groups and no interactions. Torques developed by the knee flexors and extensors were significantly smaller 2 weeks post-op than pre-op, at all velocities tested. Torques developed in the quadriceps recovered to their pre-op values by 6 weeks, and further gained significantly in strength from 6 to 10 weeks. Quadriceps torques remained weaker than the contralateral side at 10 weeks. Hamstrings torques were either higher or similar to pre-op values by 6 weeks, and demonstrated increases from 6 to 10 weeks post-op at 1.05 and 4.19 rad.s-1 only. Total work and average power developed by the quadriceps and hamstrings during the fatigue protocol changed with time in a similar manner to torque.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1612084

St-Pierre, D M; Laforest, S; Paradis, S; Leroux, M; Charron, J; Racette, D; Dalzell, M A

1992-01-01

151

Change of calcifications after arthroscopic subacromial decompression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty patients were reviewed after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Twenty-five had calcific deposits in the rotator cuff visible on x-ray evaluation. Each patient with calcification was matched with a patient without calcification who had a similar state of the rotator cuff, date of surgery, age, and sex. The calcific deposits were left untouched in all cases. No significant difference was found

Bo M Tillander; Rolf O Norlin

1998-01-01

152

Arthroscopic capsular release for stiff shoulders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The etiology, pathogenesis, time course, and response to treatment of stiff shoulder pathology is still under investigation and debate. This prospective study evaluated arthroscopic capsular release to treat stiff shoulder pathology that was resistant to conservative management. The etiology of the shoulder stiffness was categorized and analyzed for effect on outcomes. Type of Study: Operative technique and prospective evaluation.

Gregory P. Nicholson

2003-01-01

153

Medial meniscus anterior horn cyst: arthroscopic decompression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meniscus cysts are mostly seen with meniscus tears, and arthroscopic decompression of cysts is gaining great importance in their treatment. In this study, we present a medial meniscus anterior horn cyst without an accompanying tear in the meniscus. A 33-year-old male patient was seen with pain and a palpable mass in his right knee. He complained that the severity of

R?fat Erginer; Tahir Ö?üt; Hayrettin Kesmezacar; Muharrem Babacan

2004-01-01

154

Arthroscopic Release of First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrofibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrofibrosis frequently occur in patients with bunion surgery or big toe trauma. In those patients with functional limitation who fail to respond to conservative treatment, surgery is indicated. We describe here an arthroscopic approach to first metatarsophalangeal release that is designed to improve functional results. Dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals are established at the medial

Tun H. Lui

2006-01-01

155

An arthroscopic device to assess articular cartilage defects and treatment with a hydrogel.  

PubMed

The hydraulic resistance R across osteochondral tissue, especially articular cartilage, decreases with degeneration and erosion. Clinically useful measures to quantify and diagnose the extent of cartilage degeneration and efficacy of repair strategies, especially with regard to pressure maintenance, are still developing. The hypothesis of this study was that hydraulic resistance provides a quantitative measure of osteochondral tissue that could be used to evaluate the state of cartilage damage and repair. The aims were to (1) develop a device to measure R in an arthroscopic setting, (2) determine whether the device could detect differences in R for cartilage, an osteochondral defect, and cartilage treated using a hydrogel ex vivo, and (3) determine how quickly such differences could be discerned. The apparent hydraulic resistance of defect samples was ~35% less than intact cartilage controls, while the resistance of hydrogel-filled groups was not statistically different than controls, suggesting some restoration of fluid pressurization in the defect region by the hydrogel. Differences in hydraulic resistance between control and defect groups were apparent after 4 s. The results indicate that the measurement of R is feasible for rapid and quantitative functional assessment of the extent of osteochondral defects and repair. The arthroscopic compatibility of the device demonstrates the potential for this measurement to be made in a clinical setting. PMID:21107696

McCarty, William J; Luan, Anna; Sundaramurthy, Priya; Urbanczyk, Caryn; Patel, Atal; Hahr, Jacob; Sotoudeh, Mohammad; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Sah, Robert L

2011-04-01

156

Osteochondral defect in femoral head: Trufit implantation under fluoroscopic and arthroscopic control.  

PubMed

Under arthroscopic control and guided by fluoroscopy, a Trufit Plug was successfully implanted to repair an osteochondral lesion of the head of the femur. The procedure was evaluated clinically using the HOOS score and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the hip. The short-term (6 months) clinical results are encouraging: the HOOS score improved clearly and the patient was satisfied. Interpretation of MRI images in the early post-operative period is very difficult: in the early months history and clinical examination prevail in the evaluation. PMID:23409578

Vundelinckx, Bart; De Mulder, Kris; De Schepper, Jo

2012-12-01

157

Comprehensive Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Options and Techniques  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... tuberosity, I think there's ample evidence from basic science work and from also clinical work that double- ... least that it's multifactorial. We know from basic science for people like Christian Gerber and many others ...

158

Arthroscopic transosseous suture anchor technique for rotator cuff repairs.  

PubMed

The skin is incised 1 to 2 cm distal to the lateral portal. A transosseous tunnel is created through the greater tuberosity by a sharp penetrator, entering 1.5 to 2 cm distal to the top of the greater tuberosity. The penetrator exits medially, between the tip of the greater tuberosity and the articular surface of the humeral head, in the middle of the footprint. The first anchor, a 5-mm Spiralok (DePuy Mitek, Norwood, MA) is placed at the penetrator's exit site on the footprint. Using a specially designed suture leader, the lateral limb of the suture in the anchor, which passes through the previously created transosseous tunnel, is taken from the anchor and pulled out. The other suture end is passed through the supraspinatus tendon. The second suture, placed superficially in the anchor, is passed from the anchor through the supraspinatus tendon, as a mattress suture. If more anchors are required, the procedure should be repeated. The transosseous suture limb and the suture limb that is passed through the supraspinatus tendon are tied through the lateral portal. The knot tying is then performed with a sliding Delimar knot. The mattress suture, passing through the supraspinatus tendon, is tied through the anterior lateral portal. The knot tying procedure is repeated depending on the number of anchors. PMID:16651169

Cicak, Nikola; Klobucar, Hrvoje; Bicanic, Goran; Trsek, Denis

2006-05-01

159

Outcome and Structural Integrity of Rotator Cuff after Arthroscopic Treatment of Large and Massive Tears with Double Row Technique: A 2-Year Followup  

PubMed Central

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome and the tendon healing after arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears. Methods. 82 patients with a full-thickness large and massive rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic repair with double row technique. Results were evaluated by use of the UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires, the Shoulder Strength Index (SSI), and range of motion. Follow-up time was 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed on each shoulder preoperatively and 2 years after repair. Results. 100% of the patients were followed up. UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires showed significant improvement compared with preoperatively (P < 0.001). Range of motion and SSI in flexion, abduction, and internal and external rotation also showed significant improvement (P < 0.001). MRI studies showed 24 cases of tear after repair (29%). Only 8 cases were a full-thickness tear. Conclusions. At two years of followup, in large and massive rotator cuff tears, an arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair technique produces an excellent functional outcome and structural integrity.

Carbonel, Ignacio; Martinez, Angel A.; Aldea, Elisa; Ripalda, Jorge

2013-01-01

160

Arthroscopic Femoral Neck Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

Femoral neck osteoplasty is an integral component for successful treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Current techniques allow this to be performed arthroscopically, and results are equivalent to those of open procedures when typical anterior and anterosuperior lesions are considered. The arthroscopic procedure is dependent on obtaining adequate visualization through capsular management and proper leg positioning, and it requires fluoroscopy to guide and verify an adequate resection. We present our preferred technique for arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty.

Chow, Roxanne M.; Kuzma, Scott A.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

2013-01-01

161

Cross-sectional analysis of trends in meniscectomy and meniscus repair.  

PubMed

Knee arthroscopy to address meniscus tears is among the most common orthopedic procedures performed, and technical advances in the treatment of meniscus tears have affected the treatment options available to orthopedic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to perform a large cross-sectional analysis of orthopedic patients to investigate trends in arthroscopic meniscectomy and meniscus repair in the United States. Patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (Current Procedural Terminology codes 29881 and 29880) and arthroscopic meniscus repair (Current Procedural Terminology codes 29882 and 29883) were identified using the PearlDiver Patient Record Database, which is a national database of insurance records. The authors identified 187,607 arthroscopic medial or lateral meniscectomies and repairs performed between 2004 and 2009. Ninety-six percent of patients underwent meniscectomy and 4% underwent repair. No change occurred in the incidence of medial or lateral meniscectomy. The incidence of medial meniscus repair decreased from 5.3 cases per 10,000 patients in 2004 to 3.8 in 2009 (P<.001), although no significant change occurred in the incidence of lateral meniscus repair. Medial meniscectomy was most commonly performed in patients aged 50 to 59 years, whereas lateral meniscectomy demonstrated a bimodal age distribution. Conversely, meniscus repairs were most frequently performed in patients aged 10 to 19 years. Sex differences were more pronounced with meniscus repair (63% male vs 37% female) compared with meniscectomy (53% male vs 47% female). A high frequency of meniscus debridement can be expected in arthroscopic knee surgery. Despite advances in meniscus repair techniques and devices, no increase occurred in the performance of meniscus repair compared with meniscectomy. PMID:23937745

Montgomery, Scott R; Zhang, Alan; Ngo, Stephanie S; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hame, Sharon L

2013-08-01

162

Transforaminal arthroscopic decompression of lateral recess stenosis.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of arthroscopic decompression of lateral recess stenosis, determine potential associated complications, and present an alternative method to access the lateral recess of the lumbar spine. Forty patients were selected in whom the authors found clinical and computerized tomography evidence of lateral recess stenosis and sequestered foraminal herniations. All 40 were treated with a posterolateral arthroscopic technique, and 38 were available for this follow-up evaluation. A satisfactory result was obtained in 31 patients (82%). No neurovascular complications were encountered; however, other complications included an infection of the disc space in one patient and a causalgic-type pain in the involved extremity in four patients. The associated postoperative morbidity in this group of patients was minimal and resulted in rapid rehabilitation and return of patients to preoperative functioning level. PMID:8609559

Kambin, P; Casey, K; O'Brien, E; Zhou, L

1996-03-01

163

Arthroscopic stapling for detached superior glenoid labrum.  

PubMed

Superior labral tears of the shoulder involve the biceps tendon and labrum complex which may be detached, displaced inferiorly, and interposed between the glenoid and the humeral head. We have treated ten young athletes with painful shoulders due to this lesion by arthroscopic stapling. Arthroscopy at the time of staple removal, after three to six months, showed that all the lesions had been stabilised. Clinical review at over 24 months showed an excellent or good result in 80%. The two relative failures were due in one to residual subacromial bursitis, and the other to multidirectional shoulder instability. Arthroscopic stapling can restore the shoulder anatomy, and it is recommended for active adolescent athletes with this lesion. PMID:1894660

Yoneda, M; Hirooka, A; Saito, S; Yamamoto, T; Ochi, T; Shino, K

1991-09-01

164

A two-year clinical outcomes study of 400 patients, comparing open surgery and arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether there is any significant difference in temporal measurements of pain, function and rates of re-tear for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR) patients compared with those patients undergoing open RCR. Methods This study compared questionnaire- and clinical examination-based outcomes over two years or longer for two series of patients who met the inclusion criteria: 200 open RCR and 200 arthroscopic RCR patients. All surgery was performed by a single surgeon. Results Most pain measurements were similar for both groups. However, the arthroscopic RCR group reported less night pain severity at six months, less extreme pain and greater satisfaction with their overall shoulder condition than the open RCR group. The arthroscopic RCR patients also had earlier recovery of strength and range of motion, achieving near maximal recovery by six months post-operatively whereas the open RCR patients took longer to reach the same recovery level. The median operative times were 40 minutes (20 to 90) for arthroscopic RCR and 60 minutes (35 to 120) for open RCR. Arthroscopic RCR had a 29% re-tear rate compared with 52% for the open RCR group (p < 0.001). Conclusions Arthroscopic RCR involved less extreme pain than open RCR, earlier functional recovery, a shorter operative time and better repair integrity.

Walton, J. R.; Murrell, G. A. C.

2012-01-01

165

Ultrasonography of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation.  

PubMed

Ultrasonography is a well-established and widely accepted modality for the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and injury to the biceps brachii tendon. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging have comparable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing both full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. This article addresses the ultrasonographic diagnosis of abnormalities of the rotator cuff, rotator interval, and biceps brachii, with magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings as well as imaging pitfalls are reviewed. PMID:23773874

Yablon, Corrie M; Bedi, Asheesh; Morag, Yoav; Jacobson, Jon A

2013-07-01

166

Whole-Organ Arthroscopic Knee Score (WOAKS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To describe a semi-quantitative score for multi-feature, whole-organ evaluation of the knee in osteoarthritis based on the results of arthroscopic evaluation. METHODS: This was a study of 1,199 patients who were suffering from knee pain for over 3 months (range 3 to 48 months) and had undergone arthroscopy. The mean age of patients was 49.8 (range 17 to 85)

Gunter Spahn; Thomas Mückley; Hans M Klinger; Gunther O Hofmann

2008-01-01

167

Neuromuscular Function after Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy  

PubMed Central

Background Quadriceps muscle strength, which is essential for the function and stability of the knee, has been found to be impaired even years after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. However, the neuromuscular alterations that could account for such muscle weakness remain unclear. Questions/purposes We investigated (1) the side-to-side asymmetries in quadriceps muscle strength 6 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, (2) the physiologic mechanisms (neural versus muscular) underlying muscle weakness, and (3) the impact of quadriceps weakness on muscle control at submaximal force levels. Patients and Methods We tested 14 volunteers (10 men, four women) with an average age of 44 ± 9 years (range, 24–59 years) at 6 ± 1 months after unilateral medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. We measured maximal voluntary strength and muscle activation during isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions using isokinetic dynamometry and surface EMG, respectively. We assessed vastus lateralis muscle size and architecture using ultrasonography. We measured muscle control at submaximal force levels with a repositioning test (knee proprioception) and a low-force target-tracking task (steadiness, accuracy). Results Isometric and concentric quadriceps strength and vastus lateralis EMG activity were lower on the involved than on the uninvolved side. Muscle architecture and muscle control did not differ between the involved and uninvolved sides. Conclusions Our results showed quadriceps weakness exists 6 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. As suggested by the EMG results, this is likely attributable to neural impairments (activation failure) that affect muscle control at maximal but not submaximal force outputs. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Glatthorn, Julia F.; Berendts, Andreas M.; Bizzini, Mario; Munzinger, Urs

2009-01-01

168

Multirater agreement on arthroscopic image quality.  

PubMed

In arthroscopy (minimally invasive orthopaedic surgery), the view is frequently disturbed. To optimize the view, quantification of the arthroscopic image quality is important. Thereto, disturbances were categorized as bleeding, air bubbles, turbidity (synovial fluid), loose fibrous tissue, and attached fibrous tissue, which cover the arthroscopic image area. The goal is to determine the percentages of disturbance coverage for which the view is acceptable. Thirty-two short films of the five disturbances were selected from arthroscopic knee procedures. The films showed disturbances covering different percentages of the image area. Thirty-nine orthopaedic surgeons were asked to judge whether or not the view of each film was acceptable. Multiple-choice questions on irrigation and disturbances were asked. A clear transition from acceptable to unacceptable view was found for bleeding (5 per cent of the covered area was acceptable; 25 per cent was not acceptable), and air bubbles (10 per cent was acceptable; 20 per cent was not acceptable). Loose fibrous tissue showed a gradual transition where 25 per cent was still accepted by a third of the surgeons. Turbidity and attached fibrous tissue were tolerated up to 50 per cent by half of the surgeons. Surgeons using a mechanical pump tolerated a lower percentage of synovial fluid (p<0.05). The most intolerable disturbance was bleeding. The results were consistent and will be used for computerized detection of disturbances. PMID:19278195

Tuijthof, G J M; Abbink, M; Sierevelt, I N; van Dijk, C N

2009-02-01

169

Arthroscopic latarjet procedure: safety evaluation in cadavers  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in cadavers. METHODS : Twelve cadaveric shoulders underwent arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in our laboratory for arthroscopy, by four different surgeons. Following surgery, the specimens were subjected to radiographic examination and evaluated by an independent examiner. Nineteen parameters were evaluated, including the coracoid graft fixation, positioning and angulation of the screws, neurological damage and integrity of tendons. RESULTS : Four procedures were considered to be satisfactory, with no difference among the surgeons. The mean angulation of the screws was 27.2°. The subscapularis splitting was, on average, 17.8mm from the upper edge. The coracoid graft was properly positioned relative to equator of the glenoid in 11 cases. There was no injury to the axillary or musculocutaneous nerves. The main complications were: interposition of soft tissue, suprascapular nerve injury, articular deviation of the graft, diastasis and conjoined tendon injury. CONCLUSION : The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a complex technique in which each step must be precise to reduce the risk of complications. Our study showed a high risk of failure of the procedure. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Assuncao, Jorge Henrique

2013-01-01

170

Arthroscopic wafer procedure for ulnar impaction syndrome.  

PubMed

Ulnar impaction syndrome is abutment of the ulna on the lunate and triquetrum that increases stress and load, causing ulnar-sided wrist pain. Typically, ulnar-positive or -neutral variance is seen on a posteroanterior radiograph of the wrist. The management of ulnar impaction syndrome varies from conservative, symptomatic treatment to open procedures to shorten the ulna. Arthroscopic management has become increasingly popular for management of ulnar impaction with ulnar-positive variance of less than 3 mm and concomitant central triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method avoids complications associated with open procedures, such as nonunion and symptomatic hardware. The arthroscopic wafer procedure involves debridement of the central triangular fibrocartilage complex tear, along with debridement of the distal pole of the ulna causing the impaction. Debridement of the ulna arthroscopically is taken down to a level at which the patient is ulnar neutral or slightly ulnar negative. Previous studies have shown good results with relief of patient symptoms while avoiding complications seen with open procedures. PMID:24749031

Colantoni, Julie; Chadderdon, Christopher; Gaston, R Glenn

2014-02-01

171

Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Ulnar impaction syndrome is abutment of the ulna on the lunate and triquetrum that increases stress and load, causing ulnar-sided wrist pain. Typically, ulnar-positive or -neutral variance is seen on a posteroanterior radiograph of the wrist. The management of ulnar impaction syndrome varies from conservative, symptomatic treatment to open procedures to shorten the ulna. Arthroscopic management has become increasingly popular for management of ulnar impaction with ulnar-positive variance of less than 3 mm and concomitant central triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method avoids complications associated with open procedures, such as nonunion and symptomatic hardware. The arthroscopic wafer procedure involves debridement of the central triangular fibrocartilage complex tear, along with debridement of the distal pole of the ulna causing the impaction. Debridement of the ulna arthroscopically is taken down to a level at which the patient is ulnar neutral or slightly ulnar negative. Previous studies have shown good results with relief of patient symptoms while avoiding complications seen with open procedures.

Colantoni, Julie; Chadderdon, Christopher; Gaston, R. Glenn

2014-01-01

172

Return to work after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.  

PubMed

The incidence of arthroscopic subacromial decompression has been increasing over the last few years. Little is known about the duration of sick leave after such a procedure. The aim of this study was to determine the time till return to full duty and to explore the various influencing factors. We retrospectively evaluated a group of 166 patients who consecutively underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression for subacromial impingement syndrome. One hundred patients were professionally active at the time of surgery; the mean duration till return to full duty was 11.1 weeks. Self-employed workers had the shortest sick leave period (median time of 1 week). No statistically significant difference was seen between the group with a financial compensation from the national health insurance system (median time of 12 weeks) and the group with income replacement by a private insurance company (median time of 8 weeks). Patients performing manual labour typically had a longer period of sick leave than other employees (12 versus 8 weeks). A longer absence from work was also observed in individuals who underwent a concomitant arthroscopic AC resection and patients with a higher BMI. PMID:22308617

Luyckx, Lucas; Luyckx, Thomas; Donceel, Peter; Debeer, Philippe

2011-12-01

173

Arthroscopic suture bridge technique for intratendinous tear of rotator cuff in chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic removal, now the main treatment option, has almost replaced open surgery for treatment of resistant calcific tendinitis. In some cases of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, the calcific materials are hard and adherent to the tendon. Removal of these materials can cause significant intratendinous tears between the superficial and deep layers of the degenerated rotator cuff. Thus far, there are no established surgical techniques for removing the calcific materials while ensuring cuff integrity. Good clinical results for rotator cuff repair were achieved by using an arthroscopic suture bridge technique in patients with long-standing calcific tendinitis. Intact rotator cuff integrity and recovery of signal change on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were confirmed. This is a technical note about a surgical technique and its clinical results with a review of relevant published reports. PMID:24254453

Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Moon, Chang-Yun; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun

2013-11-01

174

Arthroscopic reduction and fixation with suture-bridge technique for displaced or comminuted greater tuberosity fractures.  

PubMed

The arthroscopic suture-bridge technique (transosseous equivalent technique) was initially described for increasing the footprint size during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We describe a method in which the same principles are used to fix a displaced or comminuted greater tuberosity fracture. The technique involves reducing the displaced fragment with two medially placed, trans-tendinous anchors and compressing the greater tuberosity using the sutures from these medial anchors in two laterally placed anchors. The two medial anchors are inserted through the junction of the cuff and fragment. The anchor driver can be used as a joystick to reduce the fragment into position. One suture limb of each anchor is passed back through the tendon 5 mm from the original anchor insertion point in the tendon. With the scope in the subacromial space, the sutures from the medial anchors are tied in a mattress configuration. The four suture ends are passed distally over the greater tuberosity and incorporated into two PushLock anchors (4.5 mm; Arthrex, Naples, FL) using the suture-bridge technique. The postoperative rehabilitation protocol is similar to that for rotator cuff repairs. PMID:18657746

Song, Hyun Seok; Williams, Gerald R

2008-08-01

175

The Circumferential Compression Stitch for Meniscus Repair  

PubMed Central

Over the past 30 years, many patients have benefited from arthroscopically assisted meniscus repair surgery and its ability to preserve a healthy knee. Although techniques have evolved, the basic premise of central-to-peripheral needle penetration across the tear with fixation into the capsular region immediately peripheral to the meniscus has remained. Suture repair techniques that involve encircling the tear have been discussed but have remained largely impractical because of the anatomic constraints of the arthroscopic knee. A suture-passing technology designed to function within these constraints was recently made available from Ceterix Orthopaedics (Menlo Park, CA). It allows surgeons to arthroscopically place circumferential sutures around meniscus tears to provide uniform, anatomic compression of the tear edges through an all-inside technique. This stitch is likely to improve healing rates and safety, as well as to enable repair of tears that were previously considered difficult or impossible to sew. The purposes of this note and accompanying video are to show the feasibility of placing all-inside circumferential compression stitches to treat tears of the knee meniscus and to discuss the potential benefits of such techniques.

Saliman, Justin D.

2013-01-01

176

Hip arthroscopic surgery: patient evaluation, current indications, and outcomes.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic surgery in the hip joint has historically lagged behind its counterparts in the shoulder and knee. However, the management of hip injuries in the athletic population has rapidly evolved over the past decade with our improved understanding of mechanical hip pathology as well as the marked improvement in imaging modalities and arthroscopic techniques. Current indications for hip arthroscopic surgery may include symptomatic labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), hip capsular laxity/instability, chondral lesions, disorders of the peritrochanteric or deep gluteal space, septic joint, loose bodies, and ligamentum teres injuries. Furthermore, hip arthroscopic surgery is developing an increasingly important role as an adjunct diagnostic and therapeutic tool in conjunction with open femoral and/or periacetabular osteotomy for complex hip deformities. Arthroscopic techniques have evolved to allow for effective and comprehensive treatment of various hip deformities. Techniques for extensile arthroscopic capsulotomies have allowed for improved central and peripheral compartment exposure and access for labral takedown, refixation, treatment of chondral injury, and osteochondroplasty of the femoral head-neck junction and acetabular rim. While favorable short-term and midterm clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic treatment of prearthritic hip lesions, greater long-term follow-up is necessary to assess the efficacy of hip arthroscopic surgery in altering the natural history and progressive degenerative changes associated with FAI. PMID:23449836

Lynch, T Sean; Terry, Michael A; Bedi, Asheesh; Kelly, Bryan T

2013-05-01

177

Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

1985-01-01

178

Safe arthroscopic access to the central compartment of the hip.  

PubMed

This technical note describes a new method that allows access to the central compartment of the hip under arthroscopic control via the peripheral compartment with less risk of labral perforation and/or cartilage scuffing. After placement of the anterolateral portal in the peripheral compartment without traction, the anterior head area with the anterior acetabular labrum and the anterior surface of the femoral head are inspected. Under arthroscopic control, a guidewire is introduced through the anterior portal in between the anterior labrum and anterior femoral head cartilage and into the central compartment. The arthroscope is then removed from the anterolateral portal, the hip distracted, and the arthroscope introduced via cannulated instruments over the guidewire into the central compartment. Further portal placement can be controlled arthroscopically. PMID:16376244

Dienst, Michael; Seil, Romain; Kohn, Dieter M

2005-12-01

179

Elbow arthroscopic surgery update for sports medicine conditions.  

PubMed

Elbow arthroscopic surgery can now effectively treat a variety of conditions that affect athletes. Advances in instrumentation, increased surgeon familiarity, and expanded indications have led to significant growth in elbow arthroscopic surgery in the past few decades. While positioning, portal placement, and specific instruments may vary among surgeons, anatomic considerations guide surgical approaches to minimize neurovascular compromise. Arthroscopic procedures vary in difficulty, and surgeons should follow stepwise advancement with experience. Removal of loose bodies, debridement of synovial plicae, and debridement of the extensor carpi radialis brevis for lateral epicondylitis are considered simple procedures for novice elbow arthroscopic surgeons. More advanced procedures include management of osteochondritis dissecans, valgus extension overload in the throwing athlete, and capsular release. With proper technique, a variety of athletic elbow conditions can be treated arthroscopically with predictable results and minimal morbidity. PMID:23572098

Byram, Ian R; Kim, H Mike; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

2013-09-01

180

Ulnar shortening after TFCC suture repair of Palmer type 1B lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The objective of this study was to determine functional and subjective outcomes of an ulnar shortening procedure elected by\\u000a patients who experienced persistent ulno-carpal symptoms following arthroscopic suture repair of a Palmer type 1B lesion.\\u000a All patients had a dynamic ulna positive variance.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Five patients (3 males and 2 females) with arthroscopic repair of Palmer type 1B tears who subsequently

Maya B. Wolf; Markus W. Kroeber; Andreas Reiter; Susanne B. Thomas; Peter Hahn; Raymund E. Horch; Frank Unglaub

2010-01-01

181

Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair  

PubMed Central

For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed.

2013-01-01

182

Meniscal pullout repair following meniscal ossicle resection: a case report.  

PubMed

We present this case of a meniscal ossicle of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus that was treated by an arthroscopic ossicle resection followed by a pullout repair of the remaining meniscus. A 49-year-old businessman complained of catching and left knee pain. Radiographic and arthroscopic findings revealed a meniscal ossicle embedded in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and posterior horn tear. After resection of the posterior horn with the ossicle, a pullout suture repair for the posterior segment of the meniscus was done to minimize the further extrusion of the meniscus. A histologic appearance supported the vestigial development of the meniscal ossicle as the etiology. This is the first report describing a repair of the meniscus after ossicle resection. PMID:22781211

Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Banno, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Yuta; Ohmura, Akihiro; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

2013-01-01

183

Second-Look Arthroscopic Assessment and Clinical Results of Modified Pull-Out Suture for Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus  

PubMed Central

Purpose To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to December 2010, 20 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic modified pull-out suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Thirteen patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The healing status of the medial meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. We evaluated the correlation between the clinical symptoms and second-look arthroscopic findings. Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Results There were 4 cases of complete healing, 4 lax healing, 4 scar tissue healing, and 1 failed healing. The healing status of the repaired meniscus appeared to be related to the clinical symptoms. Patients who achieved complete tissue healing had no complaint. The healing status exhibited no relationship with age, mechanical axis, degree of subluxation, and symptom duration. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 75.6 at follow-up and the mean HSS score also significantly increased from 33.5 to 82.2. Conclusions We achieved 4 complete and 8 partial healing (lax or scar) of the medial meniscus in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus root repairs performed by 1 surgeon. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of partial healing on second-look arthroscopy.

Song, Jae-Gwang

2014-01-01

184

Arthroscopic techniques to improve access to posterior meniscal lesions.  

