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Sample records for artificial chromosome libraries

  1. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries of Pulse Crops: Characteristics and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kangfu

    2012-01-01

    Pulse crops are considered minor on a global scale despite their nutritional value for human consumption. Therefore, they are relatively less extensively studied in comparison with the major crops. The need to improve pulse crop production and quality will increase with the increasing global demand for food security and people's awareness of nutritious food. The improvement of pulse crops will require fully utilizing all their genetic resources. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of pulse crops are essential genomic resources that have the potential to accelerate gene discovery and enhance molecular breeding in these crops. Here, we review the availability, characteristics, applications, and potential applications of the BAC libraries of pulse crops. PMID:21811383

  2. Construction and characterization of three wheat bacterial artificial chromosome libraries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenjin; Fu, Bisheng; Wu, Kun; Li, Na; Zhou, Yan; Gao, Zhongxia; Lin, Musen; Li, Guoqiang; Wu, Xinyi; Ma, Zhengqiang; Jia, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Wangshuibai, germplasms T. monococcum TA2026 and TA2033. A total of 1,233,792,170,880 and 263,040 clones were picked and arrayed in 384-well plates. On the basis of genome sizes of 16.8 Gb for hexaploid wheat and 5.6 Gb for diploid wheat, the three libraries represented 9.05-, 2.60-, and 3.71-fold coverage of the haploid genomes, respectively. An improved descending pooling system for BAC libraries screening was established. This improved strategy can save 80% of the time and 68% of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the same successful rate as the universal 6D pooling strategy. PMID:25464379

  3. Construction and Characterization of Three Wheat Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenjin; Fu, Bisheng; Wu, Kun; Li, Na; Zhou, Yan; Gao, Zhongxia; Lin, Musen; Li, Guoqiang; Wu,  Xinyi; Ma, Zhengqiang; Jia, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Wangshuibai, germplasms T. monococcum TA2026 and TA2033. A total of 1,233,792,170,880 and 263,040 clones were picked and arrayed in 384-well plates. On the basis of genome sizes of 16.8 Gb for hexaploid wheat and 5.6 Gb for diploid wheat, the three libraries represented 9.05-, 2.60-, and 3.71-fold coverage of the haploid genomes, respectively. An improved descending pooling system for BAC libraries screening was established. This improved strategy can save 80% of the time and 68% of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the same successful rate as the universal 6D pooling strategy. PMID:25464379

  4. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Daniel E.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries. PMID:20981143

  5. Recombination walking: Genetic selection of clones from pooled libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.M.; Savinelli, E.A.; Couture, S.M.; Hannigan, G.M.; Han, Z.; Selden, R.F.; Treco, D.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Recombination walking is based on the genetic selection of specific human clones from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by homologous recombination. The desired clone is selected from a pooled (unorderd) YAC library, eliminating labor-intensive steps typically used in organizing and maintaining ordered YAC libraries. Recombination walking represents an efficient approach to library screening and is well suited for chromosome-walking approaches to the isolation of genes associated with common diseases. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library for hexaploid wheat line 92R137

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For map-based cloning of genes conferring important traits in the hexaploid wheat line 92R137, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, including two sub libraries, was constructed using the genomic DNA of 92R137 digested with restriction enzymes HindIII and BamHI. The BAC library was compos...

  7. Preparation of high molecular weight gDNA and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries in plants.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Siddanagouda S; Nie, Xiaojun; Feng, Kewei; Weining, Song

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable large-insert DNA libraries for physical mapping, positional cloning, comparative genomic analysis, complete genome sequencing, and evolutionary studies. Due to their stability and relative simplicity BAC libraries are most preferred over other approaches for cloning large genomic DNA fragments for large-insert libraries. Isolation of intact high molecular weight (HMW) DNA is a critical step underlying the success of large-insert genomic DNA library construction. It requires the isolation of purified nuclei, embedding them into LMP agarose plugs, restriction digestion of the plugs, and quite often size selection using PFGE and electro-elution of insert DNA. The construction of BAC libraries is complex and challenging for most molecular laboratories. To facilitate the construction of BAC libraries, we present a step-by-step protocol for isolation of HMW DNA and construction of plant BAC libraries. PMID:24243195

  8. Construction, characterization and FISH mapping of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla).

    PubMed

    Che, J; Wang, J; Su, W; Ye, J; Wang, Y; Nie, W; Yang, F

    2008-01-01

    Chinese pangolins as a representative species in the order Pholidota have highly specified morphological characters and occupy an important place in the mammalian phylogenetic tree. To obtain genomic data for this species, we have constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Chinese pangolin. The library contains 208,272 clones with an average insert size of 122.1 kb and represents approximately eight times the Chinese pangolin haploid genome (if we assume that the Chinese pangolins have a genome size similar to human). One hundred and twenty randomly-selected BAC clones were mapped onto Chinese pangolin chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), showing a largely unbiased chromosomal distribution. Several clones containing repetitive DNA and ribosomal DNA genes were also found. The BAC library and FISH mapped BAC clones are useful resources for comparative genomics and cytogenetics of mammals and in particular, the ongoing genome sequencing project of Chinese pangolins. PMID:18931486

  9. Construction and characterization of a human bacterial artificial chromosome library

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ung-Jin; Birren, B.W.; Slepak, T.

    1996-06-01

    We have constructed an arrayed human genomic BAC library with approximately 4X coverage that is represented by 96,000 BAC clones with average insert size of nearly 140 kb. A new BAC vector that allows color-based positive screening to identify transformants with inserts has increased BAC cloning efficiency. The library was gridded onto hybridization filters at high density for efficient identification of BAC clones by colony hybridization. The library was also formulated into characteristic DNA pools to allow for PCR screening of the library mainly by screening with more than 300 different landmarks that include cDNA, STSs, and cosmid clones. We describe methods for using BAC clones and discuss the implications for genome characterization, mapping, and sequencing. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for Zhikong Scallop Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Scheuring, Chantel F.; Zhang, Hongbin; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2008-05-01

    Two Large-insert genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri were constructed to promote our genetic and genomic research. High-quality megabase-sized DNA was isolated from the adductor muscle of the scallop and partially digested by BamH I and Mbo I, respectively. The BamH I library consisted of 53 760 clones while the Mbo I library consisted of 7 680clones. Approximately 96 % of the clones in BamH I library contained nuclear DNA inserts in average size of 100 kb, providing a coverage of 5.3 haploid genome equivalents. Similarly, the Mbo I library with an average insert of 145 kb and no insert-empty clones, thus providing a genome coverage of 1.1 haploid genome equivalents.

  11. Construction and characterization of an eightfold redundant dog genomic bacterial artificial chromosome library.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Mignot, E; Faraco, J; Kadotani, H; Cantanese, J; Zhao, B; Lin, X; Hinton, L; Ostrander, E A; Patterson, D F; de Jong, P J

    1999-05-15

    A large insert canine genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was built from a Doberman pinscher. Approximately 166,000 clones were gridded on nine high-density hybridization filters. Insert analysis of randomly selected clones indicated a mean insert size of 155 kb and predicted 8.1 coverage of the canine genome. Two percent of the clones were nonrecombinant. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of 60 BAC clones indicated no chimerism. The library was hybridized with dog PCR products representing eight genes (ADA, TNFA, GCA, MYB, HOXA, GUSB, THY1, and TOP1). The resulting positive clones were characterized and shown to be compatible with an eightfold redundant library. PMID:10331940

  12. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, S S; Jiang, J; Gill, B S; Paterson, A H; Wing, R A

    1994-01-01

    The construction of representative large insert DNA libraries is critical for the analysis of complex genomes. The predominant vector system for such work is the yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) system. Despite the success of YACs, many problems have been described including: chimerism, tedious steps in library construction and low yields of YAC insert DNA. Recently a new E.coli based system has been developed, the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, which offers many potential advantages over YACs. We tested the BAC system in plants by constructing an ordered 13,440 clone sorghum BAC library. The library has a combined average insert size, from single and double size selections, of 157 kb. Sorghum inserts of up to 315 kb were isolated and shown to be stable when grown for over 100 generations in liquid media. No chimeric clones were detected as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization of ten BAC clones to metaphase and interphase S.bicolor nuclei. The library was screened with six sorghum probes and three maize probes and all but one sorghum probe hybridized to at least one BAC clone in the library. To facilitate chromosome walking with the BAC system, methods were developed to isolate the proximal ends of restriction fragments inserted into the BAC vector and used to isolate both the left and right ends of six randomly selected BAC clones. These results demonstrate that the S. bicolor BAC library will be useful for several physical mapping and map-based cloning applications not only in sorghum but other related cereal genomes, such as maize. Furthermore, we conclude that the BAC system is suitable for most large genome applications, is more 'user friendly' than the YAC system, and will likely lead to rapid progress in cloning biologically significant genes from plants. Images PMID:7800481

  13. A high-density physical map of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 chromosome derived from bacterial artificial chromosome library

    PubMed Central

    Capela, Delphine; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Gatius, Marie-Thérèse; Gouzy, Jérôme; Galibert, Francis

    1999-01-01

    As part of the European Sinorhizobium meliloti (strain 1021) chromosome sequencing project, four genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries have been constructed, one of which was mainly used for chromosome mapping. This library consists of 1,824 clones with an average insert size of 80 kilobases and represents approximately 20-fold total genome coverage [6.8 megabases (Mbs)]. PCR screening of 384 BAC clones with 447 chromosomal markers (PCR primer pairs), consisting of 73 markers representing 118 genes (40 individual genes and 78 genes clustered in 23 operons), two markers from the rrn operon (three loci), four markers from insertion sequences (≈16 loci) and 368 sequence-tagged sites allowed the identification of 252 chromosomal BAC clones and the construction of a high-density physical map of the whole 3.7-Mb chromosome of S. meliloti. An average of 5.5 overlapping and colinear BAC clones per marker, correlated with a low rate of deleted or rearranged clones (0.8%) indicate a solid BAC contigation and a correct mapping. Systematic blastx analysis of sequence-tagged site marker sequences allowed prediction of a biological function for a number of putative ORFs. Results are available at http://www-recomgen.univ-rennes1.fr/meliloti. This map, whose resolution averages one marker every 9 kilobases, should provide a valuable tool for further sequencing, functional analysis, and positional cloning. PMID:10430947

  14. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library for the allotetraploid Gossypium tomentosum.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wang, Y H; Gao, H Y; Wang, C Y; Zhou, Z L; Cai, X Y; Wang, X X; Zhang, Z S; Wang, K B

    2015-01-01

    Gossypium tomentosum is a wild allotetraploid species with the (AD)5 genome. It is characterized by many useful traits including finer fiber fineness, drought tolerance, and Fusarium and Verticillium resistance. We constructed the first bacterial artificial chromosome library for Gossypium tomentosum. With high quality and broad coverage, this library includes 200,832 clones, with an average insert size of about 122 kb and fewer than 3% empty clones. Our library is approximately 10-fold the size of the (AD)5-genome (2400 Mb) and provides a 99.7% probability of isolating genes of interest or their sequences. Seven of eight simple sequence repeats markers that are located on five different chromosomes and linked with resistance to Verticillium wilt could amplify the 50 superpools and obtained one to five hits. This high capacity library will be an important genomic resource for classifying and analyzing the evolution of allotetraploid cotton species as well as for isolating disease-resistance and drought-tolerance genes. PMID:26681044

  15. Systematic screening of yeast artificial-chromosome libraries by use of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Green, E D; Olson, M V

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an approach for screening ordered arrays of yeast artificial-chromosome (YAC) clones containing human DNA that is based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This approach is designed to determine the locations of positive clones within a YAC library that is stored as individual clones in 96-well microtiter plates. The high sensitivity and specificity of the PCR allow the detection of target sequences in DNA prepared from pools of 1920 or more YAC clones. The PCR-based screening protocol is performed in two successive stages, which effectively limit the location of a positive clone to four microtiter plates (384 clones). Final localization of each positive clone is accomplished by conventional DNA.DNA hybridization using a single filter containing the YAC clones from the appropriate four microtiter plates. This PCR-based screening strategy has proven highly efficient, allowing the identification and isolation of numerous YAC clones containing specific human genes. The prospects of developing a strategy for screening YAC libraries based completely on PCR assays are discussed, as are the potential applications of this approach to the systematic analysis of the human genome. Images PMID:2405397

  16. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Construction and targeted retrieval of specific clone from a non-gridded soybean bacterial artificial chromosome library.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengjun; Wu, Hongyan; Watanabe, Satoshi; Harada, Kyuya

    2014-01-01

    Although a post-genomic era is emerging for many plants, the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library is still a valuable tool for genomic studies and preservation of precious genetic resources. Construction of non-gridded BAC libraries would dramatically reduce cost and save storage space. A non-gridded BAC library composed of approximately 96,000 insert-containing clones in 80 pools with an average insert size of 75 kb was constructed. This library represented 5.2 genome equivalents. We successfully developed a unique procedure to retrieve positive clones from the non-gridded pools. With this retrieving protocol, the non-gridded library system can be adapted to different species and to serve various research needs. PMID:24090869

  18. Construction and analysis of Siberian tiger bacterial artificial chromosome library with approximately 6.5-fold genome equivalent coverage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changqing; Bai, Chunyu; Guo, Yu; Liu, Dan; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. The Siberian tiger, one of the most well-known wild primitive carnivores in China, is an endangered animal. In order to promote research on its genome, a high-redundancy BAC library of the Siberian tiger was constructed and characterized. The library is divided into two sub-libraries prepared from blood cells and two sub-libraries prepared from fibroblasts. This BAC library contains 153,600 individually archived clones; for PCR-based screening of the library, BACs were placed into 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 116.5 kb, representing approximately 6.46 genome equivalents of the haploid genome and affording a 98.86% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence. Screening the library with 19 microsatellite markers and a SRY sequence revealed that each of these markers were present in the library; the average number of positive clones per marker was 6.74 (range 2 to 12), consistent with 6.46 coverage of the tiger genome. Additionally, we identified 72 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. This BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for physical mapping, comparative genomic study and large-scale genome sequencing in the tiger. PMID:24608928

  19. Construction and Analysis of Siberian Tiger Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library with Approximately 6.5-Fold Genome Equivalent Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changqing; Bai, Chunyu; Guo, Yu; Liu, Dan; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. The Siberian tiger, one of the most well-known wild primitive carnivores in China, is an endangered animal. In order to promote research on its genome, a high-redundancy BAC library of the Siberian tiger was constructed and characterized. The library is divided into two sub-libraries prepared from blood cells and two sub-libraries prepared from fibroblasts. This BAC library contains 153,600 individually archived clones; for PCR-based screening of the library, BACs were placed into 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 116.5 kb, representing approximately 6.46 genome equivalents of the haploid genome and affording a 98.86% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence. Screening the library with 19 microsatellite markers and a SRY sequence revealed that each of these markers were present in the library; the average number of positive clones per marker was 6.74 (range 2 to 12), consistent with 6.46 coverage of the tiger genome. Additionally, we identified 72 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. This BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for physical mapping, comparative genomic study and large-scale genome sequencing in the tiger. PMID:24608928

  20. A chromosome 11 YAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Zhang, J.; Isaacs, C.M.; Nagafuchi, S.; Jani Sait, S.N.; Abel, K.J.; Higgins, M.J.; Nowak, N.J.; Shows, T.B. )

    1993-06-01

    A targeted yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for chromosome 11 has been constructed from the J1 cell line that carries a single human chromosome 11 within a hamster DNA background. Interspecies chimeric clones generated during construction of the library were detected during the screening process and eliminated from the library. Contig assembly becomes much less difficult using such a library as the complexity is decreased and the ends of the clone inserts can be rescued for walking to neighboring clones. The library contains > 1824 clones with an average insert length of 337 kb. This represents a fourfold coverage of chromosome 11 or a >95% chance of recovering a unique single-copy sequence from the library. Two hundred YAC clones were localized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and found to be randomly distributed along the chromosome. The library has been screened with probes for the chromosome 11 markers HBB, GLUR4, H19, and D11S193. Corresponding YAC clones have been isolated for each locus. This analysis has indicated that the library is unbiased, that cognate YAC clones can be recovered with chromosome 11 markers, and that extensive contig assembly should be feasible. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Construction and characterization of a 10-genome equivalent yeast artificial chromosome library for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Zee, R.Y.L.; Schalkwyk, L.C.

    1997-02-01

    Increasing attention has been focused in recent years on the rat as a model organism for genetic studies, in particular for the investigation of complex traits, but progress has been limited by the lack of availability of large-insert genomic libraries. Here, we report the construction and characterization of an arrayed yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for the rat genome containing approximately 40,000 clones in the AB1380 host using the pCGS966 vector. An average size of 736 kb was estimated from 166 randomly chosen clones; thus the library provides 10-fold coverage of the genome, with a 99.99% probability of containing a unique sequence. Eight of 39 YACs analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization were found to be chimeric, indicating a proportion of about 20-30% of chimeric clones. The library was spotted on high-density filters to allow the identification of YAC clones by hybridization and was pooled using a 3-dimensional scheme for screening by PCR. Among 48 probes used to screen the library, an average of 9.3 positive clones were found, consistent with the calculated 10-fold genomic coverage of the library. This YAC library represents the first large-insert genomic library for the rat. It will be made available to the research community at large as an important new resource for complex genome analysis in this species. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  3. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii: a new resource for plant comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Tanurdzic, Milos; Luo, Meizhong; Sisneros, Nicholas; Kim, Hye Ran; Weng, Jing-Ke; Kudrna, Dave; Mueller, Christopher; Arumuganathan, K; Carlson, John; Chapple, Clint; de Pamphilis, Claude; Mandoli, Dina; Tomkins, Jeff; Wing, Rod A; Banks, Jo Ann

    2005-01-01

    Background The lycophytes are an ancient lineage of vascular plants that diverged from the seed plant lineage about 400 Myr ago. Although the lycophytes occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolution of plants and their genomes, no genomic resources exist for this group of plants. Results Here we describe the construction of a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Based on cell flow cytometry, this species has the smallest genome size among the different lycophytes tested, including Huperzia lucidula, Diphaiastrum digita, Isoetes engelmanii and S. kraussiana. The arrayed BAC library consists of 9126 clones; the average insert size is estimated to be 122 kb. Inserts of chloroplast origin account for 2.3% of the clones. The BAC library contains an estimated ten genome-equivalents based on DNA hybridizations using five single-copy and two duplicated S. moellendorffii genes as probes. Conclusion The S. moellenforffii BAC library, the first to be constructed from a lycophyte, will be useful to the scientific community as a resource for comparative plant genomics and evolution. PMID:15955246

  4. Construction of a high-coverage bacterial artificial chromosome library and comprehensive genetic linkage map of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese amberjack/yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) is a commonly cultured marine fish in Japan. For cost effective fish production, a breeding program that increases commercially important traits is one of the major solutions. In selective breeding, information of genetic markers is useful and sufficient to identify individuals carrying advantageous traits but if the aim is to determine the genetic basis of the trait, large insert genomic DNA libraries are essential. In this study, toward prospective understanding of genetic basis of several economically important traits, we constructed a high-coverage bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, obtained sequences from the BAC-end, and constructed comprehensive female and male linkage maps of yellowtail using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers developed from the BAC-end sequences and a yellowtail genomic library. Results The total insert length of the BAC library we constructed here was estimated to be approximately 11 Gb and hence 16-times larger than the yellowtail genome. Sequencing of the BAC-ends showed a low fraction of repetitive sequences comparable to that in Tetraodon and fugu. A total of 837 SSR markers developed here were distributed among 24 linkage groups spanning 1,026.70 and 1,057.83 cM with an average interval of 4.96 and 4.32 cM in female and male map respectively without any segregation distortion. Oxford grids suggested conserved synteny between yellowtail and stickleback. Conclusions In addition to characteristics of yellowtail genome such as low repetitive sequences and conserved synteny with stickleback, our genomic and genetic resources constructed and revealed here will be powerful tools for the yellowtail breeding program and also for studies regarding the genetic basis of traits. PMID:24684753

  5. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library for the hexaploid wheat line 92R137.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingdong; Yuan, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Shi, Xue; Nie, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Hua; Chen, Xianming; Wang, Zhonghua; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Lili; Han, Dejun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    For map-based cloning of genes conferring important traits in the hexaploid wheat line 92R137, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, including two sublibraries, was constructed using the genomic DNA of 92R137 digested with restriction enzymes HindIII and BamHI. The BAC library was composed of total 765,696 clones, of which 390,144 were from the HindIII digestion and 375,552 from the BamHI digestion. Through pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of 453 clones randomly selected from the HindIII sublibrary and 573 clones from the BamHI sublibrary, the average insert sizes were estimated as 129 and 113 kb, respectively. Thus, the HindIII sublibrary was estimated to have a 3.01-fold coverage and the BamHI sublibrary a 2.53-fold coverage based on the estimated hexaploid wheat genome size of 16,700 Mb. The 765,696 clones were arrayed in 1,994 384-well plates. All clones were also arranged into plate pools and further arranged into 5-dimensional (5D) pools. The probability of identifying a clone corresponding to any wheat DNA sequence (such as gene Yr26 for stripe rust resistance) from the library was estimated to be more than 99.6%. Through polymerase chain reaction screening the 5D pools with Xwe173, a marker tightly linked to Yr26, six BAC clones were successfully obtained. These results demonstrate that the BAC library is a valuable genomic resource for positional cloning of Yr26 and other genes of interest. PMID:24895618

  6. Construction and Characterization of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library for the Hexaploid Wheat Line 92R137

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Shi, Xue; Zhuang, Hua; Wang, Zhonghua; Huang, Lili; Han, Dejun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    For map-based cloning of genes conferring important traits in the hexaploid wheat line 92R137, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, including two sublibraries, was constructed using the genomic DNA of 92R137 digested with restriction enzymes HindIII and BamHI. The BAC library was composed of total 765,696 clones, of which 390,144 were from the HindIII digestion and 375,552 from the BamHI digestion. Through pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of 453 clones randomly selected from the HindIII sublibrary and 573 clones from the BamHI sublibrary, the average insert sizes were estimated as 129 and 113 kb, respectively. Thus, the HindIII sublibrary was estimated to have a 3.01-fold coverage and the BamHI sublibrary a 2.53-fold coverage based on the estimated hexaploid wheat genome size of 16,700 Mb. The 765,696 clones were arrayed in 1,994 384-well plates. All clones were also arranged into plate pools and further arranged into 5-dimensional (5D) pools. The probability of identifying a clone corresponding to any wheat DNA sequence (such as gene Yr26 for stripe rust resistance) from the library was estimated to be more than 99.6%. Through polymerase chain reaction screening the 5D pools with Xwe173, a marker tightly linked to Yr26, six BAC clones were successfully obtained. These results demonstrate that the BAC library is a valuable genomic resource for positional cloning of Yr26 and other genes of interest. PMID:24895618

  7. BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME(BAC)LIBRARIES CONSTRUCTED FROM THE GENETIC STANDARD OF UPLAND COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two BAC libraries and one plant transformation-competent BIBAC library were developed from the Gossypium hirsutum acc. TM-1 for the development of an integrative cotton physical and genetic map and other genomic applications. TM-1 is the most desirable choice for the physical map of Upland cotton be...

  8. [Construction and analysis of rumen bacterial artificial chromosome library from a dairy cow rumen microflora].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-xin; Wang, Jia-qi; Ma, Run-lin; Huang, Li; Dong, Zhi-yang

    2007-04-01

    The high molecular weight DNA was extracted and purified directly from rumen samples in the study by using culture-independent and pulsed field gel electrophoresis approaches. After digestion with Hind III, DNA fragments ranging from 50-100 kb was collected and ligated to pCC BAC vector. The ligation mixture was transformed into E. coli EPI300 and a rumen metagenomic BAC library with about 15360 clones was constructed. The average insert size is about 54.5 kb, mostly ranging from 50-70 kb, and the capacity of this BAC library is about 837Mb. Several BAC clones with activity of amylase, Cmcellulase had been screened from the BAC library. The clones with Cmcelluase activity were screened further for linchenase, xylanase, cellobioase activity and the result is that 25 of them have at least one kind of other enzyme activity. PMID:17552222

  9. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi and physical mapping of the genome of its Wolbachia endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Kumar, Sanjay; Ganatra, Mehul B; Kamal, Ibrahim H; Ware, Jennifer; Ingram, Jessica; Pope-Chappell, Jesse; Guiliano, David; Whitton, Claire; Daub, Jennifer; Blaxter, Mark L; Slatko, Barton E

    2004-05-01

    The parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi, causes lymphatic filariasis in humans, which in severe cases leads to the condition known as elephantiasis. The parasite contains an endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterium of the genus Wolbachia that is required for normal worm development and fecundity and is also implicated in the pathology associated with infections by these filarial nematodes. Bacterial artificial chromosome libraries were constructed from B. malayi DNA and provide over 11-fold coverage of the nematode genome. Wolbachia genomic fragments were simultaneously cloned into the libraries giving over 5-fold coverage of the 1.1 Mb bacterial genome. A physical framework for the Wolbachia genome was developed by construction of a plasmid library enriched for Wolbachia DNA as a source of sequences to hybridise to high-density bacterial artificial chromosome colony filters. Bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing provided additional Wolbachia probe sequences to facilitate assembly of a contig that spanned the entire genome. The Wolbachia sequences provided a marker approximately every 10 kb. Four rare-cutting restriction endonucleases were used to restriction map the genome to a resolution of approximately 60 kb and demonstrate concordance between the bacterial artificial chromosome clones and native Wolbachia genomic DNA. Comparison of Wolbachia sequences to public databases using BLAST algorithms under stringent conditions allowed confident prediction of 69 Wolbachia peptide functions and two rRNA genes. Comparison to closely related complete genomes revealed that while most sequences had orthologs in the genome of the Wolbachia endosymbiont from Drosophila melanogaster, there was no evidence for long-range synteny. Rather, there were a few cases of short-range conservation of gene order extending over regions of less than 10 kb. The molecular scaffold produced for the genome of the Wolbachia from B. malayi forms the basis of a genomic sequencing effort for

  10. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    PubMed

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies. PMID:19132072

  11. Amplification of large artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D R; Smyth, A P; Moir, D T

    1990-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome cloning is an attractive technology for genomic mapping studies because very large DNA segments can be readily propagated. However, detailed analyses often require the extensive application of blotting-hybridization techniques because artificial chromosomes are normally present at only one copy per haploid genome. We have developed a cloning vector and host strain that alleviate this problem by permitting copy number amplification of artificial chromosomes. The vector includes a conditional centromere that can be turned on or off by changing the carbon source. Strong selective pressure for extra copies of the artificial chromosome can be applied by selecting for the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase gene. When this system was used, artificial chromosomes ranging from about 100 to 600 kilobases in size were readily amplified 10- to 20-fold. The selective conditions did not induce obvious rearrangements in any of the clones tested. Reactivation of the centromere in amplified artificial chromosome clones resulted in stable maintenance of an elevated copy number for 20 generations. Applications of copy number control to various aspects of artificial chromosome analysis are addressed. Images PMID:2236036

  12. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the causal agent of Black Sigatoka fungal leaf spot disease of banana and plantain, Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Canto-Canché, Blondy; Guillén-Maldonado, Diana Karina; Peraza-Echeverría, Leticia; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; James-Kay, Andrew

    2007-05-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome library of the causal agent of the Black Sigatoka leaf spot disease of banana and plantain, Mycosphaerella fijiensis, has been constructed using a non-sphaeroplasting technique and characterized using both homologous and heterologous probes. After first and a second size selection of PFGE-fractionated DNA, a ligation was obtained using a 1:4 molar ratio (insert:vector). One hundred random clones were analyzed, and the mean insert size was estimated to be 90 kb. The range of the insert sizes was between 40 and 160 kb. The highest percentage of inserts belonged to the range between 80 and 100 kb; 32% of the inserts had 2 or 3 internal NotI sites. This library consists of 1920 clones, if the genomic size is at least 35 Mb, then this represents 4.9 x genome equivalents, which was supported by hybridization results with homologous and heterologous probes. PMID:17827540

  13. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F. A. Gemelli School of Medicine, Rome ); Cheng, S.; Gardiner, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span >100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total [approximately]6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for the Australian saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and its utilization in gene isolation and genome characterization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Crocodilians (Order Crocodylia) are an ancient vertebrate group of tremendous ecological, social, and evolutionary importance. They are the only extant reptilian members of Archosauria, a monophyletic group that also includes birds, dinosaurs, and pterosaurs. Consequently, crocodilian genomes represent a gateway through which the molecular evolution of avian lineages can be explored. To facilitate comparative genomics within Crocodylia and between crocodilians and other archosaurs, we have constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library for the Australian saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus. This is the first BAC library for a crocodile and only the second BAC resource for a crocodilian. Results The C. porosus BAC library consists of 101,760 individually archived clones stored in 384-well microtiter plates. NotI digestion of random clones indicates an average insert size of 102 kb. Based on a genome size estimate of 2778 Mb, the library affords 3.7 fold (3.7×) coverage of the C. porosus genome. To investigate the utility of the library in studying sequence distribution, probes derived from CR1a and CR1b, two crocodilian CR1-like retrotransposon subfamilies, were hybridized to C. porosus macroarrays. The results indicate that there are a minimum of 20,000 CR1a/b elements in C. porosus and that their distribution throughout the genome is decidedly non-random. To demonstrate the utility of the library in gene isolation, we probed the C. porosus macroarrays with an overgo designed from a C-mos (oocyte maturation factor) partial cDNA. A BAC containing C-mos was identified and the C-mos locus was sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignment of the C. porosus C-mos coding sequence with avian and reptilian C-mos orthologs reveals greater sequence similarity between C. porosus and birds (specifically chicken and zebra finch) than between C. porosus and squamates (green anole). Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of the

  15. Construction, Analysis, and β-Glucanase Screening of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library from the Large-Bowel Microbiota of Mice†

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jens; Mangold, Marco; Tannock, Gerald W.

    2005-01-01

    A metagenomic (community genomic) library consisting of 5,760 bacterial artificial chromosome clones was prepared in Escherichia coli DH10B from DNA extracted from the large-bowel microbiota of BALB/c mice. DNA inserts detected in 61 randomly chosen clones averaged 55 kbp (range, 8 to 150 kbp) in size. A functional screen of the library for β-glucanase activity was conducted using lichenin agar plates and Congo red solution. Three clones with β-glucanase activity were detected. The inserts of these three clones were sequenced and annotated. Open reading frames (ORF) that encoded putative proteins with identity to glucanolytic enzymes (lichenases and laminarinases) were detected by reference to databases. Other putative genes were detected, some of which might have a role in environmental sensing, nutrient acquisition, or coaggregation. The insert DNA from two clones probably originated from uncultivated bacteria because the ORF had low sequence identity with database entries, but the genes associated with the remaining clone resembled sequences reported in Bacteroides species. PMID:15870321

  16. Construction of BAC Libraries from Flow-Sorted Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Cloned DNA libraries in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) are the most widely used form of large-insert DNA libraries. BAC libraries are typically represented by ordered clones derived from genomic DNA of a particular organism. In the case of large eukaryotic genomes, whole-genome libraries consist of a hundred thousand to a million clones, which make their handling and screening a daunting task. The labor and cost of working with whole-genome libraries can be greatly reduced by constructing a library derived from a smaller part of the genome. Here we describe construction of BAC libraries from mitotic chromosomes purified by flow cytometric sorting. Chromosome-specific BAC libraries facilitate positional gene cloning, physical mapping, and sequencing in complex plant genomes. PMID:27511172

  17. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  18. Selection of chromosome 22-specific clones from human genomic BAC library using a chromosome-specific cosmid library pool

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, U.J.; Shizuya, H.; Birren, B.

    1994-07-15

    A new approach to rapidly identify chromosome-specific subsets of clones from a total human genomic library is described. The authors report here the results of screening a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using the total pool of clones from a chromosome 22-specific cosmid library as a composite probe. The human BAC library was gridded on filters at high density and hybridized with DNA from the pooled chromosome 22-specific Lawrist library under suppressive conditions. In a single hybridization, they picked 280 candidates from the BAC library representing over 30,000 clones (or 1.2 x coverage of human genome). This subset contained more than 60% of the chromosome 22-specific BAC clones that were previously found to be present in the original BAC library. In principle, this approach can be applied to select a subset of clones from other global libraries with relatively large inserts using a pool from a regional library as a composite probe. It is important to note that the target and probe libraries must be based on vectors that share no homology with each other. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Generation of a complete single-gene knockout bacterial artificial chromosome library of cowpox virus and identification of its essential genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiyong; Zikos, Dimitrios; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Tischer, B Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) belongs to the genus Orthopoxvirus in the Poxviridae family. It infects a broad range of vertebrates and can cause zoonotic infections. CPXV has the largest genome among the orthopoxviruses and is therefore considered to have the most complete set of genes of all members of the genus. Since CPXV has also become a model for studying poxvirus genetics and pathogenesis, we created and characterized a complete set of single gene knockout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones of the CPXV strain Brighton Red. These mutants allow a systematic assessment of the contribution of single CPXV genes to the outcome of virus infection and replication, as well as to the virus host range. A full-length BAC clone of CPXV strain Brighton Red (pBRF) harboring the gene expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of a viral late promoter was modified by introducing the mrfp1 gene encoding the monomeric red fluorescent protein driven by a synthetic early vaccinia virus promoter. Based on the modified BAC (pBRFseR), a library of targeted knockout mutants for each single viral open reading frame (ORF) was generated. Reconstitution of infectious virus was successful for 109 of the 183 mutant BAC clones, indicating that the deleted genes are not essential for virus replication. In contrast, 74 ORFs were identified as essential because no virus progeny was obtained upon transfection of the mutant BAC clones and in the presence of a helper virus. More than 70% of all late CPXV genes belonged to this latter group of essential genes. PMID:24155400

  20. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  1. Screening of an E. coli O157:H7 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library by Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Identify Genomic Regions Contributing to Growth in Bovine Gastrointestinal Mucus and Epithelial Cell Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jianing; McAteer, Sean P.; Paxton, Edith; Mahajan, Arvind; Gally, David L.; Tree, Jai J.

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 can cause serious gastrointestinal and systemic disease in humans following direct or indirect exposure to ruminant feces containing the bacterium. The main colonization site of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle is the terminal rectum where the bacteria intimately attach to the epithelium and multiply in the intestinal mucus. This study aimed to identify genomic regions of EHEC O157:H7 that contribute to colonization and multiplication at this site. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was generated from a derivative of the sequenced E. coli O157:H7 Sakai strain. The library contains 1152 clones averaging 150 kbp. To verify the library, clones containing a complete locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) were identified by DNA hybridization. In line with a previous report, these did not confer a type III secretion (T3S) capacity to the K-12 host strain. However, conjugation of one of the BAC clones into a strain containing a partial LEE deletion restored T3S. Three hundred eighty-four clones from the library were subjected to two different selective screens; one involved three rounds of adherence assays to bovine primary rectal epithelial cells while the other competed the clones over three rounds of growth in bovine rectal mucus. The input strain DNA was then compared with the selected strains using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on an E. coli microarray. The adherence assay enriched for pO157 DNA indicating the importance of this plasmid for colonization of rectal epithelial cells. The mucus assay enriched for multiple regions involved in carbohydrate utilization, including hexuronate uptake, indicating that these regions provide a competitive growth advantage in bovine mucus. This BAC-CGH approach provides a positive selection screen that complements negative selection transposon-based screens. As demonstrated, this may be of particular use for identifying genes with redundant functions such as adhesion and carbon

  2. Development of genomic resources for the narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius): construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and BAC-end sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lupinus angustifolius L, also known as narrow-leafed lupin (NLL), is becoming an important grain legume crop that is valuable for sustainable farming and is becoming recognised as a potential human health food. Recent interest is being directed at NLL to improve grain production, disease and pest management and health benefits of the grain. However, studies have been hindered by a lack of extensive genomic resources for the species. Results A NLL BAC library was constructed consisting of 111,360 clones with an average insert size of 99.7 Kbp from cv Tanjil. The library has approximately 12 × genome coverage. Both ends of 9600 randomly selected BAC clones were sequenced to generate 13985 BAC end-sequences (BESs), covering approximately 1% of the NLL genome. These BESs permitted a preliminary characterisation of the NLL genome such as organisation and composition, with the BESs having approximately 39% G:C content, 16.6% repetitive DNA and 5.4% putative gene-encoding regions. From the BESs 9966 simple sequence repeat (SSR) motifs were identified and some of these are shown to be potential markers. Conclusions The NLL BAC library and BAC-end sequences are powerful resources for genetic and genomic research on lupin. These resources will provide a robust platform for future high-resolution mapping, map-based cloning, comparative genomics and assembly of whole-genome sequencing data for the species. PMID:22014081

  3. Construction and characterization of a human chromosome 2-specific BAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Shouse, S.; Manson, J.

