Sample records for article pathogen pathway

  1. FY2003 LDRD Final Annual Report Article: Pathogen Pathway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2003-11-10

    Understanding virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens is vital to anticipating biological threats and to improving detectors, vaccines, and treatments. This project will characterize factors responsible for virulence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague and a biothreat agent, which has an inducible Type III secretion virulence mechanism also found in other animal, plant, and human pathogens. Our approach relies on genomic and proteomic characterization of Y. pestis in addition to a bioinformatic infrastructure. Scientific and technical capabilities developed in this project can be applied to other microbes of interest. This work will establish a significant new direction for biodefense at LLNL and expand our national and international scientific collaborations.

  2. Intervention of Phytohormone Pathways by Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal; Lyons, Rebecca

    2014-06-10

    The constant struggle between plants and microbes has driven the evolution of multiple defense strategies in the host as well as offense strategies in the pathogen. To defend themselves from pathogen attack, plants often rely on elaborate signaling networks regulated by phytohormones. In turn, pathogens have adopted innovative strategies to manipulate phytohormone-regulated defenses. Tactics frequently employed by plant pathogens involve hijacking, evading, or disrupting hormone signaling pathways and/or crosstalk. As reviewed here, this is achieved mechanistically via pathogen-derived molecules known as effectors, which target phytohormone receptors, transcriptional activators and repressors, and other components of phytohormone signaling in the host plant. Herbivores and sap-sucking insects employ obligate pathogens such as viruses, phytoplasma, or symbiotic bacteria to intervene with phytohormone-regulated defenses. Overall, an improved understanding of phytohormone intervention strategies employed by pests and pathogens during their interactions with plants will ultimately lead to the development of new crop protection strategies. PMID:24920334

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moths that Vector a Plant Pathogen also Transport

    E-print Network

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moths that Vector a Plant Pathogen also Transport Endophytic Fungi Abstract Claviceps paspali, a common fungal pathogen of Paspalum grasses, attracts moth vectors asymptomatic plant tissue and may influence host susceptibility to pathogens. We quantified infections by C

  4. Early signal transduction pathways in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Blumwald; Gilad S Aharon; Bernard C. H. Lam

    1998-01-01

    Disease resistance depends on the ability of the plant to recognize a pathogen early in the infection process. Molecules that indicate the presence of the pathogen (elicitors) activate host receptors and these rapidly generate an internal signal that triggers early defense responses. Several transduction pathways that relay the initial recognition signal through a series of cytosolic and membrane-delimited pathways have

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Comparative genomics of emerging pathogens in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Comparative genomics of emerging pathogens in the Candida glabrata of candidemia worldwide. These two pathogenic yeasts are distantly related, C. glabrata being part to be the only pathogenic Nakaseomyces, two new pathogens have recently been described within this group: C

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Heterologous expression of pathogen-specific

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Heterologous expression of pathogen-specific genes ligA and lig,4 and Mathieu Picardeau5* Abstract Background: In comparison to other bacterial pathogens, our knowledge immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are surface proteins found in pathogenic Leptospira, but not in saprophytes

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Pathogen-induced Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Pathogen-induced Caenorhabditis elegans developmental plasticity has and lifespan of adult nematodes. Bacterial strains used in this study were either pathogenic or innocuous to nematodes. Exposure to the pathogen during development did not affect larval survival. However

  8. An overview of new biomolecular pathways in pathogen-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2015-06-01

    ABSTRACT? Cancer molecular pathways are combinations of metabolic processes deregulated in neoplastic cells. Besides pathways specific to tissues from which cancers originate, common neoplastic traits are present among most tumors. Hanahan and Weinberg have described the most critical 'hallmarks' shared by many cancer types. In recent years, cancer stem cell specific properties and pathways have also been identified. Other altered pathways are peculiar of cancer type and cancer stage, even in different cancer stem cell types. In pathogen-related tumors, the alteration of inflammatory and immunologic response along with impairment of cell cycle control represents key molecular events of tumor progression. This article summarizes the recent discoveries of new altered pathways in cancer and their importance in cancer diagnosis and tailored therapies. PMID:26043216

  9. Original article Pathogenic characteristics of persistent feline enteric

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Pathogenic characteristics of persistent feline enteric coronavirus infection (Received 22 March 2010; accepted 20 July 2010) Abstract ­ Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) comprise two biotypes: feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis viruses (FIPV). FECV is associated

  10. Review article Pathogenic diversity of Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    termed pathogenicity islands (PAls) that are absent from the genomes of commen- sal E. coli strains. PAls and systemic infections in humans and other animals. The spectrum of diseases caused by E. coli is due are likely to have been transferred horizontally and may have integrated into the E. coli chromosome through

  11. Manipulation of Plant Programmed Cell Death Pathways During Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of plants with bacterial pathogens involves the manipulation of programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. During a resistance interaction PCD is induced in a process termed the hypersensitive response (HR) which may function to limit pathogen spread. In a susceptible plant-pathogen interactions, the pathogen both inhibits and/or induces host PCD depending on the infection stage and lifestyle of the pathogen. Genes/pathways regulating PCD in plants have been difficult to identify due to a lack of homologous sequences in plants for mammalian genes that control apoptosis and possibly due to functional redundancy. Our labs study plant PCD pathways and bacterial speck disease in tomato which is caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). We recently identified the tomato protein kinases Pdk1 and Adi3 as negative regulators of plant PCD. The plant Pdk1/Adi3 pathway appears to function similarly to the Pdk1/PKB (Akt) pathway in mammals which functions as a major apoptosis negative regulation pathway. Here we discuss regulation of Pdk1/Adi3 and targeting of this pathway during the tomato-Pst interaction for modulation of host PCD. PMID:19704693

  12. Polyprenyl-dependent glycan assembly pathways in microbial pathogens

    E-print Network

    Hartley, Meredith Diane

    2011-01-01

    Polyisoprenyl-dependent glycan assembly pathways form the basis for the biosynthesis of many complex glycoconjugates. This thesis addresses key aspects of undecaprenyl-phosphate related processes; undecaprenol is the linear ...

  13. Comparative Analysis of Protein Glycosylation Pathways in Humans and the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Duncker, Iván; Díaz-Jímenez, Diana F.; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation pathways are present in all kingdoms of life and are metabolic pathways found in all the life kingdoms. Despite sharing commonalities in their synthesis, glycans attached to glycoproteins have species-specific structures generated by the presence of different sets of enzymes and acceptor substrates in each organism. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of the main glycosylation pathways shared by humans and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans: N-linked glycosylation, O-linked mannosylation and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorage. The knowledge of similarities and divergences between these metabolic pathways could help find new pharmacological targets for C. albicans infection. PMID:25104959

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mathematical paradoxes as pathways into beliefs and polymathy

    E-print Network

    Sriraman, Bharath

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mathematical paradoxes as pathways into beliefs and polymathy: an experimental, change beliefs, discover structures and open new avenues for interdisciplinary pedagogy. Keywords Beliefs-service education. The two fundamental questions explored in this paper are: (1) How can we facilitate the discovery

  15. Review article Escherichia coli as a pathogen in dogs and cats

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Review article Escherichia coli as a pathogen in dogs and cats Lothar Beutin Robert Koch; accepted 17December 1998) Abstraet-Certain strains of Escherichia coli behave as pathogens in dogs and cats were clearly associated with enteric disease in young dogs. ETEC isolates from diar- rhoeic dogs were

  16. Reciprocal developmental pathways for the generation of pathogenic effector TH17 and regulatory T cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Estelle Bettelli; Yijun Carrier; Wenda Gao; Thomas Korn; Terry B. Strom; Mohamed Oukka; Howard L. Weiner; Vijay K. Kuchroo

    2006-01-01

    On activation, T cells undergo distinct developmental pathways, attaining specialized properties and effector functions. T-helper (TH) cells are traditionally thought to differentiate into TH1 and TH2 cell subsets. TH1 cells are necessary to clear intracellular pathogens and TH2 cells are important for clearing extracellular organisms. Recently, a subset of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T (TH17) cells distinct from TH1 or TH2 cells

  17. Bi-cycling the furin pathway: from TGN localization to pathogen activation and embryogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean S. Molloy; Eric D. Anderson; François Jean; Gary Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Furin is a secretory pathway endoprotease that catalyses the maturation of a strikingly diverse group of proprotein substrates, ranging from growth factors and receptors to pathogen proteins, in multiple compartments within the trans-Golgi network (TGN)\\/endosomal system. This review focuses on recent developments in the biochemistry and cell biology of the endoprotease, including the mechanism of TGN localization, phosphorylation-dependent regulation of

  18. IntPath--an integrated pathway gene relationship database for model organisms and important pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pathway data are important for understanding the relationship between genes, proteins and many other molecules in living organisms. Pathway gene relationships are crucial information for guidance, prediction, reference and assessment in biochemistry, computational biology, and medicine. Many well-established databases--e.g., KEGG, WikiPathways, and BioCyc--are dedicated to collecting pathway data for public access. However, the effectiveness of these databases is hindered by issues such as incompatible data formats, inconsistent molecular representations, inconsistent molecular relationship representations, inconsistent referrals to pathway names, and incomprehensive data from different databases. Results In this paper, we overcome these issues through extraction, normalization and integration of pathway data from several major public databases (KEGG, WikiPathways, BioCyc, etc). We build a database that not only hosts our integrated pathway gene relationship data for public access but also maintains the necessary updates in the long run. This public repository is named IntPath (Integrated Pathway gene relationship database for model organisms and important pathogens). Four organisms--S. cerevisiae, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, H. Sapiens and M. musculus--are included in this version (V2.0) of IntPath. IntPath uses the "full unification" approach to ensure no deletion and no introduced noise in this process. Therefore, IntPath contains much richer pathway-gene and pathway-gene pair relationships and much larger number of non-redundant genes and gene pairs than any of the single-source databases. The gene relationships of each gene (measured by average node degree) per pathway are significantly richer. The gene relationships in each pathway (measured by average number of gene pairs per pathway) are also considerably richer in the integrated pathways. Moderate manual curation are involved to get rid of errors and noises from source data (e.g., the gene ID errors in WikiPathways and relationship errors in KEGG). We turn complicated and incompatible xml data formats and inconsistent gene and gene relationship representations from different source databases into normalized and unified pathway-gene and pathway-gene pair relationships neatly recorded in simple tab-delimited text format and MySQL tables, which facilitates convenient automatic computation and large-scale referencing in many related studies. IntPath data can be downloaded in text format or MySQL dump. IntPath data can also be retrieved and analyzed conveniently through web service by local programs or through web interface by mouse clicks. Several useful analysis tools are also provided in IntPath. Conclusions We have overcome in IntPath the issues of compatibility, consistency, and comprehensiveness that often hamper effective use of pathway databases. We have included four organisms in the current release of IntPath. Our methodology and programs described in this work can be easily applied to other organisms; and we will include more model organisms and important pathogens in future releases of IntPath. IntPath maintains regular updates and is freely available at http://compbio.ddns.comp.nus.edu.sg:8080/IntPath. PMID:23282057

  19. Transcriptome of Aphanomyces euteiches: New Oomycete Putative Pathogenicity Factors and Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gaulin, Elodie; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Bottin, Arnaud; Jacquet, Christophe; Mathé, Catherine; Couloux, Arnaud; Wincker, Patrick; Dumas, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Aphanomyces euteiches is an oomycete pathogen that causes seedling blight and root rot of legumes, such as alfalfa and pea. The genus Aphanomyces is phylogenically distinct from well-studied oomycetes such as Phytophthora sp., and contains species pathogenic on plants and aquatic animals. To provide the first foray into gene diversity of A. euteiches, two cDNA libraries were constructed using mRNA extracted from mycelium grown in an artificial liquid medium or in contact to plant roots. A unigene set of 7,977 sequences was obtained from 18,864 high-quality expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) and characterized for potential functions. Comparisons with oomycete proteomes revealed major differences between the gene content of A. euteiches and those of Phytophthora species, leading to the identification of biosynthetic pathways absent in Phytophthora, of new putative pathogenicity genes and of expansion of gene families encoding extracellular proteins, notably different classes of proteases. Among the genes specific of A. euteiches are members of a new family of extracellular proteins putatively involved in adhesion, containing up to four protein domains similar to fungal cellulose binding domains. Comparison of A. euteiches sequences with proteomes of fully sequenced eukaryotic pathogens, including fungi, apicomplexa and trypanosomatids, allowed the identification of A. euteiches genes with close orthologs in these microorganisms but absent in other oomycetes sequenced so far, notably transporters and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, and suggests the presence of a defense mechanism against oxidative stress which was initially characterized in the pathogenic trypanosomatids. PMID:18320043

  20. PTS1 Peroxisomal Import Pathway Plays Shared and Distinct Roles to PTS2 Pathway in Development and Pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaoyu; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Yanli; Li, Ling; Chai, Rongyao; Mao, Xueqin; Jiang, Hua; Qiu, Haiping; Du, Xinfa; Lin, Fucheng; Sun, Guochang

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes participate in various important metabolisms and are required in pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported from cytoplasm into peroxisomes through peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1) or peroxisomal targeting signal 2 (PTS2) import pathway. PEX5 and PEX7 genes participate in the two pathways respectively. The involvement of PEX7 mediated PTS2 import pathway in fungal pathogenicity has been documented, while that of PTS1 remains unclear. Through null mutant analysis of MoPEX5, the PEX5 homolog in Magnaporthe oryzae, we report the crucial roles of PTS1 pathway in the development and host infection in the rice blast fungus, and compared with those of PTS2. We found that MoPEX5 disruption specifically blocked the PTS1 pathway. ?mopex5 was unable to use lipids as sole carbon source and lost pathogenicity completely. Similar as ?mopex7, ?mopex5 exhibited significant reduction in lipid utilization and mobilization, appressorial turgor genesis and H2O2 resistance. Additionally, ?mopex5 presented some distinct defects which were undetected in ?mopex7 in vegetative growth, conidial morphogenesis, appressorial morphogenesis and melanization. The results indicated that the PTS1 peroxisomal import pathway, in addition to PTS2, is required for fungal development and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus, and also, as a main peroxisomal import pathway, played a more predominant role than PTS2. PMID:23405169

  1. A sophisticated network of signaling pathways regulates stomatal defenses to bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Dominique; Hwang, Ildoo

    2014-11-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells forming stomatal pores at the leaf surface for gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. A decade ago, stomata have been shown to play an important role in plant defense as a part of the innate immune response. Indeed, plants actively close their stomata upon contact with microbes thereby preventing pathogen entry into the leaves and the subsequent colonization of host tissues. In this review, we will present current knowledges of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in stomatal defenses with a particular attention on plant-bacteria interactions. Stomatal defense responses begin from the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activate a signaling cascade involving the production of secondary messengers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and calcium for the regulation of plasma membrane ion channels. The analyses on downstream molecular mechanisms implicated in PAMP-triggered stomatal closure have revealed extensive interplays with components regulating hormonal signaling pathways. We will also discuss on strategies deployed by pathogenic bacteria to counteract stomatal immunity through the example of the phytotoxin coronatine. PMID:25366179

  2. A sophisticated network of signaling pathways regulates stomatal defenses to bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Dominique; Hwang, Ildoo

    2015-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells forming stomatal pores at the leaf surface for gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. Stomata have been shown to play an important role in plant defense as a part of the innate immune response. Plants actively close their stomata upon contact with microbes, thereby preventing pathogen entry into the leaves and the subsequent colonization of host tissues. In this review, we present current knowledge of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in stomatal defenses, with particular emphasis on plant-bacteria interactions. Stomatal defense responses begin from the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activate a signaling cascade involving the production of secondary messengers such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and calcium for the regulation of plasma membrane ion channels. The analyses on downstream molecular mechanisms implicated in PAMP-triggered stomatal closure have revealed extensive interplays among the components regulating hormonal signaling pathways. We also discuss the strategies deployed by pathogenic bacteria to counteract stomatal immunity through the example of the phytotoxin coronatine. PMID:25661059

  3. Pathogenic Role of the Wnt Signaling Pathway Activation In Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Chen, Ying; Lin, Mingkai; Lee, Kyungwon; Mott, Robert A.; Ma, Jian-xing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a severe complication of AMD. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to mediate angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathogenic role of the Wnt pathway in CNV and explore the therapeutic potential of a novel Wnt signaling inhibitor in CNV. Methods. Adult rats and mice were photocoagulated using diode laser to induce CNV. On the same day, the animals were intravitreally injected with a monoclonal antibody (Mab2F1) blocking LRP6 or nonspecific mouse IgG. The Wnt signaling activation and target gene expression in the eyecup were determined by Western blot analysis. Fundus angiography was used to examine leakage from the laser lesion. CNV areas were measured on choroidal flatmount using FITC-dextran. Results. Levels of Wnt pathway components and Wnt target gene expression were elevated in both laser-induced CNV rat and mouse eyecups, suggesting activation of the Wnt pathway. Significant suppression of Wnt signaling was observed in the Mab2F1 treatment group. Mab2F1 decreased vascular leakage from CNV lesions and reduced the neovascular area in laser-induced CNV rats. Mab2F1 inhibited the hypoxia-induced activation of Wnt signaling in cultured RPE cells. Mab2F1 also ameliorated retinal inflammation and vascular leakage in the eyecups of very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice, a model of subretinal neovascularization. Conclusions. The Wnt pathway is activated in the laser-induced CNV models and plays a pathogenic role in CNV. Blockade of Wnt signaling using an anti-LRP6 antibody has therapeutic potential in CNV. PMID:23211829

  4. Genetic Interactions of DNA Repair Pathways in the Pathogen Neisseria meningitidis?

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Tonje; Tuven, Hanne K.; Bjørås, Magnar; Rødland, Einar A.; Tønjum, Tone

    2007-01-01

    The current increase in the incidence and severity of infectious diseases mandates improved understanding of the basic biology and DNA repair profiles of virulent microbes. In our studies of the major pathogen and model organism Neisseria meningitidis, we constructed a panel of mutants inactivating genes involved in base excision repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair (NER), translesion synthesis, and recombinational repair pathways. The highest spontaneous mutation frequency among the N. meningitidis single mutants was found in the MutY-deficient strain as opposed to mutS mutants in Escherichia coli, indicating a role for meningococcal MutY in antibiotic resistance development. Recombinational repair was recognized as a major pathway counteracting methyl methanesulfonate-induced alkylation damage in the N. meningitidis. In contrast to what has been shown in other species, meningococcal NER did not contribute significantly to repair of alkylation-induced DNA damage, and meningococcal recombinational repair may thus be one of the main pathways for removal of abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic) sites and strand breaks in DNA. Conversely, NER was identified as the main meningococcal defense pathway against UV-induced DNA damage. N. meningitidis RecA single mutants exhibited only a moderate decrease in survival after UV exposure as opposed to E. coli recA strains, which are extremely UV sensitive, possibly reflecting the lack of a meningococcal SOS response. In conclusion, distinct differences between N. meningitidis and established DNA repair characteristics in E. coli and other species were identified. PMID:17513474

  5. A Model of an Integrated Immune System Pathway in Homo sapiens and Its Interaction with Superantigen Producing Expression Regulatory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus: Comparing Behavior of Pathogen Perturbed and Unperturbed Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K.

    2013-01-01

    Response of an immune system to a pathogen attack depends on the balance between the host immune defense and the virulence of the pathogen. Investigation of molecular interactions between the proteins of a host and a pathogen helps in identifying the pathogenic proteins. It is necessary to understand the dynamics of a normally behaved host system to evaluate the capacity of its immune system upon pathogen attack. In this study, we have compared the behavior of an unperturbed and pathogen perturbed host system. Moreover, we have developed a formalism under Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) for the optimization of conflicting objective functions. We have constructed an integrated pathway system, which includes Staphylococcal Superantigen (SAg) expression regulatory pathway and TCR signaling pathway of Homo sapiens. We have implemented the method on this pathway system and observed the behavior of host signaling molecules upon pathogen attack. The entire study has been divided into six different cases, based on the perturbed/unperturbed conditions. In other words, we have investigated unperturbed and pathogen perturbed human TCR signaling pathway, with different combinations of optimization of concentrations of regulatory and signaling molecules. One of these cases has aimed at finding out whether minimization of the toxin production in a pathogen leads to the change in the concentration levels of the proteins coded by TCR signaling pathway genes in the infected host. Based on the computed results, we have hypothesized that the balance between TCR signaling inhibitory and stimulatory molecules can keep TCR signaling system into resting/stimulating state, depending upon the perturbation. The proposed integrated host-pathogen interaction pathway model has accurately reflected the experimental evidences, which we have used for validation purpose. The significance of this kind of investigation lies in revealing the susceptible interaction points that can take back the Staphylococcal Enterotoxin (SE)-challenged system within the range of normal behavior. PMID:24324645

  6. Metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in competition with respiratory bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Marie; Köhler, Thilo; Fontana, Thierry; Tognon, Mikael; Renzoni, Adriana; van Delden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa considerably contributes to lung tissue destruction and impairment of pulmonary function in cystic-fibrosis (CF) patients. Complex interplays between P. aeruginosa and other co-colonizing pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia sp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae may be crucial for pathogenesis and disease progression. Methods: We generated a library of PA14 transposon insertion mutants to identify P. aeruginosa genes required for exploitative and direct competitions with S. aureus, Burkholderia cenocepacia, and K. pneumoniae. Results: Whereas wild-type PA14 inhibited S. aureus growth, two transposon insertions located in pqsC and carB, resulted in reduced growth inhibition. PqsC is involved in the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), a family of molecules having antibacterial properties, while carB is a key gene in pyrimidine biosynthesis. The carB mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of B. cepacia and K. pneumoniae but not Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis. We further identified a transposon insertion in purF, encoding a key enzyme of purine metabolism. This mutant displayed a severe growth deficiency in the presence of Gram-negative but not of Gram-positive bacteria. We identified a beneficial interaction in a bioA transposon mutant, unable to grow on rich medium. This growth defect could be restored either by addition of biotin or by co-culturing the mutant in the presence of K. pneumoniae or E. coli. Conclusion: Complex interactions take place between the various bacterial species colonizing CF-lungs. This work identified both detrimental and beneficial interactions occurring between P. aeruginosa and three other respiratory pathogens involving several major metabolic pathways. Manipulating these pathways could be used to interfere with bacterial interactions and influence the colonization by respiratory pathogens. PMID:25954256

  7. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent Signaling Pathways in the Pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Hong; Köseo?lu, Volkan K.; Güvener, Zehra T.; Myers-Morales, Tanya; Reed, Joseph M.; D'Orazio, Sarah E. F.; Miller, Kurt W.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911), DgcB (Lmo1912) and DgcC (Lmo2174), that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131), PdeC (Lmo1914) and PdeD (Lmo0111), that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (?pdeB/C/D) or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531) gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence. PMID:25101646

  8. A self-lysis pathway that enhances the virulence of a pathogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Kirsty A; Dolben, Emily L; LeRoux, Michele; Kambara, Tracy K; Ramsey, Kathryn M; Kirkpatrick, Robin L; Mougous, Joseph D; Hogan, Deborah A; Dove, Simon L

    2015-07-01

    In mammalian cells, programmed cell death (PCD) plays important roles in development, in the removal of damaged cells, and in fighting bacterial infections. Although widespread among multicellular organisms, there are relatively few documented instances of PCD in bacteria. Here we describe a potential PCD pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that enhances the ability of the bacterium to cause disease in a lung infection model. Activation of the system can occur in a subset of cells in response to DNA damage through cleavage of an essential transcription regulator we call AlpR. Cleavage of AlpR triggers a cell lysis program through de-repression of the alpA gene, which encodes a positive regulator that activates expression of the alpBCDE lysis cassette. Although this is lethal to the individual cell in which it occurs, we find it benefits the population as a whole during infection of a mammalian host. Thus, host and pathogen each may use PCD as a survival-promoting strategy. We suggest that activation of the Alp cell lysis pathway is a disease-enhancing response to bacterial DNA damage inflicted by the host immune system. PMID:26100878

  9. A Functional Phenylacetic Acid Catabolic Pathway Is Required for Full Pathogenicity of Burkholderia cenocepacia in the Caenorhabditis elegans Host Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robyn J. Law; Jason N. R. Hamlin; Aida Sivro; Stuart J. McCorrister; Georgina A. Cardama; Silvia T. Cardona

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of metabolically versatile bacteria that have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Previously a screen of transposon mutants in a rat pulmonary infection model identified an attenuated mutant with an insertion in paaE, a gene related to the phenylacetic acid (PA) catabolic pathway. In

  10. A Single MAPKKK Regulates the Hog1 MAPK Pathway in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, Jill; Smith, Deborah A.; da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Doris, Kathryn S.; Patterson, Miranda J.; Bruce, Catherine R.

    2007-01-01

    The Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) plays a central role in stress responses in the human pathogen Candida albicans. Here, we have investigated the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK)-dependent regulation of the pathway. In contrast to the Hog1 pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is regulated by three MAPKKKs (Ssk2, Ssk22, and Ste11), our results demonstrate that Hog1 in C. albicans is regulated by a single MAPKKK Ssk2. Deletion of SSK2 results in comparable stress and morphological phenotypes exhibited by hog1? cells, and Ssk2 is required for the stress-induced phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of Hog1, and for Hog1-dependent gene expression. Furthermore, phenotypes associated with deletion of SSK2 can be circumvented by expression of a phosphomimetic mutant of the MAPKK Pbs2, indicating that Ssk2 regulates Hog1 via activation of Pbs2. In S. cerevisiae, the Hog1 pathway is also regulated by the MAPKKK Ste11. However, we can find no connection between Ste11 and the regulation of Hog1 in C. albicans. Furthermore, expression of a chimeric Pbs2 protein containing the Ste11-dependent regulatory region of S. cerevisiae Pbs2, fails to stimulate Ste11-dependent stress signaling in C. albicans. Collectively, our data show that Ssk2 is the sole MAPKKK to relay stress signals to Hog1 in C. albicans and that the MAPK signaling network in C. albicans has diverged significantly from the corresponding network in S. cerevisiae. PMID:17804815

  11. Differential involvement of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Manulis, S; Haviv-Chesner, A; Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E; Barash, I

    1998-07-01

    Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg), which induces galls on Gypsophila paniculata, harbors two major pathways for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) synthesis, the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) routes, as well as cytokinin biosynthetic genes. Mutants were generated in which the various biosynthetic routes were disrupted separately or jointly in order to assess the contribution of IAA of various origins and cytokinins to pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin biosynthesis caused the largest reduction in gall size. Inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a minor, nonsignificant decrease in pathogenicity. No further reduction in gall size was observed by the simultaneous inactivation of both IAA pathways only or in combination with that of cytokinin production. However, inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a 14-fold reduction in the population of Ehg on bean plants. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin production did not affect epiphytic fitness. While the apparent transcriptional activity of iaaM-inaZ fusion increased slightly in cells of Ehg on bean and gypsophila leaves, compared with that in culture, very high levels of induction were observed in cells injected into gypsophila stems. In contrast, moderate levels of induction of ipdC-inaZ in Ehg were observed on leaves of these plants and in gypsophila stems, when compared with that in culture. These results suggest that the IAM pathway is involved primarily in gall formation and support the main contribution of the IpyA pathway to the epiphytic fitness of this bacterial species. PMID:9650296

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Activation of pro-oncogenic pathways in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Activation of pro-oncogenic pathways in colorectal hyperplastic polyps involved in colon carcinogenesis and is known to activate pro-oncogenic pathways such as the ERK a malignant potential. Keywords: Hyperplastic polyps, Colorectal, Progastrin, ERK, STAT3, Pro-oncogenic

  13. The Renaissance of Bacillosamine and Its Derivatives: Pathway Characterization and Implications in Pathogenicity

    E-print Network

    Morrison, Michael J.

    Prokaryote-specific sugars, including N,N?-diacetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) and pseudaminic acid, have experienced a renaissance in the past decade because of their discovery in glycans related to microbial pathogenicity. ...

  14. Transcriptome of Aphanomyces euteiches: New Oomycete Putative Pathogenicity Factors and Metabolic Pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elodie Gaulin; Mohammed-Amine Madoui; Arnaud Bottin; Christophe Jacquet; Catherine Mathe ´; Arnaud Couloux; Patrick Wincker; Bernard Dumas

    2008-01-01

    Aphanomyces euteiches is an oomycete pathogen that causes seedling blight and root rot of legumes, such as alfalfa and pea. The genus Aphanomyces is phylogenically distinct from well-studied oomycetes such as Phytophthora sp., and contains species pathogenic on plants and aquatic animals. To provide the first foray into gene diversity of A. euteiches, two cDNA libraries were constructed using mRNA

  15. The Cpc1 regulator of the cross-pathway control of amino acid biosynthesis is required for pathogenicity of the vascular pathogen Verticillium longisporum.

    PubMed

    Timpner, Christian; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Tran, Van Tuan; Braus, Gerhard H

    2013-11-01

    The plant-pathogenic fungus Verticillium longisporum is a causal agent of early senescence and ripening in cruciferous crops like Brassica napus. Verticillium wilts have become serious agricultural threats in recent decades. Verticillium species infect host plants through the roots and colonize xylem vessels of the host plant. The xylem fluid provides an environment with limited carbon sources and unbalanced amino acid supply, which requires V. longisporum to induce the cross-pathway control of amino acid biosynthesis. RNA-mediated gene silencing reduced the expression of the two CPC1 isogenes (VlCPC1-1 and VlCPC1-2) of the allodiploid V. longisporum up to 85%. VlCPC1 encodes the conserved transcription factor of the cross-pathway control. The silenced mutants were highly sensitive to amino-acid starvation, and the infected plants showed significantly fewer symptoms such as stunting or early senescence in oilseed rape plant infection assays. Consistently, deletion of single CPC1 of the haploid V. dahliae resulted in strains that are sensitive to amino-acid starvation and cause strongly reduced symptoms in the plant-host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The allodiploid V. longisporum and the haploid V. dahliae are the first phytopathogenic fungi that were shown to require CPC1 for infection and colonization of their respective host plants, oilseed rape and tomato. PMID:23883358

  16. Activation of the Wnt Pathway Plays a Pathogenic Role in Diabetic Retinopathy in Humans and Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Yang; Zhou, Ti; Zhou, Kevin K.; Mott, Robert; Wu, Mingyuan; Boulton, Michael; Lyons, Timothy J.; Gao, Guoquan; Ma, Jian-xing

    2009-01-01

    Although Wnt signaling is known to mediate multiple biological and pathological processes, its association with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has not been established. Here we show that retinal levels and nuclear translocation of ?-catenin, a key effector in the canonical Wnt pathway, were increased in humans with DR and in three DR models. Retinal levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6, coreceptors of Wnts, were also elevated in the DR models. The high glucose-induced activation of ?-catenin was attenuated by aminoguanidine, suggesting that oxidative stress is a direct cause for the Wnt pathway activation in diabetes. Indeed, Dickkopf homolog 1, a specific inhibitor of the Wnt pathway, ameliorated retinal inflammation, vascular leakage, and retinal neovascularization in the DR models. Dickkopf homolog 1 also blocked the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by high glucose, suggesting that Wnt signaling contributes to the oxidative stress in diabetes. These observations indicate that the Wnt pathway plays a pathogenic role in DR and represents a novel therapeutic target. PMID:19893025

  17. A resealed-cell system for analyzing pathogenic intracellular events: perturbation of endocytic pathways under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumi; Nakatsu, Daiki; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Murata, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based assay systems that can serve as cellular models of aberrant function in pathogenic organs would be novel and useful tools for screening drugs and clarifying the molecular mechanisms of various diseases. We constructed model cells that replicated the conditions in diabetic hepatocytes by using the cell resealing technique, which enables the exchange of cytosol. The plasma membrane of HeLa cells was permeabilized with the streptococcal toxin streptolysin O, and cytosol that had been prepared from wild-type or db/db diabetic mice was introduced into the resulting semi-intact cells. By resealing the plasma membrane by exposure to Ca(2+), we created WT or Db model cells, in which the cytosolic conditions replicated those of healthy or diabetic liver. Interestingly, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was promoted, whereas the level of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate was decreased, in Db cells. We investigated several endocytic pathways in WT and Db cells, and found that retrograde endosome-to-Golgi transport was delayed in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner in Db cells. Furthermore, the degradation pathway of the EGF receptor from endosomes to lysosomes was enhanced in Db cells, and this did not depend on the activation of p38 MAPK. The disease model cell system should become a powerful tool for the detection of aberrant processes in cells under pathogenic conditions and for therapeutic applications. PMID:22952896

  18. Detoxification of nitric oxide by flavohemoglobin and the denitrification pathway in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ephemeral nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical, highly reactive, environmentally rare, and a potent signaling molecule in organisms across kingdoms of life. This gaseous small molecule can freely transverse membranes and has been implicated in aspects of pathogenicity both in animal and plant ho...

  19. Silicon induces resistance to the brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus by preventing the pathogen from hijacking the rice ethylene pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; Spíchal, Lukáš; Novák, Ond?ej; Strnad, Miroslav; Asano, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Höfte, Monica; De Vleesschauwer, David

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the ability of silicon (Si) to mitigate a wide variety of abiotic and biotic stresses, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism(s). Here, we have investigated the role of hormone defense pathways in Si-induced resistance to the rice brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus. To delineate the involvement of multiple hormone pathways, a multidisciplinary approach was pursued, combining exogenous hormone applications, pharmacological inhibitor experiments, time-resolved hormone measurements, and bioassays with hormone-deficient and/or -insensitive mutant lines. Contrary to other types of induced resistance, we found Si-induced brown spot resistance to function independently of the classic immune hormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Our data also rule out a major role of the abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin pathways, but suggest that Si mounts resistance to C. miyabeanus by preventing the fungus from hijacking the rice ethylene (ET) machinery. Interestingly, rather than suppressing rice ET signaling per se, Si probably interferes with the production and/or action of fungal ET. Together our findings favor a scenario whereby Si induces brown spot resistance by disarming fungal ET and argue that impairment of pathogen virulence factors is a core resistance mechanism underpinning Si-induced plant immunity. PMID:25625327

  20. IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

  1. Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza: Entry Pathways into North America via Bird Migration

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Benz, Brett W.; Pape?, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Given the possibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza arriving in North America and monitoring programs that have been established to detect and track it, we review intercontinental movements of birds. We divided 157 bird species showing regular intercontinental movements into four groups based on patterns of movement—one of these groups (breed Holarctic, winter Eurasia) fits well with the design of the monitoring programs (i.e., western Alaska), but the other groups have quite different movement patterns, which would suggest the importance of H5N1 monitoring along the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf coasts of North America. PMID:17330144

  2. Analogous telesensing pathways regulate mating and virulence in two opportunistic human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard J; Dunny, Gary M

    2010-01-01

    Telesensing, or probing of the environment by the release of chemical messengers, plays a central role in the sexual programs of microbial organisms. Sex pheromones secreted by mating cells are sensed by potential partner cells and mediate cell-to-cell contact and the subsequent exchange of genetic material. Although the mechanisms used by bacterial and fungal species to promote genetic exchange are distinct, recent studies have uncovered surprising parallels between pheromone signaling in these species. In addition, it is now apparent that pheromone signaling not only controls sexual reproduction and genetic exchange but can also activate expression of potential virulence factors in diverse opportunistic pathogens. PMID:20827374

  3. Unraveling Unique Structure and Biosynthesis Pathway of N-Linked Glycans in Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans by Glycomics Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Dong-Jik; Kwon, Ohsuk; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2012-01-01

    The encapsulated fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes cryptococcosis in immunocompromised individuals. Although cell surface mannoproteins have been implicated in C. neoformans pathogenicity, the structure of N-linked glycans assembled on mannoproteins has not yet been elucidated. By analyzing oligosaccharide profiles combined with exoglycosidase treatment, we report here that C. neoformans has serotype-specific high mannose-type N-glycans with or without a ?1,2-xylose residue, which is attached to the trimannosyl core of N-glycans. Interestingly, the neutral N-glycans of serotypes A and D were shown to contain a xylose residue, whereas those of serotype B appeared to be much shorter and devoid of a xylose residue. Moreover, analysis of the C. neoformans uxs1? mutant demonstrated that UDP-xylose is utilized as a donor sugar in N-glycan biosynthesis. We also constructed and analyzed a set of C. neoformans mutant strains lacking genes putatively assigned to the reconstructed N-glycan biosynthesis pathway. It was shown that the outer chain of N-glycan is initiated by CnOch1p with addition of an ?1,6-mannose residue and then subsequently extended by CnMnn2p with multiple additions of ?1,2-mannose residues. Finally, comparative analysis of acidic N-glycans from wild-type, Cnoch1?, Cnmnn2?, and Cnuxs1? strains strongly indicated the presence of xylose phosphate attached to mannose residues in the core and outer region of N-glycans. Our data present the first report on the unique structure and biosynthesis pathway of N-glycans in C. neoformans. PMID:22500028

  4. Linkage of cold acclimation and disease resistance through plant-pathogen interaction pathway in Vitis amurensis grapevine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiao; Zhang, Yali; Yin, Ling; Qu, Junjie; Lu, Jiang

    2014-12-01

    Low temperatures cause severe damage to none cold hardy grapevines. A preliminary survey with Solexa sequencing technology was used to analyze gene expression profiles of cold hardy Vitis amurensis 'Zuoshan-1' after cold acclimation at 4 °C for 48 h. A total of 16,750 and 18,068 putative genes were annotated for 4 °C-treated and control library, respectively. Among them, 393 genes were upregulated for at least 20-fold, while 69 genes were downregulated for at least 20-fold under the 4 °C treatment for 48 h. A subset of 101 genes from this survey was investigated further using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Genes associated with signaling events in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI), including generation of calcium signals (CNGC, CMLs), jasmonic acid signal (JAZ1), oxidative burst (Rboh), and phosphorylation (FLS2, BAK, MEKK1, MKKs) cascades, were upregulated after cold acclimation. Disease resistance genes (RPM1, RPS5, RIN4, PBS1) in the process of effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were also upregulated in the current condition. Defense-related genes (WRKYs, PR1, MIN7) involved in both PTI and ETI processes were abundantly expressed after cold acclimation. Our results indicated that plant-pathogen interaction pathways were linked to the cold acclimation in V. amurensis grapevine. Other biotic- and abiotic-related genes, such as defense (protein phosphatase 2C, U-box domain proteins, NCED1, stilbene synthase), transcription (DREBs, MYBs, ERFs, ZFPs), signal transduction (kinase, calcium, and auxin signaling), transport (ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, auxin:hydrogen symporter), and various metabolism, were also abundantly expressed in the cold acclimation of V. Amurensis 'Zuoshan-1' grapevine. This study revealed a series of critical genes and pathways to delineate important biological processes affected by low temperature in 'Zuoshan-1'. PMID:25154381

  5. Entry Mode–Dependent Function of an Indole Glucosinolate Pathway in Arabidopsis for Nonhost Resistance against Anthracnose Pathogens[W

    PubMed Central

    Hiruma, Kei; Onozawa-Komori, Mariko; Takahashi, Fumika; Asakura, Makoto; Bednarek, Pawe?; Okuno, Tetsuro; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Takano, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    When faced with nonadapted fungal pathogens, Arabidopsis thaliana mounts nonhost resistance responses, which typically result in the termination of early pathogenesis steps. We report that nonadapted anthracnose fungi engage two alternative entry modes during pathogenesis on leaves: turgor-mediated invasion beneath melanized appressoria, and a previously undiscovered hyphal tip–based entry (HTE) that is independent of appressorium formation. The frequency of HTE is positively regulated by carbohydrate nutrients and appears to be subject to constitutive inhibition by the fungal mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade of MAPK ESSENTIAL FOR APPRESSORIUM FORMATION1. The same MAPK cascade is essential for appressorium formation. Unexpectedly, the Arabidopsis indole glucosinolate pathway restricts entry of the nonadapted anthracnose fungi only when these pathogens employ HTE. Arabidopsis mutants defective in indole glucosinolate biosynthesis or metabolism support the initiation of postinvasion growth of nonadapted Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum orbiculare. However, genetic disruption of Colletotrichum appressorium formation does not permit HTE on host plants. Thus, Colletotrichum appressoria play a critical role in the suppression of preinvasion plant defenses, in addition to their previously described role in turgor-mediated plant cell invasion. We also show that HTE is the predominant morphogenetic response of Colletotrichum at wound sites. This implies the existence of a fungal sensing system to trigger appropriate morphogenetic responses during pathogenesis at wound sites and on intact leaf tissue. PMID:20605856

  6. Evolution of a Pathogen: A Comparative Genomics Analysis Identifies a Genetic Pathway to Pathogenesis in Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James M.; Waddell, Victor G.; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emergent and global nosocomial pathogen. In addition to A. baumannii, other Acinetobacter species, especially those in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, have also been associated with serious human infection. Although mechanisms of attachment, persistence on abiotic surfaces, and pathogenesis in A. baumannii have been identified, the genetic mechanisms that explain the emergence of A. baumannii as the most widespread and virulent Acinetobacter species are not fully understood. Recent whole genome sequencing has provided insight into the phylogenetic structure of the genus Acinetobacter. However, a global comparison of genomic features between Acinetobacter spp. has not been described in the literature. In this study, 136 Acinetobacter genomes, including 67 sequenced in this study, were compared to identify the acquisition and loss of genes in the expansion of the Acinetobacter genus. A whole genome phylogeny confirmed that A. baumannii is a monophyletic clade and that the larger Acb complex is also a well-supported monophyletic group. The whole genome phylogeny provided the framework for a global genomic comparison based on a blast score ratio (BSR) analysis. The BSR analysis demonstrated that specific genes have been both lost and acquired in the evolution of A. baumannii. In addition, several genes associated with A. baumannii pathogenesis were found to be more conserved in the Acb complex, and especially in A. baumannii, than in other Acinetobacter genomes; until recently, a global analysis of the distribution and conservation of virulence factors across the genus was not possible. The results demonstrate that the acquisition of specific virulence factors has likely contributed to the widespread persistence and virulence of A. baumannii. The identification of novel features associated with transcriptional regulation and acquired by clades in the Acb complex presents targets for better understanding the evolution of pathogenesis and virulence in the expansion of the genus. PMID:23365658

  7. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the ?-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The ?-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  8. Novel Drug Targets for Food-Borne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni: An Integrated Subtractive Genomics and Comparative Metabolic Pathway Study.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2015-07-01

    Campylobacters are a major global health burden and a cause of food-borne diarrheal illness and economic loss worldwide. In developing countries, Campylobacter infections are frequent in children under age two and may be associated with mortality. In developed countries, they are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea in early adulthood. In the United States, antibiotic resistance against Campylobacter is notably increased from 13% in 1997 to nearly 25% in 2011. Novel drug targets are urgently needed but remain a daunting task to accomplish. We suggest that omics-guided drug discovery is timely and worth considering in this context. The present study employed an integrated subtractive genomics and comparative metabolic pathway analysis approach. We identified 16 unique pathways from Campylobacter when compared against H. sapiens with 326 non-redundant proteins; 115 of these were found to be essential in the Database of Essential Genes. Sixty-six proteins among these were non-homologous to the human proteome. Six membrane proteins, of which four are transporters, have been proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Screening of 66 essential non-homologous proteins against DrugBank resulted in identification of 34 proteins with drug-ability potential, many of which play critical roles in bacterial growth and survival. Out of these, eight proteins had approved drug targets available in DrugBank, the majority serving crucial roles in cell wall synthesis and energy metabolism and therefore having the potential to be utilized as drug targets. We conclude by underscoring that screening against these proteins with inhibitors may aid in future discovery of novel therapeutics against campylobacteriosis in ways that will be pathogen specific, and thus have minimal toxic effect on host. Omics-guided drug discovery and bioinformatics analyses offer the broad potential for veritable advances in global health relevant novel therapeutics. PMID:26061459

  9. Research Article The JNK/AP1/ATF2 pathway is involved in H2O2-induced

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    Research Article The JNK/AP1/ATF2 pathway is involved in H2O2-induced acetylcholinesterase revision 14 February 2008; accepted 10 March 2008 Online First 4 April 2008 Abstract. We show that H2O2) pathway inhibitor PD98059 or p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580, attenu- ated H2O2-induced AChE expression

  10. Gene expression analysis of potential genes and pathways involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of parvovirus B19 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEI-PING; YANG, HUA; CHEN, HONG; ZHU, HAI-RONG; LEI, QUAN; SONG, YUN-HONG; DAI, ZHONG-MING; SUN, JING-SHAN; JIANG, LI-LI; NIE, ZHAN-GUO

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of parvovirus B19 in human colorectal cancer, plasmids containing the VP1 or VP2 viral capsid proteins or the NS1 non-structural proteins of parvovirus B19 were constructed and transfected into primary human colorectal epithelial cells and LoVo cells. Differential gene expression was detected using a human genome expression array. Functional gene annotation analyses were performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery v6.7 software. Gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that VP1-related functions included the immune response, immune system process, defense response and the response to stimulus, while NS1-associated functions were found to include organelle fission, nuclear division, mitosis, the M-phase of the mitotic cell cycle, the mitotic cell cycle, M-phase, cell cycle phase, cell cycle process and cell division. Pathway expression analysis revealed that VP1-associated pathways included cell adhesion molecules, antigen processing and presentation, cytokines and the inflammatory response. Moreover, NS1-associated pathways included the cell cycle, pathways in cancer, colorectal cancer, the wnt signaling pathway and focal adhesion. Among the differential genes detected in the present study, 12 genes were found to participate in general cancer pathways and six genes were observed to participate in colorectal cancer pathways. NS1 is a key molecule in the pathogenic mechanism of parvovirus B19 in colorectal cancer. Several GO categories, pathways and genes were selected and may be the key targets through which parvovirus B19 participates in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25013465

  11. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy as treatment for lower lacrimal pathway obstructions in adults: Review article

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Grigori; Tuomilehto, Henri; Kaarniranta, Kai; Seppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Obstruction of the lacrimal pathway is manifested by epiphora, infection, and blurred vision as well as ocular and facial pain. Conservative treatments only achieve temporary relief of symptoms, thus surgery is the treatment of choice. Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is recognized as the most suitable treatment for patients with obstructions of the lacrimal system at the level of the sac or in the nasolacrimal duct. The aim of this operation is to create a bypass between the lacrimal sac and the nasal cavity. During the past 2 decades, advances in rigid endoscopic equipment and other instruments have made it possible to obtain more information about the anatomic landmarks of the nasolacrimal system, which led to the development of less-invasive and safer endoscopic techniques. However, many parts of the treatment process related to endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR) still remain controversial. This article reviews the published literature about the technical issues associated with the success of EN-DCR, and clarifies the pros and cons of different pre- and postoperative procedures in adults with lower lacrimal pathway obstructions. PMID:25860166

  12. Bacterial Pathogens Induce Abscess Formation by CD4+ T-Cell Activation via the CD28–B7-2 Costimulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tzianabos, Arthur O.; Chandraker, Anil; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud; Stingele, Francesca; Dong, Victor M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Peach, Robert; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Abscesses are a classic host response to infection by many pathogenic bacteria. The immunopathogenesis of this tissue response to infection has not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have suggested that T cells are involved in the pathologic process, but the role of these cells remains unclear. To delineate the mechanism by which T cells mediate abscess formation associated with intra-abdominal sepsis, the role of T-cell activation and the contribution of antigen-presenting cells via CD28-B7 costimulation were investigated. T cells activated in vitro by zwitterionic bacterial polysaccharides (Zps) known to induce abscess formation required CD28-B7 costimulation and, when adoptively transferred to the peritoneal cavity of naïve rats, promoted abscess formation. Blockade of T-cell activation via the CD28-B7 pathway in animals with CTLA4Ig prevented abscess formation following challenge with different bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides fragilis, and a combination of Enterococcus faecium and Bacteroides distasonis. In contrast, these animals had an increased abscess rate following in vivo T-cell activation via CD28 signaling. Abscess formation in vivo and T-cell activation in vitro required costimulation by B7-2 but not B7-1. These results demonstrate that abscess formation by pathogenic bacteria is under the control of a common effector mechanism that requires T-cell activation via the CD28–B7-2 pathway. PMID:11083777

  13. Binding of the pathogen receptor HSP90AA1 to avibirnavirus VP2 induces autophagy by inactivating the AKT-MTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boli; Zhang, Yina; Jia, Lu; Wu, Huansheng; Fan, Chengfei; Sun, Yanting; Ye, Chengjin; Liao, Min; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of host innate and adaptive immunity. Viruses have developed diverse strategies for evading or utilizing autophagy for survival. The response of the autophagy pathways to virus invasion is poorly documented. Here, we report on the induction of autophagy initiated by the pathogen receptor HSP90AA1 (heat shock protein 90 kDa ? [cytosolic], class A member 1) via the AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-dependent pathway. Transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular autolysosomes packaged avibirnavirus particles. Autophagy detection showed that early avibirnavirus infection not only increased the amount of light chain 3 (LC3)-II, but also upregulated AKT-MTOR dephosphorylation. HSP90AA1-AKT-MTOR knockdown by RNA interference resulted in inhibition of autophagy during avibirnavirus infection. Virus titer assays further verified that autophagy inhibition, but not induction, enhanced avibirnavirus replication. Subsequently, we found that HSP90AA1 binding to the viral protein VP2 resulted in induction of autophagy and AKT-MTOR pathway inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that the cell surface protein HSP90AA1, an avibirnavirus-binding receptor, induces autophagy through the HSP90AA1-AKT-MTOR pathway in early infection. We reveal that upon viral recognition, a direct connection between HSP90AA1 and the AKT-MTOR pathway trigger autophagy, a critical step for controlling infection. PMID:25714412

  14. An In-depth Analysis of Iron and Pathogenicity Regulatory Pathways in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a 

    E-print Network

    Greenwald, Jessica Williams

    2012-10-19

    ability to cause disease have been well studied, the transition from epiphyte to pathogen is not well understood. The research described in this dissertation utilizes high throughput sequencing transcriptome analyses to define an iron regulatory network...