PubMed

Unsatisfactory results following partial meniscectomy and problems related to a retained posterior horn of the medial meniscus are problems often attributed to inadequate arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Although there are multiple techniques to gain better access to the various compartments in a truly tight knee, most of the problems in obtaining maximum visualization and instrumentation to the posterior aspects of the medial or lateral meniscus can usually be solved by adhering to a strict surgical technique that attempts to control the multiple variables encountered during arthroscopic surgery. These include the use of a tourniquet, leg holder, maximum distention of the knee provided by a large inflow cannula with large-bore tubing connected to 3-L bags, and an 18-gauge needle as a predecessor to the larger arthroscopic instruments. Of utmost importance is establishing the correct portal for the arthroscope, and it is time well spent at the beginning of the surgical procedure to verify the proper location of the arthroscope and not simply insert the arthroscope "a thumb-breadth above the joint line." Once these variables have been controlled, one can usually visualize and perform arthroscopic surgery on most meniscal lesions with minimal scuffing to the articular surfaces. PMID:2199073

Carson, W G

1990-07-01

185

The arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement.  

PubMed

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has recently been implicated in causing a spectrum of injury ranging from anterior hip pain, labral tears, chondral damage, and eventually perhaps to idiopathic arthritis of the hip. Three distinct types have been described: cam, pincer and mixed, with the mixed one being the commonest. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is focused towards providing an adequate clearance to alleviate femoral abutment against the acetabular rim. This is achieved by restoring a normal femoral head-neck offset and recessing the acetabular rim if necessary. The treatment of FAI has been achieved with reasonable success by open surgical dislocation as described by the Swiss group. However, the protracted post-operative recovery coupled with the trauma sustained during the open procedure, have led to the development of an arthroscopic approach to manage this problem. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with an up-to-date knowledge of the clinical and diagnostic aspects of FAI, to describe our arthroscopic technique in detail with its pitfalls and possible complications and to discuss the results and future of FAI. PMID:17534600

Khanduja, Vikas; Villar, Richard N

2007-08-01

186

Arthroscopic anatomy and surgical techniques for peritrochanteric space disorders in the hip.  

PubMed

Disorders of the lateral or peritrochanteric space (often grouped into the greater trochanteric pain syndrome), such as recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, external snapping iliotibial band, and gluteus medius and minimus tears, are now being treated endoscopically. We outline the endoscopic anatomy of the peritrochanteric space of the hip and describe surgical techniques for the treatment of these entities. Proper portal placement is key in understanding the peritrochanteric space and should be first oriented at the gluteus maximus insertion into the linea aspera, as well as the vastus lateralis. When tears of the gluteus medius and minimus are encountered, suture anchors can be placed into the footprint of the abductor tendons in a standard arthroscopic fashion. Our initial experience indicates that recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, external coxa saltans, and focal, isolated tears of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon may be successfully treated with arthroscopic bursectomy, iliotibial band release, and decompression of the peritrochanteric space and suture anchor tendon repair to the greater trochanter, respectively. PMID:17986418

Voos, James E; Rudzki, Jonas R; Shindle, Michael K; Martin, Hal; Kelly, Bryan T

2007-11-01

187

Single versus double-row repair of the rotator cuff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Several techniques for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff defects have been introduced over the past years. Besides established\\u000a techniques such as single-row repairs, new techniques such as double-row reconstructions have gained increasing interest.\\u000a The present article therefore provides an overview of the currently available literature on both repair techniques with respect\\u000a to several anatomical, biomechanical, clinical and structural endpoints.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Systematic

Stephan Pauly; Christian Gerhardt; Jianhai Chen; Markus Scheibel

2010-01-01

188

Rotator Cuff Repair Augmented With Endogenous Fibrin Clot  

PubMed Central

Despite recent technical advances, rotator cuff repair continues to have a high retear rate. Recent research focused on biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with platelet-rich plasma has shown mixed results, and use of an endogenous fibrin clot from either peripheral blood or bone marrow may have advantages over the use of platelet-rich plasma. This technique describes a method to make an endogenous fibrin clot and arthroscopically apply the fibrin clot to the superior surface of the rotator cuff repair site.

Proctor, Christopher S.

2012-01-01

189

Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears  

PubMed Central

Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure.

Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

2013-01-01

190

Anatomical basis of arthroscopic capsulotomy for elbow stiffness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stiffness is a frequent condition in elbow pathologies, both traumatic and non-traumatic, and usually requires an operative\\u000a treatment including an anterior capsulotomy. Elbow arthroscopy is certainly an alternative to surgery, but the technique of\\u000a arthroscopic capsulotomy remains controversial. Our aim was to study the anterior elbow capsule anatomy to recommend an efficient\\u000a and safe arthroscopic capsulotomy. We dissected ten cadaveric

P. Thoreux; C. Blondeau; S. Durand; A. C. Masquelet

2006-01-01

191

Arthroscopic Acetabular Rim Resection in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

Appropriate identification and precise resection of the pincer lesion are integral parts of the arthroscopic surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Preoperative radiographic planning of the bone resection, as well as executing the plan intraoperatively using both fluoroscopic and arthroscopic cues, is critical to adequately removing the pincer lesion. We present our surgical technique of removing the impinging bone by defining the focal acetabular rim overcoverage, accessing the pincer lesion with labral detachment, and then performing acetabular rim resection.

Chow, Roxanne M.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

2013-01-01

192

Arthroscopic lateral collagen meniscus implant in a professional soccer player  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of an arthroscopically implanted lateral Collagen Meniscus Implant in a 24-year-old professional soccer player is reported.\\u000a This meniscal scaffold was able to improve knee function and reduce pain in this symptomatic meniscectomized young athlete\\u000a at 36-month follow-up. This is the first case of an arthroscopic lateral collagen meniscal scaffold implanted in a high-level\\u000a soccer player described in literature.

Stefano Zaffagnini; Giulio Maria Marcheggiani Muccioli; Alberto Grassi; Tommaso Bonanzinga; Giuseppe Filardo; Angello Canales Passalacqua; Maurilio Marcacci

193

Discoid lateral meniscus: diagnosis and results of arthroscopic treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the results of arthroscopic meniscectomy in patients with discoid lateral menisci of the knee. Discoid lateral menisci were detected in 308 patients, of whom 197 (124 males, 73 females; mean age 34.5 years, range 6-67) were clinically, radiologically, and arthroscopically found to be symptomatic and underwent partial meniscectomy. The average period between injury and operation was 13.2 months

Mehmet Asik; Cengiz Sen; Omer F. Taser; Aziz K. Alturfan; Yunus V. Sozen

2003-01-01

194

Experience-based virtual training system for knee arthroscopic inspection  

PubMed Central

Background Arthroscopic surgical training is inherently difficult due to limited visibility, reduced motion freedom and non-intuitive hand-eye coordination. Traditional training methods as well as virtual reality approach lack the direct guidance of an experienced physician. Methods This paper presents an experience-based arthroscopic training simulator that integrates motion tracking with a haptic device to record and reproduce the complex trajectory of an arthroscopic inspection procedure. Optimal arthroscopic operations depend on much practice because the knee joint space is narrow and the anatomic structures are complex. The trajectory of the arthroscope from the experienced surgeon can be captured during the clinical treatment. Then a haptic device is used to guide the trainees in the virtual environment to follow the trajectory. Results In this paper, an experiment for the eight subjects’ performance of arthroscopic inspection on the same simulator was done with and without the force guidance. The experiment reveals that most subjects’ performances are better after they repeated the same inspection five times. Furthermore, most subjects’ performances with the force guidance are better than those without the force guidance. In the experiment, the average error with the force guidance is 33.01% lower than that without the force guidance. The operation time with the force guidance is 14.95% less than that without the force guidance. Conclusions We develop a novel virtual knee arthroscopic training system with virtual and haptic guidance. Compared to traditional VR training system that only has a single play-script based on a virtual model, the proposed system can track and reproduce real-life arthroscopic procedures and create a useful training database. From our experiment, the force guidance can efficiently shorten the learning curve of novice trainees. Through such system, novice trainees can efficiently develop required surgical skills by the virtual and haptic guidance from an experienced surgeon.

2013-01-01

195

Meningocele repair  

MedlinePLUS

... dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... medical team experienced in caring for children with spina bifida. Your baby will likely have an MRI (magnetic ...

196

Arthroscopic findings of coexisting lesions with greater tuberosity fractures.  

PubMed

Proximal humerus fractures comprise approximately 5% of all fractures, with isolated greater tuberosity fractures accounting for approximately 20% of proximal humerus fractures. Although performing shoulder arthroscopy in situations including a fracture is technically demanding, it allows surgeons the opportunity to identify and treat other coexisting lesions that could have otherwise been missed. The incidence of these pathologies in combination with greater tuberosity fractures has not been established. This study aimed to identify the various types of pathologies that may coexist with greater tuberosity fractures but not be detected before fixation. Displaced 2-part greater tuberosity fractures were treated arthroscopically in the authors' department. All patients initially underwent diagnostic arthroscopy during which other coexisting pathologies were detected and assessed, including rotator cuff tears, labral tears (Bankart or superior labral anterior posterior lesions), or long head of the biceps pathologies. Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic (n=10) or arthroscopic-assisted (n=14) greater tuberosity reduction and fixation. Thirteen (54.2%) fragments were fully displaced. Four (16.7%) patients had fracture dislocation of the glenohumeral joint. The concomitant soft-tissue pathologies were identified and treated arthroscopically in 22 (92%) patients. Arthroscopic evaluation before greater tuberosity fracture fixation revealed a high percentage of concomitant soft tissue pathologies. These pathologies may be overlooked otherwise, but they are easily detected arthroscopically, enabling their treatment during the same procedure. PMID:24762155

Maman, Eran; Dolkart, Oleg; Chechik, Ofir; Amar, Eyal; Rak, Ofer; Rath, Ehud; Mozes, Gavriel

2014-03-01

197

Arthroscopic Double-Locked Stitch: A New Technique for Suturing Rotator Cuff Tears  

PubMed Central

There are a number of reasons for failed rotator cuff tear repair. In such cases the suture-tendon interface seems to be the most vulnerable area, especially when tendon degeneration is present. We describe a new technique, the arthroscopic double-locked suture, that increases the tendon fixation and has the added benefit of being placed parallel to the blood vessels, therefore avoiding damage to the tendon vascularization. The suture may be achieved by use of knots or knotless anchors and suture passers, without the need for any additional instrumentation. The new technique is especially helpful in cases in which the tendon is retracted and degeneration is present, impeding the use of the double-row technique or its transosseous equivalents.

Miyazaki, Alberto N.; Zanella, Luiz A.Z.; La Salvia, Joao C.; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro D.; da Silva, Luciana A.; Sella, Guilherme do Vall; Checchia, Sergio L.

2014-01-01

198

Arthroscopic double-locked stitch: a new technique for suturing rotator cuff tears.  

PubMed

There are a number of reasons for failed rotator cuff tear repair. In such cases the suture-tendon interface seems to be the most vulnerable area, especially when tendon degeneration is present. We describe a new technique, the arthroscopic double-locked suture, that increases the tendon fixation and has the added benefit of being placed parallel to the blood vessels, therefore avoiding damage to the tendon vascularization. The suture may be achieved by use of knots or knotless anchors and suture passers, without the need for any additional instrumentation. The new technique is especially helpful in cases in which the tendon is retracted and degeneration is present, impeding the use of the double-row technique or its transosseous equivalents. PMID:24904764

Miyazaki, Alberto N; Zanella, Luiz A Z; La Salvia, João C; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro D; da Silva, Luciana A; Sella, Guilherme do Vall; Checchia, Sergio L

2014-04-01

199

Virtual reality in surgical arthroscopic training.  

PubMed

Arthroscopy has become an irreplaceble method in diagnostics. The arthroscope, with optics and light source, and the exploratory probe are inserted into the knee joint through two small incisions underneath the patella. Currently, the skills required for arthroscopy are taught through hands-on clinical experience. Therefore, the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Graphische Datenverarbeitung in Darmstadt, in cooperation with the Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Frankfurt am Main, developed a highly interactive medical training system for arthroscopy through computer graphics and virtual reality (VR) techniques. Two main issues are addressed: the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction process and the 3-D interaction. The goal of the reconstruction process is to obtain a realistic representation of the knee joint derived from a magnetic resonance image sequence suitable for computer simulation. Moreover, the 3-D interaction of the training system must stimulate real arthroscopy, providing an intuitive handling of the instruments. PMID:9080349

Müller, W K; Ziegler, R; Bauer, A; Soldner, E H

1995-01-01

200

Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneonavicular coalition in children.  

PubMed

Calcaneonavicular coalition is a common source of pain and more or less severe flat and stiff foot in children. Classically, treatment consists in resecting the coalition using a dorsolateral approach. Good quality resection and interposition can prevent recurrence. The most common complications are infection, hematoma and neuroma. Arthroscopy offers a minimally invasive alternative, but the optimal approach remains undetermined. We describe a surgical technique with an approach based on the anterolateral process of the calcaneus, in three cases with 12 months' follow-up. Arthroscopic resection has certain advantages: recovery is quicker, and the esthetic result is better. For the instrumental portal, skin incision should be superficial, followed by blunt dissection of subcutaneous tissue to avoid superficial peroneal nerve injury. Although longer term follow-up is needed, arthroscopy seems to be an attractive minimally invasive technique in this kind of pathology. PMID:21700521

Knörr, J; Accadbled, F; Abid, A; Darodes, P; Torres, A; Cahuzac, J-P; Sales de Gauzy, J

2011-09-01

201

Arthroscopic treatment of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst.  

PubMed

This report describes a rare case of femoral nerve paresthesia caused by an acetabular paralabral cyst of the hip joint. A 68-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of right hip pain and paresthesia along the anterior thigh and radiating down to the anterior aspect of the knee. Radiography showed osteoarthritis with a narrowed joint space in the right hip joint. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cyst with low T1- and high T2-weighted signal intensity arising from a labral tear at the anterior aspect of the acetabulum. The cyst was connected to the joint space and displaced the femoral nerve to the anteromedial side. The lesion was diagnosed as an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral neuropathy. Because the main symptom was femoral nerve paresthesia and the patient desired a less invasive procedure, arthroscopic labral repair was performed to stop synovial fluid flow to the paralabral cyst that was causing the femoral nerve paresthesia. After surgery, the cyst and femoral nerve paresthesia disappeared. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient had no recurrence. There have been several reports of neurovascular compression caused by the cyst around the hip joint. To the authors' knowledge, only 3 cases of acetabular paralabral cysts causing sciatica have been reported. The current patient appears to represent a rare case of an acetabular paralabral cyst causing femoral nerve paresthesia. The authors suggest that arthroscopic labral repair for an acetabular paralabral cyst causing neuropathy can be an option for patients who desire a less invasive procedure. PMID:24810828

Kanauchi, Taira; Suganuma, Jun; Mochizuki, Ryuta; Uchikawa, Shinichi

2014-05-01

202

Effect of supraspinatus tendon repair technique on the infraspinatus tendon.  

PubMed

Supraspinatus tendon tears are common and often propagate into larger tears that include the infraspinatus tendon, resulting in loss of function and increased pain. Previously, we showed that the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons mechanically interact through a range of rotation angles, potentially shielding the torn supraspinatus tendon from further injury while subjecting the infraspinatus tendon to increased risk of injury. Surgical repair of torn supraspinatus tendons is common, yet the effect of the repair on the infraspinatus tendon is unknown. Since we have established a relationship between strain in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons the success of a supraspinatus tendon repair depends on its effect on the loading environment in the infraspinatus tendon. More specifically, the effect of transosseous supraspinatus tendon repair in comparison to one that utilizes suture anchors, as is commonly done with arthroscopic repairs, on this interaction through these joint positions will be evaluated. We hypothesize that at all joint positions evaluated, both repairs will restore the interaction between the two tendons. For both repairs, (1) increasing supraspinatus tendon load will increase infraspinatus tendon strain and (2) altering the rotation angle from internal to external will increase strain in the infraspinatus tendon. Strains were measured in the infraspinatus tendon insertion through a range of joint rotation angles and supraspinatus tendon loads, for the intact, transosseous, and suture anchor repaired supraspinatus tendons. Images corresponding to specific supraspinatus tendon loads were isolated for the infraspinatus tendon insertion for analysis. The effect of supraspinatus tendon repair on infraspinatus tendon strain differed with joint position. Altering the joint rotation did not change strain in the infraspinatus tendon for any supraspinatus tendon condition. Finally, increasing supraspinatus tendon load resulted in an increase in average maximum and decrease in average minimum principal strain in the infraspinatus tendon. There is a significant difference in infraspinatus tendon strain between the intact and arthroscopically (but not transosseous) repaired supraspinatus tendons that increases with greater loads. Results suggest that at low loads neither supraspinatus tendon repair technique subjects the infraspinatus tendon to potentially detrimental loads; however, at high loads, transosseous repairs may be more advantageous over arthroscopic repairs for the health of the infraspinatus tendon. Results emphasize the importance of limiting loading of the repaired supraspinatus tendon and that at low loads, both repair techniques restore the interaction to the intact supraspinatus tendon case. PMID:21303184

Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Kuntz, Andrew F; Ramsey, Matthew L; Soslowsky, Louis J

2011-03-01

203

The Posterolateral Portal: Optimizing Anchor Placement and Labral Repair at the Inferior Glenoid  

PubMed Central

The Bankart lesion is considered the critical lesion in anterior shoulder instability, in which the anteroinferior glenoid labrum separates from the glenoid rim. Technical advances in arthroscopy have ushered in a shift from open to arthroscopic Bankart repair. When one is performing an arthroscopic Bankart repair, proper portal placement is critical for success in labral preparation and anchor placement. Frequently, standard anterior portals are insufficient for inferior glenoid anchor placement and suture shuttling. The posterolateral portal—located 4 cm lateral to the posterolateral corner of the acromion—simplifies and improves anchor placement, trajectory, and anatomic capsulolabral repair of the inferior glenoid. We present our preferred technique for capsulolabral repair of the inferior glenoid.

Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; McCormick, Frank; Erickson, Brandon J.; Gupta, Anil K.; Abrams, Geoff D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Provencher, Matthew T.

2013-01-01

204

The Preemptive Analgesic Effect of Rofecoxib After Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) provide effective postoperative analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery. Some investigators have suggested that the pre- emptive administration of NSAIDs may reduce postoper- ative analgesic requirements and hypersensitivity. We evaluated the analgesic effect of administering rofecoxib either before or after surgical incision in patients undergo- ing arthroscopic knee surgery under local anesthesia. Sixty patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscectomy

Scott S. Reuben; Shailesh Bhopatkar; Holly Maciolek; Wanda Joshi; Joseph Sklar

2002-01-01

205

A Biomechanical Analysis of Anterior Bankart Repair Using Suture Anchors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Arthroscopic repair of anterior Bankart lesions is typically done with single-loaded suture anchors tied with simple stitch configuration.Hypothesis: The knotless suture anchor will have similar biomechanical properties compared with two types of conventional suture anchors.Study Design: Controlled laboratory study.Methods: Fresh-frozen shoulders were dissected and an anteroinferior Bankart lesion was created. For phase 1, specimens were randomized into either simple

Shane J. Nho; Rachel M. Frank; Geoffrey S. Van Thiel; Fan Chia Wang; Vincent M. Wang; Matthew T. Provencher; Nikhil N. Verma

2010-01-01

206

Aseptic synovitis after meniscal repair using the biodegradable Meniscus Arrow  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of aseptic synovitis in a 19-year-old man. The synovitis of the left knee developed 13 months after meniscal repair using the biodegradable Meniscus Arrow (Bionx Inc, Malvern, PA). Histologic examination revealed chronic nonspecific synovitis and birefringent materials. Immunohistochemical tests were positive in lysozyme, ?-1-antitrypsin, and ?-1-antichymotrypsin. After arthroscopic synovectomy, pain and swelling of the knee joint

Eun Kyoo Song; Keun Bae Lee; Taek Rim Yoon

2001-01-01

207

Subscapularis Repair With the Suture Shuttle Loop Technique  

PubMed Central

Successful techniques for arthroscopic repair of subscapularis tendon tears have been previously described in the literature. Recommendations regarding portal placement, tissue mobilization, and suture passage have been published. We present a novel technique that uses a shuttle suture passed with the Viper suture passer (Arthrex, Naples, FL) through a standard anterior arthroscopy portal. The described technique easily passes a suture through the subscapularis tendon while the surgeon visualizes suture placement from the posterior portal.

Nystrom, Stephen; Fagan, Paul; Vedder, Kristin; Heming, James

2013-01-01

208

Complications of Arthroscopic Femoroacetabular Impingement Treatment: A Review  

PubMed Central

Recent developments in hip arthroscopy techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical technique for treating pincer-type and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and rather treating it arthroscopically. Early reports suggest favorable results using arthroscopic techniques. The frequency of complications reported for hip arthroscopy for all indications is generally less than 1.5%, suggesting the procedure is safe. Little information is available on complications directly related to the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Failure to recognize and treat or incompletely reshape impingement deformities may be the most frequent cause for a second hip arthroscopy and redébridement of the deformity. There has been no report of avascular necrosis related to the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement; only one femoral neck fracture after arthroscopic cam remodeling has been reported in a large series of patients. Other clinical concerns include hip dislocation secondary to extensive capsulotomies or overresection of the anterior acetabular rim in the case of pincer impingement. Level of Evidence: Level V, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

2008-01-01

209

Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis with Intra-articular Distraction.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has shown high rates of union comparable to those with open arthrodesis but with substantially less postoperative morbidity, shorter operative times, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stays. To easily perform arthroscopic resection of the articular cartilage, sufficient distraction of the joint is necessary to insert the arthroscope and instruments. However, sometimes, standard noninvasive ankle distraction will not be sufficient in post-traumatic ankle arthritis, with the development of arthrofibrosis and joint contracture after severe ankle trauma. In the present report, we describe a technique to distract the ankle joint by inserting a 4.6-mm stainless steel cannula with a blunt trocar inside the joint. The cannula allowed sufficient intra-articular distraction, and, at the same time, a 4.0-mm arthroscope can be inserted through the cannula to view the joint. Screws can be inserted to fix the joint under fluoroscopic guidance without changing the patient's position or removing the noninvasive distraction device and leg holder, which are often necessary during standard arthroscopic arthrodesis with noninvasive distraction. PMID:24717518

Kim, Hyong Nyun; Jeon, June Young; Noh, Kyu Cheol; Kim, Hong Kyun; Dong, Quanyu; Park, Yong Wook

2014-01-01

210

Osteonecrosis of the Knee after Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy  

PubMed Central

Osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle is known as an uncommon complication after arthroscopic meniscectomy. The lesion of osteonecrosis can be irreversible, thus early detection of the disease is crucial for treatment. A 50-year-old male patient without known risk factors of osteonecrosis developed increasing knee pain after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed rapid progression of osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed after 9 months of conservative therapy. The patient is now free from pain during daily activities. It might be important to remind that if the patient's pain after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is severe than expected, clinical doctors should pay attention to the possibility of ongoing osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle.

Son, Il Jin; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jae Young

2013-01-01

211

Arthroscopic management of tibial plateau fractures: special techniques.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic assessment and treatment of tibial plateau fractures has gained popularity in recent years. This article describes some maneuvers to facilitate the management of these fractures with the arthroscope. We use a 14-mm rounded curved periosteal elevator to manipulate fragments within the joint instead of using a probe. To facilitate visualization of fractures, we describe the use of loop sutures around the meniscus to retract the meniscus when there is a tear in the meniscus. We suggest the use of the arthroscope for directly viewing the interosseous space to be sure that any internal fixation devices remain outside the articular space. The use of these tactics will allow a faster, more accurate reduction with less radiation exposure in patients with displaced tibial plateau fractures. PMID:9127091

Perez Carro, L

1997-04-01

212

Arthroscopic release of first metatarsophalangeal arthrofibrosis.  

PubMed

Various degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrofibrosis frequently occur in patients with bunion surgery or big toe trauma. In those patients with functional limitation who fail to respond to conservative treatment, surgery is indicated. We describe here an arthroscopic approach to first metatarsophalangeal release that is designed to improve functional results. Dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals are established at the medial and lateral sides of the extensor hallucis longus tendon. Through these 2 portals, the dorsal capsule is released and the medial and lateral joint gutters can be cleared up. The metatarsosesamoid compartment is approached through the straight medial portal and the working portal, the latter of which is located 4 cm proximal to the joint line between the abductor hallucis tendon and the medial head of the flexor hallucis brevis. Under visualization through the medial portal, adhesions around the sesamoid apparatus can be debrided with a shaver through the working portal. This completes the release of joint circumference and improves the motion range of the joint. PMID:16904596

Lui, Tun H

2006-08-01

213

Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

1994-01-01

214

Arthroscopic medial meniscectomy on stable knees.  

PubMed

We reviewed 74 partial medial meniscectomies in 57 patients with stable knees, to assess the long-term functional and radiological outcome. The International Knee Documentation Committee score and the residual laxity were assessed in both knees. At the time of surgery the mean age of the patients was 36 +/- 11 years and the mean follow-up was 12 +/- 1 years. All had a limited medial meniscectomy. The anterior cruciate ligament was intact in all cases. The meniscal tear was vertical in 95% and complex in 5%. The posterior part of the meniscus was removed in 99%. A peripheral rim was preserved in all cases. After 12 years 95% of the patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their knee(s). Objectively, 57% had grade A function and 43% were grade B. The outcome correlated only with the presence of anterior knee pain at final follow-up. In the 49 cases of arthroscopic meniscectomy for which there was a contralateral normal knee there was narrowing of the 'joint-space' in 16% of the operated knees. There was no correlation between this and other parameters such as age or different meniscal pathologies. PMID:11245533

Hulet, C H; Locker, B G; Schiltz, D; Texier, A; Tallier, E; Vielpeau, C H

2001-01-01

215

Arthroscopic disc repositioning and suturing: a preliminary report.  

PubMed

Eight patients (11 joints) underwent arthroscopic disc repositioning and suturing. Disc displacement was established by physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and diagnostic arthroscopy. Postoperative MRIs were taken at varying intervals between 1 day and 6 months. In all 11 joints, either partial improvement or normal disc position was observed arthroscopically. In 9 of the 11 joints, either partial improvement or normal position was observed on the postoperative MRIs. It is concluded that posterior disc repositioning and suturing is an achievable goal of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy. PMID:1593316

McCain, J P; Podrasky, A E; Zabiegalski, N A

1992-06-01

216

Arthroscopic Glenohumeral Arthrodesis With O-Arm Navigation  

PubMed Central

Glenohumeral arthrodesis is an end-stage salvage operation that has traditionally been performed in an open fashion. In recent years an arthroscopic approach has been described. The purpose of this report was to present an arthroscopic glenohumeral arthrodesis technique with the assistance of O-arm–based navigation. An illustrative case example is presented. This technique allows not only a minimally invasive glenohumeral arthrodesis but also precise screw fixation by navigation, which may be particularly useful in cases of limited bone stock and/or bony deformity.

Ladermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.

2014-01-01

217

Pneumomediastinum after arthroscopic shoulder surgery -A case report-  

PubMed Central

An 86-year-old female with a history of right rotator cuff injury was admitted for arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia. There were no remarkable immediate postoperative complications. However, while recovering in the general ward, she developed dyspnea with hypoxia. She was immediately treated with oxygen, and antibiotics after pneumomediastinum was confirmed on both chest x-ray and chest computed tomography. Subcutaneous emphysema on either face or neck followed by arthroscopic shoulder surgery was common, but pneumomediastinum with hypoxia is a rare but extremely dangerous complication. Thus we would like to report our case and its pathology, the diagnosis, the treatment and prevention, with literature review.

Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Ko, Eun-Sung; Kim, Jee-Young; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Jae-Yun

2013-01-01

218

Arthroscopic treatment for symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus during childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this study was to review the operative long-term results of a large cohort of children treated arthroscopically\\u000a for a symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We retrospectively reviewed the arthroscopic procedures performed on 104 knees (97 patients) between 1990 and 2006 to treat\\u000a symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus in children. The median age at the time of surgery was 8 years

Stefano Stilli; Leonardo Marchesini Reggiani; Giulio Maria Marcheggiani Muccioli; Michela Cappella; Onofrio Donzelli

2011-01-01

219

Dorsal Wrist Capsular Tears in Association with Scapholunate Instability: Results of an Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsuloplasty  

PubMed Central

Purpose?The purpose of this study is to report the association of dorsal wrist capsular avulsion with scapholunate ligament instability and to evaluate the results of an arthroscopy-assisted repair. Methods?We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years suffering from chronic dorsal wrist pain. They underwent a wrist arthroscopy with an evaluation of the scapholunate ligament complex from the radiocarpal and midcarpal compartments. An avulsion of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (DICL) from the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) was visible from the radiocarpal compartment in all cases, while the SLIL was intact. The DICL tear was repaired with an arthroscopy-assisted dorsal capsuloplasty. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by the QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and by a clinical and radiological examination. Results?Preoperatively, all patients had reduced flexion and radial deviation of the affected wrist. On the lateral radiograph, 5 of the 10 patients showed an increase of the scapholunate angle (60 to 85°). The scapholunate instability was graded as Messina–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) II in five cases and as grade IIIB in five cases. A tear of the ulnar part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was found in seven cases. At a mean followup of 16 months, the wrist range of motion (ROM), the grip strength, the QuickDASH, and the VAS of pain improved significatively. The scapholunate angle was normalized in all cases. Discussion?Isolated tears of the DICL at its insertion from the dorsal part of the SLIL can be associated with scapholunate instability in the absence of an injury to the SLIL. The diagnosis is made arthroscopically. The arthroscopic dorsal capsuloplasty is a minimally invasive technique that provides short-term satisfactory results. Further studies are needed to determine whether repair of the DICL tear could prevent secondary destabilization of the scapholunate ligament complex. Level of evidence?IV (case series) Diagnosis

Binder, Adeline Cambon; Kerfant, Nathalie; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Tandara, Andrea A.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

2013-01-01

220

Arthroscopic intervention in early hip disease.  

PubMed

Advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for hip arthroscopy have dispelled previous myths about early hip disease. Arthroscopic findings have established the following facts: Acetabular labral tears do occur; acetabular chondral lesions do exist; tears are most frequently anterior and often associated with sudden twisting or pivoting motions; and labral tears often occur in association with articular cartilage lesions of the adjacent acetabulum or femoral head, and if present for years, contribute to the progression of delamination process of the chondral cartilage. Magnetic resonance arthrography represents an improvement over conventional magnetic resonance imaging, it does have limitations when compared with direct observation. Although indications for hip arthroscopy are constantly expanding, the most common indications include: labral tears, loose bodies, chondral flap lesions of the acetabular or femoral head, synovial chondromatosis, foreign body removal, and crystalline hip arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and others). Contraindications include conditions that limit the potential for hip distraction such as joint ankylosis, dense heterotopic bone formation, considerable protrusio, or morbid obesity. Complication rates have been reported between 0.5 and 5%, most often related to distraction and include sciatic or femoral nerve palsy, avascular necrosis, and compartment syndrome. Transient peroneal or pudendal nerve effects and chondral scuffing have been associated with difficult or prolonged distraction. Meticulous consideration to patient positioning, distraction time and portal placement are essential. Judicious patient selection and diagnostic expertise are critical to successful outcomes. Candidates for hip arthroscopy should include only those patients with mechanical symptoms (catching, locking, or buckling) that have failed to respond to conservative therapy. The extent of articular cartilage involvement has the most direct relationship to surgical outcomes. Improvements in technique and instrumentation have made hip arthroscopy an efficacious way to diagnose and treat a variety of intra-articular problems. PMID:15577481

McCarthy, Joseph C; Lee, Jo-Ann

2004-12-01

221

Infection after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.  

PubMed

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Identify the most common pathogen of infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. 2. Outline the general principles for the treatment of infection after ACL reconstruction. 3. Determine the indications of graft excision and hardware removal. 4. Summarize the outcomes of infection after ACL reconstruction. Septic arthritis is a rare but potentially devastating complication of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. The purpose of this study was to provide an evidence-based summarization of the treatment and outcome of infection after ACL reconstruction with a pooled analysis of the reported cases. The authors conducted a systematic review of published studies that evaluated the outcome of septic arthritis after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. A structured literature review of multiple databases referenced articles from 1950 to 2012. A total of 22,836 knees from 14 published studies were assessed. Postoperative septic arthritis occurred in 121 knees, with a pooled percentage of 0.5%. Mean duration of follow-up after ACL reconstruction was 53.6 months (range, 4-218 months). An average of 1.92 procedures (range, 1-5 procedures) were performed to eradicate the infection. The grafts were retained in 77% of cases. Postoperative intravenous antibiotics were used for at least 5 days (range, 5-90 days) after debridement. At final follow-up, mean postoperative Lysholm score was 80.2 (range, 23-100). No reinfection was observed in 121 patients. This study has helped to further elucidate the outcomes of infection after ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft removal can be considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(7):477-484.]. PMID:24992054

Kim, Seung-Ju; Postigo, Ricardo; Koo, Sowon; Kim, Jong Hun

2014-07-01

222

Polymyalgia rheumatica: an arthroscopic study of the shoulder joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

A careful selection of 19 patients fitting the classical description of polymyalgia rheumatica have been examined by arthroscopy and thoroughly screened and followed up to exclude rheumatoid arthritis and other disease processes. Synovitis of the shoulder joint has been observed through the arthroscope in 17 and synovitis of varying degrees noted histologically, 4 of whom were studied by immunofluorescence. Five

W A Douglas; B A Martin; J H Morris

1983-01-01

223

Displaced anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures: Arthroscopic staple fixation  

PubMed Central

Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) avulsion fracture is commonly associated with knee injuries and its management is controversial ranging from conservative treatment to arthroscopic fixation. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical and radiological results of arthroscopic staple fixation in the management of ACL avulsion fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients (17 males and 5 females) who underwent arthroscopic staple fixation for displaced ACL avulsion fractures were analysed. The mean age was 32.2 years (15-55 years) with a mean followup of 21 months (6-36 months). All patients were assessed clinically by calculating their Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores and the radiological union was assessed in the followup radiographs. Results: The mean Lysholm score was 95.4(83-100) and the mean IKDC score was 91.1(77-100) at the final followup. In 20 patients anterior drawer's test was negative at the end of final followup while two patients had grade I laxity. Associated knee injuries were found in seven cases. The final outcome was not greatly influenced by the presence of associated injuries when treated simultaneously. At final followup all the patients were able to return to their pre-injury occupation Conclusion: Arthroscopic staple fixation is a safe and reliable method for producing clinical and radiological outcome in displaced ACL avulsion fractures.

Sundararajan, S R; Rajasekaran, S; Bernard, S Leo

2011-01-01

224

Proper insertion angle is essential to prevent intra-articular protrusion of a knotless suture anchor in shoulder rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

The advent of new arthroscopic devices has led to the development of novel techniques of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. However, failure to recognize specific technical aspects and improper application of these devices can lead to complications. We report a case of intra-articular protrusion of knotless anchors (PEEK PushLock SP, 4.5 x 18.5 mm; Arthrex, Naples, FL), used in the lateral row of a suture-bridging technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This case draws attention to the increased length of such devices when compared with traditional suture anchors, the technical aspects of proper device use, the possible patient-related factors such as implant-patient size mismatch, and the importance of additional imaging for the investigation of failure to progress postoperatively. PMID:20141993

Wong, Andrew S; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Schmidt, Christopher C

2010-02-01

225

Efficacy of arthroscopic synovectomy for the effect attenuation cases of infliximab in rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate whether arthroscopic synovectomy is effective for nonresponders to infliximab, anti-tumor necrosis factor-? antibody, for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we assessed seven patients including ten arthroscopic synovectomies in knee joint, in shoulder joint, and in ankle joints. We compared C-reactive protein (CRP) and DAS28 (ESR) before and after surgery at 6 and 50 weeks. After arthroscopic synovectomy, we

Katsuaki Kanbe; Kazuhiko Inoue

2006-01-01

226

The "Flying Swan" Technique: A Novel Method for Anterior Labral Repair Using a Tensioned Suture Bridge  

PubMed Central

Arthroscopic labral repair is an effective technique for most cases of traumatic shoulder instability. However, patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions frequently have multiple episodes of subluxation or dislocation and a high recurrence rate after surgery, even with modern methods of labral repair. One reason may be failure of biological healing of the labrum due to an inadequate “footprint” of contact between the capsulolabral tissue and the glenoid bone. We have developed a technique that facilitates a tensioned suture bridge between suture anchors that may improve the results of labral repair in patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions.

Alexander, Susan; Wallace, Andrew L.

2014-01-01

227

The effect of multiple channeling on the structural integrity of repaired rotator cuff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adding multiple channeling of the greater tuberosity on the structural\\u000a integrity of the repaired rotator cuff tendon.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Fifty-six consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and postoperative computed tomography arthrography\\u000a (CTA) were included in this study; 31 consecutive patients that underwent conventional repair and 25 subsequent patients that

Chris Hyunchul Jo; Kang Sup Yoon; Ji Ho Lee; Seung Baik Kang; Jae Hyup Lee; Hyuk Soo Han; Seung Hwan Rhee; Ji Sun Shin

228

Hemophilic synovitis of the knee: radiosynovectomy or arthroscopic synovectomy?  

PubMed

Radiosynovectomy (RS) is the best choice for patients with persistent synovitis of the knee unresponsive to a 3-month trial of prophylactic factor replacement. If three consecutive RSs with 6-month intervals have been ineffective, an arthroscopic synovectomy should be indicated in patients older than 12 years of age (adolescents). In children younger than 12 years of age, adequate prophylaxis should be maintained, with arthroscopic synovectomy always being the last resort. In the knee, we recommend Yttrium-90 at a dose of 90 mBq in children and 185 mBq in adults. Although the dose of radiation of RS is minimal and neither articular nor systemic neoplastic changes related to RS have been reported so far, all patients must be given the opportunity to consider the risk/benefit ratios. Our current recommendation is to use knee RS in hemophilia patients older than 12 years of age (adolescents). PMID:24957567

Rodriguez-Merchan, Emerito Carlos

2014-08-01

229

Segmental arthroscopic resection of the hypertrophic mediopatellar plica.  

PubMed

In a retrospective review of 64 knees (58 patients) treated during a 36-month period by segmental arthroscopic resection of a hypertrophic mediopatellar plica, each patient was questioned and/or examined a minimum of one year after surgery. Medial or retropatellar pain (95%), buckling (32%), swelling (25%), and snapping (16%) were symptoms associated with a hypertrophic mediopatellar plica. Findings during physical examination of medial and retropatellar tenderness (74%) suggest the presence of the condition. Thirty percent of knees had localized chondromalacia of the medial femoral condyle, while in 13% chondromalacia was localized to the medial patellar facet. Good to excellent results were obtained in 86% of knees with a hypertrophic mediopatellar plica, with or without localized chondromalacia. In patients who had associated conditions, the lesions were also treated arthroscopically; good to excellent results were obtained in 69% of these knees. PMID:6883849

Richmond, J C; McGinty, J B

1983-09-01

230

Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Fixation Using a Modified Sugaya Technique  

PubMed Central

Arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesions in the setting of anterior shoulder instability has had successful long-term results. Key factors such as patient positioning, portal placement, visualization, mobilization of bony/soft tissues, and anatomic reduction and fixation are crucial to yield such results. We present a modified Sugaya technique that is reproducible and based on such key principles. This technique facilitates ease of anchor and suture placement to allow for anatomic reduction and fixation.

Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

2013-01-01

231

Arthroscopic removal of an osteoid osteoma at the talar neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case of a 14-year-old girl with osteoid osteoma of the talar neck that localized subperiostaly with a 1-year history of persistent ankle pain is presented. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical appearance, radiography, technetium-99m diphosphonate scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Subsequently, she underwent arthroscopic excision of the lesion using a motorized burr and curette. After

S Tüzüner; AT Aydin

1998-01-01

232

Arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the ankle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 34-year-old male soccer player with chronic right ankle dysfunction and a history of repeated ankle joint injuries is presented.\\u000a Imaging studies revealed synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint. Arthroscopic partial synovectomy was performed and more\\u000a than 20 loose bodies were excised. Four months postoperatively the patient was asymptomatic and has returned to his previous\\u000a level of sport activities. At the

Christos K. Kyriakopoulos; Andreas F. Mavrogenis; Ioannis S. Benetos; Demetrios Koulalis; Argyris Mitsou; Panayiotis J. Papagelopoulos

2006-01-01

233

Arthroscopic pancapsular plication for multidirectional shoulder instability in overhead athletes.  

PubMed

Treating shoulder multidirectional instability with an open stabilization procedure has been reported to have good results. However, few studies exist of arthroscopic plication, especially in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic pancapsular plication for multidirectional instability in overhead athletes.Twenty-three athletes with symptomatic multidirectional instability were treated with arthroscopic pancapsular plication and evaluated at a mean follow-up of 36.3 months (range, 24-61 months). Mean patient age was 23.3 years (range, 19-33 years). Functional outcomes were evaluated with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant shoulder score, and Rowe instability score. The degree of pain and range of motion were also recorded. All postoperative functional scores were rated good to excellent, with an average ASES score of 88.4 (range, 82-95), average Constant shoulder score of 88.1 (range, 81-100), and average Rowe instability score of 86.7 (range, 80-100). Five patients returned to the same level of competitive sports, and 18 returned to a limited level. All patients were satisfied with the stability postoperatively. No significant change was observed in postoperative range of motion, but patients who returned to a limited level of sports had lower functional scores and more pain than did those who fully returned to sports.Arthroscopic pancapsular plication for treating multidirectional instability in overhead athletes can provide good stability. However, the low rate of return to a full level of overhead sports is a problem. Further evaluation of the benefits of this procedure for overhead athletes with symptomatic multidirectional instability is needed. PMID:22495849

Ma, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Hui-Kuang; Chiang, En-Rung; Wang, Shih-Tein; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Chein-Lin

2012-04-01

234

Fifteen-year follow-up of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

From an original pool of 283 patients, 146 patients who had undergone arthroscopic partial meniscectomy an average of 14.7 years before were followed-up. Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, satisfaction index on a scale of 1 to 10, and standing anteroposterior and flexion weight-bearing radiographs of both knees, were obtained. A physical examination was performed on each knee emphasizing motion, swelling,

Robert T. Burks; Michael H. Metcalf; Robert W. Metcalf

1997-01-01

235

Arthroscopic Treatment of a Reverse Hill-Sachs Lesion  

PubMed Central

Acute traumatic posterior shoulder instability is a rare injury. Such injuries can result in significant bone defects of the anterior humeral head that require surgical intervention. In the past, small to medium defects have been treated by a soft-tissue or bone transfer into the lesion. We present an arthroscopic technique for addressing these lesions in which the middle glenohumeral ligament is sutured into the defect, thereby making it an extra-articular defect and preventing it from engaging the posterior glenoid.

Duey, Richard E.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

2013-01-01

236

Suture-bridge subscapularis tendon repair technique using low anterior portals.  

PubMed

A suture-bridge technique has been introduced to facilitate fixation procedures and to achieve increased holding strength in posterosuperior rotator cuff. Based on biomechanical studies, this technique has been suggested as an effective method that could optimize rotator cuff tendon-footprint contact area and mean pressure, as well as holding strength. In this technique, the suture-bridge creation is adapted for arthroscopic subscapularis repair to attain the ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. To obtain enough working portals and space, two accessory portals were made on the anterior aspect of the shoulder and use an elevator to retract the conjoined tendons and deltoid muscle. This technique could be useful for the repair of subscapularis tears, which are not easily approached using other arthroscopic techniques. From a biomechanical point of view, the subscapularis tendon could be restored more ideally using the suture-bridge technique. PMID:20890701

Park, Jin-Young; Park, Jun-Suk; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Kumar, Praveen; Oh, Kyung-Soo

2011-02-01

237

A ganglion cyst generated by non-absorbable meniscal repair suture material.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic meniscal repair has been a common procedure for the treatment of a torn meniscus, since the importance of meniscal preservation is widely understood. Over the years, the complications associated with suture material have been reported. Meniscal cyst is also one of those things. But ganglion cyst triggered by non-absorbable suture material was not documented in the literature. We report the case of a 19-year-old boy who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and repair of the medial meniscus by inside-out technique using 2-0 non-absorbable polyester sutures. The patient returned to our clinic at 4-year F/U with right knee pain due to medial meniscus tear and ganglion cyst. We suspect non-absorbable suture materials itself might have caused soft tissue irritation with repetitive trauma that lead to mucoid degeneration which results in ganglion cyst formation in the end. PMID:22858108

Kang, H J; Chun, C H; Kim, S H; Kim, K M

2012-09-01

238

Arthroscopic tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with locked retrograde compression nail.  

PubMed

Tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC) arthrodesis is a demanding procedure. Several techniques have been described for successful fusion, including the use of plates, screws, intramedullary nails, and external fixators. Arthroscopic TTC fusion with intramedullary nailing has been recently described as an alternative method to traditional open procedures. The surgical technique and clinical and radiographic outcomes of 2 patients who had undergone arthroscopic TTC arthrodesis with intramedullary nailing are presented. The indication for surgery was symptomatic tibiotalar and subtalar post-traumatic arthritis in 1 patient and distal tibia and fibula nonunion in the other. In both cases, fusion was obtained at approximately 8 weeks postoperatively. At the final follow-up visit at 2 years postoperatively, their American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score had improved from 31 to 85 points and from 16 to 71 points, respectively. No intra- or postoperative complications developed. Arthroscopic TTC arthrodesis can be an alternative to traditional open procedures, especially in patients with soft tissue concerns or several previous surgeries. Experience with ankle arthroscopy procedures is mandatory to obtain satisfactory results and minimize the risk of complications. PMID:23611414

Vilà y Rico, Jesus; Rodriguez-Martin, Juan; Parra-Sanchez, Guillermo; Marti Lopez-Amor, Carlos

2013-01-01

239

Open surgical dislocation versus arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.  

PubMed

It is unclear if open surgical dislocation or arthroscopy of the hip is superior for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). We prospectively compared the clinical results of these 2 surgical methods performed by a single surgeon. Five patients met the inclusion criteria for the open surgical dislocation group and 18 for the arthroscopic group. Patient-reported scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS) and Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) were used preoperatively, and at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively to compare the 2 groups. Average follow-up was 14.7 months (range, 12 to 25 months); both groups showed significant improvement in their postoperative scores compared with preoperative scores (P < .01). The arthroscopic group had better, earlier improvement at 3- and 6-month follow-up, with NAHS significantly better at 3 months (P < .0002). However, improvements were comparable between the 2 groups at 1 year. Open surgical dislocation and arthroscopy are viable options for the treatment of FAI. The arthroscopic group demonstrated a trend toward faster recovery and quicker return to sports, but larger and longer-term studies are needed. PMID:24839626

Botser, Itamar B; Jackson, Timothy J; Smith, Thomas W; Leonard, James P; Stake, Christine E; Domb, Benjamin G

2014-05-01

240

Arthroscopic extracapsular plication to treat multidirectional instability of the shoulder.  

PubMed

Successful arthroscopic treatment of multidirectional shoulder instability requires that the surgeon reduce the volume of the capsule. This goal can be achieved by using the extracapsular plication technique. There are several advantages to using pancapsular plication and an intra-articular knot. Much better potential for capsular healing exists when the outer layer of the capsule, which is composed of fibrous tissue, is tied extra-articularly. With the intra-articular plication technique, the inner layer of the capsule is synovia, which has less healing capacity. The amount of capsule plication that can be achieved with the extra-articular plication technique exceeds what is possible with the intra-articular plication technique. This is very important in patients who have a large degree of instability in the anterior, the posterior, and, particularly, the inferior direction. Thermal capsulorrhaphy enhances other arthroscopic stabilization procedures. Thermal striping helps to reduce capsular redundancy if laxity persists. However, with arthroscopic extracapsular plication, the capsular tissue can be shortened without using thermal energy. PMID:16226669

Cicak, Nikola; Klobucar, Hrvoje; Bicanic, Goran; Trsek, Denis

2005-10-01

241

[Arthroscopic diagnostics and treatment for cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament].  

PubMed

From among over 500 knees examined arthroscopically in 5 cases operated on because of painful limitation of the range of motion besides an inveterate ACL injury a cyst located around injured fibers was found. Arthroscopic removal of the cyst rendered permanent improvement in all cases. No recurrence has occurred. PMID:7555350

Pawlas, R; Szlachta, Z

1994-01-01

242

Arthroscopic Versus Open Shoulder Stabilization for Recurrent Anterior InstabilityA Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability has been reported to result in a higher rate of recurrent instability compared to traditional open techniques. Purpose: To test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the clinical outcomes in patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability treated with open or arthroscopic stabilization. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence,

Craig R. Bottoni; Eric L. Smith; Mark J. Berkowitz; Robert B. Towle; Josef H. Moore

2006-01-01

243

Ultrasonography-Assisted Arthroscopic Proximal Iliotibial Band Release and Trochanteric Bursectomy  

PubMed Central

We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression.

Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

2013-01-01

244

Arthroscopic-Assisted Reduction and Percutaneous External Fixation of a Displaced Intra-articular Glenoid Fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Arthroscopic reduction and percutaneous external fixation is a well-known technique for treating selected fractures. This is the first report of a method of treating intra-articular glenoid rim fracture using shoulder arthroscopy and percutaneous external fixation. The surgical trauma associated with open operative treatment of these fractures can be minimized using minimally invasive techniques under arthroscopic control. This technique not

L. Perez Carro; M. Perez Nuñez; J. I. Echevarria Llata

1999-01-01

245

Iatrogenic transection of the peroneal and partial transection of the tibial nerve during arthroscopic lateral meniscal debridement and removal of osteochondral fragment.  

PubMed

Knee arthroscopy is a common orthopedic procedure that is generally considered relatively safe, with overall complication rates reported between 1% and 8%. Approximately 0.01% to 0.06% of these complications involve neurovascular structures. While peroneal nerve and tibial artery complications are well reported, to our knowledge, injury to the tibial nerve has not been reported. We report a case of injury to the tibial and peroneal nerves during routine meniscal debridement and osteochondral fragment removal in a 17-year-old high school athlete. The likely mechanism of injury was violation of the posterolateral corner by powered arthroscopic instrumentation during the attempt at removal of the loose body. The peroneal nerve was repaired with an interpositional sural nerve graft. Management of these injuries should consist of following patients closely with electromyograms and nerve exploration and repair in those cases that do not show interval improvement. Clinicians should exercise extreme care while using powered instruments in the posterolateral corner. PMID:24730004

Wendt, Matthew C; Spinner, Robert J; Shin, Alexander Y

2014-04-01

246

The Use of Double-Loaded Suture Anchors for Labral Repair and Capsular Repair During Hip Arthroscopy  

PubMed Central

With the development of hip joint preservation procedures, the use of hip arthroscopy has grown dramatically over the past decade. However, recent articles have reported cases of hip instability after hip arthroscopy. Little is known about the role of static and dynamic stabilizers on hip joint stability, but there are concerns that an extensile capsulotomy or capsulectomy, osteoplasty of the acetabulum and proximal femur, and labral detachment or debridement during hip arthroscopy could potentially compromise hip stability. The safety parameters for arthroscopic hip surgery have not yet been fully established, and techniques are being developed for labral refixation and capsular repair after arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in an attempt to decrease the chance of iatrogenic hip instability or microinstability. The surgical technique presented in this article may provide anatomic repair of both the labrum and capsule using a double-loaded suture anchor technique. We believe that this technique increases both operative efficiency and the strength of the overall repair, which may minimize the risk of iatrogenic hip instability after hip arthroscopy.

Slikker, William; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S.; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Nho, Shane J.

2012-01-01

247

Arthroscopic Lavage and Debridement for Osteoarthritis of the Knee  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this review was to determine the effectiveness and adverse effects of arthroscopic lavage and debridement, with or without lavage, in the treatment of symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, and to conduct an economic analysis if evidence for effectiveness can be established. Questions Asked Does arthroscopic lavage improve motor function and pain associated with OA of the knee? Does arthroscopic debridement improve motor function and pain associated with OA of the knee? If evidence for effectiveness can be established, what is the duration of effect? What are the adverse effects of these procedures? What are the economic considerations if evidence for effectiveness can be established? Clinical Need Osteoarthritis, the most common rheumatologic musculoskeletal disorder, affects about 10% of the Canadian adult population. Although the natural history of OA is not known, it is a degenerative condition that affects the bone cartilage in the joint. It can be diagnosed at earlier ages, particularly within the sports injuries population, though the prevalence of non-injury-related OA increases with increasing age and varies with gender, with women being twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with this condition. Thus, with an aging population, the impact of OA on the health care system is expected to be considerable. Treatments for OA of the knee include conservative or nonpharmacological therapy, like physiotherapy, weight management and exercise; and more generally, intra-articular injections, arthroscopic surgery and knee replacement surgery. Whereas knee replacement surgery is considered an end-of-line intervention, the less invasive surgical procedures of lavage or debridement may be recommended for earlier and more severe disease. Both arthroscopic lavage and debridement are generally indicated in patients with knee joint pain, with or without mechanical problems, that are refractory to medical therapy. The clinical utility of these procedures is unclear, hence, the assessment of their effectiveness in this review. Lavage and Debridement Arthroscopic lavage involves the visually guided introduction of saline solution into the knee joint and removal of fluid, with the intent of extracting any excess fluids and loose bodies that may be in the knee joint. Debridement, in comparison, may include the introduction of saline into the joint, in addition to the smoothening of bone surface without any further intervention (less invasive forms of debridement), or the addition of more invasive procedures such as abrasion, partial or full meniscectomy, synovectomy, or osteotomy (referred to as debridement in combination with meniscectomy or other procedures). The focus of this health technology assessment is on the effectiveness of lavage, and debridement (with or without meniscal tear resection). Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat followed its standard procedures and searched these electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. The keywords searched were: arthroscopy, debridement, lavage, wound irrigation, or curettage; arthritis, rheumatoid, osteoarthritis; osteoarthritis, knee; knee or knee joint. Time frame: Only 2 previous health technology assessments were identified, one of which was an update of the other, and included 3 of 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from the first report. Therefore, the search period for inclusion of studies in this assessment was January 1, 1995 to April 24, 2005. Excluded were: case reports, comments, editorials, and letters. Identified were 335 references, including previously published health technology assessments, and 5 articles located through a manual search of references from published articles and health technology assessments. These were examined against the criteria, as described below, which resulted in the in

2005-01-01

248

Improvement of arthroscopic cartilage stiffness probe using amorphous diamond coating.  

PubMed

During arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage unstable contact and even slipping of the measurement instrument on the tissue surface may degrade the reproducibility of the measurement. The main aim of the present study was to achieve more stable contact by controlling the friction between articular cartilage surface and the arthroscopic cartilage stiffness probe (Artscan 200, Artscan Oy, Helsinki, Finland) using amorphous diamond (AD) coating. In order to obtain surfaces with different average roughnesses (R(a)), polished stainless steel disks were coated with AD by using the filtered pulsed arc-discharge (FPAD) method. Dynamic coefficient of friction (mu) between the articular cartilage (n = 8) and the coated plates along one non-coated plate was then determined. The friction between AD and cartilage could be controlled over a wide range (mu = 0.027-0.728, p < 0.05, Wilcoxon test) by altering the roughness. Possible deterioration of cartilage was investigated by measuring surface roughness after friction tests and comparing it with the roughness of the adjacent, untested samples (n = 8). Importantly, even testing with the roughest AD (R(a) = 1250 nm) did not damage articular surface. On the basis of the friction measurements, a proper AD coating was selected for the stiffness probe. The performance of coated and non-coated probe was compared by measuring bovine osteochondral samples (n = 22) with both instruments. The reproducibility of the stiffness measurements was significantly better with the AD-coated probe (CV% = 4.7) than with the uncoated probe (CV% = 8.2). To conclude, AD coating can be used to safely control dynamic friction with articular surface. Sufficient friction between articular surface and reference plate of the arthroscopic probe improves significantly reproducibility of the stiffness measurements. PMID:15660448

Töyräs, Juha; Korhonen, Rami K; Voutilainen, Tanja; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Lappalainen, Reijo

2005-04-01

249

The Thrower's Elbow: Arthroscopic Treatment of Valgus Extension Overload Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Injury to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow (MCL) can be a career-threatening injury for an overhead athlete without appropriate diagnosis and treatment. It has been considered separately from other athletic injuries due to the unique constellation of pathology that results from repetitive overhead throwing. The past decade has witnessed tremendous gains in understanding of the complex interplay between the dynamic and static stabilizers of the athlete's elbow. Likewise, the necessity to treat these problems in a minimally invasive manner has driven the development of sophisticated techniques and instrumentation for elbow arthroscopy. MCL injuries, ulnar neuritis, valgus extension overload with osteophyte formation and posteromedial impingement, flexor pronator strain, medial epicondyle pathology, and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum have all been described as sequelae of the overhead throwing motion. In addition, loose body formation, bony spur formation, and capsular contracture can all be present in conjunction with these problems or as isolated entities. Not all pathology in the thrower's elbow is amenable to arthroscopic treatment; however, the clinician must be familiar with all of these problems in order to form a comprehensive differential diagnosis for an athlete presenting with elbow pain, and he or she must be comfortable with the variety of open and arthroscopic treatments available to best serve the patient. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the thrower's elbow is critical to the care of this population. The preoperative evaluation should focus on a thorough history and physical examination, as wellas on specific diagnostic imaging modalities. Arthroscopic setup, including anesthesia, patient positioning, and portal choices will be discussed. Operative techniques in the anterior and posterior compartments will bereviewed, as well as postoperative rehabilitationandsurgical results. Lastly, complications will be reviewed.