    1994-12-01

    We have constructed a human chromosome 2-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA from the somatic cell hybrid GM10826. The average size of the clones is about 63 kb. The coverage and distribution of the library were estimated by screening with known polymorphic genetic markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Twenty-one markers tested positive when DNA pools prepared from approximately one-sixth of the library were screened with 33 known markers. This is consistent with the theoretical calculation of 63% coverage at one genomic equivalent. This suggested that the coverage of the library is approximately 5-6X. FISH analysis with 54 BACs revealed single site hybridization to chromosome 2, and the clones were distributed randomly on the chromosome. We have also performed direct sequencing of the BAC insert ends to generate sequence-tagged sites suitable for mapping and chromosome walking. This is the first reported human chromosome 2-specific BAC library and should provide a resource for physical mapping and disease searching for this chromosome. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Infectious delivery of alphaherpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Kurt; Fraefel, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) can accommodate and stably propagate the genomes of large DNA viruses in E. coli. As DNA virus genomes are often per se infectious upon transfection into mammalian cells, their cloning in BACs and easy modification by homologous recombination in bacteria has become an important strategy to investigate the functions of individual virus genes. This chapter describes a strategy to clone the genomes of viruses of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily within the family of the Herpesviridae, which is a group of large DNA viruses that can establish both lytic and latent infections in most animal species including humans. The cloning strategy includes the following steps: (1) Construction of a transfer plasmid that contains the BAC backbone with selection and screening markers, and targeting sequences which support homologous recombination between the transfer plasmid and the alphaherpesvirus genome. (2) Introduction of the transfer plasmid sequences into the alphaherpesvirus genome via homologous recombination in mammalian cells. (3) Isolation of recombinant virus genomes containing the BAC backbone sequences from infected mammalian cells and electroporation into E. coli. (4) Preparation of infectious BAC DNA from bacterial cultures and transfection into mammalian cells. (5) Isolation and characterization of progeny virus. PMID:25239748

  5. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene region cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J. |; Grzeschik, K.H.; Limon, J.; Gremaud, M.; Schlessinger, D.; De La Chapelle, A.

    1993-05-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), an X-chromosomal recessive disorder, is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving bands Xq12-q13. Using available DNA markers from the region and somatic cell hybrids the authors mapped the X-chromosomal breakpoints in two such translocations. The breakpoints were further mapped within a yeast artificial chromosome contig constructed by chromosome walking techniques. Genomic DNA markers that map between the two translocation breakpoints were recovered representing putative portions of the EDA gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  7. Construction of DNA libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deaven, L.L.; McCormick, M.K.; Grady, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a series of DNA libraries from flow-sorted chromosomes. Small insert, complete digest libraries cloned into the EcoRI insertion site of Charon 21A are available from the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Partial digest libraries cloned into cosmid (sCos1) or phage (Charon 40) vectors have been constructed for chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, X and Y. Purity estimates by in situ analysis of sorted chromosomes, flow karyotype analysis, and plaque or colony hybridization indicate that most of these libraries are 90-95% pure. Additional cosmid library constructions, 5-10X arrays of libraries into microtiter plates, and high density membrane arrays of libraries are in progress. Recently, we have completed YAC libraries for chromosomes 5, 9, 16, and 21. These libraries are made from complete DNA digests using the rare cutters Clal, SacII, EagI, or NotI/NheI. The average insert size is {similar_to}200 kb, and chimera frequencies are low (1-10%). Libraries have also been constructed using M13 or bluescript vectors (chromosomes 5, 7, 17) to generate STS markers for the selection of chromosome-specific inserts from total genomic AC libraries. Because of the advantages of insert size and stability associated with BAC and PAC cloning systems, we are currently attempting to adapt pBAC108L and pCYPAC1 vectors for use with flow-sorted chromosomal DNA.

  8. Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) with YAC/BAC-based probes and region-specific microdissection DNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Liehr, T.; Weise, A.; Heller, A.; Starke, H.; Mrasek, K.; Kuechler, A.; Weier, H.-U.G.; Claussen, U.

    2003-06-23

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) allows the delineation of chromosomal regions with a resolution of a few mega base pairs, i.e., slightly below the size of most visible chromosome bands. Based on the hybridization of over lapping region-specific probe libraries, chromosomal subregions are hybridized with probes that fluoresce in distinct wave length intervals, so they can be assigned predefined pseudo-colors during the digital imaging and visualization process. The present study demonstrates how MCB patterns can be produced by region-specific micro dissection derived (mcd) libraries as well as collections of yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs and BACs, respectively). We compared the efficiency of an mcd library based approach with the hybridization of collections of locus-specific probes (LSP) for fluorescent banding of three rather differently sized human chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes 2, 13, and 22. The LSP sets were comprised of 107 probes specific for chromosome 2, 82 probes for chromosome 13, and 31 probes for chromosome 22. The results demonstrated a more homogeneous coverage of chromosomes and thus, more desirable banding patterns using the microdissection library-based MCB. This may be related to the observation that chromosomes are difficult to cover completely with YAC and/or BAC clones as single-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments showed. Mcd libraries, on the other hand, provide high complexity probes that work well as region specific paints, but do not readily allow positioning of break points on genetic or physical maps as required for the positional cloning of genes. Thus, combinations of mcd libraries and locus-specific large insert DNA probes appear to be the most efficient tools for high-resolution cytogenetic analyses.

  9. Human chromosome-specific DNA libraries: construction and availability

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.; Albright, K.L.; Allen, N.A.; Aubuchon, M.R.; Bartholdi, M.F.; Brown, N.C.; Campbell, E.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Clark, L.M.; Cram, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    The goal of the National Laboratory Gene Library Project at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories is the production of chromosome-specific human gene libraries and their distribution to the scientific community for studies of the molecular biology of genes and chromosomes, and for the study and diagnosis of genetic disease. The specific aim of Phase I of the project is the production of complete digest (4 kb average insert size) libraries from each of the 24 human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting. The bacteriophage vector is Charon 21A, which has both Eco R1 and Hind III insertion sites accommodating human DNA fragments up to 9.1 kb in size. Each laboratory has undertaken production of a complete set of chromosome-specific libraries, Los Alamos with Eco R1 and Livermore with Hind III; most of this task has now been accomplished. Close to 1200 library aliquots have been sent to about 300 laboratories world-wide through February 1986, at which time repository and distribution functions were transferred to the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Following Phase I, libraries will be constructed with large inserts in a more advanced, recently developed bacteriophage vector (about 20 kb inserts) or in a cosmid vector (about 40 kb inserts), and with characteristics better suited to basic studies of gene structure and function.

  10. Isolation, characterization, and regional mapping of microclones from a human chromosome 21 microdissection library

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Hartz, J.; Yisheng Xu; Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Faten ); Gemmill, R.M.; Patterson, D.; Kao, Fa-Ten ); Korenberg, J.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-four unique-sequence microclones were isolated from a previously described microdissection library of human chromosome 21 and were regionally mapped using a cell hybrid mapping panel which consists of six cell hybrids and divides chromosome 21 into eight regions. The mapping results showed that the microclones were unevenly distributed along chromosome 21, with the majority of microclones located in the distal half portion of the long arm, between 21q21.3 and 21qter. The number of unique-sequence clones began to decrease significantly from 21q21.2 to centromere and extending to the short arm. This finding is consistent with those reported in other chromosome 21 libraries. Thus, it may be inferred that the proximal portion of the long arm of chromosome 21 contains higher proportions of repetitive sequences, rather than unique sequences of genes. The microclones were also characterized for insert size and were used to identify the corresponding genomic fragments generated by HindIII. In addition, the authors demonstrated that the microclones with short inserts can be efficiently used to identify YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones with large inserts, for increased genomic coverage for high-resolution physical mapping. They also used 200 unique-sequence microclones to screen a human liver cDNA library and identified two cDNA clones which were regionally assigned to the 21q21.3-q22.1 region. Thus, generation of unique-sequence microclones from chromosome 21 appears to be useful to isolate and regionally map many cDNA clones, among which will be candidate genes for important diseases on chromosome 21, including Down syndrome, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and one form of epilepsy.

  11. Isolation of mini- and microsatellite loci from chromosome 19 library

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Belajeva, O.V.; Polukarova, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    Mini- and microsatellite sequences are abundant in the human genome and are very useful as genetic markers. We report the isolation of a panel of clones containing marker sequences from chromosome 19. We screened 10,000 clones from the chromosome 19 cosmid library for the presence of di-(CA)n, tri-(TCC)n, (CAC)n microsatellites and M13-like minisatellite sequences. For this we have used synthetic oligonucleotides and polynucleotides, including micro- (CA, TCC, CAC) and minisatellite (M13 core) sequences. Preliminary results indicated that the chromosome 19 cosmid library contained both human and hamster clones. In order to identify human sequences from this library we have developed the technique of colony and blot hybridization with Alu-PCR, L1-PCR and B1-PCR probes. Dozens of clones have been selected, some of which were analyzed by conventional Southern blot analysis and non-radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes. Highly informative markers derived from these clones will be used for physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19.

  12. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27033694

  13. Drought-tolerant rice germplasm developed from an Oryza officinalis transformation-competent artificial chromosome clone.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Zhang, H H; Chen, Z X; Shahid, M Q; Fu, X L; Liu, X D

    2015-01-01

    Oryza officinalis has proven to be a natural gene reservoir for the improvement of domesticated rice as it carries many desirable traits; however, the transfer of elite genes to cultivated rice by conventional hybridization has been a challenge for rice breeders. In this study, the conserved sequence of plant stress-related NAC transcription factors was selected as a probe to screen the O. officinalis genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome library by Southern blot; 11 positive transformation-competent artificial chromosome clones were subsequently detected. By Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, an indica rice variety, Huajingxian 74 (HJX74), was transformed with a TAC clone harboring a NAC gene-positive genomic fragment from O. officinalis. Molecular analysis revealed that the O. officinalis genomic fragment was integrated into the genome of HJX74. The transgenic lines exhibited high tolerance to drought stress. Our results demonstrate that the introduction of stress-related transformation-competent artificial chromosome clones, coupled with a transgenic validation approach, is an effective method of transferring agronomically important genes from O. officinalis to cultivated rice. PMID:26535682

  14. A Yeast Artificial Chromosome Clone Map of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H.; Kiefel, P.; Yee, J.; Duncan, I.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the mapping of 979 randomly selected large yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones of Drosophila DNA by in situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes. Eight hundred and fifty-five of the clones are euchromatic and have primary hybridization sites in the banded portions of the polytene chromosomes, whereas 124 are heterochromatic and label the chromocenter. The average euchromatic clone contains about 211 kb and, at its primary site, labels eight or nine contiguous polytene bands. Thus, the extent as well as chromosomal position of each clone has been determined. By direct band counts, we estimate our clones provide about 76% coverage of the euchromatin of the major autosomes, and 63% coverage of the X. When previously reported YAC mapping data are combined with ours, euchromatic coverage is extended to about 90% for the autosomes and 82% for the X. The distribution of gap sizes in our map and the coverage achieved are in good agreement with expectations based on the assumption of random coverage, indicating that euchromatic clones are essentially randomly distributed. However, certain gaps in coverage, including the entire fourth chromosome euchromatin, may be significant. Heterochromatic sequences are underrepresented among the YAC clones by two to three fold. This may result, at least in part, from underrepresentation of heterochromatic sequences in adult DNA (the source of most of the clones analyzed), or from clone instability. PMID:8013915

  15. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations. PMID:22825423

  16. A human chromosome 11 NotI end clone library

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.; Bupwan Kim; Higgins, M.; Nowak, N.J.; Shows, T.B. ); Deaven, L.L. ); Jones, C. )

    1993-03-01

    A NotI end clone library has been constructed from a human-hamster hybrid cell line containing only human chromosome 11. Fifty-one NotI clones were chosen to characterize the library. The majority of NotI clones hybridize to small 15- to 200-kb fragments and have proven to be valuable for chromosome 11 physical mapping by detecting fragments not previously recognized by random probes. These NotI end clones have been used to isolate corresponding NotI linking cosmids which were then used to identify adjacent NotI fragments on pulsed-field gels. The clones were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization and a somatic cell hybrid panel. Although these clones were localized over the entirety of chromosome 11, a nonrandom distribution was observed. Northern blot analysis indicated that 57% (17/30) of the NotI clones examined detected poly(A)[sup +] transcripts in HeLa cell RNA. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  18. A MOLECULAR CYTOGENETICS MAP OF SORGHUM CHROMOSOME 1: FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION ANALYSIS WITH MAPPED BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used structural genomic resources for sorghum to target and develop multiple molecular cytogenetic probes that would provide extensive coverage for a specific chromosome of sorghum. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing molecular markers mapped across sorghum linkage group A were labe...

  19. Generation of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Beil, Jane; Buch, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice are among the most helpful tools to study the role of genes in physiological conditions. In this protocol, we describe the generation of bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) constructs, which are used to express a gene of interest under a particular promoter. BACs as driver of transgenes have the advantage that a characterization of transcriptional control elements is unnecessary and the construct's size usually reduces position effects from random integration. In the following, we firstly explain in detail the amplification of the BAC, the generation of the targeting construct as well as the recombination by ET-cloning, and the analysis of the recombined clones by Southern blot analysis. Finally, we also describe the preparation of the BACs for oocyte injection. In total, the construction of such BAC transgenes needs around 6-8 weeks. PMID:25064102

  20. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Duplication-deficiency of the short arm of chromosome 8 following artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Weleber, R G; Verma, R S; Kimberling, W J; Fieger, H G; lubs, H A

    1976-12-01

    A chromosomally abnormal child with psychomotor retardation and multiple anomalies, including agenesis of the corpus callosum and cleft palate, was born following artificial insemination by donor. Chromosomal and conventional markers were used to ascertain paternity. Various banding techniques were employed to identify the origin of the extra chromosomal material as most likely a duplication-deficiency of the short arm of chromosome No. 8. PMID:1087853

  2. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories. PMID:22688760

  3. Selection of chromosomal DNA libraries using a multiplex CRISPR system

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Owen W; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Maurer, Matthew J; Li, Xin; Tsai, Jordan C; Poddar, Snigdha; Lee, Michael E; DeLoache, Will; Dueber, John E; Arkin, Adam P; Cate, Jamie HD

    2014-01-01

    The directed evolution of biomolecules to improve or change their activity is central to many engineering and synthetic biology efforts. However, selecting improved variants from gene libraries in living cells requires plasmid expression systems that suffer from variable copy number effects, or the use of complex marker-dependent chromosomal integration strategies. We developed quantitative gene assembly and DNA library insertion into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by optimizing an efficient single-step and marker-free genome editing system using CRISPR-Cas9. With this Multiplex CRISPR (CRISPRm) system, we selected an improved cellobiose utilization pathway in diploid yeast in a single round of mutagenesis and selection, which increased cellobiose fermentation rates by over 10-fold. Mutations recovered in the best cellodextrin transporters reveal synergy between substrate binding and transporter dynamics, and demonstrate the power of CRISPRm to accelerate selection experiments and discoveries of the molecular determinants that enhance biomolecule function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03703.001 PMID:25139909

  4. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.; Bonnycastle, L.; Poorkai, P.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of chromosome 14q24.3 which encompasses the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus (AD3). Determined by linkage analysis of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease kindreds, this interval is bounded by the genetic markers D14S61-D14S63 and spans approximately 15 centimorgans. The contig consists of 29 markers and 74 YACs of which 57 are defined by one or more sequence tagged sites (STSs). The STS markers comprise 5 genes, 16 short tandem repeat polymorphisms and 8 cDNA clones. An additional number of genes, expressed sequence tags and cDNA fragments have been identified and localized to the contig by hybridization and sequence analysis of anonymous clones isolated by cDNA direct selection techniques. A minimal contig of about 15 YACs averaging 0.5-1.5 megabase in length will span this interval and is, at first approximation, in rough agreement with the genetic map. For two regions of the contig, our coverage has relied on L1/THE fingerprint and Alu-PCR hybridization data of YACs provided by CEPH/Genethon. We are currently developing sequence tagged sites from these to confirm the overlaps revealed by the fingerprint data. Among the genes which map to the contig are transforming growth factor beta 3, c-fos, and heat shock protein 2A (HSPA2). C-fos is not a candidate gene for AD3 based on the sequence analysis of affected and unaffected individuals. HSPA2 maps to the proximal edge of the contig and Calmodulin 1, a candidate gene from 4q24.3, maps outside of the region. The YAC contig is a framework physical map from which cosmid or P1 clone contigs can be constructed. As more genes and cDNAs are mapped, a highly resolved transcription map will emerge, a necessary step towards positionally cloning the AD3 gene.

  5. Human Artificial Chromosomes for Gene Delivery and the Development of Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Random integration of conventional gene delivery vectors such as viruses, plasmids, P1 phage-derived artificial chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes and yeast artificial chromosomes can be associated with transgene silencing. Furthermore, integrated viral sequences can activate oncogenes adjacent to the insertion site resulting in cancer. Various human artificial chromosomes (HACs) exhibit several potential characteristics desired for an ideal gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance and the capacity to carry large genomic loci with their regulatory elements, thus allowing the physiological regulation of the introduced gene in a manner similar to that of native chromosomes. HACs have been generated mainly using either a “top-down approach” (engineered chromosomes), or a “bottom-up approach” (de novo artificial chromosomes). The recent emergence of stem cell–based tissue engineering has opened up new avenues for gene and cell therapies. This review describes the lessons learned and prospects identified mainly from studies in the construction of HACs and HAC-mediated gene expression systems in cultured cells, as well as in animals. PMID:21750534

  6. Construction of a chromosome specific library of human MARs and mapping of matrix attachment regions on human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, L G; Tsevegiyn, T; Akopov, S B; Ashworth, L K; Sverdlov, E D

    1996-01-01

    Using a novel procedure a representative human chromosome 19-specific library was constructed of short sequences, which bind preferentially to the nuclear matrix (matrix attachment regions, or MARs). Judging by 20 clones sequenced so far, the library contains > 50% of human inserts, about 90% of which are matrix-binding by the in vitro test. Computer analysis of sequences of eight human MARs did not reveal any significant homologies with the EMBL Nucleotide Data Base entries as well as between MARs themselves. Eight MARs were assigned to individual positions on the chromosome 19 physical map. The library constructed can serve as a good source of MAR sequences for comparative analysis and classification and for further chromosome mapping of MARs as well. PMID:8614638

  7. Isolation of yeast artificial chromosomes free of endogenous yeast chromosomes: construction of alternate hosts with defined karyotypic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, L; Johnston, M; Green, E D

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic feature of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) is that the cloned DNA is generally in the same size range (i.e., approximately 200-2000 kb) as the endogenous yeast chromosomes. As a result, the isolation of YAC DNA, which typically involves separation by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, is frequently confounded by the presence of a comigrating or closely migrating endogenous yeast chromosome(s). We have developed a strategy that reliably allows the isolation of any YAC free of endogenous yeast chromosomes. Using recombination-mediated chromosome fragmentation, a set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae host strains was systematically constructed. Each strain contains defined alterations in its electrophoretic karyotype, which provide a large-size interval devoid of endogenous chromosomes (i.e., a karyotypic "window"). All of the constructed strains contain the kar1-delta 15 mutation, thereby allowing the efficient transfer of a YAC from its original host into an appropriately selected window strain using the kar1-transfer procedure. This approach provides a robust and efficient means to obtain relatively pure YAC DNA regardless of YAC size. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8524833

  8. Construction and availability of human chromosome-specific gene libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fuscoe, J.C.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.

    1985-06-14

    This report briefly describes Phase I of the project, the production of complete digest fibraries. Each laboratory is currently in the process of sorting individual human chromosomes from normal human fibroblasts or human X hamster hybrids. The goal of 4 x 10/sup 6/ chromosomes for cloning purposes has been achieved. Each laboratory is also in the process of cloning the chromosomal DNA, after complete digestion with a 6-cutter, into the bacteriophage vector Charon 21A. 3 refs.

  9. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression. PMID:26227242

  10. Rapid construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosomal (BAC) expression vector using designer DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Xinqing; Jin, Yingyu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) vectors are increasingly being used in cloning large DNA fragments containing complex biosynthetic pathways to facilitate heterologous production of microbial metabolites for drug development. To express inserted genes using Streptomyces species as the production hosts, an integration expression cassette is required to be inserted into the BAC vector, which includes genetic elements encoding a phage-specific attachment site, an integrase, an origin of transfer, a selection marker and a promoter. Due to the large sizes of DNA inserted into the BAC vectors, it is normally inefficient and time-consuming to assemble these fragments by routine PCR amplifications and restriction-ligations. Here we present a rapid method to insert fragments to construct BAC-based expression vectors. A DNA fragment of about 130 bp was designed, which contains upstream and downstream homologous sequences of both BAC vector and pIB139 plasmid carrying the whole integration expression cassette. In-Fusion cloning was performed using the designer DNA fragment to modify pIB139, followed by λ-RED-mediated recombination to obtain the BAC-based expression vector. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector with an insert of about 120 kb that contains the entire gene cluster for biosynthesis of immunosuppressant FK506. The empty BAC-based expression vector constructed in this study can be conveniently used for construction of BAC libraries using either microbial pure culture or environmental DNA, and the selected BAC clones can be directly used for heterologous expression. Alternatively, if a BAC library has already been constructed using a commercial BAC vector, the selected BAC vectors can be manipulated using the method described here to get the BAC-based expression vectors with desired gene clusters for heterologous expression. The rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector facilitates

  11. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. ); Lehrach, H. ); Harris, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A molecular cytogenetic map of sorghum chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Childs, K L; Klein, P E; Hodnett, G; Menz, M A; Klein, R R; Rooney, W L; Mullet, J E; Stelly, D M; Price, H J

    2002-01-01

    We used structural genomic resources for Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench to target and develop multiple molecular cytogenetic probes that would provide extensive coverage for a specific chromosome of sorghum. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones containing molecular markers mapped across sorghum linkage group A were labeled as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Signals from single-, dual-, and multiprobe BAC-FISH to spreads of mitotic chromosomes and pachytene bivalents were associated with the largest sorghum chromosome, which bears the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). The order of individual BAC-FISH loci along the chromosome was fully concordant to that of marker loci along the linkage map. In addition, the order of several tightly linked molecular markers was clarified by FISH analysis. The FISH results indicate that markers from the linkage map positions 0.0-81.8 cM reside in the short arm of chromosome 1 whereas markers from 81.8-242.9 cM are located in the long arm of chromosome 1. The centromere and NOR were located in a large heterochromatic region that spans approximately 60% of chromosome 1. In contrast, this region represents only 0.7% of the total genetic map distance of this chromosome. Variation in recombination frequency among euchromatic chromosomal regions also was apparent. The integrated data underscore the value of cytological data, because minor errors and uncertainties in linkage maps can involve huge physical regions. The successful development of multiprobe FISH cocktails suggests that it is feasible to develop chromosome-specific "paints" from genomic resources rather than flow sorting or microdissection and that when applied to pachytene chromatin, such cocktails provide an especially powerful framework for mapping. Such a molecular cytogenetic infrastructure would be inherently cross-linked with other genomic tools and thereby establish a cytogenomics system with extensive utility in development and application

  13. BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME-BASED PHYSICAL MAP OF GIBBERELLA ZEAE (FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is the primary causal pathogen of Fusarium head blight of wheat and barley, a major disease problem in the wheat and barley growing regions of the world. To accelerate genomic analysis of F. graminearum, we developed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map and...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. PMID:27034483

  15. Identification and cloning in yeast artificial chromosomes of a region of elevated loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p31.1 in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoggard, N.; Hey, Y.; Brintnell, B.; James, L.

    1995-11-20

    We have mapped a region of high loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer to a 2-cM interval between the loci D1S430 and D1S465 on chromosome 1p31.1. This region shows allelic imbalance in around 60% of breast tumors. As part of a strategy to clone the target gene(s) within this interval, we have generated a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning over 7 Mb. YACs from the CEPH and Zeneca (formerly ICI) libraries have been obtained by screening with PCR-based STSs from the region for both previously identified loci and newly isolated STSs. The YACs have been assembled into a contig by a combination of approaches, including analysis of their STS content, generation of new STSs from the ends of key YACs, and long-range restriction mapping. These YAC clones provide the basis for complete characterization of the region of high loss in breast cancer and for the ultimate identification of the target gene(s). 84 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Comparative study of artificial chromosome centromeres in human and murine cells

    PubMed Central

    Moralli, Daniela; Jefferson, Andrew; Valeria Volpi, Emanuela; Larin Monaco, Zoia

    2013-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are a valuable tool in the analysis of complex chromatin structures such as the human centromere because of their small size and relative simplicity compared with normal human chromosomes. This report includes a comprehensive study of the centromere and chromatin composition of HAC, expressing human genes, generated in human cells and transferred to murine cells. The analysis involved chromatin immuno-precipitation and immuno-FISH on metaphase chromosomes and chromatin fibres. In both the cell types, the HAC consisted of alphoid and non-alphoid DNA and were mainly euchromatic in composition, although a pericentromeric heterochromatic region was present on all the HAC. Fibre-FISH and chromatin immuno-precipitation data indicated that the position of the centromere differed between HAC in human cells and in murine cells. Our work highlights the importance and utilisation of HAC for understanding the epigenetic aspects of chromosome biology. PMID:23403904

  17. Development of inter-specific chromosomes segment substitution libraries (CSSL) in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six libraries of inter-specific Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines (CSSLs) of rice are being developed as pre-breeding materials and genetic stocks. Three accessions of O. rufipogon were selected as donors, based on phylogenetic, geographical and morphological divergence, and crossed with two rec...

  18. Six rice chromosome segment substitution lines libraries with O. rufipogon introgressions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful tool for identifying naturally occurring, favorable alleles in unadapted germplasm. Six CSSL libraries in rice (Oryza sativa) were developed from crosses between three different accessions ('Khao Pa', W1944, IRGC105567) of the rice progeni...

  19. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  20. Construction, arraying, and high-density screening of large insert libraries of human chromosomes X and 21: Their potential use as reference libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Nizetic, D.; Zehetner, G.; Monaco, A.P.; Gellen, L.; Lehrach, H. ); Young, B.D. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors have constructed cosmid libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes X and 21, each of which contains {gt}30 genome equivalents, and have developed systems allowing permanent storage of primary clones, easy screening of libraries in high-density filter formats, and the simultaneous generation of fingerprinting and mapping data on the same set of cosmid clones. Clones are picked into microtiter plate wells and stored at {minus}70C. A semiautomatic robot system allows the generation of filter replicas containing up to 10,000 clones per membrane. Sets of membranes containing 15-20 chromosome equivalents of both chromosomes will be used for the construction of ordered clone libraries by hybridization fingerprinting protocols. The authors describe the construction of the libraries and demonstrate the use of high-density screening filters in oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and the isolation of cosmids by hybridization with probes from the X chromosome.

  1. Construction of a general human chromosome jumping library, with application to cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.S.; Drumm, M.L.; Cole, J.L.; Lockwood, W.K.; Woude, G.F.V.; Iannuzzi, M.C.

    1987-02-27

    In many genetic disorders, the responsible gene and its protein product are unknown. The technique known as reverse genetics, in which chromosomal map positions and genetically linked DNA markers are used to identify and clone such genes, is complicated by the fact that the molecular distances from the closest DNA markers to the gene itself are often too large to traverse by standard cloning techniques. To address this situation, a general human chromosome jumping library was constructed that allows the cloning of DNA sequences approximately 100 kilobases away from any starting point in genomic DNA. As an illustration of its usefulness, this library was searched for a jumping clone, starting at the met oncogene, which is a marker tightly linked to the cystic fibrosis gene that is located on human chromosome 7. Mapping of the new genomic fragment by pulsed field gel electrophoresis confirmed that it resides on chromosome 7 within 240 kilobases downstream of the met gene. The use of chromosome jumping should be applicable to any genetic locus for which a closely linked DNA marker is available.

  2. A FISH approach for mapping the human genome using Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, R.S.; Chen, X.N.; Mitchell, S.

    1994-09-01

    As the Human Genome Project progresses, large insert cloning vectors such as BACs, P1, and P1 Artificial Chromosomes (PACs) will be required to complement the YAC mapping efforts. The value of the BAC vector for physical mapping lies in the stability of the inserts, the lack of chimerism, the length of inserts (up to 300 kb), the ability to obtain large amounts of pure clone DNA and the ease of BAC manipulation. These features helped us design two approaches for generating physical mapping reagents for human genetic studies. The first approach is a whole genome strategy in which randomly selected BACs are mapped, using FISH, to specific chromosomal bands. To date, 700 BACs have been mapped to single chromosome bands at a resolution of 2-5 Mb in addition to BACs mapped to 14 different centromeres. These BACs represent more than 90 Mb of the genome and include >70% of all human chromosome bands at the 350-band level. These data revealed that >97% of the BACs were non-chimeric and have a genomic distribution covering most gaps in the existing YAC map with excellent coverage of gene-rich regions. In the second approach, we used YACs to identify BACs on chromosome 21. A 1.5 Mb contig between D21S339 and D21S220 nears completion within the Down syndrome congenital heart disease (DS-CHD) region. Seventeen BACs ranging in size from 80 kb to 240 kb were ordered using 14 STSs with FISH confirmation. We have also used 40 YACs spanning 21q to identify, on average, >1 BAC/Mb to provide molecular cytogenetic reagents and anchor points for further mapping. The contig generated on chromosome 21 will be helpful in isolating the genes for DS-CHD. The physical mapping reagents generated using the whole genome approach will provide cytogenetic markers and mapped genomic fragments that will facilitate positional cloning efforts and the identification of genes within most chromosomal bands.

  3. Characterization of four human YAC libraries for clone size, chimerism and X chromosome sequence representation.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, R; Kere, J; MacMillan, S; Masisi, M J; Johnson, D; Molini, B J; Halley, G R; Wein, K; Trusgnich, M; Eble, B

    1994-01-01

    Four collections of human X-specific YACs, derived from human cells containing supernumerary X chromosomes or from somatic cell hybrids containing only X human DNA were characterized. In each collection, 80-85% of YAC strains contained a single X YAC. Five thousand YACs from the various libraries were sized, and cocloning was assessed in subsets by the fraction of YAC insert-ends with non-X sequences. Cocloning was substantial, ranging up to 50% for different collections; and in agreement with previous indications, in all libraries the larger the YACs, the higher the level of cocloning. In libraries made from human-hamster hybrid cells, expected numbers of clones were recovered by STS-based screening; but unexpectedly, the two collections from cells with 4 or 5 X chromosomes yielded numbers of YACs corresponding to an apparent content of only about two X equivalents. Thus it is possible that the DNA of inactive X chromosomes is poorly cloned into YACs, speculatively perhaps because of its specialized chromatin structure. Images PMID:8078777

  4. Large-scale cloning of human chromosome 2-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Rezonzew, R. |; Stanton, V.P. Jr.

    1995-03-20

    We report here an efficient approach to the establishment of extended YAC contigs on human chromosome 2 by using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR-based screening strategy for YAC DNA pools. Genomic DNA was extracted from 1152 YAC pools comprised of 55,296 YACs mostly derived from the CEPH Mark I library. Alu-element-mediated PCR was performed for each pool, and amplification products were spotted on hybridization membranes (IRS filters). IRS probes for the screening of the IRS filters were obtained by Alu-element-mediated PCR. Of 708 distinct probes obtained from chromosome 2-specific somatic cell hybrids, 85% were successfully used for library screening. Similarly, 80% of 80 YAC walking probes were successfully used for library screening. Each probe detected an average of 6.6 YACs, which is in good agreement with the 7- to 7.5-fold genome coverage provided by the library. In a preliminary analysis, we have identified 188 YAC groups that are the basis for building contigs for chromosome 2. The coverage of the telomeric half of chromosome 2q was considered to be good since 31 of 34 microsatellites and 22 of 23 expressed sequence tags that were chosen from chromosome region 2q13-q37 were contained in a chromosome 2 YAC sublibrary generated by our experiments. We have identified a minimum of 1610 distinct chromosome 2-specific YACs, which will be a valuable asset for the physical mapping of the second largest human chromosome. 81 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Engineering Infectious cDNAs of Coronavirus as Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; Márquez-Jurado, Silvia; Nogales, Aitor; Enjuanes, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The large size of the coronavirus (CoV) genome (around 30 kb) and the instability in bacteria of plasmids carrying CoV replicase sequences, represent serious restrictions for the development of CoV infectious clones using reverse genetic systems similar to those used for smaller positive sense RNA viruses. To overcome these problems, several approaches have been established in the last thirteen years. Here we describe the engineering of CoV full-length cDNA clones as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), using the Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) as a model. PMID:25720478

  6. Bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis through pronuclear injection of fertilized mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vintersten, Kristina; Testa, Giuseppe; Naumann, Ronald; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2008-01-01

    In the mouse, conventional transgenes often produced unpredictable results mainly because they were too small to recapitulate a natural gene context. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are large enough to encompass the natural context of most mammalian genes and consequently deliver more reliable recapitulations of their endogenous counterparts. Furthermore, recombineering methods now make it easy to engineer precise changes in a BAC transgene. Consequently, BACs have become the preferred vehicle for mouse transgenesis. Here, we detail methods for BAC transgenesis through pronuclear injection of fertilized oocytes. PMID:18370149

  7. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  8. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  9. Artificial Chromosomes to Explore and to Exploit Biosynthetic Capabilities of Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Alduina, Rosa; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes are an important source of biologically active compounds, like antibiotics, antitumor agents, and immunosuppressors. Genome sequencing is revealing that this class of microorganisms has larger genomes relative to other bacteria and uses a considerable fraction of its coding capacity (5–10%) for the production of mostly cryptic secondary metabolites. To access actinomycetes biosynthetic capabilities or to improve the pharmacokinetic properties and production yields of these chemically complex compounds, genetic manipulation of the producer strains can be performed. Heterologous expression in amenable hosts can be useful to exploit and to explore the genetic potential of actinomycetes and not cultivable but interesting bacteria. Artificial chromosomes that can be stably integrated into the Streptomyces genome were constructed and demonstrated to be effective for transferring entire biosynthetic gene clusters from intractable actinomycetes into more suitable hosts. In this paper, the construction of several shuttle Escherichia coli-Streptomyces artificial chromosomes is discussed together with old and new strategies applied to improve heterologous production of secondary metabolites. PMID:22919271

  10. Preparation of PAC libraries. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pieter J. de Jong

    1997-12-31

    The goals of this project were to create P1 Artificial Chromosome (PAC) cloning vectors and use these vectors to generate, characterize, and distribute both human and mouse genomic PAC libraries to the scientific community.

  11. Human Xq24-Xq28: approaches to mapping with yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, M; Little, R D; Abidi, F; Porta, G; Labella, T; Cooper, T; Della Valle, G; D'Urso, M; Schlessinger, D

    1990-01-01

    One hundred twenty-seven yeast strains with artificial chromosomes containing Xq24-Xqter human DNA were obtained starting from a human/hamster somatic cell hybrid. The clones were characterized with respect to their insert size, stability, and representation of a set of Xq24-Xqter DNA probes. The inserts of the clones add up to 19.3 megabase (Mb) content, or about 0.4 genomic equivalents of that portion of the X chromosome, with a range of 40-650 kb in individual YACs. Eleven clones contained more than one YAC, the additional ones usually having hamster DNA inserts; the individual YACs could be separated by extracting the total DNA from such strains and using it to retransform yeast cells. One of the YACs, containing the probe for the DXS49 locus, was grossly unstable, throwing off smaller versions of an initial 300-kb YAC during subculture; the other YACs appeared to breed true on subculture. Of 52 probes tested, 12 found cognate YACs; the YACs included one with the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogense gene and another containing four anonymous probe sequences (DX13, St14, cpx67, and cpx6). Xq location of YACs is being verified by in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, and fingerprinting and hybridization methods are being used to detect YACs that overlap. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2294758

  12. Preparation and characterization of ordered libraries of transcribable sequences from human chromosome 19 from hybrid human-hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obradovick, D.; Borodin, A.M.; Kopantsev, E.P.

    1994-08-20

    Improvements in the preparation of chromosome-specific libraries of transcribable sequences from the human genome using somatic hybrid cells are described. One of the main advantages of the new method is the enrichment of the starting material with human-specific heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) sequences at each of the three steps in library construction. The method was used to prepare a chromosome-specific library from a hybrid cell line. The resulting ranged library was characterized. The primary structures of 80 randomly selected clones were determined, and these were analyzed. Some 95% of the clones were found to be human-specific and to have arisen from hnRNA, and the chromosomal localizations of a number of clones were identified. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. [New method of construction of artificial translational-coupled operons in bacterial chromosome].

    PubMed

    Gulevich, A Iu; Skorokhodova, A Iu; Ermishev, V Iu; Krylov, A A; Minaeva, N I; Polonskaia, Z M; Zimenkov, D V; Biriukova, I V; Mashko, S V

    2009-01-01

    The new method of translational-coupled operons construction in bacterial chromosome has been developed on the basis of recombineering approach. It includes construction in vitro of the artificial operon with efficiently translated proximal cistron followed by its insertion E. coli chromosome, modification of the operon due to Red-driven insertion of the special "Junction" with excisable selective marker in the intercistronic region of the initial operon and excising the marker. The structure of this Junction has been designed and tested in the present investigation. It consists of: 1) E. coli rplC-rplD intercistronic region for placing the TAA-codon of the proximal operon's gene in the SD-sequence (TAAGGAG) of rplD; 2) Cm(R)-gene flanked by lambdaattL/R-sites in such a fashion that after lambdaInt/Xis-driven excision of the marker the residual lambdaattB-site would not contain the termination codons in frame with ATG of rplD; 3) E. coli trpE-trpD intercistronic region for location of ATG of trpD at the position of initiation codon of the distal gene of original operon. The general design of desired construction provides the conversion of the original two-cistronic operon into three-cistronic operon with translational-coupled genes, where the coupling of the artificial ORF (rplD'-lambdaattB-'trpE) with the proximal gene is occurred due to rplC-rplD intercistronic region and the coupling of this ORF with the distal gene--due to trpE-trpD. The experimental implementation of the described strategy was showed by construction of artificial operon P(tac-aroG4-serA5, where expression optimization of the distal serA5 gene was achieved via construction of three-cistronic operon with translational-coupled genes. PMID:19548541

  14. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  15. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  16. A Plasmid Set for Efficient Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Fernando; Reynolds, Eric; Lewellis, Stephen W.; Venkiteswaran, Gayatri; Knaut, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis of large DNA constructs is essential for gene function analysis. Recently, Tol2 transposase-mediated transgenesis has emerged as a powerful tool to insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA constructs into the genome of zebrafish. For efficient transgenesis, the genomic DNA piece in the BAC construct needs to be flanked by Tol2 transposon sites, and the constructs should contain a transgenesis marker for easy identification of transgenic animals. We report a set of plasmids that contain targeting cassettes that allow the insertion of Tol2 sites and different transgenesis markers into BACs. Using BACs containing these targeting cassettes, we show that transgenesis is as efficient as iTol2, that preselecting for expression of the transgenesis marker increases the transgenesis rate, and that BAC transgenics faithfully recapitulate the endogenous gene expression patterns and allow for the estimation of the endogenous gene expression levels. PMID:26818072

  17. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models. PMID:24671676

  18. Complementation of the beige mutation in cultured cells by episomally replicating murine yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Justice, M.J.