  15. Elucidation of the pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine in bacterial pathogens

    E-print Network

    Morrison, Michael James

    2014-01-01

    The highly-modified, bacterial sugar N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) has been implicated in the pathogenicity of certain microbes through its incorporation onto various protein virulence factors. In particular, ...

  16. Identification of Metabolic Pathways Expressed by Pichia anomala Kh6 in the Presence of the Pathogen Botrytis cinerea on Apple: New Possible Targets for Biocontrol Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kwasiborski, Anthony; Bajji, Mohammed; Renaut, Jenny; Delaplace, Pierre; Jijakli, M. Haissam

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Pichia anomala strain Kh6 Kurtzman (Saccharomycetales: Endomycetaceae) exhibits biological control properties that provide an alternative to the chemical fungicides currently used by fruit or vegetable producers against main post-harvest pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae). Using an in situ model that takes into account interactions between organisms and a proteomic approach, we aimed to identify P. anomala metabolic pathways influenced by the presence of B. cinerea. A total of 105 and 60 P. anomala proteins were differentially represented in the exponential and stationary growth phases, respectively. In the exponential phase and in the presence of B. cinerea, the pentose phosphate pathway seems to be enhanced and would provide P. anomala with the needed nucleic acids and energy for the wound colonisation. In the stationary phase, P. anomala would use alcoholic fermentation both in the absence and presence of the pathogen. These results would suggest that the competitive colonisation of apple wounds could be implicated in the mode of action of P. anomala against B. cinerea. PMID:24614090

  17. Biosecurity and Vector Behaviour: Evaluating the Potential Threat Posed by Anglers and Canoeists as Pathways for the Spread of Invasive Non-Native Species and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lucy G.; White, Piran C. L.; Stebbing, Paul D.; Stentiford, Grant D.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive non-native species (INNS) endanger native biodiversity and are a major economic problem. The management of pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment is a key target in the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi biodiversity targets for 2020. Freshwater environments are particularly susceptible to invasions as they are exposed to multiple introduction pathways, including non-native fish stocking and the release of boat ballast water. Since many freshwater INNS and aquatic pathogens can survive for several days in damp environments, there is potential for transport between water catchments on the equipment used by recreational anglers and canoeists. To quantify this biosecurity risk, we conducted an online questionnaire with 960 anglers and 599 canoeists to investigate their locations of activity, equipment used, and how frequently equipment was cleaned and/or dried after use. Anglers were also asked about their use and disposal of live bait. Our results indicate that 64% of anglers and 78.5% of canoeists use their equipment/boat in more than one catchment within a fortnight, the survival time of many of the INNS and pathogens considered in this study and that 12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists do so without either cleaning or drying their kit between uses. Furthermore, 8% of anglers and 28% of canoeists had used their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it after each use which could facilitate both the introduction and secondary spread of INNS in the UK. Our results provide a baseline against which to evaluate the effectiveness of future biosecurity awareness campaigns, and identify groups to target with biosecurity awareness information. Our results also indicate that the biosecurity practices of these groups must improve to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently spreading INNS and pathogens through these activities. PMID:24717714

  18. Biosecurity and vector behaviour: evaluating the potential threat posed by anglers and canoeists as pathways for the spread of invasive non-native species and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lucy G; White, Piran C L; Stebbing, Paul D; Stentiford, Grant D; Dunn, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    Invasive non-native species (INNS) endanger native biodiversity and are a major economic problem. The management of pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment is a key target in the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi biodiversity targets for 2020. Freshwater environments are particularly susceptible to invasions as they are exposed to multiple introduction pathways, including non-native fish stocking and the release of boat ballast water. Since many freshwater INNS and aquatic pathogens can survive for several days in damp environments, there is potential for transport between water catchments on the equipment used by recreational anglers and canoeists. To quantify this biosecurity risk, we conducted an online questionnaire with 960 anglers and 599 canoeists to investigate their locations of activity, equipment used, and how frequently equipment was cleaned and/or dried after use. Anglers were also asked about their use and disposal of live bait. Our results indicate that 64% of anglers and 78.5% of canoeists use their equipment/boat in more than one catchment within a fortnight, the survival time of many of the INNS and pathogens considered in this study and that 12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists do so without either cleaning or drying their kit between uses. Furthermore, 8% of anglers and 28% of canoeists had used their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it after each use which could facilitate both the introduction and secondary spread of INNS in the UK. Our results provide a baseline against which to evaluate the effectiveness of future biosecurity awareness campaigns, and identify groups to target with biosecurity awareness information. Our results also indicate that the biosecurity practices of these groups must improve to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently spreading INNS and pathogens through these activities. PMID:24717714

  19. Human microRNA-24 modulates highly pathogenic avian-origin H5N1 influenza A virus infection in A549 cells by targeting secretory pathway furin.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Emma-Kate; Diederich, Sandra; Pasick, John; Jean, François

    2015-01-01

    A common critical cellular event that many human enveloped viruses share is the requirement for proteolytic cleavage of the viral glycoprotein by furin in the host secretory pathway. For example, the furin-dependent proteolytic activation of highly pathogenic (HP) influenza A (infA) H5 and H7 haemagglutinin precursor (HA0) subtypes is critical for yielding fusion-competent infectious virions. In this study, we hypothesized that viral hijacking of the furin pathway by HP infA viruses to permit cleavage of HA0 could represent a novel molecular mechanism controlling the dynamic production of fusion-competent infectious virus particles during the viral life cycle. We explored the biological role of a newly identified furin-directed human microRNA, miR-24, in this process as a potential post-transcriptional regulator of the furin-mediated activation of HA0 and production of fusion-competent virions in the host secretory pathway. We report that miR-24 and furin are differentially expressed in human A549 cells infected with HP avian-origin infA H5N1. Using miR-24 mimics, we demonstrated a robust decrease in both furin mRNA levels and intracellular furin activity in A549 cells. Importantly, pretreatment of A549 cells with miR-24 mimicked these results: a robust decrease of H5N1 infectious virions and a complete block of H5N1 virus spread that was not observed in A549 cells infected with low-pathogenicity swine-origin infA H1N1 virus. Our results suggest that viral-specific downregulation of furin-directed microRNAs such as miR-24 during the life cycle of HP infA viruses may represent a novel regulatory mechanism that governs furin-mediated proteolytic activation of HA0 glycoproteins and production of infectious virions. PMID:25234642

  20. Article The bantam MicroRNA Is a Target of the Hippo Tumor-Suppressor Pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riitta Nolo; Clayton M. Morrison; Chunyao Tao; Xinwei Zhang; Georg Halder

    Summary Background: The Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway has emerged as a key signaling pathway that controls tissue size inDrosophila. Hippo signaling restricts tissue size by promoting apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest, and animals carrying clones of cells mutant for hippo de- velop severely overgrown adult structures. The Hippo pathway is thought to exert its effects by modulating gene expression through the phosphorylation

  1. An Oleic Acid–Mediated Pathway Induces Constitutive Defense Signaling and Enhanced Resistance to Multiple Pathogens in Soybean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aardra Kachroo; Da-Qi Fu; Wendy Havens; DuRoy Navarre; Pradeep Kachroo; Said A. Ghabrial

    2008-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturase (SACPD)-catalyzed synthesis of oleic acid (18:1) is an essential step in fatty acid biosynthesis. Arabidopsis mutants (ssi2) with reduced SACPD activity accumulate salicylic acid (SA) and exhibit enhanced resistance to multiple pathogens. We show that reduced levels of 18:1 induce similar defense-related phe- notypes in soybean. A Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-based vector was employed to effectively

  2. Specialized and shared functions of the histidine kinase- and HOG1 MAP kinase-mediated signaling pathways in Alternaria alternata, a filamentous fungal pathogen of citrus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2010-10-01

    Signal transduction pathways are critical for the coordination of complex cellular processes in cells. In Alternaria alternata, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen of citrus, cloning and characterization of a gene coding a Group III histidine kinase (AaHSK1) and the yeast HOG1 ortholog (AaHOG1) showed the two genes to operate, both uniquely and synergistically, in a number of physiological and pathological functions. Systemic loss-of-function genetics in A. alternata revealed that AaHSK1 is a primary regulator for cellular resistance to sugar osmotic stress and for sensitivity to dicarboximide or phenylpyrrole fungicides. These functions were likely modulated by unknown mechanisms rather than solely by the AaHOG1-mediated pathway. AaHOG1, which conferred cellular resistance to salts and oxidative stress, also bypassed AaHSK1, even though deletion of AaHSK1 affected AaHOG1 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of AaHOG1 was increased when the fungus was treated with osmotic stress, fungicides or H(2)O(2). Fungal mutants impaired in AaHSK1, AaHOG1, AaAP1 (encoding a redox-responsive transcription factor) or AaFUS3 (encoding a MAP kinase) were all hypersensitive to 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP) or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA). An AaHOG1::sGFP (synthetic green fluorescent protein) fusion protein became localized in the nucleus in response to H(2)O(2), CHP, TIBA, fungicides, but not glucose. Glucose, however, enhanced AaHOG1 phosphorylation and nuclear localization in the AaHSK1 deficient background. Accumulation of the AaHSK1 gene transcript was negatively regulated by AaHOG1, AaAP1 or AaFUS3. AaHOG1 was necessary for fungal pathogenicity, yet AaHSK1 was completely dispensable for pathogenicity. Our results highlight a dramatic flexibility and uniqueness in the signaling pathways that are involved in responding to diverse environmental stimuli in A. alternata. PMID:20601043

  3. WATERBORNE PATHOGENS IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause sickness or even death. A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combi...

  4. High-content image-based screening of a signal transduction pathway inhibitor small-molecule library against highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Tritsch, Sarah R; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    High-content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a small-molecule library of compounds targeting signal transduction pathways for antiviral activity against multiple highly pathogenic RNA viruses. Of the 2843 compounds screened, 120 compounds exhibited ?60% antiviral activity. Four compounds (E225-0969, E528-0039, G118-0778, and G544-0735), which were most active against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their concentration-response profile and cytotoxicity. These compounds did not show any visible cytotoxicity at the highest concentration of compound tested (200 µM). All four of these compounds were more active than ribavirin against several viruses. One compound, E225-0969, had the lowest effective concentration (EC50 = 1.9-8.92 µM) for all the viruses tested. This compound was 13- and 43-fold more inhibitory against RVFV and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), respectively, than ribavirin. The highest selectivity index (>106.2) was for E225-0969 against CHIKV. Time-of-addition assays suggested that all four lead compounds targeted early steps in the viral life cycle (entry and/or replication) but not virus egress. Overall, this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals against highly pathogenic viruses. PMID:25342145

  5. Role of Ficolin-A and Lectin Complement Pathway in the Innate Defense against Pathogenic Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bidula, Stefan; Kenawy, Hany; Ali, Youssif M.; Sexton, Darren; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus species are saprophytic molds causing life-threatening invasive fungal infections in the immunocompromised host. Innate immune recognition, in particular, the mechanisms of opsonization and complement activation, has been reported to be an integral part of the defense against fungi. We have shown that the complement component ficolin-A significantly binds to Aspergillus conidia and hyphae in a concentration-dependent manner and was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine. Calcium-independent binding to Aspergillus fumigatus and A. terreus was observed, but binding to A. flavus and A. niger was calcium dependent. Ficolin-A binding to conidia was increased under low-pH conditions, and opsonization led to enhanced binding of conidia to A549 airway epithelial cells. In investigations of the lectin pathway of complement activation, ficolin-A-opsonized conidia did not lead to lectin pathway-specific C4 deposition. In contrast, the collectin mannose binding lectin C (MBL-C) but not MBL-A led to efficient lectin pathway activation on A. fumigatus in the absence of ficolin-A. In addition, ficolin-A opsonization led to a modulation of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-8. We conclude that ficolin-A may play an important role in the innate defense against Aspergillus by opsonizing conidia, immobilizing this fungus through enhanced adherence to epithelial cells and modulation of inflammation. However, it appears that other immune pattern recognition molecules, i.e., those of the collectin MBL-C, are involved in the Aspergillus-lectin complement pathway activation rather than ficolin-A. PMID:23478320

  6. Pathogen sensing pathways in human embryonic stem cell derived-endothelial cells: role of NOD1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel M; Foldes, Gabor; Gatheral, Timothy; Paschalaki, Koralia E; Lendvai, Zsuzsanna; Bagyura, Zsolt; Nemeth, Tamas; Skopal, Judit; Merkely, Bela; Telcian, Aurica G; Gogsadze, Leila; Edwards, Michael R; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Johnston, Sebastian L; Harding, Sian E; Mitchell, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC), as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD)-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC), and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage. PMID:24690886

  7. Pathogen Sensing Pathways in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived-Endothelial Cells: Role of NOD1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Daniel M.; Foldes, Gabor; Gatheral, Timothy; Paschalaki, Koralia E.; Lendvai, Zsuzsanna; Bagyura, Zsolt; Nemeth, Tamas; Skopal, Judit; Merkely, Bela; Telcian, Aurica G.; Gogsadze, Leila; Edwards, Michael R.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Harding, Sian E.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC), as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD)-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC), and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage. PMID:24690886

  8. Siderophore-Based Iron Acquisition and Pathogen Control

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Marcus; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: High-affinity iron acquisition is mediated by siderophore-dependent pathways in the majority of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and fungi. Considerable progress has been made in characterizing and understanding mechanisms of siderophore synthesis, secretion, iron scavenging, and siderophore-delivered iron uptake and its release. The regulation of siderophore pathways reveals multilayer networks at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Due to the key role of many siderophores during virulence, coevolution led to sophisticated strategies of siderophore neutralization by mammals and (re)utilization by bacterial pathogens. Surprisingly, hosts also developed essential siderophore-based iron delivery and cell conversion pathways, which are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. In the last decades, natural and synthetic compounds have gained attention as potential therapeutics for iron-dependent treatment of infections and further diseases. Promising results for pathogen inhibition were obtained with various siderophore-antibiotic conjugates acting as “Trojan horse” toxins and siderophore pathway inhibitors. In this article, general aspects of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition, recent findings regarding iron-related pathogen-host interactions, and current strategies for iron-dependent pathogen control will be reviewed. Further concepts including the inhibition of novel siderophore pathway targets are discussed. PMID:17804665

  9. PATHOGEN TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING IN THE UPPER SALEM RIVER WATERSHED USING SWAT MODEL - PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulation of the fate and transport of pathogen contamination was conducted with SWAT for the Upper Salem River Watershed, located in Salem County, New Jersey. This watershed is 37 km2 and land uses are predominantly agricultural. The watershed drains to a 32 km str...

  10. Cues and regulatory pathways involved in natural competence and transformation in pathogenic and environmental Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Patrick; Blokesch, Melanie

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial genomics is flourishing, as whole-genome sequencing has become affordable, readily available and rapid. As a result, it has become clear how frequently horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurs in bacteria. The potential implications are highly significant because HGT contributes to several processes, including the spread of antibiotic-resistance cassettes, the distribution of toxin-encoding phages and the transfer of pathogenicity islands. Three modes of HGT are recognized in bacteria: conjugation, transduction and natural transformation. In contrast to the first two mechanisms, natural competence for transformation does not rely on mobile genetic elements but is driven solely by a developmental programme in the acceptor bacterium. Once the bacterium becomes competent, it is able to take up DNA from the environment and to incorporate the newly acquired DNA into its own chromosome. The initiation and duration of competence differ significantly among bacteria. In this review, we outline the latest data on representative naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria and how their competence windows differ. We also summarize how environmental cues contribute to the initiation of competence in a subset of naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria and how the complexity of the niche might dictate the fine-tuning of the competence window. PMID:22928673

  11. Clinical Pathways in surgery—should we introduce them into clinical routine? A review article

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Ronellenfitsch; Eric Rössner; Jens Jakob; Stefan Post; Peter Hohenberger; Matthias Schwarzbach

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims  In modern health care systems, care providers face ever new challenges with regard to quality and cost of care, as well as\\u000a to satisfaction and training of staff. Due to the intensiveness of the subject, these challenges are particularly pronounced\\u000a in surgery. Clinical Pathways, i.e. detailed care plans defining the desired measures to be performed for each treatment

  12. Traits of Pathogens Negatively Affecting

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Traits of Pathogens Negatively Affecting Livestock Lindsey Youngman, Kelly Moffett, Ryan Crawford, Taylor Arsenault #12;Hypothesis Pathogens that can be transmitted via multiple pathways are most likely to have a significant negative consequence on livestock. On the contrary, pathogens that are transmitted

  13. Effects of a Defective Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation Pathway on the Stress Response, Virulence, and Antifungal Drug Susceptibility of the Mold Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Karthik; Feng, Xizhi; Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V.; Bick, Gregory; Richie, Daryl L.; Woollett, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins that are destined for release outside the eukaryotic cell, insertion into the plasma membrane, or delivery to intracellular organelles are processed and folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An imbalance between the level of nascent proteins entering the ER and the organelle's ability to manage that load results in the accumulation of unfolded proteins. Terminally unfolded proteins are disposed of by ER-associated degradation (ERAD), a pathway that transports the aberrant proteins across the ER membrane into the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. The ERAD pathway was targeted in the mold pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus by deleting the hrdA gene, encoding the A. fumigatus ortholog of Hrd1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase previously shown to contribute to ERAD in other species. Loss of HrdA was associated with impaired degradation of a folding-defective ERAD substrate, CPY*, as well as activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR). The ?hrdA mutant showed resistance to voriconazole and reduced thermotolerance but was otherwise unaffected by a variety of environmental stressors. A double-deletion mutant deficient in both HrdA and another component of the same ERAD complex, DerA, was defective in secretion and showed hypersensitivity to ER, thermal, and cell wall stress. However, the ?hrdA ?derA mutant remained virulent in mouse and insect infection models. These data demonstrate that HrdA and DerA support complementary ERAD functions that promote survival under conditions of ER stress but are dispensable for virulence in the host environment. PMID:23355008

  14. Granulosa cells from emerged antral follicles of the bovine ovary initiate inflammation in response to bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns via Toll-like receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Price, Jennifer Claire; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections of the uterus or mammary gland commonly perturb ovarian antral follicle growth and function, causing infertility in cattle. Cells of the innate immune system use Toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR2, TLR4, and TLR5 to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of bacteria, leading to production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8. The present study examined whether granulosa cells from emerged antral follicles have functional responses to typical bacterial PAMPs. Granulosa cells from emerged bovine antral follicles expressed mRNA for all 10 TLRs. Cellular expression of mRNA for the cytokines IL1B, IL6, IL10, and TNF, and chemokines IL8 and CCL5, increased after treatment with synthetic bacterial lipoprotein binding TLR2, lipopolysaccharide binding TLR4, or flagellin binding TLR5. Supernatants of granulosa cells accumulated IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 protein in a concentration-dependent manner when treated with lipoprotein or lipopolysaccharide, but not flagellin. Accumulation of IL6 in response to lipoprotein and lipopolysaccharide was attenuated using siRNA targeting TLR2 and TLR4, respectively. Granulosa cells increased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 14 and MAPK3/1 within 30 min of treatment with lipopolysaccharide or lipoprotein, and inhibitors targeting MAPK14 reduced the accumulation of IL-6 in response to the PAMPs. Treatment with hormones follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, or progesterone did not significantly affect granulosa cell responses to PAMPs. However, epidermal growth factor enhanced IL-6 accumulation in response to lipoprotein and inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) abrogated the effect, whereas lipoprotein increased granulosa cell EGFR mRNA expression. In conclusion, bovine granulosa cells from emerged follicles sense bacterial PAMPs and initiate inflammatory responses via TLR2 and TLR4 pathways. PMID:24089202

  15. Proteasomal degradation in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vitaly Citovsky; Adi Zaltsman; Stanislav V. Kozlovsky; Yedidya Gafni; Alexander Krichevsky

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin\\/26S proteasome pathway is a basic biological mechanism involved in the regulation of a multitude of cellular processes. Increasing evidence indicates that plants utilize the ubiquitin\\/26S proteasome pathway in their immune response to pathogen invasion, emphasizing the role of this pathway during plant–pathogen interactions. The specific functions of proteasomal degradation in plant–pathogen interactions are diverse, and do not always

  16. A Ligand-Receptor Mechanism in Plant-Pathogen Recognition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chris Lamb (Salk Institute for Biological Studies; Plant Biology Laboratory)

    1996-12-20

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Two reports in this issue (p. 2060 and p. 2063) illustrate the molecular mechanism underlying the specificity of plant pathogens for certain plant species. In his Perspective, Lamb explains what these results teach us about signal transduction pathways in plants and how they provide a new tool for engineering crop plants.

  17. Unraveling the Tick-Host-Pathogen Interface

    E-print Network

    Severo, Maiara

    2013-01-01

    inhibited inflammasome- mediated inflammation upon infectioninflammasome activation and regulates inflammation during pathogen infection.inflammasome pathway. The mammalian immune- derived pathology upon infection

  18. Screening the pathogenic genes and pathways related to DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene)-induced transformation of hamster oral mucosa from precancerous lesions to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, DAN; YANG, KAI; MEI, JIE; ZHANG, GUODONG; LV, XIAOQIANG; XIANG, LI

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to screen the pathogenic genes and pathways that relate to the transformation of hamster buccal mucosa from precancerous lesions to squamous cell carcinoma by whole genome microarray and bioinformatics analysis. A DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene)-induced hamster model of a precancerous lesion and squamous cell carcinoma was established. The differentially expressed genes were detected using an Agilent whole rat genome microarray, which contains 41,000 genes/ESTs. Gene ontology (GO) functional classification and pathway analyses were performed, and a subset of differentially expressed genes were validated using RT-PCR. The results showed that during the transformation of hamster buccal mucosa from the precancerous lesion to squamous cell carcinoma, a total of 1,981 genes were differentially expressed, of which 1,037 were up-regulated and 944 were down-regulated. GO analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes are mainly involved in 14 functional groups including those of metabolism and cell structure. Additionally, 9 significantly altered pathways were identified. Among the 1,861 known differentially expressed genes, 14 genes including Casp3, CCL5 and CXCL12 were enriched in the 9 altered pathways. The up-regulation of SPARC and down-regulation of Casp3 were confirmed by RT-PCR. In conclusion, a total of 1,981 differentially expressed genes and 9 significantly altered pathways were identified in the transformation of hamster buccal mucosa from precancerous lesions to squamous cell carcinoma. A total of 14 pathway-enriched genes including Casp3, CCL5 and CXCL12 may play critical roles in the alteration of cellular pathways leading to the transformation of buccal mucosa from precancerous lesions to squamous cell carcinoma. Future studies focusing on these genes and pathways are required in order to gain a better understanding and provide effective prevention and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22848241

  19. The bacterial lipopeptide iturins induce Verticillium dahliae cell death by affecting fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Han, Qin; Wu, Fengli; Wang, Xiaonan; Qi, Hong; Shi, Liang; Ren, Ang; Liu, Qinghai; Zhao, Mingwen; Tang, Canming

    2015-04-01

    Verticillium wilt in cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae is one of the most serious plant diseases worldwide. Because no known fungicides or cotton cultivars provide sufficient protection against this pathogen, V.?dahliae causes major crop yield losses. Here, an isolated cotton endophytic bacterium, designated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 41B-1, exhibited greater than 50% biocontrol efficacy against V.?dahliae in cotton plants under greenhouse conditions. Through high-performance liquid chromatography and mass analysis of the filtrate, we found that the antifungal compounds present in the strain 41B-1 culture filtrate were a series of isoforms of iturins. The purified iturins suppressed V.?dahliae microsclerotial germination in the absence or presence of cotton. Treatment with the iturins induced reactive oxygen species bursts, Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and defects in cell wall integrity. The oxidative stress response and high-osmolarity glycerol pathway contribute to iturins resistance in V.?dahliae. In contrast, the Slt2 MAPK pathway may be involved in iturins sensitivity in this fungus. In addition to antagonism, iturins could induce plant defence responses as activators and mediate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. These findings suggest that iturins may affect fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses against V.?dahliae. PMID:24934960

  20. ARTicle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ARTicle is yet another entry in the arena of museum blogs, this time from the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). ARTicle is intended to cover all sorts of subjects related to the AIC, and its six staff writers ask readers to, "Think of it as a little peek behind the scenes." The blog dates back to October of 2009, and visitors will find recent entries that include a staff picks entry, an entry on saints and symbols, and a short video featuring Robby S., a media assistant in Communications. In the video, Robby discusses Chilean painter Matta's The Earth Is a Man, 1942, which he describes as looking like a bunch of things floating in soup. Another recent post by Sarah M. investigates a piece currently on view in the modern wing, Shade by London-based Dutch designer Simon Heijdens, taking a look at how the work was installed and the possible meaning behind the work. If a "little peek behind the scenes" means the opportunity to hear people talking about art in an accessible and straightforward fashion, then ARTicle certainly achieves its stated goal.

  1. Signaling During Pathogen Infection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sylvia Munter (University of Heidelberg Medical School; Department of Parasitology REV)

    2006-05-16

    Pathogens infect almost every living organism. In animals, including humans, the diversity of pathogens ranges from viruses, bacteria, and unicellular parasites to complex fungi, worms, and arthropods. Because pathogens have coevolved with their hosts and have sometimes been coopted as symbionts or commensals, each pathogen/host pair represents a striking success story of survival that reflects the biological complexity of both parties. All invading microorganisms face similar problems, such as gaining access to their host, achieving successful replication, and spreading to a similar or different host. It is therefore not surprising that many different pathogens target similar organs, cell types, and even molecules to achieve their goals. However, no two microbial parasites appear to be completely alike. Although they often target similar signaling networks, they do so in subtly different ways to achieve the desired outcome. This review has eight figures, three movies, and 139 citations and emphasizes two well-established signaling pathways that are often activated during the interaction of different pathogens with their host cells. It illustrates a small part of how the dissection of host/pathogen interactions can reveal, on a molecular scale, a nature shaped by evolutionary forces that can rival the great descriptions of our macroscopic world.

  2. Activation of the Phosphatidylinositol 3Kinase\\/Akt Pathway Contributes to Survival of Primary Epithelial Cells Infected with the Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ozlem Yilmaz; Thomas Jungas; Philippe Verbeke; David M. Ojcius

    2004-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, infects primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs). Despite the large number of bacteria that replicate inside the GECs, the host cell remains viable. We demonstrate that P. gingivalis triggers rapid and reversible surface phosphatidylserine exposure through a mechanism requiring caspase activation. However, after 1 day of infection, the bacteria no longer induce phosphatidylserine externalization and

  3. The FUS3 MAPK signaling pathway of the citrus pathogen Alternaria alternata functions independently or cooperatively with the fungal redox-responsive AP1 regulator for diverse developmental, physiological and pathogenic processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Hsuan Lin; Siwy Ling Yang; Nan-Yi Wang; Kuang-Ren Chung

    2010-01-01

    Alternaria alternata, the fungus that causes citrus brown spot, invades its hosts primarily through the production and action of a host-selective ACT toxin that kills citrus cells prior to invasion. In this study, we show that, in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling pathway governs a number of biological functions, either separately or in

  4. Including pathogen risk in life cycle assessment of wastewater management. 1. Estimating the burden of disease associated with pathogens.

    PubMed

    Harder, Robin; Heimersson, Sara; Svanström, Magdalena; Peters, Gregory M

    2014-08-19

    The environmental performance of wastewater and sewage sludge management is commonly assessed using life cycle assessment (LCA), whereas pathogen risk is evaluated with quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). This study explored the application of QMRA methodology with intent to include pathogen risk in LCA and facilitate a comparison with other potential impacts on human health considered in LCA. Pathogen risk was estimated for a model wastewater treatment system (WWTS) located in an industrialized country and consisting of primary, secondary, and tertiary wastewater treatment, anaerobic sludge digestion, and land application of sewage sludge. The estimation was based on eight previous QMRA studies as well as parameter values taken from the literature. A total pathogen risk (expressed as burden of disease) on the order of 0.2-9 disability-adjusted life years (DALY) per year of operation was estimated for the model WWTS serving 28,600 persons and for the pathogens and exposure pathways included in this study. The comparison of pathogen risk with other potential impacts on human health considered in LCA is detailed in part 2 of this article series. PMID:25058492

  5. The FUS3 MAPK signaling pathway of the citrus pathogen Alternaria alternata functions independently or cooperatively with the fungal redox-responsive AP1 regulator for diverse developmental, physiological and pathogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Yang, Siwy Ling; Wang, Nan-Yi; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2010-04-01

    Alternaria alternata, the fungus that causes citrus brown spot, invades its hosts primarily through the production and action of a host-selective ACT toxin that kills citrus cells prior to invasion. In this study, we show that, in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling pathway governs a number of biological functions, either separately or in a cooperative manner, with the AaAP1 gene encoding a transcription regulator. The reported MAPK is encoded by the AaFUS3 gene, which we show to be necessary for conidial development, resistance to copper fungicides, melanin biosynthesis, and particularly, for elaboration of the penetration process. In contrast, AaFUS3 negatively controls salt tolerance and production of several hydrolytic enzymes. AaFUS3 has no apparent role in the biosynthesis of host-selective toxin or in resistance to oxidative stress. Both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 are required for fungal resistance to 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP), diethyl maleate (DEM), and many pyridine-containing compounds. A strain with mutations in both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 displayed an increased sensitivity to these compounds. Expression of the AaAP1 and AaFUS3 genes and phosphorylation of AaFUS3 were also induced by CHP, DEM, or TIBA. Expression of two genes coding for a putative MFS transporter was coordinately regulated by AaAP1 and AaFUS3. The AaAP1::sGFP (synthetic green fluorescent protein) fusion protein became localized in the nucleus in response to CHP or TIBA. Inactivation of the AaAP1 gene, however, promoted phosphorylation of AaFUS3. Taken together, our results indicate that A. alternata utilizes specialized or synergistic regulatory interactions between the AP1 and MAPK signaling pathways for diverse physiological functions. PMID:20036749

  6. The CRE1 Cytokinin Pathway Is Differentially Recruited Depending on Medicago truncatula Root Environments and Negatively Regulates Resistance to a Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Laffont, Carole; Rey, Thomas; André, Olivier; Novero, Mara; Kazmierczak, Théophile; Debellé, Frédéric; Bonfante, Paola; Jacquet, Christophe; Frugier, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that regulate many developmental and environmental responses. The Medicago truncatula cytokinin receptor MtCRE1 (Cytokinin Response 1) is required for the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia. As several cytokinin signaling genes are modulated in roots depending on different biotic and abiotic conditions, we assessed potential involvement of this pathway in various root environmental responses. Phenotyping of cre1 mutant roots infected by the Gigaspora margarita arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic fungus, the Aphanomyces euteiches root oomycete, or subjected to an abiotic stress (salt), were carried out. Detailed histological analysis and quantification of cre1 mycorrhized roots did not reveal any detrimental phenotype, suggesting that MtCRE1 does not belong to the ancestral common symbiotic pathway shared by rhizobial and AM symbioses. cre1 mutants formed an increased number of emerged lateral roots compared to wild-type plants, a phenotype which was also observed under non-stressed conditions. In response to A. euteiches, cre1 mutants showed reduced disease symptoms and an increased plant survival rate, correlated to an enhanced formation of lateral roots, a feature previously linked to Aphanomyces resistance. Overall, we showed that the cytokinin CRE1 pathway is not only required for symbiotic nodule organogenesis but also affects both root development and resistance to abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. PMID:25562779

  7. The CRE1 cytokinin pathway is differentially recruited depending on Medicago truncatula root environments and negatively regulates resistance to a pathogen.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Carole; Rey, Thomas; André, Olivier; Novero, Mara; Kazmierczak, Théophile; Debellé, Frédéric; Bonfante, Paola; Jacquet, Christophe; Frugier, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that regulate many developmental and environmental responses. The Medicago truncatula cytokinin receptor MtCRE1 (Cytokinin Response 1) is required for the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia. As several cytokinin signaling genes are modulated in roots depending on different biotic and abiotic conditions, we assessed potential involvement of this pathway in various root environmental responses. Phenotyping of cre1 mutant roots infected by the Gigaspora margarita arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic fungus, the Aphanomyces euteiches root oomycete, or subjected to an abiotic stress (salt), were carried out. Detailed histological analysis and quantification of cre1 mycorrhized roots did not reveal any detrimental phenotype, suggesting that MtCRE1 does not belong to the ancestral common symbiotic pathway shared by rhizobial and AM symbioses. cre1 mutants formed an increased number of emerged lateral roots compared to wild-type plants, a phenotype which was also observed under non-stressed conditions. In response to A. euteiches, cre1 mutants showed reduced disease symptoms and an increased plant survival rate, correlated to an enhanced formation of lateral roots, a feature previously linked to Aphanomyces resistance. Overall, we showed that the cytokinin CRE1 pathway is not only required for symbiotic nodule organogenesis but also affects both root development and resistance to abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. PMID:25562779

  8. The Arabidopsis Rho of Plants GTPase AtROP6 Functions in Developmental and Pathogen Response Pathways1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Poraty-Gavra, Limor; Zimmermann, Philip; Haigis, Sabine; Bednarek, Pawe?; Hazak, Ora; Stelmakh, Oksana Rogovoy; Sadot, Einat; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    How plants coordinate developmental processes and environmental stress responses is a pressing question. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Rho of Plants6 (AtROP6) integrates developmental and pathogen response signaling. AtROP6 expression is induced by auxin and detected in the root meristem, lateral root initials, and leaf hydathodes. Plants expressing a dominant negative AtROP6 (rop6DN) under the regulation of its endogenous promoter are small and have multiple inflorescence stems, twisted leaves, deformed leaf epidermis pavement cells, and differentially organized cytoskeleton. Microarray analyses of rop6DN plants revealed that major changes in gene expression are associated with constitutive salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense responses. In agreement, their free and total SA levels resembled those of wild-type plants inoculated with a virulent powdery mildew pathogen. The constitutive SA-associated response in rop6DN was suppressed in mutant backgrounds defective in SA signaling (nonexpresser of PR genes1 [npr1]) or biosynthesis (salicylic acid induction deficient2 [sid2]). However, the rop6DN npr1 and rop6DN sid2 double mutants retained the aberrant developmental phenotypes, indicating that the constitutive SA response can be uncoupled from ROP function(s) in development. rop6DN plants exhibited enhanced preinvasive defense responses to a host-adapted virulent powdery mildew fungus but were impaired in preinvasive defenses upon inoculation with a nonadapted powdery mildew. The host-adapted powdery mildew had a reduced reproductive fitness on rop6DN plants, which was retained in mutant backgrounds defective in SA biosynthesis or signaling. Our findings indicate that both the morphological aberrations and altered sensitivity to powdery mildews of rop6DN plants result from perturbations that are independent from the SA-associated response. These perturbations uncouple SA-dependent defense signaling from disease resistance execution. PMID:23319551

  9. Proteome Analysis of Coinfection of Epithelial Cells with Filifactor alocis and Porphyromonas gingivalis Shows Modulation of Pathogen and Host Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Zhang, Kangling; Dou, Yuetan

    2014-01-01

    Changes in periodontal status are associated with shifts in the composition of the bacterial community in the periodontal pocket. The relative abundances of several newly recognized microbial species, including Filifactor alocis, as-yet-unculturable organisms, and other fastidious organisms have raised questions on their impact on disease development. We have previously reported that the virulence attributes of F. alocis are enhanced in coculture with Porphyromonas gingivalis. We have evaluated the proteome of host cells and F. alocis during a polymicrobial infection. Coinfection of epithelial cells with F. alocis and P. gingivalis strains showed approximately 20% to 30% more proteins than a monoinfection. Unlike F. alocis ATCC 35896, the D-62D strain expressed more proteins during coculture with P. gingivalis W83 than with P. gingivalis 33277. Proteins designated microbial surface component-recognizing adhesion matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) and cell wall anchor proteins were highly upregulated during the polymicrobial infection. Ultrastructural analysis of the epithelial cells showed formation of membrane microdomains only during coinfection. The proteome profile of epithelial cells showed proteins related to cytoskeletal organization and gene expression and epigenetic modification to be in high abundance. Modulation of proteins involved in apoptotic and cell signaling pathways was noted during coinfection. The enhanced virulence potential of F. alocis may be related to the differential expression levels of several putative virulence factors and their effects on specific host cell pathways. PMID:24866790

  10. Broken-Symmetry DFT Computations for the Reaction Pathway of IspH, an Iron-Sulfur Enzyme in Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blachly, Patrick G; Sandala, Gregory M; Giammona, Debra Ann; Bashford, Donald; McCammon, J Andrew; Noodleman, Louis

    2015-07-01

    The recently discovered methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway provides new targets for the development of antibacterial and antimalarial drugs. In the final step of the MEP pathway, the [4Fe-4S] IspH protein catalyzes the 2e(-)/2H(+) reductive dehydroxylation of (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) to afford the isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP). Recent experiments have attempted to elucidate the IspH catalytic mechanism to drive inhibitor development. Two competing mechanisms have recently emerged, differentiated by their proposed HMBPP binding modes upon 1e(-) reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster: (1) a Birch reduction mechanism, in which HMBPP remains bound to the [4Fe-4S] cluster through its terminal C4-OH group (ROH-bound) until the -OH is cleaved as water; and (2) an organometallic mechanism, in which the C4-OH group rotates away from the [4Fe-4S] cluster, allowing the HMBPP olefin group to form a metallacycle complex with the apical iron (?(2)-bound). We perform broken-symmetry density functional theory computations to assess the energies and reduction potentials associated with the ROH- and ?(2)-bound states implicated by these competing mechanisms. Reduction potentials obtained for ROH-bound states are more negative (-1.4 to -1.0 V) than what is typically expected of [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin proteins. Instead, we find that ?(2)-bound states are lower in energy than ROH-bound states when the [4Fe-4S] cluster is 1e(-) reduced. Furthermore, ?(2)-bound states can already be generated in the oxidized state, yielding reduction potentials of ca. -700 mV when electron addition occurs after rotation of the HMBPP C4-OH group. We demonstrate that such ?(2)-bound states are kinetically accessible both when the IspH [4Fe-4S] cluster is oxidized and 1e(-) reduced. The energetically preferred pathway gives 1e(-) reduction of the cluster after substrate conformational change, generating the 1e(-) reduced intermediate proposed in the organometallic mechanism. PMID:26098647

  11. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Primes Plants for Cell Wall Reinforcement and Induces Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens via the Salicylic Acid/Oxylipin Pathway[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Samans, Birgit; Stein, Elke; Neumann, Christina; Schikora, Marek; Reichelt, Michael; Mithöfer, Axel; Becker, Annette; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to monitor their surroundings, for instance the perception of bacteria, is of crucial importance. The perception of microorganism-derived molecules and their effector proteins is the best understood of these monitoring processes. In addition, plants perceive bacterial quorum sensing (QS) molecules used for cell-to-cell communication between bacteria. Here, we propose a mechanism for how N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), a group of QS molecules, influence host defense and fortify resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against bacterial pathogens. N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) primed plants for enhanced callose deposition, accumulation of phenolic compounds, and lignification of cell walls. Moreover, increased levels of oxylipins and salicylic acid favored closure of stomata in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection. The AHL-induced resistance seems to differ from the systemic acquired and the induced systemic resistances, providing new insight into inter-kingdom communication. Consistent with the observation that short-chain AHLs, unlike oxo-C14-HSL, promote plant growth, treatments with C6-HSL, oxo-C10-HSL, or oxo-C14-HSL resulted in different transcriptional profiles in Arabidopsis. Understanding the priming induced by bacterial QS molecules augments our knowledge of plant reactions to bacteria and suggests strategies for using beneficial bacteria in plant protection. PMID:24963057

  12. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  13. PAK in pathogen-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Doerig, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral pathogens are known to interfere with signaling pathways of their host to promote their own survival and proliferation. Here, we present selected examples of modulation of PAK activity in human cells by both intracellular and extracellular pathogens, focusing on one eukaryotic pathogen, the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, two Gram-negative bacteria (Helicobacter pylori and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and two viruses belonging to distinct groups, the lentivirus HIV and the orthomyxovirus Influenza virus A. PMID:23125952

  14. Pathogen intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  15. Pathogen intelligence.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  16. Pathways from Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Barbara, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue are based on presentations at the Pathways from Poverty Workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on May 18-25, 1995. The event aimed to foster development of a network to address rural poverty issues in the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) region. Articles report on outcomes from the Pathways from Poverty…

  17. SEWAGE SLUDGE PATHOGEN TRANSPORT MODEL PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sewage sludge pathogen transport model predicts the number of Salmonella, Ascaris, and polioviruses which might be expected to occur at various points in the environment along 13 defined pathways. These pathways describe the use of dried or liquid, raw or anaerobically digest...