Altchek, David W.

2006-01-01

250

The EWAS Classification of Scapholunate Tears: An Anatomical Arthroscopic Study  

PubMed Central

Treatment of scapho-lunate (SL) injuries is still a challenge for the surgeon, especially in chronic cases. The aim of the study isto experimentally cut, specific portions of scapholunate ligament and extrinsic ligaments and check their corresponding arthroscopic finding in order to understand the pathogenesis and develop a new classification system which is an evolution of the present arthroscopic classifications. Materials and Methods?Thirteen cadaver wrists were studied under arthroscopy. Different portions of the scapho-lunate ligament were subsequently sectioned. In group A the sectioning sequence was: anterior SLIOL, RSC, LRL, SLIOL's proximal and posterior, DIC, DRC ligament and ST ligaments (8 cases). In group B it was: SLIOL's posterior and proximal, DIC, SLIOL's anterior, LRL, RSCL, DRC, ST ligaments (5 cases). The anatomo-pathological findings after each sectioning were correlated to the classification system proposed (Table 1). Results?In group A, stage 3A was obtained when SL ligament's volar and intermediate portion and/ or SC/LRL ligaments were sectioned. A stage 3C was obtained when section of posterior SLIOL was sectioned as well. A stage IV when the DIC was also sectioned. In group B a stage 3B was obtained by cutting intermediate, posterior portion of the SLIOL ligament and DIC. A stage 3C was obtained when the anterior part of the SLIOL was also sectioned. In all cases, sectioning of the SLIOL lead to a stage 3C only if associated with sectioning of at least one of the extrinsic stabilizers (DIC or SC/LRL). Sectioning of DIC and SC ligament, in addition to SLIOL led to an arthroscopic stage IV. When ST, DRC and TH ligaments were also sectioned significant radiological signs appeared (stage V). Conclusions?This study helps us to understand the anatomo-pathological scapho-lunate lesions in their different stages of partial lesions. Commonly called scapho-lunate lesions are complex, involving also extrinsic ligaments.

Messina, Jane C.; Van Overstraeten, Luc; Luchetti, Riccardo; Fairplay, Tracy; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

2013-01-01

251

Isolated Arthroscopic Rotator Interval Closure for Shoulder Instability  

PubMed Central

We present our technique for isolated arthroscopic rotator interval closure in the treatment of mild symptomatic glenohumeral instability in the absence of a labral tear. A careful history, physical examination, and imaging help to identify a select subset of atraumatic instability patients who may benefit from this procedure, and diagnostic arthroscopy can provide further evidence. By use of a posterior viewing portal with anterior and anterolateral working portals, the anterior capsuloligamentous complex is mobilized, and the rotator interval is closed with carefully placed sutures to advance the capsule superiorly and provide tension through decreased capsular volume.

Krych, Aaron J.; Shindle, Michael K.; Baran, Sean; Warren, Russell F.

2013-01-01

252

Long Term Outcomes after Arthroscopic Management of Tibial Plateau Fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:  Tibial plateau fractures are efficiently treated using arthroscopy when limited to one condyle. Operative technique and early\\u000a results are now well documented. However, long term results have not been widely reported. The goal of this study was to evaluate\\u000a clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopically treated tibial plateau fractures in the long term.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods:  Fourteen out of thirty consecutive cases have

Marc-Antoine Rousseau; Gregory Biette; Franck Jouve; Nicolas Graveleau; Philippe Hardy

2008-01-01

253

Arthroscopic Tenoplasty in Congenital Split Biceps Long Head  

PubMed Central

The long head of the biceps brachii tendon arises mainly from the superior glenoid labrum and supraglenoid tubercle. Biceps brachii display anatomic variations, but these are rarely encountered. We report, for the first time, a technique called arthroscopic intra-articular biceps tenoplasty describing restoration of the long head of the biceps tendon using the superior capsule in a case of anomalous congenital split biceps tendon encountered incidentally during diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy in a patient who was treated for shoulder instability and SLAP tear.

Yoo, Yon-Sik; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Arora, Manish

2014-01-01

254

Arthroscopic Lateral Epicondylitis Release Using the "Bayonet" Technique  

PubMed Central

Most patients diagnosed with lateral epicondylitis respond well to conservative management. For patients who do not respond to nonoperative modalities, surgical treatment represents a viable option for long-term symptomatic relief. The arthroscopic surgical technique described in this article has been consistently used by the senior author for the treatment of recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis for more than 5 years (198 patients) without the occurrence of any major complications and appears to be a safe, reliable, and efficacious surgical intervention for the management of lateral epicondylitis.

Stiefel, Eric C.; Field, Larry D.

2014-01-01

255

Arthroscopic tenoplasty in congenital split biceps long head.  

PubMed

The long head of the biceps brachii tendon arises mainly from the superior glenoid labrum and supraglenoid tubercle. Biceps brachii display anatomic variations, but these are rarely encountered. We report, for the first time, a technique called arthroscopic intra-articular biceps tenoplasty describing restoration of the long head of the biceps tendon using the superior capsule in a case of anomalous congenital split biceps tendon encountered incidentally during diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy in a patient who was treated for shoulder instability and SLAP tear. PMID:24904759

Yoo, Yon-Sik; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Arora, Manish

2014-04-01

256

Sex Differences in Factors Influencing Recovery from Arthroscopic Knee Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Many factors affect recovery from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, including patient sex. However, sex differences in time\\u000a to maximal recovery of knee function and factors influencing differential rates of recovery are unknown.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We determined (1) preoperative sex differences, (2) sex differences in rate and extent of recovery through 1 year postoperatively,\\u000a and (3) clinical and fitness variables that could explain potential sex

Patricia H. Rosenberger; Firdaus S. Dhabhar; Elissa Epel; Peter Jokl; Jeannette R. Ickovics

2010-01-01

257

Day case arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery of the knee.  

PubMed

A Day Case Unit was opened at Wexham Park Hospital in October 1985 and this paper describes the first year's experience in arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery. Ninety nine knees in 96 patients were examined. The predominant diagnoses were lesions of the medial meniscus (33%), ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (30%) and lesions of the lateral meniscus (20%). Fourteen knees (14%) were normal. There was one postoperative infection, 3 patients had troublesome effusions and one patient developed a synovial fistula. Two patients required overnight admission. The waiting list was reduced from 14.7 weeks to 3.0 weeks. The advantages and limitations of this technique is discussed. PMID:3674684

Allum, R L; Ribbans, W J

1987-09-01

258

Day case arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery of the knee.  

PubMed Central

A Day Case Unit was opened at Wexham Park Hospital in October 1985 and this paper describes the first year's experience in arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery. Ninety nine knees in 96 patients were examined. The predominant diagnoses were lesions of the medial meniscus (33%), ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (30%) and lesions of the lateral meniscus (20%). Fourteen knees (14%) were normal. There was one postoperative infection, 3 patients had troublesome effusions and one patient developed a synovial fistula. Two patients required overnight admission. The waiting list was reduced from 14.7 weeks to 3.0 weeks. The advantages and limitations of this technique is discussed.

Allum, R. L.; Ribbans, W. J.

1987-01-01

259

Arthroscopic Assessment of Stifle Synovitis in Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture  

PubMed Central

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR?=?0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR?=?0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR?=?0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

Little, Jeffrey P.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Sutherland, Brian J.; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Ramaker, Megan A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

2014-01-01

260

Correlation of clinical, radiographic, and arthroscopic findings in internal derangements of the TMJ.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic, clinical, and imaging observations were compared in 80 temporomandibular joints with suspected internal derangements. Rating scales were developed for assessment of the key arthroscopic findings of "roofing," vascularity, redundancy, articular surface condition, adhesions, and disc function. Clinical and imaging findings were correlated with the rated arthroscopic findings. The degree of roofing was found to have a significant relationship to disc quality and function. Arthroscopy completed the diagnostic picture in these cases and provided detailed information on the joints that was not elicited from clinical findings or imaging studies. PMID:2760727

McCain, J P; de la Rua, H; Le Blanc, W G

1989-09-01

261

Eardrum repair  

MedlinePLUS

... a tear or other damage to the eardrum (tympanic membrane). Ossiculoplasty is the repair of the small bones ... The eardrum (tympanic membrane) is between the outer ear and the middle ear. The eardrum vibrates when sound waves strike it. When ...

262

Arthroscopic treatment of distal clavicle fractures: a technical note.  

PubMed

This article describes a new technique for the arthroscopic treatment of distal clavicle fractures. This technique requires the use of posterior and anterior standard arthroscopic portals. The base of the coracoid process is exposed through the rotator interval. The ancillary system drill guide is placed at the undersurface of the coracoid process. A small incision is performed above the clavicular body and the corresponding part of the guide is pushed down to the clavicle. A 4-mm hole is drilled through the clavicle and the coracoid process. A double button device is pushed through both the holes. The first button is pushed below the coracoid. The device is tightened and the second button is fixed on top of the clavicular cortical bone, allowing reduction and fixation of the fracture. Four patients treated with this technique were evaluated at 6 months postoperatively. All patients showed bony union and a full recovery of the shoulder function. The technique provides firm fixation of fractures of the distal clavicle. PMID:18592215

Pujol, Nicolas; Philippeau, Jean Marie; Richou, Julien; Lespagnol, Florent; Graveleau, Nicolas; Hardy, Philippe

2008-09-01

263

Effect of arthroscopic procedures on the acromioclavicular joint.  

PubMed

The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of arthroscopic acromioplasty, and combined acromioplasty and distal clavicle resection on joint kinematics and in situ forces in response to an anterior, posterior, and superior load of 70 N. The loading conditions were applied to 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders using a robotic and universal force and moment sensor testing system. Translations in response to a posterior load increased by approximately 30% after combined acromioplasty and distal clavicle resection when compared with the intact and acromioplasty conditions. The in situ force in the trapezoid and conoid ligaments increased significantly from 13 +/- 15 N to 40 +/- 25 N and 13 +/- 13 N to 38 +/- 28 N, respectively, between the intact and combined acromioplasty and distal clavicle resection conditions during anterior loading. The results suggest that an arthroscopic acromioplasty alone does not significantly affect the mechanics of the acromioclavicular joint with these loading conditions. However, an acromioplasty combined with a distal clavicular resection does result in significant increases in joint motion and ligament forces. In some circumstances, such as after a previous joint separation, the increased forces in the coracoclavicular ligaments could result in additional damage to weak ligaments. PMID:12579005

Debski, Richard E; Fenwick, James A; Vangura, Albert; Fu, Freddie H; Woo, Savio L-Y; Rodosky, Mark W

2003-01-01

264

Arthroscopic Treatment of Multidirectional Glenohumeral Instability in Young Overhead Athletes  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This prospective case series evaluates the outcome, and the return to sports of young overhead athletes with a persistent, symptomatic multidirectional instability (MDI) with hyperlaxity type Gerber B5 treated with an arthroscopic anteroposteroinferior capsular plication and rotator interval closure. Methods: 9 young overhead athletes (10 shoulders) with the rare diagnosis of MDI (Gerber B5) and an indication for operative treatment, after a failed physiotherapy program were physically examined 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively by a physical examination, and got a final phone interview after median 39 months. Results: At the final follow-up all patients were satisfied; Rowe Score showed 7 “excellent” and “good” results; Constant Score was “excellent” and “good” in 6, and “fair” in 1 patient. 7/9 returned to their previous sports, 3/9 at a reduced level. Conclusion: Symptomatic MDI requires an individual indication for surgical treatment after a primary conservative treatment. The described arthroscopic technique stabilizes glenohumeral joint. A return to overhead sports is possible but often at a reduced level; returning to high-performance sports cannot be recommended because of the high risk of reinstability.

Voigt, C; Schulz, A.P; Lill, H

2009-01-01

265

A minimally invasive medial patellofemoral ligament arthroscopic reconstruction.  

PubMed

The medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction is recognized as a good choice for patients with recurrent patellar dislocation. Most techniques of the medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction are open surgeries. Recently, we present a minimally invasive medial patellofemoral ligament arthroscopic reconstruction technique as a possible alternative method for recurrent patellar dislocation. The aim of the study was to describe a safe and effective technique to perform medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction. The graft was prepared in shape to "Y." Two 5-mm incisions were made in the skin above the medial edge of the patella. Two docking bone tunnels were drilled from medial edge to the center of the patella, mimicking the wide patellar insertion of the medial patellofemoral ligament, and a bone tunnel was made at the femoral insertion site. Two free ends of the graft were fixed into the patellar tunnels by lateral cortical suspension, and the folded end was fixed into the femoral tunnel by bioabsorbable interference screw. Average patellar tilt and the congruence angle were 30.7° ± 7.5° and 52.7° ± 7.3° and were reduced to 12.8° ± 0.9° and 2.3° ± 11.5° after treatment. The Kujala score was increased from 63.0 ± 9.0 to 91.0 ± 7.0. The minimally invasive medial patellofemoral ligament arthroscopic reconstruction in this paper seems to be helpful to increase safe of operation and treatment effect and reduce complications. PMID:23412307

Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hai; Ji, Gang; Ma, Long-Fei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Feng; Dong, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Fei

2014-02-01

266

The Advantage of Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Autograft from the Tendons of the Semitendinosus - Gracilis Muscles for the Recovery of the Stability of the Knee  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries remain a common orthopaedic disease, particularly in young adults. The treatment of choice for ACL injuries is ACL reconstruction (ligamentoplasty). ACL reconstruction is the surgical intervention used to replace the damaged ACL with a bone-patella tendon-bone (BTB) graft or with soft parts (semitendinosus – gracilis muscles (ST-G) – a method more frequently used nowadays). Materials and method: In the Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, during the period 01.01.2009 – 01.03.2011, a number of 37 arthroscopic ACL reconstructions with ST-G were studied, performed to treat ACL isolated injuries or injuries associated with complex trauma of the knee. Results: Clinical studies have shown that ACL reconstruction is highly superior to ACL repair (suturing). Arthroscopy was the main method of diagnosis in 28 cases, whereas the remaining ACL injuries were diagnosed using the MRI. Conclusions: The rehabilitation of the patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstructions with ST-G was easier and faster in comparison with that following the surgical interventions performed with BTB graft during the previous years.

Cirstoiu, Catalin; Circota, Gheorghe; Panaitescu, Corina; Niculaita, Radu

2011-01-01

267

REHABILITATION AFTER HIP ARTHROSCOPY AND LABRAL REPAIR IN A HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL ATHLETE  

PubMed Central

Study Design: Case Report Background: Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) has been implicated in the etiology of acetabular labral tears. The rehabilitation of younger athletes following arthroscopic surgery for FAI and labral tears is often complex and multifactorial. A paucity of evidence exists to describe the rehabilitation of younger athletes who have undergone arthroscopic hip surgery. Case Presentation: This case report describes a four-phase rehabilitation program for a high school football player who underwent hip arthroscopy with a labral repair and chondroplasty. Outcomes: The player returned to training for football 16 weeks later and at the 4 month follow-up was pain free with no signs of FAI. Discussion: There is little evidence regarding the rehabilitation of younger athletes who undergo arthroscopic hip surgery. This case study described a four phase rehabilitation program for a high school football player who underwent hip arthroscopy and labral repair. The patient achieved positive outcomes with a full return to athletic activity and football. The overall success of these patients depends on the appropriate surgical procedure and rehabilitation program. Key Words: Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI), hip, hip impingement Level of evidence: 4-Case report

Kolber, Morey J.

2012-01-01

268

All-inside meniscal repair devices and techniques.  

PubMed

Techniques and devices for meniscal repair are evolving, including for all-inside meniscal repair. The first-generation all-inside meniscal repair devices were simplistic in design, but their technical difficulties and risks led to the development of second-generation devices. These devices employed the suture anchor concept for repair and confirmed the safety of use through standard anterior arthroscopic portals. Third-generation devices introduced the idea of rigid, bioabsorbable materials; unfortunately, these demonstrated higher failure and complication rates compared with other repair techniques. They were also limited in their ability to adjust compression and tension across the repair. Now, fourth-generation devices have been developed that are flexible, suture-based, and allow for variable compression and retensioning across the tear. Each device has its own specifications and technical nuances. With a comprehensive understanding of the current devices available, the industry and surgeons may continue in the development of safer, more successful, user-friendly and cost-effective all-inside devices. PMID:22404776

Tuman, Jeff; Haro, Marc S; Foley, Sarah; Diduch, David

2012-03-01

269

A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.  

PubMed

Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

2010-10-01

270

Arthroscopically assisted reconstruction and percutaneous screw fixation of a Pilon tibial fracture.  

PubMed

We report a case of closed distal tibial fracture (AO 43C3), treated successfully with arthroscopically assisted minimally invasive reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. Techniques and postoperative treatment are described. PMID:12724669

Kralinger, Franz; Lutz, Martin; Wambacher, Markus; Smekal, Vinzenz; Golser, Karl

2003-01-01

271

Anatomical Considerations of the Suprascapular Nerve in Rotator Cuff Repairs  

PubMed Central

Introduction. When using the double interval slide technique for arthroscopic repair of chronic large or massive rotator cuff tears, the posterior interval release is directed toward the scapular spine until the fat pad that protects the suprascapular nerve is reached. Injury to the suprascapular nerve can occur due to the nerve's proximity to the operative field. This study aimed to identify safe margins for avoiding injury to the suprascapular nerve. Materials and Methods. For 20 shoulders in ten cadavers, the distance was measured from the suprascapular notch to the glenoid rim, the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and the lateral border of the acromion. Results. From the suprascapular notch, the suprascapular nerve coursed an average of 3.42?cm to the glenoid rim, 5.34?cm to the articular margin of the rotator cuff footprint, and 6.09?cm to the lateral border of the acromion. Conclusions. The results of this study define a safe zone, using anatomic landmarks, to help surgeons avoid iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve when employing the double interval slide technique in arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff.

Tom, James A.; Shah, Mitesh P.; Lee, Dan J.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Amin, Nirav H.

2014-01-01

272

Arthroscopic Preparation and Internal Fixation of an Unstable Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesion of the Knee  

PubMed Central

We present our arthroscopic technique for fixation of an unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesion. This technique includes arthroscopic evaluation of cartilage and bone quality of the OCD fragment, hinging open the lesion, debridement of fibrous nonunion tissue, reducing the fragment, and obtaining multi-point compression screw fixation. This technique avoids the morbidity of an open arthrotomy and should be considered when treating an unstable OCD lesion with adequate bone for fixation.

Camp, Christopher L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Stuart, Michael J.

2013-01-01

273

Rapid chondrolysis after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in athletes: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a patient with a severe chondrolysis after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in a 17-year-old high school basketball player. This is a rare but severe complication after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy. At 7 months after the first operation, a second-look arthroscopy showed numerous cartilaginous debris floating in the knee and a high-grade cartilage damage on the lateral compartment of the

Kazunari Ishida; Ryosuke Kuroda; Hiroshige Sakai; Minoru Doita; Masahiro Kurosaka; Shinichi Yoshiya

2006-01-01

274

Clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic assessment and treatment of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study is to evaluate clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic features of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus\\u000a and to assess the outcome of arthroscopic meniscectomy. Among the 177 arthroscopies performed for discoid lateral meniscus\\u000a between January 1993 and January 2004, 12 were bilateral. The clinical and radiologic evaluation was done from the records.\\u000a The type of discoid meniscus, the

Sharath K. Rao; P. Sripathi Rao

2007-01-01

275

Arthroscopic treatment of piriformis syndrome by perineural cyst on the sciatic nerve: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a case report of an arthroscopic treatment performed on a patient with piriformis syndrome due to perineural cyst\\u000a on piriformis muscle and sciatic nerve. Confirmation, incision, and drainage of benign cystic lesion on the sciatic nerve\\u000a below the piriformis muscle were performed following the release of the piriformis tendon through the posterior and posteroinferior\\u000a arthroscopic portal. Recurrence of

Deuk-Soo HwangChan; Chan Kang; Jung-Bum Lee; Soo-Min Cha; Kyu-Woong Yeon

2010-01-01

276

[Arthroscopic excision of elastofibroma dorsi at scapulothoracic joint: a surgical technique].  

PubMed

Elastofibroma dorsi is a rare soft tissue pseudotumor which is located at the anteroinferior aspect of the scapula. In this article, we report a 19-year-old female case who had arthroscopic marginal excision of elastofibroma dorsi at the scapulothoracic joint without recurrences during follow-up. The arthroscopic marginal excision of the elastofibroma dorsi may have good clinical results in selected cases. PMID:25036400

Cakmak, Gökhan; Ergün, Tarkan; Sahin, M Sükrü

2014-08-01

277

Arthroscopic Avulsion Repair of a Pediatric ACL with an Anomalous Primary Insertion into the Lateral Meniscus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the pediatric population is becoming more common, with the majority of ruptures\\u000a occurring at the tibial insertion site. However, to our knowledge, there are no reports of avulsion in which the primary ACL\\u000a insertion site is the anterior lateral meniscal root.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We report a rare case of a pediatric ACL\\/anterior horn of

Jason O. Toy; Brian T. Feeley; Lawrence V. Gulotta; Russell F. Warren

278

Arthroscopic repair of a type II SLAP lesion using a single corkscrew anchor.  

PubMed

The use of a double-looped 5-mm Corkscrew anchor (Arthrex, Naples, FL) enables the surgeon to use a single anchor to perform a secure fixation of both the anterior labrum as well as the biceps insertion in a type II SLAP lesion. The technique involves tying 1 knot through the anterior portal and a second knot through the posterior portal. PMID:11877628

Kartus, Jüri; Perko, Mark

2002-03-01

279

Outcomes of Type II Superior Labrum, Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Repair: Prospective Evaluation at a minimum 2-year follow-up  

PubMed Central

Hypothesis Patients with type II superior labrum, anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions will have improved function and decrease pain at a minimum two years after arthroscopic SLAP repair using bioabsorbable suture anchor fixation. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 48 patients who underwent arthroscopic SLAP repair. Subjective shoulder scores, range of motion, and strength (post-operative only) were assessed pre-operatively and at a minimum of two years post-operatively. Results At an average of 3.4 years following surgery, statistically significant improvement was seen in ASES, UCLA, SST, CADL, VAS, and SF-12 physical outcome scores. Improvements were made in forward flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation. Subgroup analysis of non-athletes, non-overhead athletes, recreational overhead athletes, and collegiate overhead athletes showed pre- to post-operative improvements in subjective outcomes scores. Overhead laborers and non-laborers subgroups also showed pre- to post-operative improvements in subjective shoulder scores. Discussion On the basis of this data, arthroscopic SLAP repair of type II lesions with bioabsorbable suture anchors provides a significant improvement in functional capacity and pain relief. No differences were seen between the outcomes of non-athletes, non-overhead athletes, recreational overhead athletes, and collegiate overhead athletes, suggesting that SLAP type II repair is successful independent of the patient’s vocation or sport. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series, Treatment Study

Friel, Nicole A.; Karas, Vasili; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Cole, Brian J.

2013-01-01

280

Arthroscopic resection of a symptomatic snapping subscapular osteochondroma.  

PubMed

Painful snapping of the scapula may have an anatomical cause but is usually idiopathic. Most patients respond well to conservative measures such as physiotherapy or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Surgery can be performed if conservative treatment is unsuccessful. Conservative measures are less likely to be successful if a clear anatomical cause can be found. Several surgical techniques have been described, ranging from bursectomy to resection of the lesion or of part of the scapula. The lesion is usually resected by an open technique. Scapulothoracic arthroscopy has previously been shown to be a safe procedure with low morbidity in idiopathic cases. A case is described in which painful crepitus of the scapula not responding to conservative measures was caused by an inferior subscapular osteochondroma. Arthroscopic resection of the osteochondroma was performed using a custom, lesion specific, inferior portal. This resulted in restoration of a full and painless function of the shoulder within two weeks of surgery. PMID:17515241

van Riet, Roger P; Van Glabbeek, Francis

2007-04-01

281

The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement  

PubMed Central

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis.

Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

2012-01-01

282

Arthroscopic psoas release for iliopsoas impingement after total hip replacement.  

PubMed

Psoas impingement is a rare cause of persisting pain after hip arthroplasty. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and exclusion of other complications after arthroplasty by radiographs, ultrasound, CT and blood analysis. The diagnosis is strongly supported by temporary pain relief after infiltration. When conservative measures fail, treatment can consist of a psoas tenotomy or a revision arthroplasty. When there is no obvious cause such as malpositioning for component impingement, psoas release reliably improves pain and function. This procedure is mostly performed through an open approach, which can give significant complications. An arthroscopic technique for psoas tenotomy after hip arthroplasty is described. This report shows that this minimal invasive technique is safe and effective and allows for inspection of the implant in the same session. However, the score used did not improve in a significant way. PMID:21473444

Van Riet, Anne; De Schepper, Jo; Delport, Hendrik Pieter

2011-02-01

283

Arthroscopic Reduction of Complex Dorsal Metacarpophalangeal Dislocation of Index Finger  

PubMed Central

Complex dorsal dislocation of the metacarpophalangeal joint is an uncommon injury, typically caused by entrapment of the volar plate within the joint space. Closed reduction of the dislocation is not effective; instead, open reduction is necessary to release the soft tissues interposed between the metacarpal head and the proximal phalanx. However, an operative risk of digital nerve injury exists because of intricate displacement of the normal anatomy. We successfully reduced a dislocation by arthroscopic release of the entrapped volar plate. The case involved an 11-year-old boy with a complex dorsal dislocation of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the right index finger that had failed closed reduction. This technique allowed for reliable joint reduction, enabling observation of the structures obstructing the reduction; was less invasive; and avoided the risk of neurovascular injury. It is a reasonable method to use when the volar plate prevents reduction of the dislocation.

Kodama, Akira; Itotani, Yuji; Mizuseki, Takaya

2014-01-01

284

Arthroscopic reduction of complex dorsal metacarpophalangeal dislocation of index finger.  

PubMed

Complex dorsal dislocation of the metacarpophalangeal joint is an uncommon injury, typically caused by entrapment of the volar plate within the joint space. Closed reduction of the dislocation is not effective; instead, open reduction is necessary to release the soft tissues interposed between the metacarpal head and the proximal phalanx. However, an operative risk of digital nerve injury exists because of intricate displacement of the normal anatomy. We successfully reduced a dislocation by arthroscopic release of the entrapped volar plate. The case involved an 11-year-old boy with a complex dorsal dislocation of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the right index finger that had failed closed reduction. This technique allowed for reliable joint reduction, enabling observation of the structures obstructing the reduction; was less invasive; and avoided the risk of neurovascular injury. It is a reasonable method to use when the volar plate prevents reduction of the dislocation. PMID:24904773

Kodama, Akira; Itotani, Yuji; Mizuseki, Takaya

2014-04-01

285

Treatment of distal clavicle fractures using an arthroscopic technique.  

PubMed

Whenever indicated, distal clavicle fractures can be treated with a double loop of a nonabsorbable, #5 suture around the clavicle and under the coracoid. We developed an all arthroscopic technique to perform this procedure. From January to September 2004, 7 patients were treated. The mean age was 46 years. The coracoid is identified through the rotator interval. Using a special needle, a double #5 suture is passed around the coracoid. A hole is created at the clavicle and, through another guide wire, is sent to the anterior portal. The double #5 suture is transported to the clavicle. After the reduction of the fracture the sutures are tightened. All 7 cases have healed. The surgical treatment of these fractures is well established, and with the aid of arthroscopy, the morbidity can be decreased. The technique has been shown to be safe with no complications. PMID:18304840

Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Doneux, Pedro S; Miyazaki, Alberto N; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Silva, Luciana A

2008-01-01

286

Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: an analysis of unsatisfactory results.  