    1996-06-11

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome in man and the beige mutation of mice are phenotypically similar disorders that have profound effects upon lysosome and melansosome morphology and function. We isolated two murine yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that, when introduced into beige mouse fibroblasts, complement the beige mutation. The complementing YACs exist as extrachromosomal elements that are amplified in high concentrations of G418. When YAC-complemented beige cells were fused to human Chediak-Higashi syndrome or Aleutian mink fibroblasts, complementation of the mutant phenotype also occurred. These results localize the beige gene to a 500-kb interval and demonstrate that the same or homologous genes are defective in mice, minks, and humans. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  19. A Plasmid Set for Efficient Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Fernando; Reynolds, Eric; Lewellis, Stephen W; Venkiteswaran, Gayatri; Knaut, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis of large DNA constructs is essential for gene function analysis. Recently, Tol2 transposase-mediated transgenesis has emerged as a powerful tool to insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA constructs into the genome of zebrafish. For efficient transgenesis, the genomic DNA piece in the BAC construct needs to be flanked by Tol2 transposon sites, and the constructs should contain a transgenesis marker for easy identification of transgenic animals. We report a set of plasmids that contain targeting cassettes that allow the insertion of Tol2 sites and different transgenesis markers into BACs. Using BACs containing these targeting cassettes, we show that transgenesis is as efficient as iTol2, that preselecting for expression of the transgenesis marker increases the transgenesis rate, and that BAC transgenics faithfully recapitulate the endogenous gene expression patterns and allow for the estimation of the endogenous gene expression levels. PMID:26818072

  20. Engineering the largest RNA virus genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; González, José M.; Pénzes, Zoltan; Izeta, Ander; Calvo, Enrique; Plana-Durán, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The construction of cDNA clones encoding large-size RNA molecules of biological interest, like coronavirus genomes, which are among the largest mature RNA molecules known to biology, has been hampered by the instability of those cDNAs in bacteria. Herein, we show that the application of two strategies, cloning of the cDNAs into a bacterial artificial chromosome and nuclear expression of RNAs that are typically produced within the cytoplasm, is useful for the engineering of large RNA molecules. A cDNA encoding an infectious coronavirus RNA genome has been cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. The rescued coronavirus conserved all of the genetic markers introduced throughout the sequence and showed a standard mRNA pattern and the antigenic characteristics expected for the synthetic virus. The cDNA was transcribed within the nucleus, and the RNA translocated to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recovered virus had essentially the same sequence as the original one, and no splicing was observed. The cDNA was derived from an attenuated isolate that replicates exclusively in the respiratory tract of swine. During the engineering of the infectious cDNA, the spike gene of the virus was replaced by the spike gene of an enteric isolate. The synthetic virus replicated abundantly in the enteric tract and was fully virulent, demonstrating that the tropism and virulence of the recovered coronavirus can be modified. This demonstration opens up the possibility of employing this infectious cDNA as a vector for vaccine development in human, porcine, canine, and feline species susceptible to group 1 coronaviruses. PMID:10805807

  1. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek’s disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpe...

  2. Plant artificial chromosome technology and its potential application in genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weichang; Yau, Yuan-Yeu; Birchler, James A

    2016-05-01

    Genetic engineering with just a few genes has changed agriculture in the last 20 years. The most frequently used transgenes are the herbicide resistance genes for efficient weed control and the Bt toxin genes for insect resistance. The adoption of the first-generation genetically engineered crops has been very successful in improving farming practices, reducing the application of pesticides that are harmful to both human health and the environment, and producing more profit for farmers. However, there is more potential for genetic engineering to be realized by technical advances. The recent development of plant artificial chromosome technology provides a super vector platform, which allows the management of a large number of genes for the next generation of genetic engineering. With the development of other tools such as gene assembly, genome editing, gene targeting and chromosome delivery systems, it should become possible to engineer crops with multiple genes to produce more agricultural products with less input of natural resources to meet future demands. PMID:26369910

  3. [Breeding of robust industrial ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by artificial zinc finger protein library].

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Zhao, Xinqing; Li, Qian; Zhang, Mingming; Kim, Jin Soo; Bai, Fengwu

    2013-05-01

    Breeding of robust industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with high ethanol tolerance is of great significance for efficient fuel ethanol production. Zinc finger proteins play important roles in gene transcription and translation, and exerting control on the regulation of multiple genes. The sequence and localization of the zinc finger motif can be designed and engineered, and the artificial zinc finger protein can be used to regulate celluar metabolism. Stress tolerance of microbial strains is related to multiple genes. Therefore, it is possible to use artificially-designed zinc finger proteins to breed stress tolerant strains. In this study, a library containing artificial zinc finger protein encoding genes was transformed into the model yeast strain S288c. A recombinant strain named M01 with improved ethanol tolerance was obtained. The plasmid in M01 was isolated, and then transformed into the industrial yeast strain Sc4126. Ethanol tolerance of the recombinant strain of Sc4126 were significantly improved. When high gravity ethanol fermentation using 250 g/L glucose was performed, comparing with the wild-type strain, fermentation time of the recombinant strain was decreased by 24 h and the final ethanol concentration was enhanced by 6.3%. The results of this study demonstrate that artificial zinc finger proteins are able to exert control on stress tolerance of yeast strains, and these results provide basis to construct robust industrial yeast strains for efficient ethanol fermentation. PMID:24010359

  4. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis. PMID:26055730

  5. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  6. Delivery of bacterial artificial chromosomes into mammalian cells with psoralen-inactivated adenovirus carrier.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, A; Cotten, M

    1997-01-01

    Molecular biology has many applications where the introduction of large (>100 kb) DNA molecules is required. The current methods of large DNA transfection are very inefficient. We reasoned that two limits to improving transfection methods with these large DNA molecules were the difficulty of preparing workable quantities of clean DNA and the lack of rapid assays to determine transfection success. We have used bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) based on the Escherichia coli F factor plasmid system, which are simple to manipulate and purify in microgram quantities. Because BAC plasmids are kept at one to two copies per cell, the problems of rearrangement observed with YACs are eliminated. We have generated two series of BAC vectors bearing marker genes for luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using these reagents, we have developed methods of delivering BACs of up to 170 kb into mammalian cells with transfection efficiency comparable to 5-10 kb DNA. Psoralen-inactivated adenovirus is used as the carrier, thus eliminating the problems associated with viral gene expression. The delivered DNA is linked to the carrier virus with a condensing polycation. Further improvements in gene delivery were obtained by replacing polylysine with low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) as the DNA condensing agent. PMID:9115362

  7. Development of canine herpesvirus based antifertility vaccines for foxes using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Strive, Tanja; Hardy, Christopher M; French, Nigel; Wright, John D; Nagaraja, Nitin; Reubel, Gerhard H

    2006-02-13

    Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology, a canine herpesvirus (CHV)-based recombinant vaccine vector was produced for the development of an antifertility vaccine for foxes. Infectious viruses were recovered following transfection of canid cells with a BAC plasmid carrying the complete CHV genome. In vitro growth characteristics of BAC-derived viruses were similar to that of wildtype (wt)-CHV. Two recombinant antigens, fox zona pellucida protein subunit 3 (fZPC) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as control antigen, were inserted into thymidine kinase (TK) locus of the CHV genome and shown to be efficiently expressed in vitro. Inoculation of foxes with transgenic CHVs induced CHV specific antibodies, but was innocuous and failed to elicit transgene-specific antibody responses. Infectious virus or viral DNA was not detected in mucosal secretions or tissues of vaccinated foxes. The CHV-BAC system proved to be a quick and reliable method to manipulate the CHV genome. It will help to readily apply changes in the vector design in order to improve virus replication in vivo. PMID:16198458

  8. Herpesvirus mutagenesis facilitated by infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (iBACs).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karl E; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    A critical factor in the study of herpesviruses, their genes and gene functions is the capacity to derive mutants that harbor deletions, truncations, or insertions within the genetic elements of interest. Once constructed the impact of the introduced mutation on the phenotypic properties of the rescued virus can be determined in either in vitro or in vivo systems. However, the construction of such mutants by traditional virological mutagenesis techniques can be a difficult and laborious undertaking. The maintenance of a viral genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (iBAC), however, endows the capacity to manipulate the viral genome for mutagenesis studies with relative ease. Here, the construction and characterization of two gene deletion mutants of an alphaherpesvirus maintained as iBAC in combination with an inducible homologous recombination system in Escherichia coli is detailed. The methodology is generally applicable to any iBAC and is demonstrated to be a highly efficient and informative approach for mutant virus construction. PMID:25239746

  9. Construction of an infectious clone of canine herpesvirus genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Arii, Jun; Hushur, Orkash; Kato, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tohya, Yukinobu; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2006-04-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) is an attractive candidate not only for use as a recombinant vaccine to protect dogs from a variety of canine pathogens but also as a viral vector for gene therapy in domestic animals. However, developments in this area have been impeded by the complicated techniques used for eukaryotic homologous recombination. To overcome these problems, we used bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to generate infectious BACs. Our findings may be summarized as follows: (i) the CHV genome (pCHV/BAC), in which a BAC flanked by loxP sites was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene, was maintained in Escherichia coli; (ii) transfection of pCHV/BAC into A-72 cells resulted in the production of infectious virus; (iii) the BAC vector sequence was almost perfectly excisable from the genome of the reconstituted virus CHV/BAC by co-infection with CHV/BAC and a recombinant adenovirus that expressed the Cre recombinase; and (iv) a recombinant virus in which the glycoprotein C gene was deleted was generated by lambda recombination followed by Flp recombination, which resulted in a reduction in viral titer compared with that of the wild-type virus. The infectious clone pCHV/BAC is useful for the modification of the CHV genome using bacterial genetics, and CHV/BAC should have multiple applications in the rapid generation of genetically engineered CHV recombinants and the development of CHV vectors for vaccination and gene therapy in domestic animals. PMID:16515874

  10. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  11. Multiplex sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes for assembling complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Beier, Sebastian; Himmelbach, Axel; Schmutzer, Thomas; Felder, Marius; Taudien, Stefan; Mayer, Klaus F X; Platzer, Matthias; Stein, Nils; Scholz, Uwe; Mascher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Hierarchical shotgun sequencing remains the method of choice for assembling high-quality reference sequences of complex plant genomes. The efficient exploitation of current high-throughput technologies and powerful computational facilities for large-insert clone sequencing necessitates the sequencing and assembly of a large number of clones in parallel. We developed a multiplexed pipeline for shotgun sequencing and assembling individual bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) using the Illumina sequencing platform. We illustrate our approach by sequencing 668 barley BACs (Hordeum vulgare L.) in a single Illumina HiSeq 2000 lane. Using a newly designed parallelized computational pipeline, we obtained sequence assemblies of individual BACs that consist, on average, of eight sequence scaffolds and represent >98% of the genomic inserts. Our BAC assemblies are clearly superior to a whole-genome shotgun assembly regarding contiguity, completeness and the representation of the gene space. Our methods may be employed to rapidly obtain high-quality assemblies of a large number of clones to assemble map-based reference sequences of plant and animal species with complex genomes by sequencing along a minimum tiling path. PMID:26801048

  12. Integration-Free iPS Cells Engineered Using Human Artificial Chromosome Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Uno, Narumi; Ueda, Kana; Kurosaki, Hajime; Imaoka, Natsuko; Kazuki, Kanako; Ueno, Etsuya; Akakura, Yutaro; Katoh, Motonobu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamanaka, Shinya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have unique characteristics as gene-delivery vectors, including episomal transmission and transfer of multiple, large transgenes. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of HAC vectors for reprogramming mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Two HAC vectors (iHAC1 and iHAC2) were constructed. Both carried four reprogramming factors, and iHAC2 also encoded a p53-knockdown cassette. iHAC1 partially reprogrammed MEFs, and iHAC2 efficiently reprogrammed MEFs. Global gene expression patterns showed that the iHACs, unlike other vectors, generated relatively uniform iPS cells. Under non-selecting conditions, we established iHAC-free iPS cells by isolating cells that spontaneously lost iHAC2. Analyses of pluripotent markers, teratomas and chimeras confirmed that these iHAC-free iPS cells were pluripotent. Moreover, iHAC-free iPS cells with a re-introduced HAC encoding Herpes Simplex virus thymidine kinase were eliminated by ganciclovir treatment, indicating that the HAC safeguard system functioned in iPS cells. Thus, the HAC vector could generate uniform, integration-free iPS cells with a built-in safeguard system. PMID:21998730

  13. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Use of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes in Baculovirus Research and Recombinant Protein Expression: Current Trends and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Polly; Noad, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus expression system is one of the most successful and widely used eukaryotic protein expression methods. This short review will summarise the role of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACS) as an enabling technology for the modification of the virus genome. For many years baculovirus genomes have been maintained in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes, and foreign genes have been inserted using a transposition-based system. However, with recent advances in molecular biology techniques, particularly targeting reverse engineering of the baculovirus genome by recombineering, new frontiers in protein expression are being addressed. In particular, BACs have facilitated the propagation of disabled virus genomes that allow high throughput protein expression. Furthermore, improvement in the selection of recombinant viral genomes inserted into BACS has enabled the expression of multiprotein complexes by iterative recombineering of the baculovirus genome. PMID:23762754

  15. The selection and use of sorghum (Sorghum propinquum) bacterial artificial chromosomes as cytogenetic FISH probes for maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Davis, James D; Strobel, Cornelia; Conejo, Maria S; Beckham, Katherine D; Ring, Brian C; Bass, Hank W

    2011-01-01

    The integration of genetic and physical maps of maize is progressing rapidly, but the cytogenetic maps lag behind, with the exception of the pachytene fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) maps of maize chromosome 9. We sought to produce integrated FISH maps of other maize chromosomes using Core Bin Marker loci. Because these 1 Kb restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes are below the FISH detection limit, we used BACs from sorghum, a small-genome relative of maize, as surrogate clones for FISH mapping. We sequenced 151 maize RFLP probes and compared in silico BAC selection methods to that of library filter hybridization and found the latter to be the best. BAC library screening, clone verification, and single-clone selection criteria are presented along with an example of transgenomic BAC FISH mapping. This strategy has been used to facilitate the integration of RFLP and FISH maps in other large-genome species. PMID:21234422

  16. Stable maintenance of de novo assembled human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liskovykh, Mikhail; Ponomartsev, Sergey; Popova, Elena; Bader, Michael; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir; Alenina, Natalia; Tomilin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    De novo assembled alphoidtetO-type human artificial chromosomes (HACs) represent a novel promising generation of high capacity episomal vectors. Their function and persistence, and any adverse effects, in various cell types in live animals, have not, however, been explored. In this study we transferred the alphoidtetO-HAC into mouse ES cells and assessed whether the presence of this extra chromosome affects their pluripotent properties. AlphoidtetO-HAC-bearing ES cells were indistinguishable from their wild-type counterparts: they retained self-renewal potential and full capacity for multilineage differentiation during mouse development, whereas the HAC itself was mitotically and transcriptionally stable during this process. Our data provide the first example of fully synthetic DNA behaving like a normal chromosome in cells of living animals. It also opens a new perspective into functional genetic studies in laboratory animals as well as stem cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:25695642

  17. Production of a yeast artificial chromosome for stable expression of a synthetic xylose isomerase-xylulokinase polyprotein in a fuel ethanol yeast strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was engineered to contain a polyprotein gene construct expressing xylos...

  18. Construction and analysis of an hn-cDNA library derived from the p-arm of pig chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Anderson Dear, D V; Miller, J R

    1996-09-01

    Our aim is to find unidentified genes on specific pig chromosomes or chromosome fragments. Our approach has involved the construction of a heterogeneous nuclear complementary (hn-c) DNA library of the p-arm of pig Chromosome (Chr) 12, the only pig chromosome present in the pig x hamster hybrid cell line 8990. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and first-strand synthesis of hn-cDNA carried out with random and oligo dT primers. Pig hn-cDNA was isolated by amplification of first-strand synthesized hn-cDNA with primers specific for Short Interspersed Repeat Elements (SINEs) via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hn-cDNAs were size selected and cloned in E. coli XL-1 blue cells with PCR-Script as the vector. The library consisted of 6000 clones. Clone inserts were amplified by PCR with vector-specific primers, and randomly picked inserts greater than 600 bp were sequenced. Homology searches were carried out with the FASTA search program on the GenEmbl database. Thirty clones were sequenced, and of these three showed strong homologies to GenEmbl sequences: (1) to sheep, mouse, human, and rat mammary gland factor (MGF); (2) to MLN-50, a gene that is amplified in human familial breast cancer and is present on human Chr 17; the latter is homologous to pig chromosome 12; (3) to a family of unassigned overlapping human ESTs. Of the other sequenced clones, seven were over 80% homologous with pig SINE sequences; three were over 75% homologous to human LINE sequences; six displayed open reading frames over a mean distance equivalent to 50 amino acids, although these showed no significant similarities with sequences in the databases. Using this approach, we have been able to identify several new genes on the p-arm of pig Chr 12. This is the first report of gene isolation from a library derived from a pig chromosome fragment. PMID:8703117

  19. Genetic Stability of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome-Derived Human Cytomegalovirus during Culture In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Isa; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Davison, Andrew J.; Statkute, Evelina; Fielding, Ceri A.; Tomasec, Peter; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strains invariably mutate when propagated in vitro. Mutations in gene RL13 are selected in all cell types, whereas in fibroblasts mutants in the UL128 locus (UL128L; genes UL128, UL130, and UL131A) are also selected. In addition, sporadic mutations are selected elsewhere in the genome in all cell types. We sought to investigate conditions under which HCMV can be propagated without incurring genetic defects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) provide a stable, genetically defined source of viral genome. Viruses were generated from BACs containing the genomes of strains TR, TB40, FIX, and Merlin, as well as from Merlin-BAC recombinants containing variant nucleotides in UL128L from TB40-BAC4 or FIX-BAC. Propagation of viruses derived from TR-BAC, TB40-BAC4, and FIX-BAC in either fibroblast or epithelial cells was associated with the generation of defects around the prokaryotic vector, which is retained in the unique short (US) region of viruses. This was not observed for Merlin-BAC, from which the vector is excised in derived viruses; however, propagation in epithelial cells was consistently associated with mutations in the unique long b′ (UL/b′) region, all impacting on gene UL141. Viruses derived from Merlin-BAC in fibroblasts had mutations in UL128L, but mutations occurred less frequently with recombinants containing UL128L nucleotides from TB40-BAC4 or FIX-BAC. Viruses derived from a Merlin-BAC derivative in which RL13 and UL128L were either mutated or repressed were remarkably stable in fibroblasts. Thus, HCMV containing a wild-type gene complement can be generated in vitro by deriving virus from a self-excising BAC in fibroblasts and repressing RL13 and UL128L. IMPORTANCE Researchers should aim to study viruses that accurately represent the causative agents of disease. This is problematic for HCMV because clinical strains mutate rapidly when propagated in vitro, becoming less cell associated, altered in

  20. Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: A Functional Genomics Tool for the Study of Positive-strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics, an approach to rescue infectious virus entirely from a cloned cDNA, has revolutionized the field of positive-strand RNA viruses, whose genomes have the same polarity as cellular mRNA. The cDNA-based reverse genetics system is a seminal method that enables direct manipulation of the viral genomic RNA, thereby generating recombinant viruses for molecular and genetic studies of both viral RNA elements and gene products in viral replication and pathogenesis. It also provides a valuable platform that allows the development of genetically defined vaccines and viral vectors for the delivery of foreign genes. For many positive-strand RNA viruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), however, the cloned cDNAs are unstable, posing a major obstacle to the construction and propagation of the functional cDNA. Here, the present report describes the strategic considerations in creating and amplifying a genetically stable full-length infectious JEV cDNA as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) using the following general experimental procedures: viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, cDNA subcloning and modification, assembly of a full-length cDNA, cDNA linearization, in vitro RNA synthesis, and virus recovery. This protocol provides a general methodology applicable to cloning full-length cDNA for a range of positive-strand RNA viruses, particularly those with a genome of >10 kb in length, into a BAC vector, from which infectious RNAs can be transcribed in vitro with a bacteriophage RNA polymerase. PMID:26780115

  1. Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: A Functional Genomics Tool for the Study of Positive-strand RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics, an approach to rescue infectious virus entirely from a cloned cDNA, has revolutionized the field of positive-strand RNA viruses, whose genomes have the same polarity as cellular mRNA. The cDNA-based reverse genetics system is a seminal method that enables direct manipulation of the viral genomic RNA, thereby generating recombinant viruses for molecular and genetic studies of both viral RNA elements and gene products in viral replication and pathogenesis. It also provides a valuable platform that allows the development of genetically defined vaccines and viral vectors for the delivery of foreign genes. For many positive-strand RNA viruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), however, the cloned cDNAs are unstable, posing a major obstacle to the construction and propagation of the functional cDNA. Here, the present report describes the strategic considerations in creating and amplifying a genetically stable full-length infectious JEV cDNA as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) using the following general experimental procedures: viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, cDNA subcloning and modification, assembly of a full-length cDNA, cDNA linearization, in vitro RNA synthesis, and virus recovery. This protocol provides a general methodology applicable to cloning full-length cDNA for a range of positive-strand RNA viruses, particularly those with a genome of >10 kb in length, into a BAC vector, from which infectious RNAs can be transcribed in vitro with a bacteriophage RNA polymerase. PMID:26780115

  2. Association Between Pachytene Chromosomes and Linkage Groups in Carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of carrot (Daucus carota L.) consists of ~ 480 Mb/1C organized in 9 chromosome pairs. The importance of carrots in human nutrition is triggering the development of genomic resources, including carrot linkage maps, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone library and BAC end sequence...

  3. Narrowing the genetic interval and yeast artificial chromosome map in the branchio-oto-renal region on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shrawan; Kimberling, W.J.; Pinnt, J.

    1996-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial abnormality, hearing loss, and renal anomalies. Recently, the disease gene has been localized to chromosome 8q. Here, we report genetic studies that further refine the disease gene region to a smaller interval and identify several YACs from the critical region. We studied two large, clinically well-characterized BOR families with a set of 13 polymorphic markers spanning the D8S165-D8S275 interval from the chromosome 8q region. Based on multipoint analysis, the highest likelihood for the location of the BOR gene is between markers D8S543 and D8S530, a distance of about 2 cM. YACs that map in the BOR critical region have been identified and characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A YAC contig, based on the STS content map, that covers a minimum of 4 Mb of human DNA in the critical region of BOR is assembled. This lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in BOR syndrome. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome spanning the 8; 21 translocation breakpoint t(8; 21)(q22; q22. 3) in acute myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Jizong Gao; Erickson, P. ); Gardiner, K.; Patterson, D. ); Le Beau, M.M.; Diaz, M.O.; Rowley, J.D. ); Drabkin, H.A. Eleanor Roosevelt Inst. for Cancer Research, Denver, CO )

    1991-06-01

    The 8;21 translocation is one of the most common specific rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia. The authors have identified markers (D21S65 and a Not I boundary clone, Not-42, referred to as probe B) flanking the chromosome 21 translocation breakpoint (21q22.3) that demonstrate physical linkage in normal genomic DNA, by using at least three restriction endonucleases (Not I, Sac II, and BssHII), and that are located not more than 250-280 kilobases apart. Pulsed-field gel analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids containing the 8;21 translocation chromosomes demonstrates rearrangement of these markers. A 470-kilobase yeast artificial chromosome, YAC-Not-42, has been isolated that contains both probes. Mapping of {lambda} subclones constructed from YAC-Not-42 suggests that >95% of the yeast artificial chromosome DNA is located on the proximal (D21S65) side of the breakpoint. In situ hybridization studies using metaphase chromosomes from five acute myelogenous leukemia patients with the 8;21 translocation confirmed these results and demonstrated the translocation of probe B to the derivative chromosome 8. A chromosome walk of {approx} 39 kilobases from probe B has allowed identification of the breakpoint in DNA from a somatic cell hybrid containing the derivative chromosome 8. Since probe B contains conserved DNA sequences and is in close proximity to the translocation breakpoint, it may represent a portion of the involved gene on chromosome 21.

  5. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae) sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakovin, Nickolay A.; Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Razumova, Olga V.; Soloviev, Alexander A.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2) of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH) using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, Humulus japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to Humulus lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in Humulus japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction. PMID:25610546

  6. Evaluation of an Hprt-Luciferase Reporter Gene on a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome in Response to Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takeshi; Noda, Natsumi; Kuromi, Yasushi; Kokura, Kenji; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) is known as a house-keeping gene, and has been used as an internal control for real-time quantitative RT-PCR and various other methods of gene expression analysis. To evaluate the Hprt mRNA levels as a reference standard, we engineered a luciferase reporter driven by a long Hprt promoter and measured its response to cytotoxicity. Methods We constructed a reporter vector that harbored a phiC31 integrase recognition site and a mouse Hprt promoter fused with green-emitting luciferase (SLG) coding sequence. The Hprt-SLG vector was loaded onto a mouse artificial chromosome containing a multi-integrase platform using phiC31 integrase in mouse A9 cells. We established three independent clones. Results The established cell lines had similar levels of expression of the Hprt-SLG reporter gene. Hprt-SLG activity increased proportionately under growth conditions and decreased under cytotoxic conditions after blasticidin or cisplatin administration. Similar increases and decreases in the SLG luminescent were observed under growth and cytotoxic conditions, respectively, to those in the fluorescent obtained using the commercially available reagent, alamarBlue. Conclusion By employing a reliable and stable expression system in a mammalian artificial chromosome, the activity of an Hprt-SLG reporter can reflect cell numbers under cell growth condition and cell viability in the evaluation of cytotoxic conditions. PMID:27493490

  7. In situ hybridization to cytogenetic bands of yeast artificial chromosomes covering 50% of human Xq24-Xq28 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Vittorio; Casamassimi, Amelia; D'Urso, Michele; Yoon, Jae-Young; Freije, Wadiha; Schlessinger, David; Muenke, Maximilian; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Saccone, Salvatore; Maugeri, Silvana; Santoro, Anna Maria; Motta, Salvatore; Della Valle, Giuliano

    1991-01-01

    From the collection described by Abidi et al., 102 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) with human DNA inserts more than 300 kb in length were assigned to chromosomal band positions on early metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization using the biotin-avidin method. All the YACs hybridized within the Xq24-Xqter region, supporting the origin of the vast majority of the YACs from single human X-chromosomal sites. With assignments precise to ±0.5 bands, YACs were distributed among cytogenetic bands to roughly equal extents. Thus, there is no gross bias in the cloning of DNA from different bands into large YACs. To test band assignments further, hybridizations were carried out blind, and band positions were then compared with (1) probe localizations in cases in which a reported location was present in one of the YACs; (2) cross-hybridization of a labeled YAC with others in the collection; and (3) hybridization to a panel of DNAs from a series of hybrid cells containing Xq DNA truncated at various regions. Of 31 cases in which YACs contained a probe with a previously reported location, 28 in situ assignments were in agreement, and 14 other assignments, including one of the three discordant with probe localization, were confirmed by YAC cross-hybridization studies. Results with a group of nine YACs were further confirmed with a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNAs from that region. Five YACs hybridized both to Xq25 and to a second site (four in Xq27 and one in Xq28), suggestive of some duplication of DNA of the hybrid cell and perhaps in normal X chromosomes. The in situ assignments are thus sufficient to place YACs easily and systematically within bins of about 7–10 Mb and to detect some possible anomalies. Furthermore, on the basis of expectations for random cloning of DNA in YACs, the assigned YACs probably cover more than 50% of the total Xq24-Xq28 region. This provides one way to initiate the assembly of YAC contigs over extended chromosomal regions. Images

  8. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Three-region specific microdissection libraries for the long arm of human chromosome 2, regions q33-q35, q31-q32, and q23-q24

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Tong, S.; Whittier, A.

    1995-09-01

    Three region-specific libraries have been constructed from the long arm of human chromosome 2, including regions 2q33-35 (2Q2 library), 2q31-32 (2Q3) and 2q23-24 (2Q4). Chromosome microdissection and the MboI linker-adaptor microcloning techniques were used in constructing these libraries. The libraries comprised hundreds of thousands of microclones in each library. Approximately half of the microclones in the library contained unique or low-copy number sequence inserts. The insert sizes ranged between 50 and 800 bp, with a mean of 130-190 bp. Southern blot analysis of individual unique sequence microclones showed that 70-94% of the microclones were derived from the dissected region. 31 unique sequence microclones from the 2Q2 library, 31 from 2Q3, and 30 from 2Q4, were analyzed for insert sizes, the hybridizing genomic HindIII fragment sizes, and cross-hybridization to rodent species. These libraries and the short insert microclones derived from the libraries should be useful for high resolution physical mapping, sequence-ready reagents for large scale genomic sequencing, and positional cloning of disease-related genes assigned to these regions, e.g. the recessive familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis assigned to 2q33-q35, and a type I diabetes susceptibility gene to 2q31-q33. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Characterization of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice expressing mCherry fluorescent protein substituted for the murine smooth muscle-alpha-actin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smooth muscle a actin (SMA) is a cytoskeletal protein expressed by mesenchymal and smooth muscle cell types, including mural cells(vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes). Using Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering technology, we generated transgenic reporter mice that express a ...

  11. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  12. Use of a Human Artificial Chromosome for Delivering Trophic Factors in a Rodent Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kazuki, Kanako; Ebiki, Mitsutaka; Nakanishi, Mami; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Yoshida Yamakawa, Miho; Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Nakashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A human artificial chromosome (HAC) is maintained as an episome within a cell and avoids random integration into the host genome. It can transfer multiple and/or large transgenes along with their regulatory elements thereby resembling native chromosomes. Using this HAC system, we established mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that simultaneously expressed hepatocyte growth factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and insulin-like growth factor 1, termed HAC-MSCs. This cell line provides an opportunity for stable transplantation and thorough analyses. We then introduced the cells for the treatment of a neurodegenerative disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The HAC-MSCs were transplanted via the fourth cerebral ventricle (CV) or intravenous (i.v.) infusion at various ages of recipient mice. Littermate- and sex-matched mice underwent a sham procedure. Compared to the controls, there was an encouraging trend of increased life span via CV transplantation and delayed onset in i.v. infusion 60 days after transplantation. Further, we confirmed a statistically significant increase in life span via CV transplantation at 100 days. This effect was not seen in mice transplanted with MSCs lacking the HAC. We successfully enhanced the trophic potential of the MSCs using the HAC. This strategy could be a promising direction for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26440597

  13. A bacterial artificial chromosome contig spanning the major domestication locus Q in wheat and identification of a candidate gene.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D; Fellers, John P; Brooks, Steven A; Gill, Bikram S

    2003-01-01

    The Q locus played a major role in the domestication of wheat because it confers the free-threshing character and influences many other agronomically important traits. We constructed a physical contig spanning the Q locus using a Triticum monococcum BAC library. Three chromosome walking steps were performed by complete sequencing of BACs and identification of low-copy markers through similarity searches of database sequences. The BAC contig spans a physical distance of approximately 300 kb corresponding to a genetic distance of 0.9 cM. The physical map of T. monococcum had perfect colinearity with the genetic map of wheat chromosome arm 5AL. Recombination data in conjunction with analysis of fast neutron deletions confirmed that the contig spanned the Q locus. The Q gene was narrowed to a 100-kb segment, which contains an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene that cosegregates with Q. AP2 is known to play a major role in controlling floral homeotic gene expression and thus is an excellent candidate for Q. PMID:12750342

  14. Construction and characterization of a NotI linking library from human chromosome region 1q25-qter

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, C.B.; Zhen, Dong-Kai; Wang, Ji-Yi

    1995-09-01

    Chromosome 1q25-qter-specific NotI linking clones have been isolated from a NotI linking library that was constructed using DNA from MCH206.1 somatic cell hybrid cells. These cells contain chromosome 1q25-qter translocated to human chromosome Xp22 as the only human genetic material in mouse background. Sixty-eight NotI linking clones have been mapped by a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization and R-banding to cytogenetic bands on the long arm of chromosome 1. The relative order of 11 NotI clones and their relation to known chromosome 1 markers have also been determined in 1q32 and 1q41, where the genes of Van der Woude and Usher syndrome type IIa have been previously mapped: cen-chr1.14-chr1.79-chr1.56-chr1.11-chr1.95-chr1.58 (chr1.74)-D1S70-chr1.15-chr1.82 (chr1.143)-chr1.62-D1S81-tel. The 1q32- and 1q41-specific NotI linking clones were sequenced in the vicinity of the NotI site. They were analyzed in terms of nucleotide composition, G+C content, frequency of CpG dinucleotides, and protein coding potentials. Most of the 1q32-q41-specific NotI linking clones were derived from CpG islands. Sequences of three NotI linking clones proved to be identical with known genes. Six of the remaining eight had a high potential for coding regions and shared short homologous regions with sequences in the GenBank database. The NotI linking clones and the identified CpG islands will provide valuable resources for constructing a long-range restriction map of chromosome 1q25-q44 and for the eventual isolation of disease genes of Van der Woude syndrome (1q32-q41) and Usher syndrome type IIa (1q41). 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Library+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses possible future directions for academic libraries in the post Web/Library 2.0 world. These possible directions include areas such as data literacy, linked data sets, and opportunities for libraries in support of digital humanities. The author provides a brief sketch of the background information regarding the topics and…

  16. Isolation of cDNAs from the spinal muscular atrophy gene region with yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.X.; He, X.X.; Hung, W.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells, leading to progressive paralysis of voluntary muscles. The SMA gene(s) is located at 5q11.2-q13.3, between D5S435 and D5S112. To isolate potential candidate gene(s) responsible for SMA, we used the YACs within the SMA gene region as probes to screen a human brainstem cDNA library. Thirteen cDNA clones were isolated. Their sizes range from 0.7 kb to 5 kb. Seven clones were found to be unique in sequence; the remaining six clones contain repetitive sequences. Five out of these seven unique clones have been used as probes to screen a phage genomic DNA library. Phage genomic clones isolated with individual unique cDNA were used for fluorescence in situ hybridization to identify the origin of cDNAs. These five unique sequences are all located in the 5q13 region, indicating the reliability of our screening method. All the thirteen clones have been partially sequenced (about 300 bp) from each end. No homology has been found with any known EST or known genes. No cross hybridization was detected among the unique clones, suggesting that there may be distinct new genes encoded in this region.

  17. A Chromosome Segment Substitution Library of Weedy Rice for Genetic Dissection of Complex Agronomic and Domestication Traits

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Prasanta K.; De Leon, Teresa; Singh, Pradeep K.; Parco, Arnold; Cohn, Marc A.; Sasaki, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful alternative for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL), analyzing gene interactions, and providing starting materials for map-based cloning projects. We report the development and characterization of a CSSL library of a U.S. weedy rice accession ‘PSRR-1’ with genome-wide coverage in an adapted rice cultivar ‘Bengal’ background. The majority of the CSSLs carried a single defined weedy rice segment with an average introgression segment of 2.8 % of the donor genome. QTL mapping results for several agronomic and domestication traits from the CSSL population were compared with those obtained from two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations involving the same weedy rice accession. There was congruence of major effect QTLs between both types of populations, but new and additional QTLs were detected in the CSSL population. Although, three major effect QTLs for plant height were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 8 in the CSSL population, the latter two escaped detection in both RIL populations. Since this was observed for many traits, epistasis may play a major role for the phenotypic variation observed in weedy rice. High levels of shattering and seed dormancy in weedy rice might result from an accumulation of many small effect QTLs. Several CSSLs with desirable agronomic traits (e.g. longer panicles, longer grains, and higher seed weight) identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding. Since weedy rice is a reservoir of genes for many weedy and agronomic attributes, the CSSL library will serve as a valuable resource to discover latent genetic diversity for improving crop productivity and understanding the plant domestication process through cloning and characterization of the underlying genes. PMID:26086245

  18. Construction and characterization of region-specific microdissection libraries and single-copy microclones for short arm of human chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, J.; Kao, F.T. |; Tong, S.; Qi, J.

    1994-07-01

    The short arm of human chromosome 2, comprising approximately 93 million bp, has been divided into four regions to construct region-specific microdissection libraries to facilitate physical mapping and gene cloning. These four regions include 2p23-p25 (designated 2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (2P3), and 2p11-p13 (2P4). Together with three previously constructed microdissection libraries of 2P1, 2P2 and 2P4, a fourth library for the region 2P3 has been constructed and characterized to complete all four region-specific libraries for the entire 2p. The 2P3 library is very large, potentially comprising 1,000,000 recombinant microclones with insert sizes ranging between 50 and 800 bp and a mean of 250 bp. Approximately 40% of the microclones contain unique sequences. Of the 77 single-copy microclones analyzed, 66 clones (86%) hybridized to both human and chromosome 2 DNAs, indicating that they were derived from human and are chromosome 2 specific. The hybridizing HindIII genomic fragments for the 66 microclones have also been determined.