  18. Waterborne pathogens in urban watersheds.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Russell D; Walling, Joyce Perdek

    2007-03-01

    A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combined sewer overflows and sanitary sewer overflows. Pathogens in US ambient water bodies are regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA), while pathogens in drinking water supplies are regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) are developed in accordance with CWA regulations for ambient water bodies with bacterial concentrations exceeding the water quality standard, which generally is a measure of a bacterial indicator organism. However, developing a TMDL for a supplementary indicator or pathogen is also required if a use impairment would still exist even after the water body is in compliance with the standard. This occurs because indicator organisms do not reflect the presence of pathogen contamination with complete certainty. The evaluation of pathogen indicators and summary of epidemiological studies presented are resources for those developing TMDLs to achieve water quality standards and restore water bodies to their intended uses. PMID:17402286

  19. Review article Melatonin synthesis pathway

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    enzymes in the chicken pineal gland and retina Marianne Bernarda Jérôme Guerlotté Pierre Grèvea Aline in the chicken pineal gland and retina. TPH and AANAT mRNA levels reach their peak at night. HIOMT mRNA levels peak at night in the retina, but during the day in the pineal gland. In this tissue, the rhythm of TPH

  20. Repositioning of Memantine as a Potential Novel Therapeutic Agent against Meningitic E. coli–Induced Pathogenicities through Disease-Associated Alpha7 Cholinergic Pathway and RNA Sequencing-Based Transcriptome Analysis of Host Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhong, John F.; Hoffman, Jill; Huang, Sheng-He

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis and meningitis (NSM) remains a leading cause worldwide of mortality and morbidity in newborn infants despite the availability of antibiotics over the last several decades. E. coli is the most common gram-negative pathogen causing NSM. Our previous studies show that ?7 nicotinic receptor (?7 nAChR), an essential regulator of inflammation, plays a detrimental role in the host defense against NSM. Despite notable successes, there still exists an unmet need for new effective therapeutic approaches to treat this disease. Using the in vitro/in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and RNA-seq, we undertook a drug repositioning study to identify unknown antimicrobial activities for known drugs. We have demonstrated for the first time that memantine (MEM), a FDA-approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, could very efficiently block E. coli-caused bacteremia and meningitis in a mouse model of NSM in a manner dependent on ?7 nAChR. MEM was able to synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of ampicillin in HBMEC infected with E. coli K1 (E44) and in neonatal mice with E44-caused bacteremia and meningitis. Differential gene expression analysis of RNA-Seq data from mouse BMEC infected with E. coli K1 showed that several E44-increased inflammatory factors, including IL33, IL18rap, MMP10 and Irs1, were significantly reduced by MEM compared to the infected cells without drug treatment. MEM could also significantly up-regulate anti-inflammatory factors, including Tnfaip3, CISH, Ptgds and Zfp36. Most interestingly, these factors may positively and negatively contribute to regulation of NF-?B, which is a hallmark feature of bacterial meningitis. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that circulating BMEC (cBMEC) are the potential novel biomarkers for NSM. MEM could significantly reduce E44-increased blood level of cBMEC in mice. Taken together, our data suggest that memantine can efficiently block host inflammatory responses to bacterial infection through modulation of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:25993608

  1. Repositioning of Memantine as a Potential Novel Therapeutic Agent against Meningitic E. coli-Induced Pathogenicities through Disease-Associated Alpha7 Cholinergic Pathway and RNA Sequencing-Based Transcriptome Analysis of Host Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Bao; Peng, Liang; Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhong, John F; Hoffman, Jill; Huang, Sheng-He

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis and meningitis (NSM) remains a leading cause worldwide of mortality and morbidity in newborn infants despite the availability of antibiotics over the last several decades. E. coli is the most common gram-negative pathogen causing NSM. Our previous studies show that ?7 nicotinic receptor (?7 nAChR), an essential regulator of inflammation, plays a detrimental role in the host defense against NSM. Despite notable successes, there still exists an unmet need for new effective therapeutic approaches to treat this disease. Using the in vitro/in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and RNA-seq, we undertook a drug repositioning study to identify unknown antimicrobial activities for known drugs. We have demonstrated for the first time that memantine (MEM), a FDA-approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, could very efficiently block E. coli-caused bacteremia and meningitis in a mouse model of NSM in a manner dependent on ?7 nAChR. MEM was able to synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of ampicillin in HBMEC infected with E. coli K1 (E44) and in neonatal mice with E44-caused bacteremia and meningitis. Differential gene expression analysis of RNA-Seq data from mouse BMEC infected with E. coli K1 showed that several E44-increased inflammatory factors, including IL33, IL18rap, MMP10 and Irs1, were significantly reduced by MEM compared to the infected cells without drug treatment. MEM could also significantly up-regulate anti-inflammatory factors, including Tnfaip3, CISH, Ptgds and Zfp36. Most interestingly, these factors may positively and negatively contribute to regulation of NF-?B, which is a hallmark feature of bacterial meningitis. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that circulating BMEC (cBMEC) are the potential novel biomarkers for NSM. MEM could significantly reduce E44-increased blood level of cBMEC in mice. Taken together, our data suggest that memantine can efficiently block host inflammatory responses to bacterial infection through modulation of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:25993608

  2. Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria

    E-print Network

    Mudgettt, Mary Beth

    109 Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria Mary Beth Mudgett secretion pathway has revealed new mechanisms by which phytopathogenic bacteria infect plants are continually exposed to a number of potentially pathogenic bacteria. Phytopathogenic bacteria, in general

  3. BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAYS: Biosynthesis Meets Bioinformatics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David E. Cane (Brown University; Department of Chemistry)

    2000-02-04

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. In his Perspective, Cane discusses the increasing importance of the study of biosynthetic pathways in the discovery of biochemical reactions and pathways. Two recent papers (Rohdich et al. and Khaleeli et al.) highlight the increasing role of molecular biology and genomics in the study of biosynthetic pathways.

  4. Original article Physiology, pathogenicity and immunogenicity

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    for fowl typhoid (FT) caused by Salmonella Gallinarum (SG), the lon and cpxR genes that are related to host against FT. S. Gallinarum / vaccine / attenuation / virulence gene / immune response 1. INTRODUCTION Fowl of Salmonella Gallinarum as vaccine candidates for fowl typhoid Kiku MATSUDA 1 , Atul A. CHAUDHARI 1 , Sam Woong

  5. Viroid Pathogenicity: One Process, Many Faces

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Robert A.; Hammond, Rosemarie W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the non-coding nature of their small RNA genomes, the visible symptoms of viroid infection resemble those associated with many plant virus diseases. Recent evidence indicates that viroid-derived small RNAs acting through host RNA silencing pathways play a key role in viroid pathogenicity. Host responses to viroid infection are complex, involving signaling cascades containing host-encoded protein kinases and crosstalk between hormonal and defense-signaling pathways. Studies of viroid-host interaction in the context of entire biochemical or developmental pathways are just beginning, and many working hypotheses have yet to be critically tested. PMID:21994551

  6. The cuticle and plant defense to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mario; Coluccia, Fania; Torres, Martha; L’Haridon, Floriane; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle provides a physical barrier against water loss and protects against irradiation, xenobiotics, and pathogens. Components of the cuticle are perceived by invading fungi and activate developmental processes during pathogenesis. In addition, cuticle alterations of various types induce a syndrome of reactions that often results in resistance to necrotrophs. This article reviews the current knowledge on the role of the cuticle in relation to the perception of pathogens and activation of defenses. PMID:24982666

  7. Fungal Pathogens: Survival and Replication within Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Andrew S; Wheeler, Robert T; May, Robin C

    2014-11-10

    The innate immune system is a critical line of defense against pathogenic fungi. Macrophages act at an early stage of infection, detecting and phagocytizing infectious propagules. To avoid killing at this stage, fungal pathogens use diverse strategies ranging from evasion of uptake to intracellular parasitism. This article will discuss five of the most important human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Coccidiodes immitis, and Histoplasma capsulatum) and consider the strategies and virulence factors adopted by each to survive and replicate within macrophages. PMID:25384769

  8. Molecular Pathways: The Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Ross; Matsui, William

    2012-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway regulates embryonic development and may be aberrantly activated in a wide variety of human cancers. Efforts to target pathogenic Hh signaling have steadily progressed from the laboratory to the clinic, and the recent approval of the Hh pathway inhibitor vismodegib for patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents an important milestone. On the other hand, Hh pathway antagonists have failed to demonstrate significant clinical activity in other solid tumors. The reasons for these negative results are not precisely understood, but it is possible that the impact of Hh pathway inhibition has not been adequately measured by the clinical endpoints used thus far or that aberrancies in Hh signal transduction limit the activity of currently available pathway antagonists. Further basic and correlative studies to better understand Hh signaling in human tumors and validate putative anti-tumor mechanisms in the clinical setting may ultimately improve the success of Hh pathway inhibition to other tumor types. PMID:22718857

  9. PATHOGENS: VIEWS OF EPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. Pre...

  10. The antioxidant systems vis-à-vis reactive oxygen species during plant–pathogen interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura De Gara; Maria C. de Pinto; Franca Tommasi

    2003-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens requires the activation of complex metabolic pathways in the infected cells, aimed at recognizing pathogen presence and hindering its propagation within plant tissues. In spite of this both compatible and incompatible responses induce alterations in plant metabolism, only in the latter the plant is able to efficiently block pathogen penetration without suffering excessive damage. One of

  11. Metagenomes of microbial communities in arsenic- and pathogen-contaminated well and surface water from bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alice C; Chauhan, Archana; Williams, Daniel E; Mailloux, Brian; Knappett, Peter S K; Ferguson, Andrew S; McKay, Larry D; Alam, M Jahangir; Matin Ahmed, Kazi; van Geen, Alexander; Sayler, Gary S

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of drinking water from both arsenic and microbial pathogens occurs in Bangladesh. A general metagenomic survey of well water and surface water provided information on the types of pathogens present and may help elucidate arsenic metabolic pathways and potential assay targets for monitoring surface-to-ground water pathogen transport. PMID:25414497

  12. New World Clade B Arenaviruses Can Use Transferrin Receptor 1 (TfR1)Dependent and Independent Entry Pathways, and Glycoproteins from Human Pathogenic Strains Are Associated with the Use of TfR1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meg L. Flanagan; Jill Oldenburg; Therese Reignier; Nathalia Holt; Genevieve A. Hamilton; Vanessa K. Martin; Paula M. Cannon

    2008-01-01

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne viruses, with five members of the family capable of causing severe hemor- rhagic fevers if transmitted to humans. To date, two distinct cellular receptors have been identified that are used by different pathogenic viruses, -dystroglycan by Lassa fever virus and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) by certain New World clade B viruses. Our previous studies have suggested that

  13. Loop analysis for pathogens: niche partitioning in the transmission graph for pathogens of the North American tick Ixodes scapularis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Davis; Stephen J. Bent

    2011-01-01

    In population biology, loop analysis is a method of decomposing a life cycle graph into life history pathways so as to compare the relative contributions of pathways to the population growth rate across species and populations. We apply loop analysis to the transmission graph of five pathogens known to infect the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis. In this context loops represent

  14. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

  15. Original article Ecopathology in aquaculture

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Ecopathology in aquaculture: risk factors in infectious disease outbreak * C, production system, season and water temperature, but their role depends on the disease. aquaculture / ecopathology / risk factor / fish / pathogen / environment Résumé ― Écopathologie en aquaculture

  16. CELL SIGNALING: Mitochondrial Longevity Pathways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    György Hajnóczky (Thomas Jefferson University; Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology)

    2007-02-02

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. A cytosolic protein that translocates into the mitochondria may serve as an integration point for signaling pathways that control longevity and cell death.

  17. Polyamine metabolism in flax in response to treatment with pathogenic and non–pathogenic Fusarium strains

    PubMed Central

    Wojtasik, Wioleta; Kulma, Anna; Namys?, Katarzyna; Preisner, Marta; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flax crop yield is limited by various environmental stress factors, but the largest crop losses worldwide are caused by Fusarium infection. Polyamines are one of the many plant metabolites possibly involved in the plant response to infection. However, in flax plants the polyamine composition, genes involved in polyamine synthesis, and in particular their regulation, were previously unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the polyamine synthesis pathway in flax and its involvement in response to pathogen infection. It is well established that polyamines are essential for the growth and development of both plants and fungi, but their role in pathogen infection still remains unknown. In our study we correlated the expression of genes involved in polyamine metabolism with the polyamine levels in plant tissues and compared the results for flax seedlings treated with two pathogenic and one non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium. We observed an increase in the expression of genes participating in polyamine synthesis after fungal infection, and it was reflected in an increase of polyamine content in the plant tissues. The highest level of mRNA was characteristic for ornithine decarboxylase during infection with all tested, pathogenic and non-pathogenic, Fusarium strains and the arginine decarboxylase gene during infection with the pathogenic strain of Fusarium culmorum. The main polyamine identified in the flax seedlings was putrescine, and its level changed the most during infection. Moreover, the considerable increase in the contents of cell wall-bound polyamines compared to the levels of free and conjugated polyamines may indicate that their main role during pathogen infection lies in strengthening of the cell wall. In vitro experiments showed that the polyamines inhibit Fusarium growth, which suggests that they play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and content of polyamines indicate different defense mechanisms activated in flax in response to infection by pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium strains. PMID:25972886

  18. Coevolution of Plants and Their Pathogens in Natural Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeremy J. Burdon (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO)â??Plant Industry; )

    2009-05-08

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Understanding of plant-pathogen coevolution in natural systems continues to develop as new theories at the population and species level are increasingly informed by studies unraveling the molecular basis of interactions between individual plants and their pathogens.

  19. Canine coronavirus: not only an enteric pathogen.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews the currently available literature on pantropic canine coronavirus (CCoV), providing a meaningful update on the virologic, epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the infections caused by this emerging pathogen of dogs. It also describes pantropic CCoV-induced disease reproduced under experimental conditions. PMID:22041207

  20. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  1. Potential drug targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis through metabolic pathway analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharmila Anishetty; Mrudula Pulimi; Pennathur Gautam

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant varieties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to a search for novel drug targets. We have performed an insilico comparative analysis of metabolic pathways of the host Homo sapiens and the pathogen M. tuberculosis. Enzymes from the biochemical pathways of M. tuberculosis from the KEGG metabolic pathway database were compared with proteins from the hostH. sapiens,

  2. How Clinical Pathways Can Be Useful: An Example of a Clinical Pathway for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Lock

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a clinical pathway for the treatment of acutely ill adolescents with anorexia nervosa in a hospital setting. The role of clinical pathways in standardizing health care and in controlling costs is reviewed. The evolution of the clinical pathway for treating adolescents with anorexia nervosa is described. The pathway’s utility in describing changes in

  3. Plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica Höfte; PAUL DE VOS

    In the current taxonomy, plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are restricted to rRNA group I organisms belonging to the Gamma subclass of Proteobacteria. Currently, about 21 validly described plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are known. The most important species is P. syringae with more than 50 described pathovars. The pathovar concept is confusing and the taxonomy of P. syringae needs revision. P.

  4. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of new foodborne pathogens is due to a number of factors. An important factor is the globalization of the food supply with the possibility of the introduction of foodborne pathogens from other countries. Animal husbandry, food production, food processing, and food distribution system...

  5. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert V. Tauxe

    2002-01-01

    The broad spectrum of foodborne infections has changed dramatically over time, as well-established pathogens have been controlled or eliminated, and new ones have emerged. The burden of foodborne disease remains substantial: one in four Americans is estimated to have a significant foodborne illness each year. The majority of these illnesses are not accounted for by known pathogens, so more must

  6. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area of investigation. Clearly, regulatory agencies have a major role to play in the evaluation of these new technologies. This chapter will cover the several types of pathogen-reduction systems, mechanisms of action, the inactivation efficacy for specific types of pathogens, toxicology of the various systems and the published research and clinical trial data supporting their potential usefulness. Due to the nature of the field, pathogen reduction is a work in progress and this review should be considered as a snapshot in time rather than a clear picture of what the future will bring. PMID:16377551

  7. Pathogenic Mechanisms in Centronuclear Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Heinz; Gautel, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathies (CNMs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuromuscular disorders characterized by clinical features of a congenital myopathy and abundant central nuclei as the most prominent histopathological feature. The most common forms of congenital myopathies with central nuclei have been attributed to X-linked recessive mutations in the MTM1 gene encoding myotubularin (“X-linked myotubular myopathy”), autosomal-dominant mutations in the DNM2 gene encoding dynamin-2 and the BIN1 gene encoding amphiphysin-2 (also named bridging integrator-1, BIN1, or SH3P9), and autosomal-recessive mutations in BIN1, the RYR1 gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, and the TTN gene encoding titin. Models to study and rescue the affected cellular pathways are now available in yeast, C. elegans, drosophila, zebrafish, mouse, and dog. Defects in membrane trafficking have emerged as a key pathogenic mechanisms, with aberrant T-tubule formation, abnormalities of triadic assembly, and disturbance of the excitation–contraction machinery the main downstream effects studied to date. Abnormal autophagy has recently been recognized as another important collateral of defective membrane trafficking in different genetic forms of CNM, suggesting an intriguing link to primary disorders of defective autophagy with overlapping histopathological features. The following review will provide an overview of clinical, histopathological, and genetic aspects of the CNMs in the context of the key pathogenic mechanism, outline unresolved questions, and indicate promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:25566070

  8. Processes for managing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Godfree, Alan; Farrell, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater contains human, animal, and plant pathogens capable of causing viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections. There are several routes whereby sewage pathogens may affect human health, including direct contact, contamination of food crops, zoonoses, and vectors. The range and numbers of pathogens in municipal wastewater vary with the level of endemic disease in the community, discharges from commercial activities, and seasonal factors. Regulations to control pathogen risk in the United States and Europe arising from land application of biosolids are based on the concept of multiple barriers to the prevention of transmission. The barriers are (i) treatment to reduce pathogen content and vector attraction, (ii) restrictions on crops grown on land to which biosolids have been applied, and (iii) minimum intervals following application and grazing or harvesting. Wastewater treatment reduces number of pathogens in the wastewater by concentrating them with the solids in the sludge. Although some treatment processes are designed specifically to inactivate pathogens, many are not, and the actual mechanisms of microbial inactivation are not fully understood for all processes. Vector attraction is reduced by stabilization (reduction of readily biodegradable material) and/or incorporation immediately following application. Concerns about health risks have renewed interest in the effects of treatment (on pathogens) and advanced treatment methods, and work performed in the United States suggests that Class A pathogen reduction can be achieved less expensively than previously thought. Effective pathogen risk management requires control to the complete chain of sludge treatment, biosolids handling and application, and post-application activities. This may be achieved by adherence to quality management systems based on hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) principles. PMID:15647539

  9. Salicylate-mediated interactions between pathogens and herbivores.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Jennifer S; Agrawal, Anurag A; Halitschke, Rayko

    2010-04-01

    Plants employ hormone-mediated signaling pathways to defend against pathogens and insects. We tested predictions about the relative effect of jasmonate and salicylate pathways and how they mediate interactions between pathogens and herbivores. We employed two pathogens of tomato, Pseudomonas syringae (Pst) and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), that are known to elicit distinct components of the two pathways, and we address the consequences of their induction for resistance in wild-type and salicylate-deficient transgenic plants in field experiments. We report that Pst infection induced jasmonic acid and proteinase inhibitors (PIs), and reduced the growth of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars on wild-type and salicylate-deficient plants. Pst and TMV both induced salicylic acid in wild-type but not salicylate-deficient plants. Although TMV did not affect jasmonic acid or PIs, infection increased caterpillar growth on wild-type plants, but not on salicylate-deficient plants. Aphid population growth was higher on salicylate-deficient compared to wild-type plants, and lower on salicylate-induced plants compared to controls. Natural aphid colonization was reduced on TMV-infected wild types, but not on salicylate-deficient plants. In sum, jasmonate-mediated resistance is induced by some pathogens, independent of salicylate, and salicylate-mediated induction by other pathogens results in induced susceptibility to a chewer and resistance to an aphid. We conclude with a predictive model for the expression of defense pathways and their consequences. PMID:20462121

  10. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature12566 The ubiquitin ligase parkin mediates

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    pathogens, including Mycobac- terium tuberculosis, are targeted for xenophagy through a ubiquitin- mediated Ubiquitin-mediated targeting of intracellular bacteria to the autophagy pathway is a key innate defence mechanism against invading microbes, including the important human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  11. Global Expression Studies of Yersinia Pestis Pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E; Motin, V; Brubaker, R; Fitch, P

    2002-10-15

    The aim of these studies continues to be the investigation into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the virulence process in Yersinia pestis. In particular, the focus of this work centers on the identification of novel genes and pathways responsible for the pathogenic properties of this organism. In spite of more than four decades of intense investigation in this field, the dilemma as to what makes Y. pestis such a virulent and lethal pathogen remains unanswered. The method being employed makes use microarray technology (DNA chip) that enables the examination of the global activities of the whole complement of genes in this pathogen. Two primary resources available to the investigators (one directly obtained from a separate CBNP-funded project) make these studies possible: (1) Whole genome comparisons of the genes in Y. pestis and its near neighbors with attenuated or non pathogenic characteristics, and (2) the ability to duplicate in vitro, conditions that mimic the infection process of this pathogen. This year we have extended our studies from the original work of characterizing the global transcriptional regulation in Y. pestis triggered during temperature transition from 26 C to 37 C (roughly conditions found in the flea vector and the mammalian host, respectively) to studies of regulation encountered during shift between growth from conditions of neutral pH to acidic pH (the latter conditions, those mimic the environment found inside macrophages, a likely environment found by these cells during infection.). For this work, DNA arrays containing some 5,000 genes (the entire genome of Y. pestis plus those genes found uniquely in the enteropathogen, and near neighbor, Y. pseudotuberculosis) are used to monitor the simultaneous expression levels of each gene of known and unknown function in Y. pestis. Those genes that are up-regulate under the experimental conditions represent genes potentially involved in the pathogenic process. The ultimate role in pathogenicity of those candidate genes uncovered from these studies will be further ascertained by direct knock outs (gene inactivation) and by in vivo studies using an animal model. Discovery of new virulence factors in Y. pestis will directly impact the development of new signatures for detection and geo-location since it will help us to understand and identify those genes that are essential in making the organism pathogenic. These are genes that cannot be altered or removed from the pathogen and as such constitute the best type of signature that we can utilize in their detection and identification. Applications such as this will also enable the utilization of similar technologies to study other pathogens such as Francisella and Brucella, for which we know substantially less in terms of their modality of virulence.

  12. An evolutionary perspective on zinc uptake by human fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to withhold essential micronutrients from invading pathogens. These processes, collectively known as nutritional immunity serve to limit microbial proliferation and bolster killing of the invader. Successful pathogens, therefore, have developed strategies to counteract nutritional immunity and acquire essential micronutrients in the restrictive environment of the infected host. Here I take advantage of the now large number of sequenced fungal genomes to explore the zinc acquisition strategies of human fungal pathogens and reflect on the evolutionary context of these uptake pathways. PMID:25652414

  13. Botrytis cinerea manipulates the antagonistic effects between immune pathways to promote disease development in tomato.

    PubMed

    El Oirdi, Mohamed; El Rahman, Taha Abd; Rigano, Luciano; El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Daayf, Fouad; Vojnov, Adrian; Bouarab, Kamal

    2011-06-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and respond to pathogen attacks. Resistance against necrotrophic pathogens generally requires the activation of the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, whereas the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway is mainly activated against biotrophic pathogens. SA can antagonize JA signaling and vice versa. Here, we report that the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea exploits this antagonism as a strategy to cause disease development. We show that B. cinerea produces an exopolysaccharide, which acts as an elicitor of the SA pathway. In turn, the SA pathway antagonizes the JA signaling pathway, thereby allowing the fungus to develop its disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SA-promoted disease development occurs through Nonexpressed Pathogen Related1. We also show that the JA signaling pathway required for tomato resistance against B. cinerea is mediated by the systemin elicitor. These data highlight a new strategy used by B. cinerea to overcome the plant's defense system and to spread within the host. PMID:21665999

  14. Microarrays for Pathogen Detection and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays have emerged as a viable platform for detection of pathogenic organisms in clinical and environmental samples. These microbial detection arrays occupy a middle ground between low cost, narrowly focused assays such as multiplex PCR and more expensive, broad-spectrum technologies like high-throughput sequencing. While pathogen detection arrays have been used primarily in a research context, several groups are aggressively working to develop arrays for clinical diagnostics, food safety testing, environmental monitoring and biodefense. Statistical algorithms that can analyze data from microbial detection arrays and provide easily interpretable results are absolutely required in order for these efforts to succeed. In this article, we will review the most promising array designs and analysis algorithms that have been developed to date, comparing their strengths and weaknesses for pathogen detection and discovery. PMID:21930658

  15. Introduction to Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Elizabeth Love; Barbara Jones

    This chapter is a brief introduction to pathogenic microorganisms and also discusses virulence factors. An understanding of\\u000a virulence factors is important, as they represent potential targets for the detection of microbial pathogens. Sources and\\u000a routes of infection are also briefly discussed with reference to specific examples. There are a number of ways in which infection\\u000a could be acquired, including via

  16. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-print Network

    Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits are not required for Risk Group 1 materals. If the material is deemed to be non- pathogenic, a courtesy notice may is required from PHAC*, please go to the PHAC website at http://www.phac- aspc.gc.ca/ols-bsl/pathogen

  17. BTI Pathogen Use Committee BTI Pathogen Use Form

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    BTI Pathogen Use Committee 4/7/04 1 BTI Pathogen Use Form Date Submitted: Date Received by PUC for space, if appropriate. 1. Are you planning to use recombinant pathogens in the BTI Plant Growth facilities? Yes No If yes, provide permit # of approved IBC r DNA MUA and attach copy. 2. List all pathogens

  18. Pathogens and gene product normalization in the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakova, Dina; Pasche, Emilie; Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach for pathogens and gene product normalization in the biomedical literature. The idea of this approach was motivated by needs such as literature curation, in particular applied to the field of infectious diseases thus, variants of bacterial species (S. aureus, Staphyloccocus aureus, ...) and their gene products (protein ArsC, Arsenical pump modifier, Arsenate reductase, ...). Our approach is based on the use of an Ontology Look-up Service, a Gene Ontology Categorizer (GOCat) and Gene Normalization methods. In the pathogen detection task the use of OLS disambiguates found pathogen names. GOCat results are incorporated into overall score system to support and to confirm the decisionmaking in normalization process of pathogens and their genomes. The evaluation was done on two test sets of BioCreativeIII benchmark: gold standard of manual curation (50 articles) and silver standard (507 articles) curated by collective results of BCIII participants. For the cross-species GN we achieved the precision of 46% for silver and 27% for gold sets. Pathogen normalization results showed 95% of precision and 93% of recall. The impact of GOCat explicitly improves results of pathogen and gene normalization, basically confirming identified pathogens and boosting correct gene identifiers on the top of the results' list ranked by confidence. A correct identification of the pathogen is able to improve significantly normalization effectiveness and to solve the disambiguation problem of genes. PMID:22491118

  19. Will the package contain pathogens

    E-print Network

    Will the package contain pathogens OR dry ice ? Is the material considered hazardous by the DOT? Do ? NO NO YES YES Pack and ship. If you have identified any hazardous pathogenic substances, ensure you take EHS to a location outside of the US, and: - The materials are pathogens listed on Stanford's Dual Use Pathogen List

  20. A comprehensive Prunus pathogen array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive pathogen array was developed for the detection of pathogens of many major crops in the Prunus genus. The APS disease lists for peach, plum, apricot and cherry were combined into a single Prunus pathogen list, containing 102 pathogens (75 fungi, 18 viruses, 6 bacteria and 3 phytoplasm...

  1. A more flexible lipoprotein sorting pathway.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-05-15

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  2. In silico Identification of Putative Drug Targets in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Through Metabolic Pathway Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deepak Perumal; Chu Sing Lim; Meena K. Sakharkar

    2007-01-01

    Comparative genomic analysis between pathogens and the host Homo sapiens has led to identification of novel drug targets. Microbial drug target identification and validation has been the latest\\u000a trend in pharmacoinformatics. In order to identify a suitable drug target for the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa an in silico comparative analysis of the metabolic pathways between the pathogen and the host Homo

  3. The regulation of host translation initiation in plant-pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jackson Russell Moeller

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens dramatically alter plant mRNA transcript levels by activating and repressing a variety of signaling pathways. However, the effects of plant pathogens on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To assess pathogen-induced changes in host mRNA transcription and translation, we conducted DNA microarray analysis of total and polyribosomal RNA fractions in the Arabidopsis thaliana–Turnip mosaic

  4. Evolution of microbial pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Morschhäuser, J; Köhler, G; Ziebuhr, W; Blum-Oehler, G; Dobrindt, U; Hacker, J

    2000-01-01

    Various genetic mechanisms including point mutations, genetic rearrangements and lateral gene transfer processes contribute to the evolution of microbes. Long-term processes leading to the development of new species or subspecies are termed macroevolution, and short-term developments, which occur during days or weeks, are considered as microevolution. Both processes, macro- and microevolution need horizontal gene transfer, which is particularly important for the development of pathogenic microorganisms. Plasmids, bacteriophages and so-called pathogenicity islands (PAIs) play a crucial role in the evolution of pathogens. During microevolution, genome variability of pathogenic microbes leads to new phenotypes, which play an important role in the acute development of an infectious disease. Infections due to Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli will be described with special emphasis on processes of microevolution. In contrast, the development of PAIs is a process involved in macroevolution. PAIs are especially important in processes leading to new pathotypes or even species. In this review, particular attention will be given to the fact that the evolution of pathogenic microbes can be considered as a specific example for microbial evolution in general. PMID:10874741

  5. Differential sensitivity of rice pathogens to growth inhibition by flavonoids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manchikanti Padmavati; Natarajan Sakthivel; K. V. Thara; Arjula R. Reddy

    1997-01-01

    Differential sensitivity of the major pathogens of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Pyricularia oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani to inhibition by certain flavonoids was tested using paper disc\\/liquid culture and spore germination assays. Naringenin, the first intermediate of the flavonoid pathway, displayed growth inhibition of Xanthomonas strains and spore germination of P. oryzae. On the other hand, no such inhibition was

  6. The Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 type III secretion system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Phoebe Lostroh; Catherine A. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1) encodes a type III secretion system that is required for virulence during the intestinal phase of infection. The expression of SPI1 genes is controlled by many global regulatory pathways that affect the expression\\/activity of transcriptional regulators encoded on SPI1.

  7. The RAM Network in Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Saputo, Sarah; Chabrier-Rosello, Yeissa; Luca, Francis C.; Kumar, Anuj

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of Ace2 and morphogenesis (RAM) network is a protein kinase signaling pathway conserved among eukaryotes from yeasts to humans. Among fungi, the RAM network has been most extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been shown to regulate a range of cellular processes, including daughter cell-specific gene expression, cell cycle regulation, cell separation, mating, polarized growth, maintenance of cell wall integrity, and stress signaling. Increasing numbers of recent studies on the role of the RAM network in pathogenic fungal species have revealed that this network also plays an important role in the biology and pathogenesis of these organisms. In addition to providing a brief overview of the RAM network in S. cerevisiae, we summarize recent developments in the understanding of RAM network function in the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Pneumocystis spp. PMID:22544903

  8. Stress adaptation in a pathogenic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alistair J. P.; Budge, Susan; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Yin, Zhikang; Ene, Iuliana V.; Bohovych, Iryna; Sandai, Doblin; Kastora, Stavroula; Potrykus, Joanna; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Childers, Delma S.; Shahana, Shahida; Leach, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans. This yeast is carried by many individuals as a harmless commensal, but when immune defences are perturbed it causes mucosal infections (thrush). Additionally, when the immune system becomes severely compromised, C. albicans often causes life-threatening systemic infections. A battery of virulence factors and fitness attributes promote the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Fitness attributes include robust responses to local environmental stresses, the inactivation of which attenuates virulence. Stress signalling pathways in C. albicans include evolutionarily conserved modules. However, there has been rewiring of some stress regulatory circuitry such that the roles of a number of regulators in C. albicans have diverged relative to the benign model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This reflects the specific evolution of C. albicans as an opportunistic pathogen obligately associated with warm-blooded animals, compared with other yeasts that are found across diverse environmental niches. Our understanding of C. albicans stress signalling is based primarily on the in vitro responses of glucose-grown cells to individual stresses. However, in vivo this pathogen occupies complex and dynamic host niches characterised by alternative carbon sources and simultaneous exposure to combinations of stresses (rather than individual stresses). It has become apparent that changes in carbon source strongly influence stress resistance, and that some combinatorial stresses exert non-additive effects upon C. albicans. These effects, which are relevant to fungus–host interactions during disease progression, are mediated by multiple mechanisms that include signalling and chemical crosstalk, stress pathway interference and a biological transistor. PMID:24353214

  9. Neopolyploidy and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin P; Nuismer, Scott L

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well-documented historical importance of polyploidy, the mechanisms responsible for the establishment and evolutionary success of novel polyploid lineages remain unresolved. One possibility, which has not been previously evaluated theoretically, is that novel polyploid lineages are initially more resistant to pathogens than the diploid progenitor species. Here, we explore this possibility by developing and analysing mathematical models of interactions between newly formed polyploid lineages and their pathogens. We find that for the genetic mechanisms of pathogen resistance with the best empirical support, newly formed polyploid populations of hosts are expected to be more resistant than their diploid progenitors. This effect can be quite strong and, in the case of perennial species with recurrent polyploid formation, may last indefinitely, potentially providing a general explanation for the successful establishment of novel polyploid lineages. PMID:17686733

  10. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  11. Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasdell, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    The final rule on the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens was published in the Federal Register on Dec. 6, 1991. This Standard, 29 CFR Part 1910.130, is expected to prevent 8,900 hepatitis B infections and nearly 200 deaths a year in healthcare workers in the U.S. The Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health Services at KSC has been planning to implement this standard for several years. Various aspects of this standard and its Bloodborne Pathogens Program at KSC are discussed.

  12. Review article Chemical architecture of antennal pathways

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    , and the suboesophageal ganglion. This review focusses on the distribution of some classical neurotransmitters within system in proboscis extension learning. Apis mellifera/ nervous system/ neurotransmitter/ receptor

  13. Application of microfluidics in waterborne pathogen monitoring: a review.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Helen; Miller, Brian; Desmulliez, Marc P Y

    2014-05-15

    A review of the recent advances in microfluidics based systems for the monitoring of waterborne pathogens is provided in this article. Emphasis has been made on existing, commercial and state-of-the-art systems and research activities in laboratories worldwide. The review separates sample processing systems and monitoring systems, highlighting the slow progress made in automated sample processing for monitoring of pathogens in waterworks and in the field. Future potential directions of research are also highlighted in the conclusions. PMID:24631875

  14. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors. PMID:25584723

  15. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  16. DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

  17. Actinomycetes as plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romano Locci

    1994-01-01

    Biology, taxonomy, pathogenicity and control of plant disease inducing actinomycetes are reviewed. Recent progress in the study of potato, sweet potato, blueberry and fruit and forest tree diseases is illustrated. The role in potato scab pathogenesis of the newly discovered phytotoxins, thaxtomins, is discussed.

  18. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  19. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  20. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  1. Immune pathways and defence mechanisms in honey bees Apis mellifera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Evans; K. Aronstein; Y. P. Chen; C. Hetru; J.-L. Imler; H. Jiang; M. Kanost; G. J. Thompson; Z. Zou; D. Hultmark

    2006-01-01

    Social insects are able to mount both group-level and individual defences against pathogens. Here we focus on individual defences, by presenting a genome-wide analysis of immunity in a social insect, the honey bee Apis mellifera . We present honey bee models for each of four signalling pathways associated with immunity, identifying plausible orthologues for nearly all predicted pathway members. When

  2. 2903RESEARCH ARTICLE INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

    2903RESEARCH ARTICLE INTRODUCTION The Drosophila eggshell is an elaborate structure that protects conserved EGFR pathway forms two respiratory eggshell appendages, also called dorsal appendages (DAs required for eggshell morphogenesis (Cavaliere et al., 2008; Dobens and Raftery, 2000; Wu et al., 2008

  3. Purification and proteomics of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes

    PubMed Central

    Herweg, Jo-Ana; Hansmeier, Nicole; Otto, Andreas; Geffken, Anna C.; Subbarayal, Prema; Prusty, Bhupesh K.; Becher, Dörte; Hensel, Michael; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Rudel, Thomas; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Certain pathogenic bacteria adopt an intracellular lifestyle and proliferate in eukaryotic host cells. The intracellular niche protects the bacteria from cellular and humoral components of the mammalian immune system, and at the same time, allows the bacteria to gain access to otherwise restricted nutrient sources. Yet, intracellular protection and access to nutrients comes with a price, i.e., the bacteria need to overcome cell-autonomous defense mechanisms, such as the bactericidal endocytic pathway. While a few bacteria rupture the early phagosome and escape into the host cytoplasm, most intracellular pathogens form a distinct, degradation-resistant and replication-permissive membranous compartment. Intracellular bacteria that form unique pathogen vacuoles include Legionella, Mycobacterium, Chlamydia, Simkania, and Salmonella species. In order to understand the formation of these pathogen niches on a global scale and in a comprehensive and quantitative manner, an inventory of compartment-associated host factors is required. To this end, the intact pathogen compartments need to be isolated, purified and biochemically characterized. Here, we review recent progress on the isolation and purification of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes, as well as their proteomic characterization by mass spectrometry and different validation approaches. These studies provide the basis for further investigations on the specific mechanisms of pathogen-driven compartment formation.

  4. Insect Vectors of Human Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    0000-00-00

    Four orders of insects (Hemiptera, Phthiraptera, Diptera, and Siphonaptera) are covered detailing vector species along with their pathogens of human importance. Links to pathogens as well as vectors are highlighted (some of these are CDC, and WHO).

  5. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  6. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  7. Errata: "Mean field approximation to a spatial host-pathogen model" Marcus A. M. de Aguiar,1, 2

    E-print Network

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    Errata: "Mean field approximation to a spatial host-pathogen model" Marcus A. M. de Aguiar,1, 2 (Dated: July 17, 2013) The article "Mean field approximation to a spatial- host pathogen model" by Rauch-approximation treatment of the system with two types of pathogen. In each case, the sign of the third term should

  8. Windward Community College BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

    E-print Network

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    Windward Community College BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN FOR NON-RESEARCH PERSONNEL with this mission, Windward Community College has established a Bloodborne Pathogens program which includes) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. 2.2 Scope This ECP applies to all Windward Community College non

  9. Pathway Analysis

    Cancer.gov

    Projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas have gathered enormous quantities of data from human tumor samples. Informaticians at the National Lab are looking within such data for insights about the influence of mutant RAS genes on signaling pathways in cancers. On a smaller scale, the RAS Initiative will use numerous experimental platforms to interrogate cell lines expressing mutant RAS genes.

  10. Arabidopsis Jasmonate Signaling Pathway

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aurelie Gfeller (University of Lausanne; Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV)

    2006-02-14

    Jasmonates control defense gene expression and male fertility in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In both cases, the involvement of the jasmonate pathway is complex, involving large-scale transcriptional reprogramming. Additionally, jasmonate signaling is hard-wired into the auxin, ethylene, and salicylate signal networks, all of which are under intense investigation in Arabidopsis. In male fertility, jasmonic acid (JA) is the essential signal intervening both at the level of anther elongation and in pollen dehiscense. A number of genes potentially involved in jasmonate-dependent anther elongation have recently been discovered. In the case of defense, at least two jasmonates, JA and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), are necessary for the fine-tuning of defense gene expression in response to various microbial pathogens and arthropod herbivores. However, only OPDA is required for full resistance to some insects and fungi. Other jasmonates probably affect yet more physiological responses. A series of breakthroughs have identified the SKP/CULLIN/F-BOX (SCF), CORONATINE INSENSITIVE (COI1) complex, acting together with the CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 9 (COP9) signalosome, as central regulatory components of jasmonate signaling in Arabidopsis. The studies, mostly involving mutational approaches, have paved the way for suppressor screens that are expected to further extend our knowledge of jasmonate signaling. When these and other new mutants affecting jasmonate signaling are characterized, new nodes will be added to the Arabidopsis Jasmonate Signaling Pathway Connections Map, and the lists of target genes regulated by jasmonates in Arabidopsis will be expanded.

  11. The Pathway Tools Software in 2009

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter D. Karp; Suzanne M. Paley; Markus Krummenacker; Mario Latendresse; Joseph M. Dale; Tom Lee; Pallavi Kaipa; Fred Gilham; Aaron Spaulding; Liviu Popescu; Tomer Altman; Ian Paulsen; Ingrid M. Keseler; Ron Caspi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Pathway Tools is a production-quality software environment for creating a type of model- organism database (MOD) called a Pathway\\/Genome Database (PGDB). A PGDB such as EcoCyc integrates the evolving understanding of the genes, proteins, metabolic network, and regulatory network of an organism. This article provides an overview of Pathway Tools capabilities. The software performs multiple computational inferences including prediction

  12. Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fang; Parker, Jayme; Chul Choi, Sang; Layer, Mark; Ross, Katherine; Jilly, Bernard; Chen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology in the diagnosis of human pathogens is hindered by the fact that pathogenic sequences, especially viral, are often scarce in human clinical specimens. This known disproportion leads to the requirement of subsequent deep sequencing and extensive bioinformatics analysis. Here we report a method we called "Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences (PATHseq)" that can be used to greatly enrich pathogenic sequences. Using a computer program, we developed 8-, 9-, and 10-mer oligonucleotides called "non-human primers" that do not match the most abundant human transcripts, but instead selectively match transcripts of human pathogens. Instead of using random primers in the construction of cDNA libraries, the PATHseq method recruits these short non-human primers, which in turn, preferentially amplifies non-human, presumably pathogenic sequences. Using this method, we were able to enrich pathogenic sequences up to 200-fold in the final sequencing library. This method does not require prior knowledge of the pathogen or assumption of the infection; therefore, it provides a fast and sequence-independent approach for detection and identification of human viruses and other pathogens. The PATHseq method, coupled with NGS technology, can be broadly used in identification of known human pathogens and discovery of new pathogens. PMID:26067233

  13. Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Fang; Parker, Jayme; Chul Choi, Sang; Layer, Mark; Ross, Katherine; Jilly, Bernard; Chen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology in the diagnosis of human pathogens is hindered by the fact that pathogenic sequences, especially viral, are often scarce in human clinical specimens. This known disproportion leads to the requirement of subsequent deep sequencing and extensive bioinformatics analysis. Here we report a method we called “Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences (PATHseq)” that can be used to greatly enrich pathogenic sequences. Using a computer program, we developed 8-, 9-, and 10-mer oligonucleotides called “non-human primers” that do not match the most abundant human transcripts, but instead selectively match transcripts of human pathogens. Instead of using random primers in the construction of cDNA libraries, the PATHseq method recruits these short non-human primers, which in turn, preferentially amplifies non-human, presumably pathogenic sequences. Using this method, we were able to enrich pathogenic sequences up to 200-fold in the final sequencing library. This method does not require prior knowledge of the pathogen or assumption of the infection; therefore, it provides a fast and sequence-independent approach for detection and identification of human viruses and other pathogens. The PATHseq method, coupled with NGS technology, can be broadly used in identification of known human pathogens and discovery of new pathogens. PMID:26067233

  14. Tropism and Pathogenicity of Rickettsiae

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular parasitic bacteria that cause febrile exanthematous illnesses such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Mediterranean spotted fever, epidemic, and murine typhus, etc. Although the vector ranges of each Rickettsia species are rather restricted; i.e., ticks belonging to Arachnida and lice and fleas belonging to Insecta usually act as vectors for spotted fever group (SFG) and typhus group (TG) rickettsiae, respectively, it would be interesting to elucidate the mechanisms controlling the vector tropism of rickettsiae. This review discusses the factors determining the vector tropism of rickettsiae. In brief, the vector tropism of rickettsiae species is basically consistent with their tropism toward cultured tick and insect cells. The mechanisms responsible for rickettsiae pathogenicity are also described. Recently, genomic analyses of rickettsiae have revealed that they possess several genes that are homologous to those affecting the pathogenicity of other bacteria. Analyses comparing the genomes of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of rickettsiae have detected many factors that are related to rickettsial pathogenicity. It is also known that a reduction in the rickettsial genome has occurred during the course of its evolution. Interestingly, Rickettsia species with small genomes, such as Rickettsia prowazekii, are more pathogenic to humans than those with larger genomes. This review also examines the growth kinetics of pathogenic and non-pathogenic species of SFG rickettsiae (SFGR) in mammalian cells. The growth of non-pathogenic species is restricted in these cells, which is mediated, at least in part, by autophagy. The superinfection of non-pathogenic rickettsiae-infected cells with pathogenic rickettsiae results in an elevated yield of the non-pathogenic rickettsiae and the growth of the pathogenic rickettsiae. Autophagy is restricted in these cells. These results are discussed in this review. PMID:22737150

  15. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  16. [Bioterrorism and pathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Schatzmayr, Hermann G; Barth, Ortrud Monika

    2013-10-01

    In recent years the use of pathogenic microorganisms in acts of bioterrorism has been the subject of major concern in many countries. This paper presents a possible application of viruses and bacteria for warfare and terrorist purposes, as well as a laboratory diagnosis to identify those agents. The viruses of smallpox (orthopoxvirus), of hemorrhagic fever and those belonging to filovirus have been highlighted, inter alia, as agents of human infection with bioterrorist intent. Among the bacteria, the emphasis has been on anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), the plague (Yersinia pestis), botulism (Clostridium botulinum) and tularemia (Francisella tularensis), not to mention ricin (Ricinus communis), as one of the Group B agents. PMID:24473660

  17. Fusobacterium nucleatum: a commensal-turned pathogen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yiping W

    2015-02-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic oral commensal and a periodontal pathogen associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. This article reviews its implication in adverse pregnancy outcomes (chorioamnionitis, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal sepsis, preeclampsia), GI disorders (colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis), cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, respiratory tract infections, Lemierre's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The virulence mechanisms involved in the diseases are discussed, with emphasis on its colonization, systemic dissemination, and induction of host inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. The FadA adhesin/invasin conserved in F. nucleatum is a key virulence factor and a potential diagnostic marker for F. nucleatum-associated diseases. PMID:25576662

  18. MICROBIOLOGY: Enhanced: Pathogenic Bacteria Prefer Heme

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tracey A. Rouault (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Human Iron Metabolism, Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch)

    2004-09-10

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Bloodletting by physicians before the era of antibiotics may seem like a barbaric practice, but it may have been of some benefit to patients suffering from bacterial infections. In her Perspective, Rouault explains that most bacteria depend on a source of iron to grow and survive inside their animal hosts. A new study (Skaar et al.) shows that the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus uses several ingenious strategies to obtain iron from heme stored as hemoglobin in the red blood cells of its mammalian hosts.