PubMed

Results of 150 arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomies were analyzed by computer to identify the factors that lead to an unsatisfactory (fair or poor) outcome. The average follow-up for the group was 36 months (range 24-60 months). One-hundred ten men and 40 women were involved, with an average age of 48 years. The overall results were 58% excellent-good, 28% fair, and 14% poor. Most tears involved the posterior horn (76%). Bucket-handle, longitudinal, and flap tears were rated 88% excellent-good, whereas horizontal cleavage and degenerative and complex tears had only 45% excellent-good scores. The results were adversely affected by the severity of the chondromalacia, work-related injury, prior knee surgery, simultaneous lateral meniscectomy, and increased knee laxity. Because degenerative posterior horn tears had such a high percentage of unsatisfactory results, the question remains as to whether all these tears need to be removed. PMID:4091909

Ferkel, R D; Davis, J R; Friedman, M J; Fox, J M; Del Pizzo, W; Snyder, S J; Berasi, C C

1985-01-01

287

Arthroscopic Transosseous Reinsertion of theRotator Cuff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:  Arthroscopic reinsertion of the supraspinatus\\u000a and infraspinatus tendons by means of imitation of\\u000a an open trans osseous reinsertion technique.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Indications:  Tears in the tendon cuffs of the supraspinatus\\u000a and infraspinatus muscles.\\u000a Patients < 75 years of age.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Contraindications:  Retracted tendons that cannot be\\u000a sufficiently mobilized to provide a tension-free\\u000a reinsertion.\\u000a Tears of the tendon cuff of the subscapsularis muscle.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Surgical Technique:  The free

Nicholas Matis; Clemens Hübner; Erwin Aschauer; Herbert Resch

2006-01-01

288

Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle  

PubMed Central

Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach.

Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

2013-01-01

289

Arthroscopic treatment of ruptures of the rotator cuff.  

PubMed

566 patients with shoulder disease were treated at the Clinic of Orthopaedics at the University Hospital Olomouc. Of these, 181 were operated for ruptures of the rotator cuff (RC). They were categorised according to the Gschwend classification, age and gender(1). Laterality of the operated limb was also evaluated. Patients with ruptures larger than 4 cm were treated by open operation. 84 shoulders with ruptures classified as Gschwend I, II and IIIa -52 males and 32 females-were treated arthroscopically. The age of the operated patients ranged from 40-60 years. In both genders, the right shoulder was more often affected. Two operating techniques were used: 1) Transosseal refixation of the RC muscle tendons, using RC MITEK anchor implants, 2) "End to end" sutures, without implants(2-4). Operating time was reduced to 30-40 min. The operating results were evaluated according to the UCLA criteria- University of California Shoulder Rating Score(2). 45 patients achieved excellent results (53 %), 35 patients had good results (42 %), and 4 patients (5 %) obtained satisfactory results. None of the patients obtained poor results- a score of less than 20 was poor. Patients felt comfortable following the operation and none had any post-operational complications. The author is convinced, along with others, that arthroscopic suturing of RC ruptures classified I-IIIa allows for rupture treatment that in the past had to be treated by open technique(2-5). The deltoid muscle is not affected by arthroscopy. There is normalisation of the patient's movement, pain, force, and rotational stability is comparable to the healthy limb. Treatment time is reduced to a minimum and the patient may soon return to normal daily life. PMID:16601771

Holibka, Radomír; Kalina, Radim; Pach, Miroslav; R?zicková, Katherine

2005-12-01

290

Arthroscopic Gluteal Muscle Contracture Release With Radiofrequency Energy  

PubMed Central

Gluteal muscle contracture is common after repeated intramuscular injections and sometimes is sufficiently debilitating to require open surgery. We asked whether arthroscopic release of gluteal muscle contracture using radiofrequency energy would decrease complications with clinically acceptable results. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with bilateral gluteal muscle contractures (57 males, 51 females; mean age, 23.7 years). We used inferior, anterosuperior, and posterosuperior portals. With the patient lying laterally, we developed and enlarged a potential space between the gluteal muscle group and the subcutaneous fat using blunt dissection. Under arthroscopic guidance through the inferior portal, we débrided and removed fatty tissue overlying the contractile band of the gluteal muscle group using a motorized shaver introduced through the superior portal. Radiofrequency then was introduced through the superior portal to gradually excise the contracted bands from superior to inferior. Finally, hemostasis was ensured using radiofrequency. Patients were followed a minimum of 7 months (mean, 17.4 months; range, 7–42 months). At last followup, the adduction and flexion ranges of the hip were 45.3° ± 8.7° and 110.2° ± 11.9°, compared with 10.4° ± 7.2° and 44.8° ± 14.1° before surgery. No hip abductor contracture recurred and no patient had residual hip pain or gluteal muscle wasting. We found gluteal muscle contracture could be released effectively with radiofrequency energy. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0595-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Liu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee

2008-01-01

291

Motorcycle Repair.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

292

Validity of arthroscopic measurement of glenoid bone loss using the bare spot  

PubMed Central

Purpose Our aim was to test the validity of using the bare spot method to quantify glenoid bone loss arthroscopically in patients with shoulder instability. Methods Twenty-seven patients with no evidence of instability (18 males, nine females; mean age 59.1 years) were evaluated arthroscopically to assess whether the bare spot is consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid. Another 40 patients with glenohumeral anterior instability who underwent shoulder arthroscopy (30 males, ten females; mean age 25.9 years) were evaluated for glenoid bone loss with preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and arthroscopic examination. In patients without instability, the distances from the bare spot of the inferior glenoid to the anterior (Da) and posterior (Dp) glenoid rim were measured arthroscopically. In patients with instability, we compared the percentage glenoid bone loss calculated using CT versus arthroscopic measurements. Results Among patients without instability, the bare spot could not be identified in three of 27 patients. Da (9.5±1.2 mm) was smaller than Dp (10.1±1.5 mm), but it was not significantly different. However, only 55% of glenoids showed less than 1 mm of difference between Da and Dp, and 18% showed more than 2 mm difference in length. The bare spot could not be identified in five of 40 patients with instability. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed significant (P<0.001) and strong (R2=0.63) correlation in percentage glenoid bone loss between the 3D-CT and arthroscopy method measurements. However, in ten shoulders (29%), the difference in percentage glenoid bone loss between 3D-CT and arthroscopic measurements was greater than 5%. Conclusion The bare spot was not consistently located at the center of the inferior glenoid, and the arthroscopic measurement of glenoid bone loss using the bare spot as a landmark was inaccurate in some patients with anterior glenohumeral instability. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study.

Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Takeda, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Koji; Takasago, Tomoya; Iwame, Toshiyuki

2014-01-01

293

Failed meniscus repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes problems arising after an arthroscopic meniscal refixation using the biodegradable Clearfix screw system (Innovasive Devices, Marlborough, MA). A serious problem arose in the form of migration of a meniscal screw that had been inserted in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Dislocation of the screw led to pain on the medial aspect of the knee joint and irritation

Frank Schneider; Joerg H Schroeder; Karsten Labs

2003-01-01

294

[Value of arthro-CT in decision for arthroscopic or open stabilization in ventral shoulder instability].  

PubMed

A prospective study was performed on 30 patients with anterior instability of the shoulder to assess the diagnostic value of preoperative arthro-CT. One special diagnostic problem was the definition of diagnostic criteria for arthroscopic or open surgery. Arthro-CT of the shoulder was performed with a double-contrast technique. Visualization of labral tears, bony lesions, glenohumeral ligaments and disruption of the rotator cuff was registered. Findings of arthro-CT were verified by diagnostic arthroscopy. Therapy consisted of either arthroscopic or open surgery depending on the lesion pattern found in diagnostic arthroscopy. The most common cause of anterior instability (90% of cases) was damage of the ventro-caudal labral complex, which was diagnosed by arthro-CT with a sensitivity of 93% and a positive predictive value of 93%. Specificity and negative predictive value were reduced to 33%; the overall accuracy was 87%. In all, 16 patients were successfully treated using arthroscopic stabilization because whereas 14 patients required open surgery because diagnostic arthroscopy contraindicated an arthroscopic approach. The preoperative arthro-CT failed to define all criteria mandatory for the decision for arthroscopic or open surgery because pathoanatomy of the joint was not sufficiently demonstrated with the current technique of arthro-CT. PMID:9082562

Jürgensen, I; Weimar, B; Bachmann, G; Cassens, J

1996-12-01

295

Reprocessed arthroscopic shavers: evaluation of sharpness and function in a cadaver model.  

PubMed

This study was designed to test limited arthroscopic shaver reuse following reprocessing and to compare the functional performance between new and reprocessed arthroscopic shavers in arthroscopic procedures using fresh cadaveric knees. A trial using arthroscopic procedures (menisectomy, synovectomy, and debridements) was conducted by experienced surgeons using cadaveric knees to determine whether the surgeons could correctly identify reprocessed shavers. Thirty-nine shavers were tested; the surgeons were given both new and reprocessed shavers. Thirteen of the 39 shavers were new and 26 were reprocessed (13 of which had also been sharpened). The surgeons were asked to assess whether each shaver was new or reprocessed and to indicate whether the shaver was functional or not. Cadaveric shavers were subsequently used in an engineering test developed to measure shaver blade sharpness. Comparisons in sharpness were made between new and reprocessed cadaveric shaver blades. The success rate in identifying reprocessed shavers was determined to be 42% (11 of 26), with an upper confidence bound of 60%, demonstrating that the ability to detect a reprocessed shaver is no better than chance (50%), with a margin of error of 10% (P=.0328). In addition, engineering sharpness testing demonstrated that new and reprocessed cadaveric blades exhibit equivalent sharpness. Surgeons were unable to distinguish reprocessed arthroscopic shavers that passed acceptance tests from new shavers based on functional characteristics. This outcome is not unexpected due to the fact that engineering testing of shaver blades used in the study indicated that they exhibited similar sharpness. PMID:24683649

Ledonio, Charles G T; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Adams, Julie E; Matz, Jennifer; Boers, Arie; Miller, Keith; Lester, Bruce R

2014-01-01

296

Results of infected total knee arthroplasty treated with arthroscopic debridement and continuous antibiotic irrigation system  

PubMed Central

Background: Arthroscopic debridement with continuous irrigation system was used with success in treating infective arthritis. We evaluated the effectiveness of arthroscopic debridement coupled with antibiotic continuous irrigation system in acute presentation of late infected total knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of medical record of patients with acute presentation of late infected total knee arthroplasty who were treated by arthroscopic debridement coupled with continuous postoperative antibiotic irrigation system. Results: Seventeen patients were included in our study. 15 (88%) patients preserved their total knee prosthesis at mean of followup of 27.5 months (range, 14-28 months). Two (12%) patients failed arthroscopic protocol and finally needed two stages revision. Our study showed an 88% prosthesis retention rate in patients with acute presentation of late prosthetic knee infection. No complication was associated with use of antibiotic irrigation system. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement combined with continuous antibiotic irrigation and suction is an effective treatment for patients with acute presentation of late infected total knee arthroplasty.

Liu, Che-Wei; Kuo, Chun-Lin; Chuang, Shih-Youeng; Chang, Jen-Huei; Wu, Chia-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Leou-Chyr

2013-01-01

297

A detached arthroscopic lens within the shoulder joint: a case report.  

PubMed

Shoulder arthroscopy has become a common procedure in today's orthopedic practice. The safety of this procedure has been well established, but there are some complications associated with every surgical procedure both minor and major. In the present era, with advanced arthroscopic instruments, it is rare to encounter the problem of instrument breakage during arthroscopic surgery. Here, we report an unusual case in which we found a detached arthroscopic lens within the shoulder joint. A 58-year-old male patient who was previously operated for shoulder arthroscopy for the treatment of impingement syndrome combined with shoulder stiffness. We performed shoulder arthroscopy again and removed the detached lens arthroscopically. This case warrants the need for the surgeon and the operating room staff to be well acquainted with the arthroscopic instruments and to check the instruments properly before and after the completion of the procedure. If the operating room staff would have identified the damage to the scope, encountered during the primary operation, we could have avoided the second procedure to remove the lens. PMID:24861465

Ji, Jong-Hun; Jeong, Jae-Jung; Panchal, Karnav; Park, Yong

2014-08-01

298

Comparison between Arthroscopic Partial and Total Meniscectomy of Medial Meniscus in Non-Professional Athletes.  

PubMed

Large number of patients suffers from medial meniscus injury during athletic activities despite of not being involved in professional sports. Our goal was to compare clinical and functional outcome of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy with results of arthroscopic total meniscectomy of the medial meniscus in these non-professional athletes. The prospective interventional study was carried out in a five years period from January 2007 to December 2011. According to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria 109 patients were selected and underwent surgery but 29 patients lost from follow-up. Results of 40 cases with Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (Group-I) and 40 cases with arthroscopic total meniscectomy (Group-II) were analyzed. There were 75 male patients and the predominant age group was 21-30 years. Patients were followed up for a range of 36-60 months. Standard questionnaires of Visual Analogue Score (VAS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Tegner-Lysholm Knee Score (TLKS) and Tapper and Hoover criteria was used to assess and compare the outcomes. Radiological assessment was done to note any changes. Students were sufferers in majority cases and bucket handle tear had been the commonest type. Significant difference of clinical, functional and radiological outcome was observed at minimum 3 years follow up. One case needed revision in Group-II and the infection rates were insignificant. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is significantly better method for surgical management of medial meniscus injuries. PMID:24858159

Chowdhury, A Z; Sakeb, N; Arifeen, M N; Selimullah, A M; Joarder, A I; Salek, A M

2014-04-01

299

Arthroscopic subacromial decompression: results and factors affecting outcome.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic subacromial decompression was performed on 114 patients with rotator cuff impingement who had not responded to nonoperative measures. None of the patients had a full-thickness cuff tear. Patients with associated instability, symptomatic acromioclavicular joint disease, or ruptures of the long head of biceps were not included. Results were determined by questioning patients about their satisfaction with the outcome of surgery and by functional assessment of the shoulder with the parameters of pain, ability to perform daily activities, and range of motion according to the Constant scoring system. When reviewed at a mean interval of 19 months after surgery, 85 patients (75%) were satisfied with the outcome. Pain scores improved by an average of 8.6 points; "activities of daily living" scores improved by an average of 5.8 points; range-of-motion scores improved by an average of 3.6 points. The improvements in all 3 parameters scored were significant (P < .05). The following variables were statistically analyzed to assess their influence on final outcome: age, sex, occupation, duration of symptoms before surgery, dominance of the affected shoulder, outcome of the impingement test, state of the cuff, and experience of the surgeon performing the operation. The duration of symptoms before surgery was the most significant predictor of outcome. Symptoms of prolonged duration were associated with an unsatisfactory subjective results (P < .01) and with smaller improvements in the parameters of the Constant score (P < .001). Recovery after arthroscopic subacromial decompression and eventual outcome were related to the extent of cuff damage. Patients with partial thickness tears or fraying of the cuff had a delayed return to work (P < .001) and were found to have smaller increases in the pain and range-of-motion scores (P < .05). A satisfactory subjective result was most often associated with a positive impingement test (P < .05). Unsatisfactory outcomes were associated with a questionable diagnosis and lack of clear evidence of impingement at arthroscopy, inadequate decompression of the subacromial space, or the presence of calcium deposits in the rotator cuff. PMID:10389078

Patel, V R; Singh, D; Calvert, P T; Bayley, J I

1999-01-01

300

Arthroscopic treatment of a case with concomitant subacromial and subdeltoid synovial chondromatosis and labrum tear.  

PubMed

Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed. PMID:24383030

Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Kocadal, Onur; Ozmeric, Ahmet; Aktekin, Cem Nuri

2013-01-01

301

Arthroscopic Transfer of the Pectoralis Major for Irreparable Tear of the Subscapularis: A Preliminary Report  

PubMed Central

An irreparable tear of the subscapularis is a surgical challenge. Open approaches have been widely described to restore the anatomy and the function of the shoulder. Pectoralis major transfer is the most common technique used in this difficult clinical situation. Although this procedure has only been performed through an open approach, we describe a new arthroscopic technique for pectoralis major transfer. The critical part in this technique, in general, is the musculocutaneous nerve dissection, which is also possible through the arthroscopic approach. Together with an alternative method of harvesting using chips of bone and a minimal skin incision, this promising, less invasive technique presents all the advantages of the arthroscopic approach and provides a strong fixation to the lesser tuberosity.

Gibon, Emmanuel; El Hajj, Firass; Ouaknine, Michael

2013-01-01

302

Time and cost savings in arthroscopic subacromial decompression: the use of bipolar versus monopolar radiofrequency  

PubMed Central

There is currently an increased interest in the use of electro surgery in arthroscopy. Since the introduction of the bipolar arthroscopic radiofrequency (RF) wand, it has started to replace the classic Bovie monopolar probe on the assumption that the new technology provides multifunctional devices, combining both tissue removal and haemostasis into one instrument. The more efficient tissue ablation and precise haemostasis achieved with these instruments should result in a significant reduction in the operative time and cost. We ran a prospective comparative randomised study to test this hypothesis. Forty patients underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression, randomised into two groups. The group treated with bipolar RF was associated with an average operative time saving of 8 min (P?arthroscopic shoulder surgery, as it saves time and money.

Fernandez, G. N.; Elsorafy, Kareem

2008-01-01

303

Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear  

PubMed Central

Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Kocadal, Onur; Ozmeric, Ahmet; Aktekin, Cem Nuri

2013-01-01

304

Arthroscopic transfer of the pectoralis major for irreparable tear of the subscapularis: a preliminary report.  

PubMed

An irreparable tear of the subscapularis is a surgical challenge. Open approaches have been widely described to restore the anatomy and the function of the shoulder. Pectoralis major transfer is the most common technique used in this difficult clinical situation. Although this procedure has only been performed through an open approach, we describe a new arthroscopic technique for pectoralis major transfer. The critical part in this technique, in general, is the musculocutaneous nerve dissection, which is also possible through the arthroscopic approach. Together with an alternative method of harvesting using chips of bone and a minimal skin incision, this promising, less invasive technique presents all the advantages of the arthroscopic approach and provides a strong fixation to the lesser tuberosity. PMID:24749024

Gibon, Emmanuel; El Hajj, Firass; Ouaknine, Michael

2014-02-01

305

Acupuncture for postoperative pain in day surgery patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.  

PubMed

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postoperative pain in day surgery patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Twenty-two participants scheduled to undergo arthroscopic shoulder surgery were included. The results showed that on postoperative day one pain decreased (-1.1) in patients receiving acupuncture compared to the control group in which pain increased (2.0), p=.014. Sleep quality was also significantly higher in the acupuncture group compared to the control group, p=.042. In conclusions, acupuncture seems to have a reducing effect on postoperative pain as well as increase sleep quality in day surgery patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. In regards to application, nurses should be encouraged to use additional nonpharmacologic approaches like acupuncture in postoperative pain management, as this can be a part of the multimodal analgesic regimes to improve patients care. PMID:22843248

Ward, Ulla; Nilsson, Ulrica G

2013-02-01

306

Fixed assets repair timetable  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with repairs of fixed assets. Repairs can be current and capital. A repair process model is analyzed under\\u000a some assumptions on the repair process stationarity. The optimal time for the first capital repair is found.

V. V. Ostapenko; D. A. Belyaeva

2009-01-01

307

An arthroscopic technique for treating patients with frozen shoulder.  

PubMed

Forty-three patients with a diagnosis of primary or secondary frozen shoulder who had symptoms for an average of 12 months and failed conservative treatment of at least 12 weeks of physical therapy, were treated with an arthrosopic capsular release. On completion of standard shoulder arthroscopy, intra-articular cautery was used to completely divide the anterior-inferior capsule, the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis tendon, and the middle glenohumeral, the superior glenohumeral, and the coracohumeral ligaments. The subacromial space was inspected in all patients. Eighteen patients had extensive subacromial fibrosis that required debridement. Subacromial decompression was reserved for patients with evidence of an acromial spur seen at the time of arthroscopy. Postoperatively, all patients showed substantial gains in shoulder range of motion, as well as diminished shoulder pain. Thirty-five patients completed a telephone survey at an average of 22 months after surgery. The average modified shoulder score was 19 (scale, 13 to 65), with 83% of patients indicating that their shoulder was normal or caused only mild symptoms. In conclusion, the authors believe that arthroscopic capsular release is an effective and safe alternative to manipulation in patients with a recalcitrant frozen shoulder. PMID:10024027

Pearsall, A W; Osbahr, D C; Speer, K P

1999-01-01

308

T1? MRI Quantification of Arthroscopically-Confirmed Cartilage Degeneration  

PubMed Central

9 asymptomatic subjects and 6 patients underwent T1? MRI to determine whether Outerbridge grade 1 or 2 cartilage degeneration observed during arthroscopy could be detected noninvasively. MRI was performed 2–3 months post-arthroscopy using sagittal T1-weighted and axial and coronal T1? MRI from which spatial T1? relaxation maps were calculated from segmented T1-weighted images. Median T1? relaxation times of patients with arthroscopically documented cartilage degeneration and asymptomatic subjects were significantly different (p < 0.001) and median T1? exceeded asymptomatic articular cartilage median T1? by 2.5 to 9.2 ms. In 8 observations of mild cartilage degeneration at arthroscopy (Outerbridge grades 1 and 2), mean compartment T1? was elevated in 5, but in all observations, large foci of increased T1? were observed. It was determined that T1? could detect some, but not all, Outerbridge grade 1 and 2 cartilage degeneration but that a larger patient population is needed to determine the sensitivity to these changes.

Witschey, Walter RT; Borthakur, Arijitt; Fenty, Matt; Kneeland, J Bruce; Lonner, Jess H; McArdle, Erin L.; Sochor, Matt; Reddy, Ravinder

2010-01-01

309

[Arthroscopic acromioplasty. Medium results after more than a year].  

PubMed

Sixty-nine arthroscopic acromioplasties were evaluated with an average follow-up of 18 months (6 to 38 months), with the UCLA score. The UCLA scores evolved from an average of 9.9 preoperatively (minimum 5, maximum 18) to 30.2 (minimum 18, maximum 35) postoperatively. There were 26% excellent results (34 to 35 points on the UCLA score), 55% good results (28 to 33 points), 14.5% poor results (21 to 27 points) and 4.3% bad results (0 to 20 points), i.e. 81% good and excellent results. There was no relationship between the duration of the complaints and the results, nor was there between the age and the results. The best results were seen in patients without rupture of the rotator cuff. Calcification without rupture of the cuff had no influence on the results. Pain, the most important complaint, was diminished much more than the complaints about restricted range of motion, which is better tolerated. PMID:8116367

Goguin, J P; Lokietek, J C; Cambier, P; Decloedt, P; Kinzinger, P; Leflot, J; Twahirwa, J

1993-01-01

310

All-arthroscopic double-bundle coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus graft: a new technique.  

PubMed

We present our novel arthroscopic anatomic double-bundle coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction technique using a semitendinosus tendon autograft. The dorsal limb of the graft is positioned around the dorsal edge of the clavicle, re-creating the conoid ligament. The anterior limb proceeds superiorly and re-creates the trapezoid ligament. The solution effectively stabilizes the acromioclavicular joint and prevents anterior posterior translation. This new arthroscopic double-bundle coracoclavicular joint reconstruction is an effective and reliable method in stabilizing the clavicle and neutralizing the anterior-posterior translation, and we find it to be technically practical for the surgeon. PMID:23766964

Ranne, Juha O; Sarimo, Janne J; Rawlins, Mark I; Heinonen, Olli J; Orava, Sakari Y

2012-09-01

311

All-Arthroscopic Double-Bundle Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction Using Autogenous Semitendinosus Graft: A New Technique  

PubMed Central

We present our novel arthroscopic anatomic double-bundle coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction technique using a semitendinosus tendon autograft. The dorsal limb of the graft is positioned around the dorsal edge of the clavicle, re-creating the conoid ligament. The anterior limb proceeds superiorly and re-creates the trapezoid ligament. The solution effectively stabilizes the acromioclavicular joint and prevents anterior posterior translation. This new arthroscopic double-bundle coracoclavicular joint reconstruction is an effective and reliable method in stabilizing the clavicle and neutralizing the anterior-posterior translation, and we find it to be technically practical for the surgeon.

Ranne, Juha O.; Sarimo, Janne J.; Rawlins, Mark I.; Heinonen, Olli J.; Orava, Sakari Y.

2012-01-01

312

Arthroscopic Posterior Stabilization of the Shoulder Using a Percutaneous Knotless Mattress Suture Technique  

PubMed Central

Posterior shoulder instability is far less common than anterior instability, and its arthroscopic treatment can be technically demanding. We describe a percutaneous arthroscopic technique for posterior shoulder stabilization using mattress sutures and knotless anchors. Spinal needles are used to pass the sutures percutaneously in a mattress fashion. Knotless anchors are used to secure the sutures under the labrum. These anchors can be used without cannulas, giving easier access to the posterior glenoid. This procedure is simple, cost-effective, and safe, avoiding the presence of both knots and suture strands in contact with the humeral head.

Tennent, Duncan; Concina, Chiara; Pearse, Eyiyemi

2014-01-01

313

Arthroscopic Posterior Stabilization of the Shoulder Using a Percutaneous Knotless Mattress Suture Technique.  

PubMed

Posterior shoulder instability is far less common than anterior instability, and its arthroscopic treatment can be technically demanding. We describe a percutaneous arthroscopic technique for posterior shoulder stabilization using mattress sutures and knotless anchors. Spinal needles are used to pass the sutures percutaneously in a mattress fashion. Knotless anchors are used to secure the sutures under the labrum. These anchors can be used without cannulas, giving easier access to the posterior glenoid. This procedure is simple, cost-effective, and safe, avoiding the presence of both knots and suture strands in contact with the humeral head. PMID:24749039

Tennent, Duncan; Concina, Chiara; Pearse, Eyiyemi

2014-02-01

314

Arthroscopic treatment of piriformis syndrome by perineural cyst on the sciatic nerve: a case report.  

PubMed

This is a case report of an arthroscopic treatment performed on a patient with piriformis syndrome due to perineural cyst on piriformis muscle and sciatic nerve. Confirmation, incision, and drainage of benign cystic lesion on the sciatic nerve below the piriformis muscle were performed following the release of the piriformis tendon through the posterior and posteroinferior arthroscopic portal. Recurrence of the symptoms has not been observed since postoperative period of 20 months. Nor did the MRI taken after the procedure reveal any such recurrence. PMID:20062971

Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Kang, Chan; Lee, Jung-Bum; Cha, Soo-Min; Yeon, Kyu-Woong

2010-05-01

315

Ultrasound- and Doppler-guided arthroscopic shaving to treat Jumper's knee: a technical note.  

PubMed

Here we present a new technique for arthroscopic treatment of patellar tendinopthy-Jumper's knee, were arthroscopic shaving and Ultrasound + Doppler examination are performed simultaneously. Using this technique, the tendon and the areas with structural tendon changes and high blood flow are continuously demonstrated in the operating field. By this, the shaving procedure can be more exactly addressed to the area of interest on the dorsal surface of the tendon, and the trauma to the Hoffa fat pad and the tendon is minimized. PMID:17721702

Willberg, Lotta; Sunding, Kerstin; Forssblad, Magnus; Alfredson, Håkan

2007-11-01

316

Percutaneous and minimally invasive Achilles tendon repair - review of surgical techniques.  

PubMed

Abstract This article presents advantages and disadvantages associated with percutaneous, noninvasive repair of Achilles tendon rupture. We presented most widely known procedures, such as Ma/Griffith, Web/Banister, McCleland/Maffulli, Carmont and Assal Achillon suture system, as well as several other less known surgical techniques. We performed a review of literature with regard to possible complications, including sural nerve damage, possibilities of broadening those techniques to include arthroscopic as well as ultrasound imaging, and proposed a scheme of patient management after surgery. PMID:24984160

Sliwa, Marek

2014-01-01

317

Brain aneurysm repair  

MedlinePLUS

... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened up. A metal clip is placed ...