  19. Gata3 Hypomorphic Mutant Mice Rescued with a Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgene Suffer a Glomerular Mesangial Cell Defect.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Takashi; Yu, Lei; Otsuki, Akihito; Ainoya, Keiko; Lim, Kim-Chew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-09-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic kidney development, while its precise functions in the adult kidney remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GATA3 is specifically expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and plays a critical role in the maintenance of renal glomerular function. Newly generated Gata3 hypomorphic mutant mice exhibited neonatal lethality associated with severe renal hypoplasia. Normal kidney size was restored by breeding the hypomorphic mutant with a rescuing transgenic mouse line bearing a 662-kb Gata3 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), and these animals (termed G3YR mice) survived to adulthood. However, most of the G3YR mice showed degenerative changes in glomerular mesangial cells, which deteriorated progressively during postnatal development. Consequently, the G3YR adult mice suffered severe renal failure. We found that the 662-kb Gata3 YAC transgene recapitulated Gata3 expression in the renal tubules but failed to direct sufficient GATA3 activity to mesangial cells. Renal glomeruli of the G3YR mice had significantly reduced amounts of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), which is known to participate in the development and maintenance of glomerular mesangial cells. These results demonstrate a critical role for GATA3 in the maintenance of mesangial cells and its absolute requirement for prevention of glomerular disease. PMID:27296697

  20. Telomerase-mediated life-span extension of human primary fibroblasts by human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector

    SciTech Connect

    Shitara, Shingo; Kakeda, Minoru; Nagata, Keiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Sano, Akiko; Osawa, Kanako; Okazaki, Akiyo; Katoh, Motonobu; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Tomizuka, Kazuma

    2008-05-09

    Telomerase-mediated life-span extension enables the expansion of normal cells without malignant transformation, and thus has been thought to be useful in cell therapies. Currently, integrating vectors including the retrovirus are used for human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-mediated expansion of normal cells; however, the use of these vectors potentially causes unexpected insertional mutagenesis and/or activation of oncogenes. Here, we established normal human fibroblast (hPF) clones retaining non-integrating human artificial chromosome (HAC) vectors harboring the hTERT expression cassette. In hTERT-HAC/hPF clones, we observed the telomerase activity and the suppression of senescent-associated SA-{beta}-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, the hTERT-HAC/hPF clones continued growing beyond 120 days after cloning, whereas the hPF clones retaining the silent hTERT-HAC senesced within 70 days. Thus, hTERT-HAC-mediated episomal expression of hTERT allows the extension of the life-span of human primary cells, implying that gene delivery by non-integrating HAC vectors can be used to control cellular proliferative capacity of primary cultured cells.

  1. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors. PMID:17501993

  2. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek's disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sanjay M; Sun, Aijun; Khan, Owais A; Lee, Lucy F; Lupiani, Blanca

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that causes rapid induction of T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Based on the virus's ability to cause disease in vaccinated chickens, MDV strains are classified into pathotypes, with the most virulent strains belonging to the very virulent plus (vv+) pathotype. Here we report the construction of BAC clones of 686 (686-BAC), a vv+ strain of MDV. Transfection of DNA isolated from two independent clones into duck embryo fibroblasts resulted in recovery of infectious virus. Pathogenesis studies showed that the BAC-derived 686 viruses were more virulent than Md5, a vv strain of MDV. With the use of a two-step red-mediated mutagenesis process, both copies of viral interleukin 8 (vIL-8) were deleted from the MDV genome, showing that 686-BACs were amenable to mutagenesis techniques. The generation of BAC clones from a vv+ strain of MDV is a significant step toward understanding molecular basis of MDV pathogenesis. PMID:23901763

  3. The H19 Imprinting Control Region Mediates Preimplantation Imprinted Methylation of Nearby Sequences in Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Eiichi; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Sakaguchi, Ryuuta; Takahashi, Takuya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse Igf2/H19 imprinted locus, differential methylation of the imprinting control region (H19 ICR) is established during spermatogenesis and is maintained in offspring throughout development. Previously, however, we observed that the paternal H19 ICR, when analyzed in yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice (YAC-TgM), was preferentially methylated only after fertilization. To identify the DNA sequences that confer methylation imprinting, we divided the H19 ICR into two fragments (1.7 and 1.2 kb), ligated them to both ends of a λ DNA fragment into which CTCF binding sites had been inserted, and analyzed this in YAC-TgM. The maternally inherited λ sequence, normally methylated after implantation in the absence of H19 ICR sequences, became hypomethylated, demonstrating protective activity against methylation within the ICR. Meanwhile, the paternally inherited λ sequence was hypermethylated before implantation only when a 1.7-kb fragment was ligated. Consistently, when two subfragments of the H19 ICR were individually investigated for their activities in YAC-TgM, only the 1.7-kb fragment was capable of introducing paternal allele-specific DNA methylation. These results show that postfertilization methylation imprinting is conferred by a paternal allele-specific methylation activity present in a 1.7-kb DNA fragment of the H19 ICR, while maternal allele-specific activities protect the allele from de novo DNA methylation. PMID:23230275

  4. Visualization of lymphatic vessels by Prox1-promoter directed GFP reporter in a bacterial artificial chromosome-based transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Choi, Dongwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Aguilar, Berenice

    2011-01-01

    Although the blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mouse has been an excellent tool to study vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, a lymphatic-specific fluorescent mouse model has not been established to date. Here we report a transgenic animal model that expresses the green fluorescent protein under the promoter of Prox1, a master control gene in lymphatic development. Generated using an approximately 200-kb-long bacterial artificial chromosome harboring the entire Prox1 gene, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein mouse was found to faithfully recapitulate the expression pattern of the Prox1 gene in lymphatic endothelial cells and other Prox1-expressing organs, and enabled us to conveniently visualize detailed structure and morphology of lymphatic vessels and networks throughout development. Our data demonstrate that this novel transgenic mouse can be extremely useful for detection, imaging, and isolation of lymphatic vessels and monitoring wound-associated lymphangiogenesis. Together, this Prox1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse will be a great tool for the lymphatic research. PMID:20962325

  5. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  6. Process for assembly and transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a synthetic yeast artificial chromosome containing a multigene cassette to express enzymes that enhance xylose utilization designed for an automated pla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system ...

  7. Comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of a 431-kb Arabidopsis thaliana bacterial artificial chromosome contig reveals the role of chromosomal duplications in the expansion of the Brassica rapa genome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S A; Cheng, Z; Wang, M L; Goodman, H M; Jiang, J

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genome studies are important contributors to our understanding of genome evolution. Most comparative genome studies in plants have been based on genetic mapping of homologous DNA loci in different genomes. Large-scale comparative physical mapping has been hindered by the lack of efficient and affordable techniques. We report here the adaptation of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for comparative physical mapping between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. A set of six bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) representing a 431-kb contiguous region of chromosome 2 of A. thaliana was mapped on both chromosomes and DNA fibers of B. rapa. This DNA fragment has a single location in the A. thaliana genome, but hybridized to four to six B. rapa chromosomes, indicating multiple duplications in the B. rapa genome. The sizes of the fiber-FISH signals from the same BACs were not longer in B. rapa than those in A. thaliana, suggesting that this genomic region is duplicated but not expanded in the B. rapa genome. The comparative fiber-FISH mapping results support that chromosomal duplications, rather than regional expansion due to accumulation of repetitive sequences in the intergenic regions, played the major role in the evolution of the B. rapa genome. PMID:11014828

  8. Isolation and characterization of transcribed sequences from a chromosome 16 hn-cDNA library and the physical mapping of genes and transcribed sequences using a high-resolution somatic cell panel of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, S.A.; Apostolou, S.; Lane, S.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F. )

    1994-03-15

    A hn-cDNA (heteronuclear complementary DNA) library was constructed from a mouse/human somatic cell hybrid, CY18, which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. Hexamer primers constructed from consensus 5[prime]intron splice sequences were used to generate cDNA from the immature unspliced mRNA. The resulting cDNA library was screened with a total human DNA probe to identify potential human clones. Rescreening was necessary, and use of a mouse-derived clone with homology to 7SL RNA proved successful in eliminating the majority of mouse clones. Thirteen clones had open reading frames, and of those, five showed homology to human sequences in Gen-Bank. Two clones had homology to random partially sequenced cDNAs, one clone was likely to be a GRP78 pseudogene, one clone mapped the PHKG2 gene to 16p11.2-16p12.1, and one clone had homology to human S-13 ribosomal protein. All clones except the latter were mapped to a high-resolution somatic cell panel. Although isolation of human chromosome 16 genes from this library was successful, it was apparent that cDNA synthesis was initiated at sites other than intron splice sites, presumably by mispairing of the hexamers. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A method for producing transgenic cells using a multi-integrase system on a human artificial chromosome vector.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeyuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Yuji; Nanba, Eiji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The production of cells capable of expressing gene(s) of interest is important for a variety of applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, including gene therapy and animal transgenesis. The ability to insert transgenes at a precise location in the genome, using site-specific recombinases such as Cre, FLP, and ΦC31, has major benefits for the efficiency of transgenesis. Recent work on integrases from ΦC31, R4, TP901-1 and Bxb1 phages demonstrated that these recombinases catalyze site-specific recombination in mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the activities of integrases on site-specific recombination and gene expression in mammalian cells. We designed a human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector containing five recombination sites (ΦC31 attP, R4 attP, TP901-1 attP, Bxb1 attP and FRT; multi-integrase HAC vector) and de novo mammalian codon-optimized integrases. The multi-integrase HAC vector has several functions, including gene integration in a precise locus and avoiding genomic position effects; therefore, it was used as a platform to investigate integrase activities. Integrases carried out site-specific recombination at frequencies ranging from 39.3-96.8%. Additionally, we observed homogenous gene expression in 77.3-87.5% of colonies obtained using the multi-integrase HAC vector. This vector is also transferable to another cell line, and is capable of accepting genes of interest in this environment. These data suggest that integrases have high DNA recombination efficiencies in mammalian cells. The multi-integrase HAC vector enables us to produce transgene-expressing cells efficiently and create platform cell lines for gene expression. PMID:21390305

  10. Cloning human herpes virus 6A genome into bacterial artificial chromosomes and study of DNA replication intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Ronen; Frenkel, Niza

    2009-01-01

    Cloning of large viral genomes into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) facilitates analyses of viral functions and molecular mutagenesis. Previous derivations of viral BACs involved laborious recombinations within infected cells. We describe a single-step production of viral BACs by direct cloning of unit length genomes, derived from circular or head-to-tail concatemeric DNA replication intermediates. The BAC cloning is independent of intracellular recombinations and DNA packaging constraints. We introduced the 160-kb human herpes virus 6A (HHV-6A) genome into BACs by digesting the viral DNA replicative intermediates with the Sfil enzyme that cleaves the viral genome in a single site. The recombinant BACs contained also the puromycin selection gene, GFP, and LoxP sites flanking the BAC sequences. The HHV-6A-BAC vectors were retained stably in puromycin selected 293T cells. In the presence of irradiated helper virus, supplying most likely proteins enhancing gene expression they expressed early and late genes in SupT1 T cells. The method is especially attractive for viruses that replicate inefficiently and for viruses propagated in suspension cells. We have used the fact that the BAC cloning “freezes” the viral DNA replication intermediates to analyze their structure. The results revealed that HHV-6A-BACs contained a single direct repeat (DR) rather than a DR-DR sequence, predicted to arise by circularization of parental genomes with a DR at each terminus. HHV-6A DNA molecules prepared from the infected cells also contained DNA molecules with a single DR. Such forms were not previously described for HHV-6 DNA. PMID:19858479

  11. Yeast artificial chromosomes employed for random assembly of biosynthetic pathways and production of diverse compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Naesby, Michael; Nielsen, Søren VS; Nielsen, Curt AF; Green, Trine; Tange, Thomas Ø; Simón, Ernesto; Knechtle, Philipp; Hansson, Anders; Schwab, Markus S; Titiz, Olca; Folly, Christophe; Archila, Roberto E; Maver, Milena; van Sint Fiet, Stephan; Boussemghoune, Thiamo; Janes, Michael; Kumar, A S Sathish; Sonkar, Shailendra P; Mitra, Partha P; Benjamin, V Ajai Kumar; Korrapati, Nimitha; Suman, Inala; Hansen, Esben H; Thybo, Tanja; Goldsmith, Neil; Sorensen, Alexandra Santana

    2009-01-01

    Background Natural products are an important source of drugs and other commercially interesting compounds, however their isolation and production is often difficult. Metabolic engineering, mainly in bacteria and yeast, has sought to circumvent some of the associated problems but also this approach is impeded by technical limitations. Here we describe a novel strategy for production of diverse natural products, comprising the expression of an unprecedented large number of biosynthetic genes in a heterologous host. Results As an example, genes from different sources, representing enzymes of a seven step flavonoid pathway, were individually cloned into yeast expression cassettes, which were then randomly combined on Yeast Artificial Chromosomes and used, in a single transformation of yeast, to create a variety of flavonoid producing pathways. Randomly picked clones were analysed, and approximately half of them showed production of the flavanone naringenin, and a third of them produced the flavonol kaempferol in various amounts. This reflected the assembly of 5–7 step multi-species pathways converting the yeast metabolites phenylalanine and/or tyrosine into flavonoids, normally only produced by plants. Other flavonoids were also produced that were either direct intermediates or derivatives thereof. Feeding natural and unnatural, halogenated precursors to these recombinant clones demonstrated the potential to further diversify the type of molecules that can be produced with this technology. Conclusion The technology has many potential uses but is particularly suited for generating high numbers of structurally diverse compounds, some of which may not be amenable to chemical synthesis, thus greatly facilitating access to a huge chemical space in the search for new commercially interesting compounds PMID:19678954

  12. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Cubells, Joseph F; Schroeder, Jason P; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Manvich, Daniel F; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A; Liles, L Cameron; Squires, Katherine E; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a "C" or a "T" at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh deficiency

  13. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame K8 by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sathish, Narayanan; Hollow, Charles; Yuan, Yan

    2011-03-01

    The open reading frame K8 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZip) protein that binds to the origin of viral DNA replication and is an integral component of viral lytic DNA replication complex. Moreover, K8 physically interacts with replication and transcription activator (RTA) and represses its transactivation activity on several viral promoters. To investigate the role of this protein in viral life cycle, we constructed two K8-null recombinant mutant viruses (BAC-ΔK8 and BAC-stopK8) by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system. Latent viral infection can be reconstituted in 293T and BJAB cells with wild-type and the K8-null recombinant viruses by introducing the cloned viral genomes into the cells. When the cells carrying these viruses were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate, no significant difference was seen in overall viral gene expression between wild-type and K8-null viruses, with lytic DNA replication still active in the latter. However, 293T cells harboring K8-null mutant viruses, either BAC-ΔK8 or BAC-stopK8, displayed lower copy numbers of latent KSHV genome in comparison with wild-type viruses. Furthermore, although K8 deficiency appeared to not affect infectivity when K8-null viruses were used to infect 293T, primary human microvascular dermal endothelial and human foreskin fibroblast cells, they exhibited much lower viral genome copy numbers in all types of cell compared to wild-type viruses. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role of K8 in abortive lytic DNA replication occurring in early stages of de novo infection or in the maintenance of latent viral genomes. PMID:21159864

  14. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cubells, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A.; Liles, L. Cameron; Squires, Katherine E.; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L.; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a “C” or a “T” at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh

  15. Construction and Characterization of a Repetitive DNA Library in Parodontidae (Actinopterygii: Characiformes): A Genomic and Evolutionary Approach to the Degeneration of the W Sex Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jordana Inácio Nascimento; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive DNA sequences, including tandem and dispersed repeats, comprise a large portion of eukaryotic genomes and are important for gene regulation, sex chromosome differentiation, and karyotype evolution. In Parodontidae, only the repetitive DNAs WAp and pPh2004 and rDNAs were previously studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study aimed to build a library of repetitive DNA in Parodontidae. We isolated 40 clones using Cot-1; 17 of these clones exhibited similarity to repetitive DNA sequences, including satellites, minisatellites, microsatellites, and class I and class II transposable elements (TEs), from Danio rerio and other organisms. The physical mapping of the clones to chromosomes revealed the presence of a satellite DNA, a Helitron element, and degenerate short interspersed element (SINE), long interspersed element (LINE), and tc1-mariner elements on the sex chromosomes. Some clones exhibited dispersed signals; other sequences were not detected. The 5S rDNA was detected on an autosomal pair. These elements likely function in the molecular degeneration of the W chromosome in Parodontidae. Thus, the location of these elements on the chromosomes is important for understanding the function of these repetitive DNAs and for integrative studies with genome sequencing. The presented data demonstrate that an intensive invasion of TEs occurred during W sex chromosome differentiation in the Parodontidae. PMID:25122415

  16. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems: Will They Change the Library? Papers Presented at the Annual Clinic on Library Applications of Data Processing (27th, Urbana, Illinois, March 25-27, 1990). Illinois, March 25-27, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. W., Ed.; Smith, Linda C., Ed.

    Some of the 12 conference papers presented in this proceedings focus on the present and potential capabilities of artificial intelligence and expert systems as they relate to a wide range of library applications, including descriptive cataloging, technical services, collection development, subject indexing, reference services, database searching,…

  17. A 6-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig and long-range physical map encompassing the region on chromosome 12q15 frequently rearranged in a variety of benign solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Geurts, J.M.W.; Kools, P.F.J.; Mols, R.

    1995-10-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of a variety of benign solid tumors, among which uterine leiomyoma, lipoma, pleomorphic salivary gland adenoma, and pulmonary chondroid hamartoma, has indicated that these tumors often display chromosome breakpoints in region q13-q15 of chromosome 12. In previous studies, we have reported that these breakpoints map between locus D12S8 and the CHOP gene, the latter of which has been shown to be consistently rearranged in myxoid liposarcomas with t(12;16)(q13;p11). Here, we report directional chromosome walking studies starting from D12S8 and resulting in the construction of a YAC contig of about 6 Mb. This YAC contig, whose orientation on chromosome 12 was determined by double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, has at least double coverage and consists of 75 overlapping YAC clones, all isolated from CEPH YAC libraries. Their insert sizes were estimated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis. On the basis of YAC end-derived DNA markers and sequence-tagged sites (STSs), with an average spacing of approximately 70 kb, as well as restriction enzyme analysis, a long-range physical map was established for the 6-Mb DNA region of chromosome 12 covered by the YAC contig. Within the YAC contig, the relative positions of various known genes, an expressed sequence-tagged site, and a number of CEPH/Genethon polymorphic markers were determined. The latter data allow full integration of our mapping data with those obtained by CEPH/Genethon as well as those reported at the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 12 Mapping. Finally, this YAC contig constitutes the basis for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and is likely to facilitate identification of genes involved in the formation of various benign solid tumor types. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Characterization of a BAC Library from Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus: Indications of High Rates of Evolution Among Teleost Genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CHORI-212 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed by cloning EcoRI/EcoRI partially digested DNA into the pTARBAC2.1 vector. The library has an average insert size of 161 kb, and provides 10.6-fold coverage of the channel catfish haploid genome. Screening of 32 genes using o...

  19. Characterization of a deep-coverage carrot (Daucus carota L.) BAC library and initial analysis of BAC-end sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 17.3-fold redundant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library has been synthesized for carrot, the most-economically important member of the family Apiaceae. The library consists of 92,160 clones with an average insert size of 121 kb and ~ 2 % organellar DNA content. To provide an overview of ...

  20. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) gene: Toward the cloning of the ANLL/MDS tumor-suppressor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Ing-Ming; Gilmore, E.C.; Liu, Yang; Payson, R.A. )

    1994-02-01

    The region surrounding the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) locus on chromosome 5q31 is of particular interest since it represents a critical region consistently lost in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients who have a demonstrable deletion of the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 5. It is proposed that an ANLL/MDS leukemia suppressor gene resides on 5q31. The authors have previously shown that the gene is most likely localized between FGF1 and PDGFRB/CSF1R loci. The region has also been linked to at least four other genetic diseases, Treacher Collins syndrome, diastrophic dysplasia, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and an autosomal dominant deafness, by linkage analysis. Here, they describe yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) spanning 450 kb around the FGF1 gene. Six YAC clones were isolated from a human YAC library and their restriction enzyme maps were determined. The overlap of the clones with each other and with FGF1 cosmid and phage clones was characterized. Three of the YAC clones were found to contain the entire FGF1 gene, which spans more than 100 kb. Proximal and distal ends of several of these YAC clones were isolated for further overlap cloning. The proximal ends of both Y2 and Y4 were localized to previously isolated FGF1 DNA by sequence analysis. The distal ends of these two clones also hybridized to a human-hamster hybrid containing chromosome 5 as the only human genetic material. These results suggest that these YAC clones represent colinear DNA around the FGF1 locus. None of the YAC clones were found to contain the CD 14 and GRL genes, the closest known proximal and distal markers (relative to the centromere) to the FGF1 gene, respectively. This contig is useful for the overlap cloning of the 5q31 region and for reverse genetic strategies for the isolation of disease genes in the region. 46 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Reliability Checks on the Indo-US Stellar Spectral Library Using Artificial Neural Networks and Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder P.; Yuasa, Manabu; Yamamoto, Nawo; Gupta, Ranjan

    2006-02-01

    The Indo-US coudé feed stellar spectral library (CFLIB) made available to the astronomical community recently by Valdes et al. (2004, ApJS, 152, 251) contains spectra of 1273 stars in the spectral region 3460 to 9464Å at a high resolution of 1Å (FWHM) and a wide range of spectral types. Cross-checking the reliability of this database is an important and desirable exercise since a number of stars in this database have no known spectral types and a considerable fraction of stars has not so complete coverage in the full wavelength region of 3460-9464Å resulting in gaps ranging from a few Å to several tens of Å. We use an automated classification scheme based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to classify all 1273 stars in the database. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) is carried out to reduce the dimensionality of the data set before the spectra are classified by the ANN. Most importantly, we have successfully demonstrated employment of a variation of the PCA technique to restore the missing data in a sample of 300 stars out of the CFLIB.

  2. Development of BAC libraries and integrated physical mapping of human chromosome 22 using BACs. Annual report, July 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, U.J.; Shizuya, Hiroaki; Simon, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    BACs and fosmids are stable, nonchimeric, and highly representative cloning systems. BACs maintain large-fragment genomic inserts (100 to 300 kb) that are easily prepared for most types of experiments, including DNA sequencing. The authors have improved the methods for generating BACs and developed extensive BAC libraries. They have constructed human BAC libraries with more than 175,000 clones from male fibroblast and sperm, and a mouse BAC library with more than 200,000 clones. The authors are currently expanding human library with the aim of achieving total 50X coverage human genomic library using sperm samples from anonymous donors.

  3. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Faten Eleanor Roosevelt Inst. for Cancer Research, Denver, CO ); Yu, Jingwei )

    1991-03-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions.

  4. A Novel Ty1-Mediated Fragmentation Method for Native and Artificial Yeast Chromosomes Reveals That the Mouse Steel Gene Is a Hotspot for Ty1 Integration

    PubMed Central

    Dalgaard, J. Z.; Banerjee, M.; Curcio, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for the physical analysis of genomes called Ty1-mediated chromosomal fragmentation and have used the method to map 24 retrotransposon insertions into two different mouse-derived yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). Expression of a plasmid-encoded GAL1:Ty1 fusion element marked with the retrotransposition indicator gene, ade2AI, resulted in a high fraction of cells that sustained a single Ty1 insertion marked with ADE2. Strains in which Ty1ADE2 inserted into a YAC were identified by cosegregation of the ADE2 gene with the URA3-marked YAC. Ty1ADE2 elements also carried a site for the endonuclease I-DmoI, which we demonstrate is not present anywhere in the yeast genome. Consequently, I-DmoI cleaved a single chromosome or YAC at the unique site of Ty1ADE2 insertion, allowing rapid mapping of integration events. Our analyses showed that the frequency of Ty1ADE2 integration into YACs is equivalent to or higher than that expected based on random insertion. Remarkably, the 50-kb transcription unit of the mouse Steel locus was shown to be a highly significant hotspot for Ty1 integration. The accessibility of mammalian transcription units to Ty1 insertion stands in contrast to that of yeast transcription units. PMID:8725218

  5. The human ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single translocation: analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization, spectral karyotyping, and bacterial artificial chromosome microarray.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Shireen; Tejada, Raphael; Abawi, Massih; Oberst, Michael; Dennis, Tom; Simon, Kelly Claire; Blancato, Jan

    2005-08-01

    Cell lines derived from tumors contain numerous chromosomal aberrations and are the focus of study in tumor evolution. The ovarian teratocarcinoma cell line PA-1 demonstrates a single chromosomal aberration: a reciprocal t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2). A complete molecular genetic analysis was undertaken to characterize this cell line. The PA-1 cell line was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), spectral karyotyping (SKY), bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) microarray, and Western blotting. Amplification of 20q is frequently implicated in both breast and ovarian cancer; this region contains a number of oncogenes including MDM2, ZNF217, and the ovarian tumor marker WFDC2 (alias HE4). FISH revealed gene amplification of AIB1 (now known as NCOA3) but not STK15 (now known as AURKA). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated 3.6-fold overexpression of the AIB1 protein product, but no elevation of the STK15. BAC cancer gene microarray analysis showed gene amplification of > or =1.20 for five oncogenes. The presence of a consistent single change in PA-1, the t(15;20)(p11.2;q11.2), suggests that the aberration is significant with respect to the transformation status of the cell line. This translocation appears to cause overexpression of AIB1 (and perhaps other proteins), which may provide an immortalizing effect on this cell line. PMID:16080959

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF THREE MAIZE BAC LIBRARIES AND ANCHORING OF THE PHYSICAL MAP TO THE GENETIC MAP USING HIGH-DENSITY BAC FILTER HYBRIDIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three maize (Zea mays L.) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries, HindIII, EcoRI and MboI, were constructed from inbred line B73 to minimize under-representation of certain genomic regions caused by the use of a single restriction enzyme library. High-density filter sets from all three lib...

  7. BAC Libraries from Wheat Chromosome 7D – Efficient Tool for Positional Cloning of Aphid Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Positional cloning in bread wheat is a tedious task due to its huge genome size (~17 Gbp) and polyploid character. BAC libraries represent an essential tool for positional cloning. However, wheat BAC libraries comprise more than million clones, which make their screening very laborious. Here we pres...

  8. Selection of Specific Protein Binders for Pre-Defined Targets from an Optimized Library of Artificial Helicoidal Repeat Proteins (alphaRep)

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a “filtration” procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×109 independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties. PMID:24014183

  9. Organization of the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome between kdg and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage: use of Long Accurate PCR and yeast artificial chromosomes for sequencing.

    PubMed

    Capuano, V; Galleron, N; Pujic, P; Sorokin, A; Ehrlich, S D

    1996-11-01

    Within the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, the region between lysA and ilvA was assigned to our laboratory. In this report we present the sequence of the last 36 kb of this region, between the kdg operon and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage. A two-step strategy was used for the sequencing. In the first step, total chromosomal DNA was cloned in phage M13-based vectors and the clones carrying inserts from the target region were identified by hybridization with a cognate yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) from our collection. Sequencing of the clones allowed us to establish a number of contigs. In the second step the contigs were mapped by Long Accurate (LA) PCR and the remaining gaps closed by sequencing of the PCR products. The level of sequence inaccuracy due to LA PCR errors appeared to be about 1 in 10,000, which does not affect significantly the final sequence quality. This two-step strategy is efficient and we suggest that it can be applied to sequencing of longer chromosomal regions. The 36 kb sequence contains 38 coding sequences (CDSs), 19 of which encode unknown proteins. Seven genetic loci already mapped in this region, xpt, metB, ilvA, ilvD, thyB, dfrA and degR were identified. Eleven CDSs were found to display significant similarities to known proteins from the data banks, suggesting possible functions for some of the novel genes: cspD may encode a cold shock protein; bcsA, the first bacterial homologue of chalcone synthase; exol, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, similar to that of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli; and bsaA, a stress-response-associated protein. The protein encoded by yplP has homology with the transcriptional NifA-like regulators. The arrangement of the genes relative to possible promoters and terminators suggests 19 potential transcription units. PMID:8969496

  10. First Birth after Sperm Selection through Discontinuous Gradient Centrifugation and Artificial Insemination from a Chromosomal Translocation Carrier.

    PubMed

    Rouen, Alexandre; Hyon, Capucine; Balet, Richard; Joyé, Nicole; Cassuto, Nino Guy; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Balanced chromosomal carriers, though usually healthy, are confronted with recurrent spontaneous abortions and malformations in the offspring. Those are related to the transmission of an abnormal, chromosomally unbalanced genotype. We evidenced that the proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa can be significantly decreased through a sperm preparation process called discontinuous gradient centrifugation (DGC). We therefore started offering intrauterine inseminations with this procedure to couples with a male translocation carriers. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 37-year-old man carrying a t(3;10)(q25;p13) reciprocal translocation. He and his partner had had trouble conceiving for ten years and had four spontaneous abortions. DGC in this patient decreased the proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa from 63.6% to 52.3%. They were therefore offered intrauterine insemination with DGC, which eventually led to the birth of a healthy female child carrying the paternal translocation. Conclusion. We showed that translocation carriers could be offered intrauterine inseminations with DGC. Before this, the only two options were natural conception with prenatal diagnosis and termination of chromosomally unbalanced fetuses or preimplantation genetic diagnosis, which is a much heavier and costly procedure. We are currently offering this option through a multicentric program in France, and this is the first birth originating from it. PMID:24587925

  11. A MEQ Deleted Marek's Disease Virus Cloned as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome is a Highly Efficacious Vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Marek’s disease virus (MDV) MEQ gene is essential for the T-cell lymphocytic infiltration of nerves and other organs seen in chickens with Marek’s disease (MD). In an earlier study, researchers used an overlapping cosmid clone library of MDV and demonstrated that deleting MEQ resulted in an exce...

  12. A 1.6-Mb contig of yeast artificial chromosomes around the human factor VIII gene reveals three regions homologous to probes for the DXS115 locus and two for the DXYS64 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Freije, D; Schlessinger, D

    1992-01-01

    Two yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries were screened for probes in Xq28, around the gene for coagulation factor VIII (F8). A set of 30 YACs were recovered and assembled into a contig spanning at least 1.6 Mb from the DXYS64 locus to the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (G6PD). Overlaps among the YACs were determined by several fingerprinting techniques and by additional probes generated from YAC inserts by using Alu-vector or ligation-mediated PCR. Analysis of more than 30 probes and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) made from the region revealed the presence of several homologous genomic segments. For example, a probe for the DXYS64 locus, which maps less than 500 kb 5' of F8, detects a similar but not identical locus between F8 and G6PD. Also, a probe for the DXS115 locus detects at least three identical copies in this region, one in intron 22 of F8 and at least two more, which are upstream of the 5' end of the gene. Comparisons of genomic and YAC DNA suggest that the multiple loci are not created artifactually during cloning but reflect the structure of uncloned human DNA. On the basis of these data, the most likely order for the loci analyzed is tel-DXYS61-DXYS64-(DXS115-3-DXS115-2)-5'F8-(D XS115-1)-3'F8-G6PD. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1609806

  13. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  14. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  15. A 4.5-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig from human chromosome 13q14.3 ordering 9 polymorphic microsatellites (22 sequence-tagged sites) tightly linked to the Wilson disease locus.

    PubMed Central

    White, A; Tomfohrde, J; Stewart, E; Barnes, R; Le Paslier, D; Weissenbach, J; Cavalli-Sforza, L; Farrer, L; Bowcock, A

    1993-01-01

    We have previously performed a genetic analysis of multiply affected families to map a locus responsible for Wilson disease (WND) to a 0.3-centimorgan (cM) region within chromosome 13q14.3, between D13S31 and D13S59. Here we describe the construction of a contig of approximately 4.5 Mb, which spans this region and extends from D13S25 to D13S59. This contig consists of 28 genomic yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. Five critical crossover events have been defined in this interval in two unaffected (Centre d'Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain) and three WND families. The combination of sequence tagged site content mapping of YACs with both polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers and recombination breakpoint mapping resulted in the following order of polymorphic markers: centromere-RB1-D13S25-AFM205vh2-D13S31-D13S22 7-D13S228-AFM238vc3-D13S133- AFM084xc5-D13S137-D13S169, D13S155-D13S59-telomere. The recombination/physical distance ratio varies from approximately 3000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S25 to 6000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S59. Three WND families exhibiting recombination between the disease locus and D13S31 or D13S59 were genotyped for additional markers in this region and further refined the location of the WND gene to between D13S155 and D13S133. Nine of the markers in this region of < 1 cM are polymorphic microsatellites (seven have observed heterozygosities of 70% or above) that will be extremely useful in prenatal and preclinical diagnosis of this disease. This physical map is an essential step in the isolation of the WND gene and is a framework for the identification of candidate genes. PMID:8234264

  16. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information content fingerprinting: a distal region of wheat chromosome 3DS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of wheat. We report the use of the Ae. tauschii, the diploid ancestor of the wheat D genome, for the construction of t...

  17. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of wheat genome, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat...

  18. De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael A.; McKinley, Kara L.; Bradley, Luke H.; Viola, Sara R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >106 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains – ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes – were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions) can be sustained by sequences designed de novo. PMID:21245923

  19. Genetic Analysis of Varicella-Zoster Virus ORF0 to ORF4 by Use of a Novel Luciferase Bacterial Artificial Chromosome System▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Rowe, Jenny; Wang, Weijia; Sommer, Marvin; Arvin, Ann; Moffat, Jennifer; Zhu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    To efficiently generate varicella-zoster virus (VZV) mutants, we inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector in the pOka genome. We showed that the recombinant VZV (VZVBAC) strain was produced efficiently from the BAC DNA and behaved indistinguishably from wild-type virus. Moreover, VZV's cell-associated nature makes characterizing VZV mutant growth kinetics difficult, especially when attempts are made to monitor viral replication in vivo. To overcome this problem, we then created a VZV strain carrying the luciferase gene (VZVLuc). This virus grew like the wild-type virus, and the resulting luciferase activity could be quantified both in vitro and in vivo. Using PCR-based mutagenesis, open reading frames (ORF) 0 to 4 were individually deleted from VZVLuc genomes. The deletion mutant viruses appeared after transfection into MeWo cells, except for ORF4, which was essential. Growth curve analysis using MeWo cells and SCID-hu mice indicated that ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 were dispensable for VZV replication both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the ORF0 deletion virus showed severely retarded growth both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defects of the ORF0 and ORF4 mutants could be fully rescued by introducing wild-type copies of these genes back into their native genome loci. This work has validated and justified the use of the novel luciferase VZV BAC system to efficiently generate recombinant VZV variants and ease subsequent viral growth kinetic analysis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17581997

  20. Cloning of the Koi Herpesvirus Genome as an Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Demonstrates That Disruption of the Thymidine Kinase Locus Induces Partial Attenuation in Cyprinus carpio koi▿

    PubMed Central

    Costes, B.; Fournier, G.; Michel, B.; Delforge, C.; Raj, V. Stalin; Dewals, B.; Gillet, L.; Drion, P.; Body, A.; Schynts, F.; Lieffrig, F.; Vanderplasschen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) is the causative agent of a lethal disease in koi and common carp. In the present study, we describe the cloning of the KHV genome as a stable and infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone that can be used to produce KHV recombinant strains. This goal was achieved by the insertion of a loxP-flanked BAC cassette into the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. This insertion led to a BAC plasmid that was stably maintained in bacteria and was able to regenerate virions when permissive cells were transfected with the plasmid. Reconstituted virions free of the BAC cassette but carrying a disrupted TK locus (the FL BAC-excised strain) were produced by the transfection of Cre recombinase-expressing cells with the BAC. Similarly, virions with a wild-type revertant TK sequence (the FL BAC revertant strain) were produced by the cotransfection of cells with the BAC and a DNA fragment encoding the wild-type TK sequence. Reconstituted recombinant viruses were compared to the wild-type parental virus in vitro and in vivo. The FL BAC revertant strain and the FL BAC-excised strain replicated comparably to the parental FL strain. The FL BAC revertant strain induced KHV infection in koi carp that was indistinguishable from that induced by the parental strain, while the FL BAC-excised strain exhibited a partially attenuated phenotype. Finally, the usefulness of the KHV BAC for recombination studies was demonstrated by the production of an ORF16-deleted strain by using prokaryotic recombination technology. The availability of the KHV BAC is an important advance that will allow the study of viral genes involved in KHV pathogenesis, as well as the production of attenuated recombinant candidate vaccines. PMID:18337580

  1. Functional Characterization of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Open Reading Frame K8 by Bacterial Artificial Chromosome-Based Mutagenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Sathish, Narayanan; Hollow, Charles; Yuan, Yan

    2011-01-01

    The open reading frame K8 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZip) protein that binds to the origin of viral DNA replication and is an integral component of viral lytic DNA replication complex. Moreover, K8 physically interacts with replication and transcription activator (RTA) and represses its transactivation activity on several viral promoters. To investigate the role of this protein in viral life cycle, we constructed two K8-null recombinant mutant viruses (BAC-ΔK8 and BAC-stopK8) by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system. Latent viral infection can be reconstituted in 293T and BJAB cells with wild-type and the K8-null recombinant viruses by introducing the cloned viral genomes into the cells. When the cells carrying these viruses were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate, no significant difference was seen in overall viral gene expression between wild-type and K8-null viruses, with lytic DNA replication still active in the latter. However, 293T cells harboring K8-null mutant viruses, either BAC-ΔK8 or BAC-stopK8, displayed lower copy numbers of latent KSHV genome in comparison with wild-type viruses. Furthermore, although K8 deficiency appeared to not affect infectivity when K8-null viruses were used to infect 293T, primary human microvascular dermal endothelial and human foreskin fibroblast cells, they exhibited much lower viral genome copy numbers in all types of cell compared to wild-type viruses. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role of K8 in abortive lytic DNA replication occurring in early stages of de novo infection or in the maintenance of latent viral genomes. PMID:21159864

  2. (Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22)

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  3. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-12-31

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  4. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  5. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Possible mechanisms responsible for absence of a retrotransposon family on a plant Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kubat, Zdenek; Zluvova, Jitka; Vogel, Ivan; Kovacova, Viera; Cermak, Tomas; Cegan, Radim; Hobza, Roman; Vyskot, Boris; Kejnovsky, Eduard

    2014-04-01

    Some transposable elements (TEs) show extraordinary variance in abundance along sex chromosomes but the mechanisms responsible for this variance are unknown. Here, we studied Ogre long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons in Silene latifolia, a dioecious plant with evolutionarily young heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Ogre elements are ubiquitous in the S. latifolia genome but surprisingly absent on the Y chromosome. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to determine Ogre structure and chromosomal localization. Next generation sequencing (NGS) data were analysed to assess the transcription level and abundance of small RNAs. Methylation of Ogres was determined by bisulphite sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was used to determine mobilization time and selection forces acting on Ogre elements. We characterized three Ogre families ubiquitous in the S. latifolia genome. One family is nearly absent on the Y chromosome despite all the families having similar structures and spreading mechanisms. We showed that Ogre retrotransposons evolved before sex chromosomes appeared but were mobilized after formation of the Y chromosome. Our data suggest that the absence of one Ogre family on the Y chromosome may be caused by 24-nucleotide (24-nt) small RNA-mediated silencing leading to female-specific spreading. Our findings highlight epigenetic silencing mechanisms as potentially crucial factors in sex-specific spreading of some TEs, but other possible mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24456522

  7. A genomic-scale artificial microRNA library as a tool to investigate the functionally redundant gene space in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Felix; Chen, Wenxiao; Deinlein, Ulrich; Chang, Kenneth; Ossowski, Stephan; Fitz, Joffrey; Hannon, Gregory J; Schroeder, Julian I

    2013-08-01

    Traditional forward genetic screens are limited in the identification of homologous genes with overlapping functions. Here, we report the analyses and assembly of genome-wide protein family definitions that comprise the largest estimate for the potentially redundant gene space in Arabidopsis thaliana. On this basis, a computational design of genome-wide family-specific artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) was performed using high-performance computing resources. The amiRNA designs are searchable online (http://phantomdb.ucsd.edu). A computationally derived library of 22,000 amiRNAs was synthesized in 10 sublibraries of 1505 to 4082 amiRNAs, each targeting defined functional protein classes. For example, 2964 amiRNAs target annotated DNA and RNA binding protein families and 1777 target transporter proteins, and another sublibrary targets proteins of unknown function. To evaluate the potential of an amiRNA-based screen, we tested 122 amiRNAs targeting transcription factor, protein kinase, and protein phosphatase families. Several amiRNA lines showed morphological phenotypes, either comparable to known phenotypes of single and double/triple mutants or caused by overexpression of microRNAs. Moreover, novel morphological and abscisic acid-insensitive seed germination mutants were identified for amiRNAs targeting zinc finger homeodomain transcription factors and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases, respectively. These resources provide an approach for genome-wide genetic screens of the functionally redundant gene space in Arabidopsis. PMID:23956262

  8. A yeast artificial chromosome contig that spans the RB1-D13S31 interval on human chromosome 13 and encompasses the frequently deleted region in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorn, L.; Roberts, T.; Cowell, J.K.