  19. MICROBIOLOGY: Enhanced: A Furtive Pathogen Revealed

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Xavier Nassif (Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM Unit 411)

    2000-03-10

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required: The pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is the cause of meningococcal meningitis. Although a vaccine is available for Neisseria of serogroups A and C, there is no vaccine available for serogroup B. In a Perspective, Nassif reports on the sequencing of the complete genome of N. meningitidis type B strain MC58 (Tettelin et al.) and the mining of this genome to identify highly conserved surface proteins that may be valuable as vaccine antigens (Pizza et al.).

  20. Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: Research, Commercialization, and Application in the USA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brian B. McSpadden Gardener (The Ohio State University-OARDC; )

    2002-05-10

    This article describes the current status of research, commercial development, and application of biocontrol strategies targeted at plant pathogens. Also included is a description of future prospects for using biological control to limit the damage of plant pathogens in both conventional and organic agriculture.

  1. Focus on food safety: Human pathogens on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article introduces the first Focus Issue of Phytopathology, a dedicated issue of the journal that highlights a topic of significant interest to our readership. This first Focus Issue addresses the topic of food safety and the biology of human pathogens on plants, a relatively new problem in pla...

  2. Inflammatory Monocytes Are Required for Mucosal Resistance to the Pathogen

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Immunity Article Gr1+ Inflammatory Monocytes Are Required for Mucosal Resistance to the Pathogen in the murine model. We demonstrated that after oral infection, the parasite rapidly recruited in- flammatory susceptible to oral toxoplasmosis. Col- lectively, these findings illustrate the critical impor- tance

  3. The Oxylipin Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on how free fatty acids are produced and the role of beta-oxidation in the biosynthetic pathway for oxylipins. It is also becoming apparent that oxylipin content and composition changes during growth and development and during pathogen or insect attack. Oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid modulate the expression of numerous genes and influence specific aspects of plant growth, development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Although oxylipins are believed to act alone, several examples were presented to illustrate that JA-induced responses are modulated by the type and the nature of crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as ethylene and salicylic acid. How oxylipins cause changes in gene expression and instigate a physiological response is becoming understood with the isolation of mutations in both positive and negative regulators in the jasmonate signaling pathway and the use of cDNA microarrays. PMID:22303193

  4. The Type I Interferon Pathway

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David S. Aaronson (Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Immunobiology Center REV)

    2003-08-26

    The type I interferon (IFN-?/?) signal transduction pathway is not only the first-characterized Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway, but one of the best studied in molecular detail. IFN-?-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) is atypical for STAT-containing complexes, because it requires interaction with an additional factor, IFN regulatory factor 9 (IRF9), to provide specific DNA binding. Type I IFN is the main innate antiviral cytokine, and the outcome of ISGF3 activation is establishment of the cellular antiviral state, in which cells are able to inhibit the replication of a broad range of virus types providing a general resistance to infection. It is increasingly evident that other branches of the innate and adaptive immune systems activate IFN-?/? signaling, indicating its importance in various stress responses. The Connections Map provides an overview of this canonical pathway, with an interpathway relation to the Toll-like Receptor Pathway, which stimulates the production of type I interferons in response to microbial pathogens. Science Viewpoint D. S. Aaronson, C. M. Horvath, A road map for those who don't know JAK-STAT. Science 296, 1653-1655 (2002). [Abstract] [Full Text

  5. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  6. Developmental Pathways in Juvenile Externalizing and Internalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeber, Rolf; Burke, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the empirical studies showing pathways in the development of externalizing and delinquent behaviors. Pathways are defined as the orderly temporal development between more than two problem behaviors. The paper addresses the following questions: (1) What are the developmental pathways between different diagnoses of Disruptive…

  7. Pathway-Pondering: Metabolic Engineering Problem Space

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sebrenka Robic (Agnes Scott College; )

    2007-06-17

    This problem space can be used to explore concepts related to metabolism. It is based on an article by Causey et al. (2004), entitled "Engineering Escherichia coli for Efficient Conversion of Glucose to Pyruvate". Students can use the original data from the article and various tools to visualize metabolic pathways to explore questions about bioengineering.

  8. Glacial refugia in pathogens: European genetic structure of anther smut pathogens on Silene latifolia and Silene dioica.

    PubMed

    Vercken, Elodie; Fontaine, Michael C; Gladieux, Pierre; Hood, Michael E; Jonot, Odile; Giraud, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Climate warming is predicted to increase the frequency of invasions by pathogens and to cause the large-scale redistribution of native host species, with dramatic consequences on the health of domesticated and wild populations of plants and animals. The study of historic range shifts in response to climate change, such as during interglacial cycles, can help in the prediction of the routes and dynamics of infectious diseases during the impending ecosystem changes. Here we studied the population structure in Europe of two Microbotryum species causing anther smut disease on the plants Silene latifolia and Silene dioica. Clustering analyses revealed the existence of genetically distinct groups for the pathogen on S. latifolia, providing a clear-cut example of European phylogeography reflecting recolonization from southern refugia after glaciation. The pathogen genetic structure was congruent with the genetic structure of its host species S. latifolia, suggesting dependence of the migration pathway of the anther smut fungus on its host. The fungus, however, appeared to have persisted in more numerous and smaller refugia than its host and to have experienced fewer events of large-scale dispersal. The anther smut pathogen on S. dioica also showed a strong phylogeographic structure that might be related to more northern glacial refugia. Differences in host ecology probably played a role in these differences in the pathogen population structure. Very high selfing rates were inferred in both fungal species, explaining the low levels of admixture between the genetic clusters. The systems studied here indicate that migration patterns caused by climate change can be expected to include pathogen invasions that follow the redistribution of their host species at continental scales, but also that the recolonization by pathogens is not simply a mirror of their hosts, even for obligate biotrophs, and that the ecology of hosts and pathogen mating systems likely affects recolonization patterns. PMID:21187901

  9. Glacial Refugia in Pathogens: European Genetic Structure of Anther Smut Pathogens on Silene latifolia and Silene dioica

    PubMed Central

    Vercken, Elodie; Fontaine, Michael C.; Gladieux, Pierre; Hood, Michael E.; Jonot, Odile; Giraud, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Climate warming is predicted to increase the frequency of invasions by pathogens and to cause the large-scale redistribution of native host species, with dramatic consequences on the health of domesticated and wild populations of plants and animals. The study of historic range shifts in response to climate change, such as during interglacial cycles, can help in the prediction of the routes and dynamics of infectious diseases during the impending ecosystem changes. Here we studied the population structure in Europe of two Microbotryum species causing anther smut disease on the plants Silene latifolia and Silene dioica. Clustering analyses revealed the existence of genetically distinct groups for the pathogen on S. latifolia, providing a clear-cut example of European phylogeography reflecting recolonization from southern refugia after glaciation. The pathogen genetic structure was congruent with the genetic structure of its host species S. latifolia, suggesting dependence of the migration pathway of the anther smut fungus on its host. The fungus, however, appeared to have persisted in more numerous and smaller refugia than its host and to have experienced fewer events of large-scale dispersal. The anther smut pathogen on S. dioica also showed a strong phylogeographic structure that might be related to more northern glacial refugia. Differences in host ecology probably played a role in these differences in the pathogen population structure. Very high selfing rates were inferred in both fungal species, explaining the low levels of admixture between the genetic clusters. The systems studied here indicate that migration patterns caused by climate change can be expected to include pathogen invasions that follow the redistribution of their host species at continental scales, but also that the recolonization by pathogens is not simply a mirror of their hosts, even for obligate biotrophs, and that the ecology of hosts and pathogen mating systems likely affects recolonization patterns. PMID:21187901

  10. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Swart, L; Denman, S; Taylor, J E; Bezuidenhout, C M; Palm, M E; Marincowitz, S; Groenewald, J Z

    2011-12-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study was to characterise several of these pathogens using morphology, culture characteristics, and DNA sequence data of the rRNA-ITS and LSU genes. In some cases additional genes such as TEF 1-? and CHS were also sequenced. Based on the results of this study, several novel species and genera are described. Brunneosphaerella leaf blight is shown to be caused by three species, namely B. jonkershoekensis on Protea repens, B. nitidae sp. nov. on Protea nitida and B. protearum on a wide host range of Protea spp. (South Africa). Coniothyrium-like species associated with Coniothyrium leaf spot are allocated to other genera, namely Curreya grandicipis on Protea grandiceps, and Microsphaeropsis proteae on P. nitida (South Africa). Diaporthe leucospermi is described on Leucospermum sp. (Australia), and Diplodina microsperma newly reported on Protea sp. (New Zealand). Pyrenophora blight is caused by a novel species, Pyrenophora leucospermi, and not Drechslera biseptata or D. dematoidea as previously reported. Fusicladium proteae is described on Protea sp. (South Africa), Pestalotiopsis protearum on Leucospermum cuneiforme (Zimbabwe), Ramularia vizellae and R. stellenboschensis on Protea spp. (South Africa), and Teratosphaeria capensis on Protea spp. (Portugal, South Africa). Aureobasidium leaf spot is shown to be caused by two species, namely A. proteae comb. nov. on Protea spp. (South Africa), and A. leucospermi sp. nov. on Leucospermum spp. (Indonesia, Portugal, South Africa). Novel genera and species elucidated in this study include Gordonomyces mucovaginatus and Pseudopassalora gouriqua (hyphomycetes), and Xenoconiothyrium catenata (coelomycete), all on Protea spp. (South Africa). PMID:22403475

  11. Loop analysis for pathogens: niche partitioning in the transmission graph for pathogens of the North American tick Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen; Bent, Stephen J

    2011-01-21

    In population biology, loop analysis is a method of decomposing a life cycle graph into life history pathways so as to compare the relative contributions of pathways to the population growth rate across species and populations. We apply loop analysis to the transmission graph of five pathogens known to infect the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis. In this context loops represent repeating chains of transmission that could maintain the pathogen. They hence represent completions of the life cycle, in much the same way as loops in a life cycle graph do for plants and animals. The loop analysis suggests the five pathogens fall into two distinct groups. Borellia burgdorferi, Babesia microti and Anaplasma phagocytophilum rely almost exclusively on a single loop representing transmission to susceptible larvae feeding on vertebrate hosts that were infected by nymphs. Borellia miyamotoi, in contrast, circulates among a separate set of host types and utilizes loops that are a mix of vertical transmission and horizontal transmission. For B. miyamotoi the main loop is from vertebrate hosts to susceptible nymphs, where the vertebrate hosts were infected by larvae that were infected from birth. The results for Powassan virus are similar to B. miyamotoi. The predicted impacts of the known variation in tick phenology between populations of I. scapularis in the Midwest and Northeast of the United States are hence markedly different for the two groups. All of these pathogens benefit, though, from synchronous activity of larvae and nymphs. PMID:20950628

  12. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Manes, Nathan P.; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott; Estep, Ryan D.; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-12-19

    The elucidation of critical functional pathways employed by pathogens and hosts during an infectious cycle is both challenging and central to our understanding of infectious diseases. In recent years, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used as a powerful tool to identify key pathogenesis-related proteins and pathways. Despite the analytical power of mass spectrometry-based technologies, samples must be appropriately prepared to characterize the functions of interest (e.g. host-response to a pathogen or a pathogen-response to a host). The preparation of these protein samples requires multiple decisions about what aspect of infection is being studied, and it may require the isolation of either host and/or pathogen cellular material.

  13. Algodystrophy: recent insight into the pathogenic framework

    PubMed Central

    Varenna, Massimo; Zucchi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Algodystrophy, nowadays called CRPS I, is a painful syndrome characterized by sensory and vasomotor disturbance, edema and functional impairment. Significant progress in knowledge about the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease have been recently achieved, but they are not yet fully understood and some clinical aspects are still lacking of a whole pathogenetic comprehension. The local release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides and some cytokines may be the event that triggers and maintains the disease, causing hyperalgesia and allodynia. In the following phases, the impaired capillary permeability, the interstitial edema and the consequent hypoxia and local acidosis have been proposed as possible pathophysiological pathways. The local hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system supposed in the past has not be confirmed and the hypothesis of an altered nociceptive processing at CNS level has limited evidences in acute phases of the disease. The steady bone involvement could be confirmed by the efficacy of bisphosphonates in the treatment of early disease. PMID:26136792

  14. The Road Less Traveled: HIV's Use of Alternative Routes through Cellular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-05-01

    Pathogens such as HIV-1, with their minimalist genomes, must navigate cellular networks and rely on hijacking and manipulating the host machinery for successful replication. Limited overlap of host factors identified as vital for pathogen replication may be explained by considering that pathogens target, rather than specific cellular factors, crucial cellular pathways by targeting different, functionally equivalent, protein-protein interactions within that pathway. The ability to utilize alternative routes through cellular pathways may be essential for pathogen survival when restricted and provide flexibility depending on the viral replication stage and the environment in the infected host. In this minireview, we evaluate evidence supporting this notion, discuss specific HIV-1 examples, and consider the molecular mechanisms which allow pathogens to flexibly exploit different routes. PMID:25762730

  15. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  16. New trends in emerging pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niels Skovgaard

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of pathogens is the result of a number of impact in all parts of the food chain.The emerging technologies in food production explain how new pathogens can establish themselves in the food chain and compromise food safety. The impact of the food technology is analysed for several bacteria, such as Yersinia, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter pullorum, Enterobacter sakazakii, Mycobacterium

  17. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, B B; Falkow, S

    1989-01-01

    A bacterial pathogen is a highly adapted microorganism which has the capacity to cause disease. The mechanisms used by pathogenic bacteria to cause infection and disease usually include an interactive group of virulence determinants, sometimes coregulated, which are suited for the interaction of a particular microorganism with a specific host. Because pathogens must overcome similar host barriers, common themes in microbial pathogenesis have evolved. However, these mechanisms are diverse between species and not necessarily conserved; instead, convergent evolution has developed several different mechanisms to overcome host barriers. The success of a bacterial pathogen can be measured by the degree with which it replicates after entering the host and reaching its specific niche. Successful microbial infection reflects persistence within a host and avoidance or neutralization of the specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms of the host. The degree of success of a pathogen is dependent upon the status of the host. As pathogens pass through a host, they are exposed to new environments. Highly adapted pathogenic organisms have developed biochemical sensors exquisitely designed to measure and respond to such environmental stimuli and accordingly to regulate a cascade of virulence determinants essential for life within the host. The pathogenic state is the product of dynamic selective pressures on microbial populations. PMID:2569162

  18. Bacteria: More Than Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Trudy Wassenaar (; )

    2002-07-01

    The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article reveals that there are more bacteria on Earth than there are humans. Bacteria: inhabit every environment on the planet, playing a key ecological role, can be good for our health -- for example, by helping us digest food, and can cause disease even though the human body is not the natural host for many bacteria.

  19. Toll-like receptor–induced arginase 1 in macrophages thwarts effective immunity against intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C; Qualls, Joseph E; Pesce, John T; Smith, Amber M; Thompson, Robert W; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall J; König, Till; Schleicher, Ulrike; Koo, Mi-Sun; Kaplan, Gilla; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Orme, Ian M; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Bogdan, Christian; Wynn, Thomas A; Murray, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is required for antipathogen responses, including the biosynthesis of nitric oxide from arginine, and is essential for immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii and other intracellular pathogens. Here we report a ‘loophole’ in the TLR pathway that is advantageous to these pathogens. Intracellular pathogens induced expression of the arginine hydrolytic enzyme arginase 1 (Arg1) in mouse macrophages through the TLR pathway. In contrast to diseases dominated by T helper type 2 (TH2) responses, TLR-mediated Arg1 induction was independent of the TH2-associated STAT6 pathway. Specific elimination of Arg1 in macrophages favored host survival in T. gondii infection and decreased lung bacterial load in tuberculosis infection. PMID:18978793

  20. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction tests for detection of pathogens associated with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2015-06-01

    A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms are time-consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have provided new clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing has been used in gastroenterology diagnostics in recent years. This article presents a review of recent laboratory-developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. It focuses on two commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel and BioFire FilmArray gastrointestinal test. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. PMID:26004652

  1. Carbon metabolism of intracellular bacterial pathogens and possible links to virulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Eisenreich; Thomas Dandekar; Jürgen Heesemann; Werner Goebel

    2010-01-01

    New technologies such as high-throughput methods and 13C-isotopologue-profiling analysis are beginning to provide us with insight into the in vivo metabolism of microorganisms, especially in the host cell compartments that are colonized by intracellular bacterial pathogens. In this Review, we discuss the recent progress made in determining the major carbon sources and metabolic pathways used by model intracellular bacterial pathogens

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Multiple introductions of highly pathogenic avian

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    in geese in Guangdong, China, and continues to circulate in the poultry population in many countries,3 those that are currently circulating are clades 1.1 (Cambodia and Vietnam); 2.1.3.2 (Indonesia); 2.2.1 (Egypt); 2.3.2.1 (Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal and Vietnam); 2.3.4.2 (China); and 7

  3. Pathogens in Dairy Farming: Source Characterization and Groundwater Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwill, E. R.; Watanabe, N.; Li, X.; Hou, L.; Harter, T.; Bergamaschi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Intense animal husbandry is of growing concern as a potential contamination source of enteric pathogens as well as antibiotics. To assess the public health risk from pathogens and their hydrologic pathways, we hypothesize that the animal farm is not a homogeneous diffuse source, but that pathogen loading to the soil and, therefore, to groundwater varies significantly between the various management units of a farm. A dairy farm, for example, may include an area with calf hutches, corrals for heifers of various ages, freestalls and exercise yards for milking cows, separate freestalls for dry cows, a hospital barn, a yard for collection of solid manure, a liquid manure storage lagoon, and fields receiving various amounts of liquid and solid manure. Pathogen shedding and, hence, therapeutic and preventive pharmaceutical treatments vary between these management units. We are implementing a field reconnaissance program to determine the occurrence of three different pathogens ( E. coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter) and one indicator organism ( Enterococcus) at the ground-surface and in shallow groundwater of seven different management units on each of two farms, and in each of four seasons (spring/dry season, summer/irrigation season, fall/dry season, winter/rainy season). Initial results indicate that significant differences exist in the occurrence of these pathogens between management units and between organisms. These differences are weakly reflected in their occurrence in groundwater, despite the similarity of the shallow geologic environment across these sites. Our results indicate the importance of differentiating sources within a dairy farm and the importance of understanding subsurface transport processes for these pathogens.

  4. Filamentous pathogen effector functions: of pathogens, hosts and microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Rovenich, Hanna; Boshoven, Jordi C; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms play essential roles in almost every environment on earth. For instance, microbes decompose organic material, or establish symbiotic relationships that range from pathogenic to mutualistic. Symbiotic relationships have been particularly well studied for microbial plant pathogens and have emphasized the role of effectors; secreted molecules that support host colonization. Most effectors characterized thus far play roles in deregulation of host immunity. Arguably, however, pathogens not only deal with immune responses during host colonization, but also encounter other microbes including competitors, (myco)parasites and even potential co-operators. Thus, part of the effector catalog may target microbiome co-inhabitants rather than host physiology. PMID:24879450

  5. Exposure Control Plan Bloodborne Pathogen Program

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Exposure Control Plan Bloodborne Pathogen Program 1. Introduction 2. Occupational Exposure Bloodborne Pathogen Program 1. INTRODUCTION OSHA defines occupational exposure as reasonably anticipated skin set forth in the Bloodborne Pathogens (BBP) Standard are necessary to provide protection to employees

  6. 40 CFR 503.32 - Pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...enteric viruses in the sewage sludge after pathogen treatment is less than one...for the pathogen treatment process, the sewage sludge continues to be Class...helminth ova in the sewage sludge after pathogen treatment is less than...

  7. Bacteria: More Than Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.

    This ActionBioscience lesson plan has students explore the many roles of bacteria, harmful and beneficial. A detailed article written for ActionBioscience by a microbiologist provides background information, which is followed by discussion questions and educational activities designed for middle school to undergraduate biology courses. The Web site also provides carefully selected links for further exploring the topic, including useful sites for student research projects.

  8. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators. PMID:25911760

  9. Pathogenic obesity and nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Conroy, K P; Davidson, I M; Warnock, M

    2011-11-01

    Over a decade of intense research in the field of obesity has led to the knowledge that chronic, excessive adipose tissue expansion leads to an increase in the risk for CVD, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. This is primarily thought to stem from the low-grade, systemic inflammatory response syndrome that characterises adipose tissue in obesity, and this itself is thought to arise from the complex interplay of factors including metabolic endotoxaemia, increased plasma NEFA, hypertrophic adipocytes and localised hypoxia. Plasma concentrations of vitamins and antioxidants are lower in obese individuals than in the non-obese, which is hypothesised to negatively affect the development of inflammation and disease in obesity. This paper provides a review of the current literature investigating the potential of nutraceuticals to ameliorate the development of oxidative stress and inflammation in obesity, thereby limiting the onset of obesity complications. Research has found nutraceuticals able to positively modulate the activity of adipocyte cell lines and further positive effects have been found in other aspects of pathogenic obesity. While their ability to affect weight loss is still controversial, it is clear that they have a great potential to reverse the development of overweight and obesity-related comorbidities; this, however, still requires much research especially that utilising well-structured randomised controlled trials. PMID:21854698

  10. Principles of the Atmospheric Pathway for Invasive Species Applied to Soybean Rust

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    SCOTT A. ISARD, STUART H. GAGE, PAUL COMTOIS, and JOSEPH M. RUSSO (; )

    2005-10-01

    This peer reviewed article from BioScience is about disease in soybeans. Aerial transport alone is seldom responsible for the introduction of nonindigenous species into distant regions; however, the capacity to use the atmospheric pathway for rapid spread in large part determines the invasive potential of organisms once they are introduced. Because physical and biological features of Earth's surface influence the routes and timing of organisms that use the atmospheric pathway, long-distance movement of aerobiota is largely regular and thus predictable. Soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi), potentially the most destructive foliar disease of soybean, recently invaded North America. The concepts presented in this article form the basis of the soybean rust aerobiology prediction system (SRAPS) that was developed to assess potential pathogen movement from South America to the United States. Output from SRAPS guided the scouting operations after the initial discovery of soybean rust in Louisiana. Subsequent observations of P. pachyrhizi in the southeastern United States provide validation of the modeling effort.

  11. Article Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Karen Bridges

    During the semester, students must complete two article reviews. They are required to summarize and critically evaluate a recent article pertaining to a topic in Earth Science. Articles may include topics such as global warming, ocean water chemistry, magnetic field wander, hurricane formation, etc. Articles are generally from popular science magazines (Discover, ScienceNews, GeoTimes)but may include artiticles from peer reviewed journals. Students must, in their 2-3 page paper summarize the article, but the most important part I look for is their critical assessment of the science process with an explicit description of how the evidence in the article supports their conclusion.

  12. Bioterrorism Articles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is offering free access to a large number of its previously published articles related to bioterrorism. Among the articles are five pieces by the Working Group on Civilian Biodefense, which are focused on Anthrax, Smallpox, Plague, Botulinum Toxin, and Tularemia. The remainder of the articles are sorted by subject, including these diseases plus Ebola and Brucella, as well as Clinical Articles, Epidemiologic Investigations, articles on Preparedness, and a section devoted to Policy, Historical, and Editorial Perspectives. Articles are available in HTML or .pdf formats.

  13. Cell biology of Zymoseptoria tritici: Pathogen cell organization and wheat infection

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Cell biological research in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici (formerly Mycosphaerella graminicola) has led to a good understanding of the histology of the infection process. Expression profiling and bioinformatic approaches, combined with molecular studies on signaling pathways, effectors and potential necrosis factors provides first insight into the complex interplay between the host and the pathogen. Cell biological studies will help to further our understanding of the infection strategy of the fungus. The cellular organization and intracellular dynamics of the fungus itself is largely unexplored. Insight into essential cellular processes within the pathogen will expand our knowledge of the basic biology of Z. tritici, thereby providing putative new anti-fungal targets. PMID:26092785

  14. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  15. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  16. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)1 is a complex disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality and is clinically characterized by an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. The histopathology is marked by vascular proliferation/fibrosis, remodeling, and vessel obstruction. Development of PAH involves the complex interaction of multiple vascular effectors at all anatomic levels of the arterial wall. Subsequent vasoconstriction, thrombosis, and inflammation ensue, leading to vessel wall remodeling and cellular hyperproliferation as the hallmarks of severe disease. These processes are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as diverse endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Recent studies have provided a glimpse at certain molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis; these have led to the identification of attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. We will review our current understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of the genetic and exogenous/acquired triggers of PAH. The resulting imbalance of vascular effectors provoking pathogenic vascular changes will also be discussed, with an emphasis on common and overarching regulatory pathways that may relate to the primary triggers of disease. The current conceptual framework should allow for future studies to refine our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of PAH and improve the therapeutic regimen for this disease. PMID:17950310

  17. Finding the Sweet Spot: How Human Fungal Pathogens Acquire and Turn the Sugar Inositol against Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inositol is an essential nutrient with important structural and signaling functions in eukaryotes. Its role in microbial pathogenesis has been reported in fungi, protozoans, and eubacteria. In a recent article, Porollo et al. [mBio 5(6):e01834-14, 2014, doi:10.1128/mBio.01834-14] demonstrated the importance of inositol metabolism in the development and viability of Pneumocystis species—obligate fungal pathogens that remain unculturable in vitro. To understand their obligate nature, the authors used innovative comparative genomic approaches and discovered that Pneumocystis spp. are inositol auxotrophs due to the lack of inositol biosynthetic enzymes and that inositol insufficiency is a contributing factor preventing fungal growth in vitro. This work is in accord with other studies suggesting that inositol plays a conserved role in microbial pathogenesis. Inositol uptake and metabolism therefore may represent novel antimicrobial drug targets. Using comparative genomics to analyze metabolic pathways offers a powerful tool to gain new insights into nutrient utilization in microbes, especially obligate pathogens. PMID:25736882

  18. Finding the sweet spot: how human fungal pathogens acquire and turn the sugar inositol against their hosts.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Inositol is an essential nutrient with important structural and signaling functions in eukaryotes. Its role in microbial pathogenesis has been reported in fungi, protozoans, and eubacteria. In a recent article, Porollo et al. [mBio 5(6):e01834-14, 2014, doi:10.1128/mBio.01834-14] demonstrated the importance of inositol metabolism in the development and viability of Pneumocystis species--obligate fungal pathogens that remain unculturable in vitro. To understand their obligate nature, the authors used innovative comparative genomic approaches and discovered that Pneumocystis spp. are inositol auxotrophs due to the lack of inositol biosynthetic enzymes and that inositol insufficiency is a contributing factor preventing fungal growth in vitro. This work is in accord with other studies suggesting that inositol plays a conserved role in microbial pathogenesis. Inositol uptake and metabolism therefore may represent novel antimicrobial drug targets. Using comparative genomics to analyze metabolic pathways offers a powerful tool to gain new insights into nutrient utilization in microbes, especially obligate pathogens. PMID:25736882

  19. Host Pathogen Relations: Exploring Animal Models for Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Catherine G.; Rao, Reeta P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens. PMID:25438011

  20. Effectiveness of clinical pathways for total knee and total hip arthroplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Kim; Elena Losina; Daniel H. Solomon; John Wright; Jeffrey N. Katz

    2003-01-01

    Although many hospitals have implemented clinical pathways to standardize the process of care, the effectiveness of clinical pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasties has not been reviewed critically. We searched for articles comparing outcomes of total hip or knee arthroplasty for patients who were treated using clinical pathways as opposed to patients treated without these pathways. Eleven studies met

  1. Recognition of pathogens by plants

    E-print Network

    Holt III, Ben F.

    and respond to specific pathogens? Unlike animals, plants do not have the luxury of a circulating immune and localized programmed cell death. The hypersensitive response serves to Magazine R5 Figure 1 The interaction

  2. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  3. NLR functions beyond pathogen recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A Kufer; Philippe J Sansonetti

    2011-01-01

    The last 10 years have witnessed the identification of a new class of intracellular pattern-recognition molecules—the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat–containing family (NLR). Members of this family garnered interest as pattern-recognition receptors able to trigger inflammatory responses against pathogens. Many studies support a pathogen-recognition function for human NLR proteins and shed light on their role in the broader control of

  4. Original article Use of stem diameter variations for detecting

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Use of stem diameter variations for detecting the effects of pathogens on plant the maximum daily shrinkage or the daily evolution of stem diameter. However, the pathogenic effects of B to rehydrate and absorption exceeds transpi- ration, causing an increase in stem diameter. It has been proved

  5. Original article Serum sensitivity and apathogenicity for chickens

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Serum sensitivity and apathogenicity for chickens and chick embryos of Escherichia coli J5 strain was assessed for its serum resistance and pathogenicity for both chickens and chick embryos. Pathogenicity for chickens was assessed by intravenous inoculation into three-week-old broiler

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Genotype and diet shape resistance and

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, Brian

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Genotype and diet shape resistance and tolerance across distinct against pathogenic infection is composed of resistance and tolerance. Resistance is the ability an escalating arms race between pathogen virulence factors and host antimicrobial activity. How a host balances

  7. Plants, plant pathogens, and microgravity--a deadly trio.

    PubMed

    Leach, J E; Ryba-White, M; Sun, Q; Wu, C J; Hilaire, E; Gartner, C; Nedukha, O; Kordyum, E; Keck, M; Leung, H; Guikema, J A

    2001-06-01

    Plants grown in spaceflight conditions are more susceptible to colonization by plant pathogens. The underlying causes for this enhanced susceptibility are not known. Possibly the formation of structural barriers and the activation of plant defense response components are impaired in spaceflight conditions. Either condition would result from altered gene expression of the plant. Because of the tools available, past studies focused on a few physiological responses or biochemical pathways. With recent advances in genomics research, new tools, including microarray technologies, are available to examine the global impact of growth in the spacecraft on the plant's gene expression profile. In ground-based studies, we have developed cDNA subtraction libraries of rice that are enriched for genes induced during pathogen infection and the defense response. Arrays of these genes are being used to dissect plant defense response pathways in a model system involving wild-type rice plants and lesion mimic mutants. The lesion mimic mutants are ideal experimental tools because they erratically develop defense response-like lesions in the absence of pathogens. The gene expression profiles from these ground-based studies will provide the molecular basis for understanding the biochemical and physiological impacts of spaceflight on plant growth, development and disease defense responses. This, in turn, will allow the development of strategies to manage plant disease for life in the space environment. PMID:11865865

  8. Plants, plant pathogens, and microgravity--a deadly trio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J. E.; Ryba-White, M.; Sun, Q.; Wu, C. J.; Hilaire, E.; Gartner, C.; Nedukha, O.; Kordyum, E.; Keck, M.; Leung, H.; Guikema, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants grown in spaceflight conditions are more susceptible to colonization by plant pathogens. The underlying causes for this enhanced susceptibility are not known. Possibly the formation of structural barriers and the activation of plant defense response components are impaired in spaceflight conditions. Either condition would result from altered gene expression of the plant. Because of the tools available, past studies focused on a few physiological responses or biochemical pathways. With recent advances in genomics research, new tools, including microarray technologies, are available to examine the global impact of growth in the spacecraft on the plant's gene expression profile. In ground-based studies, we have developed cDNA subtraction libraries of rice that are enriched for genes induced during pathogen infection and the defense response. Arrays of these genes are being used to dissect plant defense response pathways in a model system involving wild-type rice plants and lesion mimic mutants. The lesion mimic mutants are ideal experimental tools because they erratically develop defense response-like lesions in the absence of pathogens. The gene expression profiles from these ground-based studies will provide the molecular basis for understanding the biochemical and physiological impacts of spaceflight on plant growth, development and disease defense responses. This, in turn, will allow the development of strategies to manage plant disease for life in the space environment.

  9. The Evolution of the Wnt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt genes are important regulators of embryogenesis and cell differentiation in vertebrates and insects. New data revealed by comparative genomics have now shown that members of the Wnt signaling pathway can be found in all clades of metazoans, but not in fungi, plants, or unicellular eukaryotes. This article focuses on new data from recent genomic analyses of several basal metazoan organisms, providing evidence that the Wnt pathway was a primordial signaling pathway during evolution. The formation of a Wnt signaling center at the site of gastrulation was instrumental for the formation of a primary, anterior–posterior body axis, which can be traced throughout animal evolution. PMID:22751150

  10. SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION: Nuclear Fusion of Signaling Pathways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ralf Janknecht (Mayo Clinic; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

    1999-04-16

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. There is often crosstalk between signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokines. In this issue, Nakashima and colleagues report on one way in which signaling pathways communicate. They show that the signaling pathways for two cytokines (LIF and BMP2), which are necessary for astrocyte differentiation, can interact synergistically through the binding of their transcription factor targets (STAT3 and Smad1, respectively) to a common transcriptional coactivator molecule called p300.

  11. Environmental Health and Safety BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Environmental Health and Safety BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN Revised March 2010 #12 or body fluids from individuals infected with pathogenic agents. Examples of pathogens that can Virus (HIV). These two viruses and other similar agents are referred to as bloodborne pathogens (BBP

  12. Injury vs Disease Lifestyles of pathogens

    E-print Network

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Recap Injury vs Disease Lifestyles of pathogens #12;Lifestyle of pathogens Parasites Biotrophs The characteristics of hot the pathogen and host remain unchanged for longer periods Sudden changes in climate can of temperature 3 Days After #12;#12;Effects of wind Mostly dispersal of pathogens In some cases, wind can

  13. Interactive Fly: Developmental Pathways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Thomas B Brody (NIH Laboratory of Neurochemistry)

    2006-12-11

    this site describes evolutionarily conserved developmental pathways. The pathways are named according to the processes they govern, and not by the names of the genes involved: for example, "lateral inhibition" rather than "the Notch pathway." Inevitably, there will be cases where the function is less well understood: hence, "the Wingless pathway."

  14. Masquerading microbial pathogens: Capsular polysaccharides mimic host-tissue molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Brady F.; Englaender, Jacob A.; He, Wenqin; Kasper, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens bearing capsular polysaccharides identical to mammalian glycans benefit from an additional level of protection from host immune response. The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria portends an impending post-antibiotic age, characterized by diminishing efficacy of common antibiotics and routine application of multifaceted, complementary therapeutic approaches to treat bacterial infections, particularly multidrug-resistant organisms. The first line of defense for most bacterial pathogens consists of a physical and immunological barrier known as the capsule, commonly composed of a viscous layer of carbohydrates that are covalently bound to the cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria or often to lipids of the outer membrane in many Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are a diverse class of high molecular weight polysaccharides contributing to virulence of many human pathogens in the gut, respiratory tree, urinary tract, and other host tissues, by hiding cell-surface components that might otherwise elicit host immune response. This review highlights capsular polysaccharides that are structurally identical or similar to polysaccharides found in mammalian tissues, including polysialic acid and glycosaminoglycan capsules hyaluronan, heparosan, and chondroitin. Such non-immunogenic coatings render pathogens insensitive to certain immune responses, effectively increasing residence time in host tissues and enabling pathologically relevant population densities to be reached. Biosynthetic pathways and capsular involvement in immune system evasion are described providing a basis for potential therapies aimed at supplementing or replacing antibiotic treatment. PMID:24372337

  15. Iron and copper as virulence modulators in human fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Festa, Richard A; Sun, Tian-Shu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2014-07-01

    Fungal pathogens have evolved sophisticated machinery to precisely balance the fine line between acquiring essential metals and defending against metal toxicity. Iron and copper are essential metals for many processes in both fungal pathogens and their mammalian hosts, but reduce viability when present in excess. However, during infection, the host uses these two metals differently. Fe has a long-standing history of influencing virulence in pathogenic fungi, mostly in regards to Fe acquisition. Numerous studies demonstrate the requirement of the Fe acquisition pathway of Candida, Cryptococcus and Aspergillus for successful systemic infection. Fe is not free in the host, but is associated with Fe-binding proteins, leading fungi to develop mechanisms to interact with and to acquire Fe from these Fe-bound proteins. Cu is also essential for cell growth and development. Essential Cu-binding proteins include Fe transporters, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and cytochrome c oxidase. Although Cu acquisition plays critical roles in fungal survival in the host, recent work has revealed that Cu detoxification is extremely important. Here, we review fungal responses to altered metal conditions presented by the host, contrast the roles of Fe and Cu during infection, and outline the critical roles of fungal metal homeostasis machinery at the host-pathogen axis. PMID:24851950

  16. Xylella Genomics and Bacterial Pathogenicity to Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dow, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a pathogen of citrus, is the first plant pathogenic bacterium for which the complete genome sequence has been published. Inspection of the sequence reveals high relatedness to many genes of other pathogens, notably Xanthomonas campestris. Based on this, we suggest that Xylella possesses certain easily testable properties that contribute to pathogenicity. We also present some general considerations for deriving information on pathogenicity from bacterial genomics. PMID:11119303

  17. Edinburgh Research Explorer Highly pathogenic or low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Highly pathogenic or low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H7N1 pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H7N1 infection in chicken lungs: small differences in general acute. 2014 #12;RESEARCH Open Access Highly pathogenic or low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H7N1

  18. Waterborne protozoan pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M M; Naumovitz, D; Ortega, Y; Sterling, C R

    1997-01-01

    Protozoan parasites were the most frequently identified etiologic agents in waterborne disease outbreak from 1991 to 1994. The waterborne parasites Giardia lamblia, Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanesis, Isospora belli, and the microsporidia are reviewed. For each parasite, the review includes history, life cycle, incidence, symptoms, and therapy. Clinical detection methods are compared, and emerging technologies are discussed. Information on the association of these parasites with waterborne outbreaks is reviewed. Current information on protozoan parasites identified as etiological agents in waterborne outbreaks is discussed. Water industry issues related to recent disease outbreaks are examined in the context of water quality testing regulations for G. lamblia and those proposed for C. parvum. The review identifies the limitations of the American Society of Testing and Materials water-testing method for these parasites. An overview of federal regulations affecting the water industry and laboratories that test for water quality is also provided. The article highlights the importance of the clinical laboratory as a frontline defense for the detection of infectious organisms. The review points to the need for clinical laboratories, physicians, and public health personnel to cooperatively plan and assess the challenge of meeting this potential public health threat. PMID:8993859

  19. RESEARCH Open Access Host-pathogen interactome mapping for HTLV-1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the systematic mapping and comparison of pathogen-host protein interactions that includes stringent yeast two and presents new insights on biological pathways involved in retroviral infection. Keywords: HTLV, Interactome and proliferation path- ways [6]. Modulations of viral and cellular function upon infection rely on crosstalk

  20. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila–microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection. PMID:24398387

  1. Network-assisted genetic dissection of pathogenicity and drug resistance in the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanhae; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Maeng, Shinae; Chen, Ying-Lien; Shin, Junha; Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Janbon, Guilhem; Kim, Taeyup; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus that causes meningoencephalitis. Due to the increasing global risk of cryptococcosis and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, the development of predictive genetics platforms for the rapid identification of novel genes governing pathogenicity and drug resistance of C. neoformans is imperative. The analysis of functional genomics data and genome-scale mutant libraries may facilitate the genetic dissection of such complex phenotypes but with limited efficiency. Here, we present a genome-scale co-functional network for C. neoformans, CryptoNet, which covers ~81% of the coding genome and provides an efficient intermediary between functional genomics data and reverse-genetics resources for the genetic dissection of C. neoformans phenotypes. CryptoNet is the first genome-scale co-functional network for any fungal pathogen. CryptoNet effectively identified novel genes for pathogenicity and drug resistance using guilt-by-association and context-associated hub algorithms. CryptoNet is also the first genome-scale co-functional network for fungi in the basidiomycota phylum, as Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the ascomycota phylum. CryptoNet may therefore provide insights into pathway evolution between two distinct phyla of the fungal kingdom. The CryptoNet web server (www.inetbio.org/cryptonet) is a public resource that provides an interactive environment of network-assisted predictive genetics for C. neoformans. PMID:25739925

  2. Network-assisted genetic dissection of pathogenicity and drug resistance in the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanhae; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Maeng, Shinae; Chen, Ying-Lien; Shin, Junha; Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Janbon, Guilhem; Kim, Taeyup; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus that causes meningoencephalitis. Due to the increasing global risk of cryptococcosis and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, the development of predictive genetics platforms for the rapid identification of novel genes governing pathogenicity and drug resistance of C. neoformans is imperative. The analysis of functional genomics data and genome-scale mutant libraries may facilitate the genetic dissection of such complex phenotypes but with limited efficiency. Here, we present a genome-scale co-functional network for C. neoformans, CryptoNet, which covers ~81% of the coding genome and provides an efficient intermediary between functional genomics data and reverse-genetics resources for the genetic dissection of C. neoformans phenotypes. CryptoNet is the first genome-scale co-functional network for any fungal pathogen. CryptoNet effectively identified novel genes for pathogenicity and drug resistance using guilt-by-association and context-associated hub algorithms. CryptoNet is also the first genome-scale co-functional network for fungi in the basidiomycota phylum, as Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the ascomycota phylum. CryptoNet may therefore provide insights into pathway evolution between two distinct phyla of the fungal kingdom. The CryptoNet web server (www.inetbio.org/cryptonet) is a public resource that provides an interactive environment of network-assisted predictive genetics for C. neoformans. PMID:25739925

  3. Hepcidin Induction by Pathogens and Pathogen-Derived Molecules Is Strongly Dependent on Interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Richard; Jung, Chun-Ling; Gabayan, Victoria; Deng, Jane C.; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin, the iron-regulatory hormone, is increased during infection or inflammation, causing hypoferremia. This response is thought to be a host defense mechanism that restricts iron availability to invading pathogens. It is not known if hepcidin is differentially induced by bacterial versus viral infections, whether the stimulation of pattern recognition receptors directly regulates hepcidin transcription, or which of the proposed signaling pathways are essential for hepcidin increase during infection. We analyzed hepcidin induction and its dependence on interleukin-6 (IL-6) in response to common bacterial or viral infections in mice or in response to a panel of pathogen-derived molecules (PAMPs) in mice and human primary hepatocytes. In wild-type (WT) mice, hepcidin mRNA was induced several hundred-fold both by a bacterial (Streptococcus pneumoniae) and a viral infection (influenza virus PR8) within 2 to 5 days. Treatment of mice and human primary hepatocytes with most Toll-like receptor ligands increased hepcidin mRNA within 6 h. Hepcidin induction by microbial stimuli was IL-6 dependent. IL-6 knockout mice failed to increase hepcidin in response to S. pneumoniae or influenza infection and had greatly diminished hepcidin response to PAMPs. In vitro, hepcidin induction by PAMPs in primary human hepatocytes was abolished by the addition of neutralizing IL-6 antibodies. Our results support the key role of IL-6 in hepcidin regulation in response to a variety of infectious and inflammatory stimuli. PMID:24478088

  4. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Giro, Gabriela; Taubman, Martin A.; Han, Xiaozhe; Mayer, Marcia P.A.; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, we discuss earlier studies of immune intervention, ultimately leading to the identification of bacteria-reactive lymphocytes as the cellular source of osteoclast-induction factor lymphokine (now called RANKL) in the context of periodontal bone resorption. Next, we consider (1) the effects of periodontal bacteria on RANKL production from a variety of adaptive immune effector cells, as well as fibroblasts, in inflamed periodontal tissue and (2) the bifunctional roles (upregulation vs. downregulation) of LPS produced from periodontal bacteria in a RANKL-induced osteoclast-signal pathway. Future studies in these two areas could lead to new therapeutic approaches for the management of PD by down-modulating RANKL production and/or RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in the context of host immune responses against periodontal pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21523224

  5. Pathogens and the Placental Fortress

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Placental infections are major causes of maternal and fetal disease. This review introduces a new paradigm for placental infections based on current knowledge of placental defenses and how this barrier can be breached. Transmission of pathogens from mother to fetus can occur at two sites of direct contact between maternal cells and specialized fetal cells (trophoblasts) in the human placenta: (i) maternal immune and endothelial cells juxtaposed to extravillous trophoblasts in the uterine implantation site and (ii) maternal blood surrounding the syncytiotrophoblast. Recent findings suggest that the primary vulnerability is in the implantation site. We explore evidence that the placental syncytiotrophoblast evolved as a defense against pathogens, and that inflammation-mediated spontaneous abortion may benefit mother and pathogen. PMID:22169833

  6. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  7. Cellular defense processes regulated by pathogen-elicited receptor signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rongcong; Goldsipe, Arthur; Schauer, David B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-06-01

    Vertebrates are constantly threatened by the invasion of microorganisms and have evolved systems of immunity to eliminate infectious pathogens in the body. Initial sensing of microbial agents is mediated by the recognition of pathogens by means of molecular structures expressed uniquely by microbes of a given type. So-called 'Toll-like receptors' are expressed on host epithelial barrier cells play an essential role in the host defense against microbial pathogens by inducing cell responses (e.g., proliferation, death, cytokine secretion) via activation of intracellular signaling networks. As these networks, comprising multiple interconnecting dynamic pathways, represent highly complex multi-variate "information processing" systems, the signaling activities particularly critical for governing the host cell responses are poorly understood and not easily ascertained by a priori theoretical notions. We have developed over the past half-decade a "data-driven" computational modeling approach, on a 'cue-signal-response' combined experiment/computation paradigm, to elucidate key multi-variate signaling relationships governing the cell responses. In an example presented here, we study how a canonical set of six kinase pathways combine to effect microbial agent-induced apoptotic death of a macrophage cell line. One modeling technique, partial least-squares regression, yielded the following key insights: {a} signal combinations most strongly correlated to apoptotic death are orthogonal to those most strongly correlated with release of inflammatory cytokines; {b} the ratio of two key pathway activities is the most powerful predictor of microbe-induced macrophage apoptotic death; {c} the most influential time-window of this signaling activity ratio is surprisingly fast: less than one hour after microbe stimulation.