318

Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular  

MedlinePLUS

EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

319

The role of arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy in the hip.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic thermal modification of collagen in the hip capsular tissue appears to be a treatment option for patients with hip instability. Traumatic hip instability is associated with frank dislocation or a subluxation, and labral tears. Atraumatic hip instability is associated with evidence of generalized ligament laxity. It can be associated with bone-collagen type disorders, including Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Down syndrome, arthrochalasis multiplex congenita, developmental dysplastic hip, and idiopathic type. As previously discussed by Bellabarba et al, capsular laxity may be the underlying cause of dynamic hip instability. The capsule is a fibrous, thick, and strong structure that encircles the proximal femur and the acetabulum. The capsule is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly, and consists of two sets of fibers, circular and longitudinal. The capsule ligaments play a very important role in hip stability. The hip joint capsule is reinforced by the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments. It remains sensitive to stretch and serves as a mechanism for muscular feedback and pain. The iliofemoral ligament limits hyperextension and lateral rotation of the hip joint and is taut in full extension. Full extension of the hip exposes the capsule and ligaments to a twisting and shortening effect that forces the head onto the acetabulum. We are currently studying the effect of iliofemoral ligament deficiency and its relationship to instability. Many of the properties of synovial lubrication depend on contact with articular surfaces, and incongruency due to instability may have some functional role in distribution of synovial fluid, leading to stresses from weightbearing and eventually to rapid deterioration of the articular surfaces. The high-level athletes in this series include two professional baseball players, three professional golfers (PGA), one professional football player (NFL), one figure skater (Olympic gold medalist), one gymnast (Olympic level, bilateral hips), and one ballet dancer; they returned to their pre-injury level of activity. The other patients returned to their pre-injury functional lifestyle. Hip instability appears to present consistently with stable gait abnormalities and painful sensation of instability. Recognizing the various patterns of hip instability is complicated, and therefore management and outcome of these disorders are quite variable. Bellabarba et al concluded that physical therapy alone had been unsuccessful and that temporary success of a posterior capsular "plication" in one patient showed promise. Arthroscopic thermal modification of collagen in the hip capsular tissue appears to be a treatment option for patients with hip instability. The hip joint capsule is predominantly type 1 collagen, and the mechanism of tissue shrinkage through type 1 collagen alteration is well documented in the literature. Short-term results appear promising, however, more studies are required to determine the long-term efficacy of this procedure in the treatment of this challenging disorder. PMID:11675889

Philippon, M J

2001-10-01

320

Arthroscopic reconstruction of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) with tendon graft for chronic DRUJ instability.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: To report the 10-years' experience of a novel arthroscopic assisted anatomical TFCC reconstruction in treatment of chronic DRUJ instability resulting from irreparable TFCC injuries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 15 patients (7 males, 8 females) with mean age of 37 (17-49) suffering from irreparable TFCC injuries received arthroscopic assisted reconstruction using palmaris longus graft. Three skin incisions were made with creation of one radial and one ulna tunnel for passage of graft following the path of dorsal and palmar radio-ulnar ligaments under fluoroscopic and arthroscopic guidance. The joint capsule was kept intact. Early mid-range forearm rotation was started since 4th week postoperatively. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 85.53months (32-138). Mayo wrist score improved from 62.5 to 88(p<0.05). Comparing contralateral side, total prono-supination range increased from 76.6% to 92.1% and grip strength increased from 56.1% to 76.9%. Twelve patients resumed previous jobs. No evidence of DRUJ arthritis was noticed. Complications included 2 late graft ruptures and one unexplained dystonia. CONCLUSIONS: Our arthroscopic assisted approach on TFCC reconstruction is safe, produces comparable results as the standard technique and may achieve better range of motion with less soft tissue dissection and earlier mobilization. PMID:23337702

Tse, Wing-Lim; Lau, Sun-Wing; Wong, Wing Yee; Cheng, Hi-Shan; Chow, Ching-Shan; Ho, Pak-Cheong; Hung, Leung-Kim

2013-01-18

321

Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement

Johnny U. V. Monu; Steven Pruett; William J. Vanarthos; Thomas L. Pope

1994-01-01

322

Correlation of Short Form36 and Disability Status With Outcomes of Arthroscopic Acetabular Labral Debridement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Arthroscopic debridement is the standard of care for the treatment of acetabular labral tears. The Short Form-36 has not been used to measure hip arthroscopy outcomes, and the impact of disability status on hip arthroscopy outcomes has not been reported.Hypothesis: Short Form-36 subscale scores will demonstrate good correlation with the modified Harris hip score, but patients undergoing disability evaluation

Benjamin K. Potter; Brett A. Freedman; Romney C. Andersen; John A. Bojescul; Timothy R. Kuklo; Kevin P. Murphy

2005-01-01

323

Arthroscopic stabilization of Neer type 2 fracture of the distal part of the clavicle.  

PubMed

With regard to the anatomic basis of Neer type 2 fractures of the distal part of the clavicle, a clavicle fracture is associated with a coracoclavicular conoid ligament disruption. We describe an arthroscopic-assisted surgical procedure to stabilize the fracture and reconstruct the ligament. Surgery is performed with the patient in the beach-chair position. Through a 2-cm incision perpendicular to the direction of the fracture, we perform suturing around the fracture. During the arthroscopic procedure, the coracoid process is exposed by opening the rotator interval and the medial part of the capsule. The knee of the coracoid process should be exposed via an anterolateral portal for the arthroscope. Then, by use of an acromioclavicular joint stabilization device from Arthrex (Naples, FL), a hole is placed through the knee of the coracoid process. FiberTape suture (Arthrex) is passed around the clavicle and through the knee of the coracoid process. The intra-articular sutures are pulled out through the upper incision on top of the clavicle. Tightening of the 2 knots is performed at the same time. This arthroscopic-assisted surgery allows for total recovery of shoulder function, without the inconvenience of device migration or acromioclavicular joint lesions reported with other procedures. PMID:17560484

Nourissat, Geoffroy; Kakuda, Carlos; Dumontier, Christian; Sautet, Alain; Doursounian, Levon

2007-06-01

324

The role of osteonecrosis in canine coronoid dysplasia: arthroscopic and histopathological findings.  

PubMed

Coronoid dysplasia (CD) or medial coronoid disease is part of canine elbow dysplasia and eventually results in osteoarthrosis. Although CD was originally attributed to disturbed endochondral ossification, more recent data point to the subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to assess dysplastic bone and cartilage of dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the treatment of CD. Arthroscopic findings and histopathology of bone and cartilage removed from elbow joints with CD were compared. The most common arthroscopic finding was fragmentation with softening of the subchondral bone of the central part of the medial coronoid process. In dogs without obvious fragmentation, CD was characterised by bone softening and chondromalacia. During arthroscopic intervention dysplastic bone and cartilage were collected for histopathological assessment. Forty-five slices of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded bone and cartilage samples were stained using haematoxylin and eosin and evaluated. Histopathological findings primarily consisted of osteonecrosis of subchondral bone with necrosis within the marrow spaces. Histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were characterised by fibrillation, chondrocyte clone formation, and focal cartilage necrosis. The pathology was found primarily in the subchondral bone and not in the articular cartilage. Vascular compromise may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis in CD. PMID:24797106

Mariee, I C; Gröne, A; Theyse, L F H

2014-06-01

325

Technical note: The quadrant technique for arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff calcifications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reliable intraoperative localization of the calcium deposit is the most demanding and often time-consuming part of arthroscopic surgery for calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. A new technique is described to intraoperatively localize calcium deposits based on preoperative ultrasonographic identification and subsequent assignment to a defined quadrant lateral of the acromion edge. The technique requires only a partial subacromial bursectomy,

Peter Ogon; Michael Ogon; Alwin Jäger

2001-01-01

326

T2 Mapping Magnetic Resonance Imaging Encourages an Arthroscopic Approach for Osteoid Osteoma in the Acetabulum  

PubMed Central

Intra-articular osteoid osteoma (OO) is uncommon, especially in the hip joint. Delayed treatment may cause early osteoarthritis; however, diagnosis and complete excision are often challenging. We describe the feasibility of the combination of T2 mapping magnetic resonance imaging evaluation and arthroscopic excision of OO in the acetabulum. A 12-year-old boy presented with a 6-month history of hip pain. An undifferentiated tumor of the medial wall of the acetabulum was suspected on radiographs and computed tomography. T2 mapping showed joint effusion, and the T2 value of the acetabular cartilage just above the tumor was significantly high. These findings suggested OO in the acetabulum. An arthroscopic excision was performed for biopsy and excision of the tumor to avoid damage to the normal cartilage and growth plate. Histologic examination confirmed the OO. At 16 months' follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence. This is the first report to evaluate intra-articular OO by T2 mapping and to treat it arthroscopically. Arthroscopic treatment assisted by T2 mapping has excellent potential as a minimally invasive technique to enable us to approach the tumor from the area of discriminative abnormal cartilage with minimal damage to the normal cartilage and surrounding tissue.

Shoji, Takeshi; Yasunaga, Yuji; Yamasaki, Takuma; Mori, Ryo; Hamanishi, Michio; Shimose, Shoji; Ochi, Mitsuo

2014-01-01

327

Subscapularis, medial, and lateral head coracohumeral ligament insertion anatomy: Arthroscopic appearance and the incidence of \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the incidence of lesions of the rotator interval, illustrate the arthroscopic appearance of subtle differences in these lesions, and discuss how various lesions may affect biceps tendon stability in the bicipital groove. Type of Study: A Data Registry has been used in my office since 1995 (Microsoft Office Access). This study

William F. Bennett

2001-01-01

328

Anterosuperior impingement of the shoulder as a result of pulley lesions: a prospective arthroscopic study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lesions of the biceps pulley and the rotator cuff have been reported to be associated with an internal anterosuperior impingement (ASI) of the shoulder. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors influencing the development of an ASI. Eighty-nine patients with an arthroscopically diagnosed pulley lesion were prospectively included in this study. Four patterns of intraarticular lesions could

Peter Habermeyer; Petra Magosch; Maria Pritsch; Markus Thomas Scheibel; Sven Lichtenberg

2004-01-01

329

Anterosuperior impingement of the shoulder as a result of pulley lesions: A prospective arthroscopic study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lesions of the biceps pulley and the rotator cuff have been reported to be associated with an internal an- terosuperior impingement (ASI) of the shoulder. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors influ- encing the development of an ASI. Eighty-nine patients with an arthroscopically diagnosed pulley lesion were prospectively included in this study. Four patterns of intraarticular

Peter Habermeyer; Petra Magosch; Maria Pritsch; Markus Thomas Scheibel; Sven Lichtenberg

330

The Impact of Arthroscopic Capsular Release in Patients with Primary Frozen Shoulder on Shoulder Muscular Strength  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of arthroscopic capsular release in patients with primary frozen shoulder on muscular strength of nonaffected and treated shoulder after at least two-year follow-up after the surgery. The assessment included twenty-seven patients, who underwent arthroscopic capsular release due to persistent limitation of range of passive and active motion, shoulder pain, and limited function of upper limb despite 6-month conservative treatment. All the patients underwent arthroscopic superior, anteroinferior, and posterior capsular release. After at least two-year follow-up, measurement of muscular strength of abductors, flexors, and external and internal rotators of the operated and nonaffected shoulder, as well as determination of range of motion (ROM) and function (ASES) in the operated and nonaffected shoulder, was performed. Measurement of muscular strength in the patient group did not reveal statistically significant differences between operated and nonaffected shoulder. The arthroscopic capsular release does not have significant impact on the decrease in the muscular strength of the operated shoulder.

Waszczykowski, Michal; Fabis, Jaroslaw

2014-01-01

331

Indentation instrument for the measurement of cartilage stiffness under arthroscopic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage are one of the first signs of the tissue degeneration. We have developed a small size indentation instrument for the quantification of cartilage stiffness under arthroscopic control. During measurement, the indenter imposes a constant deformation on the cartilage and the maximal indenter force, by which the cartilage resists the deformation, is used

T. Lyyra; J. Jurvelin; P. Pitkänen; U. Väätäinen; I. Kiviranta

1995-01-01

332

Arthroscopic extraarticular reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with gracilis tendon autograft - surgical technique.  

PubMed

The standard approach to reconstruct the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is by mini-open incision at its patellar insertion and femoral origin. At the medial patella rim, the MPFL insertion may be visualized in most cases by dissection during surgery. On the femur, it is more difficult to localize the MPFL remnants by a mini-open incision due to soft tissue covering the anatomical origin. Therefore, the femoral MPFL origin is usually identified by intraoperative lateral fluoroscopy. However, the insertion and origin of the MPFL at the patella and femur might be directly visualized using an arthroscopic extraarticular approach from the knee joint through a window of the synovial layer. This is especially helpful on the femoral side but also at the patella to find the individual anatomical MPFL footprints. Arthroscopic extraarticular reconstruction may then be performed using one additional medial mid-parapatellar portal. The major advantages of this technique are an individualized anatomical procedure, which is minimal invasive and cosmetically appealing. The aim of this study was to describe the arthroscopic extraarticular approach to the MPFL insertion at the patella and origin at the femur through synovial windows and to explain the procedure of arthroscopic MPFL reconstruction with a gracilis tendon autograft. Level of evidence Expert opinion, surgical technique, Level V. PMID:22484369

Siebold, Rainer; Borbon, Carlo Angelo V

2012-07-01

333

A novel technique of arthroscopic excision of a symptomatic os trigonum.  

PubMed

We describe a new arthroscopic excision technique for a symptomatic os trigonum. With the patient lying in a prone position, a posterolateral portal just lateral to the Achilles tendon, at the 5-mm level proximal to the tip of the fibula, is used for the arthroscope and an accessory posterolateral portal just posterior to the peroneal tendon at the same level is used for instruments. The synovial tissues are then debrided with a power shaver through the accessory posterolateral portal for better visualization. An elevator is used to release the fibrous tissue between the os trigonum and the talus. The os trigonum is completely excised with a grasper to visualize the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Radiographic control is helpful to check the position of the arthroscope if it happens to be inserted into the ankle joint as a result of the reduced subtalar joint space. Postoperatively, no immobilization is necessary, and full weight-bearing is allowed as tolerated. Three of us have performed 11 procedures with excellent results and no cases of complications. This arthroscopic excision technique for the symptomatic os trigonum is a safe and effective procedure. PMID:18182212

Horibe, Shuji; Kita, Keisuke; Natsu-ume, Takashi; Hamada, Masayuki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei

2008-01-01

334

Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was

Stephen J. O'Brien; Drew V. Miller; Stephen V. Fealy; Mary A. Gibney; Anne M. Kelly

1991-01-01

335

A new technique of arthroscopic capsular shift in anterior shoulder instability.  

PubMed

We describe a new arthroscopic technique to reinforce the torn inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL) and the elongated capsule to the glenoid rim. The arthroscope is inserted over the superior portal and, after the insertion of a suture anchor, both limbs are pulled out over the posterior portal. The IGHL is grasped and pulled upward onto the glenoid rim using a suture retriever clamp inserted over the posterior portal. A 45 degrees curved blunt clamp (Sidewinder; Arthrex, Naples, FL) coming from the anterior penetrates the IGHL, and 1 end of the suture limb is given into the branches of the clamp and pulled out anteriorly. After a second perforation of the capsule, a horizontal suture creating a neolabrum can be placed. This technique allows a suitable reinforcement of the capsule without intraoperative complications. In cases of capsular elongation, especially a torn IGHL, the capsular instability can be addressed by the described Sidewinder technique. More sophisticated arthroscopic techniques such as this will increase the indication for arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. PMID:11288020

Nebelung, W; Röpke, M; Urbach, D; Becker, R

2001-04-01

336

Case report: correction of neglected club foot deformity by arthroscopic assisted triple arthrodesis.  

PubMed

Neglected club foot deformity at the adulthood is difficult to correct. It is usually a rigid deformity associated with arthritic change of the hindfoot joint. Combined bone and soft tissue procedure is necessary to correct the deformity. We present a case of neglected club foot in adulthood who was successfully corrected with arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. PMID:20213451

Lui, Tun Hing

2010-08-01

337

Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

1990-06-01

338

Osteonecrosis of the knee following arthroscopic meniscectomy in patients over 50-years old  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed eight patients over 50-years old, with an initial diagnosis of medial meniscal tear confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and with no evidence of osteonecrosis. After arthroscopic meniscectomy, all patients had recurrent aggravated knee pain and reevaluation with MRI showed images compatible with osteonecrosis. The average age was 65 years (range 54 to 75 years). The mean time

D. Luis Muscolo; Matías Costa-Paz; Arturo Makino; Miguel A. Ayerza

1996-01-01

339

Arthroscopic studies of variants of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to arthroscopically analyse the morphology and dynamics of variants of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus of the knee (VAMM) and to then consider the pathological significance of these variants. VAMM was defined as knees in which the anterior horn of the medial meniscus is not attached to the tibia. Between April 1992

Yasumitsu Ohkoshi; Tatsuto Takeuchi; Chiharu Inoue; Tomoyuki Hashimoto; Keiichi Shigenobu; Shigeru Yamane

1997-01-01

340

Day-case or short-stay admission for arthroscopic knee surgery: a randomised controlled trial.  

PubMed Central

The Royal Colleges, The Audit Commission, and politicians have encouraged day-case care for patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. However, there remains both public and professional concern regarding the acceptability and safety of this form of management, although there are clear economic benefits. In a prospective randomised controlled trial, 50 patients underwent arthroscopic surgery as a day-case and 50 patients were admitted overnight. Outcome was assessed by postal questionnaire 4 weeks after discharge. A linear visual analogue scale was used to measure pain levels. The response rate was 93%. The diagnoses and types of arthroscopic surgery were similar in both groups. In total, 94% of day-cases and 91% of patients admitted overnight expressed overall satisfaction. Pain after discharge was similar in both groups. Day-case management was preferred by 90% of day-case patients and by 64% of those admitted overnight. Of patients in the day-case group, 12% had to be admitted overnight because of recovery problems, but 7% of patients randomised to overnight stay discharged themselves. One patient admitted overnight required readmission because of a wound haematoma. Patients who had received day-case management returned to work significantly faster than those who had been admitted. Modern anaesthetic techniques with special attention to anti-emesis and pain control have reduced postoperative morbidity to acceptable levels. Provided that patients are properly selected and well informed, day-case care is preferable for the majority of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

Weale, A. E.; Ackroyd, C. E.; Mani, G. V.; Winson, I. G.

1998-01-01

341

Book Repair Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

Milevski, Robert J.

1995-01-01

342

Neuronal repair  

PubMed Central

The potential of the central nervous system (CNS) to regenerate is regulated by a complex interaction of neuronal intrinsic and extrinsic factors that remain poorly understood. Significant research has been dedicated to identifying these factors to facilitate design of therapies that will treat the functional impairment associated with CNS injuries. Over the last decade, the development of in vivo laser severing of single axons in C. elegans has established an invaluable model for the genetic identification of novel regeneration factors. In a recent study we report the unexpected identification of the core apoptotic proteins CED-4/Apaf-1 and the executioner caspase CED-3 as important factors that promote early events in regeneration in C. elegans. Other upstream regulators of apoptosis do not influence regeneration, indicating the existence of a novel mechanism for activation of CED-4 and CED-3 in neuronal repair. CED-4 and CED-3 function downstream of injury-induced calcium transients and appear to act through the conserved DLK-1 pathway to promote regeneration. We propose a working model for calcium-dependent localized activation of CED-4 and CED-3 caspase and discuss questions raised including mechanisms for spatially regulating activated CED-3 and the possible substrates that it might cleave to initiate regeneration.

Reina, Christopher P.; Driscoll, Monica; Gabel, Christopher V.

2013-01-01

343

Computed tomography analysis of the coracoid process and anatomic structures of the shoulder after arthroscopic coracoid decompression: a cadaveric study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this anatomic study is to define the morphologic changes of the coracoid and surrounding soft tissue after arthroscopic coracoid decompression. We obtained 5 fresh-frozen forequarter cadaveric specimens, 3 female and 2 male, with a mean age of 86.2 years. Arthroscopic coracoid decompression was performed, and intraarticular pathology was documented. Preoperative and postoperative measures of coracoid overlap, coracoid index, and coracohumeral distance were made on limited-cut axial computed tomography scans. Dissection was performed to assess anatomic relationships after coracoid decompression. Arthroscopic findings revealed subscapularis pathology and glenohumeral arthritis in all specimens, long head of biceps pathology in 3, and supraspinatus pathology in 2. Gross dissection confirmed the pathologic findings. Arthroscopic coracoid decompression effectively improves coracoid overlap, coracoid index, and coracohumeral distance. The adjacent major neurovascular structures are at a safe distance from the decompression site. PMID:17097308

Kleist, Kenneth D; Freehill, Michael Q; Hamilton, Linsey; Buss, Daniel D; Fritts, Hollis

2007-01-01

344

Intraarticular tramadol plus pericapsular incisional bupivacaine provides better analgesia than intraarticular plus pericapsular incisional bupivacaine after outpatient arthroscopic partial meniscectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postoperative analgesic effects of intraarticular tramadol plus periarticular bupivacaine, and intraarticular plus periarticular\\u000a bupivacaine injections after day-case arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were compared. Seventy-four ASA I\\/II patients undergoing\\u000a arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, performed by a single surgeon under general anesthesia were assigned in a randomized, double-blinded\\u000a manner into two groups: Group TB (n = 41) received intraarticular 100 mg of tramadol in 20 ml normal saline

Tahsin Beyzadeoglu; Cemil Yilmaz; Halil Bekler; Alper Gokce; Murat M. Sayin

2007-01-01

345

Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup.

Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

2012-01-01

346

Rapid road repair vehicle  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

Mara, L.M.

1998-05-05

347

Dry Arthroscopy With a Retraction System for Matrix-Aided Cartilage Repair of Patellar Lesions  

PubMed Central

Several commercially available cartilage repair techniques use a natural or synthetic matrix to aid cartilage regeneration (e.g., autologous matrix–induced chondrogenesis or matrix-induced cartilage implantation). However, the use of matrix-aided techniques during conventional knee joint arthroscopy under continuous irrigation is challenging. Insertion and fixation of the matrix can be complicated by the presence of fluid and the confined patellofemoral joint space with limited access to the lesion. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel arthroscopic approach for matrix-aided cartilage repair of patellar lesions. This technical note describes the use of dry arthroscopy assisted by a minimally invasive retraction system. An autologous matrix–induced chondrogenesis procedure is used to illustrate this novel approach.

Sadlik, Boguslaw; Wiewiorski, Martin

2014-01-01

348

Mini-open rotator cuff repair does not result in intractable stiffness.  

PubMed

We conducted a study to determine whether intractable postoperative stiffness or deltoid damage results from primary arthroscopic anterior acromioplasty and mini-open repair of full-thickness tears of the superior rotator cuff. Eighty-three repairs (80 patients) were available for follow-up at a mean (range) of 57.2 (12-98) months. Range of motion at presentation and motion in contralateral shoulder at final follow-up were used for comparison. Significant improvements were seen in active forward elevation, passive forward elevation, and active external rotation at 90° abduction. Final motion in the operative and contralateral shoulders was similar. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder index improved significantly (P<.0001) from 50.0 before surgery to 88.3 after surgery. Although 1 patient had a symptomatic retear that required revision surgery, there were no cases of intractable stiffness, and there were no cases of deltoid damage. PMID:22268017

Doppelt, Jason D; Neviaser, Robert J

2011-12-01

349

A cadaveric study of the potential damage in arthroscopic examination of the temporomandibular joints.  

PubMed

An arthroscopic study on 22 temporomandibular joints in 13 cadavers was undertaken. Dissections were carried out to correlate the arthroscopic with macroscopic findings in the joints. Iatrogenic damage to the temporomandibular joints and their surrounding tissues was also examined. Correlation between arthroscopy and macro findings was 91.0%. There was no damage to the facial nerve and superficial temporal vessels. Iatrogenic damage to the temporomandibular joint included scuffing of the articular surfaces of the glenoid fossa and articular eminence (31.8%), scuffing of the condylar articular surface (9%), one disc perforation (4.5%) and one perforation of the medial capsule (4.5%). Prevention of iatrogenic injuries is discussed. PMID:1295412

Teh, L Y; Peck, R H; Chew, S C; Goh, W S; Chua, E K

1992-11-01

350

Glomus Tumor of Hoffa's Fat Pad and Its Management by Arthroscopic Excision  

PubMed Central

We present a rare case of glomus tumor of Hoffa's fat pad in a 42-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance imaging findings along with the characteristic clinical picture led us to suspect a glomus tumor as the possible etiology. An ischemia test was found to be positive and this further substantiated our diagnosis. An arthroscopic excision was performed and the histology confirmed the diagnosis of glomus tumor of Hoffa's fat pad. The patient responded well to the excision with immediate complete resolution of pain and she remains asymptomatic at the last follow-up after 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of glomus tumor of Hoffa's fat pad and the first ever to be managed by simple arthroscopic excision. The tumor poses a great challenge to an orthopedic surgeon. However, knowledge of its characteristic clinical presentation and the recognition of such a rare entity can help achieve an early diagnosis and timely management.

Prabhakar, Sharad; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Vasishtha, Rakesh Kumar

2013-01-01

351

Arthroscopic anatomic humeral head reconstruction with osteochondral allograft transplantation for large hill-sachs lesions.  

PubMed

Anatomic reconstruction of the humeral head with osteochondral allograft has been reported as a solution for large Hill-Sachs lesions with or without glenoid bone loss. However, to date, varying techniques have been used. This technical note describes an arthroscopic reconstruction technique using fresh-frozen, side- and size-matched osteochondral humeral head allograft. Allograft plugs are press fit into the defect without internal fixation and seated flush with the surrounding articular surface. This technique restores the native articular contour of the humeral head without compromising shoulder range of motion. Potential benefits of this all-arthroscopic approach include minimal trauma to the soft tissue and articular surface without the need for hardware or staged reoperation. PMID:24266001

Snir, Nimrod; Wolfson, Theodore S; Hamula, Mathew J; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J

2013-01-01

352

A Case of Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Use of a Pneumatic Tourniquet during Arthroscopic Knee Surgery  

PubMed Central

The common causes of rhabdomyolysis include trauma, hypoxia, drugs, toxins, infections and hyperthermia. Operative insults, including direct trauma and ischemia, have the potential to cause the development of rhabdomyolysis. Pneumatic tourniquets used during arthroscopic knee surgery to prevent blood loss have led to many complications such as nerve paralysis and vascular injuries. Rhabdomyolysis can also be caused by prolonged pneumatic tourniquet application without a midapplication release, and also from an increased application pressure, but the actual incidence of this is low. In order to prevent rhabdomyolysis, the clinicians must be aware of such risks and follow strict guidelines for the application time, the midapplication release and also the inflation pressure. Vigorous hydration and postoperative patient surveillance are helpful to prevent rhabdomyolysis. We have recently experienced a case of rhabdomyolysis after the arthroscopic knee surgery, and the rhabdomyolysis could have been associated with the use of a pneumatic tourniquet.

Lee, Yong Gu; Park, Woong; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yun, Sang Pil; Jeong, Hun; Kim, Hyung Jong

2010-01-01

353

Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

1991-05-01

354

[Arthroscopic reconstruction of the capsule-ligament using Landsiedl's technique for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation].  

PubMed

Landsiedl arthroscopic capsuloligamentous reconstruction in treatment for recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder has been performed in 48 patients with follow-up between 6 months and 3 years. High efficacy and insignificant invasiveness make the method attractive. The success is secured by precise location of the canal for sutures within the neck of the scapula. It should be located in the original attachment of the lower glenohumeral ligament. PMID:9102236

Pawlas, R; Pajak, J; Chrobok, A; Smolik, M

1996-01-01

355

Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement of the Hip: A New Technique to Access the Joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Femoroacetabular impingement has been established as an important cause of groin pain and limitation of range of motion in\\u000a young, active patients and a possible cause for early osteoarthritis of the hip. Open surgery is a well-recognized approach\\u000a for treatment and probably the standard for most surgeons, but recent reports regarding arthroscopic treatment procedures\\u000a suggest comparable results. We present a

Monika Horisberger; Alexander Brunner; Richard F. Herzog

2010-01-01

356

Prognostic value of chondral defects on the outcome after arthroscopic treatment of acetabular labral tears  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathology of the acetabular labrum plays an increasing role in the treatment of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy has proven its clinical\\u000a value as a useful procedure for successful treatment of labral tears. Until today, only a few studies have investigated the\\u000a influence of articular cartilage defects on the clinical outcome of partial arthroscopic labrum resection in a larger patient\\u000a population.

Nikolaus A. Streich; Tobias Gotterbarm; Alexander Barié; Holger Schmitt

2009-01-01

357

Arthroscopic fixation of a type II-variant, unstable distal clavicle fracture.  