    1995-12-10

    Abnormalities involving chromosome 13 have been a reported as the only cytogenetic change in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). Deletions are the most common cytogenetic abnormality and always involve 13q14, but when translocations are seen, the consistent breakpoint is always in 13q14. It is now established that deletions, distal to the RB1 gene in 13q14, are invariably associated with these translocations. We have recently described the smallest such deletion from a series of rearrangements from these tumors isolated in somatic cell hybrids, which spans approximately 1 Mb. In this report, we present the results of a series of a chromosome walking experiments using YACs and have been able to span this small deletion, which must contain the gene that is frequently deleted in BCLL. Four probes from 13q14 (RB1-mgg15-D13S25-D13S31) were used to isolate corresponding YACs for each of the markers. The chromosomal location of these YACs was verified using FISH, which also demonstrated their nonchimeric nature. Vectorette end rescue was then used to demonstrate the overlap of the YACs and to isolate new clones to complete the contig. The extremes of the contig were shown to cross the chromosome 13 translocation breakpoints isolated in somatic cell hybrids that carry the derivatives of chromosome 13 involved in the smallest BCLL deletion. This YAC contig covers the entire deletion and will prove a valuable resource to begin isolating genes from this region. In addition, we have isolated YACs corresponding to the RB1 locus, which extends the contig over a 3.8-cM distance on the chromosome. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. A yeast artificial chromosome contig and NotI restriction map that spans the tumor suppressor gene(s) locus, 11q22.2-q23.3

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Yasuhito; Hosoda, Fumie; Nakayama, Kyoko; Ohki, Misao

    1996-07-01

    Human chromosome 11q22-q23 is a pathologically important region in which a high level of loss of heterozygosity has been reported for breast, ovary, cervical, colon, and lung carcinomas, malignant melanomas, and hematologic malignancies. This strongly indicates that one or more tumor suppressor genes reside within the deleted region. In this report, we report the development of a contig map that covers most of the deleted regions found in these malignancies. The map comprises a contig of 66 overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and spans a region of 17 Mb from the PGR gene at 11q22.2 to the MLL gene at q23.3. In the process of screening the YACs, 50 new sequence-tagged site markers were developed from the termini of the YAC inserts. These markers were used for chromosome walking, and the data were then integrated into the contig map. NotI sites in the region. Using 22 of them, a NotI restriction map of the region from PGR to D11S939 was developed. This YAC contig will provide efficient tools for identification of the putative tumor suppressor gene(s). 49 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Mice trisomic for a bacterial artificial chromosome with the single-minded 2 gene (Sim2) show phenotypes similar to some of those present in the partial trisomy 16 mouse models of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrast, R; Scott, H S; Madani, R; Huber, L; Wolfer, D P; Prinz, M; Aguzzi, A; Lipp, H P; Antonarakis, S E

    2000-07-22

    The Drosophila single-minded (sim) transcription factor, is a master regulator of fruitfly neurogenesis. Recently, we have cloned and mapped a human homolog of sim, SIM2, to chromosome 21 in the so-called 'Down syndrome chromosomal region'. Three copies of SIM2 may contribute to some Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes because of the mapping position function as transcriptional repressor, temporal and spatial expression pattern of mouse Sim2, and the potentially analogous role of human SIM2 to that of Drosophila sim during neurogenesis. In order to validate this hypothesis in vivo, we have created the first bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice overexpressing a gene possibly involved in DS with only one or two additional copies of mouse Sim2. The transgene was shown to be expressed in the same spatial pattern as the endogenous gene. The mice develop normally, are fertile and do not show detectable histopathological abnormalities. However, detailed analysis of their behavior revealed anxiety-related/reduced exploratory behaviour and sensitivity to pain, phenotypes similar to those also present in other partial trisomy 16 mouse models of DS. Our data therefore suggest that overexpression of SIM2 contributes to some of the complex DS phenotypes. PMID:10915774

  11. Repetitive Genomic Elements in a European Corn Borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, BAC Library were Indicated by BAC End Sequencing and Development of Sequence Tag Site Markers: Implications for Lepidopteran Genomic Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia, and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36,864 clones with estim...

  12. The Chromosome Microdissection and Microcloning Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Xin; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome microdissection followed by microcloning is an efficient tool combining cytogenetics and molecular genetics that can be used for the construction of the high density molecular marker linkage map and fine physical map, the generation of probes for chromosome painting, and the localization and cloning of important genes. Here, we describe a modified technique to microdissect a single chromosome, paint individual chromosomes, and construct single-chromosome DNA libraries. PMID:27511173

  13. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  14. Screening and chromosome localization of two cotton BAC clones.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinglei; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuling; Zhou, Zhongli; Wang, Chunying; Yanyan Zhao; Meng, Fei; Wang, Xingxing; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuhong; Peng, Renhai; Wang, Kunbo

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones (350B21 and 299N22) of Pima 90-53 cotton [Gossypium barbadense Linnaeus, 1753 (2n=4x=52)] were screened from a BAC library using SSR markers. Strong hybridization signals were detected at terminal regions of all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes, but were almost absent in D genome (sub-genome) chromosomes with BAC clone 350B21 as the probe. The results indicate that specific sequences, which only exist at the terminal parts of A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes with a huge repeat number, may be contained in BAC clone 350B21. When utilizing FISH with the BAC clone 299N22 as probe, a pair of obvious signals was detected on chromosome 13 of D genome (sub-genome), while strong dispersed signals were detected on all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes. The results showed that peculiar repetitive sequence, which was distributed throughout all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes, may exist in BAC clone 299N22. The absence of the repetitive sequences, which exist in the two BAC clones, in D genome may account for the genome-size variation between A and D genomes. In addition, the microcolinearity analysis of the clone 299N22 and its homologous region on Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich, 1932 chromosome 13 (D513) indicated that the clone 299N22 might come from A sub-genome of sea island cotton (Gossypium barbadense), and a huge number of small deletions, illegitimate recombination, translocation and rearrangements may have occurred during the genus evolution. The two BAC clones studied here can be used as cytological markers but will be also be helpful to research in cotton genome evolution and comparative genomics. PMID:27186333

  15. Screening and chromosome localization of two cotton BAC clones

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xinglei; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuling; Zhou, Zhongli; Wang, Chunying; Yanyan Zhao; Meng, Fei; Wang, Xingxing; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuhong; Peng, Renhai; Wang, Kunbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones (350B21 and 299N22) of Pima 90-53 cotton [Gossypium barbadense Linnaeus, 1753 (2n=4x=52)] were screened from a BAC library using SSR markers. Strong hybridization signals were detected at terminal regions of all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes, but were almost absent in D genome (sub-genome) chromosomes with BAC clone 350B21 as the probe. The results indicate that specific sequences, which only exist at the terminal parts of A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes with a huge repeat number, may be contained in BAC clone 350B21. When utilizing FISH with the BAC clone 299N22 as probe, a pair of obvious signals was detected on chromosome 13 of D genome (sub-genome), while strong dispersed signals were detected on all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes. The results showed that peculiar repetitive sequence, which was distributed throughout all A genome (sub-genome) chromosomes, may exist in BAC clone 299N22. The absence of the repetitive sequences, which exist in the two BAC clones, in D genome may account for the genome-size variation between A and D genomes. In addition, the microcolinearity analysis of the clone 299N22 and its homologous region on Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich, 1932 chromosome 13 (D513) indicated that the clone 299N22 might come from A sub-genome of sea island cotton (Gossypium barbadense), and a huge number of small deletions, illegitimate recombination, translocation and rearrangements may have occurred during the genus evolution. The two BAC clones studied here can be used as cytological markers but will be also be helpful to research in cotton genome evolution and comparative genomics. PMID:27186333

  16. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  17. Construction and characterization of two bacterial artificial chromosome libraries of pea (Pisum sativum L.) for the isolation of economically important genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) has a genome of about 4 Gbp that appears to share conserved synteny with model legumes having genomes of 0.2-0.4 Gbp despite extensive intergenic expansion. Pea plant inventory (PI) 269818 has been used to introgress genetic diversity into the cultivated germplasm pool. The ai...

  18. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  19. Molecular cytotaxonomy of primates by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wienberg, J; Jauch, A; Stanyon, R; Cremer, T

    1990-10-01

    A new strategy for analyzing chromosomal evolution in primates is presented using chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization. Biotin-labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes are hybridized to chromosome preparations of catarrhines, platyrrhines, and prosimians. By this approach rearrangements of chromosomes that occurred during hominoid evolution are visualized directly at the level of DNA sequences, even in primate species with pronounced chromosomal shuffles. PMID:2249853

  20. Construction and characterization of a BAC library for the molecular dissection of a single wild beet centromere and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gindullis, F; Dechyeva, D; Schmidt, T

    2001-10-01

    We have constructed a sugar beet bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of the chromosome mutant PRO1. This Beta vulgaris mutant carries a single chromosome fragment of 6-9 Mbp that is derived from the wild beet Beta procumbens and is transmitted efficiently in meiosis and mitosis. The library consists of 50,304 clones, with an average insert size of 125 kb. Filter hybridizations revealed that approximately 3.1% of the clones contain mitochondrial or chloroplast DNA. Based on a haploid genome size of 758 Mbp, the library represents eight genome equivalents. Thus, there is a greater than 99.96% probability that any sequence of the PROI genome can be found in the library. Approximately 0.2% of the clones hybridized with centromeric sequences of the PRO1 minichromosome. Using the identified BAC clones in fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments with PRO1 and B. procumbens chromosome spreads, their wild-beet origin and centromeric localization were demonstrated. Comparative Southern hybridization of pulsed-field separated PROI DNA and BAC inserts indicate that the centromeric region of the minichromosome is represented by overlapping clones in the library. Therefore, the PRO1 BAC library provides a useful tool for the characterization of a single plant centromere and is a valuable resource for sugar beet genome analysis. PMID:11681609

  1. Construction and characterization of a bovine BAC library with four genome-equivalent coverage.

    PubMed

    Eggen, A; Gautier, M; Billaut, A; Petit, E; Hayes, H; Laurent, P; Urban, C; Pfister-Genskow, M; Eilertsen, K; Bishop, M D

    2001-01-01

    A bovine artificial chromosome (BAC) library of 105 984 clones has been constructed in the vector pBeloBAC11 and organized in 3-dimension pools and high density membranes for screening by PCR and hybridization. The average insert size, determined after analysis of 388 clones, was estimated at 120 kb corresponding to a four genome coverage. Given the fact that a male was used to construct the library, the probability of finding any given autosomal and X or Y locus is respectively 0.98 and 0.86. The library was screened for 164 microsatellite markers and an average of 3.9 superpools was positive for each PCR system. None of the 50 or so BAC clones analysed by FISH was chimeric. This BAC library increases the international genome coverage for cattle to around 28 genome equivalents and extends the coverage of the ruminant genomes available at the Inra resource center to 15 genome equivalents. PMID:11712974

  2. BAC libraries of Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides and Ae. tauschii, the diploid ancestors of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Akhunov, E D; Akhunova, A R; Dvorák, J

    2005-11-01

    Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides and Ae. tauschii are respectively the immediate diploid sources, or their closest relatives, of the A, B and D genomes of polyploid wheats. Here we report the construction and characterization of arrayed large-insert libraries in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector, one for each of these diploid species. The libraries are equivalent to 3.7, 5.4 and 4.1 of the T. urartu, Ae. speltoides, Ae. tauschii genomes, respectively. The predicted levels of genome coverage were confirmed by library hybridization with single-copy genes. The libraries were used to estimate the proportion of known repeated nucleotide sequences and gene content in each genome by BAC-end sequencing. Repeated sequence families previously detected in Triticeae accounted for 57, 61 and 57% of the T. urartu, Ae. speltoides and Ae. tauschii genomes, and coding regions accounted for 5.8, 4.5 and 4.8%, respectively. PMID:16177898

  3. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Yeh, C C; Taylor, J F; Gallagher, D S; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Davis, S K

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F(2) full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F1 parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. Ml individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is [BM6017-6.1 -TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3 -BM2713 -21.1 -BM4604-2.4-BR215 - 12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321 - 1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA12O- 12.5-TGLA325- 1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA3O], with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA3O, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Ypl2-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xpl4-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC2O4, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. PMID:8833151

  4. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome clone spanning a translocation breakpoint at 7q32.1 in a Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome patient.

    PubMed Central

    Alley, T L; Gray, B A; Lee, S H; Scherer, S W; Tsui, L C; Tint, G S; Williams, C A; Zori, R; Wallace, M R

    1995-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a mental retardation/multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. The gene(s) involved has not been mapped or cloned, but, recently, a biochemical abnormality in cholesterol biosynthesis has been shown to occur in most SLOS patients. The defect is suspected to occur in the penultimate step of the cholesterol pathway, involving the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, which has not been isolated. On the basis of the hypothesis that a de novo balanced translocation [t(7;20)(q32.1;q13.2)] in an SLOS patient directly interrupts the SLOS gene, positional cloning techniques are being employed to localize and identify the SLOS gene. We report the identification of a chromosome 7-specific YAC that spans the translocation breakpoint, as detected by FISH. This is the first study narrowing a candidate SLOS region and placing it on physical and genetic maps of the human genome. Images Figure 1 PMID:7762564

  5. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    PubMed

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  6. Preparation and characterization of a 3-fold redundant human PAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Chen, C.; Frengen, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, we have developed new procedures for the cloning of large DNA fragments using a bacteriophage P1-derived vector, pCYPAC1. In view of the large sizes (up to 400 kb clones have been observed) and the single copy mode of maintenance, we have designated our clones as {open_quotes}PACs{close_quotes} for {open_quotes}P1-derived artificial chromosomes{close_quotes}. Our subsequent efforts have focused on the construction of a large human PAC library from MboI digested human DNA (from white blood cells). About 120,000 PAC clones have been picked into 312 microtiter dishes of 384 wells. Preliminary characterization has revealed that the insert containing clones have average inserts of 110-120 kb and that the library has approximately 27% empty clones (vector without insert). Based on the average insert size and the total number of recombinant clones, we estimate that the library has 3-fold genome redundancy. This estimate is consistent with results obtained by screening of the library: 18 STS markers detect 52 corresponding clones and 6 unique probes find 20 positives. The library is expanded to a final size of 6- to 8-fold genome redundancy and is also being characterized with by fluorescent in situ hybridization and chromosome-walking procedures. Copies of the arrayed library are being distributed.

  7. In Pursuit of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watstein, Sarah; Kesselman, Martin

    1986-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence and reviews current research in natural language processing, expert systems, and robotics and sensory systems. Discussion covers current commercial applications of artificial intelligence and projections of uses and limitations in library technical and public services, e.g., in cataloging and online information and…

  8. Construction of chromosome markers from the Lake Victoria cichlid Paralabidochromis chilotes and their application to comparative mapping.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, A; Terai, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yoshida, K; Suzuki, M; Nakanishi, A; Matsuda, Y; Watanabe, M; Okada, N

    2014-01-01

    Cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes are known as a spectacular example of adaptive radiation in vertebrates. Four linkage maps have been constructed to identify the genes responsible for adaptation and speciation, and the genetic linkages of those genes are assumed to play an important role during adaptive evolution. However, it is difficult to analyze such linkages because the linkage groups of one species do not match well with those of the other species. Chromosome markers are a powerful tool for the direct identification of linkage homology between different species. We used information about the linkage map of the Lake Malawi cichlid (Labeotropheus fuelleborni/Metriaclima zebra) to isolate bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the BAC library of Paralabidochromis chilotes, Lake Victoria. We identified 18 of 22 P. chilotes chromosomes by single- and multi-color BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization using 19 BAC clones. Comparative mapping with the chromosome markers of P. chilotes in Astatotilapia burtoni (2n = 40) from Lake Tanganyika revealed the chromosome rearrangements that have occurred in this lineage. These chromosome markers will be useful for delineating the process of genome and chromosome evolution in African species. PMID:24217467

  9. Process for Assembly and Transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Synthetic Yeast Artificial Chromosome Containing a Multigene Cassette to Express Enzymes That Enhance Xylose Utilization Designed for an Automated Platform.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Cox, Elby J; Bang, Sookie S; Pinkelman, Rebecca J; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Saha, Badal C; Qureshi, Nasib; Gibbons, William R; Fry, Michelle R; Moser, Bryan R; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Liu, Siqing; Sterner, David E; Butt, Tauseef R; Riedmuller, Steven B; Jones, Marjorie A; Riaño-Herrera, Néstor M

    2015-12-01

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system in yeast and to design an assembly process suitable for an automated platform. Expression of XI and XKS from the YAC was confirmed by Western blot and PCR analyses. The recombinant and wild-type strains showed similar growth on plates containing hexose sugars, but only recombinant grew on D-xylose and L-arabinose plates. In glucose fermentation, doubling time (4.6 h) and ethanol yield (0.44 g ethanol/g glucose) of recombinant were comparable to wild type (4.9 h and 0.44 g/g). In whole-corn hydrolysate, ethanol yield (0.55 g ethanol/g [glucose + xylose]) and xylose utilization (38%) for recombinant were higher than for wild type (0.47 g/g and 12%). In hydrolysate from spent coffee grounds, yield was 0.46 g ethanol/g (glucose + xylose), and xylose utilization was 93% for recombinant. These results indicate introducing a YAC expressing XI and XKS enhanced xylose utilization without affecting integrity of the host strain, and the process provides a potential platform for automated synthesis of a YAC for expression of multiple optimized genes to improve yeast strains. PMID:25720598

  10. Alphoid satellite DNA is tightly associated with centromere antigens in human chromosomes throughout the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Okazaki, Tuneko )

    1989-03-01

    In this study, the authors have examined a DNA element specific to the centromere domain of human chromosomes. Purified HeLa chromosomes were digested with the restriction enzyme Sau3AI and fractionated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Fractions showing antigenicity to anticentromere (kinetochore) serum obtained from a scleroderma CREST patient were used to construct a DNA library. From this library they found one clone which has specifically hybridized to the centromere domain of metaphase chromosomes using a biotinylated probe DNA and FITC-conjugated avidin. The clone contained a stretch of alphoid DNA dimer. To determine precisely the relative location of the alphoid DNA stretch and the centromere antigen, a method was developed to carry out in situ hybridization of DNA and indirect immunofluorescent staining of antigen on the same cell preparation. Using this method, they have found perfect overlapping of the alphoid DNA sites with the centromere antigen in both metaphase chromosomes and nuclei at various stages in the cell cycle. They have also observed this exact correlation at the attachment sites of artificially extended sister chromatids. These results suggest the possibility that alphoid DNA repeats are a key component of kinetochore structure.

  11. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name, "LJ" launched…

  12. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  13. Positional cloning of the hereditary renal carcinoma 3; 8 chromosome translocation breakpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Boldog, F.L.; Nilsson, A.S.; Drabkin, H.A. ); Gemmill, R.M. ); Wilke, C.M.; Glover, T.W.; Chandrasekharappa, S.C. ); Brown, R.S. ); Li, F.P. )

    1993-09-15

    The chromosome (p14.2;q24.1) translocation t(3;8) has been associated with hereditary renal cancer in one family. Based on cytogenetic analysis and loss-of-heterozygosity experiments, the 3p14 region has been independently implicated as harboring a tumor suppressor gene critical to kidney and lung cancer development. The 3p14.2 region also contains FRA3B, the most sensititive fragile site induced by aphidicolin. A chromosome 3 probe, R7K145, derived from a radiation-reduced hybrid was positioned between the t(3;8) breakpoint and an aphidicolin-induced 3p14 breakpoint. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig containing R7K145 was developed that crossed the aphidicolin-induced breakpoint on its telomeric side. A subsequent chromosome walk identified a YAC that crossed the 3;8 translocation breakpoint. A [lambda] sublibrary allowed isolation of clones spanning the rearrangement. Unique and evolutionarily conserved DNA sequences were used to screen a kidney cDNA library. The authors have identified a gene, referred to as HRCA1 (hereditary renal cancer associated 1), that maps immediately adjacent to the breakpoint. On the basis of its chromosomal position, HRCA1 may be a candidate tumor suppressor gene. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Isolation and characterization of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) from a cow affected by post partum metritis and cloning of the genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Cavirani, Sandro; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a gammaherpesvirus with a Worldwide distribution in cattle and is often isolated from the uterus of animals with postpartum metritis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Virus strain adaptation to an organ, tissue or cell type is an important issue for the pathogenesis of disease. To explore the mechanistic role of viral strain variation for uterine disease, the present study aimed to develop a tool enabling precise genetic discrimination between strains of BoHV-4 and to easily manipulate the viral genome. Methods A strain of BoHV-4 was isolated from the uterus of a persistently infected cow and designated BoHV-4-U. The authenticity of the isolate was confirmed by RFLP-PCR and sequencing using the TK and IE2 loci as genetic marker regions for the BoHV-4 genome. The isolated genome was cloned as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) and manipulated through recombineering technology Results The BoHV-4-U genome was successfully cloned as a BAC, and the stability of the pBAC-BoHV-4-U clone was confirmed over twenty passages, with viral growth similar to the wild type virus. The feasibility of using BoHV-4-U for mutagenesis was demonstrated using the BAC recombineering system. Conclusion The analysis of genome strain variation is a key method for investigating genes associated with disease. A resource for dissection of the interactions between BoHV-4 and host endometrial cells was generated by cloning the genome of BoHV-4 as a BAC. PMID:19691825

  15. Advances in plant chromosome genomics.

    PubMed

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Simková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing genomics and is providing novel insights into genome organization, evolution and function. The number of plant genomes targeted for sequencing is rising. For the moment, however, the acquisition of full genome sequences in large genome species remains difficult, largely because the short reads produced by NGS platforms are inadequate to cope with repeat-rich DNA, which forms a large part of these genomes. The problem of sequence redundancy is compounded in polyploids, which dominate the plant kingdom. An approach to overcoming some of these difficulties is to reduce the full nuclear genome to its individual chromosomes using flow-sorting. The DNA acquired in this way has proven to be suitable for many applications, including PCR-based physical mapping, in situ hybridization, forming DNA arrays, the development of DNA markers, the construction of BAC libraries and positional cloning. Coupling chromosome sorting with NGS offers opportunities for the study of genome organization at the single chromosomal level, for comparative analyses between related species and for the validation of whole genome assemblies. Apart from the primary aim of reducing the complexity of the template, taking a chromosome-based approach enables independent teams to work in parallel, each tasked with the analysis of a different chromosome(s). Given that the number of plant species tractable for chromosome sorting is increasing, the likelihood is that chromosome genomics - the marriage of cytology and genomics - will make a significant contribution to the field of plant genetics. PMID:24406816

  16. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  17. Terminal sequence importance of de novo proteins from binary-patterned library: stable artificial proteins with 11- or 12-amino acid alphabet.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2012-06-01

    Successful approaches of de novo protein design suggest a great potential to create novel structural folds and to understand natural rules of protein folding. For these purposes, smaller and simpler de novo proteins have been developed. Here, we constructed smaller proteins by removing the terminal sequences from stable de novo vTAJ proteins and compared stabilities between mutant and original proteins. vTAJ proteins were screened from an α3β3 binary-patterned library which was designed with polar/ nonpolar periodicities of α-helix and β-sheet. vTAJ proteins have the additional terminal sequences due to the method of constructing the genetically repeated library sequences. By removing the parts of the sequences, we successfully obtained the stable smaller de novo protein mutants with fewer amino acid alphabets than the originals. However, these mutants showed the differences on ANS binding properties and stabilities against denaturant and pH change. The terminal sequences, which were designed just as flexible linkers not as secondary structure units, sufficiently affected these physicochemical details. This study showed implications for adjusting protein stabilities by designing N- and C-terminal sequences. PMID:22519540

  18. Rapid EST Isolation from Chromosome 1R of Rye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To obtain important expressed sequence tags (ESTs) located on specific chromosomes is difficult at present. Construction of single chromosome EST library could be an efficient strategy to isolate important ESTs located on specific chromosomes. In this research, we develop a method to rapidly isola...

  19. Meiotic Crossing over between Nonhomologous Chromosomes Affects Chromosome Segregation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S.; Sayeed, S.; Murphy, T.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotic recombination between artificial repeats positioned on nonhomologous chromosomes occurs efficiently in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both gene conversion and crossover events have been observed, with crossovers yielding reciprocal translocations. In the current study, 5.5-kb ura3 repeats positioned on chromosomes V and XV were used to examine the effect of ectopic recombination on meiotic chromosome segregation. Ura(+) random spores were selected and gene conversion vs. crossover events were distinguished by Southern blot analysis. Approximately 15% of the crossover events between chromosomes V and XV were associated with missegregation of one of these chromosomes. The missegregation was manifest as hyperploid spores containing either both translocations plus a normal chromosome, or both normal chromosomes plus one of the translocations. In those cases where it could be analyzed, missegregation occurred at the first meiotic division. These data are discussed in terms of a model in which ectopic crossovers compete efficiently with normal allelic crossovers in directing meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:9136001

  20. Novel glycoside hydrolases identified by screening a Chinese Holstein dairy cow rumen-derived metagenome library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Bu, Dengpan; Liu, Kailang; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Zhiyang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2010-10-01

    One clone encoding glycoside hydrolases was identified through functional screening of a rumen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Of the 68 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted, one ORF encodes a novel endo-β-1,4-xylanase with two catalytic domains of family GH43 and two cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) of family IV. Partial characterization showed that this endo-xylanase has a greater specific activity than a number of other xylanases over a wide temperature range at neutral pH and could be useful in some industrial applications. PMID:20709844

  1. Library Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Patricia; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes nine articles that discuss cooperative library networking in Illinois. Highlights include library systems as cooperative agencies; PALI (Private Academic Libraries of Illinois); rural school and public library development; systemwide users; regional medical libraries; virtual libraries and the Coalition for Networked Information; a…

  2. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  3. Original Research: Generation of non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models: -175 Black HPFH and -195 Brazilian HPFH.

    PubMed

    Braghini, Carolina A; Costa, Flavia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y; Novikova, Lesya V; Parker, Matthew P; Winefield, Robert D; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Fetal hemoglobin is a major genetic modifier of the phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with sickle cell disease and certain β-thalassemias. Normal levels of fetal hemoglobin postnatally are approximately 1% of total hemoglobin. Patients who have hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, characterized by elevated synthesis of γ-globin in adulthood, show reduced disease pathophysiology. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is caused by β-globin locus deletions (deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) or γ-globin gene promoter point mutations (non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin). Current research has focused on elucidating the pathways involved in the maintenance/reactivation of γ-globin in adult life. To better understand these pathways, we generated new β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice bearing the (A)γ-globin -175 T > C or -195 C > G hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations to model naturally occurring hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Adult -175 and -195 mutant β-YAC mice displayed a hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin phenotype, as measured at the mRNA and protein levels. The molecular basis for these phenotypes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of transcription factor/co-factor binding, including YY1, PAX1, TAL1, LMO2, and LDB1. In -175 HPFH versus wild-type samples, the occupancy of LMO2, TAL1 and LDB1 proteins was enriched in HPFH mice (5.8-fold, 5.2-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively), a result that concurs with a recent study in cell lines showing that these proteins form a complex with GATA-1 to mediate long-range interactions between the locus control region and the (A)γ-globin gene. Both hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations result in a gain of (A)γ-globin activation, in contrast to other hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations that result in a loss of repression. The mice provide additional tools to

  4. Generation of non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models: −175 Black HPFH and −195 Brazilian HPFH

    PubMed Central

    Braghini, Carolina A; Costa, Flavia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y; Novikova, Lesya V; Parker, Matthew P; Winefield, Robert D; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin is a major genetic modifier of the phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with sickle cell disease and certain β-thalassemias. Normal levels of fetal hemoglobin postnatally are approximately 1% of total hemoglobin. Patients who have hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, characterized by elevated synthesis of γ-globin in adulthood, show reduced disease pathophysiology. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is caused by β-globin locus deletions (deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) or γ-globin gene promoter point mutations (non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin). Current research has focused on elucidating the pathways involved in the maintenance/reactivation of γ-globin in adult life. To better understand these pathways, we generated new β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice bearing the Aγ-globin −175 T >C or −195 C >G hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations to model naturally occurring hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Adult −175 and −195 mutant β-YAC mice displayed a hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin phenotype, as measured at the mRNA and protein levels. The molecular basis for these phenotypes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of transcription factor/co-factor binding, including YY1, PAX1, TAL1, LMO2, and LDB1. In −175 HPFH versus wild-type samples, the occupancy of LMO2, TAL1 and LDB1 proteins was enriched in HPFH mice (5.8-fold, 5.2-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively), a result that concurs with a recent study in cell lines showing that these proteins form a complex with GATA-1 to mediate long-range interactions between the locus control region and the Aγ-globin gene. Both hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations result in a gain of Aγ-globin activation, in contrast to other hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations that result in a loss of repression. The mice provide additional tools to study

  5. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed. PMID:25947045

  6. Construction of random sheared fosmid library from Chinese cabbage and its use for Brassica rapa genome sequencing project.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jin-A; Hong, Joon Ki; Jin, Mina; Seol, Young-Joo; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the Multinational Genome Sequencing Project of Brassica rapa, linkage group R9 and R3 were sequenced using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) by BAC strategy. The current physical contigs are expected to cover approximately 90% euchromatins of both chromosomes. As the project progresses, BAC selection for sequence extension becomes more limited because BAC libraries are restriction enzyme-specific. To support the project, a random sheared fosmid library was constructed. The library consists of 97536 clones with average insert size of approximately 40 kb corresponding to seven genome equivalents, assuming a Chinese cabbage genome size of 550 Mb. The library was screened with primers designed at the end of sequences of nine points of scaffold gaps where BAC clones cannot be selected to extend the physical contigs. The selected positive clones were end-sequenced to check the overlap between the fosmid clones and the adjacent BAC clones. Nine fosmid clones were selected and fully sequenced. The sequences revealed two completed gap filling and seven sequence extensions, which can be used for further selection of BAC clones confirming that the fosmid library will facilitate the sequence completion of B. rapa. PMID:21338952

  7. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as ...

  8. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  9. Inexpensive Multiplexed Library Preparation for Megabase-Sized Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Michael M.; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing has become an indispensible tool of modern biology. However, the cost of sample preparation relative to the cost of sequencing remains high, especially for small genomes where the former is dominant. Here we present a protocol for rapid and inexpensive preparation of hundreds of multiplexed genomic libraries for Illumina sequencing. By carrying out the Nextera tagmentation reaction in small volumes, replacing costly reagents with cheaper equivalents, and omitting unnecessary steps, we achieve a cost of library preparation of $8 per sample, approximately 6 times cheaper than the standard Nextera XT protocol. Furthermore, our procedure takes less than 5 hours for 96 samples. Several hundred samples can then be pooled on the same HiSeq lane via custom barcodes. Our method will be useful for re-sequencing of microbial or viral genomes, including those from evolution experiments, genetic screens, and environmental samples, as well as for other sequencing applications including large amplicon, open chromosome, artificial chromosomes, and RNA sequencing. PMID:26000737

  10. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  11. Generation of a human chromosome 18-specific YAC clone collection and mapping of 55 unique YACs by FISH and fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.; Giacalone, J.; Welch, S.; Luna, J.; Francke, U. )

    1993-08-01

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library was constructed from a somatic cell hybrid line in which the human chromosome content had been reduced by repeated subcloning to one or two copies of chromosome 18. Screening of 4700 primary yeast transformants generated 74 clones containing a YAC with a human DNA insert averaging 190 kb in size. The human YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 18 by in situ hybridization of biotin-labeled Alu-PCR products obtained using total yeast DNA as a template. Comparisons of interspersed repetitive sequence-PCR and restriction fragment fingerprint patterns identified five sets of identical and three sets of overlapping YACs. Dual-label fluorescence in situ hybridization interphase mapping was used to determine the order of some nonoverlapping YACs. STS (sequence-tagged site) content mapping was carried out with PCR primers for 56 chromosome 18-specific markers. The identification of YACs containing four known genes - encoding the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PA-CAP), the myelin basic protein (MBP), ferrochelatase (FECH), and SSAV1, an endogenous retroviral element related to the SSAV virus - provides a precise cytological map position for the respective loci. The final collection of 55 randomly isolated, unique, and regionally localized YACs (D18S107-D18S161) is distributed over the entire chromosome and collectively covers approximately 12 Mb, i.e., 16% of the estimated 77 Mb of DNA in euchromatin of chromosome 18. These YACs provide reagents for isolation of genes in these regions and represent nucleation points for the generation of STS to increase coverage of the chromosome by YAC contigs.

  12. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  13. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  14. Construction of a BAC library and identification of Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel, Monopterus albus

    SciTech Connect

    Jang Songhun; Zhou Fang; Xia Laixin; Zhao Wei; Cheng Hanhua . E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia . E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

    2006-09-22

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed using nuclear DNA from the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). The BAC library consists of a total of 33,000 clones with an average insert size of 115 kb. Based on the rice field eel haploid genome size of 600 Mb, the BAC library is estimated to contain approximately 6.3 genome equivalents and represents 99.8% of the genome of the rice field eel. This is first BAC library constructed from this species. To estimate the possibility of isolating a specific clone, high-density colony hybridization-based library screening was performed using Dmrt1 cDNA of the rice field eel as a probe. Both library screening and PCR identification results revealed three positive BAC clones which were overlapped, and formed a contig covering the Dmrt1 gene of 195 kb. By sequence comparisons with the Dmrt1 cDNA and sequencing of first four intron-exon junctions, Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel was predicted to contain four introns and five exons. The sizes of first and second intron are 1.5 and 2.6 kb, respectively, and the sizes of last two introns were predicted to be about 20 kb. The Dmrt1 gene structure was conserved in evolution. These results also indicate that the BAC library is a useful resource for BAC contig construction and molecular isolation of functional genes.