  8. Involvement of host regulatory pathways during geminivirus infection: a novel platform for generating durable resistance.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Sharma, Namisha; Puranik, Swati; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Prasad, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Geminiviruses are widely distributed throughout the world and cause devastating yield losses in almost all the economically important crops. In this review, the newly identified roles of various novel plant factors and pathways participating in plant–virus interaction are summarized with a particular focus on the exploitation of various pathways involving ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway, small RNA pathways, cell division cycle components, and the epigenetic mechanism as defense responses during plant–pathogen interactions. Capturing the information on these pathways for the development of strategies against geminivirus infection is argued to provide the basis for new genetic approaches to resistance. PMID:24233104

  9. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  10. What are bloodborne pathogens? Bloodborne pathogens are infectious materials

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    document annually that they have considered and implemented safer medical devices, if feasible medical devices such as sharps with engineered sharps-injury protection and needleless systems. Enforce controls. Use engineering controls. These are devices that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogen

  11. Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Krishnan; P Folta

    2006-01-01

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes

  12. Pathogenic microbes and community service through manipulation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Liang, Shuang; McIntosh, Megan L.; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis undermines major components of innate immunity, such as complement, Toll-like receptors (TLR), and their crosstalk pathways. At least in principle, these subversive activities could promote the adaptive fitness of the entire periodontal biofilm community. In this regard, the virulence factors responsible for complement and TLR exploitation (gingipain enzymes, atypical lipopolysaccharide molecules, and fimbriae) are released as components of readily diffusible membrane vesicles, which can thus become available to other biofilm organisms. This review summarizes important immune subversive tactics of P. gingivalis which might enable it to exert a supportive impact on the oral microbial community. PMID:21948363

  13. Gating by Cyclic AMP: Expanded Role for an Old Signaling Pathway

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ravi Iyengar (City University of New York; Department of Pharmacology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

    1996-01-26

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. The intracellular signal transduction pathway that utilizes cyclic AMP as a key messenger was the first such pathway to be described and has served as a model for many other transducing systems. Now Iyengar illustrates how this classic pathway has yet another function--in a number of different biological systems, the cyclic AMP pathway appears to gate (either negatively or positively) other signal transduction pathways.

  14. The role of the nurse educator in the development of critical pathways.

    PubMed

    Martich, D

    1993-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of the nurse educator in developing critical pathways. It serves as a guide for the nurse educator by defining how critical pathways support managed care, identifying the goals of critical pathway education, and reviewing the importance of organizational commitment to the critical pathways before their use. The nurse educator serves as instructor, facilitator, and consultant in critical pathway development. PMID:8229262

  15. Nuclear jasmonate and salicylate signaling and crosstalk in defense against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Solano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    An extraordinary progress has been made over the last two decades on understanding the components and mechanisms governing plant innate immunity. After detection of a pathogen, effective plant resistance depends on the activation of a complex signaling network integrated by small signaling molecules and hormonal pathways, and the balance of these hormone systems determines resistance to particular pathogens. The discovery of new components of hormonal signaling pathways, including plant nuclear hormone receptors, is providing a picture of complex crosstalk and induced hormonal changes that modulate disease and resistance through several protein families that perceive hormones within the nucleus and lead to massive gene induction responses often achieved by de-repression. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of positive and negative regulators of these hormones signaling pathways that are crucial regulatory targets of hormonal crosstalk in disease and defense. We focus on the most recent discoveries on the jasmonate and salicylate pathway components that explain their crosstalk with other hormonal pathways in the nucleus. We discuss how these components fine-tune defense responses to build a robust plant immune system against a great number of different microbes and, finally, we summarize recent discoveries on specific nuclear hormonal manipulation by microbes which exemplify the ingenious ways by which pathogens can take control over the plant’s hormone signaling network to promote disease. PMID:23577014

  16. Transient Pulse Formation in Jasmonate Signaling Pathway

    E-print Network

    Subhasis Banerjee; Indrani Bose

    2010-03-03

    The jasmonate (JA) signaling pathway in plants is activated as defense response to a number of stresses like attacks by pests or pathogens and wounding by animals. Some recent experiments provide significant new knowledge on the molecular detail and connectivity of the pathway. The pathway has two major components in the form of feedback loops, one negative and the other positive. We construct a minimal mathematical model, incorporating the feedback loops, to study the dynamics of the JA signaling pathway. The model exhibits transient gene expression activity in the form of JA pulses in agreement with experimental observations. The dependence of the pulse amplitude, duration and peak time on the key parameters of the model is determined computationally. The deterministic and stochastic aspects of the pathway dynamics are investigated using both the full mathematical model as well as a reduced version of it. We also compare the mechanism of pulse formation with the known mechanisms of pulse generation in some bacterial and viral systems.

  17. [Wound signal transduction pathways in plants].

    PubMed

    Szczegielniak, Jadwiga

    2007-01-01

    A significant advancement in our knowledge and understanding of wound-signaling pathways in plants has been made recently. Essential role in the explanation of these processes came from the genetic screens and analysis of mutants which are defective in either jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, JA perception or systemin function. Plants equally react to wound in the tissues directly damaged (local response) as well as in the non-wounded areas (systemic response). Jasmonides and in particular the most studied JA, produced by the octadecanoid pathway, are responsible for the systemic response. Jasmonides functioning as long-distance signal particles transmit the information about wound to distant, non-wounded tissues where defense response is invoked. Peptyd - systemin, identified in some Solanaceous species, acts locally to the wounded area to elicit the production of JA. Jasmonic acid-dependent and -independent wound signal transduction pathways have been identified and partially characterized. JA-dependent wound signaling pathways are responsible for the activation of systemic responses, whereas JA-independent wound signaling pathways, activated close to wound side, have a role in reparation of damaged tissue and in defense against pathogens. PMID:17969872

  18. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Expressed by Regulating Metabolic Thresholds of the Host Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Saquib, Najmuddin; Sinha, Neeraj; Siddiqui, Zaved; Manivel, Venkatasamy; Chatterjee, Samrat; Rao, Kanury V. S.

    2014-01-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen derives from its facile adaptation to the intracellular milieu of human macrophages. To explore this process, we asked whether adaptation also required interference with the metabolic machinery of the host cell. Temporal profiling of the metabolic flux, in cells infected with differently virulent mycobacterial strains, confirmed that this was indeed the case. Subsequent analysis identified the core subset of host reactions that were targeted. It also elucidated that the goal of regulation was to integrate pathways facilitating macrophage survival, with those promoting mycobacterial sustenance. Intriguingly, this synthesis then provided an axis where both host- and pathogen-derived factors converged to define determinants of pathogenicity. Consequently, whereas the requirement for macrophage survival sensitized TB susceptibility to the glycemic status of the individual, mediation by pathogen ensured that the virulence properties of the infecting strain also contributed towards the resulting pathology. PMID:25058590

  19. Constraint-Based Modeling and Scheduling of Clinical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Armin

    In this article a constraint-based modeling of clinical pathways, in particular of surgical pathways, is introduced and used for an optimized scheduling of their tasks. The addressed optimization criteria are based on practical experiences in the area of Constraint Programming applications in medical work flow management. Objective functions having empirical evidence for their adequacy in the considered use cases are formally presented. It is shown how they are respected while scheduling clinical pathways.

  20. Lab-on-a-Chip Pathogen Sensors for Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Bumsang

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors. PMID:23112625

  1. Original article Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    enteritidis is recognised as a frequent and important pathogen for poultry and has been isolated from broilerOriginal article Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a Salmonella enteritidis antigen obtained from a clinical isolate of Salmonella enteritidis, were compared with those obtained with the gm

  2. Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Care Association, Atlanta, GA.

    This sample exposure control plan is a guide to assist child care providers in complying with the blood-borne pathogens standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The standard requires employers to establish a written exposure control plan by May 5, 1992 (for exposure to microorganisms in human blood that cause…

  3. LABORATORY MAINTENANCE OF PATHOGENIC LEPTOSPIRA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of Leptospira requires use of specialized media for growth, maintenance, and storage of viable bacteria that can be used in experimental protocols in a predictable manner. However, pathogenic Leptospira are fastidious bacteria with unusual nutritional requirements. These problems make pri...

  4. Receptor use by pathogenic arenaviruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Therese Reignier; Jill Oldenburg; Beth Noble; Erika Lamb; Victor Romanowski; Michael J. Buchmeier; Paula M. Cannon

    2006-01-01

    The arenavirus family contains several important human pathogens including Lassa fever virus (LASV), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the New World clade B viruses Junin (JUNV) and Machupo (MACV). Previously, ?-dystroglycan (?-DG) was identified as a receptor recognized by LASV and certain strains of LCMV. However, other studies have suggested that ?-DG is probably not used by the clade B

  5. Proteomics of foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on recent research on foodborne bacterial pathogens that use mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques as well as protein microarrays. Mass spectrometry ionization techniques (e.g. electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization), analyzers (e.g. ion ...

  6. PATHOGEN RISK ASSESSMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the practicality of formulating guidelines to assess the risk associated with exposure to pathogens in sludge. Risk assessment may be used to determine the likelihood that an environmental agent may cause human disease (that is, potential to cause human cance...

  7. Mycobacterium haemophilum : An emerging pathogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Kiehn; M. White

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is emerging as a pathogen of immunocompromised patients particularly those with AIDS and organ transplants. Infection has also occurred in healthy children. Adults usually present with cutaneous manifestations, septic arthritis or occasionally pneumonia. Children have perihilar, cervical or submandibular adenitis. The organism grows on mycobacterial media supplemented with ferric ammonium citrate or hemin, incubated at 30°C to 32°C,

  8. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    in 1995 was 800, indicating the effectiveness of Standard Precautions, HBV vaccinations, and other Rubock, MPH. Director of Biological Safety Nov 2009 6.0 Outlined "the Standard", "the Policy" and "the 1910.1030 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard ("the Standard") in 1991 to protect workers with potential

  9. PATHOGENIC 'NAEGLERIA': DISTRIBUTION IN NATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infection in man with pathogenic Naegleria, a free-living soil amoeba, results in a usually fatal disease entity known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Epidemiological data usually included exposure to freshwater lakes or streams within the week prior to onset. However, no...

  10. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a summary of the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) publication entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination, EPA/600/R-03/111 (September 2003). It is available on the internet at http://www.epa.gov/ednnrmrl/repository/water...

  11. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is written as a resource for state and local watershed managers who have the responsibility of managing pathogen contamination in urban watersheds. In addition it can be an information source for members of the public interested in watershed mitigation efforts aime...

  12. Biosignatures of Pathogen and Host

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; Chromy, B A; Forde, C E; Garcia, E; Gardner, S N; Gu, P P; Kuczmarksi, T A; Melius, C F; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Milanovich, F P; Motin, V L; Ott, L L; Quong, A A; Quong, J N; Rocco, J M; Slezak, T R; Sokhansanj, B A; Vitalis, E A; Zemla, A T; McCready, P M

    2002-08-27

    In information theory, a signature is characterized by the information content as well as noise statistics of the communication channel. Biosignatures have analogous properties. A biosignature can be associated with a particular attribute of a pathogen or a host. However, the signature may be lost in backgrounds of similar or even identical signals from other sources. In this paper, we highlight statistical and signal processing challenges associated with identifying good biosignatures for pathogens in host and other environments. In some cases it may be possible to identify useful signatures of pathogens through indirect but amplified signals from the host. Discovery of these signatures requires new approaches to modeling and data interpretation. For environmental biosignal collections, it is possible to use signal processing techniques from other applications (e.g., synthetic aperture radar) to track the natural progression of microbes over large areas. We also present a computer-assisted approach to identify unique nucleic-acid based microbial signatures. Finally, an understanding of host-pathogen interactions will result in better detectors as well as opportunities in vaccines and therapeutics.

  13. Pathogenic pseudorabies virus, China, 2012.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuling; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Dongmei; Zhang, Qian; Han, Tao; Li, Xiaoxia; Gu, Xiaoxue; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Baoyue; Qu, Ping; Liu, Jinhua; Zhai, Xinyan; Tian, Kegong

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, an unprecedented large-scale outbreak of disease in pigs in China caused great economic losses to the swine industry. Isolates from pseudorabies virus epidemics in swine herds were characterized. Evidence confirmed that the pathogenic pseudorabies virus was the etiologic agent of this epidemic. PMID:24377462

  14. Pathogenic Pseudorabies Virus, China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiuling; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Dongmei; Zhang, Qian; Han, Tao; Li, Xiaoxia; Gu, Xiaoxue; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Baoyue; Qu, Ping; Liu, Jinhua; Zhai, Xinyan

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, an unprecedented large-scale outbreak of disease in pigs in China caused great economic losses to the swine industry. Isolates from pseudorabies virus epidemics in swine herds were characterized. Evidence confirmed that the pathogenic pseudorabies virus was the etiologic agent of this epidemic. PMID:24377462

  15. Kicking Out Pathogens in Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2015-06-01

    Host-pathogen interactions involve a series of attacks and counter-attacks. Miao et al. show that, although some invading bacteria can take shelter in lysosomes by neutralizing their pH, this respite is temporary, as host cells can expel them in exosomes. PMID:26046431

  16. Exit strategies of intracellular pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Hybiske; Richard S. Stephens

    2008-01-01

    The exit of intracellular pathogens from host cells is an important step in the infectious cycle, but is poorly understood. It has recently emerged that microbial exit is a process that can be directed by organisms from within the cell, and is not simply a consequence of the physical or metabolic burden that is imposed on the host cell. This

  17. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  18. Integrated care pathways (ICPs) and infection control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ted Nyatanga; Rick Holliman

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – The article aims to globally illuminate and inform the healthcare delivery systems of the potential value of integrated care pathways (ICPs) application to the management and control of infection in the hospital setting Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An analysis of recent pertinent literature (1993-2004) is given, preceded by a broad overview of both the subjects of infection control and ICPs.

  19. Alternative Certification Pathways: Filling a Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Carlyn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the proliferation of alternative certification pathways through an analysis of the role and history of teacher certification and supply followed by a synthesis of national, regional, and state research studies on alternative routes to certification programs and a review of studies conducted on well-known…

  20. In vivo assays to evaluate the pathogenic effects of minerals in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.M.G. [Institute of Occupational Medicine Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    Concern for the pathogenic effects of minerals centers on two pathological conditions: fibrosis and neoplasia. For many years it has been known that some dusts (e.g. quartz and coal mine dusts) can produce nodular pulmonary fibrosis when inhaled by humans and that some fibrous dusts could also cause cancer in addition to asbestosis. In order to assess the pathogenicity of various dusts and to learn more about the mechanisms of this pathogenicity, a number of in vivo assays have been developed. This article focuses on the principles underlying in vivo methods and reviews some of the data and significant discoveries. 135 refs.

  1. Pathways of Youth Development in a Rural Trailer Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacTavish, Katherine A.; Salamon, Sonya

    2006-01-01

    Limited empirical documentation exists for the developmental pathways available to "rural" youth growing up in low-resource community settings. Drawing on ethnographic data, this article examines the developmental pathways experienced by youth in a rural trailer park. Findings reveal how various factors, some inherent to working poor class status…

  2. Impacts of Climate Change on Indirect Human Exposure to Pathogens and Chemicals from Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, Alistair B.A.; Hardy, Anthony; Beulke, Sabine; Boucard, Tatiana; Burgin, Laura; Falloon, Peter D.; Haygarth, Philip M.; Hutchinson, Thomas; Kovats, R. Sari; Leonardi, Giovanni; Levy, Leonard S.; Nichols, Gordon; Parsons, Simon A.; Potts, Laura; Stone, David; Topp, Edward; Turley, David B.; Walsh, Kerry; Wellington, Elizabeth M.H.; Williams, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Climate change is likely to affect the nature of pathogens and chemicals in the environment and their fate and transport. Future risks of pathogens and chemicals could therefore be very different from those of today. In this review, we assess the implications of climate change for changes in human exposures to pathogens and chemicals in agricultural systems in the United Kingdom and discuss the subsequent effects on health impacts. Data sources In this review, we used expert input and considered literature on climate change; health effects resulting from exposure to pathogens and chemicals arising from agriculture; inputs of chemicals and pathogens to agricultural systems; and human exposure pathways for pathogens and chemicals in agricultural systems. Data synthesis We established the current evidence base for health effects of chemicals and pathogens in the agricultural environment; determined the potential implications of climate change on chemical and pathogen inputs in agricultural systems; and explored the effects of climate change on environmental transport and fate of different contaminant types. We combined these data to assess the implications of climate change in terms of indirect human exposure to pathogens and chemicals in agricultural systems. We then developed recommendations on future research and policy changes to manage any adverse increases in risks. Conclusions Overall, climate change is likely to increase human exposures to agricultural contaminants. The magnitude of the increases will be highly dependent on the contaminant type. Risks from many pathogens and particulate and particle-associated contaminants could increase significantly. These increases in exposure can, however, be managed for the most part through targeted research and policy changes. PMID:19440487

  3. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: a member of the signalling pathway of a new G protein ? subunit in Sporothrix schenckii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirley Valentín-Berríos; Waleska González-Velázquez; Lizaida Pérez-Sánchez; Ricardo González-Méndez; Nuri Rodríguez-del Valle

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sporothrix schenckii is a pathogenic dimorphic fungus, the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a lymphocutaneous disease that can remain localized or can disseminate, involving joints, lungs, and the central nervous system. Pathogenic fungi use signal transduction pathways to rapidly adapt to changing environmental conditions and S. schenckii is no exception. S. schenckii yeast cells, either proliferate (yeast cell cycle) or

  4. Identifying pathogenic processes by integrating microarray data with prior knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is of great importance to identify molecular processes and pathways that are involved in disease etiology. Although there has been an extensive use of various high-throughput methods for this task, pathogenic pathways are still not completely understood. Often the set of genes or proteins identified as altered in genome-wide screens show a poor overlap with canonical disease pathways. These findings are difficult to interpret, yet crucial in order to improve the understanding of the molecular processes underlying the disease progression. We present a novel method for identifying groups of connected molecules from a set of differentially expressed genes. These groups represent functional modules sharing common cellular function and involve signaling and regulatory events. Specifically, our method makes use of Bayesian statistics to identify groups of co-regulated genes based on the microarray data, where external information about molecular interactions and connections are used as priors in the group assignments. Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling is used to search for the most reliable grouping. Results Simulation results showed that the method improved the ability of identifying correct groups compared to traditional clustering, especially for small sample sizes. Applied to a microarray heart failure dataset the method found one large cluster with several genes important for the structure of the extracellular matrix and a smaller group with many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. The method was also applied to a microarray dataset on melanoma cancer patients with or without metastasis, where the main cluster was dominated by genes related to keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion Our method found clusters overlapping with known pathogenic processes, but also pointed to new connections extending beyond the classical pathways. PMID:24758699

  5. Polyamines as a common source of hydrogen peroxide in host- and nonhost hypersensitive response during pathogen infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Yoda; Kazuki Fujimura; Hideyuki Takahashi; Ikuko Munemura; Hirofumi Uchimiya; Hiroshi Sano

    2009-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a powerful resistance system that plants have developed against pathogen attack. There\\u000a are two major pathways for HR induction; one is through recognition of the pathogen by a specific host protein, and is known\\u000a as the host HR. The other is through common biochemical changes upon infection—the nonhost HR. We previously demonstrated\\u000a that hydrogen peroxide

  6. Genome of the Opportunistic Pathogen Streptococcus sanguinis? †

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Alves, Joao M.; Kitten, Todd; Brown, Arunsri; Chen, Zhenming; Ozaki, Luiz S.; Manque, Patricio; Ge, Xiuchun; Serrano, Myrna G.; Puiu, Daniela; Hendricks, Stephanie; Wang, Yingping; Chaplin, Michael D.; Akan, Doruk; Paik, Sehmi; Peterson, Darrell L.; Macrina, Francis L.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2007-01-01

    The genome of Streptococcus sanguinis is a circular DNA molecule consisting of 2,388,435 bp and is 177 to 590 kb larger than the other 21 streptococcal genomes that have been sequenced. The G+C content of the S. sanguinis genome is 43.4%, which is considerably higher than the G+C contents of other streptococci. The genome encodes 2,274 predicted proteins, 61 tRNAs, and four rRNA operons. A 70-kb region encoding pathways for vitamin B12 biosynthesis and degradation of ethanolamine and propanediol was apparently acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The gene complement suggests new hypotheses for the pathogenesis and virulence of S. sanguinis and differs from the gene complements of other pathogenic and nonpathogenic streptococci. In particular, S. sanguinis possesses a remarkable abundance of putative surface proteins, which may permit it to be a primary colonizer of the oral cavity and agent of streptococcal endocarditis and infection in neutropenic patients. PMID:17277061

  7. Discovering pathways by orienting edges in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Gitter, Anthony; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Gupta, Anupam; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Modern experimental technology enables the identification of the sensory proteins that interact with the cells’ environment or various pathogens. Expression and knockdown studies can determine the downstream effects of these interactions. However, when attempting to reconstruct the signaling networks and pathways between these sources and targets, one faces a substantial challenge. Although pathways are directed, high-throughput protein interaction data are undirected. In order to utilize the available data, we need methods that can orient protein interaction edges and discover high-confidence pathways that explain the observed experimental outcomes. We formalize the orientation problem in weighted protein interaction graphs as an optimization problem and present three approximation algorithms based on either weighted Boolean satisfiability solvers or probabilistic assignments. We use these algorithms to identify pathways in yeast. Our approach recovers twice as many known signaling cascades as a recent unoriented signaling pathway prediction technique and over 13 times as many as an existing network orientation algorithm. The discovered paths match several known signaling pathways and suggest new mechanisms that are not currently present in signaling databases. For some pathways, including the pheromone signaling pathway and the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, our method suggests interesting and novel components that extend current annotations. PMID:21109539

  8. A logic-based diagram of signalling pathways central to macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Sobia; Robertson, Kevin A; Lacaze, Paul A; Page, David; Enright, Anton J; Ghazal, Peter; Freeman, Tom C

    2008-01-01

    Background The complex yet flexible cellular response to pathogens is orchestrated by the interaction of multiple signalling and metabolic pathways. The molecular regulation of this response has been studied in great detail but comprehensive and unambiguous diagrams describing these events are generally unavailable. Four key signalling cascades triggered early-on in the innate immune response are the toll-like receptor, interferon, NF-?B and apoptotic pathways, which co-operate to defend cells against a given pathogen. However, these pathways are commonly viewed as separate entities rather than an integrated network of molecular interactions. Results Here we describe the construction of a logically represented pathway diagram which attempts to integrate these four pathways central to innate immunity using a modified version of the Edinburgh Pathway Notation. The pathway map is available in a number of electronic formats and editing is supported by yEd graph editor software. Conclusion The map presents a powerful visual aid for interpreting the available pathway interaction knowledge and underscores the valuable contribution well constructed pathway diagrams make to communicating large amounts of molecular interaction data. Furthermore, we discuss issues with the limitations and scalability of pathways presented in this fashion, explore options for automated layout of large pathway networks and demonstrate how such maps can aid the interpretation of functional studies. PMID:18433497

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations...Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations...Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations...Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations...Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations...Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  14. INOCULATION AND GROWTH WITH FOLIAR PATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes methods for evaluating responses of Medicago truncatula to foliar plant-pathogenic fungi. Growth of plants, preparation of inoculum, incubation conditions, and disease assessment are described for five necrotrophic pathogens (Ascochyta lentis, Ascochyta rabiei, Colletotrichum ...

  15. The role of Caenorhabditis elegans insulin-like signaling in the behavioral avoidance of pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Hasshoff, Martin; Böhnisch, Claudia; Tonn, Daniela; Hasert, Barbara; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2007-06-01

    Pathogens cause damage, and their elimination requires activation of the costly immune response. A highly economic defense strategy should thus be the behavioral avoidance of pathogens, as manifested in humans by all aspects of hygiene or revulsion at pathogen-rich material. Despite its potential importance, behavioral defenses have as yet received only little attention in biomedical research--in stark contrast to the physiological immune system. In the present study, the genetics of such behavioral defenses are elucidated in a simple model organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show for the first time that mutations in the insulin-like receptor (ILR) pathway lead to two distinct behavioral responses against pathogenic strains of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (BT), including the physical evasion of pathogens and their reduced oral uptake. Since this pathway also contributes to nematode stress resistance, the results surprisingly reveal a genetic link between physiological and behavioral defenses. Considering that many signaling pathways have conserved their functions across evolution, including the ILR pathway, this signaling cascade may represent an interesting candidate regulator for behavioral defenses in more complex organisms, including humans. PMID:17314144

  16. [Study on serological cross-reactivity of six pathogenic phleboviruses].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, Chuan; Liang, Mi-Fang; Li, De-Xin

    2014-07-01

    This article aimed to study the antigenicity of nucleocapsid proteins (NPs) in six pathogenic phleboviruses and to provide theoretical evidence for the development of serological diagnostic reagents. NPs of six pathogenic phleboviruses were expressed and purified using a prokaryotic expression system and rabbits were immunized with individual recombinant NPs. Cross-reactions among NPs and rabbit sera were determined by both indirect ELISA and Western blotting analyses, and the sera titer was determined by indirect ELISA. Furthermore, sera from SFTS patients were also detected by each recombinant NP as a coating antigen using indirect ELISA. The cross-reactions and the sera titer were subsequently determined. Both the concentration and purity of recombinant NPs of six pathogenic phleboviruses met the standards for immunization and detection. The results of indirect ELISA and Western blotting showed that each anti-phlebovirus NP rabbit immune serum had potential serological cross-reactivity with the other five virus NP antigens. Furthermore, the sera from SFTS patients also had cross-reactivity with the other five NP antigens to a certain extent. Our preliminary study evaluated the antigenicity and immune reactivity of six pathogenic phleboviruses NPs and laid the foundation for the development of diagnostic reagents. PMID:25272591

  17. Comparative Phylogenomics of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Arun N.; Mehra, Sarika

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium species are the source of a variety of infectious diseases in a range of hosts. Genome based methods are used to understand the adaptation of each pathogenic species to its unique niche. In this work, we report the comparison of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Mycobacterium genomes. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using sequence of core orthologs, gene content and gene order. It is found that the genome based methods can better resolve the inter-species evolutionary distances compared to the conventional 16S based tree. Phylogeny based on gene order highlights distinct evolutionary characteristics as compared to the methods based on sequence, as illustrated by the shift in the relative position of M. abscessus. This difference in gene order among the Mycobacterium species is further investigated using a detailed synteny analysis. It is found that while rearrangements between some Mycobacterium genomes are local within synteny blocks, few possess global rearrangements across the genomes. The study illustrates how a combination of different genome based methods is essential to build a robust phylogenetic relationship between closely related organisms. PMID:24015186

  18. DC-SIGN: escape mechanism for pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teunis B. H. Geijtenbeek; Yvette van Kooyk

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in the defence against pathogens. Invading pathogens are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and receptors such as C-type lectins expressed on the surface of DCs. However, it is becoming evident that some pathogens, including viruses, such as HIV-1, and non-viral pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, subvert DC functions to escape immune surveillance by targeting the

  19. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  20. Genetics of plant—pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheng Ji; Smith-Becker Jennifer; Keen Noel T

    1998-01-01

    Progress has occurred in understanding the function of disease-resistance genes that govern the resistance of plants to pathogens, and pathogen-produced molecules, called elicitors, that resistance genes key on. Data support the elicitor—receptor model wherein resistant plants contain receptors for pathogen elicitors. This recognition may be complex, however, involving delivery of elicitors to plant cells by specialized pathogen secretion systems and

  1. Pathogen reduction of blood components.

    PubMed

    Solheim, Bjarte G

    2008-08-01

    Thanks to many blood safety interventions introduced in developed countries the risk of transfusion transmitted infections has become exceedingly small in these countries. However, emerging pathogens still represent a serious challenge, as demonstrated by West Nile virus in the US and more recently by Chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean. In addition bacterial contamination, particularly in platelets, and protozoa transmitted by blood components still represent sizeable risks in developed countries. In developing countries the risk of all transfusion transmitted infections is still high due to insufficient funding and organisation of the health service. Pathogen reduction of pooled plasma products has virtually eliminated the risk of transfusion transmitted infections, without compromising the quality of the products significantly. Pathogen reduction of blood components has been much more challenging. Solvent detergent treatment which has been so successfully applied for plasma products dissolves cell membranes, and can, therefore, only be applied for plasma and not for cellular blood components. Targeting of nucleic acids has been another method for pathogen inactivation of plasma and the only approach possible for cellular blood products. As documented in more than 15 year's track record, solvent detergent treatment of pooled plasma can yield high quality plasma. The increased risk for contamination by unknown viruses due to pooling is out weighed by elimination of TRALI, significant reduction in allergic reactions and standardisation of the product. Recently, a promising method for solvent detergent treatment of single donor plasma units has been published. Methylene blue light treatment of single donor plasma units has a similar long track record as pooled solvent detergent treated plasma; but the method is less well documented and affects coagulation factor activity more. Psoralen light treated plasma has only recently been introduced (CE marked in Europe, but not licensed by the FDA), while the method of Riboflavin light treatment of plasma still is under development. In addition to pathogen reduction the methods, however, result in some reduction of coagulation factor activity. For platelets only Psoralen and Riboflavin light treatment have been implemented. Both are CE marked products in Europe but only approved for clinical trials in the USA. The methods affect platelet activity, but result in clinically acceptable platelets with only slightly reduced CCI and increased demand for platelet transfusions. Pathogen reduction of red blood cells with FRALE (S-303) or INACTINE (PEN110) has so far resulted in the formation of antibodies against neo-epitopes on red blood cells. A promising method for Riboflavin treatment of red blood cells is under development. This manuscript reviews the current experience and discusses future trends. PMID:18602343

  2. University Of Florida Bloodborne Pathogen Program

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    University Of Florida Bloodborne Pathogen Program Standard Operating Procedures Revised Page 1 of 12 keep in lab #12;University Of Florida Bloodborne Pathogen Program Standard Operating with the bloodborne pathogen standard. These worksheets will assist you in tailoring the Exposure Control Plan to your

  3. Bloodborne Pathogens Program Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Bloodborne Pathogens Program Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION 2.0 RESPONSIBILITIES 3.0 EXPOSURE Appendix 4 TRAINING INFORMATION FOR THE BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS PROGRAM Table 1: SUMMARY OF PRACTICAL Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard found

  4. BIODIVERSITY Insect pests and pathogens of Australian

    E-print Network

    BIODIVERSITY REVIEW Insect pests and pathogens of Australian acacias grown as non threatened by invasive alien pests and pathogens (Wingfield et al., 2010). The reality of this threat first by the gypsy moth and the chestnut blight pathogens appearing in North America. It is unfortunate that new

  5. Phylogeography of human pathogens Hosted by the

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    Phylogeography of human pathogens Hosted by the Centre for Immunity, Infection, and Evolution (Bristol) Matt Fisher (Imperial) The phylogenetic study of gene sequences from pathogens has become information into these techniques to allow us to track the otherwise hidden movement of pathogens globally

  6. Phylogeography of human pathogens Hosted by the

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    Phylogeography of human pathogens Hosted by the Centre for Immunity, Infection, and Evolution" 12:15 Roman Biek (University of Glasgow) "Beyond invasion: how do pathogens persist in their endemic for Darwinian selection in the microevolution of genetically monomorphic bacterial pathogens" 2:50 Matt Fisher

  7. Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Karen A.

    Chapter 25 Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change K.A. Garrett, M. Nita, E.D. De Wolf, L [1]. While some animal hosts may provide their pathogens with a consistent range of body temperatures, plant pathogens are generally much more exposed to the elements. Plant disease will tend to respond

  8. Page 1 of 16 Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    E-print Network

    Page 1 of 16 Bloodborne Pathogens Program Revised July, 5 2012 #12;Page 2 of 16 Table of Contents 1 will be potentially exposed to Bloodborne Pathogens. By following these procedures, the safety of the working 4 of 16 2.0 EXPOSURE CONTROL METHODS Bloodborne pathogens (BBP) are present in human blood and can

  9. Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants

    E-print Network

    Innes, Roger

    Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants Jules Ade, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, pathogens must overcome three layers of defense: (1) preformed physical barriers; (2) a cell-surface-based surveillance system that detects conserved pathogen molecules and (3) an intracellular surveillance system

  10. Genomic islands in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Dobrindt; Bianca Hochhut; Ute Hentschel; Jörg Hacker

    2004-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important mechanism for the evolution of microbial genomes. Pathogenicity islands — mobile genetic elements that contribute to rapid changes in virulence potential — are known to have contributed to genome evolution by horizontal gene transfer in many bacterial pathogens. Increasing evidence indicates that equivalent elements in non-pathogenic species — genomic islands — are important in

  11. Perturbation of host ubiquitin systems by plant pathogen/pest effector proteins

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogens and pests of animals and plants secrete effector proteins into host cells, altering cellular physiology to the benefit of the invading parasite. Research in the past decade has delivered significant new insights into the molecular mechanisms of how these effector proteins function, with a particular focus on modulation of host immunity-related pathways. One host system that has emerged as a common target of effectors is the ubiquitination system in which substrate proteins are post-translationally modified by covalent conjugation with the small protein ubiquitin. This modification, typically via isopeptide bond formation through a lysine side chain of ubiquitin, can result in target degradation, relocalization, altered activity or affect protein–protein interactions. In this review, I focus primarily on how effector proteins from bacterial and filamentous pathogens of plants and pests perturb host ubiquitination pathways that ultimately include the 26S proteasome. The activities of these effectors, in how they affect ubiquitin pathways in plants, reveal how pathogens have evolved to identify and exploit weaknesses in this system that deliver increased pathogen fitness. PMID:25339602

  12. Inhibitors of Pathogen Intercellular Signals as Selective Anti-Infective Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lesic, Biliana; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric; Zhang, Jiangwen; Zhang, Qunhao; Padfield, Katie; Castonguay, Marie-Hélène; Milot, Sylvain; Stachel, Scott; Tzika, A. Aria; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G

    2007-01-01

    Long-term antibiotic use generates pan-resistant super pathogens. Anti-infective compounds that selectively disrupt virulence pathways without affecting cell viability may be used to efficiently combat infections caused by these pathogens. A candidate target pathway is quorum sensing (QS), which many bacterial pathogens use to coordinately regulate virulence determinants. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa MvfR-dependent QS regulatory pathway controls the expression of key virulence genes; and is activated via the extracellular signals 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ) and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (PQS), whose syntheses depend on anthranilic acid (AA), the primary precursor of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs). Here, we identified halogenated AA analogs that specifically inhibited HAQ biosynthesis and disrupted MvfR-dependent gene expression. These compounds restricted P. aeruginosa systemic dissemination and mortality in mice, without perturbing bacterial viability, and inhibited osmoprotection, a widespread bacterial function. These compounds provide a starting point for the design and development of selective anti-infectives that restrict human P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, and possibly other clinically significant pathogens. PMID:17941706

  13. Caspase-11 activation requires lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles by IFN-induced GTPases.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Dick, Mathias S; Dreier, Roland F; Schürmann, Nura; Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Warming, Søren; Roose-Girma, Merone; Bumann, Dirk; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Broz, Petr

    2014-05-15

    Lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria is sensed in the host cell cytoplasm by a non-canonical inflammasome pathway that ultimately results in caspase-11 activation and cell death. In mouse macrophages, activation of this pathway requires the production of type-I interferons, indicating that interferon-induced genes have a critical role in initiating this pathway. Here we report that a cluster of small interferon-inducible GTPases, the so-called guanylate-binding proteins, is required for the full activity of the non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome during infections with vacuolar Gram-negative bacteria. We show that guanylate-binding proteins are recruited to intracellular bacterial pathogens and are necessary to induce the lysis of the pathogen-containing vacuole. Lysis of the vacuole releases bacteria into the cytosol, thus allowing the detection of their lipopolysaccharide by a yet unknown lipopolysaccharide sensor. Moreover, recognition of the lysed vacuole by the danger sensor galectin-8 initiates the uptake of bacteria into autophagosomes, which results in a reduction of caspase-11 activation. These results indicate that host-mediated lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles is an essential immune function and is necessary for efficient recognition of pathogens by inflammasome complexes in the cytosol. PMID:24739961

  14. Animal Pathogen/Product Import Importing "Animal" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-print Network

    Animal Pathogen/Product Import Importing "Animal" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits) Complete the three-page "Facility Certification for the Importation of Animal Pathogens" located the appropriate checklist and complete it. Complete only one of either the "Inspection Checklist ­ Animal Pathogen

  15. Azole Drug Import into the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Brooke D; Smith, Adam R; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C

    2015-06-01

    The fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus causes serious illness and often death when it invades tissues, especially in immunocompromised individuals. The azole class of drugs is the most commonly prescribed treatment for many fungal infections and acts on the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. One common mechanism of acquired azole drug resistance in fungi is the prevention of drug accumulation to toxic levels in the cell. While drug efflux is a well-known resistance strategy, reduced azole import would be another strategy to maintain low intracellular azole levels. Recently, azole uptake in Candida albicans and other yeasts was analyzed using [(3)H]fluconazole. Defective drug import was suggested to be a potential mechanism of drug resistance in several pathogenic fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida krusei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have adapted and developed an assay to measure azole accumulation in A. fumigatus using radioactively labeled azole drugs, based on previous work done with C. albicans. We used this assay to study the differences in azole uptake in A. fumigatus isolates under a variety of drug treatment conditions, with different morphologies and with a select mutant strain with deficiencies in the sterol uptake and biosynthesis pathway. We conclude that azole drugs are specifically selected and imported into the fungal cell by a pH- and ATP-independent facilitated diffusion mechanism, not by passive diffusion. This method of drug transport is likely to be conserved across most fungal species. PMID:25824209

  16. Lagenidium giganteum Pathogenicity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Raquel; Taylor, John W.; Walker, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of mammals by species in the phylum Oomycota taxonomically and molecularly similar to known Lagenidium giganteum strains have increased. During 2013–2014, we conducted a phylogenetic study of 21 mammalian Lagenidium isolates; we found that 11 cannot be differentiated from L. giganteum strains that the US Environmental Protection Agency approved for biological control of mosquitoes; these strains were later unregistered and are no longer available. L. giganteum strains pathogenic to mammals formed a strongly supported clade with the biological control isolates, and both types experimentally infected mosquito larvae. However, the strains from mammals grew well at 25°C and 37°C, whereas the biological control strains developed normally at 25°C but poorly at higher temperatures. The emergence of heat-tolerant strains of L. giganteum pathogenic to lower animals and humans is of environmental and public health concern. PMID:25625190

  17. Superconductive articles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of oxides of Ce, Y, Cm, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Gd, Ho, In, La, Mn, Lu, Nd, Pr, Pu, Sm, Tb, Tl, Tm, Y, and Yb over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductive material layer as an overcoat upon the buffer layer whereby the ceramic superconductive material situated directly above the substrate has a crystal structure substantially different than the ceramic superconductive material situated above the overcoated patterned interlayer.