PubMed

This article describes a case of a patient with a type II-variant, unstable distal clavicle fracture that was successfully treated with a novel arthroscopic technique using the Tightrope system (Arthrex, Naples, Florida). The arthroscope was placed into the anterolateral portal after a bursectomy was performed. An anterior portal was made lateral to the coracoid using superficial landmarks and arthroscopic visualization. A radiofrequency device was inserted through the anterior portal. Following the coracoacromial ligament medially, the radiofrequency device was used to first tactilely then visually identify the coracoid base. An anterior cruciate ligament guide was inserted through the anterior portal and placed inferior to the base of the coracoid. The guide pin sleeve was placed medial to the fractured clavicle perpendicular to the coracoid. A small incision was made and a guide pin was drilled through the clavicle and through the coracoid under arthroscopic visualization. A cannulated drill was used to drill a hole through the clavicle into the base of the coracoid. A looped guide wire was inserted through the cannulated drill, passed out of the hole drilled in the coracoid, and retrieved through the anterior cannula. The drill was removed, leaving the guide wire in place. The Tightrope was inserted into the looped guide wire and pulled first through the clavicle and then the coracoid. Once the inferior button was pulled out of the coracoid drill hole, the button was deployed to anchor it under the inferior coracoid. With the fracture held reduced, the Tightrope was tied down over the superior clavicle, obtaining reduction and fixation of the distal clavicle fracture. Fracture consolidation was confirmed at 3 months, and the patient returned to painless, unrestricted activity at 5 months. PMID:19226058

Baumgarten, Keith M

2008-12-01

358

Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with modified “wireless” cross-screw transfix femoral fixation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among several graft fixation options in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction for hamstring tendons, transcondylar fixation has\\u000a been suggested to offer mechanical advantages compared to other femoral fixation systems. Blind nature of the procedure may\\u000a result in several complications including iliotibial band irritation syndrome, breakage of the bio absorbable cross-pin, stress\\u000a fracture of the femoral cortex, and more commonly intraoperative wire loop

Fereidoon M. Jaberi; Ali Haghighat; Zahra Babanezhad; Mehrad M. Jaberi

2010-01-01

359

Substantial disability 3 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: A prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study using validated questionnaires to assess patient-relevant outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Data from the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the SF-36 Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey, and the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were available for 74 consecutive patients (50 males, 24 females; mean age, 45 years) with

Ewa M. Roos; Harald P. Roos; Leif Ryd; L. Stefan Lohmander

2000-01-01

360

Effects of arthroscopic meniscectomy on the long-term prognosis for the discoid lateral meniscus  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes, according to the extent of arthroscopic meniscectomy,\\u000a of complete and incomplete types of the discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 125 discoid menisci (74 complete and 51 incomplete\\u000a types) without significant cartilage erosion at the time of surgery were included. The extent of meniscectomy was decided\\u000a along with tear patterns and

Sung-Jae Kim; Yong-Min Chun; Jae-Hoon Jeong; Sang-Wook Ryu; Kyung-Soo Oh; Andri M. T. Lubis

2007-01-01

361

Arthroscopic or conservative treatment of degenerative medial meniscal tears: a prospective randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this prospective randomised study two treatments after non-traumatic medial meniscal tear diagnosed with radiological examination\\u000a and magnetic resonance imaging were compared; arthroscopic partial meniscectomy followed by supervised exercise or supervised\\u000a exercise alone. The aim was to evaluate knee function and physical activity. Ninety patients (mean age 56 years) were evaluated\\u000a using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Lysholm

Sylvia Herrlin; Maria Hållander; Peter Wange; Lars Weidenhielm; Suzanne Werner

2007-01-01

362

A new technique for arthroscopic meniscus transplant using soft tissue fixation and anatomical meniscal root reinsertion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Allograft meniscus transplant is considered as a treatment option for meniscus-deficient patients to provide pain relief and\\u000a decrease contact stress. This procedure is now considered as safe and reliable for the treatment for knee pain after total\\u000a menisectomy. This is a new technique that has been developed for arthroscopic meniscus transplant with no bone blocks. It\\u000a anatomically recreates the meniscus–tibial

Yee Han Dave Lee; David N. M. Caborn

363

Locked knee caused by meniscal subluxation: magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic verification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subluxation or dislocation of an intact lateral meniscus is a controversial and rarely reported cause of knee pain and locking. We report a case of knee locking caused by lateral meniscal subluxation in the absence of a meniscal tear or true discoid meniscus, with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopic verification. A 9.5-year-old child experienced multiple episodes of locking

Michael George; Eric J Wall

2003-01-01

364

Arthroscopic removal of EndoButton after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: case report and surgical technique.  

PubMed

Multiple methods of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are in use, and femoral fixation has been much discussed. The EndoButton Continuous Loop (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, Mass) fixation device has been shown to be efficacious and is in widespread use, but few complications have been reported. In this article, we describe the case of a properly positioned EndoButton that caused symptomatic extensor mechanism irritation necessitating arthroscopic removal. PMID:19212571

Petit, Charles; Millett, Peter J

2008-12-01

365

Arthroscopically assisted combined posterior cruciate ligament\\/posterior lateral complex reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the minimum 2-year results (range, 24 to 54 months) of 21 arthroscopically assisted posterior cruciate ligament\\/posterior lateral complex (PCL\\/PLC) reconstructions, evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Tegner, Lysholm, and Hospital for Special Surgery knee ligament rating scales, and the KT 1000 knee ligament arthrometer (Medmetric Corp., San Diego, CA, U.S.A.). There were 15 male and 6 female

Gregory C. Fanelli; Bradley F. Giannotti; Craig J. Edson

1996-01-01

366

Safety and efficacy of talonavicular arthroscopy in arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. A cadaveric study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a cadaveric study on the safety and efficacy of talonavicular arthroscopy in arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. Talonavicular\\u000a arthroscopy was performed in 18 feet of 9 fresh frozen cadavers. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (6 feet in each\\u000a group). The articular cartilage of the talar and navicular facet was abraded with a hemostat through the dorsolateral portal\\u000a in

Tun Hing Lui; L. K. Chan

2010-01-01

367

Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-tendon-bone patellar graft  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a retrospective study of 24 patients with chronic injury of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) treated by arthroscopically\\u000a assisted reconstruction with bone-tendon-bone patellar autograft. At a mean follow-up of 26.5 months (range 24–53 months)\\u000a the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation form, Lysholm and Tegner rating systems were used to evaluate\\u000a symptoms, functional limitations during sports and daily

P. P. Mariani; E. Adriani; N. Santori; G. Maresca

1997-01-01

368

Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Repair of parastomal represents a significant challenge for the hernia surgeon. Repair of these hernias is indicated because of an ill-fitting appliance, cosmetic deformity, inability to maintain proper hygiene and complications from the hernia itself such as incarceration or strangulation. Recent reports in the literature have shown that primary fascial repair can occur in 46% of patients and relocation of

K. A. LeBlanc; D. E. Bellanger; J. M. Whitaker; M. G. Hausmann

2005-01-01

369

Relevance of photobiological repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

From symposium on new trends in photobiology; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (15 ; Jul 1973). A review is presented of photobiological and photochemical studies in ; relation to radiation damage and repair. Some topics discussed are: repair of ; damage induced in DNA by ultraviolet and gamma radiation; the repair of ; chemically induced damage to DNA; uv-induced skin cancer;

Setlow

1973-01-01

370

Arthroscopic sternoclavicular joint resection arthroplasty: a technical note and illustrated case report.  

PubMed

Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values. PMID:24749040

Warth, Ryan J; Lee, Jared T; Campbell, Kevin J; Millett, Peter J

2014-02-01

371

Adult tibial eminence fracture fixation: arthroscopic procedure using K-wire folded fixation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe a new and simple technique for arthroscopic fixation of tibial intercondylar eminence avulsion fractures using folded surgical pin. This technique allows reduction and fixation of the bone fragment without using special equipment. After standard arthroscopic procedure to explore the knee and to remove fracture debris and blood clot, the bone block is reduced and advanced with the spike of the anterior cruciate ligament tibial drill guide. A 1.8-mm K-wire is drilled through the guide from the proximal tibia into the reduced fragment. It is bent on its end into the joint with a strong needle case. The K-wire is then pulled back until good fragment compression to the tibia appears with the wire starting unbending. Next, the other side is bent on the anterior tibial cortex and cut. This arthroscopic fixation allows elastic compression fragment stabilization that authorizes early weight bearing and rehabilitation programs. The material is extracted by traction after 6 months. PMID:17235617

Bonin, Nicolas; Jeunet, Laurent; Obert, Laurent; Dejour, David

2007-07-01

372

Femoroacetabular impingement in 45 professional athletes: associated pathologies and return to sport following arthroscopic decompression  

PubMed Central

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) occurs when an osseous abnormality of the proximal femur (cam) or acetabulum (pincer) triggers damage to the acetabular labrum and articular cartilage in the hip. Although the precise etiology of FAI is not well understood, both types of FAI are common in athletes presenting with hip pain, loss of range-of-motion, and disability in athletics. An open surgical approach to decompressing FAI has shown good clinical outcomes; however, this highly invasive approach inherently may delay or preclude a high level athlete’s return to play. The purpose of this study was to define associated pathologies and determine if an arthroscopic approach to treating FAI can allow professional athletes to return to high-level sport. Hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport. Between October 2000 and September 2005, 45 professional athletes underwent hip arthroscopy for the decompression of FAI. Operative and return-to-play data were obtained from patient records. Average time to follow-up was 1.6 years (range: 6 months to 5.5 years). Forty two (93%) athletes returned to professional competition following arthroscopic decompression of FAI. Three athletes did not return to play; however, all had diffuse osteoarthritis at the time of arthroscopy. Thirty-five athletes (78%) remain active in professional sport at an average follow-up of 1.6 years. Arthroscopic treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport.

Schenker, Mara; Briggs, Karen; Kuppersmith, David

2007-01-01

373

Arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy for first carpometacarpal arthritis: results at 7-year follow-up.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy combined with thermal capsular plication and temporary K-wire fixation in patients with painful thumb basal joint due to either osteoarthritis or posttraumatic arthritis. There were 18 thumbs that were evaluated in this retrospective study of arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy of the distal trapezium in addition to a pancapsular thermal shrinkage at an average of 7.6-year follow-up. No patient has required further surgery. A subjective improvement in pain, pinch activities, strength, and range of motion (ROM) was noted in all patients, and no patient had further surgery on their thumb. On exam, no patient had a first carpal-metacarpal grind or laxity. Total ROM of the thumb axis decreased by 20%, but all patients could oppose to the fifth finger. Grip strength remained unchanged, key pinch improved from 8 to 11 lbs, and tip pinch improved from 4 to 5 lbs. Radiographs showed a metacarpal subsidence of 1.8 mm (0-4 mm). Four complications were noted: two cases of dorsal radial nerve neuritis, one rupture of the flexor pollicis longus, and one prolonged hematoma. Results demonstrate that arthroscopic hemitrapeziectomy and capsular shrinkage for first carpometacarpal arthritis is an effective technique that provides high patient satisfaction, a functional pain-free thumb, and a reliable rate of return to activity. PMID:18820976

Hofmeister, Eric P; Leak, Robert S; Culp, Randall W; Osterman, A Lee

2009-03-01

374

Arthroscopic ligamentoplasty of the dorsal and volar portions of the scapholunate ligament.  

PubMed

Classical arthroscopic techniques for scapholunate instability consist of debridement, thermal shrinkage, and percutaneous pinning. Good results are obtained in acute lesions or in chronic partial tears, but they are less predictable when the lesion is complete, because of the poor healing capacity of the scapholunate ligament and because it is not possible to perform an anatomic ligamentous reconstruction with these techniques. Open techniques are thus required for reconstruction, but they damage the soft tissues. We recently published a description and cadaver study of an arthroscopic ligamentoplasty, trying to combine the advantages of arthroscopic techniques (minimally invasive surgery) and open techniques (reconstruction of the ligament). With this approach, it is possible to reconstruct the dorsal scapholunate ligament and the secondary stabilizers while causing minimal damage to the soft tissues and avoiding injury to the posterior interosseous nerve and detachment of the dorsal intercarpal ligament. The current report describes an additional step to this technique with which it is possible to reconstruct the volar portion of the scapholunate ligament. We also describe an early mobilization postoperative protocol that we believe is equally important. PMID:24275054

Corella, Fernando; Del Cerro, Miguel; Ocampos, Montserrat; Larrainzar-Garijo, Ricardo

2013-12-01

375

Arthroscopic Treatment of Comminuted Distal Clavicle Fractures (Latarjet Fractures) Using 2 Double-Button Devices  

PubMed Central

Complex distal clavicle fractures associated with a rupture of the coracoclavicular ligaments (Latarjet fractures) can result in delayed union or nonunion. There is no standard treatment for a clavicle fracture. This report introduces an arthroscopic technique for treating distal clavicle fractures associated with ruptured coracoclavicular ligament using 2 double-button devices. By use of posterior and anterior standard arthroscopic portals, the base of the coracoid process is exposed through the rotator interval. A 4-mm hole is drilled through the clavicle and the coracoid process with a specific ancillary drill guide. The first button is pushed through both holes down the coracoid process. The device is tightened, and the second button is fixed on top of the clavicle, allowing reduction and fixation of the proximal part of the fracture. Then, the undersurface of the lateral clavicle is dissected through standard posterior and lateral subacromial approaches. The inferior clavicle fragment is reduced and fixed to the clavicle body by a double button fixed down and at the top of the clavicle. With this technique, the arthroscopic treatment of distal clavicle fracture has been extended to comminuted fractures.

Pujol, Nicolas; Desmoineaux, Pierre; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

2013-01-01

376

Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy in high-level athletes  

PubMed Central

Summary To present the results of arthroscopic treatment of patellar tendinopathy in high-level competition athletes. Eleven high-level athletes presented chronic patellar tendinopathy which did not respond to long term conservative treatment. Average age of the patients was 24.8 ±3.4 years old. All patients received an arthroscopic procedure with osteoplasty of the distal patellar pole, debridement of the underlying Hoffa fat pad and of the degenerated areas of the proximal posterior patella tendon and cauterization of the visible neo-vessels. Mean duration of follow-up was 17.4±4 months. Patients showed a major improvement in the Lysholm score from 49.9±5.2 to 92.5±7 and in the VISA P score from 41.2±5.2 to 86.8±14.9 on tenth post-operative week. All patients had returned to sports activities by the twelfth postoperative week. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy found to be a minimal invasive and safe technique which produced satisfactory results.

Alaseirlis, Dimosthenis Artemis; Konstantinidis, George Athanasios; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Nakou, Lamprini Stefanos; Korompilias, Anastasios; Maffulli, Nicola

2012-01-01

377

Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique  

PubMed Central

Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start.

De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

2012-01-01

378

Arthroscopic evaluation for omalgia patients undergoing the clavicular hook plate fixation of distal clavicle fractures  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study is to investigate the anatomic changes in the shoulder joints responsible for omalgia after the clavicular hook plate fixation under arthroscope. Methods Arthroscopic examination was carried out for 12 omalgia patients who underwent clavicular hook plate fixation due to distal clavicle fractures. Functional outcome of shoulder was measured by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before and after the withdrawal of the fixation plate. Results The rotator cuff compression by the clavicular hook was arthroscopically observed in 11 of the 12 cases. The JOA scores of the shoulder were significantly improved at 1 month after the withdrawal of the fixation plate (pain, 28?±?2.4 vs. 15?±?5.2; function, 19.2?±?1.0 vs. 11.7?±?1.9; range of movements, 26.8?±?2.6 vs. 14.8?±?3.4) compared with before. Conclusions The impingement of the hook to the rotator cuff may be the main cause for the omalgia. The appropriate hook and plate that fit to the curve of the clavicle as well as the acromion are necessary to decrease the severity of omalgia.

2014-01-01

379

Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the shoulder: Fourteen-year follow-up  

PubMed Central

Shoulder arthrodesis is indicated in infections, brachial paralysis, irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis without indication of prosthesis, rescue after arthroplasty, or after surgery for cancer. Arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional. Our aim is presenting our result after 14 years of follow-up of one patient. We present a case report of a 17-year-old male patient. He suffered fracture of left scapula (type V, Ideberg), fracture of left clavicle (type I, Craig), and fracture of left distal ulna. We realized osteosynthesis of clavicle (plate and screws) with the aim of treating this floating shoulder. Electromyography showed partial axonotmesis of axilar nerve. After 7 months of follow-up, axonotmesis was still present. We realized arthroscopic shoulder arthrodesis (three cannulated screws). Fourteen years later, shoulder movement was as follows: Flexion, 0-90°; maximum abduction, 40° with shoulder atrophy; Constant, 47 points; and UCLA, 17 points, without pain. Arthrodesis with screws reaches a subjective benefit in 82% of patients. Percentage of pseudarthrosis is less than in patients treated with plates, although the risks of infections, fractures, and material removal are greater than in patients treated with plates. Shoulder arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional, but it allows minimal surgical aggression.

Jimenez-Martin, Antonio; Perez-Hidalgo, Santiago

2011-01-01

380

Long-term results after arthroscopic resection of lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.  

PubMed

Thirty-five patients with central and radial lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) were treated by arthroscopic resection and debridement. Their median age was 36 years (range 11-52), and preoperative duration of symptoms 18 months (range 4-132). Fall on a hyperextended wrist was the most common injury (n = 15), and nine patients had had a previous fracture of the radius. Eighteen patients had an additional arthroscopic debridement of coexisting chondral lesions. There were no complications. At a median follow up time of 39 months (range 18-58), grip strength was recorded as a median of 94% (range 4-164), flexion-extension sector as 94% (range 50-107), and pronation and supination sector as 100% (range 50-112) of the uninjured side. At follow up eight patients were free of pain, 14 much better, eight somewhat better, five unchanged, and no patient had got worse. The Mayo Modified Wrist Score assessed 13 patients as excellent, 14 good, four fair, and one poor. Thirty-one patients returned to full-time work, and four were unemployed (partly because of reasons not relevant to the operation). Thirty-three patients reported they would have had the same procedure if they had known the outcome of the surgery. We find arthroscopic debridement of central or radial lesions of the TFCC to be safe and reliable with good pain relief. PMID:11291355

Husby, T; Haugstvedt, J R

2001-03-01

381

The arthroscopic treatment of multidirectional shoulder instability: two-year results of a multiple suture technique.  

PubMed

Nineteen consecutive shoulders in 19 patients were treated for multidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic capsular shift. Indications for the procedure included complaints of pain, instability, or both that was unresponsive to a prescribed exercise program that stressed rotator cuff and scapular stabilizer strengthening. All patients had evidence of increased joint laxity on physical examination; 17 had a 2+ or greater sulcus test and 2 had 3+ laxity both anteriorly and posteriorly. Fourteen of the 19 patients were injured during athletic activity. All surgeries were performed in an outpatient setting. All the patients were evaluated at an average of 34 months postoperatively with a minimum follow-up of 25 months. Based on the outcome scale described by Tibone and Bradley, the average postoperative score was 91 out of a possible 100 with 13 excellent, 5 good, and 1 fair result. All but 1 of the athletes returned to their previous level of performance but none were elite throwers. One patient had recurrent anterior subluxations treated with a repeat arthroscopic capsular shift and was rated as good. The patient rated as fair had no improvement in her pain after surgery. One patient complained of a painful supraclavicular suture that resolved spontaneously. There were no neurovascular complications or infections. Visualization of intra-articular pathology was enhanced with the arthroscope and aided in the diagnosis of multidirectional instability. The described technique proved safe and effective in treating multidirectional instability and enabling athletes to return to their previous level of function. PMID:9276046

McIntyre, L F; Caspari, R B; Savoie, F H

1997-08-01

382

Arthroscopic Sternoclavicular Joint Resection Arthroplasty: A Technical Note and Illustrated Case Report  

PubMed Central

Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values.

Warth, Ryan J.; Lee, Jared T.; Campbell, Kevin J.; Millett, Peter J.

2014-01-01

383

Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

1996-04-01

384

Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the shoulder: Fourteen-year follow-up.  

PubMed

Shoulder arthrodesis is indicated in infections, brachial paralysis, irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis without indication of prosthesis, rescue after arthroplasty, or after surgery for cancer. Arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional. Our aim is presenting our result after 14 years of follow-up of one patient. We present a case report of a 17-year-old male patient. He suffered fracture of left scapula (type V, Ideberg), fracture of left clavicle (type I, Craig), and fracture of left distal ulna. We realized osteosynthesis of clavicle (plate and screws) with the aim of treating this floating shoulder. Electromyography showed partial axonotmesis of axilar nerve. After 7 months of follow-up, axonotmesis was still present. We realized arthroscopic shoulder arthrodesis (three cannulated screws). Fourteen years later, shoulder movement was as follows: Flexion, 0-90°; maximum abduction, 40° with shoulder atrophy; Constant, 47 points; and UCLA, 17 points, without pain. Arthrodesis with screws reaches a subjective benefit in 82% of patients. Percentage of pseudarthrosis is less than in patients treated with plates, although the risks of infections, fractures, and material removal are greater than in patients treated with plates. Shoulder arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional, but it allows minimal surgical aggression. PMID:21897586

Jiménez-Martín, Antonio; Pérez-Hidalgo, Santiago

2011-04-01

385

Arthroscopic Capsulolabral Reconstruction of the Type VIII Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior LesionMean 2Year Follow-up on 13 Shoulders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A type VIII superior labrum anterior posterior lesion represents pathologic posteroinferior extension of a type II superior labrum anterior posterior lesion with injury to the insertion of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. No reports in the literature describe arthroscopic treatment of a type VIII superior labrum anterior posterior lesion and its associated glenohumeral instability.Hypothesis: Arthroscopic capsulolabral

Shane Seroyer; Samir G. Tejwani; James P. Bradley

2007-01-01

386

Glenohumeral joint motion after subscapularis tendon repair: an analysis of cadaver shoulder models  

PubMed Central

Background As for the surgical treatment of the rotator cuff tears, the subscapularis tendon tears have recently received much attention for the mini-open or arthroscopic repair. The results of surgical repair for the subscapularis tendon tear are satisfactory, but the range of external rotation is reported to be restricted after the repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the range of glenohumeral joint motion after repairs of various sizes of subscapularis tendon tears. Methods Using eight fresh frozen human cadaveric shoulders (mean age at death, 81.5 years), three sizes of subscapularis tendon tear (small, medium, and large) were made and then repaired. With the scapula fixed to the wooden jig, the end-range of glenohumeral motion was measured with passive movement applied through 1.0-Nm torque in the directions of scapular elevation, flexion, abduction, extension, horizontal abduction, and horizontal adduction. The passive end-ranges of external and internal rotation in various positions with rotational torque of 1.0 Nm were also measured. Differences in the ranges among the three type tears were analyzed. Results As tear size increased, range of glenohumeral motion in horizontal abduction after repair decreased gradually and was significantly decreased with the large size tear (P?repair of large size tear at 30° to 60° of scapular elevation and abduction. Conclusions As the size of the subscapularis tendon tear increased, the passive ranges of horizontal abduction and external rotation of the glenohumeral joint after repair decreased significantly. In shoulders with a subscapularis tendon tear, it is necessary to consider the reduction of external rotation depending on tear size.

2014-01-01

387

Recurrent knee arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a 10-year asymptomatic period after arthroscopic synovectomy: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. The frequency of recurrence after arthroscopic synovectomy in patients with oligoarthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis was reported to be lower than that in patients with polyarthritis. However, recurrence in cases of oligoarthritis after arthroscopic knee synovectomy was shown to be 67% in one recent study and, furthermore, a shorter period free from recurrence was also reported after synovectomy. Here we report a child who suffered recurrent knee arthritis with a 10-year asymptomatic period after arthroscopic synovectomy. Case presentation A 12-year-old Japanese girl presented with normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 2 years she experienced joint swelling in both knees. Her symptoms continued and arthroscopic synovectomy was eventually performed. During the operation, rice bodies and thickening of the synovial membrane were observed; however, no definitive diagnosis was made. After a 10-year asymptomatic period, knee joint swelling recurred on one side without any cause. Arthroscopic synovectomy was beneficial in reducing the symptoms and in diagnosis. Conclusions Children who suffer prolonged joint swelling have a risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Even if the symptoms heal and no definite diagnosis is made at the first treatment, informed consent is needed to make the patients understand the future risk of recurrent arthritis after even lengthy asymptomatic periods.

2013-01-01

388

Optimality in DNA repair  

PubMed Central

DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

2012-01-01

389

Fundamentals of Airframe Repair  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this site, visitors will find introductory materials to airframes and airframe repair for helicopters and airplanes. The resource is divided into two parts; part one discusses the basic components and processes of airframes, and part two covers airframe damage repair. Additionally, each part is broken down into four lessons, including Aviation Hardware, Structural Repair, and Metal-Working Processes. The text of the material is supplemented with helpful labeled drawings to illustrate each part of the airframe. This resource is useful for students who are just beginning in the field of airframe maintenance and repair, or the more general fields of aeronautics or aeronautical engineering.

2006-12-25

390

Biomechanical testing of a new knotless suture anchor compared with established anchors for rotator cuff repair.  

PubMed

Various suture anchors are available for rotator cuff repair. For arthroscopic application, a knotless anchor was developed to simplify the intra-operative handling. We compared the new knotless anchor (BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC; DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) with established absorbable and titanium suture anchors (UltraSorbtrade mark and Super Revo 5mmtrade mark; ConMed Linvatec, Utica, NY). Each anchor was tested on 6 human cadaveric shoulders. The anchors were inserted into the greater tuberosity. An incremental cyclic loading was performed. Ultimate failure loads, anchor displacement, and mode of failure were recorded. The anchor displacement of the BIOKNOTLESStrade mark RC (15.3 +/- 5.3 mm) after the first cycle with 75 N was significantly higher than with the two other anchors (Super Revo 2.1 +/- 1.6 mm, UltraSorb: 2.7 +/- 1.1 mm). There was no significant difference in the ultimate failure loads of the 3 anchors. Although the Bioknotlesstrade mark RC indicated comparable maximal pullout strength, it bares the risk of losing contact between the tendon-bone-interface due to a significantly higher system displacement. Therefore, gap formation between the bone and the soft tissue fixation jeopardizes the repair. Bioknotlesstrade mark RC should be used in the lateral row only when a double row technique for rotator cuff repair is performed, and is not appropriate for rotator cuff repair if used on its own. PMID:18396417

Pietschmann, Matthias F; Froehlich, Valerie; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E

2008-01-01

391

Needle Assisted Arthroscopic Clysis of the Medial Collateral Ligament of the Knee: a Simple Technique to Improve Exposure in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery  

PubMed Central

During knee arthroscopy, narrowness and tightness maybe encountered in the medial compartment that does not allow sufficient visualization or instrumentation. When this occurs, our team has found it helpful to perform a percutaneous clysis of the deep portion of the medial collateral ligament with a spinal needle. With the knee positioned in 10° to 20° of flexion and a valgus stress is applied. A spinal needle (18 Gauge) is passed percutaneously through the medial collateral ligament between the tibial plateau and undersurface of the medial meniscus. Several passes are made with the spinal needle with the bevel of the needle angled to selectively divide the fibers while keeping the medial collateral ligament under tension. Then with controlled valgus force, the medial compartment will progressively open allowing improved visualization to the posteromedial corner of the knee. This increase in space gives an enhanced visual field and further allows more room for arthroscopic instrumentation.

Li, Xinning; Selby, Ronald M.; Newman, Ashley; O'Brien, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

392

Arthroscopic resection of multiple ossifying tumors in the infrapatellar fat pad  

PubMed Central

A 49 year-old male visited a nearby clinic five years back with a complaint of pain in the right knee during exercise. Plain radiographs revealed absence of any anomalies. He began to feel a lumpy mass in his right knee two years back. The pain worsened, on imaging, an anomaly was identified in the infrapatellar fat pad of his right knee, and he was subsequently referred to our department where he was hospitalized. On examination, a mass extending on either side of the patellar tendon was identified along with rigid tenderness in that area. The knee’s range of motion was 0degrees-130degrees, and knee flexion was accompanied by pain. The results of blood tests were normal. A plain radiograph of the knee revealed multiple ossifying tumors at a site consistent with the infrapatellar fat pad. T1-weighted MRI exhibited low-signal intensity, while T2-weighted MRI exhibited a mosaic-shaped tumor. We performed arthroscopic surgery to excise the tumor. The patient resumed work shortly after surgery and did not experience any pain during the two year postoperative observation period. The joint’s range of motion improved to the extent that it was comparable with that of the left knee. No recurrence was observed on radiographic examination. In past studies, resection of similar tumors has been performed with an arthrotomy; however, we performed arthroscopic resection on our patient, who demonstrated a quick improvement in symptoms and range of motion after surgery. We believe that arthroscopic surgery is a feasible option to consider while treating such cases.

2012-01-01

393

Prognostic value of chondral defects on the outcome after arthroscopic treatment of acetabular labral tears.  