  15. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  16. Novel Glycoside Hydrolases Identified by Screening a Chinese Holstein Dairy Cow Rumen-Derived Metagenome Library ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Bu, Dengpan; Liu, Kailang; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Zhiyang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2010-01-01

    One clone encoding glycoside hydrolases was identified through functional screening of a rumen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Of the 68 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted, one ORF encodes a novel endo-β-1,4-xylanase with two catalytic domains of family GH43 and two cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) of family IV. Partial characterization showed that this endo-xylanase has a greater specific activity than a number of other xylanases over a wide temperature range at neutral pH and could be useful in some industrial applications. PMID:20709844

  17. Library 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    In fall 1984, the Georgia Institute of Technology administration and library staff began planning for Library 2000, a project aimed at creating a showcase library to demonstrate the application of the latest information technology in an academic and research environment. The purposes of Library 2000 include: increasing awareness of students,…

  18. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  19. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  20. Closing the gaps on human chromosome 19 revealed genes with a high density of repetitive tandemly arrayed elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Leem, Sun-Hee; Kouprina, Natalay; Grimwood, Jane; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Mullokandov, Michael; Yoon, Young-Ho; Chae, Ji-Youn; Morgan, Jenna; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Detter, Chris; Glavina, Tijana; Rubin, Eddy; Barrett, J. Carl; Larionov, Vladimir

    2003-09-01

    The reported human genome sequence includes about 400 gaps of unknown sequence that were not found in the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and cosmid libraries used for sequencing of the genome. These missing sequences correspond to {approx} 1 percent of euchromatic regions of the human genome. Gap filling is a laborious process because it relies on analysis of random clones of numerous genomic BAC or cosmid libraries. In this work we demonstrate that closing the gaps can be accelerated by a selective recombinational capture of missing chromosomal segments in yeast. The use of both methodologies allowed us to close the four remaining gaps on the human chromosome 19. Analysis of the gap sequences revealed that they contain several abnormalities that could result in instability of the sequences in microbe hosts, including large blocks of micro- and minisatellites and a high density of Alu repeats. Sequencing of the gap regions, in both BAC and YAC forms, allowed us to generate a complete sequence of four genes, including the neuronal cell signaling gene SCK1/SLI. The SCK1/SLI gene contains a record number of minisatellites, most of which are polymorphic and transmitted through meiosis following a Mendelian inheritance. In conclusion, the use of the alternative recombinational cloning system in yeast may greatly accelerate work on closing the remaining gaps in the human genome (as well as in other complex genomes) to achieve the goal of annotation of all human genes.

  1. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are also briefly…

  2. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of articles focuses on artificial intelligence research and development to enhance information systems and services. Topics discussed include knowledge base designs, expert system development tools, natural language processing, expert systems for reference services, and the role that artificial intelligence concepts should have in…

  3. Artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Firschein, O.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on artificial intelligence. Topics considered include knowledge engineering, expert systems, applications of artificial intelligence to scientific reasoning, planning and problem solving, error recovery in robots through failure reason analysis, programming languages, natural language, speech recognition, map-guided interpretation of remotely-sensed imagery, and image understanding architectures.

  4. Construction of an expressible BAC library of the unculturable insect microorganism, stink bug Plautia stali symbiont, for the search of biologically active and useful symbiont products.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Fujii-Muramatsu, Rika; Noda, Hiroaki; Takeishi, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    While gene products and metabolites of insect symbiotic bacteria may act as useful resources for insect-microbe studies and medicinal use, it is usually difficult to obtain the insect symbionts to some extent in quantity because most of them are unculturable. In this study, the possibility of using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries as a heterologous gene expression tool for the discovery of novel symbiont metabolites was evaluated. A BAC library was constructed from the symbiont purified from the posterior midgut cecum of the stink bug Plautia stali. The BAC library, which consisted of 513 clones with an average insert size of 41 kb, represented greater than five-fold coverage of the genome. The ability of the BAC clones to express plural genes from large-sized insert DNA in Escherichia coli was examined by the growth of BAC-transformed leu operon-deficient DH10B cells on M9 minimal medium supplemented with glucose. Two BAC clones complemented leucine deficiency in DH10B cells; the clones contained the leu operon of the symbiont chromosome. The P. stali symbiont genes introduced into the BAC vector are functional in E. coli, and these genes are expressed in an operon unit. BAC libraries can be used to generate gene product- and metabolite-libraries, facilitating to characterize potential metabolites of the P. stali symbiont. PMID:24694601

  5. Analysis of chromosome conservation in Lemur catta studied by chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Ventura, Mario; Tempesta, Sergio; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2002-12-01

    A panel of human chromosome painting probes and bacterial and P1 artificial chromosome (BAC/PAC) clones were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments to investigate the chromosome conservation of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta, LCA) with respect to human. Whole chromosome paints specific for human chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, and X were found to identify a single chromosome or an uninterrupted chromosomal region in LCA. A large set of partial chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes were then used to refine the characterization of the rearrangements differentiating the two karyotypes. The results were also used to reconstruct the ancestral Lemuridae karyotype. Lemur catta, indeed, can be used as an outgroup, allowing symplesiomorphic (ancestral) rearrangements to be distinguished from apomorphic (derived) rearrangements in lemurs. Some LCA chromosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically. The 'anchorage' of most LCA chromosomes to specific probes will contribute to the standardization of the karyotype of this species. PMID:12474064

  6. Special Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendel, Giuliana

    1977-01-01

    Discusses problems involved in maintaining special scientific or engineering libraries, including budget problems, remote storage locations, rental computer retrieval systems, protecting trade secrets, and establishing a magnetic tape library. (MLH)

  7. Mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 19 identified by comparative genomic hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, S R; Boyd, E; Connor, J M; Jones, A M; Tolmie, J L

    1998-01-01

    We report the use of comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) to define the origin of a supernumerary ring chromosome which conventional cytogenetic banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) methods had failed to identify. Targeted FISH using whole chromosome 19 library arm and site specific probes then confirmed the CGH results. This study shows the feasibility of using CGH for the identification of supernumerary marker chromosomes, even in fewer than 50% of cells, where no clinical or cytogenetic clues are present. Images PMID:9783708

  8. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karin; Kuhlthau, Carol C.; Branch, Jennifer L.; Solowan, Diane Galloway; Case, Roland; Abilock, Debbie; Eisenberg, Michael B.; Koechlin, Carol; Zwaan, Sandi; Hughes, Sandra; Low, Ann; Litch, Margaret; Lowry, Cindy; Irvine, Linda; Stimson, Margaret; Schlarb, Irene; Wilson, Janet; Warriner, Emily; Parsons, Les; Luongo-Orlando, Katherine; Hamilton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Includes 19 articles that address issues related to library skills and Canadian school libraries. Topics include information literacy; inquiry learning; critical thinking and electronic research; collaborative inquiry; information skills and the Big 6 approach to problem solving; student use of online databases; library skills; Internet accuracy;…

  9. Artificial urushi.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity. PMID:11763444

  10. Physical chromosome mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: evidences for a differential distribution of repetitive elements in the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Irani A; Martins, Cesar

    2008-06-01

    Repetitive DNAs have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers on comparative studies, identification of chromosome rearrangements and sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis, and applied genetics. Here we report the characterization of repetitive DNA sequences from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genome by construction and screening of plasmid library enriched with repetitive DNAs, analysis of a BAC-based physical map, and hybridization to chromosomes. The physical mapping of BACs enriched with repetitive sequences and C(o)t-1 DNA (DNA enriched for highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences) to chromosomes using FISH showed a predominant distribution of repetitive elements in the centromeric and telomeric regions and along the entire length of the largest chromosome pair (X and Y sex chromosomes) of the species. The distribution of repetitive DNAs differed significantly between the p arm of X and Y chromosomes. These findings suggest that repetitive DNAs have had an important role in the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:17395473

  11. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  12. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  13. The infectious BAC genomic DNA expression library: a high capacity vector system for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Lufino, Michele M P; Edser, Pauline A H; Quail, Michael A; Rice, Stephen; Adams, David J; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gene dosage plays a critical role in a range of cellular phenotypes, yet most cellular expression systems use heterologous cDNA-based vectors which express proteins well above physiological levels. In contrast, genomic DNA expression vectors generate physiologically-relevant levels of gene expression by carrying the whole genomic DNA locus of a gene including its regulatory elements. Here we describe the first genomic DNA expression library generated using the high-capacity herpes simplex virus-1 amplicon technology to deliver bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) into cells by viral transduction. The infectious BAC (iBAC) library contains 184,320 clones with an average insert size of 134.5 kb. We show in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) disease model cell line and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that this library can be used for genetic rescue studies in a range of contexts including the physiological restoration of Ldlr deficiency, and viral receptor expression. The iBAC library represents an important new genetic analysis tool openly available to the research community. PMID:27353647

  14. The infectious BAC genomic DNA expression library: a high capacity vector system for functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lufino, Michele M. P.; Edser, Pauline A. H.; Quail, Michael A.; Rice, Stephen; Adams, David J.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gene dosage plays a critical role in a range of cellular phenotypes, yet most cellular expression systems use heterologous cDNA-based vectors which express proteins well above physiological levels. In contrast, genomic DNA expression vectors generate physiologically-relevant levels of gene expression by carrying the whole genomic DNA locus of a gene including its regulatory elements. Here we describe the first genomic DNA expression library generated using the high-capacity herpes simplex virus-1 amplicon technology to deliver bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) into cells by viral transduction. The infectious BAC (iBAC) library contains 184,320 clones with an average insert size of 134.5 kb. We show in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) disease model cell line and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that this library can be used for genetic rescue studies in a range of contexts including the physiological restoration of Ldlr deficiency, and viral receptor expression. The iBAC library represents an important new genetic analysis tool openly available to the research community. PMID:27353647

  15. Construction and characterization of a BAC library from the Coffea arabica genotype Timor Hybrid CIFC 832/2.

    PubMed

    Cação, S M B; Silva, N V; Domingues, D S; Vieira, L G E; Diniz, L E C; Vinecky, F; Alves, G S C; Andrade, A C; Carpentieri-Pipolo, V; Pereira, L F P

    2013-06-01

    Most of the world's coffee production originates from Coffea arabica, an allotetraploid species with low genetic diversity and for which few genomic resources are available. Genomic libraries with large DNA fragment inserts are useful tools for the study of plant genomes, including the production of physical maps, integration studies of physical and genetic maps, genome structure analysis and gene isolation by positional cloning. Here, we report the construction and characterization of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library from C. arabica Timor Hybrid CIFC 832/2, a parental genotype for several modern coffee cultivars. The BAC library consists of 56,832 clones with an average insert size of 118 kb, which represents a dihaploid genome coverage of five to sixfold. The content of organellar DNA was estimated at 1.04 and 0.5 % for chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. The BAC library was screened for the NADPH-dependent mannose-6-phosphate reductase gene (CaM6PR) with markers positioned on four linkage groups of a partial C. arabica genetic map. A mixed approach using PCR and membrane hybridization of BAC pools allowed for the discovery of nine BAC clones with the CaM6PR gene and 53 BAC clones that were anchored to the genetic map with simple sequence repeat markers. This library will be a useful tool for future studies on comparative genomics and the identification of genes and regulatory elements controlling major traits in this economically important crop species. PMID:23677718

  16. Libraries program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Congress authorized a library for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1879. The library was formally established in 1882 with the naming of the first librarian and began with a staff of three and a collection of 1,400 books. Today, the USGS Libraries Program is one of the world's largest Earth and natural science repositories and a resource of national significance used by researchers and the public worldwide.

  17. Artificial noses.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, Shannon E; Aernecke, Matthew J; Walt, David R

    2011-08-15

    The mammalian olfactory system is able to detect many more odorants than the number of receptors it has by utilizing cross-reactive odorant receptors that generate unique response patterns for each odorant. Mimicking the mammalian system, artificial noses combine cross-reactive sensor arrays with pattern recognition algorithms to create robust odor-discrimination systems. The first artificial nose reported in 1982 utilized a tin-oxide sensor array. Since then, however, a wide range of sensor technologies have been developed and commercialized. This review highlights the most commonly employed sensor types in artificial noses: electrical, gravimetric, and optical sensors. The applications of nose systems are also reviewed, covering areas such as food and beverage quality control, chemical warfare agent detection, and medical diagnostics. A brief discussion of future trends for the technology is also provided. PMID:21417721

  18. A BAC library of Beta vulgaris L. for the targeted isolation of centromeric DNA and molecular cytogenetics of Beta species.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gunnar; Dechyeva, Daryna; Wenke, Torsten; Weber, Beatrice; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    We constructed a sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of the monosomic addition line PAT2. This chromosomal mutant carries a single additional chromosome fragment (minichromosome) derived from the wild beet Beta patellaris. Restriction analysis of the mutant line by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine HindIII as a suitable enzyme for partial digestion of genomic DNA to generate large-insert fragments which were cloned into the vector pCC1. The library consists of 36,096 clones with an average insert size of 120 kb, and 2.2% of the clones contain mitochondrial or chloroplast DNA. Based on a haploid genome size of 758 Mbp, the library represents 5.7 genome equivalents providing the probability of 99.67% that any sequence of the PAT2 genome can be found in the library. Hybridization to high-density filters was used to isolate 89 BACs containing arrays of the centromere-associated satellite repeats pTS5 and pTS4.1. Using the identified BAC clones in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments with PAT2 and Beta patellaris chromosome spreads their wild beet origin and centromeric localization was demonstrated. Multi-colour FISH with differently labelled satellite repeats pTS5 and pTS4.1 was used to investigate the large-scale organization of the centromere of the PAT2 minichromosome in detail. FISH studies showed that the centromeric satellite pTS5 is flanked on both sides by pTS4.1 arrays and the arms of the minichromosome are terminated by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric sequences. FISH with a BAC, selected from high-density filters after hybridization with an RFLP marker of the genetic linkage group I, demonstrated that it is feasible to correlate genetic linkage groups with chromosomes. Therefore, the PAT2 BAC library provides a useful tool for the characterization of Beta centromeres and a valuable resource for sugar beet genome analysis. PMID:18386131

  19. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  20. Characterization of Chromosome Stability in Diploid, Polyploid and Hybrid Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Rajaraman; Yang, Shi-Yow; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome instability is a key component of cancer progression and many heritable diseases. Understanding why some chromosomes are more unstable than others could provide insight into understanding genome integrity. Here we systematically investigate the spontaneous chromosome loss for all sixteen chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosome instability. We observed that the stability of different chromosomes varied more than 100-fold. Consistent with previous studies on artificial chromosomes, chromosome loss frequency was negatively correlated to chromosome length in S. cerevisiae diploids, triploids and S. cerevisiae-S. bayanus hybrids. Chromosome III, an equivalent of sex chromosomes in budding yeast, was found to be the most unstable chromosome among all cases examined. Moreover, similar instability was observed in chromosome III of S. bayanus, a species that diverged from S. cerevisiae about 20 million years ago, suggesting that the instability is caused by a conserved mechanism. Chromosome III was found to have a highly relaxed spindle checkpoint response in the genome. Using a plasmid stability assay, we found that differences in the centromeric sequence may explain certain aspects of chromosome instability. Our results reveal that even under normal conditions, individual chromosomes in a genome are subject to different levels of pressure in chromosome loss (or gain). PMID:23874507

  1. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  2. Privatizing Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  3. Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kate

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the issue of advocacy. Standing at the vanguard of literacy, library media specialists have a unique role. However, it is time for media specialists to advocate their services in a proactive way. If library media specialists cannot, both individually and collectively, put advocacy at the forefront, then students will suffer the…

  4. Macintoshed Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.; John, Nancy R., Ed.

    Contributed by librarians from public, academic, school, and special libraries, the 17 essays in this collection describe ways in which the Apple Macintosh is used in their libraries: (1) "Workstations and the Apple Macintosh" (Edward J. Valauskas); (2) "The Macintosh Experience at Chesapeake College" (Liz Cooper); (3) "ANSEL Character Set for the…

  5. Library Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Keyes D.

    Chapter I provides a background and explains pertinent library lighting problems such as quality, function, aesthetics, intensity, and costs. Emphasis is on the quality and function of lighting for library users. Chapter II deals with the comments and answers to questions by persons who have a special interest and competence in the field of…

  6. Library Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  7. Generating a physical map of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, N.; Oin, S.; Sait, S.

    1994-09-01

    A four-hit chromosome-specific YAC library is being used to construct an overlapping YAC clone physical map of human chromosome 11. Each of the 1824 YAC clones have been sized by pulsed-field gel analysis with a resulting average insert size of 350 kb. Three hundred of the clones have been localized to a chromosome band by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We are using two complementary approaches to assemble YAC contigs: hybridization-based screening with Alu-PCR products and STS-based screening. Both screening approaches use pooling strategies to uniquely address each of the well locations with a minimum number of DNA pools. Since our main source of YAC clones is a chromosome specific library, the pool complexity is an order of magnitude smaller in comparison to total genomic libraries. Alu products with three different Alu primers were generated from both the monochromosomal J1 hybrid and individual YAC clones. YAC clones were chosen to generate probes using a sample without replacement strategy. Greater than 1700 YAC clones have been assembled into contigs. These initial contigs are estimated to be on average 1 Mb in size. Each of the contigs have been binned into a chromosomal band by virture of it containing YACs localized by FISH or YACs positive for one or more mapped STSs. Confirmation of the contigs is being achieved with Line I fingerprinting. The initial contigs are currently being joined using probes derived from the YAC clone ends defining the outermost points in the contigs for hybridization of colony filters. Remaining gaps in the contigs will be joined using alternative large insert libraries.

  8. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF 47 NEW MICROSATELLITE MARKERS FROM A BTA6 LIBRARY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific libraries provide a means to isolate genetic markers from specific chromosomal regions. A small-insert BTA6 library, constructed by microdissection, was screened for dinucleotide repeats (CA)15. A total of 47 new microsatellite loci were developed and tested for polymorphism a...

  10. Chromosome-specific cDNAs/STSs

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1992-10-01

    This project seeks to construct high-quality normalized cDNA libraries from human tissues, to develop methods for isolation of chromosome-specific cDNAs, and to contribute sequence information to the expanding cDNA/EST database. A human infant brain cDNA library having a very high complexity, short poly (A) tails; long size inserts; undetectable co-cloning events; and low background of non-recombinants was previously described. Over 2,000 ESTs have already been successfully derived from this library, and so become one of the best so far characaterized. Having established the protocol to construct high quality cDNA libraries, a major effort was mounted to develope a method to normalize cDNA libraries constructed in phagemid vectors. Briefly, this method involves priming of the library in the form of single-stranded circles with a Not I-oligo (dT) primer and controlled extensions with Klenow in the presence of dNTPs and ddNTPS. After purification of the partial duplexes over HAP, melting and reannealing to a moderate Cot, unhybridized (normalized) single-stranded circles are purified by HAP and electroporated into bacteria, generating a normalized library. The extent of normalization of the infant brain cDNA library has been determined by a series of screenings with probes that represent mRNAs from the 3 frequency classes.

  11. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10[sup 5] copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G[sub 0], the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes.

  12. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  13. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  14. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  15. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve. PMID:26957450

  16. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  17. Callpath Library

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, T.

    2013-11-09

    The "Callpath Library" is a software abstraction layer over a number of stack tracing utilities. It allows tool develoopers to conveniently represent and mNipulate call paths gathered fro U. Wisconsin's Stackwalker API and GNU Backtrace.

  18. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  19. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  20. DNA shuttling between plasmid vectors and a genome vector: systematic conversion and preservation of DNA libraries using the Bacillus subtilis genome (BGM) vector.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shinya; Akioka, Manami; Tsuge, Kenji; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2005-06-24

    The combined use of the contemporary vector systems, the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector and the Bacillus subtilis genome (BGM) vector, makes possible the handling of giant-length DNA (above 100 kb). Our newly constructed BGM vector efficiently integrated DNA prepared in the BAC vector. A BAC library comprised of 18 independent clones prepared from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Arabidopsis thaliana was converted to a parallel BGM library using the new BGM vector. The effectiveness of the combined use of the vector systems was confirmed by the stable recovery of all 18 DNAs as BAC clones from the respective BGM clones. We show that DNA in BGM was stably preserved at room temperature after spore formation of the host B.subtilis. Rapid and stable shuttling between Escherichiacoli and the B. subtilis host, combined with spore-mediated DNA storage, may facilitate the long-term and low-cost preservation and the transportation of DNA resources. PMID:15913652

  1. One-Step Generation of Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice.

    PubMed

    Murata, Minoru; Kanatani, Asaka; Kashihara, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    The combination of the DNA sequence-specific recombination system Cre/LoxP and the DNA transposon system Activator (Ac)/Dissociation (Ds) has been used for insertional and deletional mutagenesis, as well as for the generation of artificial ring chromosomes in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco. However, it takes a long time to complete this process, even in Arabidopsis. To overcome this issue, a new binary vector, pDLHC, has been developed to induce chromosomal rearrangements for a short time in rice. pDLHC has been found to be effective in the induction of deletions between two LoxPs in the T2 generation of "Nihon bare" expressing Ac TPase. pDLHC has potential for the efficient generation of various types of chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, inversions, translocations and artificial ring chromosomes in plants, and the detailed protocol for rice is described here. PMID:27557686

  2. Isolation and refined regional mapping of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.; Yu, J.; Patterson, D.

    1994-10-01

    To increase candidate genes from human chromosome 21 for the analysis of Down syndrome and other genetic diseases localized on this chromosome, we have isolated and studied 9 cDNA clones encoded by chromosome 21. For isolating cDNAs, single-copy microclones from a chromosome 21 microdissection library were used in direct screening of various cDNA libraries. Seven of the cDNA clones have been regionally mapped on chromosome 21 using a comprehensive hybrid mapping panel comprising 24 cell hybrids that divide the chromosome into 33 subregions. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions should be useful for identification and cloning of genes responsible for the specific component phenotypes of Down syndrome and other diseases on chromosome 21, including progressive myoclonus epilepsy in 21q22.3. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Standards for British Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Reviews developments in British library standards since 1971, highlighting types of standards, public libraries, academic libraries (university, polytechnic, college), school libraries, and special libraries (hospital and health sciences, prison, subject specializations). Thirty-nine references are cited. (EJS)

  4. Reconstruction of genomic rearrangements in great apes and gibbons by chromosome painting.

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, A; Wienberg, J; Stanyon, R; Arnold, N; Tofanelli, S; Ishida, T; Cremer, T

    1992-01-01

    The homology between hylobatid chromosomes and other primates has long remained elusive. We used chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization of all human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to "paint" the chromosomes of primates and establish homologies between the human, great ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan), and gibbon karyotypes (Hylobates lar species group, 2n = 44). The hybridization patterns unequivocally demonstrate the high degree of chromosomal homology and synteny of great ape and human chromosomes. Relative to human, no translocations were detected in great apes, except for the well-known fusion-origin of human chromosome 2 and a 5;17 translocation in the gorilla. In contrast, numerous translocations were detected that have led to the massive reorganization of the gibbon karyotype: the 22 autosomal human chromosomes have been divided into 51 elements to compose the 21 gibbon autosomes. Molecular cytogenetics promises to finally allow hylobatids to be integrated into the overall picture of chromosomal evolution in the primates. Images PMID:1528869

  5. Artificial halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmke, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Judged by their frequency and beauty, ice halos easily rival rainbows as a prominent atmospheric optics phenomenon. This article presents experimental halo demonstrations of varying complexity. Using a single commercially available hexagonal glass prism, a variety of artificial halos can be simulated. The experiments include laser beam path analysis, a modified classic spinning prism experiment, and a novel Monte-Carlo machine for three-dimensional rotations. Each of these experiments emulates different conditions of certain halo displays, and in combination, they allow a thorough understanding of these striking phenomena.

  6. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Artificial Intelligence. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kay, Comp.

    Desgined to serve as a guide to resources on artificial intelligence (AI) and expert systems, this Library of Congress bulletin is divided into 18 sections that contain lists of books, journal articles, periodicals, associations, and other sources of information. A brief statement of the scope of the guide introduces the sections, which are listed…

  8. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  9. Chromosomal development of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 30, describes the chromosomal development of cancer. It has been established through cytological research that the number of chromosomes in cancer cells often deviates greatly from the usual number in healthy cells of the host organism. This chapter includes discussions on chromosome studies in ascites tumors, stemline and tumor development, mitotic aberrations in cancer, and selection and tumor progression. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  10. High-resolution physical mapping of a 250-kb region of human chromosome 11q24 by genomic sequence sampling (GSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Selleri, L.; Smith, M.W.; Holmsen, A.L.

    1995-04-10

    A physical map of the region of human chromosome 11q24 containing the FLI1 gene, disrupted by the t(11;22) translocation in Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, was analyzed by genomic sequence sampling. Using a 4- to 5-fold coverage chromosome 11-specific library, 22 region-specific cosmid clones were identified by phenol emulsion reassociation hybridization, with a 245-kb yeast artificial chromosome clone containing the FLI1 gene, and by directed {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} techniques. Cosmid contigs were constructed by individual clone fingerprinting using restriction enzyme digestion and assembly with the Genome Reconstruction and AsseMbly (GRAM) computer algorithm. The relative orientation and spacing of cosmid contigs with respect to the chromosome were determined by the structural analysis of cosmid clones and by direct visual in situ hybridization mapping. Each cosmid clone in the contig was subjected to {open_quotes}one-pass{close_quotes} end sequencing, and the resulting ordered sequence fragments represent {approximately}5% of the complete DNA sequence, making the entire region accessible by PCR amplification. The sequence samples were analyzed for putative exons, repetitive DNAs, and simple sequence repeats using a variety of computer algorithms. Based upon the computer predictions, Southern and Northern blot experiments led to the independent identification and localization of the FLI1 gene as well as a previously unknown gene located in this region of chromosome 11q24. This approach to high-resolution physical analysis of human chromosomes allows the assembly of detailed sequence-based maps. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Sarah

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  12. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L.; Lau, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  13. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Ping; Gan, Hai-Yan; Li, Fen-Xia; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Rong-Liang; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure. Methods Artificial DNA mixture samples (360), with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction. Results A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B. Conclusion A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability. PMID:26765738

  14. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  15. The first report of a Pelecaniformes defensin cluster: characterization of β-defensin genes in the crested ibis based on BAC libraries.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Hui; Chen, Li-Cheng; Wang, Bei-Bing; Sun, Li; Ma, Mei-Ying; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Defensins play a key role in the innate immunity of various organisms. Detailed genomic studies of the defensin cluster have only been reported in a limited number of birds. Herein, we present the first characterization of defensins in a Pelecaniformes species, the crested ibis (Nipponia nippon), which is one of the most endangered birds in the world. We constructed bacterial artificial chromosome libraries, including a 4D-PCR library and a reverse-4D library, which provide at least 40 equivalents of this rare bird's genome. A cluster including 14 β-defensin loci within 129 kb was assigned to chromosome 3 by FISH, and one gene duplication of AvBD1 was found. The ibis defensin genes are characterized by multiform gene organization ranging from two to four exons through extensive exon fusion. Splicing signal variations and alternative splice variants were also found. Comparative analysis of four bird species identified one common and multiple species-specific duplications, which might be associated with high GC content. Evolutionary analysis revealed birth-and-death mode and purifying selection for avian defensin evolution, resulting in different defensin gene numbers among bird species and functional conservation within orthologous genes, respectively. Additionally, we propose various directions for further research on genetic conservation in the crested ibis. PMID:25372018

  16. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  17. Structure, sequence, expression, and chromosomal localization of the human V{sub 1a} vasopressin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.; Graves, M.K.; Wagner, M.S.

    1996-02-01

    We recently reported the structure and functional expression of a human V{sub 1a} vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1a}R) cDNA isolated from human liver cDNA libraries. To understand further the expression and regulation of the V{sub 1a}R, we now describe the genomic characteristics, tissue expression, chromosomal localization, and regional mapping of the human V{sub 1a}R gene, AVPR1A. Tissue distribution of the human V{sub 1a}R mRNA explored by Northern blot analysis of various human tissues or organs revealed the presence of a 5.5-kb mRNA transcript expressed in the liver and to a lesser degree in the heart, the kidney, and skeletal muscle. Screening of human genomic libraries revealed that the human AVPR1A gene is included entirely within a 6.4-kb rated by a 2.2-kb intron located before the corresponding seventh transmembrane domain of the receptor sequence. The first exon also contains 2 kb of 5{prime}-untranslated region, and the second exon includes 1 kb of 3{prime}-untranslated region. 5{prime}-RACE analysis of human liver mRNA by PCR localized the V{sub 1a}R mRNA transcription start site 1973 bp upstream of the translation the intron sequence were used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids. AVPR1A was localized by PCR analysis of a somatic cell hybrid panel to chromosome 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a yeast artificial chromosome physically mapped AVPR1A to region 12q14-q15. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731

  19. Artificial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Pine, David J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  20. Artificial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  1. Spatial control of chromosomal location in a live cell with functionalized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Juhee; Purwar, Prashant; Cha, Misun; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-12-01

    Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements. PMID:26524004

  2. Chromosomes, conflict, and epigenetics: chromosomal speciation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith D; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    Since Darwin first noted that the process of speciation was indeed the "mystery of mysteries," scientists have tried to develop testable models for the development of reproductive incompatibilities-the first step in the formation of a new species. Early theorists proposed that chromosome rearrangements were implicated in the process of reproductive isolation; however, the chromosomal speciation model has recently been questioned. In addition, recent data from hybrid model systems indicates that simple epistatic interactions, the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, are more complex. In fact, incompatibilities are quite broad, including interactions among heterochromatin, small RNAs, and distinct, epigenetically defined genomic regions such as the centromere. In this review, we will examine both classical and current models of chromosomal speciation and describe the "evolving" theory of genetic conflict, epigenetics, and chromosomal speciation. PMID:20438362

  3. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  4. Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Building data is given for the following public libraries: New York, New York; Blue Island, Illinois; Corte Madera, California; Muskogee, Oklahoma: Charlotte, North Carolina; Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; Albermarle, North Carolina; Spokane, Washington; and Hemet, California. (Author/NH)

  5. Library Venturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, H. Donald

    1986-01-01

    There is opportunity for service and profit to imaginative libraries organizing to provide new forms of knowledge. Librarians as entrepreneurs must learn venture management and finance. Available assistance includes growing entrepreneural understanding in large institutions; family and friends; private wealth-seeking investment; new business…

  6. Library Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cupp, Christian M., Ed.

    The purpose of this handbook is to help students, staff, and community patrons attain a reasonable degree of skill in using the Southeastern Community College Library effectively. The first section instructs the user on how to find information. A discussion of the card catalog and its use provides examples of catalog cards, reviews the…

  7. Library Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Computers in Libraries, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special section includes two articles that review products and services for the automated library environment. Highlights include ergonomic products; products for visually, hearing-, and speech-impaired users; analog film recorders; computer filters; document imaging systems; electric filing systems; and printers. A list of vendors is…

  8. A YAC contig of approximately 3 Mb from human chromosome 5q31 [yields] q33

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Wang Jabs, E.; Hawkins, A.L.; Griffin, C.A. ); Wise, C.A.; Lovett, M. ); Le Paslier, D. ); Pittler, S.J. )

    1994-02-01

    The human chromosome 5q31-q33 region contains an interesting cluster of growth factor and receptor genes. In addition, several genetic disease loci have been localized within this region, but have not as yet been isolated as molecular clones. These include those loci involved in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of this region would assist in the further localization and isolation of these genes. The authors have used YACs isolated from the Washington University and Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain YAC libraries, including YACs from the large insert (mega) YAC library to build a contig greater than 3 Mb in size. An STS content strategy coupled with limited walking from YAC ends was used to isolate 22 overlapping YACs with as much as sixfold coverage. A total of 20 STSs, derived from genes, anonymous sequences, and vector Alu-PCR or inverse PCR products, were used to compile this contig. The order of loci, centromere-GRL-D5S207-D5S70-D5S545-D5S546-D5S547-D5S68-D5S548-D5S210-D5S549-D5S686- ADRB2-D5S559-CSF1R-D5S551-RPS14-D5S519-SPARC-telomere, was derived from the overlapping clones. This contig and clones derived from it will be useful substrates in selecting candidate cDNAs for the disease loci in this interval. 45 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  10. Chromosome painting defines genomic rearrangements between red howler monkey subspecies.

    PubMed

    Consigliere, S; Stanyon, R; Koehler, U; Agoramoorthy, G; Wienberg, J

    1996-06-01

    We hybridized whole human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to chromosomes of two supposed subspecies of Alouatta seniculus: Alouatta seniculus sara and Alouatta seniculus arctoides. The number of hybridization signals per haploid set is 42 in A. s. sara and 43 in A. s. arctoidea; the two karyotypes differ by at least 16 chromosomal rearrangements, including numerous translocations. An unusual sex chromosome system is shared by both taxa. The sex chromosome system results from a Y translocation with a chromosome homologous to parts of human chromosome 3/15 and can be described as X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 (male/female). Both red howlers also have microchromosomes, a highly unusual karyological trait not found in other higher primates. These microchromosomes are not hybridized by any human chromosome paint and therefore are probably composed of repetitive DNA. It is well known that New World monkeys have high karyological variability. It is probable that molecular cytogenetic analyses including chromosome painting will permit an accurate reconstruction of the phylogeny of these monkeys and help establish the ancestral karyotype for higher primates. PMID:8817065

  11. Artificial Respiration and Artificial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Joseph; Brook, Morris H.; Lopez, Jose F.

    1965-01-01

    A training program in the newer methods of treatment of acute cardiopulmonary emergencies which was developed at the University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, is reported. Artificial respiration by the chance rescuer, primary and secondary resuscitation, and post-resuscitation measures involving the use of special drugs and equipment by trained personnel are described. Figures and tables designed for wall-mounting and ready reference in an emergency situation are presented. Firstaid ventilatory adjuncts for use by trained personnel are classified and critically appraised, and the propriety of their use is emphasized. A plea is made to the medical profession and allied agencies to assume the responsibility of spreading knowledge of the new techniques more widely. Unless effective treatment is instituted early enough to prevent death or permanent anoxic damage to heart and brain, follow-through therapy will often be fruitless. PMID:14339303

  12. Familial four breakpoint complex chromosomal rearrangement as a cause of monosomy 9p22-->pter and trisomy 10p11.2-->pter and 11q21 analysed by dual and triple colour FISH.

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, P; Kostyk, E; Bocian, E; Stańczak, H; Parczewska, J; Piatkowska, E; Mazurczak, T; Pietrzyk, J J

    1997-01-01

    A familial four breakpoint complex chromosomal rearrangement involving chromosomes 9, 10, and 11 was ascertained through a child with dysmorphic features, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and hypotonia. A cryptic insertion, invisible in G banded chromosomes was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using chromosome specific libraries. Possible mechanisms of its formation as well as karyotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Images PMID:9279768

  13. Cosmid clones derived from both euchromatic and heterochromatic regions of the human Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, J; Erickson, R P; Rigby, P W; Goodfellow, P N

    1984-01-01

    Clones containing sequences derived from the human Y chromosome have been isolated from cosmid libraries of a human-mouse hybrid cell line. These libraries were constructed in the new expression vectors Homer V and Homer VI. The collection of cosmids isolated is enriched for unique sequence DNA and only a few of the cosmids contain the tandemly repeated sequences which constitute a major portion of the Y chromosome. Three cosmids have been studied in detail. One cosmid shows extensive homology over at least 20 kb with the long arm of the X chromosome; this homology is outside the predicted homology region required for sex chromosome pairing. The other two clones contain unique sequences specific to the Y chromosome and both map to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome long arm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6092051

  14. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Gibson, J; Wu, J; Shaffer, L G; Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    1999-10-01

    Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Many studies have implicated the enteroviruses and, particularly, the Coxsackievirus-B family as etiologic agents of the acquired forms of these diseases. However, we have shown the group-C adenoviruses to be as commonly detected as enteroviruses in the myocardium of children and adults with these diseases. It has remained something of a conundrum why two such divergent virus families cause these diseases. The recent description of the common human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor (CAR) offers at least a partial explanation. In order to characterize the CAR gene, we screened a bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) library (RPCI11) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product derived from the 3' end of the CAR cDNA sequence. This identified 13 BACs that were further characterized by PCR amplification of seven contiguous regions of the entire cDNA sequence. Eleven of the BACs were determined to encode pseudogenes while the other two BACs (131J5 and 246M1) encoded the presumed functional gene. PCR amplification of a monochromosomal hybrid panel indicated the presence of pseudogenes on chromosomes 15, 18, and 21 while the functional gene is encoded on chromosome 21. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the gene is located at 21q11.2. DNA sequencing of BACs 131J5 and 246M1 revealed the presence of seven exons. The DNA sequences have been determined for each exon-intron boundary, and putative promoter sequences and transcription initiation sites identified. No consensus polyadenylation signal was identified. PMID:10543405

  15. Library Automation and Library Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabenstott, Jon, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Several consultants address the issue of competencies required of professional librarians for the effective management of the automation process. Highlights include formal and professional ongoing education and the need for technical training and problem solving skills to enable librarians to evaluate and develop library systems effectively.…

  16. Research in Library Reference/Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo

    1983-01-01

    This review of library reference service research, which focuses on the provision of information in response to questions, covers measurement of reference service, evaluation using unobtrusive techniques, online search services, information needs and uses, the process of asking and answering questions, and artificial intelligence. Eighty-four…

  17. Speech Recognition for A Digital Video Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witbrock, Michael J.; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    Production of the meta-data supporting the Informedia Digital Video Library interface is automated using techniques derived from artificial intelligence research. Speech recognition and natural-language processing, information retrieval, and image analysis are applied to produce an interface that helps users locate information and navigate more…

  18. The Roles of the Future Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Williams, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses emerging roles for the library and librarian, including services in the following areas: (1) special collection management and reference; (2) information systems; (3) expert systems; (4) electronic publishing; (5) telecommunications networking; and (6) computer support. The technologies of artificial intelligence, graphic imaging,…

  19. A 37-kb fragment common to the pericentromeric region of human chromosomes 13 and 21 and to the ancestral inactive centromere of chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Charlieu, J.P.; Laurent, A.M.; Orti, R.; Bellis, M.; Roizes, G. INSERM U 249, Montpellier ); Viegas-Pequignot, E. )

    1993-03-01

    A YAC clone from a chromosome 21-specific partial library was localized by in situ hybridization to the pericentromeric region of chromosomes 13 and 21 and to the long arm of chromosome 2, where an ancestral inactive centromere is present. Restriction mapping of the insert showed that it may contain tandemly repeated DNA. Probes for [alpha]-satellite and satellite II and III failed to hybridize with the cloned DNA. Shotgun subcloning might reveal a sequence that seems to be specific for chromosome 21. Alu-PCR was performed to generate probes from the YAC clone to map it more precisely, using a somatic hybrid containing only human chromosome 21. The inter-Alu sequences thus isolated were found to be clustered in an approximately 37-kb-long fragment common to chromosomes 2, 13, and 21, which might be involved in the centromeric function of these chromosomes. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Counselor CDO Angels Build a Physician Database Resources Library Latest Research & Studies External Info Links Newsletter Library ... here to Join our cause today Join the Open Access Professional DB Check out the latest CDO Newsletter! ...