  18. The Chemical Arsenal of Burkholderia pseudomallei Is Essential for Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that small-molecule chemistry in microbes (i.e., secondary metabolism) can modulate the microbe–host response in infection and pathogenicity. The bacterial disease melioidosis is conferred by the highly virulent, antibiotic-resistant pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP). Whereas some macromolecular structures have been shown to influence BP virulence (e.g., secretion systems, cellular capsule, pili), the role of the large cryptic secondary metabolome encoded within its genome has been largely unexplored for its importance to virulence. Herein we demonstrate that BP-encoded small-molecule biosynthesis is indispensible for in vivo BP pathogenicity. Promoter exchange experiments were used to induce high-level molecule production from two gene clusters (MPN and SYR) found to be essential for in vivo virulence. NMR structural characterization of these metabolites identified a new class of lipopeptide biosurfactants/biofilm modulators (the malleipeptins) and syrbactin-type proteasome inhibitors, both of which represent overlooked small-molecule virulence factors for BP. Disruption of Burkholderia virulence by inhibiting the biosynthesis of these small-molecule biosynthetic pathways may prove to be an effective strategy for developing novel melioidosis-specific therapeutics. PMID:24884988

  19. Strategies for Wheat Stripe Rust Pathogenicity Identified by Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Diana P.; Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Dodds, Peter N.; Rathjen, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Stripe rust caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) is a major constraint to wheat production worldwide. The molecular events that underlie Pst pathogenicity are largely unknown. Like all rusts, Pst creates a specialized cellular structure within host cells called the haustorium to obtain nutrients from wheat, and to secrete pathogenicity factors called effector proteins. We purified Pst haustoria and used next-generation sequencing platforms to assemble the haustorial transcriptome as well as the transcriptome of germinated spores. 12,282 transcripts were assembled from 454-pyrosequencing data and used as reference for digital gene expression analysis to compare the germinated uredinospores and haustoria transcriptomes based on Illumina RNAseq data. More than 400 genes encoding secreted proteins which constitute candidate effectors were identified from the haustorial transcriptome, with two thirds of these up-regulated in this tissue compared to germinated spores. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression patterns of 94 effector candidates. The analysis also revealed that spores rely mainly on stored energy reserves for growth and development, while haustoria take up host nutrients for massive energy production for biosynthetic pathways and the ultimate production of spores. Together, these studies substantially increase our knowledge of potential Pst effectors and provide new insights into the pathogenic strategies of this important organism. PMID:23840606

  20. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabières, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-05-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In total, we received 263 votes from 62 scientists in 15 countries for a total of 33 species. The Top 10 species and their ranking are: (1) Phytophthora infestans; (2, tied) Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis; (2, tied) Phytophthora ramorum; (4) Phytophthora sojae; (5) Phytophthora capsici; (6) Plasmopara viticola; (7) Phytophthora cinnamomi; (8, tied) Phytophthora parasitica; (8, tied) Pythium ultimum; and (10) Albugo candida. This article provides an introduction to these 10 taxa and a snapshot of current research. We hope that the list will serve as a benchmark for future trends in oomycete research. PMID:25178392

  1. Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

  2. Internalization of fresh produce by foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies addressing the internalization of fresh produce by foodborne pathogens arose in response to the growing number of recent and high profile outbreaks involving fresh produce. Because chemical sanitizing agents used during harvest and minimal processing are unlikely to reach enteric pathogens residing within plant tissue, it is imperative that paths for pathogen entry be recognized and minimized. Using both microscopy and microbial enumeration tools, enteric pathogens have been shown to enter plant tissues through both natural apertures (stomata, lateral junctions of roots, flowers) and damaged (wounds, cut surfaces) tissue. In studies revealing preharvest internalization via plant roots or leaf stomata, experimental conditions have primarily involved exposure of plants to high pathogen concentrations (? 6 log g?¹ soil or 6 log ml?¹ water), but those pathogens internalized appear to have short-term persistence. Postharvest internalization of pathogens via cut surfaces may be minimized by maintaining effective levels of sanitizing agents in waters during harvesting and minimal processing. PMID:22243280

  3. Edinburgh Research Explorer A logic-based diagram of signalling pathways central to

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    purposes) BMC Systems Biology Open AccessResearch article A logic-based diagram of signalling pathwaysEdinburgh Research Explorer A logic-based diagram of signalling pathways central to macrophage & Freeman, T 2008, 'A logic-based diagram of signalling pathways central to macrophage activation' BMC

  4. UV signaling pathways within the skin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongxiang; Weng, Qing Yu; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of UVR on the skin include tanning, carcinogenesis, immunomodulation, and synthesis of vitamin D, among others. Melanocortin 1 receptor polymorphisms correlate with skin pigmentation, UV sensitivity, and skin cancer risk. This article reviews pathways through which UVR induces cutaneous stress and the pigmentation response. Modulators of the UV tanning pathway include sunscreen agents, MC1R activators, adenylate cyclase activators, phosphodiesterase 4D3 inhibitors, T oligos, and MITF regulators such as histone deacetylase (HDAC)-inhibitors. UVR, as one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens, represents both a challenge and enormous opportunity in skin cancer prevention. PMID:24759085

  5. UV signaling pathways within the skin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxiang; Weng, Qing Y; Fisher, David E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of UVR on the skin include tanning, carcinogenesis, immunomodulation, and synthesis of vitamin D, among others. Melanocortin 1 receptor polymorphisms correlate with skin pigmentation, UV sensitivity, and skin cancer risk. This article reviews pathways through which UVR induces cutaneous stress and the pigmentation response. Modulators of the UV-tanning pathway include sunscreen agents, melanocortin 1 receptor activators, adenylate cyclase activators, phosphodiesterase 4D3 inhibitors, T-oligos, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor regulators such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. UVR, as one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens, represents both a challenge and an enormous opportunity in skin cancer prevention. PMID:24759085

  6. PATHWAYS - ELECTRON TUNNELING PATHWAYS IN PROTEINS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, D. N.

    1994-01-01

    The key to understanding the mechanisms of many important biological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration is a better understanding of the electron transfer processes which take place between metal atoms (and other groups) fixed within large protein molecules. Research is currently focused on the rate of electron transfer and the factors that influence it, such as protein composition and the distance between metal atoms. Current models explain the swift transfer of electrons over considerable distances by postulating bridge-mediated tunneling, or physical tunneling pathways, made up of interacting bonds in the medium around and between donor and acceptor sites. The program PATHWAYS is designed to predict the route along which electrons travel in the transfer processes. The basic strategy of PATHWAYS is to begin by recording each possible path element on a connectivity list, including in each entry which two atoms are connected and what contribution the connection would make to the overall rate if it were included in a pathway. The list begins with the bonded molecular structure (including the backbone sequence and side chain connectivity), and then adds probable hydrogen bond links and through-space contacts. Once this list is completed, the program runs a tree search from the donor to the acceptor site to find the dominant pathways. The speed and efficiency of the computer search offers an improvement over manual techniques. PATHWAYS is written in FORTRAN 77 for execution on DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program inputs data from four data sets and one structure file. The software was written to input BIOGRAF (old format) structure files based on x-ray crystal structures and outputs ASCII files listing the best pathways and BIOGRAF vector files containing the paths. Relatively minor changes could be made in the input format statements for compatibility with other graphics software. The executable and source code are included with the distribution. The main memory requirement for execution is 2.6 Mb. This program is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard distribution) or on a TK50 tape cartridge. PATHWAYS was developed in 1988. PATHWAYS is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. DEC, VAX, VMS, and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. BIOGRAF is a trademark of Molecular Simulations, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA.

  7. DSB proteins and bacterial pathogenicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen R. Shouldice; Makrina Totsika; Martin J. Scanlon; Mark A. Schembri; Begoña Heras; Jennifer L. Martin

    2009-01-01

    If DNA is the information of life, then proteins are the machines of life — but they must be assembled and correctly folded to function. A key step in the protein-folding pathway is the introduction of disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in a process called oxidative protein folding. Many bacteria use an oxidative protein-folding machinery to assemble proteins that are

  8. The Aspergillus fumigatus cell wall integrity signaling pathway: drug target, compensatory pathways, and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, Vito; Macheleidt, Juliane; Föge, Martin; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen, causing severe infections with invasive growth in immunocompromised patients. The fungal cell wall (CW) prevents the cell from lysing and protects the fungus against environmental stress conditions. Because it is absent in humans and because of its essentiality, the fungal CW is a promising target for antifungal drugs. Nowadays, compounds acting on the CW, i.e., echinocandin derivatives, are used to treat A. fumigatus infections. However, studies demonstrating the clinical effectiveness of echinocandins in comparison with antifungals currently recommended for first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis are still lacking. Therefore, it is important to elucidate CW biosynthesis pathways and their signal transduction cascades, which potentially compensate the inhibition caused by CW- perturbing compounds. Like in other fungi, the central core of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway in A. fumigatus is composed of three mitogen activated protein kinases. Deletion of these genes resulted in severely enhanced sensitivity of the mutants against CW-disturbing compounds and in drastic alterations of the fungal morphology. Additionally, several cross-talk interactions between the CWI pathways and other signaling pathways are emerging, raising the question about their role in the CW compensatory mechanisms. In this review we focused on recent advances in understanding the CWI signaling pathway in A. fumigatus and its role during drug stress response and virulence. PMID:25932027

  9. Including pathogen risk in life cycle assessment of wastewater management. 2. Quantitative comparison of pathogen risk to other impacts on human health.

    PubMed

    Heimersson, Sara; Harder, Robin; Peters, Gregory M; Svanström, Magdalena

    2014-08-19

    Resource recovery from sewage sludge has the potential to save natural resources, but the potential risks connected to human exposure to heavy metals, organic micropollutants, and pathogenic microorganisms attract stakeholder concern. The purpose of the presented study was to include pathogen risks to human health in life cycle assessment (LCA) of wastewater and sludge management systems, as this is commonly omitted from LCAs due to methodological limitations. Part 1 of this article series estimated the overall pathogen risk for such a system with agricultural use of the sludge, in a way that enables the results to be integrated in LCA. This article (part 2) presents a full LCA for two model systems (with agricultural utilization or incineration of sludge) to reveal the relative importance of pathogen risk in relation to other potential impacts on human health. The study showed that, for both model systems, pathogen risk can constitute an important part (in this study up to 20%) of the total life cycle impacts on human health (expressed in disability adjusted life years) which include other important impacts such as human toxicity potential, global warming potential, and photochemical oxidant formation potential. PMID:25058416

  10. Raphanusanin-mediated resistance to pathogens is light dependent in radish and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Moehninsi; Miura, Kenji; Yamada, Kosumi; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    Raphanusanin (Ra) is a light-induced inhibitor of hypocotyl growth that responds to unilateral blue light illumination in radish seedlings. We have previously shown that Ra regulates genes that are involved in common defense mechanisms. Many genes that are induced by Ra are also positively regulated by early blue light. To extend the understanding of the role of Ra in pathogen defense, we evaluated the effects of Ra on radish and Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) infected with the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea) and biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (P. syringae). Radish and A. thaliana were found to be resistant to both pathogens when treated with Ra, depending on the concentration used. Interestingly, Ra-mediated resistance to P. syringae is dependent on light because Ra-treated seedlings exhibited enhanced susceptibility to P. syringae infection when grown in the dark. In addition to regulating the biotic defense response, Ra inhibited seed germination and root elongation and enhanced the growth of root hairs in the presence of light in radish and A. thaliana. Our data suggest that Ra regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in defense signaling pathways and plays a role in pathogen defense and plant development. Our results show that light may be generally required not only for the accumulation of Ra but also for its activation during the pathogen defense response. PMID:24923677

  11. The emerging role of photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism in pathogen defence.

    PubMed

    Sørhagen, K; Laxa, M; Peterhänsel, C; Reumann, S

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration represents one of the major highways of primary plant metabolism and is the most prominent example of metabolic cell organelle integration, since the pathway requires the concerted action of plastidial, peroxisomal, mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes and organellar transport proteins. Oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate by Rubisco leads to the formation of large amounts of 2-phosphoglycolate, which are recycled to 3-phosphoglycerate by the photorespiratory C2 cycle, concomitant with stoichiometric production rates of H2 O2 in peroxisomes. Apart from its significance for agricultural productivity, a secondary function of photorespiration in pathogen defence has emerged only recently. Here, we summarise literature data supporting the crosstalk between photorespiration and pathogen defence and perform a meta-expression analysis of photorespiratory genes during pathogen attack. Moreover, we screened Arabidopsis proteins newly predicted using machine learning methods to be targeted to peroxisomes, the central H2 O2 -producing organelle of photorespiration, for homologues of known pathogen defence proteins and analysed their expression during pathogen infection. The analyses further support the idea that photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism play multi-faceted roles in pathogen defence beyond metabolism of reactive oxygen species. PMID:23506300

  12. Th1/Th2 Paradigm Extended: Macrophage Polarization as an Unappreciated Pathogen-Driven Escape Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric; Leo, Oberdan; Moser, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    The classical view of the Th1/Th2 paradigm posits that the pathogen nature, infectious cycle, and persistence represent key parameters controlling the choice of effector mechanisms operating during an immune response. Thus, efficient Th1 responses are triggered by replicating intracellular pathogens, while Th2 responses would control helminth infection and promote tissue repair during the resolution phase of an infectious event. However, this vision does not account for a growing body of data describing how pathogens exploit the polarization of the host immune response to their own benefit. Recently, the study of macrophages has illustrated a novel aspect of this arm race between pathogens and the immune system, and the central role of macrophages in homeostasis, repair and defense of all tissues is now fully appreciated. Like T lymphocytes, macrophages differentiate into distinct effectors including classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages. Interestingly, in addition to represent immune effectors, M1/M2 cells have been shown to represent potential reservoir cells to a wide range of intracellular pathogens. Subversion of macrophage cell metabolism by microbes appears as a recently uncovered immune escape strategy. Upon infection, several microbial agents have been shown to activate host metabolic pathways leading to the production of nutrients necessary to their long-term persistence in host. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the strategies employed by pathogens to manipulate macrophage differentiation, and in particular their basic cell metabolism, to favor their own growth while avoiding immune control. PMID:25505468

  13. Pathogens hijack the epigenome: a new twist on host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Silmon de Monerri, Natalie C; Kim, Kami

    2014-04-01

    Pathogens have evolved strategies to promote their survival by dramatically modifying the transcriptional profile and protein content of the host cells they infect. Modifications of the host transcriptome and proteome are mediated by pathogen-encoded effector molecules that modulate host cells through a variety of different mechanisms. Recent studies highlight the importance of the host chromatin and other epigenetic regulators as targets of pathogens. Host gene regulatory mechanisms may be targeted through cytoplasmic signaling, directly by pathogen effector proteins, and possibly by pathogen RNA. Although many of these changes are short-lived and persist only during the course of infection, several studies indicate that pathogens are able to induce long-term, heritable changes that are essential to pathogenesis of infectious diseases and persistence of pathogens within their hosts. In this review, we discuss how pathogens modulate the epigenome of host cells, a new and flourishing avenue of host-pathogen interaction studies. PMID:24525150

  14. Insect antiviral innate immunity: pathways, effectors, and connections.

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Megan B; Huang, Zhijing; Hardy, Richard W

    2013-12-13

    Insects are infected by a wide array of viruses some of which are insect restricted and pathogenic, and some of which are transmitted by biting insects to vertebrates. The medical and economic importance of these viruses heightens the need to understand the interaction between the infecting pathogen and the insect immune system in order to develop transmission interventions. The interaction of the virus with the insect host innate immune system plays a critical role in the outcome of infection. The major mechanism of antiviral defense is the small, interfering RNA pathway that responds through the detection of virus-derived double-stranded RNA to suppress virus replication. However, other innate antimicrobial pathways such as Imd, Toll, and Jak-STAT and the autophagy pathway have also been shown to play important roles in antiviral immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the main insect antiviral pathways and examine recent findings that further our understanding of the roles of these pathways in facilitating a systemic and specific response to infecting viruses. PMID:24120681

  15. Insect antiviral innate immunity: pathways, effectors, and connections

    PubMed Central

    Kingsolver, Megan B.; Huang, Zhijing; Hardy, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Insects are infected by a wide array of viruses some of which are insect-restricted and pathogenic, and some of which are transmitted by biting insects to vertebrates. The medical and economic importance of these viruses heightens the need to understand the interaction between the infecting pathogen and the insect immune system in order to develop transmission interventions. The interaction of the virus with the insect host innate immune system plays a critical role in the outcome of infection. The major mechanism of antiviral defense is the siRNA pathway that responds through the detection of virus-derived dsRNA to suppress virus replication. However, other innate antimicrobial pathways such as Imd, Toll, Jak-STAT, and the autophagy pathway have also been shown to play important roles in antiviral immunity. In this review we provide an overview of the current understanding of the main insect antiviral pathways and examine recent findings that further our understanding of the roles of these pathways in facilitating a systemic and specific response to infecting viruses. PMID:24120681

  16. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Jorge; Bernardini, Alejandra; Garcia-Leon, Guillermo; Corona, Fernando; B. Sanchez, Maria; Martinez, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyze recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice. PMID:23641241

  17. Laminate article

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN); Paranthaman, Mariappan (Knoxville, TN); Chirayil, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Dominic F. (Knoxville, TN); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Feenstra, Roeland (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  18. Forest Ecosystem Responses to Exotic Pests and Pathogens in Eastern North America

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    GARY M. LOVETT, CHARLES D. CANHAM, MARY A. ARTHUR, KATHLEEN C. WEATHERS, and ROSS D. FITZHUGH (; )

    2006-05-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience investigates exotic pests and pathogens in eastern North America.The forests of eastern North America have been subjected to repeated introductions of exotic insect pests and pathogens over the last century, and several new pests are currently invading, or threatening to invade, the region. These pests and pathogens can have major short- and long-term impacts on forest ecosystem processes such as productivity, nutrient cycling, and support of consumer food webs. We identify six key features of the biology of exotic animal pests and the ecology of their hosts that are critical to predicting the general nature and severity of those impacts. Using three examples of introduced pests and pathogens in eastern forest ecosystems, we provide a conceptual framework for assessing potential ecosystem-scale effects.

  19. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  20. Proteomic dissection of plant responses to various pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Jianping; Dai, Liangying; Ma, Huasheng; Zhang, Hengmu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Fang; Yan, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    During their growth and development, plants are vulnerable to the effects of a variety of pathogens. Proteomics technology plays an important role in research studies of plant defense mechanisms by mining the expression changes of proteins in response to various biotic stresses. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in international proteomic research on plant biotic stress. It summarizes the methods commonly used in plant proteomic research to investigate biotic stress, analyze the protein responses of plants in adverse conditions, and reviews the applications of proteomics combined with transgenic technology in plant protection. PMID:25641875

  1. Multidirectional chemical signalling between Mammalian hosts, resident microbiota, and invasive pathogens: neuroendocrine hormone-induced changes in bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Karavolos, Michail H; Khan, C M Anjam

    2014-01-01

    Host-pathogen communication appears to be crucial in establishing the outcome of bacterial infections. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this communication can take place by bacterial pathogens sensing and subsequently responding to host neuroendocrine (NE) stress hormones. Bacterial pathogens have developed mechanisms allowing them to eavesdrop on these communication pathways within their hosts. These pathogens can use intercepted communication signals to adjust their fitness to persist and cause disease in their hosts. Recently, there have been numerous studies highlighting the ability of NE hormones to act as an environmental cue for pathogens, helping to steer their responses during host infection. Host NE hormone sensing can take place indirectly or directly via bacterial adrenergic receptors (BARs). The resulting changes in bacterial gene expression can be of strategic benefit to the pathogen. Furthermore, it is intriguing that not only can bacteria sense NE stress hormones but they are also able to produce key signalling molecules known as autoinducers. The rapid advances in our knowledge of the human microbiome, and its impact on health and disease highlights the potential importance of communication between the microbiota, pathogens and the host. It is indeed likely that the microbiota input significantly in the neuroendocrinological homeostasis of the host by catabolic, anabolic, and signalling processes. The arrival of unwanted guests, such as bacterial pathogens, clearly has a major impact on these delicately balanced interactions. Unravelling the pathways involved in interkingdom communication between invading bacterial pathogens, the resident microbiota, and hosts, may provide novel targets in our continuous search for new antimicrobials to control disease. PMID:24997037

  2. Signalling pathway in appressorium formation in Magnaporthe grisea 

    E-print Network

    Filippi, Marta Cristina

    2004-11-15

    1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Rice, Oryza sativa, is a principal food1 source for developing countries. It is the source of 20% of the calories and 13% of the protein consumed in the world (Soares et al. 1990). More than four-fifths of the world... and Cryptococcus neoformans, and in the plant pathogens Ustilago maydis, M. grisea and Cryphonectria parasitica, and in the model filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa (Lengeler et al. 2000). In every case, these pathways play important...

  3. [A rare gastroenteritis pathogen: Cyclospora].

    PubMed

    Ta?bakan, Meltem; Yolasi?maz, Ay?egül; Pullukçu, Hüsnü; S?pah?, O?uz Re?at; Yamazhan, Tansu; Turgay, Nevin; Ulusoy, Sercan

    2010-01-01

    Cyclospora spp. which are coccidian parasites are rare gastroenteritis pathogens. The first cyclosporiasis case in Turkey was reported in 1998 in a patient with AIDS. In this paper we report a case of Cyclospora gastroenteritis, in a patient who was admitted to our hospital and who had had diarrhea, abdominal pain and nausea for ten days. In the anamnesis it was learned that he had travelled to the Black Sea region and had drunk muddy and cloudy water. His physical examination was normal except for increased bowel sounds. There were no leukocytes or erythrocytes in the direct microscopy of the stool and bacteriologic culture did not yield any enteropathogen. Cylospora oocyysts were seen in the parasitologic exmination. The patient was treated with cotrimaxasole (2x1,160/800 mg tablet). There was no pathogen in the repeated stool examination. Our case suggests that parasitologic examination should not be neglected in longlasting diarrhea cases and occasionally Cyclospora may be the causative agent. PMID:20597053

  4. Enteric pathogens through life stages

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Glynis; Wu, Martin; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Enteric infections and diarrheal diseases constitute pervasive health burdens throughout the world, with rates being highest at the two ends of life. During the first 2–3 years of life, much of the disease burden may be attributed to infection with enteric pathogens including Salmonella, rotavirus, and many other bacterial, viral, and protozoan organisms; however, infections due to Clostridium difficile exhibit steady increases with age. Still others, like Campylobacter infections in industrialized settings are high in early life (<2 years old) and increase again in early adulthood (called the “second weaning” by some). The reasons for these differences undoubtedly reside in part in pathogen differences; however, host factors including the commensal intestinal microbial communities, immune responses (innate and acquired), and age-dependant shifts likely play important roles. Interplay of these factors is illustrated by studies examining changes in human gut microbiota with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Recent gut microbial surveys have indicated dramatic shifts in gut microbial population structure from infants to young adults to the elders. An understanding of the evolution of these factors and their interactions (e.g., how does gut microbiota modulate the “inflamm-aging” process or vice versa) through the human life “cycle” will be important in better addressing and controlling these enteric infections and their consequences for both quality and quantity of life (often assessed as disability adjusted life-years or “DALYs”). PMID:22937528

  5. Targeting the PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Burhan; Akcakanat, Argun; Holder, Ashley M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis This article presents an overview of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. As a central regulator of cell growth, protein translation, survival, and metabolism, activation of this signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of many tumor types. Biochemical and genetic aberrations of this pathway observed in various cancer types will be explored. Lastly, pathway inhibitors both in development and already FDA-approved will be discussed. PMID:24012393

  6. Plants versus pathogens: an evolutionary arms race

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Gleason, Cynthia A.; Foley, Rhonda C.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy B.; Singh, Karam B.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of plant–pathogen interactions is a rapidly moving research field and one that is very important for productive agricultural systems. The focus of this review is on the evolution of plant defence responses and the coevolution of their pathogens, primarily from a molecular-genetic perspective. It explores the evolution of the major types of plant defence responses including pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector triggered immunity as well as the forces driving pathogen evolution, such as the mechanisms by which pathogen lineages and species evolve. Advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling, stomatal regulation, R gene–effector interactions and host specific toxins are used to highlight recent insights into the coevolutionary arms race between pathogens and plants. Finally, the review considers the intriguing question of how plants have evolved the ability to distinguish friends such as rhizobia and mycorrhiza from their many foes. PMID:21743794

  7. Hard Tick Factors Implicated in Pathogen Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang Ye; Bonnet, Sarah I.

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are the most common arthropod vector, after mosquitoes, and are capable of transmitting the greatest variety of pathogens. For both humans and animals, the worldwide emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne disease is becoming increasingly problematic. Despite being such an important issue, our knowledge of pathogen transmission by ticks is incomplete. Several recent studies, reviewed here, have reported that the expression of some tick factors can be modulated in response to pathogen infection, and that some of these factors can impact on the pathogenic life cycle. Delineating the specific tick factors required for tick-borne pathogen transmission should lead to new strategies in the disruption of pathogen life cycles to combat emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:24498444

  8. Building clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Leininger, S M

    1998-01-01

    TQM principles change the work environment so that point-of-service personnel can improve health care delivery to patients. The clinical pathway process starts with the principles of TQM. In the era of managed care, health care resources can be managed effectively using a clinical pathway. The multidisciplinary team has the opportunity to improve the health care services provided to patients. PMID:9847822

  9. Unconventionally secreted effectors of two filamentous pathogens target plant salicylate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingli; Song, Tianqiao; Zhang, Xiong; Yuan, Hongbo; Su, Liming; Li, Wanlin; Xu, Jing; Liu, Shiheng; Chen, Linlin; Chen, Tianzi; Zhang, Meixiang; Gu, Lichuan; Zhang, Baolong; Dou, Daolong

    2014-01-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes pose an increasing threat to food security and ecosystem health worldwide. These filamentous pathogens, while taxonomically distinct, modulate host defense responses by secreting effectors, which are typically identified based on the presence of signal peptides. Here we show that Phytophthora sojae and Verticillium dahliae secrete isochorismatases (PsIsc1 and VdIsc1, respectively) that are required for full pathogenesis. PsIsc1 and VdIsc1 can suppress salicylate-mediated innate immunity in planta and hydrolyse isochorismate in vitro. A conserved triad of catalytic residues is essential for both functions. Thus, the two proteins are isochorismatase effectors that disrupt the plant salicylate metabolism pathway by suppressing its precursor. Furthermore, these proteins lack signal peptides, but exhibit characteristics that lead to unconventional secretion. Therefore, this secretion pathway is a novel mechanism for delivering effectors and might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25156390

  10. Unconventionally secreted effectors of two filamentous pathogens target plant salicylate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingli; Song, Tianqiao; Zhang, Xiong; Yuan, Hongbo; Su, Liming; Li, Wanlin; Xu, Jing; Liu, Shiheng; Chen, Linlin; Chen, Tianzi; Zhang, Meixiang; Gu, Lichuan; Zhang, Baolong; Dou, Daolong

    2014-01-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes pose an increasing threat to food security and ecosystem health worldwide. These filamentous pathogens, while taxonomically distinct, modulate host defense responses by secreting effectors, which are typically identified based on the presence of signal peptides. Here we show that Phytophthora sojae and Verticillium dahliae secrete isochorismatases (PsIsc1 and VdIsc1, respectively) that are required for full pathogenesis. PsIsc1 and VdIsc1 can suppress salicylate-mediated innate immunity in planta and hydrolyse isochorismate in vitro. A conserved triad of catalytic residues is essential for both functions. Thus, the two proteins are isochorismatase effectors that disrupt the plant salicylate metabolism pathway by suppressing its precursor. Furthermore, these proteins lack signal peptides, but exhibit characteristics that lead to unconventional secretion. Therefore, this secretion pathway is a novel mechanism for delivering effectors and might play an important role in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25156390

  11. The Arabidopsis PEPR pathway couples local and systemic plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Annegret; Yamada, Kohji; Hiruma, Kei; Yamashita-Yamada, Misuzu; Lu, Xunli; Takano, Yoshitaka; Tsuda, Kenichi; Saijo, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of microbial challenges leads to enhanced immunity at both the local and systemic levels. In Arabidopsis, EFR and PEPR1/PEPR2 act as the receptor for the bacterial elongation factor EF-Tu (elf18 epitope) and for the endogenous PROPEP-derived Pep epitopes, respectively. The PEPR pathway has been described to mediate defence signalling following microbial recognition. Here we show that PROPEP2/PROPEP3 induction upon pathogen challenges is robust against jasmonate, salicylate, or ethylene dysfunction. Comparative transcriptome profiling between Pep2-and elf18-treated plants points to co-activation of otherwise antagonistic jasmonate-and salicylate-mediated immune branches as a key output of PEPR signalling. Accordingly, as well as basal defences against hemibiotrophic pathogens, systemic immunity is reduced in pepr1 pepr2 plants. Remarkably, PROPEP2/PROPEP3 induction is essentially restricted to the pathogen challenge sites during pathogen-induced systemic immunity. Localized Pep application activates genetically separable jasmonate and salicylate branches in systemic leaves without significant PROPEP2/PROPEP3 induction. Our results suggest that local PEPR activation provides a critical step in connecting local to systemic immunity by reinforcing separate defence signalling pathways. PMID:24357608

  12. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  13. Pathogen profiling for disease management and surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan R. Iredell; Gwendolyn L. Gilbert; Vitali Sintchenko

    2007-01-01

    The usefulness of rapid pathogen genotyping is widely recognized, but its effective interpretation and application requires integration into clinical and public health decision-making. How can pathogen genotyping data best be translated to inform disease management and surveillance? Pathogen profiling integrates microbial genomics data into communicable disease control by consolidating phenotypic identity-based methods with DNA microarrays, proteomics, metabolomics and sequence-based typing.

  14. Plant–pathogen interactions: will the understanding of common mechanisms lead to the unification of concepts?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Reignault; Michel Sancholle

    2005-01-01

    Plant–pathogen interactions are still classically described using concepts that make a distinction between qualitative and quantitative aspects linked to these concepts. This article first describes these aspects, using the terminology associated with them. It then presents some recent experimental observations that demonstrate that such concepts share either common or closely related mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels. The emergence

  15. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  16. Arp2/3-mediated actin-based motility: a tail of pathogen abuse

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.; Way, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed elaborate mechanisms to exploit the different cellular systems of their unwilling hosts to facilitate their entry, replication and survival. In particular, a diverse range of bacteria and viruses have evolved unique strategies to harness the power of Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization to enhance their cell-to-cell spread. In this review, we discuss how studying these pathogens has revolutionized our molecular understanding of Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly, and revealed key signalling pathways regulating actin assembly in cells. Further studies with known and newly emerging pathogens will undoubtedly continue to enhance our understanding of the role of the actin cytoskeleton during pathogenesis. Moreover, looking back over the last 20 years, it would be surprising if future analyses of microbe-host interactions did not continue to uncover new mechanisms regulating actin assembly and dynamics, as well as unexpected cellular functions for actin. PMID:24034611

  17. Memory CD4+ T cells induce innate responses independent of pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Tara M.; McKinstry, K. Kai; Dibble, John P.; Winchell, Caylin; Kuang, Yi; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Huston, Gail; Dutton, Richard W.; Swain, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation induced by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns dramatically impacts subsequent adaptive responses. We asked if the adaptive immune system can also affect the character and magnitude of innate inflammatory responses. We find that the response of memory, but not naïve, CD4+ T cells enhances production of multiple innate inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IIC) in the lung, and that during influenza infection, this leads to early control of virus. Memory CD4+ T cell induced IIC and viral control require cognate antigen recognition and are optimal when memory cells are either T helper type 1 (TH1)- or TH17-polarized, but are independent of interferon-? (IFN-?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) production and do not require activation of conserved pathogen recognition pathways. This represents a novel mechanism by which memory CD4+ T cells induce an early innate response that enhances immune protection against pathogens. PMID:20436484

  18. An Extracellular Bacterial Pathogen Modulates Host Metabolism to Regulate its Own Sensing and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Moshe; Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Hertzog, Baruch B.; Ravins, Miriam; Dov, Eran; McIver, Kevin S.; Le Breton, Yoann S.; Zhou, Yiting; Youting, Catherine Cheng; Hanski, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Successful infection depends on the ability of the pathogen to gain nutrients from the host. The extracellular pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a vast array of human diseases. By using the quorum sensing sil system as a reporter, we found that during adherence to host cells GAS delivers streptolysin toxins creating endoplasmic reticulum stress. This in turn, increases asparagine (ASN) synthetase expression and the production of ASN. The released ASN is sensed by the bacteria altering the expression of ~17% of GAS genes of which about 1/3 are dependent on the two-component system TrxSR. The expression of the streptolysin toxins is strongly upregulated whereas genes linked to proliferation are downregulated in ASN absence. Asparaginase a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, arrests GAS growth in human blood and blocks GAS proliferation in a mouse model of human bacteremia. These results delineate a pathogenic pathway and propose a new therapeutic strategy against GAS infections. PMID:24439371

  19. Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction and Virulence in Human Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways regulating growth and stress responses are areas of significant study in the effort to delineate pathogenic mechanisms of fungi. In-depth knowledge of signal transduction events deepens our understanding of how a fungal pathogen is able to sense changes in the environment and respond accordingly by modulation of gene expression and re-organization of cellular activities to optimize fitness. Members of the Ras protein family are important regulators of growth and differentiation in eukaryotic organisms, and have been the focus of numerous studies exploring fungal pathogenesis. Here, the current data regarding Ras signal transduction are reviewed for three major pathogenic fungi: Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Particular emphasis is placed on Ras-protein interactions during control of morphogenesis, stress response and virulence. PMID:24855584

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans pathways that surveil and defend mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Samuel, Buck S; Breen, Peter C; Ruvkun, Gary

    2014-04-17

    Mitochondrial function is challenged by toxic by-products of metabolism as well as by pathogen attack. Caenorhabditis elegans normally responds to mitochondrial dysfunction with activation of mitochondrial-repair, drug-detoxification and pathogen-response pathways. Here, from a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified 45 C. elegans genes that are required to upregulate detoxification, pathogen-response and mitochondrial-repair pathways after inhibition of mitochondrial function by drug-induced or genetic disruption. Animals defective in ceramide biosynthesis are deficient in mitochondrial surveillance, and addition of particular ceramides can rescue the surveillance defects. Ceramide can also rescue the mitochondrial surveillance defects of other gene inactivations, mapping these gene activities upstream of ceramide. Inhibition of the mevalonate pathway, either by RNAi or statin drugs, also disrupts mitochondrial surveillance. Growth of C. elegans with a significant fraction of bacterial species from their natural habitat causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Other bacterial species inhibit C. elegans defence responses to a mitochondrial toxin, revealing bacterial countermeasures to animal defence. PMID:24695221

  1. Transcriptional activator TSRF1 reversely regulates pathogen resistance and osmotic stress tolerance in tobacco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongbo Zhang; Wenzheng Li; Jia Chen; Yuhong Yang; Zhijin Zhang; Haiwen Zhang; Xue-Chen Wang; Rongfeng Huang

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) proteins regulate plant stress response and the interaction of different stress responsive pathways through interacting with different cis-acting elements, even other transcription factors. Here, we report a transcriptional activator TSRF1, which was previously demonstrated to regulate plant resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, reversely regulates pathogen resistance and osmotic stress tolerance in tobacco. Sequence analysis

  2. Population dynamics of a pathogen: the conundrum of vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Philip G

    2010-08-01

    Building a mathematical model of population dynamics of pathogens within their host involves considerations of factors similar to those in ecology, as pathogens can prey on cells in the host. But within the multicellular host, attacked cell types are integrated with other cellular systems, which in turn intervene in the infection. For example, immune responses attempt to sense and then eliminate or contain pathogens, and homeostatic mechanisms try to compensate for cell loss. This review focuses on modeling applied to malarias, diseases caused by single-cell eukaryote parasites that infect red blood cells, with special concern given to vivax malaria, a disease often thought to be benign (if sometimes incapacitating) because the parasite only attacks a small proportion of red blood cells, the very youngest ones. However, I will use mathematical modeling to argue that depletion of this pool of red blood cells can be disastrous to the host if growth of the parasite is not vigorously check by host immune responses. Also, modeling can elucidate aspects of new field observations that indicate that vivax malaria is more dangerous than previously thought. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12551-010-0034-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20730124

  3. Pathogen–Host Interactions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Christman, John W.; Prince, Alice S.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen causing a wide range of acute and chronic infections. P. aeruginosa rarely causes infection in the normal host, but is an efficient opportunistic pathogen causing serious infections in patients who are mechanically ventilated, individuals who are immunocompromised, and patients with malignancies or HIV infection. Among these risk groups, the most vulnerable hosts are neutropenic and patients who are mechanically ventilated. In addition, P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent chronic infection contributing to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Because of the ubiquitous nature of P. aeruginosa and its ability to develop resistance to antibiotics, it continues to be problematic from a treatment perspective. The pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa is largely caused by multiple bacterial virulence factors and genetic flexibility enabling it to survive in varied environments. Lung injury associated with P. aeruginosa infection results from both the direct destructive effects of the organism on the lung parenchyma and exuberant host immune responses. This article focuses on the major bacterial virulence factors and important aspects of the host immunity that are involved in the pathogenesis of serious P. aeruginosa infection. In addition to antibiotic therapy, strategies directed toward enhancing host defense and/or limiting excessive inflammation could be important to improve outcome in P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:15695491

  4. Antimicrobial Impacts of Essential Oils on Food Borne-Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ozogul, Yesim; Kuley, Esmeray; Ucar, Yilmaz; Ozogul, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve essential oil (pine oil, eucalyptus, thyme, sage tea, lavender, orange, laurel, lemon, myrtle, lemon, rosemary and juniper) was tested by a disc diffusion method against food borne pathogens (Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi A, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas hydrophila, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus). The major components in essential oils were monoterpenes hydrocarbons, ?-pinene, limonene; monoterpene phenol, carvacrol and oxygenated monoterpenes, camphor, 1,8-cineole, eucalyptol, linalool and linalyl acetate. Although the antimicrobial effect of essential oils varied depending on the chemical composition of the essential oils and specific microorganism tested, majority of the oils exhibited antibacterial activity against one or more strains. The essential oil with the lowest inhibition zones was juniper with the values varied from 1.5 to 6 mm. However, the components of essential oil of thyme and pine oil are highly active against food borne pathogen, generating the largest inhibition zones for both gram negative and positive bacteria (5.25-28.25 mm vs. 12.5-30 mm inhibition zones). These results indicate the possible use of the essential oils on food system as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogen. The article also offers some promising patents on applications of essential oils on food industry as antimicrobial agent. PMID:26072990

  5. Molecular Pathways: Targeted ?-Particle Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    An ?-particle, a 4He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic, and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of ? radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition (high linear energy transfer, LET) and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells (targeted ?-therapy (TAT)) with minimal normal tissue effects. There is a burgeoning interest in the development of TAT that is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders ?-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high-LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double strand (ds) DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly impact cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using ?-emitters such as 225Ac, 211At, 213Bi, 212Pb and 223Ra. PMID:23230321

  6. Activation of the Jasmonic Acid Plant Defence Pathway Alters the Composition of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhais, Lilia C.; Dennis, Paul G.; Badri, Dayakar V.; Tyson, Gene W.; Vivanco, Jorge M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling plays a central role in plant defences against necrotrophic pathogens and herbivorous insects, which afflict both roots and shoots. This pathway is also activated following the interaction with beneficial microbes that may lead to induced systemic resistance. Activation of the JA signalling pathway via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) alters the composition of carbon containing compounds released by roots, which are implicated as key determinants of rhizosphere microbial community structure. In this study, we investigated the influence of the JA defence signalling pathway activation in Arabidopsis thaliana on the structure of associated rhizosphere bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Application of MeJA did not directly influence bulk soil microbial communities but significant changes in rhizosphere community composition were observed upon activation of the jasmonate signalling pathway. Our results suggest that JA signalling may mediate plant-bacteria interactions in the soil upon necrotrophic pathogen and herbivorous insect attacks. PMID:23424661

  7. Mining host-pathogen protein interactions to characterize Burkholderia mallei infectivity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Memiševi?, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Rajagopala, Seesandra V; Kwon, Keehwan; Pieper, Rembert; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence factors and their interactions with human proteins to map out how the bacteria can influence and alter host processes and pathways. Specifically, we employed topological analyses to assess the connectivity patterns of targeted host proteins, identify modules of pathogen-interacting host proteins linked to processes promoting infectivity, and evaluate the effect of crosstalk among the identified host protein modules. Overall, our analysis showed that the targeted host proteins generally had a large number of interacting partners and interacted with other host proteins that were also targeted by B. mallei proteins. We also introduced a novel Host-Pathogen Interaction Alignment (HPIA) algorithm and used it to explore similarities between host-pathogen interactions of B. mallei, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We inferred putative roles of B. mallei proteins based on the roles of their aligned Y. pestis and S. enterica partners and showed that up to 73% of the predicted roles matched existing annotations. A key insight into Burkholderia pathogenicity derived from these analyses of Y2H host-pathogen interactions is the identification of eukaryotic-specific targeted cellular mechanisms, including the ubiquitination degradation system and the use of the focal adhesion pathway as a fulcrum for transmitting mechanical forces and regulatory signals. This provides the mechanisms to modulate and adapt the host-cell environment for the successful establishment of host infections and intracellular spread. PMID:25738731

  8. Signal signature and transcriptome changes of Arabidopsis during pathogen and insect attack.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Martin; Van Oosten, Vivian R; Van Poecke, Remco M P; Van Pelt, Johan A; Pozo, Maria J; Mueller, Martin J; Buchala, Antony J; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Van Loon, L C; Dicke, Marcel; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2005-09-01

    Plant defenses against pathogens and insects are regulated differentially by cross-communicating signaling pathways in which salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET) play key roles. To understand how plants integrate pathogen- and insect-induced signals into specific defense responses, we monitored the dynamics of SA, JA, and ET signaling in Arabidopsis after attack by a set of microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects with different modes of attack. Arabidopsis plants were exposed to a pathogenic leaf bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato), a pathogenic leaf fungus (Alternaria brassicicola), tissue-chewing caterpillars (Pieris rapae), cell-content-feeding thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis), or phloem-feeding aphids (Myzus persicae). Monitoring the signal signature in each plant-attacker combination showed that the kinetics of SA, JA, and ET production varies greatly in both quantity and timing. Analysis of global gene expression profiles demonstrated that the signal signature characteristic of each Arabidopsis-attacker combination is orchestrated into a surprisingly complex set of transcriptional alterations in which, in all cases, stress-related genes are overrepresented. Comparison of the transcript profiles revealed that consistent changes induced by pathogens and insects with very different modes of attack can show considerable overlap. Of all consistent changes induced by A. brassicicola, Pieris rapae, and E occidentalis, more than 50% also were induced consistently by P. syringae. Notably, although these four attackers all stimulated JA biosynthesis, the majority of the changes in JA-responsive gene expression were attacker specific. All together, our study shows that SA, JA, and ET play a primary role in the orchestration of the plant's defense response, but other regulatory mechanisms, such as pathway cross-talk or additional attacker-induced signals, eventually shape the highly complex attacker-specific defense response. PMID:16167763

  9. A Nod to disease vectors: mitigation of pathogen sensing by arthropod saliva

    PubMed Central

    Sakhon, Olivia S.; Severo, Maiara S.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Pedra, Joao H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Arthropod saliva possesses anti-hemostatic, anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory properties that facilitate feeding and, inadvertently, dissemination of pathogens. Vector-borne diseases caused by these pathogens affect millions of people each year. Many studies address the impact of arthropod salivary proteins on various immunological components. However, whether and how arthropod saliva counters Nod-like (NLR) sensing remains elusive. NLRs are innate immune pattern recognition molecules involved in detecting microbial molecules and danger signals. Nod1/2 signaling results in activation of the nuclear factor-?B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Caspase-1 NLRs regulate the inflammasome~– a protein scaffold that governs the maturation of interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-18. Recently, several vector-borne pathogens have been shown to induce NLR activation in immune cells. Here, we provide a brief overview of NLR signaling and discuss clinically relevant vector-borne pathogens recognized by NLR pathways. We also elaborate on possible anti-inflammatory effects of arthropod saliva on NLR signaling and microbial pathogenesis for the purpose of exchanging research perspectives. PMID:24155744

  10. Identification of Development and Pathogenicity Related Gene in Botrytis cinerea via Digital Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Si, He Long; Sun, Zhi Ying; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Zhan; Zhang, Jin lin; Xing, Ji Hong; Dong, Jin Gao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Botrytis cinerea, a haploid Euascomycete fungus that infects numerous crops, has been used as a model system for studying molecular phytopathology. Botrytis cinerea adopts various modes of infection, which are mediated by a number of pathogenicity and virulence-related genes. Many of these genes have not been reported previously. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate development and pathogenicity-related genes between a novel nonpathogenic mutant and the Wild Type (WT) in B. cinerea. Materials and Methods: Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling can reveal novel genes that may be involved in development and pathogenicity of plant pathogen. A large volume of B. cinerea tag-seq was generated to identify differential expressed genes by the Illumina DGE tag pro?ling technology. Results: A total of 4,182,944 and 4,182,021 clean tags were obtained from the WT and a nonpathogenic mutant stain (BCt89), respectively, and 10,410 differentially expressed genes were identified. In addition, 84 genes were expressed in the WT only while 34 genes were expressed in the mutant only. A total of 664 differentially expressed genes were involved in 91 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathways, including signaling and metabolic pathways. Conclusions: Expression levels of 1,426 genes were significantly up-regulated in the mutant compared to WT. Furthermore, 301 genes were down-regulated with False Discovery Rates (FDR) of < 0.001 and absolute value of log2 Ratio of ? 1. PMID:26034553

  11. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Tzin, Vered; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area. PMID:24575102

  12. c-KIT signaling is targeted by pathogenic Yersinia to suppress the host immune response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenic Yersinia species exhibit a primarily extracellular lifestyle through manipulation of host signaling pathways that regulate pro-inflammatory gene expression and cytokine release. To identify host genes that are targeted by Yersinia during the infection process, we performed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen based on recovery of host NF-?B-mediated gene activation in response to TNF-? stimulation upon Y. enterocolitica infection. Results We screened shRNAs against 782 genes in the human kinome and 26 heat shock genes, and identified 19 genes that exhibited ?40% relative increase in NF-?B reporter gene activity. The identified genes function in multiple cellular processes including MAP and ERK signaling pathways, ion channel activity, and regulation of cell growth. Pre-treatment with small molecule inhibitors specific for the screen hits c-KIT and CKII recovered NF-?B gene activation and/or pro-inflammatory TNF-? cytokine release in multiple cell types, in response to either Y. enterocolitica or Y. pestis infection. Conclusions We demonstrate that pathogenic Yersinia exploits c-KIT signaling in a T3SS-dependent manner to downregulate expression of transcription factors EGR1 and RelA/p65, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. This study is the first major functional genomics RNAi screen to elucidate virulence mechanisms of a pathogen that is primarily dependent on extracellular-directed immunomodulation of host signaling pathways for suppression of host immunity. PMID:24206648

  13. Secretory Pathway of Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Mullin, Kylie A.; Ilgoutz, Steven C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae comprise a large group of parasitic protozoa, some of which cause important diseases in humans. These include Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness and nagana in cattle), Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas' disease in Central and South America), and Leishmania spp. (the causative agent of visceral and [muco]cutaneous leishmaniasis throughout the tropics and subtropics). The cell surfaces of these parasites are covered in complex protein- or carbohydrate-rich coats that are required for parasite survival and infectivity in their respective insect vectors and mammalian hosts. These molecules are assembled in the secretory pathway. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of these parasites as well as progress with the parasite genome projects has greatly advanced our understanding of processes that underlie secretory transport in trypanosomatids. This article provides an overview of the organization of the trypanosomatid secretory pathway and connections that exist with endocytic organelles and multiple lytic and storage vacuoles. A number of the molecular components that are required for vesicular transport have been identified, as have some of the sorting signals that direct proteins to the cell surface or organelles in the endosome-vacuole system. Finally, the subcellular organization of the major glycosylation pathways in these parasites is reviewed. Studies on these highly divergent eukaryotes provide important insights into the molecular processes underlying secretory transport that arose very early in eukaryotic evolution. They also reveal unusual or novel aspects of secretory transport and protein glycosylation that may be exploited in developing new antiparasite drugs. PMID:11875130

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Meta-analysis of Chicken Salmonella infection

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Meta-analysis of Chicken ­ Salmonella infection experiments Marinus FW zoonotic pathogens, especially Salmonella species. These food items contain a potential hazard for humans. Chickens lines differ in susceptibility for Salmonella and can harbor Salmonella pathogens without showing

  15. Application of complementation tests in identifying pathogenicity determinants of the chickpea pathogen Ascochyta rabiei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrotrophic pathogen Ascochyta rabiei causes chickpea Ascochyta blight. Very little is known about its pathogenicity mechanisms. The objective of this research was to identify pathogenicity determinants of A. rabiei using complementation tests. The hygromycin-resistant mutant ArW519 was non-pa...