PubMed

Pathology of the acetabular labrum plays an increasing role in the treatment of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy has proven its clinical value as a useful procedure for successful treatment of labral tears. Until today, only a few studies have investigated the influence of articular cartilage defects on the clinical outcome of partial arthroscopic labrum resection in a larger patient population. We prospectively evaluated patients with an intraoperatively proven labral lesion/tear without any radiological and arthroscopical sign of a concomitant bony femoroacetabular impingement or hip dysplasia for a minimum postoperative follow-up of 2 years. Cartilage defects were classified according to Outerbridge and divided into two subgroups: Outerbridge < or = 1 and Outerbridge > or = 2, respectively. To evaluate combined results, various established scoring systems (visual analogue scale, modified Harris Hip Score, Larson Hip Score) were used. Out of 54 originally enrolled patients, 50 individuals (29 female, 21 male) with a median age of 33 years (range 15-49) were available for follow-up after a mean of 34 (range 24-48) months. At follow-up, the total study population experienced significant improvement in pain and in the combined evaluation scales (Larson Hip Score/MHHS). When patients were categorized into two subgroups, either with intraoperatively present or absent articular cartilage defects, our data indicated that subjects with no degenerative changes of the articular cartilage surface significantly improved in the applied clinically scoring systems. In contrast, in patients with an articular cartilage lesion during hip arthroscopy score values had a tendency to be unimproved or even deteriorated at follow-up. Regression analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between postoperative outcome and the grading of the coexistent articular cartilage defect. On the basis of our investigation, we conclude that partial arthroscopic resection of a torn labrum without attending bone deformity (dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement) can reveal good and satisfied results. Depending on the extent of a coexisting articular cartilage defect subjective clinical results are compromised. PMID:19565221

Streich, Nikolaus A; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Barié, Alexander; Schmitt, Holger

2009-10-01

394

A Comparison of Functional Outcomes After Metallic and Bioabsorbable Interference Screw Fixations in Arthroscopic ACL Reconstructions  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is as one of the most frequently injured ligaments in the modern contact sports scenario. Graft fixations can be achieved during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions by using either bioabsorbable screws or metal screws. The objective of this study was to compare the functional outcomes after bioabsorbable and metallic interference screw fixations in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions done by using hamstring grafts. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized study. Patients in Group 1 received bioabsorbable interference screws and patients in Group 2 received metallic interference screws. Arthroscopic assisted, anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions with the use of hamstring grafts which were fixed proximally with endobuttons and distally with bioabsorbable or metallic interference screws, were undertaken. Progress in functional outcomes was assessed by using Mann Whitney U- test. Functional outcomes in the two groups were compared by using independent t-test. Observation and Results: In each group, there were statistically significant improvements in functional outcomes over successive follow-ups, which were seen on basis on Mann-Whitney U-test. The comparison of functional outcomes between the two groups, done by using independent t-test, showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year of follow-up. p-value <0.05 was considered to be significant in our study. Conclusion: In our prospective study of comparison of functional outcomes between bioabsorbable and metallic interference screws in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstuctions, which were evaluated by using Tegner activity scale and Lysholm knee scoring scale for a period of 1 year, no statistically significant difference was found. However, further authentication is required by doing long term studies.

Rai, Deepak K; Kannampilly, Antony J

2014-01-01

395

Arthroscopic Capsular Plication in the Treatment of Shoulder Pain in Competitive Swimmers  

PubMed Central

Shoulder pain is a common and difficult problem in competitive swimmers due to cumulative loads from repetitive overhead motion. Capsular laxity has been implicated as a potential etiology for shoulder pain in competitive swimmers. No study has examined the role of capsular plication in addressing recurrent shoulder pain in competitive swimmers. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively describe our series of competitive swimmers treated with arthroscopic capsular plication with a primary outcome of return to competitive swimming. Eighteen shoulders in 15 patients underwent arthroscopic capsular plication from 2003 to 2007. Patients were contacted at an average follow-up of 29 months (range, 8–42) and a swimming history, American Shoulder and Elbow (ASES) scores, and L'Insalata scores were obtained. At time of surgery, all patients demonstrated laxity under examination under anesthesia. All patients had a positive drive-through sign. Eighty percent (12/15) of patients returned to competitive swimming although only 20% (3/15) were able to return to their pre-injury training regimen volume. All patients subjectively reported improved pain after surgery. The average ASES score was 78?±?16 (average, standard deviation). The average L'Insalata score was 82?±?11. Although our results demonstrate that arthroscopic capsular plication has utility in the treatment of shoulder pain in swimmers who have failed non-operative treatment, the inability of some athletes to return to pre-injury training volume illustrates the difficult nature of shoulder pain in swimmers. Level of Evidence: Retrospective case series, Level IV

Chen, Neal C.; Rodeo, Scott A.

2010-01-01

396

Patellar instability with and without trochlear dysplasia: new arthroscopic medial soft tissue plication with pullout technique.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and radiologic results of an arthroscopic medial plication with the pullout technique and to define indications and limitations of this procedure for patellar instability. Records of 45 patients treated for patellar instability with arthroscopic medial plication with the pullout technique were reviewed. The mean patient age was 22.8±8.3 years. The tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, trochlear depth (TD), and Insall-Salvati ratio were measured using magnetic resonance imaging taken preoperatively. Patients were evaluated clinically by the Insall and Kujala score and radiographically by measuring the congruence angle, lateral patellofemoral angle, and lateral patellar translation pre- and postoperatively. Patients were classified into 2 groups: group 1 comprised 23 patients with TD greater than or equal to 3.0 mm and group 2 comprised 22 patients with TD less than 3.0 mm. A significant improvement (P=.007) in postoperative clinical scores compared with preoperative values was observed. The congruence angle improved to 11.0°±20.6° (P=.006), the lateral patellofemoral angle improved to -1.6°±7.7° (P?.0001), and the lateral patellar translation improved to 8.7±5.3 mm (P?.0001) postoperatively. There were 5 (11%) failure cases. No significant difference existed in the number of failure cases and clinical scores between the 2 groups. This arthroscopic medial soft tissue pullout technique showed good clinical and radiologic results for patellar instability even in the presence of mild to moderate trochlear dysplasia. However, the technique showed limited success in severe trochlear dysplasia cases. PMID:24200442

Ahn, Jin Hwan; Kang, Jun Hee; Kasat, Niraj Sharad; Kim, Jae Gyoon

2013-11-01

397

Safety and efficacy of talonavicular arthroscopy in arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. A cadaveric study.  

PubMed

This is a cadaveric study on the safety and efficacy of talonavicular arthroscopy in arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. Talonavicular arthroscopy was performed in 18 feet of 9 fresh frozen cadavers. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (6 feet in each group). The articular cartilage of the talar and navicular facet was abraded with a hemostat through the dorsolateral portal in group 1 specimens. The cartilage was abraded through the dorsomedial portal in group 2 specimens and through the medial portal in group 3 specimens. The area of cartilage abrasion represented the working area of the corresponding portal. The working area of individual portal and the relationship of individual portal to the adjacent neurovascular structure were studied. The medial portal averaged 12 mm medial to the long saphenous vein and saphenous nerve. The dorsomedial portal was 1 mm lateral to the intermediate cutaneous branch of superficial peroneal nerve and 5 mm lateral to the extensor hallucis longus tendon. It was 4 mm lateral to the deep peroneal nerve. The dorsolateral portal was 4 mm medial to the lateral branch of superficial peroneal nerve. In group 1, the working area of the dorsolateral portal averaged 60 +/- 4% for the talar facet and 66 +/- 12% for the navicular facet. In group 2, the working area of the dorsomedial portal averaged 56 +/- 3% for the talar facet and 64 +/- 8% for the navicular facet. In group 3, the working area of the medial portal averaged 40 +/- 4% for the talar facet and 55 +/- 11% for the navicular facet. Most of the talar and navicular surfaces can be prepared for fusion without the need of excessive bone removal during arthroscopic triple arthrodesis. This study confirmed the efficacy of the arthroscopic triple arthrodesis and arouses the surgeon about the risk of neural damage especially at the dorsomedial portal. PMID:20217388

Lui, Tun Hing; Chan, L K

2010-05-01

398

Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee.  

PubMed

The short-term recovery period post-arthroscopic meniscectomy is characterized by pain and impaired function most likely related to the irrigation of synovial fluid from the knee intraoperatively. Consequently, along with removal of harmful debris, the irrigation fluid dilutes the hyaluronic acid layer covering the joint tissues. Hyaluronic acid contributes to the homeostasis of the joint environment and is an important component of synovial fluid and cartilage matrix. Hence, the instillation of hyaluronic acid after the procedure may relieve symptoms. This prospective, single-blind, randomized, controlled study evaluated clinical outcome after hyaluronic acid injection to patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee. Patients with ligamentous injuries or severe chondral damage were excluded. Fifty-six patients with a mean age of 34 years (range, 17-44 years) were injected with Viscoseal (TRB Chemedica International S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) or normal saline immediately post-arthroscopy and divided into the Viscoseal group or control group, respectively. Patients were evaluated for pain, swelling, and function at 1, 4, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Patients in the control group reported more pain at week 1, with a mean visual analog score (VAS) of 43, than did patients in the Viscoseal group, with a mean VAS of 28 (P=.006). At 4 weeks postoperatively, none of the Viscoseal patients had consumed analgesics, where 9 (of 28) in the control group reported acetaminophen intake (P=.039). No significant difference in knee function was found between groups. Intra-articular injection of Viscoseal after arthroscopic meniscectomy reduced pain in the short-term recovery period. PMID:20954664

Thein, Rafael; Haviv, Barak; Kidron, Amos; Bronak, Shlomo

2010-10-01

399

Arthroscopic Excision of Intra-Articular Hip Osteoid Osteoma: A Report of 2 Cases  

PubMed Central

Intra-articular osteoid osteoma is uncommon accounting for approximately 12% of all osteoid osteomas. It presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges since several traumatic or degenerative pathologies of the joint can be simulated with delay in the diagnosis. We report the clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings in 2 cases of intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck and of the acetabulum. Technical aspects of arthroscopic excision and results of surgery are discussed. Arthroscopy allowed complete excision of the osteoid osteomas, with a short postoperative rehabilitation and excellent functional results.

Nehme, Alexandre H.; Bou Ghannam, Alaa G.; Imad, Joseph P.; Jabbour, Fouad C.; Moucharafieh, Ramzi; Wehbe, Joseph

2012-01-01

400

Arthroscopic excision of intra-articular hip osteoid osteoma: a report of 2 cases.  

PubMed

Intra-articular osteoid osteoma is uncommon accounting for approximately 12% of all osteoid osteomas. It presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges since several traumatic or degenerative pathologies of the joint can be simulated with delay in the diagnosis. We report the clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings in 2 cases of intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck and of the acetabulum. Technical aspects of arthroscopic excision and results of surgery are discussed. Arthroscopy allowed complete excision of the osteoid osteomas, with a short postoperative rehabilitation and excellent functional results. PMID:23304593

Nehme, Alexandre H; Bou Ghannam, Alaa G; Imad, Joseph P; Jabbour, Fouad C; Moucharafieh, Ramzi; Wehbe, Joseph

2012-01-01

401

Arthroscopic identification of iliopubic and ilioischial grooves in a single adult acetabulum  

PubMed Central

We report the arthroscopic identification of combined morphological variants of the acetabulum in an adult. The combination of iliopubic and ilioischial grooves has not been reported before. Preoperative radiographic and MRI failed to detect the lesions. These grooves strongly suggest incomplete fusion between the three limbs of the triradiate cartilage. When identified, this condition should not be treated as pathological but as a rare anatomical variant. Hip arthroscopy is a competent tool in discovering such asymptomatic cartilage abnormalities and subtle anatomical variations even in the presence of normal preoperative imaging.

Paliobeis, C P; Villar, R N

2010-01-01

402

Arthroscopic-assisted core decompression for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.  

PubMed

The management of pre-collapse osteonecrosis of the femoral head is controversial. Core decompression is a technique that theoretically decreases the intraosseous pressure of the femoral head, resulting in a local vascularized healing response. Its efficacy has been shown in delaying early subchondral collapse. We describe the technique of arthroscopic-assisted core decompression of the femoral head for osteonecrosis. The advantages of this technique include evaluation of the presence or absence of articular cartilage injury, subchondral collapse, and guidance during reaming and curettage. It also allows the ability to address any concomitant soft-tissue or bony pathology associated with or in addition to the osteonecrotic lesion. PMID:24749025

Gupta, Anil K; Frank, Rachel M; Harris, Joshua D; McCormick, Frank; Mather, Richard C; Nho, Shane J

2014-02-01

403

Fibrin glue as a non-invasive outpatient treatment for post-arthroscopic knee seromas.  

PubMed

Post-surgical seromas and cysts have been reported across many surgical subspecialties including orthopaedics. Treatments include both invasive surgical approaches and more recently reported non-invasive techniques. Non-invasive approaches currently include compressive wrapping, vasopneumatic cryotherapy, and motion exercises. Persistent lesions have been treated with talc or doxycycline sclerodesis. This case presents a patient with a post-arthroscopic seroma that was treated with fibrin glue in an outpatient setting. Fibrin glue has not been reported in the post-arthroscopy outpatient setting to address cystic lesions. This case suggests a viable non-invasive treatment option for these lesions. Level of evidence V. PMID:23579228

Berkoff, David J; Kanaan, Matthew; Kamath, Ganesh

2013-08-01

404

In Situ Pinning With Arthroscopic Osteoplasty for Mild SCFE: A Preliminary Technical Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  There is emerging evidence that even mild slipped capital femoral epiphysis leads to early articular damage. Therefore, we\\u000a have begun treating patients with mild slips and signs of impingement with in situ pinning and immediate arthroscopic osteoplasty.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Description of Techniques  Surgery was performed using the fracture table. After in situ pinning and diagnostic arthroscopy, peripheral compartment access\\u000a was obtained and head-neck

Michael Leunig; Kevin Horowitz; Hannes Manner; Reinhold Ganz

2010-01-01

405

Combined arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance in the atraumatic treatment of posterior ankle impingement syndrome.  

PubMed

Posterior ankle impingement syndrome can result from chronic overuse or acute trauma. When coupled with the presence of an anatomic bony anomaly, the patient can present with significant pain with maximal plantarflexion. Treatment involves resection of the site of bony impingement (e.g., os trigonum or fractured Steida's process) and circumferential fibrosis and inflammation. The presented technique involves a stepwise approach incorporating focused arthroscopic release of the surrounding fibrosis and atraumatic fluoroscopic resection of the bony source of impingement. Thus, a minimal amount of trauma is incurred to the patient, and fragment resection is performed in an efficient manner. PMID:22766192

Sundararajan, Priya Ponnapula

2012-01-01

406

Bupivacaine\\/ketamine is superior to intra-articu-lar ketamine analgesia following arthroscopic knee surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a Purpose  Centroneuraxial and parenteral administration of ketamine has been shown to produce analgesia. However, this analgesia is\\u000a limited by adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ketamine alone or in combination with bupivacaine\\u000a provides superior pain relief after surgery in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Sixty patients (classified as ASA status I or II) undergoing arthroscopic meniscus

Yatindra Kumar Batra; Rajesh Mahajan; Sushil Kumar Bangalia; Onkar Nath Nagi; Mandeep Singh Dhillon

2005-01-01

407

A pyogenic, ruptured Baker's cyst induced by arthroscopic pressure pump irrigation.  

PubMed

Post-steroid septic arthritis can be treated with irrigation pump assisted arthroscopic synovectomy. The high-intra-articular fluid pressures can force the pyogenic fluid into a pre-existing Baker's cyst. The cyst can rupture and with the pre-existing steroid induced immune-suppression, the calf abscess will be hard to control. Therefore, thorough investigation with an ultrasound-guided aspiration followed by an early drainage of the collection is warranted and mandatory. Close monitoring for the development of a deep thrombosis of the popliteal vein is required. PMID:19083206

Corten, Kristoff; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Reynders, Peter; Nijs, Stefaan; Pittevils, Theo; Bellemans, Johan

2009-03-01

408

Divergent diagnosis from arthroscopic findings and identification of CPII and C2C for detection of cartilage degradation in horses.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in synovial fluid concentration of collagen type II cleavage site (C2C) and procollagen II C-propeptide (CPII), markers of joint cartilage degeneration and synthesis, respectively, in horses with intraarticular fracture or osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD), and to examine the relationship between arthroscopic findings and these biomarker levels. Synovial fluid was collected from 36 joints in 18 horses (6 fractures and 12 OCDs). Samples from contralateral normal joints, when available, served as controls (n = 12). Concentrations of C2C and CPII were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. Moreover, the severity of the cartilage degradation was graded arthroscopically in 16 horses, and the correlation between the C2C and CPII levels and the arthroscopic scores were investigated. Compared to the control, the concentration of C2C was increased in OCD joints but not in fracture joints, whereas the concentration of CPII was increased in fracture joints but not in OCD joints. Within each disease group there was no correlation between biomarker levels and arthroscopic findings. Therefore, although C2C and CPII have diagnostic potential further knowledge is required to provide accurate analysis. PMID:20364792

Lettry, Vivien; Sumie, Yasuharu; Mitsuda, Kenta; Tagami, Masaaki; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

2010-02-01

409

Arthroscopic management of temporomandibular joint disc perforations and associated advanced chondromalacia by discoplasty and abrasion arthroplasty: preliminary results.  

PubMed

This article describes the arthroscopic surgical treatment of disc perforations by discoplasty to mobilize the disc and reduce joint friction. Grade IV chondromalacia with exposed bone was treated by abrasion arthroplasty with the goal of resurfacing the bone with fibrocartilage. Preliminary data on the results of these procedures are presented. PMID:8040731

Quinn, J H

1994-08-01

410

An arthroscopic technique for confirming intra-articular subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon: The ramp test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this technical note is to introduce the ramp test and explain this arthroscopic technique. The ramp test is used to test the integrity of the soft tissue restraint to intra-articular subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. Injury to the soft tissue restraint, the hidden lesion, has been proposed as occurring in conjunction with a

Gregory S. Motley; Daryl C. Osbahr; Thomas F. Holovacs; Kevin P. Speer

2002-01-01

411

An arthroscopic technique for confirming intra-articular subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon: the ramp test.  

PubMed

The purpose of this technical note is to introduce the ramp test and explain this arthroscopic technique. The ramp test is used to test the integrity of the soft tissue restraint to intra-articular subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. Injury to the soft tissue restraint, the hidden lesion, has been proposed as occurring in conjunction with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Both cadaveric dissections and arthroscopic patient assessments were conducted to develop the ramp test. In this study, 17 patients also presented with refractory anterior shoulder pain and underwent arthroscopy to further characterize the ramp test. An abnormal examination result showed that the long head of the biceps tendon translated medially and inferiorly across the humeral head. In addition, this subgroup of 17 patients all had an abnormal ramp test but did not have a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. The ramp test is now applied to all arthroscopic procedures by the senior author, and we recommend its use for arthroscopic confirmation of intra-articular subluxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. Thus, we advocate that an abnormal ramp test result indicates pathology and warrants the surgical removal of the long head of the biceps tendon from the glenohumeral joint. PMID:12426555

Motley, Gregory S; Osbahr, Daryl C; Holovacs, Thomas F; Speer, Kevin P

2002-01-01

412

Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: Clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up findings at two to five years  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1996 to 1999, 95 shoulders with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were treated arthroscopically by the same surgeon and assigned to the same rehabilitation program. The 63 patients matching the inclusion criteria were reviewed after a mean follow-up of 36 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical functional assessment was performed separately by the same three surgeons using the Constant

Giuseppe Porcellini; Paolo Paladini; Fabrizio Campi; Massimo Paganelli

2004-01-01

413

Estimation of the Young's modulus of articular cartilage using an arthroscopic indentation instrument and ultrasonic measurement of tissue thickness  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated whether the use of cartilage thickness measurement would improve the ability of the arthroscopic indentation technique to estimate the intrinsic stiffness of articular cartilage. First, cartilage thickness and ultrasound reflection from the surface of bovine humeral head were registered in situ using a high-frequency ultrasound probe. Subsequently, cartilage was indented in situ at the sites of the ultrasound

J Töyräs; T Lyyra-Laitinen; M Niinimäki; R Lindgren; M. T Nieminen; I Kiviranta; J. S Jurvelin

2001-01-01

414

Arthroscopic treatment of a medial meniscal cyst using a posterior trans-septal approach: a case report.  

PubMed

Arthroscopic partial menisectomy followed by cyst decompression is currently recommended for treatment of a meniscal cyst. However, it is doubtful whether partial menisectomy should be performed on cysts communicating with the joint in cases without a meniscal tear on its surface since meniscal function will be sacrificed. In this report, a meniscal cyst arising from the posterior horn of the medial meniscus without meniscal tear on its surface was resected using an arthroscopic posterior trans-septal approach. A 59 year-old male presented to our hospital with popliteal pain when standing up after squatting down. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated meniscal cyst arising from the posterior horn of the medial meniscus extending to the posterior septum with a grade 2 meniscal tear by Mink's classification. The medial meniscus was intact on the surface on arthroscopic examination. The meniscal cyst and posterior septum were successfully resected using a posterior trans-septal approach without harming the meniscus. This is the first report on a meniscal cyst being resected using an arthroscopic posterior trans-septal approach with a 9-month follow-up period. PMID:20939883

Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Torikai, Eiji; Suzuki, Daisuke; Banno, Tomohiro; Honda, Yosuke

2010-01-01

415

Arthroscopic treatment of sports-related anterior osteophytes in the ankle.  

PubMed

Osteophytes on the anterior aspect of the tibia and anterior talus are common in athletes such as dancers, runners, and high jumpers who impact with quick and forceful dorsiflexion to this area. This pathology is often confirmed easily on lateral x-ray films. Excision, debridement, and/or abrasion arthroplasty can be performed arthroscopically to remove osteophytic bone. The joint space is easily approached and managed using small joint or even regular-sized arthroscopic instruments. Care is taken to reshape the anterior tibia and/or talus to its original contour, thus avoiding impingement of the joint space and scuffing of adjacent articular cartilage. Proper abrasion depths and punch lesions may be needed to expose bleeding capillary bone. This allows a regeneration of a fibrocartilage covering that not only decreases pain but also permits a return to functional and athletic activities. Postoperative treatment, including physical therapy, is described. Three case studies are presented that adequately demonstrate this problem, along with the corrective measures taken. Each case concludes with a brief summary of follow-up. PMID:3147229

Hawkins, R B

1988-10-01

416

Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS): A Potential Arthroscopic Tool for Quantitative Assessment of Articular Cartilage  

PubMed Central

Conventional ultrasound examination of the articular cartilage performed externally on the body surface around the joint has limited accuracy due to the inadequacy in frequency used. In contrast to this, minimally invasive arthroscopy-based ultrasound with adequately high frequency may be a better alternative to assess the cartilage. Up to date, no special ultrasound transducer for imaging the cartilage in arthroscopic use has been designed. In this study, we introduced the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for this purpose. An IVUS system with a catheter-based probe (Ø ? 1mm) was used to measure the thickness and surface acoustical reflection of the bovine patellar articular cartilage in vitro before and after degeneration induced by enzyme treatments. Similar measurement was performed using another high frequency ultrasound system (Vevo) with a probe of much larger size and the results were compared between the two systems. The thickness measured using IVUS was highly correlated (r = 0.985, p < 0.001) with that obtained by Vevo. Thickness and surface reflection amplitude measured using IVUS on the enzymatically digested articular cartilage showed changes similar to those obtained by Vevo, which were expectedly consistent with previous investigations. IVUS can be potentially used for the quantitative assessment of articular cartilage, with its ready-to-use arthroscopic feature.

Huang, Yan-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Ping

2009-01-01

417

Arthroscopic treatment of intraarticular fibrous bands after total knee arthroplasty. A followup note.  

PubMed

Eighteen consecutive patients (average age, 66.4 years at arthroscopy) who had a previous total knee arthroplasty underwent arthroscopic resection of a transverse suprapatellar fibrous band, which was causing patellar snapping and jumping as it impinged on the intercondylar notch portion of the femoral component during active extension (tethered patellar syndrome). Fourteen patients were available for followup at an average of 56 months (range, 37-91 months). All patients had complete relief of the patellar symptoms. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms 10 months after arthroscopy but remained symptom free 30 months after repeat resection. All are currently symptom free and are classified as having excellent results. The average range of motion is 1 degree to 115 degrees. There were no complications attributable to the arthroscopy. The tethered patellar syndrome has been noted by various authors, and has been most commonly treated by arthrotomy. At arthroscopy, a transverse suprapatellar fibrous band was seen to catch on the intercondylar notch of the femoral component, snapping free as the knee extended past approximately 30 degrees. In this population, excellent long-term results were achieved with arthroscopic removal of the transverse suprapatellar band. PMID:7994966

Lintner, D M; Bocell, J R; Tullos, H S

1994-12-01

418

The Effects of Intraarticular Opioids in pain relief after Arthroscopic Menisectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: Knee arthroscopy is a painful procedure which if untreated will cause intensive and prolonged pain that may prevent rehabilitation of patients. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effects of different opioids in the early post operative period in comparison to control group. Methodology: One hundred forty patients were prospectively assigned to four groups randomly. After arthroscopic menisectomy all patients received an intraarticular injection containing 9.5 ml bupivacaine 0.5% with 1:200000 epinephrine in a 10 ml syringe. The remainder of syringe was filled with one of the study solutions. Group I: 5mg methadone, group II: 5mg morphine, group III: 5 ml normal saline, group IV: 50 mg meperidine. At three stages in the ealy post operative period the need for analgesics was recorded. A statistical comparison was done afterwards. Results : In morphine group (group II), the analgesic usage in hospitalized and outpatients compared with other groups was significantly low(P<0.05). Conclusion: Morphine in comparison to meperidine or methadone is more beneficial in reducing pain or analgesic need when is added to bupivacain injection following arthroscopic menisectomy.

Arti, Hamidreza; Arti, Sara

2013-01-01

419

Reliability Assessment of Arthroscopic Findings Versus MRI in ACL Injuries of the Knee  

PubMed Central

Introduction: This study was conducted to analyze the reliability of clinical diagnosis in ACL tear injuries. Material and methods: All patients attending our clinic with knee pain from 2009 to 2013 underwent systematic and thorough clinical assessment. From one hundred and three patients with knee problems in 73 were arhroscopicaly diagnosed ACL tears. All these patients underwent therapeutic arthroscopic knee surgery. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed during this procedure. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were calculated based on these arthroscopic findings. Results: The accuracy of clinical diagnosis in our study was 82.5% for ACL tears. Our study revealed high sensitivity and specificity and almost high accuracy for ACL injuries of knee joint in comparison to arthroscopy. MRI is an appropriate screening tool for therapeutic arthroscopy, making diagnostic arthroscopy unnecessary in most patients. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging is accurate and non invasive modality for the assessment of ligamentous injuries. It can be used as a first line investigation in patients with soft tissue trauma to knee.

Kostov, Hristijan; Stojmenski, Slavcho; Kostova, Elena

2014-01-01

420

Isokinetic torque deficit of the knee extensor muscles after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.  

PubMed

Isokinetic torque deficit of the knee extensor muscles in the operated leg was measured in 21 male patients (mean age 26.4 +/- 1.9 years) who had undergone arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The isokinetic torque testing was performed 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively using the Cybex II dynamometer according to standard technique. Isokinetic knee extension peak torque (PT) at angular velocities of 60 degrees and 180 degrees/s was determined in both legs, and the proportional PT deficit in the operated leg was compared with that in the nonoperated leg. A significant (P<0.001) isokinetic PT deficit in the operated leg in testing with angular velocity of 60 degrees and 80 degrees/s was observed at 1 month (28.6% and 31.0%, respectively) and 3 months (19.8% and 15.8%, respectively) postoperatively. At 6 months postoperatively a significant (P<0.001) isokinetic PT deficit (18.2%) of the knee extensor muscles in the operated leg was observed only in testing with angular velocity of 60 degrees/s; no significant differences (P>0.05) in isokinetic PT between the operated and nonoperated leg in testing with angular velocity of 180 degrees/s was found 6 months postoperatively. Thus in patients with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy the postoperative recovery of isokinetic strength of the knee extensor muscles in the injured leg is closely related to testing velocity, while it is more delayed at low than intermediate angular velocities. PMID:11061300

Gapeyeva, H; Pääsuke, M; Ereline, J; Pintsaar, A; Eller, A

2000-01-01