  1. Development of a novel HAC-based "gain of signal" quantitative assay for measuring chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Sheung; Lee, Nicholas C O; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Kumeiko, Vadim; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2016-03-22

    Accumulating data indicates that chromosome instability (CIN) common to cancer cells can be used as a target for cancer therapy. At present the rate of chromosome mis-segregation is quantified by laborious techniques such as coupling clonal cell analysis with karyotyping or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, a novel assay was developed based on the loss of a non-essential human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a constitutively expressed EGFP transgene ("loss of signal" assay). Using this system, anticancer drugs can be easily ranked on by their effect on HAC loss. However, it is problematic to covert this "loss of signal" assay into a high-throughput screen to identify drugs and mutations that increase CIN levels. To address this point, we re-designed the HAC-based assay. In this new system, the HAC carries a constitutively expressed shRNA against the EGFP transgene integrated into human genome. Thus, cells that inherit the HAC display no green fluorescence, while cells lacking the HAC do. We verified the accuracy of this "gain of signal" assay by measuring the level of CIN induced by known antimitotic drugs and added to the list of previously ranked CIN inducing compounds, two newly characterized inhibitors of the centromere-associated protein CENP-E, PF-2771 and GSK923295 that exhibit the highest effect on chromosome instability measured to date. The "gain of signal" assay was also sensitive enough to detect increase of CIN after siRNA depletion of known genes controlling mitotic progression through distinct mechanisms. Hence this assay can be utilized in future experiments to uncover novel human CIN genes, which will provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of cancer. Also described is the possible conversion of this new assay into a high-throughput screen using a fluorescence microplate reader to characterize chemical libraries and identify new conditions that modulate CIN level. PMID:26943579

  2. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Final progress report, March 1991--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    A reciprocal probing method is described which uses pooled cDNA probes to order chromosome specific libraries in order to identify cosmids containing sequences capable to hybridizing to the pool. In this pilot study, placental DNA clones were used to identify cosmids from both chromosomes X and 17. Sixty unique cDNA`s were identified of which 22 were novel.

  3. Moving toward a higher efficiency of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer.

    PubMed

    Liskovykh, Mikhail; Lee, Nicholas Co; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2016-01-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) technology enables individual mammalian chromosomes, megabase-sized chromosome fragments, or mammalian artificial chromosomes that include human artificial chromosomes (HACs) and mouse artificial chromosomes (MACs) to be transferred from donor to recipient cells. In the past few decades, MMCT has been applied to various studies, including mapping the genes, analysis of chromosome status such as aneuploidy and epigenetics. Recently, MMCT was applied to transfer MACs/HACs carrying entire chromosomal copies of genes for genes function studies and has potential for regenerative medicine. However, a safe and efficient MMCT technique remains an important challenge. The original MMCT protocol includes treatment of donor cells by Colcemid to induce micronucleation, where each chromosome becomes surrounded with a nuclear membrane, followed by disarrangement of the actin cytoskeleton using Cytochalasin B to help induce microcells formation. In this study, we modified the protocol and demonstrated that replacing Colcemid and Cytochalasin B with TN-16 + Griseofulvin and Latrunculin B in combination with a Collage/Laminin surface coating increases the efficiency of HAC transfer to recipient cells by almost sixfold and is possibly less damaging to HAC than the standard MMCT method. We tested the improved MMCT protocol on four recipient cell lines, including human mesenchymal stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells that could facilitate the cell engineering by HACs. PMID:27382603

  4. Moving toward a higher efficiency of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer

    PubMed Central

    Liskovykh, Mikhail; Lee, Nicholas CO; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2016-01-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) technology enables individual mammalian chromosomes, megabase-sized chromosome fragments, or mammalian artificial chromosomes that include human artificial chromosomes (HACs) and mouse artificial chromosomes (MACs) to be transferred from donor to recipient cells. In the past few decades, MMCT has been applied to various studies, including mapping the genes, analysis of chromosome status such as aneuploidy and epigenetics. Recently, MMCT was applied to transfer MACs/HACs carrying entire chromosomal copies of genes for genes function studies and has potential for regenerative medicine. However, a safe and efficient MMCT technique remains an important challenge. The original MMCT protocol includes treatment of donor cells by Colcemid to induce micronucleation, where each chromosome becomes surrounded with a nuclear membrane, followed by disarrangement of the actin cytoskeleton using Cytochalasin B to help induce microcells formation. In this study, we modified the protocol and demonstrated that replacing Colcemid and Cytochalasin B with TN-16 + Griseofulvin and Latrunculin B in combination with a Collage/Laminin surface coating increases the efficiency of HAC transfer to recipient cells by almost sixfold and is possibly less damaging to HAC than the standard MMCT method. We tested the improved MMCT protocol on four recipient cell lines, including human mesenchymal stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells that could facilitate the cell engineering by HACs. PMID:27382603

  5. The National Laboratory Gene Library Project

    SciTech Connect

    Deaven, L.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The two National Laboratories at Livermore and Los Alamos have played a prominent role in the development and application of flow cytometry and sorting to chromosome classification and purification. Both laboratories began to receive numerous requests for specific human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting for gene library construction, but these requests were difficult to satisfy due to time and personnel constraints. The Department of Energy, through its Office of Health and Environmental Research, has a long-standing interest in the human genome in general and in the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of energy-related environmental pollutants in particular. Hence, it was decided in 1983 to use the flow construct chromosome-specific gene libraries to be made available to the genetic research community. The National Laboratory Gene Library Project was envisioned as a practical way to deal with requests for sorted chromosomes, and also as a way to promote increased understanding of the human genome and the effects of mutagens and carcinogens on it. The strategy for the project was developed with the help of an advisory committee as well as suggestions and advice from many other geneticists. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Symposium on Presidential Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relyea, Harold C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss presidential libraries. Highlights include an overview of the development of the federal presidential library system; the Ronald Reagan library; the Richard Nixon library archives; access at the Gerald Ford library; and computerizing the Jimmy Carter library. (LRW)

  7. Turkish Libraries: Historical Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakin, Irfan

    1984-01-01

    Summary of the development of libraries in Turkey highlights the existence of libraries in the ninth century, the Shamssaddin Altunaba Medrese library in Konya, libraries established during the Ottoman era, reports to reform libraries (1869-70, 1909), and reports and library developments attributed to the Republican Era beginning in 1923. (EJS)

  8. Library Research and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; St. Lifer, Evan; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee; Miller, Marilyn L.; Shontz, Marilyn L.

    2001-01-01

    These nine articles discuss research and statistics on libraries and librarianship, including libraries in the United States, Canada, and Mexico; acquisition expenditures in public, academic, special, and government libraries; price indexes; state rankings of public library data; library buildings; expenditures in school library media centers; and…

  9. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Construction of two BAC libraries from the wild Mexican diploid potato, Solanum pinnatisectum, and the identification of clones near the late blight and Colorado potato beetle resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Sun, S; Ye, Q; McCuine, S; Huff, E; Zhang, H-B

    2004-04-01

    To facilitate isolation and characterization of disease and insect resistance genes important to potato, two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from genomic DNA of the Mexican wild diploid species, Solanum pinnatisectum, which carries high levels of resistance to the most important potato pathogen and pest, the late blight and the Colorado potato beetle (CPB). One of the libraries was constructed from the DNA, partially digested with BamHI, and it consists of 40328 clones with an average insert size of 125 kb. The other library was constructed from the DNA partially digested with EcoRI, and it consists of 17280 clones with an average insert size of 135 kb. The two libraries, together, represent approximately six equivalents of the wild potato haploid genome. Both libraries were evaluated for contamination with organellar DNA sequences and were shown to have a very low percentage (0.65-0.91%) of clones derived from the chloroplast genome. High-density filters, prepared from the two libraries, were screened with ten restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers linked to the resistance genes for late blight, CPB, Verticillium wilt and potato cyst nematodes, and the gene Sr1 for the self-incompatibility S-locus. Thirty nine positive clones were identified and at least two positive BAC clones were detected for each RFLP marker. Four markers that are linked to the late blight resistance gene Rpi1 hybridized to 14 BAC clones. Fifteen BAC clones were shown to harbor the PPO (polyphenol oxidase) locus for the CPB resistance by three RFLP probes. Two RFLP markers detected five BAC clones that were linked to the Sr1 gene for self-incompatibility. These results agree with the library's predicted extent of coverage of the potato genome, and indicated that the libraries are useful resources for the molecular isolation of disease and insect resistance genes, as well as other economically important genes in the wild potato species. The

  11. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Zhou, Hongyi; Stass, S.A.; Sen, P. ); Mulac-Jericevic, B.; Pirrotta, V. )

    1994-02-01

    Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will be generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Rice chromosome segment substitution line selection utilizing SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful tool for identifying naturally occurring, favorable alleles in unadapted germplasm. Six CSSL libraries in rice (Oryza sativa) are being developed from crosses between three different accessions of the rice progenitor species, O. rufipogon...

  14. A high-resolution annotated physical map of the human chromosome 13q12-13 region containing the breast cancer susceptibility locus BRCA2.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, S G; Cayanis, E; de Fatima Bonaldo, M; Bowcock, A M; Deaven, L L; Edelman, I S; Gallardo, T; Kalachikov, S; Lawton, L; Longmire, J L; Lovett, M; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Rothstein, R; Russo, J J; Soares, M B; Sunjevaric, I; Venkatraj, V S; Warburton, D; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A

    1996-01-01

    Various types of physical mapping data were assembled by developing a set of computer programs (Integrated Mapping Package) to derive a detailed, annotated map of a 4-Mb region of human chromosome 13 that includes the BRCA2 locus. The final assembly consists of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with 42 members spanning the 13q12-13 region and aligned contigs of 399 cosmids established by cross-hybridization between the cosmids, which were selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs. The end sequences of 60 cosmids spaced nearly evenly across the map were used to generate sequence-tagged sites (STSs), which were mapped to the YACs by PCR. A contig framework was generated by STS content mapping, and the map was assembled on this scaffold. Additional annotation was provided by 72 expressed sequences and 10 genetic markers that were positioned on the map by hybridization to cosmids. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8570617

  15. Strengthening State Library Administrative Agency (Territorial Library).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library, Agana, Guam.

    This document describes the Basic State Plan Amendments for the Library Services and Construction Act in Guam and the regulations promulgated thereunder. The major projects described under the plan are: Strengthening State Library Administrative Agency; Staff Development; Library Collections, Extention Services, Institutional Libraries; and…

  16. Library Instruction Assessment in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tancheva, Kornelia; Andrews, Camille; Steinhart, Gail

    2007-01-01

    Determining the best methods of assessment for a library instruction program in a large research university can be a challenging task. Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University Library has pilot-tested three methods of formative and summative assessment for its library instruction program--attitudinal, outcomes-based, and gap-measure--and…

  17. Enhancing genome investigations in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus via BAC library construction and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) is a major species in the Culex pipiens complex and an important vector for several human pathogens including West Nile virus and parasitic filarial nematodes causing lymphatic filariasis. It is common throughout tropical and subtropical regions and is among the most geographically widespread mosquito species. Although the complete genome sequence is now available, additional genomic tools are needed to improve the sequence assembly. Findings We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using the pIndigoBAC536 vector and HindIII partially digested DNA isolated from Cx. quinquefasciatus pupae, Johannesburg strain (NDJ). Insert size was estimated by NotI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of 82 randomly selected clones. To estimate genome coverage, each 384-well plate was pooled for screening with 29 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and five gene markers. The NDJ library consists of 55,296 clones arrayed in 144 384-well microplates. Fragment insert size ranged from 50 to 190 kb in length (mean = 106 kb). Based on a mean insert size of 106 kb and a genome size of 579 Mbp, the BAC library provides ~10.1-fold coverage of the Cx. quinquefasciatus genome. PCR screening of BAC DNA plate pools for SSR loci from the genetic linkage map and for four genes associated with reproductive diapause in Culex pipiens resulted in a mean of 9.0 positive plate pools per locus. Conclusion The NDJ library represents an excellent resource for genome assembly enhancement and characterization in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes. PMID:21914202

  18. Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Likun; You, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Yanliang; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Zixia; Chen, Baohua; Zhao, Yunfeng; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Ke, Caihuan; Xu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33%. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor. PMID:26438131

  19. Isolation of a 97-kb minimal essential MHC B locus from a new reverse-4D BAC library of the golden pheasant.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; He, Ke; Wu, Shao-Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system is widely used in isolation of large genomic fragments of interest. Construction of a routine BAC library requires several months for picking clones and arraying BACs into superpools in order to employ 4D-PCR to screen positive BACs, which might be time-consuming and laborious. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cluster of genes involved in the vertebrate immune system, and the classical avian MHC-B locus is a minimal essential one, occupying a 100-kb genomic region. In this study, we constructed a more effective reverse-4D BAC library for the golden pheasant, which first creates sub-libraries and then only picks clones of positive sub-libraries, and identified several MHC clones within thirty days. The full sequencing of a 97-kb reverse-4D BAC demonstrated that the golden pheasant MHC-B locus contained 20 genes and showed good synteny with that of the chicken. The notable differences between these two species were the numbers of class II B loci and NK genes and the inversions of the TAPBP gene and the TAP1-TAP2 region. Furthermore, the inverse TAP2-TAP1 was unique in the golden pheasant in comparison with that of chicken, turkey, and quail. The newly defined genomic structure of the golden pheasant MHC will give an insight into the evolutionary history of the avian MHC. PMID:22403630

  20. Isolation of a 97-kb Minimal Essential MHC B Locus from a New Reverse-4D BAC Library of the Golden Pheasant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shao-Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system is widely used in isolation of large genomic fragments of interest. Construction of a routine BAC library requires several months for picking clones and arraying BACs into superpools in order to employ 4D-PCR to screen positive BACs, which might be time-consuming and laborious. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cluster of genes involved in the vertebrate immune system, and the classical avian MHC-B locus is a minimal essential one, occupying a 100-kb genomic region. In this study, we constructed a more effective reverse-4D BAC library for the golden pheasant, which first creates sub-libraries and then only picks clones of positive sub-libraries, and identified several MHC clones within thirty days. The full sequencing of a 97-kb reverse-4D BAC demonstrated that the golden pheasant MHC-B locus contained 20 genes and showed good synteny with that of the chicken. The notable differences between these two species were the numbers of class II B loci and NK genes and the inversions of the TAPBP gene and the TAP1-TAP2 region. Furthermore, the inverse TAP2-TAP1 was unique in the golden pheasant in comparison with that of chicken, turkey, and quail. The newly defined genomic structure of the golden pheasant MHC will give an insight into the evolutionary history of the avian MHC. PMID:22403630

  1. Amniote phylogenomics: testing evolutionary hypotheses with BAC library scanning and targeted clone analysis of large-scale DNA sequences from reptiles.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Andrew M; Janes, Daniel E; Edwards, Scott V

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenomics research integrating established principles of systematic biology and taking advantage of the wealth of DNA sequences being generated by genome science holds promise for answering long-standing evolutionary questions with orders of magnitude more primary data than in the past. Although it is unrealistic to expect whole-genome initiatives to proceed rapidly for commercially unimportant species such as reptiles, practical approaches utilizing genomic libraries of large-insert clones pave the way for a phylogenomics of species that are nevertheless essential for testing evolutionary hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework. This chapter reviews the case for adopting genome-enabled approaches to evolutionary studies and outlines a program for using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries or plasmid libraries as a basis for completing "genome scans" of reptiles. We have used BACs to close a critical gap in the genome database for Reptilia, the sister group of mammals, and present the methodological approaches taken to achieve this as a guideline for designing similar comparative studies. In addition, we provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for BAC-library screening and shotgun sequencing of specific clones containing target genes of evolutionary interest. Taken together, the genome scanning and shotgun sequencing techniques offer complementary diagnostic potential and can substantially increase the scale and power of analyses aimed at testing evolutionary hypotheses for nonmodel species. PMID:18629663

  2. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  3. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  4. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  5. Cell Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA contract led to the development of faster and more energy efficient semiconductor materials for digital integrated circuits. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) conducts electrons 4-6 times faster than silicon and uses less power at frequencies above 100-150 megahertz. However, the material is expensive, brittle, fragile and has lacked computer automated engineering tools to solve this problem. Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) developed a series of GaAs cell libraries for cell layout, design rule checking, logic synthesis, placement and routing, simulation and chip assembly. The system is marketed by Compare Design Automation.

  6. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  7. Identification of a novel retrotransposon with sex chromosome-specific distribution in Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Tereza; Cegan, Radim; Kubat, Zdenek; Vrana, Jan; Vyskot, Boris; Vogel, Ivan; Kejnovsky, Eduard; Hobza, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Silene latifolia is a dioecious plant species with chromosomal sex determination. Although the evolution of sex chromosomes in S. latifolia has been the subject of numerous studies, a global view of X chromosome structure in this species is still missing. Here, we combine X chromosome microdissection and BAC library screening to isolate new X chromosome-linked sequences. Out of 8 identified BAC clones, only BAC 86M14 showed an X-preferential signal after FISH experiments. Further analysis revealed the existence of the Athila retroelement which is enriched in the X chromosome and nearly absent in the Y chromosome. Based on previous data, the Athila retroelement belongs to the CL3 group of most repetitive sequences in the S. latifolia genome. Structural, transcriptomics and phylogenetic analyses revealed that Athila CL3 represents an old clade in the Athila lineage. We propose a mechanism responsible for Athila CL3 distribution in the S. latifolia genome. PMID:24751661

  8. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  9. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  10. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  11. Library Services. Miscellaneous Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library journal cooperation, interlibrary lending, library services to minorities, and school library media centers, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "The Co-operation between Editors of Library Journals in Socialist Countries," in which Wolfgang Korluss…

  12. Marketing the Virtual Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2009-01-01

    Far more people are familiar with their local public or college library facility than their library's website and online resources. In fact, according to a recent survey, 96% of Americans said they had visited a library in person, but less than one-third have visited their online library. Since everyone agrees that online library resources are…

  13. Library Research and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; Brier, David J.; Lebbin, Vickery K.; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee; Kremen, Maya L.; Miller, Marilyn L.; Shontz, Marilyn L.

    1998-01-01

    Provides nine articles: research on libraries and librarianship, 1997; changing faces of library education (ALA-accredited graduate program title changes); number of libraries in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico; highlights of NCES surveys; library acquisition expenditures; price indexes for public and academic libraries; state rankings of selected…

  14. Library Handbook for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Angelina, Ed.

    Discussions of library resources, services and related activities as well as library materials selection and acquisition are provided for faculty to facilitate and enhance their use of the library. Included in the library resources section are books, periodicals, microforms, and special collections and archives. Instruction in library use,…

  15. Library Directions in 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, GraceAnne A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews major library issues and events of 1988, including: (1) the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Library Awareness Program; (2) cooperation with USSR libraries; (3) library finance; (4) preservation; and (5) special programing. News about a number of prominent library professionals is included in a sidebar. (MES)

  16. Public Library in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerdsuriyakul, Kulthorn

    This paper on public libraries in Thailand begins with a section that provides background on public libraries in the past, lists the functions of the public library, and describes three size classifications of public libraries. The second section outlines the tasks of the current public library in three areas: informal education; nonformal…

  17. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  18. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  19. Direct and inverted reciprocal chromosome insertions between chromosomes 7 and 14 in a woman with recurrent miscarriages

    SciTech Connect

    Ying-Tai Wang; Zhao-Cai Wang; Bajalica, S.; Han, F.Y.; Bui, T.H.; Xie, Y.G.

    1994-09-01

    We present the first case of direct and inverted reciprocal chromosome insertions between human chromosomes 7 and 14, ascertained because of repeated spontaneous abortions. Prometaphase GTG banding analysis showed the karyotype to be 46, XX, inv ins (7;14)(7pter {yields} 7q11.23::14q32.2 {yields} 14q22::7q21.2 {yields} 7qter), dir ins(14;7)(14pter {yields} 14q22::7q11.23 {yields} 7q21.2::14q32.2 {yields} 14qter). Origins of the insertion have been confirmed by chromosome painting with libraries specific for chromosomes 7 and 14 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evolutionary Design of Rule Changing Artificial Society Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun; Kanoh, Hitoshi

    Socioeconomic phenomena, cultural progress and political organization have recently been studied by creating artificial societies consisting of simulated agents. In this paper we propose a new method to design action rules of agents in artificial society that can realize given requests using genetic algorithms (GAs). In this paper we propose an efficient method for designing the action rules of agents that will constitute an artificial society that meets a specified demand by using a GAs. In the proposed method, each chromosome in the GA population represents a candidate set of action rules and the number of rule iterations. While a conventional method applies distinct rules in order of precedence, the present method applies a set of rules repeatedly for a certain period. The present method is aiming at both firm evolution of agent population and continuous action by that. Experimental results using the artificial society proved that the present method can generate artificial society which fills a demand in high probability.

  1. Homecoming for Library Symbol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Bessie

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the significance and development of the library symbol and the history of its acceptance by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Canadian Library Association (CLA). Suggestions are made for its use. (CLB)

  2. Genetic markers on chromosome 7.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, L C

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome 7 is frequently associated with chromosome aberrations, rearrangements, and deletions. It also contains many important genes, gene families, and disease loci. This brief review attempts to summarise these and other interesting aspects of chromosome 7. With the rapid accumulation of cloned genes and polymorphic DNA fragments, this chromosome has become an excellent substrate for molecular genetic studies. PMID:3290488

  3. Incidence of Chromosome Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A minority of conceptions result in live births. Of recognized conceptions, 15% result in spontaneous abortions, up to 60% of which are due to chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of the different disorders is given. Of live births, one in 200 suffers a chromosome abnormality. The common abnormalities are described with their incidence. The effect of maternal age on this incidence is pronounced, but even so must be kept in proportion for counselling purposes.

  4. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  5. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... works well. When you need to urinate, the cuff of the artificial sphincter can be relaxed so ... pain. An artificial sphincter has three parts: A cuff, which fits around your urethra, the tube that ...

  6. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  7. A verified minimal YAC contig for human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Graw, S.L.; Patterson, D.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project is the construction of a verified YAC contig of the complete long arm of human chromosome 21 utilizing YACs from the CEPH and St. Louis libraries. The YACs in this contig have been analyzed for size by PFGE, tested for chimerism by FISH or end-cloning, and verified for STS content by PCR. This last analysis has revealed a number of cases of conflict with the published STS order. To establish correct order, we have utilized STS content analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 21. Additional problems being addressed include completeness of coverage and possible deletions or gaps. Questions of completeness of the CEPH 810 YAC set arose after screening with 57 independently derived probes failed to identify clones for 11 (19%). Ten of the 11, however, do detect chromosome 21 cosmids when used to screen Lawrence Livermore library LL21NC02`G,` a cosmid library constructed from flow-sorted chromosomes 21. Remaining gaps in the contig are being closed by several methods. These include YAC fingerprinting and conversion of YACs to cosmids. In addition, we are establishing the overlap between the physical NotI map and the YAC contig by testing YACs for NotI sites and screening the YACs in the contig for the presence of NotI-linking clones.

  8. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  9. The Library of Virginia's Digital Library Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Elizabeth; Taylor, Jean Marie; Byrd, Sam; Courson, Glenn

    1997-01-01

    Describes The Library of Virginia's Digital Library Project that has made many of its state library collections available via the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include digitization decisions; the HTML Web gateway; the online catalog; microfilm digitization; users and use statistics; and future projects. (LRW)

  10. Alabama Public Library Service Library Directory and 1996 Statistical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This publication presents library contact information and statistics for Alabama public libraries for fiscal year 1996 (October 1, 1995-September 30, 1996). The library directory is arranged by type of library: public libraries, single-county public library systems, multi-county public library systems, and multitype library systems. Entries…

  11. Karyotype and identification of all homoeologous chromosomes of allopolyploid Brassica napus and its diploid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhiyong; Pires, J Chris

    2011-01-01

    Investigating recombination of homoeologous chromosomes in allopolyploid species is central to understanding plant breeding and evolution. However, examining chromosome pairing in the allotetraploid Brassica napus has been hampered by the lack of chromosome-specific molecular probes. In this study, we establish the identification of all homoeologous chromosomes of allopolyploid B. napus by using robust molecular cytogenetic karyotypes developed for the progenitor species Brassica rapa (A genome) and Brassica oleracea (C genome). The identification of every chromosome among these three Brassica species utilized genetically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from B. rapa as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). With this BAC-FISH data, a second karyotype was developed using two BACs that contained repetitive DNA sequences and the ubiquitous ribosomal and pericentromere repeats. Using this diagnostic probe mix and a BAC that contained a C-genome repeat in two successive hybridizations allowed for routine identification of the corresponding homoeologous chromosomes between the A and C genomes of B. napus. When applied to the B. napus cultivar Stellar, we detected one chromosomal rearrangement relative to the parental karyotypes. This robust novel chromosomal painting technique will have biological applications for the understanding of chromosome pairing, homoeologous recombination, and genome evolution in the genus Brassica and will facilitate new applied breeding technologies that rely upon identification of chromosomes. PMID:21041557

  12. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Buenaventura, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  13. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hilary C.; O’Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  14. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  15. Karyotyping of Brachypodium pinnatum (2n = 18) chromosomes using cross-species BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Wolny, Elzbieta; Fidyk, Wojciech; Hasterok, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Identification of individual chromosomes in a complement is usually a difficult task in the case of most plant species, especially for those with small, numerous, and morphologically uniform chromosomes. In this paper, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by cross-species fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) of Brachypodium distachyon derived bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be used for discrimination of Brachypodium pinnatum (2n = 18) chromosomes. Selected sets of clones were hybridised in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, using reprobing of cytological preparations. Analysis of the morphometric features of B. pinnatum chromosomes was performed to establish their total length, the position of centromeres, and the position of BAC-based landmarks in relation to the centromere, thereby enabling their effective karyotyping, which is a prerequisite for more complex study of the grass genome structure and evolution at the cytomolecular level. PMID:23706077

  16. Development of a novel HAC-based “gain of signal” quantitative assay for measuring chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Sheung; Lee, Nicholas C. O.; Goncharov, Nikolay V.; Kumeiko, Vadim; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C.; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that chromosome instability (CIN) common to cancer cells can be used as a target for cancer therapy. At present the rate of chromosome mis-segregation is quantified by laborious techniques such as coupling clonal cell analysis with karyotyping or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, a novel assay was developed based on the loss of a non-essential human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a constitutively expressed EGFP transgene (“loss of signal” assay). Using this system, anticancer drugs can be easily ranked on by their effect on HAC loss. However, it is problematic to covert this “loss of signal” assay into a high-throughput screen to identify drugs and mutations that increase CIN levels. To address this point, we re-designed the HAC-based assay. In this new system, the HAC carries a constitutively expressed shRNA against the EGFP transgene integrated into human genome. Thus, cells that inherit the HAC display no green fluorescence, while cells lacking the HAC do. We verified the accuracy of this “gain of signal” assay by measuring the level of CIN induced by known antimitotic drugs and added to the list of previously ranked CIN inducing compounds, two newly characterized inhibitors of the centromere-associated protein CENP-E, PF-2771 and GSK923295 that exhibit the highest effect on chromosome instability measured to date. The “gain of signal” assay was also sensitive enough to detect increase of CIN after siRNA depletion of known genes controlling mitotic progression through distinct mechanisms. Hence this assay can be utilized in future experiments to uncover novel human CIN genes, which will provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of cancer. Also described is the possible conversion of this new assay into a high-throughput screen using a fluorescence microplate reader to characterize chemical libraries and identify new conditions that modulate CIN level. PMID:26943579

  17. Chromosomes of kinetoplastida.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ploeg, L H; Cornelissen, A W; Barry, J D; Borst, P

    1984-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-sized DNA molecules (molecular karyotypes) of five genera (nine species) of kinetoplastida after cell lysis and deproteinization of DNA in agarose blocks and size fractionation of the intact DNA molecules by pulsed field gradient (PFG) gel electrophoresis. With the possible exception of Trypanosoma vivax and Crithidia fasciculata, all species have at least 20 chromosomes. There are large differences between species in molecular karyotype and in the chromosomal distribution of the genes for alpha- and beta-tubulin, rRNA and the common mini-exon sequence of kinetoplastid mRNAs. In all cases, the rRNA genes are in DNA that is larger than 500 kb. Whereas T. brucei has approximately 100 mini-chromosomes of 50-150 kb, only few are found in T. equiperdum; T. vivax has no DNA smaller than 2000 kb. As all three species exhibit antigenic variation, small chromosomes with telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes cannot be vital to the mechanism of antigenic variation. The apparent plasticity of kinetoplastid genome composition makes PFG gel electrophoresis a potentially useful tool for taxonomic studies. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6526012

  18. Libraries, Ebooks, and Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    People keep writing articles about how valuable libraries are, even with ebooks and the Internet. What people are overlooking is that the reason libraries are having such fits dealing with a changing environment is not that libraries are unrecognized as fountains of value, it's that libraries are so valuable that they attract voracious new…

  19. The Library Building Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of the library of tomorrow speculates about the impact of changes in the functions of government, technology, demographics, lifestyle, and values on the role of the library. A facility for the contemporary public library is described that can both accommodate traditional services and respond to changes in the library's role. (17…

  20. School Libraries in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Therese Bissen

    This paper outlines the history, functions, administration, and current focus of school library services in Hawaii, which is the only state in the United States with a library staffed by a trained librarian in every public school. Its first school library was established in 1882. Elementary school libraries developed concurrently with secondary…

  1. California: Library Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Barbara, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Describes six information technology projects in California libraries, including Internet access in public libraries; digital library developments at the University of California, Berkeley; the World Wide Web home page for the state library; Pacific Bell's role in statewide connectivity; state government initiatives; and services of the state…

  2. Economics of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumol, William J.; Marcus, Matityahu

    An analysis is conducted of economic issues pertinent to library planning in higher education in the face of rising costs and diminishing financial support. The individual chapters deal with: 1) growth rates in large university libraries; 2) library costs in colleges and universities; 3) cost trends and long-range plans; 4) library data; and 5) a…

  3. Alaska Library Directory, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Mary, Ed.

    This directory of Alaska's Libraries lists: members of the Alaska Library Association (AkLA) Executive Council and Committee Chairs; State Board of Education members; members of the Governor's Advisory Council on Libraries; school, academic and public libraries and their addresses, phone and fax numbers, and contact persons; personal,…

  4. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  5. The New Library Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses what the growing generation gap among library employees mean for academic research libraries and for the profession. Viewed collectively, the members of the under-35 cohort are a harbinger of a new kind of academic library professional, one whose traits bear directly on the ability of libraries to thrive amid the continuing…

  6. AMERICA 2000 Library Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The United States Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Library of Congress, the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, and the National Institute for Literacy have formed the AMERICA 2000 Library Partnership to support libraries in their work toward the six National Education Goals announced by…

  7. Conservation of Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Libraries, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Twelve articles cover books as artifacts; workstations for conservation of library materials; care of scrapbooks, albums, and photographs; map preservation; library environment; flood recovery; disaster prevention and preparedness; incorporating preservation into library organization; and bibliography of Chester Public Library (Illinois) First…

  8. The Bush Memorial Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamline University Bulletin, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Bush Memorial Library was formally dedicated on October 9, 1971. As part of Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, the Bush Memorial Library has a reading room, audio booths, and audio-visual classroom as well as an audio control room. The Bush Memorial Library is a member of the Cooperating Libraries in Consortium which is a cooperative…

  9. Sorting of chromosome 13 from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nasedkina, T.V.; Polesskaya, A.N.; Surkov, S.A.; Poletaev, A.I. ); Aksenov, N.; Zenin, V.V. )

    1993-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines were established from patients with Wilson disease (WD) which maps to human chromosome 13 and served as a source of chromosomes. The authors used a modified isolation procedure to increase the yield of metaphase chromosomes and additional purification of the chromosome suspension on Percoll gradient to achieve more stable sorting conditions. Vibariate flow analysis using dual laser cell-sorter, ATC-3000, showed a sufficient resolution of the flow karyotype and a low level of debris. They sorted chromosome 13 at a speed of up to 5,000 chr/sec, providing about 2 million chromosomes per day. The purity of the sorted fraction was about 90%. The fractions will be further used to construct cosmid libraries to facilitate studies of the WD locus.

  10. Vertical integration of cosmid and YAC resources for interval mapping on the X-chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.; Coffey, A.J.; Giannelli, F.; Bentley, D.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The vertical integration of cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resources is of particular importance in the development of high-resolution maps of selected regions of the human genome. A resource of approximately 95,000 cosmids constructed using DNA from primary fibroblasts of karyotype 49,XXXXX was validated by detailed characterization of a 200-kb cosmid contig spanning exons 8-20 of the dystrophin gene. This resource was used to construct contigs in 0.65 Mb of Xq26 by hybridization of gel-purified YAC DNA to high-density gridded arrays of the cosmid library; positive cosmids were overlapped by fingerprinting. Contigs were oriented and ordered relative to existing YACs in the region using cross-hybridization. The overlaps between a representative set of cosmids define 54 intervals of 5-20 kb and were used to construct a high-resolution cosmid interval map of the region, locating markers, dinucleotide repeats, and candidate CpG islands. This approach can be applied rapidly to large regions of the genome and without recourse to subcloning of individual YACs. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  11. High density transcriptional mapping of chromosome 21 by hybridization selection

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F.; Wade, H.; Gardiner, K.

    1994-09-01

    A transcriptional map of human chromosome 21 is important for the study of Down syndrome, development processes and genome organization. To construct a high density transcriptional map, the technique of cDNA hybrid selection is being applied to a minimal tiling path of YAC clones that span 21q. The cDNA used for selection represents a complex pool of sequences obtained from a variety of fetal and adult tissues and cell lines. Approximately 70-80 YAC clones are sufficient to span 21q; each is individually processed through the selection procedure to obtain a YAC-specific {open_quotes}selected cDNA library{close_quotes}. Survey analysis of each library includes determination of levels of ribosomal contamination, verification of enrichment of control genes, identification of a preliminary number of novel unique sequences, and verification that novel sequences map to the correct YAC and chromosomal regions. This analysis has been completed for 19 YACs that together comprise approximately 10 Mb of non-overlapping DNA, 25% of the long arm. Ribosomal cDNA contamination is low (<10%) and all known genes of appropriate tissue specificity of expression have been recovered, as well as new genes from each YAC. Libraries of expression have been recovered, as well as new genes from each YAC. Libraries from 8 of these YACs are now being subjected to exhaustive analysis to identify all novel genes contained within them and to obtain complete cDNAs and expression analysis for each. Not all regions of the chromosome, however, are equally amenable to these analyses. Selected cDNA libraries from the centromeric YACs are yielding apparently novel genes, but confirmation of map position is problematic. Also of interest is a region of several megabases within the Giemsa dark band, 21q21. Selected cDNA libraries from these YACs so far have yielded no novel genes and support the idea of a genuinely very gene-poor region.