  16. Plant-pathogen interactions and elevated CO2: morphological changes in favour of pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice Ann Lake; Ruth Nicola Wade

    2009-01-01

    Crop losses caused by pests and weeds have been estimated at 42% worldwide, with plant pathogens responsible for almost $10 billion worth of damage in the USA in 1994 alone. Elevated carbon dioxide (ECO2) and associated climate change have the potential to accelerate plant pathogen evolution, which may, in turn, affect virulence. Plant- pathogen interactions under increasing CO2 concentrations have

  17. Rewiring of the jasmonate signaling pathway in Arabidopsis during insect herbivory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Verhage; I. Vlaardingerbroek; C. Raaijmakers; N. M. van Dam; M. Dicke; S. C. M. van Wees; C. M. J. Pieterse

    2011-01-01

    Plant defenses against insect herbivores and necrotrophic pathogens are differentially regulated by different branches of the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway. In Arabidopsis, the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor MYC2 and the APETALA2\\/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2\\/ERF) domain transcription factor ORA59 antagonistically control these distinct branches of the JA pathway. Feeding by larvae of the specialist insect herbivore Pieris rapae

  18. Intestinal barrier: Molecular pathways and modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is frequently challenged by pathogens/antigens contained in food and water and the intestinal epithelium must be capable of rapid regeneration in the event of tissue damage. Disruption of the intestinal barrier leads to a number of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, and celiac disease. The intestinal mucosa is composed of different types of epithelial cells in specific barrier functions. Epithelial cells control surface-associated bacterial populations without disrupting the intestinal microflora that is crucial for host health. They are also capable of modulating mucosal immune system, and are thus essential in maintaining homeostasis in the gut. Thus, the regulation of intestinal epithelial homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of the structure of the mucosa and the defensive barrier functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell polarity. These include the Wnt, Notch, Hippo, transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog pathways, most of which were identified in lower organisms where they play important roles during embryogenesis. These pathways are also used in adult organisms to regulate multiple self-renewing organs. Understanding the interactions between these molecular mechanisms and intestinal barrier function will therefore provide important insight into the pathogenesis of intestinal-based immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24244877

  19. Intestinal barrier: Molecular pathways and modifiers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-15

    The gastrointestinal tract is frequently challenged by pathogens/antigens contained in food and water and the intestinal epithelium must be capable of rapid regeneration in the event of tissue damage. Disruption of the intestinal barrier leads to a number of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, and celiac disease. The intestinal mucosa is composed of different types of epithelial cells in specific barrier functions. Epithelial cells control surface-associated bacterial populations without disrupting the intestinal microflora that is crucial for host health. They are also capable of modulating mucosal immune system, and are thus essential in maintaining homeostasis in the gut. Thus, the regulation of intestinal epithelial homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of the structure of the mucosa and the defensive barrier functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell polarity. These include the Wnt, Notch, Hippo, transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog pathways, most of which were identified in lower organisms where they play important roles during embryogenesis. These pathways are also used in adult organisms to regulate multiple self-renewing organs. Understanding the interactions between these molecular mechanisms and intestinal barrier function will therefore provide important insight into the pathogenesis of intestinal-based immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24244877

  20. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison P.; Bennett, George N.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    This paper presents a graph-based algorithm for identifying complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. These complex pathways are called branched pathways because they can arrive at a target compound through combinations of pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways, branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks. Automatic identification of branched pathways has a number of important applications in areas that require deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. Our algorithm utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on two well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that this new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways with complex structures.

  1. Multiplexed Activity-based Protein Profiling of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Large Functional Changes upon Exposure to Human Serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Fortuin, Suereta; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ansong, Charles; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-08-03

    Environmental and metabolic adaptability is critical for survival of the fungal human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus in the immunocompromised lung. We employed an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) approach utilizing a new aryl vinyl sulfonate probe and a serine hydrolase probe combined with quantitative LC-MS based accurate mass and time (AMT) tag proteomics for the identification of functional pathway adaptation of A. fumigatus to environmental variability relevant to pulmonary Invasive Aspergillosis. When the fungal pathogen was grown with human serum, metabolism and energy processes were markedly decreased compared to no serum culture. Additionally, functional pathways associated with amino acid and protein biosynthesis were limited as the fungus scavenged from the serum to obtain essential nutrients. Our approach revealed significant metabolic adaptation by A. fumigatus, and provides direct insight into this pathogen’s ability to survive and proliferate.

  2. The main auxin biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Keita; Sakai, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Satoko; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Yaeno, Takashi; Shirasu, Ken; Yao, Hong; McSteen, Paula; Zhao, Yunde; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays critical roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) has been recognized as the major auxin for more than 70 y. Although several pathways have been proposed, how auxin is synthesized in plants is still unclear. Previous genetic and enzymatic studies demonstrated that both TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase-like proteins are required for biosynthesis of IAA during plant development, but these enzymes were placed in two independent pathways. In this article, we demonstrate that the TAA family produces indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) and the YUC family functions in the conversion of IPA to IAA in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by a quantification method of IPA using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. We further show that YUC protein expressed in Escherichia coli directly converts IPA to IAA. Indole-3-acetaldehyde is probably not a precursor of IAA in the IPA pathway. Our results indicate that YUC proteins catalyze a rate-limiting step of the IPA pathway, which is the main IAA biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:22025724

  3. The main auxin biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Keita; Sakai, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Satoko; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Yaeno, Takashi; Shirasu, Ken; Yao, Hong; McSteen, Paula; Zhao, Yunde; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays critical roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) has been recognized as the major auxin for more than 70 y. Although several pathways have been proposed, how auxin is synthesized in plants is still unclear. Previous genetic and enzymatic studies demonstrated that both TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase-like proteins are required for biosynthesis of IAA during plant development, but these enzymes were placed in two independent pathways. In this article, we demonstrate that the TAA family produces indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) and the YUC family functions in the conversion of IPA to IAA in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by a quantification method of IPA using liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem MS. We further show that YUC protein expressed in Escherichia coli directly converts IPA to IAA. Indole-3-acetaldehyde is probably not a precursor of IAA in the IPA pathway. Our results indicate that YUC proteins catalyze a rate-limiting step of the IPA pathway, which is the main IAA biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:22025724

  4. Review article Cardioprotective signaling to mitochondria

    E-print Network

    Brand, Paul H.

    Review article Cardioprotective signaling to mitochondria Keith D. Garlid a, , Alexandre D.T. Costa species Permeability transition Signaling pathways Mitochondria are central players in the pathophysiology the plasma membrane and migrate to mitochondria. The signalosome­mitochondria interaction then initiates

  5. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR). Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLR). Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses. PMID:25514371

  6. [Hospital pathway of patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Boinot, L; Gautreau, G; Defossez, G; Daban, A; Bourgeois, H; Migeot, V; Ingrand, P

    2007-04-01

    Health care network should promote better quality, equity and care efficacy. On the subject of breast cancer, literature has shown inequality in care depending on geographical areas and health centres locations. This article illustrates a method of analysis of female non in situ non metastatic breast cancer patients hospital care pathway, from the 2002 and 2003 Poitou-Charentes' county Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG's) data bases. The treatments several phases are described along with their combination. The number of chemotherapy and radiotherapy sessions per patient are each analysed for comparison between Health Centres, Health Centres Status, and in view of the referentials recommendations. Several health pathways options are quantified: Mono/pluri Health Centres sites, inside/outside a geographical department, inside/outside Poitou-Charentes county. Nine hundred and nine patients hospital care pathways are described. Surgery was more often partial (66%), with Health Centres variation between 17 and 68%. Among the 308 patients who had chemotherapy, 78% received between 4 and 6 sessions, with variation per Health Centre between 65 and 90%. Radiotherapy is difficult to trace because of the Health Centres non systematic radiotherapy sessions linkage, and private Health Centres lack of information (no DRG's). 91% of identified radiotherapy benefiting patients had 25 to 35 sessions, in conformation with recommendations depending on the surgery performed with Health Centres variation ratio between 76 and 96%. Hospital care pathways options between two type of treatments were identified. 90% of the hospital care pathways took place in the same geographical department, and 30% took place in public Health Centres alone. Despite radiotherapy tractability limits, proper DRG's data collection allows the description of health pathways between Health Centres and allows health practice disparity identification. Using this tool, in accordance with the Cancer Plan, can therefore help health networks in evaluating care pathway in cancer and many other fields. PMID:17434281

  7. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The interim...vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through...

  8. Arthropods vector grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moyo, P; Allsopp, E; Roets, F; Mostert, L; Halleen, F

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Arthropod-mediated dispersal of pathogens is known in many cropping systems but has never been demonstrated for grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Arthropods from vineyards were screened for the presence of pathogens associated with Petri disease and esca using cultural and molecular techniques. The ability of the most abundant pathogen-carrying species to inoculate healthy grapevine vascular tissues was also determined. Millipedes and ants were allowed to associate with a DsRed- Express-transformed Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, after which they were exposed to freshly pruned healthy grapevines under controlled conditions and wounds were monitored for subsequent infection. In addition, the possibility of millipede excreta, commonly found on pruning wounds in the field, to act as inoculum source was determined. A diverse arthropod fauna was associated with declining grapevines and many of these carried trunk disease pathogens. However, spiders, the ant Crematogaster peringueyi, and the millipede Ommattoiulus moreleti were the most abundant pathogen carriers. The ant and millipede species fed on pruning wound sap and effectively transmitted trunk disease pathogens. Millipede excreta contained viable spores of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and may serve as an inoculum source. Numerous arthropods, including beneficial predators, are potential vectors of grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Our results highlight the need for an integrated approach, including targeted management of ants and millipedes at the time of pruning, to limit the spread of grapevine trunk diseases. PMID:24624953

  9. Pathogenic trickery: deception of host cell processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leigh A. Knodler; Jean Celli; B. Brett Finlay

    2001-01-01

    Microbial pathogens cause a spectrum of diseases in humans. Although the disease mechanisms vary considerably, most pathogens have developed virulence factors that interact with host molecules, often usurping normal cellular processes, including cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle targeting. These virulence factors often mimic host molecules, and mediate events as diverse as bacterial invasion, antiphagocytosis, and intracellular parastism.

  10. Filifactor alocis - a new emerging periodontal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Aruni, A Wilson; Mishra, Arunima; Dou, Yuetan; Chioma, Ozioma; Hamilton, Brittany N; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2015-07-01

    Filifactor alocis, a previously unrecognized Gram-positive anaerobic rod, is now considered a new emerging pathogen that may play a significant role in periodontal disease. F. alocis' unique characteristics and variations at the molecular level that may be responsible for the functional changes required to mediate the pathogenic process are discussed. PMID:25841800

  11. Filifactor alocis — a new emerging periodontal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Mishra, Arunima; Dou, Yuetan; Chioma, Ozioma; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2015-01-01

    Filifactor alocis, a previously unrecognized Gram-positive anaerobic rod, is now considered a new emerging pathogen that may play a significant role in periodontal disease. F. alocis’ unique characteristics and variations at the molecular level that may be responsible for the functional changes required to mediate the pathogenic process are discussed. PMID:25841800

  12. Microsatellite markers in plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the genetic diversity of plant pathogenic fungi is essential in the management of crops and disease. The genetic variability of fungal pathogens can be evaluated using molecular markers, among which, microsatellites are a relatively inexpensive source of information. We have developed an e...

  13. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides And Plant—pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M.-A. Newman; J. M. Dow; M. J. Daniels

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides are amphipathic molecules forming the outermost layer of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria. They are essential for protecting the cell from hostile environments and, in the case of pathogens, they play a direct role in interactions with eukaryotic host cells. Mutants with altered lipopolysaccharide structure have been obtained with several plant pathogenic bacteria; such mutants generally show reduced

  14. Genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster pathogen susceptibility

    E-print Network

    Jiggins, Francis

    may be maintained by temporal or spatial variation in the costs and benefits of pathogen defence an integrated response of both humoral and cellular components, tailored to combat specific pathogen classes the production of a variety of antimicrobial peptides, both systemically and locally at the infection site

  15. WORKSHOP ON EMERGING PATHOGENS IN RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable concern among regulatory authorities, the agricultural community and the public as a whole about the scientific community's ability to measure the level(s) of known pathogens in residuals. There is also concern for whether we are aware of all the pathogens t...

  16. Evolutionary implications of hostpathogen specificity: fitness consequences of pathogen

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    Evolutionary implications of host­pathogen specificity: fitness consequences of pathogen virulence (ETH), Zürichbergstrasse 38, CH-8044 Zürich, Switzerland ABSTRACT Pathogens and parasites can be strong a simple host­pathogen model to explore the con- sequences of host­pathogen specificity for selection

  17. Multiple pathogens infect multiple hosts: Inference for incidence, infection, & impact

    E-print Network

    Wolpert, Robert L

    Multiple pathogens infect multiple hosts: Inference for incidence, infection, & impact #12 a different pathogen to regulate each host · If Janzen-Connell effects maintain diversity through pathogens, then ­ Pathogens effects are host-specific (N pathogens for N hosts) ­ Strongest effect when host is abundant #12

  18. Metabolic Network Model of a Human Oral Pathogen? ‡

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Varun; Snitkin, Evan S.; Amar, Salomon; Segrè, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The microbial community present in the human mouth is engaged in a complex network of diverse metabolic activities. In addition to serving as energy and building-block sources, metabolites are key players in interspecies and host-pathogen interactions. Metabolites are also implicated in triggering the local inflammatory response, which can affect systemic conditions such as atherosclerosis, obesity, and diabetes. While the genome of several oral pathogens has been sequenced, quantitative understanding of the metabolic functions of any oral pathogen at the system level has not been explored yet. Here we pursue the computational construction and analysis of the genome-scale metabolic network of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative anaerobe that is endemic in the human population and largely responsible for adult periodontitis. Integrating information from the genome, online databases, and literature screening, we built a stoichiometric model that encompasses 679 metabolic reactions. By using flux balance approaches and automated network visualization, we analyze the growth capacity under amino-acid-rich medium and provide evidence that amino acid preference and cytotoxic by-product secretion rates are suitably reproduced by the model. To provide further insight into the basic metabolic functions of P. gingivalis and suggest potential drug targets, we study systematically how the network responds to any reaction knockout. We focus specifically on the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway and identify eight putative targets, one of which has been recently verified experimentally. The current model, which is amenable to further experimental testing and refinements, could prove useful in evaluating the oral microbiome dynamics and in the development of novel biomedical applications. PMID:18931137

  19. Competition for zinc binding in the host-pathogen interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cerasi, Mauro; Ammendola, Serena; Battistoni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Due to its favorable chemical properties, zinc is used as a structural or catalytic cofactor in a very large number of proteins. Despite the apparent abundance of this metal in all cell types, the intracellular pool of loosely bound zinc ions available for biological exchanges is in the picomolar range and nearly all zinc is tightly bound to proteins. In addition, to limit bacterial growth, some zinc-sequestering proteins are produced by eukaryotic hosts in response to infections. Therefore, to grow and multiply in the infected host, bacterial pathogens must produce high affinity zinc importers, such as the ZnuABC transporter which is present in most Gram-negative bacteria. Studies carried in different bacterial species have established that disruption of ZnuABC is usually associated with a remarkable loss of pathogenicity. The critical involvement of zinc in a plethora of metabolic and virulence pathways and the presence of very low number of zinc importers in most bacterial species mark zinc homeostasis as a very promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:24400228

  20. Surface-expressed enolases of Plasmodium and other pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anil Kumar; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2011-08-01

    Enolase is the eighth enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, a reaction that generates ATP from phosphoenol pyruvate in cytosolic compartments. Enolase is essential, especially for organisms devoid of the Krebs cycle that depend solely on glycolysis for energy. Interestingly, enolase appears to serve a separate function in some organisms, in that it is also exported to the cell surface via a poorly understood mechanism. In these organisms, surface enolase assists in the invasion of their host cells by binding plasminogen, an abundant plasma protease precursor. Binding is mediated by the interaction between a lysine motif of enolase with Kringle domains of plasminogen. The bound plasminogen is then cleaved by specific proteases to generate active plasmin. Plasmin is a potent serine protease that is thought to function in the degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding the targeted host cell, thereby facilitating pathogen invasion. Recent work revealed that the malaria parasite Plasmodium also expresses surface enolase, and that this feature may be essential for completion of its life cycle. The therapeutic potential of targeting surface enolases of pathogens is discussed. PMID:21881761

  1. Oxidative stress responses in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  2. TLR-Mediated Preterm Birth in Response to Pathogenic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thaxton, Jessica E.; Nevers, Tania A.; Sharma, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of preterm birth in developed countries has risen in the past decades. Underlying causes for this enigmatic pregnancy complication are numerous, yet infectious agents that induce dysregualtion of immunity at the maternal-fetal interface pose one of the most probable causes of preterm birth. This paper highlights two factors regarding maternal infections that trigger unscheduled inflammatory sequences that are deleterious to the maternal-fetal balance necessary to maintain pregnancy. Firstly, we discuss the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as sentinels of uterine immunity in the context of response to pathogens. We highlight the idea that particular TLR activations lead to differential immune cascades that induce preterm birth. Secondly, two alternative routes of pathogenic entry may prove to be critical for inducing preterm birth via a cytokine storm or a secondary and currently unknown cell-mediated mechanism of uterine inflammation. This paper summarizes pathways that underlie activation of adverse and diverse immune responses to foreign agents that may result in preterm birth. PMID:20827416

  3. Human Pathogens and the Host Cell SUMOylation System

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Peter; Schreiner, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Since posttranslational modification (PTM) by the small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) was discovered over a decade ago, a huge number of cellular proteins have been found to be reversibly modified, resulting in alteration of differential cellular pathways. Although the molecular consequences of SUMO attachment are difficult to predict, the underlying principle of SUMOylation is altering inter- and/or intramolecular interactions of the modified substrate, changing localization, stability, and/or activity. Unsurprisingly, many different pathogens have evolved to exploit the cellular SUMO modification system due to its functional flexibility and far-reaching functional downstream consequences. Although the extensive knowledge gained so far is impressive, a definitive conclusion about the role of SUMO modification during virus infection in general remains elusive and is still restricted to a few, yet promising concepts. Based on the available data, this review aims, first, to provide a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge and, second, to evaluate the currently known common principles/molecular mechanisms of how human pathogenic microbes, especially viruses and their regulatory proteins, exploit the host cell SUMO modification system. PMID:22072786

  4. Surface-expressed enolases of Plasmodium and other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anil Kumar; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Enolase is the eighth enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, a reaction that generates ATP from phosphoenol pyruvate in cytosolic compartments. Enolase is essential, especially for organisms devoid of the Krebs cycle that depend solely on glycolysis for energy. Interestingly, enolase appears to serve a separate function in some organisms, in that it is also exported to the cell surface via a poorly understood mechanism. In these organisms, surface enolase assists in the invasion of their host cells by binding plasminogen, an abundant plasma protease precursor. Binding is mediated by the interaction between a lysine motif of enolase with Kringle domains of plasminogen. The bound plasminogen is then cleaved by specific proteases to generate active plasmin. Plasmin is a potent serine protease that is thought to function in the degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding the targeted host cell, thereby facilitating pathogen invasion. Recent work revealed that the malaria parasite Plasmodium also expresses surface enolase, and that this feature may be essential for completion of its life cycle. The therapeutic potential of targeting surface enolases of pathogens is discussed. PMID:21881761

  5. Early progress in epigenetic regulation of endothelin pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Welch, AK; Jacobs, ME; Wingo, CS; Cain, BD

    2013-01-01

    Control of gene transcription is a major regulatory determinant for function of the endothelin pathway. Epigenetic mechanisms act on tissue-specific gene expression during development and in response to physiological stimuli. Most of the limited evidence available on epigenetic regulation of the endothelin pathway focuses on the EDN1 and EDNRB genes. Examination of whole genome databases suggests that both genes are influenced by histone modifications and DNA methylation. This interpretation is supported by studies directed at detecting epigenetic action on the two genes. The clearest illustration of epigenetic factors altering endothelin signalling is DNA methylation-associated EDNRB silencing during tumourigenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of epigenetic regulation of the endothelin pathway genes. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Endothelin. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.168.issue-1 PMID:22220553

  6. Metabolic environments and genomic features associated with pathogenic and mutualistic interactions between bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Park, Byung H; Syed, Mustafa H; Klotz, Martin G; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2014-07-01

    Genomic characteristics discriminating parasitic and mutualistic relationship of bacterial symbionts with plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 mutualists and pathogens to discover genomic markers associated with the different phenotypes. Using metabolic network models, we predict external environments associated with free-living and symbiotic lifestyles and quantify dependences of symbionts on the host in terms of the consumed metabolites. We show that specific differences between the phenotypes are pronounced at the levels of metabolic enzymes, especially carbohydrate active, and protein functions. Overall, biosynthetic functions are enriched and more diverse in plant mutualists whereas processes and functions involved in degradation and host invasion are enriched and more diverse in pathogens. A distinctive characteristic of plant pathogens is a putative novel secretion system with a circadian rhythm regulator. A specific marker of plant mutualists is the co-residence of genes encoding nitrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). We predict that RuBisCO is likely used in a putative metabolic pathway to supplement carbon obtained heterotrophically with low-cost assimilation of carbon from CO2. We validate results of the comparative analysis by predicting correct phenotype, pathogenic or mutualistic, for 20 symbionts in an independent set of 30 pathogens, mutualists, and commensals. PMID:24580106

  7. Mitochondrial UPR-regulated innate immunity provides resistance to pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Mark W.; Nargund, Amrita M.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gillis, Reba; Fiorese, Christopher J.; Haynes, Cole M.

    2014-01-01

    Metazoans identify and eliminate bacterial pathogens in microbe-rich environments such as the intestinal lumen, however the mechanisms are unclear. Potentially, host cells employ intracellular surveillance or stress response programs to detect pathogens that target monitored cellular activities to initiate innate immune responses1–3. Mitochondrial function is evaluated by monitoring mitochondrial protein import efficiency of the transcription factor ATFS-1, which mediates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). During mitochondrial stress, import is impaired4 allowing ATFS-1 to traffic to the nucleus where it mediates a transcriptional response to re-establish mitochondrial homeostasis5. Here, we examined the role of ATFS-1 during pathogen exposure because in addition to mitochondrial protective genes, ATFS-1 induced innate immune genes during mitochondrial stress that included a secreted lysozyme and anti-microbial peptides. Exposure to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of the UPRmt. Animals lacking atfs-1 were susceptible to P. aeruginosa, while hyper-activation of ATFS-1 and the UPRmt improved clearance of P. aeruginosa from the intestine and prolonged C. elegans survival largely independent of known innate immune pathways6,7. We propose that ATFS-1 import efficiency and the UPRmt is a means to detect pathogens that target mitochondria and initiate a protective innate immune response. PMID:25274306

  8. Susceptibility of Intact Germinating Arabidopsis thaliana to Human Fungal Pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus contributes a large global burden of infectious death in both HIV-infected and healthy individuals. As Cryptococcus is an opportunistic pathogen, much of the evolutionary pressure shaping virulence occurs in environments in contact with plants and soil. The present studies investigated inoculation of intact seeds of the common weed Arabidopsis thaliana with fungal cells over a 21-day period. C. gattii was the more virulent plant pathogen, resulting in disrupted germination as well as increased stem lodging, fungal burden, and plant tissue colocalization. C. neoformans was a less virulent plant pathogen but exhibited prolonged tissue residence within the cuticle and vascular spaces. Arabidopsis mutants of the PRN1 gene, which is involved in abiotic and biotic signaling affecting phenylalanine-derived flavonoids, showed altered susceptibility to cryptoccocal infections, suggesting roles for this pathway in cryptococcal defense. The fungal virulence factor laccase was also implicated in plant pathogenesis, as a cryptococcal lac1? strain was less virulent than wild-type fungi and was unable to colonize seedlings. In conclusion, these studies expand knowledge concerning the ecological niche of Cryptococcus by demonstrating the pathogenic capacity of the anamorphic form of cryptococcal cells against healthy seedlings under physiologically relevant conditions. In addition, an important role of laccase in plant as well as human virulence may suggest mechanisms for laccase retention and optimization during evolution of this fungal pathogen. PMID:23435895

  9. Transcriptional analysis of the response of poultry species to respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Munir, S; Kapur, V

    2003-06-01

    Respiratory tract diseases are the single most important cause of economic loss due to infections among poultry populations worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to infections remain unknown. Here, we review the literature and describe the adoption of a conceptually simple approach to understand the genetic and biochemical responses of host cells during infection with respiratory pathogens, such as avian pneumovirus (APV). The strategy that we have adopted integrates the powerful techniques of cDNA subtraction hybridization and microarray analysis for global transcriptional profiling. The results of our investigations identify the specific transcriptional alterations in host-cell gene expression that result from an attempt by the host to combat and limit the spread of the pathogen or by the pathogen to enhance its own survival and ability to reproduce. Our studies suggest that a molecular description of host-pathogen interactions in terms of differential gene expression will provide key insights on the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis, pathogen virulence, and host immunity. In addition, the results suggest that the identification of genes and pathways with a role in host response to infection has considerable practical implications for the future design and development of effective immunomodulators and vaccines. PMID:12817442

  10. Transcriptional activator TSRF1 reversely regulates pathogen resistance and osmotic stress tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Jia; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhijin; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Xue-Chen; Huang, Rongfeng

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) proteins regulate plant stress response and the interaction of different stress responsive pathways through interacting with different cis-acting elements, even other transcription factors. Here, we report a transcriptional activator TSRF1, which was previously demonstrated to regulate plant resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, reversely regulates pathogen resistance and osmotic stress tolerance in tobacco. Sequence analysis revealed that TSRF1 contains a putative transcriptional activation domain. Using yeast two hybrid system we evidenced that this activation domain is essential for activating the expression of reporter gene. To confirm the broad-spectrum pathogen resistance of TSRF1 we observed that over-expressing TSRF1 enhances the resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea in both tobacco and tomato plants, but RNA interference of TSRF1 in tomato plants decreases the resistance to these pathogens, unraveling the positive regulation of TSRF1 in plant pathogen infections. The expression of TSRF1 in response to NaCl and mannitol suggests the possible functions of TSRF1 in osmotic stress responses, but the physiological tests indicate that expressing TSRF1 in tobaccos decreases tolerance to NaCl or mannitol during germination and seedling root development, and this result was consistent with PEG6000 treatment with mature tobacco seedlings, indicating the negative modulation of TSRF1 in osmotic stress response. Therefore, our research reveals that transcriptional activator TSRF1 reversely regulates plant pathogen resistance and osmotic stress response. PMID:17160455

  11. Evolution of Pathogen Specialisation in a Host Metapopulation: Joint Effects of Host and Pathogen Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Papaïx, Julien; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Lannou, Christian; Thrall, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Metapopulation processes are important determinants of epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics in host-pathogen systems, and are therefore central to explaining observed patterns of disease or genetic diversity. In particular, the spatial scale of interactions between pathogens and their hosts is of primary importance because migration rates of one species can affect both spatial and temporal heterogeneity of selection on the other. In this study we developed a stochastic and discrete time simulation model to specifically examine the joint effects of host and pathogen dispersal on the evolution of pathogen specialisation in a spatially explicit metapopulation. We consider a plant-pathogen system in which the host metapopulation is composed of two plant genotypes. The pathogen is dispersed by air-borne spores on the host metapopulation. The pathogen population is characterised by a single life-history trait under selection, the infection efficacy. We found that restricted host dispersal can lead to high amount of pathogen diversity and that the extent of pathogen specialisation varied according to the spatial scale of host-pathogen dispersal. We also discuss the role of population asynchrony in determining pathogen evolutionary outcomes. PMID:24853675

  12. Pathway Tools version 13.0: integrated software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Suzanne M.; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Dale, Joseph M.; Lee, Thomas J.; Kaipa, Pallavi; Gilham, Fred; Spaulding, Aaron; Popescu, Liviu; Altman, Tomer; Paulsen, Ian; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Caspi, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Pathway Tools is a production-quality software environment for creating a type of model-organism database called a Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB). A PGDB such as EcoCyc integrates the evolving understanding of the genes, proteins, metabolic network and regulatory network of an organism. This article provides an overview of Pathway Tools capabilities. The software performs multiple computational inferences including prediction of metabolic pathways, prediction of metabolic pathway hole fillers and prediction of operons. It enables interactive editing of PGDBs by DB curators. It supports web publishing of PGDBs, and provides a large number of query and visualization tools. The software also supports comparative analyses of PGDBs, and provides several systems biology analyses of PGDBs including reachability analysis of metabolic networks, and interactive tracing of metabolites through a metabolic network. More than 800 PGDBs have been created using Pathway Tools by scientists around the world, many of which are curated DBs for important model organisms. Those PGDBs can be exchanged using a peer-to-peer DB sharing system called the PGDB Registry. PMID:19955237

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of trinitrotoluene biodegradation and mineralization pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, M.D.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Wild, J.R.; Dale, B.E. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-07-20

    Biodegradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) proceeds through several different metabolic pathways. However, the reaction steps which are considered rate-controlling have not been fully determined. Glycolysis and other biological pathways contain biochemical reactions which are acutely rate-limiting due to enzyme control. These rate-limiting steps also have large negative Gibbs free energy changes. Because xenobiotic compounds such as TNT can be used by biological systems as nitrogen, carbon, and energy sources, it is likely that their degradation pathways also contain acutely rate-limiting steps. Identification of these rate-controlling reactions will enhance and better direct genetic engineering techniques to increase specific enzyme levels. This article identifies likely rate-controlling steps (or sets of steps) in reported TNT biodegradation pathways by estimating the Gibbs free energy change for each step and for the overall pathways. The biological standard Gibbs free energy change of reaction was calculated for each pathway step using a group contribution method specifically tailored for biomolecules. The method was also applied to hypothetical pathways constructed to mineralize TNT using several different microorganisms. Pathways steps that have large negative Gibbs free energy changes are postulated to be potentially rate-controlling. The microorganisms which utilize degradation pathways with the largest overall (from TNT to citrate) negative Gibbs free energy changes were also determined.

  14. Worldwide distribution and diversity of seabird ticks: implications for the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Muriel; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; McCoy, Karen D

    2011-05-01

    The ubiquity of ticks and their importance in the transmission of pathogens involved in human and livestock diseases are reflected by the growing number of studies focusing on tick ecology and the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens. Likewise, the involvement of wild birds in dispersing pathogens and their role as reservoir hosts are now well established. However, studies on tick-bird systems have mainly focused on land birds, and the role of seabirds in the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens is rarely considered. Seabirds typically have large population sizes, wide geographic distributions, and high mobility, which make them significant potential players in the maintenance and dispersal of disease agents at large spatial scales. They are parasitized by at least 29 tick species found across all biogeographical regions of the world. We know that these seabird-tick systems can harbor a large diversity of pathogens, although detailed studies of this diversity remain scarce. In this article, we review current knowledge on the diversity and global distribution of ticks and tick-borne pathogens associated with seabirds. We discuss the relationship between seabirds, ticks, and their pathogens and examine the interesting characteristics of these relationships from ecological and epidemiological points of view. We also highlight some future research directions required to better understand the evolution of these systems and to assess the potential role of seabirds in the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:20874222

  15. Terrific Protein Traffic: The Mystery of Effector Protein Delivery by Filamentous Plant Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ralph Panstruga (Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research; Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions)

    2009-05-08

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Many biotrophic fungal and oomycete plant pathogens deliver effector proteins directly into host cells during infection. Recent advances are revealing the extensive effector repertoires of these pathogens and are beginning to shed light on how they manipulate host cells to establish a parasitic relationship. The current explosion of information is opening new research avenues in molecular plant pathology and is providing new opportunities to limit the impact of plant disease on food production.

  16. SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION: Are There Close Encounters Between Signaling Pathways?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephane Noselli (Institut de Recherches; )

    2000-10-06

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Do different signaling pathways inside the same cell talk to each other? Evidence suggests that in the worm and fly, signaling pathways exist as separate linear cassettes, whereas in mammalian cells there does appear to be cross talk between signaling pathways. However, as Noselli and Perrimon argue in their Perspective, most of the evidence in mammalian cells comes from tumor cells and overexpression assays. They suggest that true cross talk may not actually exist in mammalian cells under normal circumstances.

  17. Montana State University-Bozeman Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University-Bozeman Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan 1 #12;Table of Contents................................................................................................ 4 MSU-Bozeman Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan Major Revisions............... 5 Policy................................................................................................... 7 Bloodborne Pathogens

  18. Functional similarities between computer worms and biological pathogens5

    E-print Network

    Li, Jun

    Functional similarities between computer worms and biological pathogens5 Jun Li*, Paul Accepted 11 December 2006 Keywords: Computer worm Worm detection Worm defense Biological pathogen tactics with biological pathogens with respect to infecting and propagating. In this paper, we study

  19. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANT PATHOGENIC Prepared by Gabrielle Carstensen

    E-print Network

    ', `Molecular Plant-Pathogen Interactions', `Epidemiology and Ecology' and `Control and Breeding93 13TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANT PATHOGENIC BACTERIA Prepared by Gabrielle Carstensen The 13th International Conference on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (ICPPB) was held during June 2014

  20. From Genetic Footprinting to Antimicrobial Drug Targets: Examples in Cofactor Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Svetlana Y.; Scholle, Michael D.; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Baev, Mark V.; Farrell, Michael; Kurnasov, Oleg V.; Daugherty, Matthew D.; Mseeh, Faika; Polanuyer, Boris M.; Campbell, John W.; Anantha, Shubha; Shatalin, Konstantin Y.; Chowdhury, Shamim A. K.; Fonstein, Michael Y.; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2002-01-01

    Novel drug targets are required in order to design new defenses against antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Comparative genomics provides new opportunities for finding optimal targets among previously unexplored cellular functions, based on an understanding of related biological processes in bacterial pathogens and their hosts. We describe an integrated approach to identification and prioritization of broad-spectrum drug targets. Our strategy is based on genetic footprinting in Escherichia coli followed by metabolic context analysis of essential gene orthologs in various species. Genes required for viability of E. coli in rich medium were identified on a whole-genome scale using the genetic footprinting technique. Potential target pathways were deduced from these data and compared with a panel of representative bacterial pathogens by using metabolic reconstructions from genomic data. Conserved and indispensable functions revealed by this analysis potentially represent broad-spectrum antibacterial targets. Further target prioritization involves comparison of the corresponding pathways and individual functions between pathogens and the human host. The most promising targets are validated by direct knockouts in model pathogens. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated using examples from metabolism of adenylate cofactors NAD(P), coenzyme A, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Several drug targets within these pathways, including three distantly related adenylyltransferases (orthologs of the E. coli genes nadD, coaD, and ribF), are discussed in detail. PMID:12142426

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis: a clonal pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Enersen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in infectious disease research has allowed standardized typing of bacterial clones. Through multiple markers around the genome, it is possible to determine the sequence type (ST) of bacterial isolates to establish the population structure of a species. For the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, the MLST scheme has been established at www.pubmlst.org/pgingivalis, and data from the database indicate a high degree of genetic diversity and a weakly clonal population structure comparable with Neisseria menigitidis. The major fimbriae (FimA) have been held responsible for the adhesive properties of P. gingivalis and represent an important virulence factor. The fimA genotyping method (PCR based) indicate that fimA genotype II, IV and Ib are associated with diseased sites in periodontitis and tissue specimens from cardiovascular disease. fimA genotyping of the isolates in the MLST database supports the association of genotypes II and IV with periodontitis. As a result of multiple positive PCR reactions in the fimA genotyping, sequencing of the fimA gene revealed only minor nucleotide variation between isolates of the same and different genotypes, suggesting that the method should be redesigned or re-evaluated. Results from several investigations indicate a higher intraindividual heterogeneity of P. gingivalis than found earlier. Detection of multiple STs from one site in several patients with “refractory” periodontitis, showed allelic variation in two housekeeping genes indicating recombination between different clones within the periodontal pocket. PMID:22125739

  2. The outcomes of pathway database computations depend on pathway ontology

    PubMed Central

    Green, M. L.; Karp, P. D.

    2006-01-01

    Different biological notions of pathways are used in different pathway databases. Those pathway ontologies significantly impact pathway computations. Computational users of pathway databases will obtain different results depending on the pathway ontology used by the databases they employ, and different pathway ontologies are preferable for different end uses. We explore differences in pathway ontologies by comparing the BioCyc and KEGG ontologies. The BioCyc ontology defines a pathway as a conserved, atomic module of the metabolic network of a single organism, i.e. often regulated as a unit, whose boundaries are defined at high-connectivity stable metabolites. KEGG pathways are on average 4.2 times larger than BioCyc pathways, and combine multiple biological processes from different organisms to produce a substrate-centered reaction mosaic. We compared KEGG and BioCyc pathways using genome context methods, which determine the functional relatedness of pairs of genes. For each method we employed, a pair of genes randomly selected from a BioCyc pathway is more likely to be related by that method than is a pair of genes randomly selected from a KEGG pathway, supporting the conclusion that the BioCyc pathway conceptualization is closer to a single conserved biological process than is that of KEGG. PMID:16893953

  3. Waterborne Pathogens: Detection Methods and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Castillo, Flor Yazmín; Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Garneau, Philippe; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Harel, Josée; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma Lilián

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems’ infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health. PMID:26011827

  4. Waterborne pathogens: detection methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Castillo, Flor Yazmín; Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Garneau, Philippe; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Harel, Josée; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma Lilián

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems' infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health. PMID:26011827

  5. The Interaction of Human Enteric Pathogens with Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Dong Hwan; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-01-01

    There are an increasing number of outbreaks of human pathogens related to fresh produce. Thus, the growth of human pathogens on plants should be explored. Human pathogens can survive under the harsh environments in plants, and can adhere and actively invade plants. Plant-associated microbiota or insects contribute to the survival and transmission of enteric pathogens in plants. Human enteric pathogens also trigger plant innate immunity, but some pathogens–such as Salmonella–can overcome this defense mechanism. PMID:25288993

  6. PLANTINSECT INTERACTIONS Insect Frass as a Pathway for Transmission of Bacterial

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    on vector relationships between the striped cucumber beetle, Acalymma vittatum (F.) (Coleoptera was infective to cucumber plants, conÞrming that DNA was indicative of viable bacteria and that frass could be a pathway for trans- mission of the pathogen. This research suggests that few cucumber beetles serve as long

  7. Induction of Inflammation by West Nile virus Capsid through the Caspase9 Apoptotic Pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joo-Sung Yang; Mathura P. Ramanathan; Karuppiah Muthumani; Andrew Y. Choo; Sung-Ha Jin; Qian-Chun Yu; Daniel S. Hwang; Daniel K. Choo; Mark D. Lee; Kesen Dang; J. Joseph. Kim; David B. Weiner

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family of vector-borne pathogens. Clinical signs of WNV infection include neurologic symptoms, limb weakness, and encephalitis, which can result in paraly- sis or death. We report that the WNV capsid (Cp) by itself induces rapid nuclear condensation and cell death in tissue culture. Apoptosis is induced through the mitochondrial pathway

  8. Suppression of the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway of Toll-like receptors by luteolin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in induction of immune and inflammatory responses by recognizing invading pathogens. TLRs have two major downstream signaling pathways activated through the interaction with adaptor molecules, MyD88 and TRIF, leading to the expression of proinflammat...

  9. Chlorophyllase 1, a Damage Control Enzyme, Affects the Balance between Defense Pathways in Plants

    E-print Network

    Palva, Tapio

    in the accumulation of photosensitive porphyrin rings, causing increased oxidative stress and lesion developmentChlorophyllase 1, a Damage Control Enzyme, Affects the Balance between Defense Pathways in Plants (ROS) is central to plant response to several pathogens. One of the sources of ROS is the chloroplast

  10. Diversity in the protein N-glycosylation pathways among campylobacter species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The foodborne bacterial pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses an N-linked protein glycosylation (pgl) pathway involved in adding conserved heptasaccharides to asparaginecontaining motifs of >60 proteins, and releasing the same glycan into its periplasm as free oligosaccharides. In this study, co...

  11. Production of Pyomelanin, a Second Type of Melanin, via the Tyrosine Degradation Pathway in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeannette Schmaler-Ripcke; Venelina Sugareva; Peter Gebhardt; Robert Winkler; Olaf Kniemeyer; Thorsten Heinekamp; Axel A. Brakhage

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed humans. A. fumigatus is able to produce dihydroxynaphthalene melanin, which is predominantly present in the conidia. Its biosynthesis is an important virulence determinant. Here, we show that A. fumigatus is able to produce an alternative melanin, i.e., pyomelanin, by a different pathway, starting from L-tyrosine. Proteome analysis indicated that

  12. Transcription changes in the phenylpropanoid pathway of Glycine max in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports of plant molecular responses to pathogenic infections have pinpointed increases in activity of several genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway leading to the synthesis of lignin and flavonoids. The majority of those findings were derived from single gene studies and more recently from several g...

  13. Starter unit specificity directs genome mining of polyketide synthase pathways in fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Search of the protein database with the aflatoxin pathway polyketide synthase (PKS) revealed putative PKSs in the pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii that could require partnerships with a pair of fatty acid synthase (FAS) subunits for the biosynthesis of fatty acid-poly...

  14. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, B B; Falkow, S

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a number of genetic strategies to cause infection and, occasionally, disease in their hosts. Many of these virulence factors and their regulatory elements can be divided into a smaller number of groups based on the conservation of similar mechanisms. These common themes are found throughout bacterial virulence factors. For example, there are only a few general types of toxins, despite a large number of host targets. Similarly, there are only a few conserved ways to build the bacterial pilus and nonpilus adhesins used by pathogens to adhere to host substrates. Bacterial entry into host cells (invasion) is a complex mechanism. However, several common invasion themes exist in diverse microorganisms. Similarly, once inside a host cell, pathogens have a limited number of ways to ensure their survival, whether remaining within a host vacuole or by escaping into the cytoplasm. Avoidance of the host immune defenses is key to the success of a pathogen. Several common themes again are employed, including antigenic variation, camouflage by binding host molecules, and enzymatic degradation of host immune components. Most virulence factors are found on the bacterial surface or secreted into their immediate environment, yet virulence factors operate through a relatively small number of microbial secretion systems. The expression of bacterial pathogenicity is dependent upon complex regulatory circuits. However, pathogens use only a small number of biochemical families to express distinct functional factors at the appropriate time that causes infection. Finally, virulence factors maintained on mobile genetic elements and pathogenicity islands ensure that new strains of pathogens evolve constantly. Comprehension of these common themes in microbial pathogenicity is critical to the understanding and study of bacterial virulence mechanisms and to the development of new "anti-virulence" agents, which are so desperately needed to replace antibiotics. PMID:9184008

  15. TLR-4 signalling pathway: MyD88 independent pathway up-regulation in chicken breeds upon LPS treatment.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Hanuma Kumar; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Kandi, Ravinder; Undi, Ram Babu; Sahu, Itishri; Kannaki, T R; Subbiah, Madhuri; Gutti, Ravi Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that sense the microbial pathogens are important components of host immune system. TLRs play key roles in the innate defence mechanism against pathogens, in the development of adaptive immunity, and are possibly the major determinants of the susceptibility to infections. To study the resistance pattern in different breeds of chicken, a comprehensive understanding of TLR4 signalling pathways is required. We investigated the TLR-4 pathway regulated gene expressions in PBMCs of chicken breeds of Broiler (Cobb), Aseel, Dahlem Red and Ghagus upon LPS treatment using Quantitative RT-PCR approach. Several genes were found to be up regulated in both TLR-induced MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent pathways. These genes include TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4), MyD88 (Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88), TRAF6 (TNF receptor associated factor 6), TRIF (TIR domain containing adapter inducing interferon beta), the transcription factors NFkB (Nuclear factor kappa B), IRF7 (Interferon regulatory factor 7) and IFN ? (Interferon beta). We have also studied inflammatory cytokines such as IL2, IL6, IL8, IL1 ? and TNF ? to further understand the downstream signalling of TLR4 pathway. These results showed that higher expression of TLR signalling activation via both MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways are more beneficial to chicken mononuclear cells mediated innate immunity. We observed TRIF dependent pathway in Aseel and Ghagus breeds. Our results are in concurrent with general observation that Aseel breed is comparatively more resistant, Ghagus and broilers are moderately resistant and Dahlem Red is comparatively more susceptible to bacterial infections. PMID:25417198

  16. Killing of anaerobic pathogens by predatory bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Van Essche; M. Quirynen; I. Sliepen; G. Loozen; N. Boon; J. Van Eldere; W. Teughels

    2011-01-01

    PRecently, the predation of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on a periodontal\\u000a pathogen has been described. The current study explores the potential\\u000a antimicrobial activity of a range of predatory bacteria against key\\u000a periodontal pathogens. A number of representatives from the\\u000a Bdellovibrio, Bacteriovorax and Peredibacter lineages (called `BALOs')\\u000a were tested for their activity towards a group of key periodontal\\u000a pathogens and an optimal multiplicity

  17. Rapid pathogen-induced apoptosis: a mechanism used by dendritic cells to limit intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Catarina V; Lindsten, Tullia; Jamieson, Amanda M; Case, Christopher L; Shin, Sunny; Thompson, Craig B; Roy, Craig R

    2009-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized phagocytes that internalize exogenous antigens and microbes at peripheral sites, and then migrate to lymphatic organs to display foreign peptides to naïve T cells. There are several examples where DCs have been shown to be more efficient at restricting the intracellular replication of pathogens compared to macrophages, a property that could prevent DCs from enhancing pathogen dissemination. To understand DC responses to pathogens, we investigated the mechanisms by which mouse DCs are able to restrict replication of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. We show that both DCs and macrophages have the ability to interfere with L. pneumophila replication through a cell death pathway mediated by caspase-1 and Naip5. L. pneumophila that avoided Naip5-dependent responses, however, showed robust replication in macrophages but remained unable to replicate in DCs. Apoptotic cell death mediated by caspase-3 was found to occur much earlier in DCs following infection by L. pneumophila compared to macrophages infected similarly. Eliminating the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak or overproducing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were both found to restore L. pneumophila replication in DCs. Thus, DCs have a microbial response pathway that rapidly activates apoptosis to limit pathogen replication. PMID:19521510

  18. Microbial effectors target multiple steps in the salicylic acid production and signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Han, Xiaowei; Kahmann, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Microbes attempting to colonize plants are recognized through the plant immune surveillance system. This leads to a complex array of global as well as specific defense responses, which are often associated with plant cell death and subsequent arrest of the invader. The responses also entail complex changes in phytohormone signaling pathways. Among these, salicylic acid (SA) signaling is an important pathway because of its ability to trigger plant cell death. As biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens need to invade living plant tissue to cause disease, they have evolved efficient strategies to downregulate SA signaling by virulence effectors, which can be proteins or secondary metabolites. Here we review the strategies prokaryotic pathogens have developed to target SA biosynthesis and signaling, and contrast this with recent insights into how plant pathogenic eukaryotic fungi and oomycetes accomplish the same goal. PMID:26042138

  19. In Vivo Yeast Cell Morphogenesis Is Regulated by a p21-Activated Kinase in the Human Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kylie J.; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Pathogens have developed diverse strategies to infect their hosts and evade the host defense systems. Many pathogens reside within host phagocytic cells, thus evading much of the host immune system. For dimorphic fungal pathogens which grow in a multicellular hyphal form, a central attribute which facilitates growth inside host cells without rapid killing is the capacity to switch from the hyphal growth form to a unicellular yeast form. Blocking this transition abolishes or severely reduces pathogenicity. Host body temperature (37°C) is the most common inducer of the hyphal to yeast transition in vitro for many dimorphic fungi, and it is often assumed that this is the inducer in vivo. This work describes the identification and analysis of a new pathway involved in sensing the environment inside a host cell by a dimorphic fungal pathogen, Penicillium marneffei. The pakB gene, encoding a p21-activated kinase, defines this pathway and operates independently of known effectors in P. marneffei. Expression of pakB is upregulated in P. marneffei yeast cells isolated from macrophages but absent from in vitro cultured yeast cells produced at 37°C. Deletion of pakB leads to a failure to produce yeast cells inside macrophages but no effect in vitro at 37°C. Loss of pakB also leads to the inappropriate production of yeast cells at 25°C in vitro, and the mechanism underlying this requires the activity of the central regulator of asexual development. The data shows that this new pathway is central to eliciting the appropriate morphogenetic response by the pathogen to the host environment independently of the common temperature signal, thus clearly separating the temperature- and intracellular-dependent signaling systems. PMID:19956672

  20. Myocyte Adrenoceptor Signaling Pathways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yang Xiang (Stanford Medical Center; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology)

    2003-06-06

    Adrenoceptors (ARs), members of the G proteinâ??coupled receptor superfamily, form the interface between the sympathetic nervous system and the cardiovascular system, with integral roles in the rapid regulation of myocardial function. However, in heart failure, chronic catecholamine stimulation of adrenoceptors has been linked to pathologic cardiac remodeling, including myocyte apoptosis and hypertrophy. In cardiac myocytes, activation of AR subtypes results in coupling to different G proteins and induction of specific signaling pathways, which is partly regulated by the subtype-specific distribution of receptors in plasma membrane compartments containing distinct complexes of signaling molecules. The Connections Maps of the Adrenergic and Myocyte Adrenergic Signaling Pathways bring into focus the specific signaling pathways of individual AR subtypes and their relevant functions in vivo.

  1. Pathways database system.

    PubMed

    Ozsoyoglu, Z Meral; Nadeau, Joseph H; Ozsoyoglu, G

    2003-01-01

    During the next phase of the Human Genome Project, research will focus on functional studies of attributing functions to genes, their regulatory elements, and other DNA sequences. To facilitate the use of genomic information in such studies, a new modeling perspective is needed to examine and study genome sequences in the context of many kinds of biological information. Pathways are the logical format for modeling and presenting such information in a manner that is familiar to biological researchers. In this paper, we introduce an integrated system, called "Pathways Database System," with a set of software tools for modeling, storing, analyzing, visualizing, and querying biological pathways data at different levels of genetic, molecular, biochemical and organismal detail. PMID:12831573

  2. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia. PMID:25732107

  3. Regulation of host cell transcriptional physiology by the avian pneumovirus provides key insights into host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Munir, Shirin; Kapur, Vivek

    2003-04-01

    Infection with a viral pathogen triggers several pathways in the host cell that are crucial to eliminating infection, as well as those that are used by the virus to enhance its replication and virulence. We have here used suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analyses to characterize the host transcriptional response in an avian pneumovirus model of infection. The results of our investigations reveal a dynamic host response that includes the regulation of genes with roles in a vast array of cellular functions as well as those that have not been described previously. The results show a considerable upregulation in transcripts representing the interferon-activated family of genes, predicted to play a role in virus replication arrest. The analysis also identified transcripts for proinflammatory leukocyte chemoattractants, adhesion molecules, and complement that were upregulated and may account for the inflammatory pathology that is the hallmark of viral respiratory infection. Interestingly, alterations in the transcription of several genes in the ubiquitin and endosomal protein trafficking pathways were observed, suggesting a role for these pathways in virus maturation and budding. Taken together, the results of our investigations provide key insights into individual genes and pathways that constitute the host cell's response to avian pneumovirus infection, and they have enabled the development of resources and a model of host-pathogen interaction for an important avian respiratory tract pathogen. PMID:12663796

  4. Exposure Control--OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granville, Mark F.

    1993-01-01

    Explains schools' responsibilities in complying with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Describes exposure determination plan, protective equipment, housekeeping practices, labeling of waste, training employees, hepatitis B vaccinations, postexposure evaluation and medical follow-up, and…

  5. Killing of anaerobic pathogens by predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Essche, M; Quirynen, M; Sliepen, I; Loozen, G; Boon, N; Van Eldere, J; Teughels, W

    2011-02-01

    Recently, the predation of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on a periodontal pathogen has been described. The current study explores the potential antimicrobial activity of a range of predatory bacteria against key periodontal pathogens. A number of representatives from the Bdellovibrio, Bacteriovorax and Peredibacter lineages (called 'BALOs') were tested for their activity towards a group of key periodontal pathogens and an optimal multiplicity of infection was established. As the oral cavity contains a wide variety of bacteria that are not preyed upon, it was investigated if they can have an effect on the predation efficiency of BALOs. It was concluded that a number of important variables involved in bacterial predation are found to be compatible with the composition of the oral microbiota. This finding makes the case for continued study of the potential for BALOs to combat periodontal pathogens. PMID:21214872

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in human pathogens

    E-print Network

    Juhas, Mario

    2013-07-18

    contributing to the emergence of novel “superbugs”. This review provides update on various mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer and examines how horizontal gene transfer contributes to the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. Special focus is paid to the role...

  7. Receptor-mediated recognition of mycobacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Killick, Kate E; Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Hokamp, Karsten; MacHugh, David E; Harris, James

    2013-09-01

    Mycobacteria are a genus of bacteria that range from the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. Mycobacteria primarily infect host tissues through inhalation or ingestion. They are phagocytosed by host macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the surface of mycobacteria are recognized by phagocytic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Several families of PRRs have been shown to non-opsonically recognize mycobacterial PAMPs, including membrane-bound C-type lectin receptors, membrane-bound and cytosolic Toll-like receptors and cytosolic NOD-like receptors. Recently, a possible role for intracellular cytosolic PRRs in the recognition of mycobacterial pathogens has been proposed. Here, we discuss currentideas on receptor-mediated recognition of mycobacterial pathogens by macrophages and dendritic cells. PMID:23795683

  8. Genomic Organization of Fungal Plant Pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent large scale genomic sequencing of fungal phytopathogens has revolutionized the study of plant pathogenesis. Initially, having whole genome sequence (WGS) data for individual fungal genomes has accelerated classical forward and reverse genetic approaches for identifying pathogenicity genes...

  9. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE UPDATE: PFRP EQUIVALENCY DETERMINATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will: Review the mandate of the Pathogen Equivalency Committee Review the PEC's current membership of 10 Discuss how a typical application is evaluated Note where information can be found List present deliberations/applications and describe t...

  10. The language connectome: new pathways, new concepts.

    PubMed

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Bernal, Byron; Tremblay, Pascale

    2014-10-01

    The field of the neurobiology of language is experiencing a paradigm shift in which the predominant Broca-Wernicke-Geschwind language model is being revised in favor of models that acknowledge that language is processed within a distributed cortical and subcortical system. While it is important to identify the brain regions that are part of this system, it is equally important to establish the anatomical connectivity supporting their functional interactions. The most promising framework moving forward is one in which language is processed via two interacting "streams"--a dorsal and ventral stream--anchored by long association fiber pathways, namely the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and two less well-established pathways, the middle longitudinal fasciculus and extreme capsule. In this article, we review the most up-to-date literature on the anatomical connectivity and function of these pathways. We also review and emphasize the importance of the often overlooked cortico-subcortical connectivity for speech via the "motor stream" and associated fiber systems, including a recently identified cortical association tract, the frontal aslant tract. These pathways anchor the distributed cortical and subcortical systems that implement speech and language in the human brain. PMID:24342910

  11. Adhesion Mechanisms of Plant-Pathogenic Xanthomonadaceae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadia Mhedbi-Hajri; Marie-Agnès Jacques; Ralf Koebnik

    \\u000a The family Xanthomonadaceae is a wide-spread family of bacteria belonging to the gamma subdivision of the Gram-negative proteobacteria, including the\\u000a two plant-pathogenic genera Xanthomonas and Xylella, and the related genus Stenotrophomonas. Adhesion is a widely conserved virulence mechanism among Gram-negative bacteria, no matter whether they are human, animal\\u000a or plant pathogens, since attachment to the host tissue is one of

  12. Naturally Occurring Pathogens and Invasive Arthropods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ted E. Cottrell; David I. Shapiro-Ilan

    Establishment of introduced pest arthropods has been attributed, in part, to the pest arthropods’ separation from natural\\u000a control agents in their native ranges. Here we focus on the role of endemic pathogens in establishment and population regulation\\u000a of exotic pest and beneficial arthropods and explore factors affecting their regulation by endemic pathogens. We do not attempt\\u000a an exhaustive list of

  13. Chemical proteomics of host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingyan; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-04-23

    In less than two decades, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) has expanded to become the de facto tool for the study of small molecule-protein interactions in a proteomic environment. In this issue, Na et al. (2015) present another ABPP method, which they called reactive probe-based chemical proteomics, to study host-pathogen interaction and subsequently identify the protein PheA as a potential key effector during the pathogen infection process. PMID:25910239

  14. Lactobacillus fermentum, a pathogen in documented cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Josue; Dvoskin, Dmitriy; Morato, Fernando P.; Fahoum, Bashar

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lactobacillus species are probiotics proven to exhibit various preventative as well as therapeutic properties. While lactobacillus species have been implicated in the formation of dental caries, endocarditis and bacteremia, their role as pathogens in cholecystitis has not been reported. We present a rare case of Lactobacillus fermentum working as a pathogen in cholecystitis. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 81-year old male was admitted with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. His signs, symptoms, laboratory values and imaging were consistent with a diagnosis of cholecystitis with ascending cholangitis. In view of his co-morbidity and severe sepsis, the patient was treated non-operatively with antibiotics and cholecystostomy. L. fermentum, which was vancomycin resistant, was identified from the cholecystostomy aspirate and from anaerobic blood culture. The patient went into septic shock, developed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome and eventually died. DISCUSSION Commensal bacteria such as L. fermentum are known to modulate immunity, reduce the pathogenicity of gastrointestinal organisms and play a therapeutic role in various disease processes. We isolated L. fermentum as a pathogen in a documented case of cholecystitis with ascending cholangitis. CONCLUSION While the routine use lactobacillus species as a probiotic is supported in the literature, understanding its potential role as a pathogen may allow more judicious use of these bacteria and encourage research to elucidate the pathogenicity of lactobacillus species. PMID:23792476

  15. Pathogenic bacteria and timing of laying

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Soler, Juan J; Nielsen, Jan Tøttrup; Galván, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria constitute a serious threat to viability of many organisms. Because growth of most bacteria is favored by humid and warm environmental conditions, earlier reproducers in seasonal environments should suffer less from the negative consequences of pathogenic bacteria. These relationships, and the effects on reproductive success, should be particularly prominent in predators because they are frequently exposed to pathogenic microorganisms from sick prey. Here, we presented and tested this hypothesis by sampling bacteria on adult and nestling goshawks Accipiter gentilis. We predicted that early breeders and their offspring should have fewer bacteria than those reproducing later during the breeding season. Adult goshawks with a high abundance of Staphylococcus on their beak and claws were easier to capture and their laying date was delayed. Moreover, goshawks that laid their eggs later had offspring with more Staphylococcus on their beaks and claws. The strength of the association between laying date and bacterial density of nestlings was stronger during the warm spring of 2013, when nestlings suffered from a higher abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Hatching failure and fledging failure were more common in nests with a higher abundance of Staphylococcus independently of the number of years occupied, laying date, and age of the female nest owner. These findings imply that timing of reproduction may be under the influence of pathogenic bacteria. Because early breeding goshawks produce more recruits than later breeders, our results suggest a role for pathogenic bacteria in the optimal timing of reproduction. PMID:25937910

  16. Pathogenic bacteria and timing of laying.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Soler, Juan J; Nielsen, Jan Tøttrup; Galván, Ismael

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria constitute a serious threat to viability of many organisms. Because growth of most bacteria is favored by humid and warm environmental conditions, earlier reproducers in seasonal environments should suffer less from the negative consequences of pathogenic bacteria. These relationships, and the effects on reproductive success, should be particularly prominent in predators because they are frequently exposed to pathogenic microorganisms from sick prey. Here, we presented and tested this hypothesis by sampling bacteria on adult and nestling goshawks Accipiter gentilis. We predicted that early breeders and their offspring should have fewer bacteria than those reproducing later during the breeding season. Adult goshawks with a high abundance of Staphylococcus on their beak and claws were easier to capture and their laying date was delayed. Moreover, goshawks that laid their eggs later had offspring with more Staphylococcus on their beaks and claws. The strength of the association between laying date and bacterial density of nestlings was stronger during the warm spring of 2013, when nestlings suffered from a higher abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Hatching failure and fledging failure were more common in nests with a higher abundance of Staphylococcus independently of the number of years occupied, laying date, and age of the female nest owner. These findings imply that timing of reproduction may be under the influence of pathogenic bacteria. Because early breeding goshawks produce more recruits than later breeders, our results suggest a role for pathogenic bacteria in the optimal timing of reproduction. PMID:25937910

  17. Review article Nitrates in the human diet good or bad?

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    surfaces, and that this combination is effective in killing a variety of human gut and skin pathogensReview article Nitrates in the human diet ­ good or bad? Nigel BENJAMIN* Department of Clinical, there is no definite evidence as yet that this mech- anism is truly protective in humans exposed to a contaminated

  18. Review article Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Review article Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp Peter J. WALKER 1*, James R. WINTON 2 1 and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular the challenges presented by climate change. disease emergence / shrimp / fish / virus Table of contents 1

  19. Original article Prevalence of microorganisms in dead mink kits

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Prevalence of microorganisms in dead mink kits from Aleutian, liver, heart) taken from 81 dead newborn mink originating from Aleutian disease (AD) infected and AD of these microorganisms as specific pathogens or secondary invaders remains controversial. mink I bacteriology I Aleutian

  20. Original article Effect of turning out dairy cows to pasture

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effect of turning out dairy cows to pasture on milk somatic cell count Dominique-shed. The measurements were: milk production, chemical composition, somatic cell count, pathogens in the milk and plasma somatic cell count and plasma markers level was noticed. In conclusion, the increase in milk somatic cell

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Maize host requirements for Ustilago maydis tumor induction

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Maize host requirements for Ustilago maydis tumor induction Virginia Walbot Æ Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract The biotrophic pathogen Ustilago maydis cau- ses tumors by redirecting, tumors were found in all floral organs, with a progression of organ susceptibility that mirrors

  2. Comparison of innate immune responses to pathogenic and putative non-pathogenic hantaviruses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shim, So Hee; Park, Man-Seong; Moon, Sungsil; Park, Kwang Sook; Song, Jin-Won; Song, Ki-Joon; Baek, Luck Ju

    2011-09-01

    Hantaviruses are human pathogens that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. The mechanisms accounting for the differences in virulence between pathogenic and non-pathogenic hantaviruses are not well known. We have examined the pathogenesis of different hantavirus groups by comparing the innate immune responses induced in the host cell following infection by pathogenic (Sin Nombre, Hantaan, and Seoul virus) and putative non-pathogenic (Prospect Hill, Tula, and Thottapalayam virus) hantaviruses. Pathogenic hantaviruses were found to replicate more efficiently in interferon-competent A549 cells than putative non-pathogenic hantaviruses. The former also suppressed the expression of the interferon-? and myxovirus resistance protein genes, while the transcription level of both genes increased rapidly within 24 h post-infection in the latter. In addition, the induction level of interferon correlated with the activation level of interferon regulatory factor-3. Taken together, these results suggest that the observed differences are correlated with viral pathogenesis and further indicate that pathogenic and putative non-pathogenic hantaviruses differ in terms of early interferon induction via activation of the interferon regulatory factor-3 in infected host cells. PMID:21820021

  3. Viral infection and the evolution of caspase 8-regulated apoptotic and necrotic death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mocarski, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens specifically target both the caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death pathway and the necrotic cell death pathway that is dependent on receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1; also known as RIPK1) and RIP3 (also known as RIPK3). The fundamental co-regulation of these two cell death pathways emerged when the midgestational death of mice deficient in FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD) or caspase 8 was reversed by elimination of RIP1 or RIP3, indicating a far more entwined relationship than previously appreciated. Thus, mammals require caspase 8 activity during embryogenesis to suppress the kinases RIP1 and RIP3 as part of the dialogue between two distinct cell death processes that together fulfil reinforcing roles in the host defence against intracellular pathogens such as herpesviruses. PMID:22193709

  4. Targeting DXP synthase in human pathogens: enzyme inhibition and antimicrobial activity of butylacetylphosphonate

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica M.; Warrington, Nicole V.; Vierling, Ryan J.; Kuhn, Misty L.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Koppisch, Andrew T.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2013-01-01

    The unique methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential in most bacterial pathogens. The first enzyme in this pathway, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase, catalyzes a distinct thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent reaction to form DXP from D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (D-GAP) and pyruvate and represents a potential anti-infective drug target. We have previously demonstrated that the unnatural bisubstrate analog, butylacetylphosphonate (BAP), exhibits selective inhibition of Escherichia coli DXP synthase over mammalian ThDP-dependent enzymes. Here, we report the selective inhibition by BAP against recombinant DXP synthase homologs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We also demonstrate antimicrobial activity of BAP against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains (including E. coli, S. enterica, Bacillus anthracis), and several clinically isolated pathogens. Our results suggest a mechanism of action involving inhibition of DXP synthase and show that BAP acts synergistically with established antimicrobial agents, highlighting a potential strategy to combat emerging resistance in bacterial pathogens. PMID:24169798

  5. Recent insights into host-pathogen interaction in white spot syndrome virus infected penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, M S; Ponniah, A G

    2015-07-01

    Viral disease outbreaks are a major concern impeding the development of the shrimp aquaculture industry. The viral disease due to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) observed in early 1990s still continues unabated affecting the shrimp farms and cause huge economic loss to the shrimp aquaculture industry. In the absence of effective therapeutics to control WSSV, it is important to understand viral pathogenesis and shrimp response to WSSV at the molecular level. Identification and molecular characterization of WSSV proteins and receptors may facilitate in designing and development of novel therapeutics and antiviral drugs that may inhibit viral replication. Investigations into host-pathogen interactions might give new insights to viral infectivity, tissue tropism and defence mechanism elicited in response to WSSV infection. However, due to the limited information on WSSV gene function and host immune response, the signalling pathways which are associated in shrimp pathogen interaction have also not been elucidated completely. In the present review, the focus is on those shrimp proteins and receptors that are potentially involved in virus infection or in the defence mechanism against WSSV. In addition, the major signalling pathways involved in the innate immune response and the role of apoptosis in host-pathogen interaction is discussed. PMID:24953507

  6. A Pathway Idea for Model Building

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, A.M.; Moschopoulos, Panagis

    2013-01-01

    Models, mathematical or stochastic, which move from one functional form to another through pathway parameters, so that in between stages can be captured, are examined in this article. Models which move from generalized type-1 beta family to type-2 beta family, to generalized gamma family to generalized Mittag-Leffler family to Lévy distributions are examined here. It is known that one can likely find an approximate model for the data at hand whether the data are coming from biological, physical, engineering, social sciences or other areas. Different families of functions are connected through the pathway parameters and hence one will find a suitable member from within one of the families or in between stages of two families. Graphs are provided to show the movement of the different models showing thicker tails, thinner tails, right tail cut off etc. PMID:24883223

  7. Pathways in general surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick Carty

    Surgery is an ideal fi eld for the application of care pathways. There is typically a single evaluation and diagnostic episode followed by a defi ned treatment. Where follow-up is required, this usually has a predictable schedule. In contrast, many other medical specialities are concerned with the treatment of diseases, which, by their nature, are less easily defi ned. This

  8. Pathway Graphical Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Grechkin, Maxim; Fazel, Maryam; Witten, Daniela; Lee, Su-In

    2014-01-01

    Graphical models provide a rich framework for summarizing the dependencies among variables. The graphical lasso approach attempts to learn the structure of a Gaussian graphical model (GGM) by maximizing the log likelihood of the data, subject to an l1 penalty on the elements of the inverse co-variance matrix. Most algorithms for solving the graphical lasso problem do not scale to a very large number of variables. Furthermore, the learned network structure is hard to interpret. To overcome these challenges, we propose a novel GGM structure learning method that exploits the fact that for many real-world problems we have prior knowledge that certain edges are unlikely to be present. For example, in gene regulatory networks, a pair of genes that does not participate together in any of the cellular processes, typically referred to as pathways, is less likely to be connected. In computer vision applications in which each variable corresponds to a pixel, each variable is likely to be connected to the nearby variables. In this paper, we propose the pathway graphical lasso, which learns the structure of a GGM subject to pathway-based constraints. In order to solve this problem, we decompose the network into smaller parts, and use a message-passing algorithm in order to communicate among the subnetworks. Our algorithm has orders of magnitude improvement in run time compared to the state-of-the-art optimization methods for the graphical lasso problem that were modified to handle pathway-based constraints.

  9. Pathways of Lateral Spreading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Jacobi; S. Schanzer; H.-J. Weigmann; A. Patzelt; T. Vergou; W. Sterry; J. Lademann

    2011-01-01

    In the case of topically applied substances, usually both lateral spreading and competitive penetration into the skin occur in parallel. In the present study, the pathways of lateral spreading were studied quantitatively and visually. The local distribution and lateral spreading of the UV filter substance butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane applied in an o\\/w emulsion was studied on the forearm and the back.

  10. The 3-Hydroxy-2-Butanone Pathway Is Required for Pectobacterium carotovorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Villavicencio, Maria del Pilar; Weber, Brooke; Witherell, R. Andrews; Willis, David K.; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2011-01-01

    Pectobacterium species are necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that cause soft rot diseases in potatoes and several other crops worldwide. Gene expression data identified Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum budB, which encodes the ?-acetolactate synthase enzyme in the 2,3-butanediol pathway, as more highly expressed in potato tubers than potato stems. This pathway is of interest because volatiles produced by the 2,3-butanediol pathway have been shown to act as plant growth promoting molecules, insect attractants, and, in other bacterial species, affect virulence and fitness. Disruption of the 2,3-butanediol pathway reduced virulence of P. c. subsp. carotovorum WPP14 on potato tubers and impaired alkalinization of growth medium and potato tubers under anaerobic conditions. Alkalinization of the milieu via this pathway may aid in plant cell maceration since Pectobacterium pectate lyases are most active at alkaline pH. PMID:21876734

  11. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis for Venturia inaequalis, the devastating apple scab pathogen.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Karnika; Chawla, Vandna; Bhatti, Shammi; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Kaur, Jagdeep; Shankar, Ravi; Jha, Gopaljee

    2013-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, one of the most devastating diseases of apple. Due to several distinct features, it has emerged as a model fungal pathogen to study various aspects of hemibiotrophic plant pathogen interactions. The present study reports de novo assembling, annotation and characterization of the transcriptome of V. inaequalis. Venturia transcripts expressed during its growth on laboratory medium and that expressed during its biotrophic stage of infection on apple were sequenced using Illumina RNAseq technology. A total of 94,350,055 reads (50 bp read length) specific to Venturia were obtained after filtering. The reads were assembled into 62,061 contigs representing 24,571 unique genes. GO analysis suggested prevalence of genes associated with biological process categories like metabolism, transport and response to stimulus. Genes associated with molecular function like binding, catalytic activities and transferase activities were found in majority. EC and KEGG pathway analyses suggested prevalence of genes encoding kinases, proteases, glycoside hydrolases, cutinases, cytochrome P450 and transcription factors. The study has identified several putative pathogenicity determinants and candidate effectors in V. inaequalis. A large number of transcripts encoding membrane transporters were identified and comparative analysis revealed that the number of transporters encoded by Venturia is significantly more as compared to that encoded by several other important plant fungal pathogens. Phylogenomics analysis indicated that V. inaequalis is closely related to Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (the causal organism of tan spot of wheat). In conclusion, the findings from this study provide a better understanding of the biology of the apple scab pathogen and have identified candidate genes/functions required for its pathogenesis. This work lays the foundation for facilitating further research towards understanding this host-pathogen interaction. PMID:23349770

  12. Dynamic Evolution of Pathogenicity Revealed by Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. PMID:21799664

  13. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    PubMed

    Baltrus, David A; Nishimura, Marc T; Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R; Jones, Corbin D; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2011-07-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. PMID:21799664

  14. Nitrate reduction pathways in mycobacteria and their implications during latency.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arshad; Sarkar, Dhiman

    2012-02-01

    Mycobacterial persistence has gained a lot of attention with respect to developing novel antitubercular drugs, which could drastically reduce the duration of tuberculosis (TB) therapy. A better understanding of the physiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and of the metabolic state of the bacillus during the latent period, is a primary need in finding drug targets against persistent TB. Recent biochemical and genetic studies of nitrate reduction in mycobacteria have revealed the roles of distinct proteins and enzymes involved in the pathway. The differential degree of nitrate reduction among pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacterial species, and its regulation during oxygen and nutrient limitation, suggest a link between nitrate reduction pathways and latency. The respiratory and assimilatory reduction of nitrate in mycobacteria may be interconnected to facilitate rapid adaptation to changing oxygen and/or nitrogen conditions, increasing metabolic flexibility for survival in the hostile host environment. This review summarizes the nitrate metabolic pathways operative in mycobacteria to provide an insight into the mechanisms that M. tuberculosis has evolved to adapt successfully to the host environment. PMID:22174380

  15. Jasmonate Signaling Pathway

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robin Liechti (University of Lausanne; Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV)

    2006-02-14

    Jasmonates in plants are cyclic fatty acid–derived regulators structurally similar to prostaglandins in metazoans. These chemicals mediate many of plants' transcriptional responses to wounding and pathogenesis by acting as potent regulators for the expression of numerous frontline immune response genes, including those for defensins and antifungal proteins. Additionally, the pathway is critical for fertility. Ongoing genetic screens and protein-protein interaction assays are identifying components of the canonical jasmonate signaling pathway. A massive molecular machine, based on two multiprotein complexes, SCFCOI1 and the COP9 signalosome (CNS), plays a central role in jasmonate signaling. This machine functions in vivo as a ubiquitin ligase complex, probably targeting regulatory proteins, some of which are expected to be transcriptional repressors. Some defense-related mediators, notably salicylic acid, antagonize jasmonates in controlling the expression of many genes. In Arabidopsis, NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES (NPR1) mediates part of this interaction, with another layer of control provided further downstream by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) homolog MPK4. Numerous other interpathway connections influence the jasmonate pathway. Insights from Arabidopsis have shown that an allele of the auxin signaling gene AXR1, for example, reduces the sensitivity of plants to jasmonate. APETALA2 (AP2)-domain transcription factors, such as ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 1 (ERF1), link the jasmonate pathway to the ethylene signaling pathway. As progress in characterizing several new mutants (some of which are hypersensitive to jasmonic acid) augments our understanding of jasmonate signaling, the Connections Map will be updated to include this new information.

  16. INTRODUCTION: Intracellular pathogens, which include viruses and some bacteria,

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    RESEARCH INTRODUCTION: Intracellular pathogens, which include viruses and some bacteria, typically in the extracellular environment, pathogens can be intercepted by humoral immunity or by professional immune cells. How mechanisms to detect and disable pathogens. RATIONALE: We hypothesized that one method of pathogen detection

  17. Multiple pathogens infect multiple hosts: Inference for incidence, infection, & impact

    E-print Network

    Wolpert, Robert L

    Multiple pathogens infect multiple hosts: Inference for incidence, infection, & impact #12;Nature · Competing species can coexist if each is attacked when it becomes abundant · Requires a different pathogen to regulate each host · If Janzen-Connell effects maintain diversity through pathogens, then ­ Pathogens

  18. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    applications in fields such as metabolic engineering, which focuses on discovering and implementing newIdentifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways Allison P. Heath1 presents a graph-based algorithm for identify- ing complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale

  19. Lessons from a red squirrel, mentors, and the pathway to success.

    PubMed

    Reithmeier, Reinhart A F

    2014-12-01

    In this article I will review my personal career path starting with how a red squirrel got me interested in research, and the vital role that mentors played in my pathway to success - a pathway that taught me many lessons that I would like to share with the reader, particularly graduate students and post-doctoral fellows who are just starting down their own unique pathways. PMID:25008076

  20. Using Drosophila melanogaster to map human cancer pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony M. Brumby; Helena E. Richardson

    2005-01-01

    The development of human cancer is a multistep process, involving the cooperation of mutations in signalling, cell-cycle and cell-death pathways, as well as interactions between the tumour and the tumour microenvironment. To dissect the steps of tumorigenesis, simple animal models are needed. This article discusses the use of the genetically amenable, multicellular organism, the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. In particular,

  1. Single-molecule nanocatalysis reveals heterogeneous reaction pathways and

    E-print Network

    Chen, Peng

    ARTICLES Single-molecule nanocatalysis reveals heterogeneous reaction pathways and catalytic in ensemble measurements. Using a single-nanoparticle single-turnover approach, we study the redox catalysis of individual colloidal Au nanoparticles in solution, using single-molecule detection of fluorogenic reactions

  2. Cell Stem Cell Molecular Pathway and Cell State Responsible

    E-print Network

    South Bohemia, University of

    Cell Stem Cell Article Molecular Pathway and Cell State Responsible for Dissociation-Induced Apoptosis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Masatoshi Ohgushi,1,2 Michiru Matsumura,1,2 Mototsugu Eiraku,1 Sasai1,2,* 1Organogenesis and Neurogenesis Group 2Division of Human Stem Cell Technology 3Laboratory

  3. Children's School May 2011 Director's Corner: Learning Pathways

    E-print Network

    Children's School May 2011 Director's Corner: Learning Pathways Over the course of my articles the Children's School's "developmental goals". For each set of goals, I also explained the ways that our for reinforcing central mathematics concepts, and the approaches families can adopt to support the children

  4. Developing Teacher Leadership in Singapore: Multiple Pathways for Differentiated Journeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, A. Lin; Low, Ee Ling; Ng, Pak Tee

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine quality teachers through teacher leadership development. Using Singapore as an illustrative case, we describe the redefinition of the teaching profession to include deliberate structures and multiple pathways designed to nurture teacher leaders, and the role of teacher leaders in supporting education reform. We go on to…

  5. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  6. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis: pathway to apical localization.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Wiegeshaus, E H; Taylor, B T; Smith, D W

    1994-06-01

    We have examined the published work of investigators which dealt with the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, especially the following: the infective dose, the yield of bacilli from the primary lesion and primary complex, the predominant location of the minimal lesion, the hypotheses of a vulnerable region in the lung and the specific pathways (endogenous or exogenous) by which tubercle bacilli cause disease. More knowledge of the pathogenic pathway to tuberculosis would provide clues to the development of new vaccines and drug regimens that can intervene at a specific stage in the pathogenesis. Based on the examination of the literature on pathogenesis of human tuberculosis and our findings in a guinea-pig model of experimental airborne tuberculosis, we have proposed an hypothesis which integrates the endogenous and exogenous pathways to tuberculosis. This hypothesis is based on the following observations: 1. The infectious dose is very low, usually 1-5 tubercle bacilli. 2. The first implant can occur anywhere in the lungs. 3. The cavitary lesion, characteristic of tuberculous disease, is often located in the apical regions in the lungs. 4. Whereas the primary implant can occur anywhere in the lungs, for the progression from infection to disease, the tubercle bacilli must gain access to the 'vulnerable' regions in the apex of the lungs. Our hypothesis states that in areas of the world where there is a low risk of infection with tubercle bacilli low incidence of vaccination or sensitization to environmental mycobacteria, or high incidence of high virulent isolates, the virulent tubercle bacilli reach the vulnerable region via a bacillemia during the first infection. In areas of the world where there is a high risk of infection with tubercle bacilli, high incidence of vaccination or sensitization to environmental mycobacteria or a high incidence of low virulent isolates, the tubercle bacilli reach the vulnerable region via the airway, which requires repeated episodes of infection as the probability of a first implant occurring in the vulnerable regions is low. PMID:7919306

  7. Uncovering differentially expressed pathways with protein interaction and gene expression data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu-Qing Qiu; Shihua Zhang; Xiang-Sun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The identification of genes and pathways involved in biological processes is a central problem in systems biology. Recent microarray technologies and other high-throughput experi- ments provide information which sheds light on this problem. In this article, we propose a new method to identify differentially expressed pathways via integration of gene expression and inter- actomic data in a sophisticated and efficient

  8. Transitions to College: Academic Pathways from High School to the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of high school-to-college transition models, referred to as academic pathways, that regard community colleges as a primary partner for higher learning. It explores three academic pathways that deliberately partner secondary schools with community colleges. They are dual credit and dual enrollment, tech prep and…

  9. Systems biology by the rules: hybrid intelligent systems for pathway modeling and discovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J Bosl

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expert knowledge in journal articles is an important source of data for reconstructing biological pathways and creating new hypotheses. An important need for medical research is to integrate this data with high throughput sources to build useful models that span several scales. Researchers traditionally use mental models of pathways to integrate information and development new hypotheses. Unfortunately, the amount

  10. A bacterial pathogen uses dimethylsulfoniopropionate as a cue to target heat-stressed corals.

    PubMed

    Garren, Melissa; Son, Kwangmin; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Rusconi, Roberto; Menolascina, Filippo; Shapiro, Orr H; Tout, Jessica; Bourne, David G; Seymour, Justin R; Stocker, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Diseases are an emerging threat to ocean ecosystems. Coral reefs, in particular, are experiencing a worldwide decline because of disease and bleaching, which have been exacerbated by rising seawater temperatures. Yet, the ecological mechanisms behind most coral diseases remain unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that a coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus, uses chemotaxis and chemokinesis to target the mucus of its coral host, Pocillopora damicornis. A primary driver of this response is the host metabolite dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a key element in the global sulfur cycle and a potent foraging cue throughout the marine food web. Coral mucus is rich in DMSP, and we found that DMSP alone elicits chemotactic responses of comparable intensity to whole mucus. Furthermore, in heat-stressed coral fragments, DMSP concentrations increased fivefold and the pathogen's chemotactic response was correspondingly enhanced. Intriguingly, despite being a rich source of carbon and sulfur, DMSP is not metabolized by the pathogen, suggesting that it is used purely as an infochemical for host location. These results reveal a new role for DMSP in coral disease, demonstrate the importance of chemical signaling and swimming behavior in the recruitment of pathogens to corals and highlight the impact of increased seawater temperatures on disease pathways. PMID:24335830

  11. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J. J. (John J.); Gupta, G. (Goutam); Gray, P. C. (Perry C.); Hush, D. R. (Donald R.); Fugate, M. L. (Michael L.); Cleland, T. J. (Timothy J.); Roberts, R. M. (Randy M.); Hlavacek, W. S. (William S.); Smith, J. L. (Jessica L.)

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  12. Arabidopsis phospholipase D?1 modulates defense responses to bacterial and fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Devaiah, Shivakumar P.; Wang, Cunxi; Li, Maoyin; Welti, Ruth; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pathogen infection of higher plants often induces a rapid production of phosphatic acid (PA) and changes in lipid profiles, but the enzymatic basis and the function of the lipid change in pathogen-plant interactions are not well understood. Infection of PLD?1-deficient plants by Pseudomonas syringae pv. DC3000 resulted in less bacterial growth than in wild-type plants, and the effect was more profound in virulent Pst DC3000 than avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrRpt2) infection. The expression levels of salicylic acid (SA)-inducible genes were higher, but those inducible by jasmonic acid (JA) were lower in PLD?1 mutants than in wild-type plants. However, PLD?1-deficient plants were more susceptible than wild-type plants to the fungus Botrytis cinerea. The PLD?1-deficient plants had lower levels of PA, JA and JA-related defense gene expression after B. cinerea inoculation. PLD?1 plays a positive role in pathogen-induced JA production and plant resistance to necrotrophic fungal pathogen B. cinerea, but a negative role in the SA-dependent signaling pathway and plant tolerance to the infection of biotrophic Pst DC3000. PLD?1 is responsible for the major part of PA increased in response to necrotrophic B. cinerea and virulent Pst DC3000 infection, but contributes less to the avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrRpt2)-induced PA production. PMID:23577648

  13. Altered Localization of HrpZ in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae hrp Mutants Suggests that Different Components of the Type III Secretion Pathway Control Protein Translocation across the Inner and Outer Membranes of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AMY O. CHARKOWSKI; HSIOU-CHEN HUANG; ALAN COLLMER

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 (Pss61) secretes the HrpZ harpin by a type III protein secretion pathway encoded by a cluster of hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) and hrc genes. The nine hrc genes represent a subset of hrp genes that are also conserved in the type III virulence protein secretion systems of animal pathogenic Yersinia, Shigella, and Salmonella spp.

  14. MICROBIOLOGY: A Fifth Pathway of Carbon Fixation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rudolf K. Thauer (Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology; )

    2007-12-14

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Genome sequence analyses and enzymatic studies reveal a novel CO2 fixation cycle in some autotrophic archaea. Autotrophs are organisms that can grow using carbon dioxide (CO2) as their sole source of carbon. Four mechanisms are known by which autotrophic organisms fix carbon. Berg et al. describe a fifth autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in archaea that may have been used by some of the earliest organisms on Earth.

  15. Prion degradation pathways: Potential for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Goold, Rob; McKinnon, Chris; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders. Pathology is closely linked to the misfolding of native cellular PrPC into the disease-associated form PrPSc that accumulates in the brain as disease progresses. Although treatments have yet to be developed, strategies aimed at stimulating the degradation of PrPSc have shown efficacy in experimental models of prion disease. Here, we describe the cellular pathways that mediate PrPSc degradation and review possible targets for therapeutic intervention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Neuronal Protein’. PMID:25584786

  16. Vibrio vulnificusBiotype 2, Pathogenic for Eels, Is Also an Opportunistic Pathogen for Humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CARMEN AMARO; ANDELENA G. BIOSCA

    We report that the eel pathogen Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is also an opportunistic pathogen for humans. Results from a detailed comparative study using reference strains of both biotypes revealed that the clinical strain ATCC 33817, originally isolated from a human leg wound and classified as V. vulnificus (no reference on its biotype is noted), belongs to biotype 2 of

  17. Fusarium graminearum: an pathogen of maize in Nepal, pathogenic variability and mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen of maize in hills of Nepal. It predominantly occurs on maize grown in cool and humid environment of high hills. The pathogen is also known to infect other cereal crops including wheat and rice causing important diseases. The incidence of ear rot is hi...

  18. Pathogenicity of two Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. Interestingly, the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in ducks. These changes in vir...

  19. Emerging Bacterial Pathogens in Meat and Poultry: An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Montserrat Mor-Mur; Josep Yuste

    2010-01-01

    Many foodborne diseases are associated with consumption of meat and poultry. Some pathogens were not previously known (new\\u000a pathogens), others have newly arisen as foodborne (emerging pathogens), and others have become more potent or associated with\\u000a other products (evolving pathogens). Many of these pathogens may cause severe illness, besides gastroenteritis. Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of food-associated bacterial illness;

  20. Processes affecting the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum and other persistent pathogens in surface- and ground-waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Lau, B. L.; Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    Waterborne diseases are transmitted through numerous environmental pathways, and their migration is strongly mediated by interaction with a wide variety of sediments and other natural materials during transport. Here we provide an overview of factors that affect the fate of persistent water-borne pathogens, focusing particularly on the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum as an example. While individual microbial cells are both small and have low specific gravity, suggesting that they should be highly mobile and remain suspended for long periods of time, attachment to a variety of background materials can substantially reduce pathogen mobility. Cryptosporidium oocysts readily associate with both inorganic and organic particles, resulting in the formation of aggregates. This process tends to increase the effective settling velocity of C. parvum in surface waters. Similarly, pathogens readily become associated with the solid matrix during transport in groundwater, resulting in removal by filtration. However, this process is reversible with C. parvum, resulting in a slow long-term release following the initial deposition. Pathogens also become associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached communities of microorganisms in a gelatinous matrix. The presence of biofilms increases the immobilization and retention of Cryptosporidium on solid surfaces. All of these processes influence pathogen transmission in surface waters such as rivers and water-supply canals. In these environments, pathogens can be immobilized by deposition into stable sediment beds by a combination of gravitational sedimentation and advection into pore waters followed by subsurface filtration. Association with background suspended matter tends to increase pathogen deposition by sedimentation, and the presence of benthic (sedimentary) biofilms also tends to increase pathogen retention. For pathogens that remain viable for long periods of time in natural aquatic systems, as is the case with Cryptosporidium and other cyst-and spore-forming organisms, then the sediments and sedimentary biofilms become an environmental reservoir of pathogens. Cysts retained in biofilms appear to be relatively difficult to resuspend, but slow, long-term biological release and high-flow events that mobilize streambed sediments both deliver pathogens into transport.