  12. Plant Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-04-29

    Although individuals in most flowering plant species, and in many haploid plants, have both sex functions, dioecious species-in which individuals have either male or female functions only-are scattered across many taxonomic groups, and many species have genetic sex determination. Among these, some have visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and molecular genetic studies are starting to uncover sex-linked markers in others, showing that they too have fully sex-linked regions that are either too small or are located in chromosomes that are too small to be cytologically detectable from lack of pairing, lack of visible crossovers, or accumulation of heterochromatin. Detailed study is revealing that, like animal sex chromosomes, plant sex-linked regions show evidence for accumulation of repetitive sequences and genetic degeneration. Estimating when recombination stopped confirms the view that many plants have young sex-linked regions, making plants of great interest for studying the timescale of these changes. PMID:26653795

  13. Sex chromosome drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  14. Construction of a BAC library and a physical map of a major QTL for CBB resistance of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, S Y; Yu, K; Huffner, M; Park, S J; Banik, M; Pauls, K P; Crosby, W

    2010-07-01

    A major quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning common bacterial blight (CBB) resistance in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines HR45 and HR67 was derived from XAN159, a resistant line obtained from an interspecific cross between common bean lines and the tepary bean (P. acutifolius L.) line PI319443. This source of CBB resistance is widely used in bean breeding. Several other CBB resistance QTL have been identified but none of them have been physically mapped. Four molecular markers tightly linked to this QTL have been identified suitable for marker assisted selection and physical mapping of the resistance gene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed from high molecular weight DNA of HR45 and is composed of 33,024 clones. The size of individual BAC clone inserts ranges from 30 kb to 280 kb with an average size of 107 kb. The library is estimated to represent approximately sixfold genome coverage. The BAC library was screened as BAC pools using four PCR-based molecular markers. Two to seven BAC clones were identified by each marker. Two clones were found to have both markers PV-tttc001 and STS183. One preliminary contig was assembled based on DNA finger printing of those positive BAC clones. The minimum tiling path of the contig contains 6 BAC clones spanning an estimated size of 750 kb covering the QTL region. PMID:20419470

  15. Chromosomes and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Robert James McKinlay

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome abnormalities may cast light on the nature of mechanisms whereby normal anatomy evolves, and abnormal anatomy arises. Correlating genotype to phenotype is an exercise in which the geneticist and the anatomist can collaborate. The increasing power of the new genetic methodologies is enabling an increasing precision in the delineation of chromosome imbalances, even to the nucleotide level; but the classical skills of careful observation and recording remain as crucial as they always have been. Clin. Anat. 29:540-546, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990310

  16. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2) from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases. PMID:14604515

  17. America's Star Libraries, 2010: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2010-01-01

    The "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2010, "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Ray Lyons and Keith Curry Lance, and based on 2008 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,407 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries, stars or…

  18. Characterization of chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis by chromosome conformation capture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The packaging of long chromatin fibers in the nucleus poses a major challenge, as it must fulfill both physical and functional requirements. Until recently, insights into the chromosomal architecture of plants were mainly provided by cytogenetic studies. Complementary to these analyses, chromosome conformation capture technologies promise to refine and improve our view on chromosomal architecture and to provide a more generalized description of nuclear organization. Results Employing circular chromosome conformation capture, this study describes chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis nuclei from a genome-wide perspective. Surprisingly, the linear organization of chromosomes is reflected in the genome-wide interactome. In addition, we study the interplay of the interactome and epigenetic marks and report that the heterochromatic knob on the short arm of chromosome 4 maintains a pericentromere-like interaction profile and interactome despite its euchromatic surrounding. Conclusion Despite the extreme condensation that is necessary to pack the chromosomes into the nucleus, the Arabidopsis genome appears to be packed in a predictive manner, according to the following criteria: heterochromatin and euchromatin represent two distinct interactomes; interactions between chromosomes correlate with the linear position on the chromosome arm; and distal chromosome regions have a higher potential to interact with other chromosomes. PMID:24267747

  19. Chromatin Folding, Fragile Sites, and Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Low- and High- LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cox, Bradley; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated non-random distributions of breaks involved in chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation. To investigate the factors contributing to the break point distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome in separate colors. After the images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multimega base pair scale. Specific locations of the chromosome, in interphase, were also analyzed with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Both mBAND and BAC studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested association of interphase chromatin folding to the radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. We further investigated the distribution of genes, as well as the distribution of breaks found in tumor cells. Comparisons of these distributions to the radiation hotspots showed that some of the radiation hotspots coincide with the frequent breaks found in solid tumors and with the fragile sites for other environmental toxins. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including the chromatin structure and the gene distribution, can contribute to radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  20. Speeding up chromosome evolution in Phaseolus: multiple rearrangements associated with a one-step descending dysploidy.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferraz, Maria Eduarda; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The genus Phaseolus L. has been subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its global economic importance. It is considered karyotypically stable, with most of its ca. 75 species having 2n = 22 chromosomes, and only three species (Phaseolus leptostachyus, Phaseolus macvaughii, and Phaseolus micranthus), which form the Leptostachyus clade, having 2n = 20. To test whether a simple chromosomal fusion was the cause of this descending dysploidy, mitotic chromosomes of P. leptostachyus (2n = 20) were comparatively mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes. Our results corroborated the conservation of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites on ancestral chromosomes 10 and 6, respectively. The reduction from x = 11 to x = 10 was the result of the insertion of chromosome 10 into the centromeric region of chromosome 11, supporting a nested chromosome fusion (NCF) as the main cause of this dysploidy. Additionally, the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 6 was translocated to this larger chromosome. Surprisingly, the NCF was accompanied by several additional translocations and inversions previously unknown for the genus, suggesting that the dysploidy may have been associated to a burst of genome reorganization in this otherwise stable, diploid plant genus. PMID:26490170

  1. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  2. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  3. Structural and functional partitioning of bread wheat chromosome 3B.

    PubMed

    Choulet, Frédéric; Alberti, Adriana; Theil, Sébastien; Glover, Natasha; Barbe, Valérie; Daron, Josquin; Pingault, Lise; Sourdille, Pierre; Couloux, Arnaud; Paux, Etienne; Leroy, Philippe; Mangenot, Sophie; Guilhot, Nicolas; Le Gouis, Jacques; Balfourier, Francois; Alaux, Michael; Jamilloux, Véronique; Poulain, Julie; Durand, Céline; Bellec, Arnaud; Gaspin, Christine; Safar, Jan; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Rogers, Jane; Vandepoele, Klaas; Aury, Jean-Marc; Mayer, Klaus; Berges, Hélène; Quesneville, Hadi; Wincker, Patrick; Feuillet, Catherine

    2014-07-18

    We produced a reference sequence of the 1-gigabase chromosome 3B of hexaploid bread wheat. By sequencing 8452 bacterial artificial chromosomes in pools, we assembled a sequence of 774 megabases carrying 5326 protein-coding genes, 1938 pseudogenes, and 85% of transposable elements. The distribution of structural and functional features along the chromosome revealed partitioning correlated with meiotic recombination. Comparative analyses indicated high wheat-specific inter- and intrachromosomal gene duplication activities that are potential sources of variability for adaption. In addition to providing a better understanding of the organization, function, and evolution of a large and polyploid genome, the availability of a high-quality sequence anchored to genetic maps will accelerate the identification of genes underlying important agronomic traits. PMID:25035497

  4. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  5. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  6. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  7. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  8. Why chromosome palindromes?

    PubMed

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the "palindromes as protectors" view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  9. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A.; Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J.

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  11. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodraco hamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodraco hamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action. PMID:25893071

  12. Genetic mapping of the branchio-oto-renal syndrome and construction of YAC contig spanning the BOR region on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Kimberling, W.J.; Bumegi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Branchio-oto-renal syndrome (BOR) is an autosomal dominant disorder which consists of external, middle and inner ear malformations, branchial cleft sinuses, cervical fistulas, mixed hearing loss and renal anomalies. The prevalence of BOR syndrome is approximately 1:40,000, and it has been reported to occur in about 2% of profoundly deaf children. The BOR syndrome has been localized to chromosome 8q. Initial localization results indicated a distance of about 15 cM between the flanking markers D8S87 and PENK for the BOR gene. This localization has been further refined, using new markers, to a distance of about 7 cM. The multipoint analysis was carried out using markers D8S285, PENK, D8S166, D8S260, D8S510, D8S553, D8S543, D8S530, D8S279, D8S164, D8S286 and D8S275. For cloning the BOR gene, an overlapping Yeast Artificial Chromosome (YAC) contig map of the critical region is being constructed. We have isolated eight YACs from the CEPH Mega YAC library and their size and quality are being characterized by PFGE and FISH analysis. Additional STSs and polymorphic markers developed from the region will be used to further refine the region and close the contig. The availability of this contig will be a useful resource for the systematic search for identifying transcribed sequences from this region.

  13. Individual chromosome assignment and chromosomal collinearity in Gossypium thurberi, G. trilobum and D subgenome of G. barbadense revealed by BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yimei; Chen, Dan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Peng, Renhai; Wang, Kunbo

    2011-01-01

    The experiment on individual chromosome assignments and chromosomal diversity was conducted using a multi-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) system in D subgenome of tetraploid Gossypium barbadense (D(b)), G. thurberi (D(1)) and G. trilobum (D(8)), which the later two were the possible subgenome donors of tetraploid cottons. The FISH probes contained a set of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones specific to 13 individual chromosomes from D subgenome of G. hirsutum (D(h)), a D genome centromere-specific BAC clone 150D24, 45S and 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clones, respectively. All tested chromosome orientations were confirmed by the centromere-specific BAC probe. In D(1) and D(8), four 45S rDNA loci were found assigning at the end of the short arm of chromosomes 03, 07, 09 and 11, while one 5S rDNA locus was successfully marked at pericentromeric region of the short arm of chromosome 09. In D(b), three 45S rDNA loci and two 5S rDNA loci were found out. Among them, two 45S rDNA loci were located at the terminal of the short arm of chromosomes D(b)07 and D(b)09, whilst one 5S rDNA locus was found situating near centromeric region of the short arm of chromosome D(b)09. The positions of the BAC clones specific to the 13 individual chromosomes from D(h) were compared between D(1), D(8) and D(b). The result showed the existence of chromosomal collinearity within D(1) and D(8), and as well between them and D(b). The results will serve as a base for understanding chromosome structure of cotton and polyploidy evolution of cotton genome and will provide bio-information for assembling the sequences of finished and the on-going cotton whole genome sequencing projects. PMID:21952206

  14. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s) occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female) were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement. PMID:20051104

  15. Art Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on art libraries and information services for the arts, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "'I See All': Information Technology and the Universal Availability of Images" by Philip Pacey (United Kingdom); (2) "Online Databases in the Fine Arts" by Michael Rinehart…

  16. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  17. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  18. Equine artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Merkt, H

    1976-07-24

    The use and techniques of artificial insemination for horses in Germany over the last 30 years is described. Artificial insemination appears to produce pregnancy percentages equal to those from normal breeding methods and its continued availability under veterinary supervision is recommended in conditions where disease, disability or distance debar normal service. PMID:960520

  19. The Libraries of Rio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Describes aspects of several libraries in Rio de Janeiro. Topics covered include library policies, budgets, periodicals and books in the collections, classification schemes used, and literary areas of interest to patrons. (6 references) (CLB)

  20. Facility Focus: Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Ferris State University Library for Information, Technology and Education (FLITE), and the Meyer Library and Information Technology Center at Southwest Missouri State University. Includes photographs. (EV)

  1. Selecting Library Furniture & Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media & Methods, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Offers suggestions for selecting school library furniture and equipment. Describes various models of computer workstations; reading tables and chairs; and shelving. Sidebar lists names and addresses of library furniture manufactures and distributors. (AEF)

  2. Medical Library Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11th, 2016 Patricia Flatley Brennan, registered nurse, informatician, industrial engineer, and renowned researcher is appointed as Director of the National Library of Medicine Tweets Copyright © 2016 Medical Library Association. ...

  3. Israeli Special Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Israel is sprinkled with a noteworthy representation of special libraries which run the gamut from modest kibbutz efforts to highly technical scientific and humanities libraries. A few examples are discussed here. (Author/CH)

  4. Fat element-a new marker for chromosome and genome analysis in the Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Paux, Etienne; Gay, Georges; Zoshchuk, Natalia V; Roger, Delphine; Zelenin, Alexander V; Bernard, Michel; Feuillet, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    Chromosomal distribution of the Fat element that was isolated from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences of wheat chromosome 3B was studied in 45 species representing eight genera of Poaceae (Aegilops, Triticum, Agropyron, Elymus, Secale, Hordeum, Avena and Triticale) using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). The Fat sequence was not present in oats and in two barley species, Hordeum vulgare and Hordeum spontaneum, that we investigated. Only very low amounts of the Fat element were detected on the chromosomes of two other barley species, Hordeum geniculatum and Hordeum chilense, with different genome compositions. The chromosomes of other cereal species exhibited distinct hybridisation patterns with the Fat probe, and labelling intensity varied significantly depending on the species or genome. The highest amount of hybridisation was detected on chromosomes of the D genome of Aegilops and Triticum and on chromosomes of the S genome of Agropyron. Despite the bioinformatics analysis of several BAC clones that revealed the tandem organisation of the Fat element, hybridisation with the Fat probe produces uneven, diffuse signals in the proximal regions of chromosomes. In some of the genomes we investigated, however, it also forms distinct, sharp clusters in chromosome-specific positions, and the brightest fluorescence was always observed on group 4 chromosomes. Thus, the Fat element represents a new family of Triticeae-specific, highly repeated DNA elements with a clustered-dispersed distribution pattern. These elements may have first emerged in cereal genomes at the time of divergence of the genus Hordeum from the last common ancestor. During subsequent evolution, the amount and chromosomal distribution of the Fat element changed due to amplification, elimination and re-distribution of this sequence. Because the labelling patterns that we detected were highly specific, the Fat element can be used as an accessory probe in FISH analysis for chromosome

  5. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  6. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  7. Sex chromosome aneuploidy and aging.

    PubMed

    Stone, J F; Sandberg, A A

    1995-10-01

    Loss of an X chromosome in females and of the Y chromosome in males are phenomena associated with aging. X chromosome loss occurs in and may be limited to PHA stimulated peripheral lymphocytes. In males, the loss of the Y is most evident in bone marrow cells, but also occurs to a lesser extent in PHA stimulated peripheral lymphocytes. X chromosome loss is associated with premature centromere division leading to anaphase lag and elimination in micronuclei. The mechanism of Y chromosome loss has not been elucidated. No pathological consequence of either X or Y chromosome loss has been convincingly demonstrated. With the advent of FISH technology, measurement of sex chromosome aneuploidy may prove to be a convenient assay for cellular senecence and aging. PMID:7565866

  8. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  9. Origin of human chromosome 2: An ancestral telomere-telomere fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ijdo, J.W.; Baldini, A.; Ward, D.C.; Reeders, S.T.; Wells, R.A. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors identified two allelic genomic cosmids from human chromosome 2, c8.1 and c29B, each containing two inverted arrays of the vertebrate telomeric repeat in a head-to-head arrangement, 5{prime}(TTAGGG){sub n}-(CCCTAA){sub m}3{prime}. Sequences flanking this telomeric repeat are characteristic of present-day human pretelomeres. BAL-31 nuclease experiments with yeast artificial chromosome clones of human telomeres and fluorescence in situ hybridization reveal that sequences flanking these inverted repeats hybridize both to band 2q13 and to different, but overlapping, subsets of human chromosome ends. They conclude that the locus cloned in cosmids c8.1 and c29B is the relic of an ancient telomere-telomere fusion and marks the point at which two ancestral ape chromosomes fused to give rise to human chromosome 2.

  10. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions. PMID:21869477

  11. Bookmarking Your Library's Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mary Pasek

    1999-01-01

    Describes one public library's project of photographing teenagers reading around the library and making the photos into bookmarks with the library logo and a "read" message. Discusses the background, arrangements, photo session, assembly, distribution and publicity, and funding and community response. (AEF)

  12. The End of Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that if librarians and libraries are to continue to fulfill their true tasks, they need to adapt to changes resulting from new technology and overcome the professional paralysis that has made most major libraries largely unusable. Problems of size, arrangement, and catalogs are identified as contributors to unusable library. (EJS)

  13. Library Studies I Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, William J.

    Developed for use in the Library Studies I component of the Library Studies Program at Bloomsburg University (Pennsylvania), this self-paced workbook is intended to acquaint students with the Harvey A. Andruss Library and help them develop information-seeking skills. The workbook is designed to be used in conjunction with an exercise book, and…

  14. Art for Libraries' Sake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Mark-Elliot

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the benefits of an aggressive library program of regularly scheduled and professionally curated art exhibitions and related events. Describes the Visual Arts Program at the Pacific Beach branch library (San Diego). A sidebar by Debra Wilcox Johnson discusses libraries' development of cultural programming for adults. (AEF)

  15. California Library Laws, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul G., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    California Library Laws 2009 is a selective guide to state laws and related materials that most directly affect the everyday operations of public libraries and organizations that work with public libraries. It is intended as a convenient reference, not as a replacement for the annotated codes or for legal advice. The guide is organized as follows.…

  16. California Library Laws, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul G., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "California Library Laws 2008" is a selective guide to state laws and related materials that most directly affect the everyday operations of public libraries and organizations that work with public libraries. It is intended as a convenient reference, not as a replacement for the annotated codes or for legal advice. The guide is organized as…

  17. A Library That Swings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spragens, Thomas A.

    1971-01-01

    The Grace Doherty Library (Centre College, Danville, Kentucky) is a library that "swings," being so designed that a substantial part of its space is used alternately for classroom purposes during the day and for library reading-study space in the peak evening hours. (Author)

  18. School Libraries in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Harry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a 50-year history of school library development and national educational programs in Fiji and discusses the future of Fiji's elementary and secondary school libraries. Examines obstacles to school library development including government ignorance, lack of trained librarians, changes in school curriculum, lack of financing, and high costs…

  19. Marketing Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  20. The Toy Lending Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiscont, Jeanne Mull

    This paper explores the concept of toy lending libraries. The first six chapters discuss: (1) the history of toy lending libraries; (2) the values and purposes of using games and toys with children; (2) the contribution of games and toys to the goals of a children's services library division; (3) examples of toy lending service in public…

  1. The Library Morphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2008-01-01

    As campus renovation projects go, the Ohio State University's plan to turn its main library into "a library for the 21st century" is ambitious. The author describes the decade-long, $109 million transformation of the William Oxley Thompson Memorial Library. The overhaul calls for a complete replacement of all mechanical and electrical systems,…

  2. A Truly Bookless Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolowich, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The difference between the University of Texas at San Antonio's Applied Engineering and Technology Library and other science-focused libraries is not that its on-site collection is also available electronically. It is that its on-site collection is only available electronically. The idea of libraries with no bound books has been a recurring theme…

  3. Simple Library Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Herbert H.

    A simple and cheap manual double entry continuous transaction posting system with running balances is developed for bookkeeping by small libraries. A very small library may operate without any system of fiscal control but when a library's budget approaches three figures, some kind of bookkeeping must be introduced. To maintain control over his…

  4. Library Awareness Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of Iowa City residents regarding their awareness of public library services. Data are presented on use of the library for factual information, statistical/numerical information, learning, and information not available at home; awareness of in-person and telephone library reference services; and knowledge about…

  5. PAL: Positional Astronomy Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, T.; Berry, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The PAL library is a partial re-implementation of Pat Wallace's popular SLALIB library written in C using a Gnu GPL license and layered on top of the IAU's SOFA library (or the BSD-licensed ERFA) where appropriate. PAL attempts to stick to the SLA C API where possible.

  6. Environmental Library Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sarah M.; Needle, Lester P.

    1975-01-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Library System consists of 28 libraries. The libraries are supported by computer systems covering journal and book holdings, journal check-in, circulation, document control, EPA reports, international exchange items, and specialized subject area collections. (Author)

  7. Worthington Libraries, OH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    Worthington, Ohio, has deep library roots. A library has been part of its history since the planning by settlers before the city's birth in 1803. Among the treasures brought by James Kilbourne and the Scioto Company from Connecticut to the new, planned community they built was a collection of books for their new subscription library. The books…

  8. Staffing the College Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    College libraries use a variety of methods to identify and select professional library personnel. 70 libraries responded to a questionnaire about their methods and the results are presented. The effectiveness of advertisements, employment services, testing and reference checks are among the topics discussed. (DH)

  9. Merchandising Your Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivulich, Kenneth G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses library circulation figures as a reflection of the success of library services and describes merchandising techniques that have produced a 137 percent circulation increase at Queens Borough Public Library over the past seven years. Merchandising techniques such as minibranches, displays, signage, dumps, and modified shelving are…

  10. Libraries and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three articles address issues that relate to libraries and the environment. Highlights include recycling projects; buying recycled paper products and other ecology-minded purchasing ideas; energy-efficient libraries; indoor pollution problems; a list of environmental information sources; designing library buildings; and activities that libraries…

  11. The Honor System Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    An honor system library can be created inside the library media center (LMC). Where students can access free books and magazines that require no formal checkouts. The honor library system at Washington High School, Fremont, California, has become self-sustaining. As many students, parents and teachers donate quality material. No student is ever…

  12. School Libraries and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    School library programs have measured success by improved test scores. But how do next-generation school libraries demonstrate success as they strive to be centers of innovation and creativity? These libraries offer solutions for school leaders who struggle to restructure existing systems built around traditional silos of learning (subjects and…

  13. Changing State Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  14. The Michigan Electronic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidsen, Susanna L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Michigan Electronic Library (MEL), the largest evaluated and organized Web-based library of Internet resources, that was designed to provide a library of electronic information resources selected by librarians. MEL's partnership is explained, the collection is described, and future developments are considered. (LRW)

  15. Summer Library Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Carole D.

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all public libraries in the United States provide some type of summer library reading program during the traditional summer vacation period. Summer library reading programs provide opportunities for students of many ages and abilities to practice their reading skills and maintain skills that are developed during the school year. Fiore…

  16. Spanish Museum Libraries Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez de Prado, Rosario

    This paper describes the creation of an automated network of museum libraries in Spain. The only way in which the specialized libraries in the world today can continue to be active and to offer valid information is to automate the service they offer, and create network libraries with cooperative plans. The network can be configured with different…

  17. International School Library Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Laurel A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of an International School Library Day and discusses activities in Australian school libraries. Highlights include the development of Web pages; sponsorship by national, state, or provincial associations; publicity materials; joint activities with other countries; student involvement; and activities with public libraries.…

  18. Technostress and Library Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Discusses information overload and society's and libraries' responses to technology. Considers eight values that libraries should focus on and how they relate to technology in libraries: democracy, stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, privacy, rationalism, equity of access, and building harmony and balance. (LRW)

  19. Supervision in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Martha J.

    Although the literature of library administration draws extensively on that of business management, it is difficult to compare library supervision to business or industrial supervision. Library supervisors often do not have managerial training and may consider their management role as secondary. The educational level of the staff they supervise…

  20. Public Libraries Going Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Going green is now a national issue, and patrons expect their library to respond in the same way many corporations have. Libraries are going green with logos on their Web sites, programs for the public, and a host of other initiatives. This is the first book to focus strictly on the library's role in going green, helping you with: (1) Collection…

  1. Automation in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Library Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The fourth Canadian Association of College and University Libraries (CACUL) Conference on Library Automation was held in Hamilton, June 20-21, 1970, as a pre-conference workshop of the Canadian Library Association (CLA). The purpose of the conference was to present papers on current projects and to discuss the continuing need for this type of…

  2. Libraries in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyia, Christian O.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss library and information work in Africa. Highlights include computerization in Nigerian libraries; education for library and information services in Ghana; an evaluation of African librarianship; the role of Nigerian publishers in national development; and the role of information services in national development…

  3. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  4. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  5. Chromosome Evolution in African Cichlid Fish: Contributions from the Physical Mapping of Repeated DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, I.A.; Poletto, A.B.; Kocher, T.D.; Mota-Velasco, J.C.; Penman, D.J.; Martins, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation that has led to extensive ecological diversity and because of their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To further understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, we have comparatively mapped the SATA satellite DNA, the transposable element ROn-1, and repeated sequences in the bacterial artificial chromosome clone BAC-C4E09 on the chromosomes of a range of African species of Cichlidae, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SATA satellite DNA was mapped in almost all the centromeres of all tilapiine and haplochromine species studied. The maintenance and centromeric distribution of the SATA satellite DNA in African cichlids suggest that this sequence plays an important role in the organization and function of the centromere in these species. Furthermore, analysis of SATA element distribution clarifies that chromosome fusions occurred independently in Oreochromis and Tilapia genera, and led to the reduced chromosome number detected in O. karongae and T. mariae. The comparative chromosome mapping of the ROn-1 SINE-like element and BAC-C4E09 shows that the repeated sequences have been maintained among tilapiine, haplochromine and hemichromine fishes and has demonstrated the homology of the largest chromosomes among these groups. Furthermore, the mapping of ROn-1 suggested that different chromosomal rearrangements could have occurred in the origin of the largest chromosome pairs of tilapiines and non-tilapiines. PMID:20606399

  6. Mitotic chromosome length scales in response to both cell and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Anne-Marie; Dorn, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular development requires that cells reduce in size as a result of consecutive cell divisions without increase in embryo volume. To maintain cellular integrity, organelle size adapts to cell size throughout development. During mitosis, the longest chromosome arm must be shorter than half of the mitotic spindle for proper chromosome segregation. Using high-resolution time-lapse microscopy of living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we have quantified the relation between cell size and chromosome length. In control embryos, chromosome length scaled to cell size. Artificial reduction of cell size resulted in a shortening of chromosome length, following a trend predicted by measurements from control embryos. Disturbing the RAN (Ras-related nuclear protein)-GTP gradient decoupled nuclear size from cell size and resulted in chromosome scaling to nuclear size rather than cell size; smaller nuclei contained shorter chromosomes independent of cell size. In sum, quantitative analysis relating cell, nuclear, and chromosome size predicts two levels of chromosome length regulation: one through cell size and a second in response to nuclear size. PMID:26033258

  7. Imagining the Digital Library in a Commercialized Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckart, Ronald J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses digital library planning in light of Internet commerce and technological innovation in marketing and customer relations that are transforming user expectations about Web sites that offer products and services. Topics include user self-sufficiency; personalized service; artificial intelligence; collaborative filtering; and electronic…

  8. Chromosomal localization of actin genes in the malaria mosquito Anopheles darlingi

    PubMed Central

    BRIDI, L. C.; SHARAKHOVA, M. V.; SHARAKHOV, I. V.; CORDEIRO, J.; AZEVEDO, G. M.; TADEI, W. P.; RAFAEL, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical and genetic maps have been used for chromosomal localization of genes in vectors of infectious diseases. The availability of polytene chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes provides a unique opportunity to precisely map genes of interest. We report physical mapping of two actin genes on polytene chromosomes of the major malaria vector in Amazon Anopheles darlingi. The clones with the actin genes sequences were obtained from a cDNA library constructed from RNA isolated from adult females and males of An. darlingi. Each of the two clones was mapped to a unique site on the chromosomal arm 2L in subdivisions 21A (clone pl05-A04) and 23B (clone pl17-G06). The obtained results together with previous mapping data provide a suitable basis for comparative genomics and for establishing chromosomal homologies among major malaria vectors. PMID:22804344

  9. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    PubMed

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. PMID:22775355

  10. Incidental Prenatal Diagnosis of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies: Health, Behavior, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, J. J. P. M.; Kooper, A. J. A.; van Kessel, A. Geurts; Braat, D. D. M.; Smits, A. P. T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic relevance of incidental prenatal findings of sex chromosome aneuploidies. Methods. We searched with medical subject headings (MeSHs) and keywords in Medline and the Cochrane Library and systematically screened publications on postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies from 2006 to 2011 as well as publications on incidentally prenatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies from 1980 to 2011. Results. Postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrated three clinical relevant domains of abnormality: physical (22–100%), behavior (0–56%), and reproductive health (47–100%), while incidentally prenatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrated, respectively, 0–33%, 0–40%, and 0–36%. Conclusion. In the literature incidental prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosomal aneuploidies is associated with normal to mildly affected phenotypes. This contrasts sharply with those of postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies and highlights the importance of this ascertainment bias towards the prognostic value of diagnosis of fetal sex chromosomal aneuploidies. This observation should be taken into account, especially when considering excluding the sex chromosomes in invasive prenatal testing using Rapid Aneuploidy Detection. PMID:22191050

  11. A FISH-based chromosome map for the European corn borer yields insights into ancient chromosomal fusions in the silkworm.

    PubMed

    Yasukochi, Y; Ohno, M; Shibata, F; Jouraku, A; Nakano, R; Ishikawa, Y; Sahara, K

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of the genomes of Lepidoptera, butterflies and moths, is the high conservation of chromosome organization. Recent remarkable progress in genome sequencing of Lepidoptera has revealed that syntenic gene order is extensively conserved across phylogenetically distant species. The ancestral karyotype of Lepidoptera is thought to be n=31; however, that of the most well-studied moth, Bombyx mori, is n=28, and diverse studies suggest that three chromosomal fusion events occurred in this lineage. To identify the boundaries between predicted ancient fusions involving B. mori chromosomes 11, 23 and 24, we constructed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based chromosome maps of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (n=31). We first determined a 511 Mb genomic sequence of the Asian corn borer, O. furnacalis, a congener of O. nubilalis, and isolated bacterial artificial chromosomes and fosmid clones that were expected to localize in candidate regions for the boundaries using these sequences. Combined with FISH and genetic analysis, we narrowed down the candidate regions to 40 kb-1.5 Mb, in strong agreement with a previous estimate based on the genome of a butterfly, Melitaea cinxia. The significant difference in the lengths of the candidate regions where no functional genes were observed may reflect the evolutionary time after fusion events. PMID:26264548

  12. Metagenomic chromosome conformation capture (meta3C) unveils the diversity of chromosome organization in microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Marbouty, Martial; Cournac, Axel; Flot, Jean-François; Marie-Nelly, Hervé; Mozziconacci, Julien; Koszul, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analyses of microbial populations in their natural environment remain limited by the difficulty to assemble full genomes of individual species. Consequently, the chromosome organization of microorganisms has been investigated in a few model species, but the extent to which the features described can be generalized to other taxa remains unknown. Using controlled mixes of bacterial and yeast species, we developed meta3C, a metagenomic chromosome conformation capture approach that allows characterizing individual genomes and their average organization within a mix of organisms. Not only can meta3C be applied to species already sequenced, but a single meta3C library can be used for assembling, scaffolding and characterizing the tridimensional organization of unknown genomes. By applying meta3C to a semi-complex environmental sample, we confirmed its promising potential. Overall, this first meta3C study highlights the remarkable diversity of microorganisms chromosome organization, while providing an elegant and integrated approach to metagenomic analysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03318.001 PMID:25517076

  13. Rhode Island Library Trustees Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacono, Frank P., Ed.

    This handbook for library trustees identifies the duties and responsibilities of library boards and librarians, the qualifications of an effective library and of a library board, and library policy requirements. The concept of intellectual freedom, the Library Bill of Rights, and the Freedom to Read Statement are discussed, and the role of the…

  14. Planning & Urban Affairs Library Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobbe, Mary L., Ed.; Lessel, Janice W., Ed.

    Written especially for persons without a library degree who are operating a small urban study or planning agency library on a part-time basis. Subjects covered are: (1) library function and staff function, duties and training; (2) physical layout and equipment of library; (3) establishing and maintaining the library; (4) library administration;…

  15. Artificial ecosystem selection.

    PubMed

    Swenson, W; Wilson, D S; Elias, R

    2000-08-01

    Artificial selection has been practiced for centuries to shape the properties of individual organisms, providing Darwin with a powerful argument for his theory of natural selection. We show that the properties of whole ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially are composed of thousands of species and millions of individuals. Artificial ecosystem selection can be used for practical purposes, illustrates an important role for complex interactions in evolution, and challenges a widespread belief that selection is most effective at lower levels of the biological hierarchy. PMID:10890915

  16. Identification of an antibacterial protein by functional screening of a human oral metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Arivaradarajan, Preeti; Warburton, Philip J; Paramasamy, Gunasekaran; Nair, Sean P; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Screening of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library containing metagenomic DNA from human plaque and saliva allowed the isolation of four clones producing antimicrobial activity. Three of these were pigmented and encoded homologues of glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), an enzyme involved in the C5 pathway leading to tetrapyrole synthesis, and one clone had antibacterial activity with no pigmentation. The latter contained a BAC with an insert of 15.6 kb. Initial attempts to localize the gene(s) responsible for antimicrobial activity by subcloning into pUC-based vectors failed. A new plasmid for toxic gene expression (pTGEX) was designed enabling localization of the antibacterial activity to a 4.7-kb HindIII fragment. Transposon mutagenesis localized the gene to an open reading frame of 483 bp designated antibacterial protein1 (abp1). Abp1 was 94% identical to a hypothetical protein of Neisseria subflava (accession number WP_004519448.1). An Escherichia coli clone expressing Abp1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis BS78H, Staphylococcus epidermidis NCTC 11964 and B4268, and S. aureus NCTC 12493,ATCC 35696 and NCTC 11561. However, no antibacterial activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, N. subflava ATCC A1078, E. coli K12 JM109 and BL21(DE3) Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 and NCTC 11326, Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 or Lactobacillus casei NCTC 6375. PMID:26347298

  17. Flight Software Math Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David

    2013-01-01

    The flight software (FSW) math library is a collection of reusable math components that provides typical math utilities required by spacecraft flight software. These utilities are intended to increase flight software quality reusability and maintainability by providing a set of consistent, well-documented, and tested math utilities. This library only has dependencies on ANSI C, so it is easily ported. Prior to this library, each mission typically created its own math utilities using ideas/code from previous missions. Part of the reason for this is that math libraries can be written with different strategies in areas like error handling, parameters orders, naming conventions, etc. Changing the utilities for each mission introduces risks and costs. The obvious risks and costs are that the utilities must be coded and revalidated. The hidden risks and costs arise in miscommunication between engineers. These utilities must be understood by both the flight software engineers and other subsystem engineers (primarily guidance navigation and control). The FSW math library is part of a larger goal to produce a library of reusable Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) FSW components. A GN&C FSW library cannot be created unless a standardized math basis is created. This library solves the standardization problem by defining a common feature set and establishing policies for the library s design. This allows the libraries to be maintained with the same strategy used in its initial development, which supports a library of reusable GN&C FSW components. The FSW math library is written for an embedded software environment in C. This places restrictions on the language features that can be used by the library. Another advantage of the FSW math library is that it can be used in the FSW as well as other environments like the GN&C analyst s simulators. This helps communication between the teams because they can use the same utilities with the same feature set and syntax.

  18. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z; Roberts, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  19. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  20. The Isolation of Polygenic Factors Controlling Bristle Score in Drosophila Melanogaster. I. Allocation of Third Chromosome Sternopleural Bristle Effects to Chromosome Sections

    PubMed Central

    Shrimpton, A. E.; Robertson, A.

    1988-01-01

    A single third chromosome C, with a high sternopleural bristle score, had been extracted from an artificial selection line. C was divided into five chromosomal sections by recombination with a multiply marked third chromosome ruseca, which had a low sternopleural bristle score. A nonuniform distribution of sternopleural bristle effect with physical length of chromosome was observed. The second section (26-44 cM) of C carried the most sternopleural bristle effect (10 bristles when homozygous), the first (0-26 cM) and third (44-62 cM) also carried significant sternopleural bristle effects (six and five bristles, respectively). The fourth section (62-71 cM) carried a small but significant effect (less than one bristle) while the fifth section (71-101 cM) carried little effect when alone (less than one bristle), though it did carry effects which had an epistatic interaction with those of the first and second sections. PMID:17246416

  1. A YAC contig map of plasmodium falciparum chromosome 4: Characterization of a DNA amplification between two recently separated isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, J.P.; Triglia, T.; Cowman, A.F.

    1995-03-20

    We have generated a physical map of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 4 using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The map is defined by a YAC contig spanning approximately 1.05 Mb, which has been restriction mapped to a resolution of 30 kb and is punctuated by 22 sequence-tagged sites. The physical information obtained has enabled us to compare and contrast the structure of chromosome 4 in detail between FCR3 and B8, two recently separated isolates of P. falciparum, leading to characterization of a novel chromosome polymorphism occurring in a subtelomeric region. Comparison of chromosomes 4 from 10 different isolates has shown that chromosome size polymorphisms are restricted to both subtelomeric regions. These analyses provide a high-resolution physical map that will be important to complement genetic analysis of this human pathogen. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1987-09-01

    The author discusses the development of artificial intelligence (AI). He explains the basic elements of AI: Heuristic search, knowledge representation, AI languages and tools, Natural Language Processing, computer vision, expert systems and problem solving and planning.

  3. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  4. Artificial Sweeteners and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... artificial sweeteners and cancer? Saccharin Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the ... cause cancer in laboratory animals .” Subsequent studies in rats showed an increased incidence of urinary bladder cancer ...

  5. Chimera-free, high copy number YAC libraries and efficient methods of analysis. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The first experiment involved a low chimera YAC library in recombination deficient host strains. To determine if the genetic background of the yeast host strain contributes to the formation of chimeric YACs the same YAC ligation mixture was introduced into three isogenic yeast hosts differing only in their recombination abilities. To prepare YACs, human genomic DNA was partially digested with EcoR1 and then ligated to YAC vector pCGS966 arms. DNA was size fractionated before and after ligation by preparative pulsed field gel electrophoresis (CHEF), selecting for fragments greater than 400 kb, and introduced into competent spheroplasts. CHEF gel Southern blots of resulting colony-purified YACs were probed with human DNA to determine if multiple YACs or YAC fragments were present in the same cell. The frequency of chimeric YACs was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of YACs to human prometaphase spreads. YACs that hybridized to more than one location were assumed to be chimeric. In the second experiment new YAC vectors featuring tags for capture of YACs and YAC inserts were constructed. Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) have been of tremendous value in the physical mapping of the human genome. Because they can carry very large inserts, YACs are likely not only to contain entire genes but also their control elements. However, the only mode of purification of YAC DNA from current commonly used YAC libraries such as the CEPH library is by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. This is an inefficient, time consuming process and due to the single copy nature of these YACs, often result in poor yields. The vector pCGS1000 was designed to test new efficient ways of YAC DNA purification.

  6. Assessing Library Automation and Virtual Library Development in Four Academic Libraries in Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gbadamosi, Belau Olatunde

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines the level of library automation and virtual library development in four academic libraries. A validated questionnaire was used to capture the responses from academic librarians of the libraries under study. The paper discovers that none of the four academic libraries is fully automated. The libraries make use of librarians with…

  7. 40 CFR 799.9538 - TSCA mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cells are analyzed for chromosome aberrations. (2) Description—(i) Preparations—(A) Selection of animal... 70% other than during room cleaning, the aim should be 50-60%. Lighting should be artificial, the..., and treatment regimen to be used in the main study (an approach to dose selection is presented in...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9538 - TSCA mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cells are analyzed for chromosome aberrations. (2) Description—(i) Preparations—(A) Selection of animal... 70% other than during room cleaning, the aim should be 50-60%. Lighting should be artificial, the..., and treatment regimen to be used in the main study (an approach to dose selection is presented in...

  9. 40 CFR 799.9538 - TSCA mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cells are analyzed for chromosome aberrations. (2) Description—(i) Preparations—(A) Selection of animal... 70% other than during room cleaning, the aim should be 50-60%. Lighting should be artificial, the..., and treatment regimen to be used in the main study (an approach to dose selection is presented in...

  10. Library and Information Science's Ontological Position in the Networked Society: Using New Technology to Get Back to an Old Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kåhre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper concerns the ontological position of library and informations science in the networked society. The aim of the study is to understand library use and library functions in the age of Internet and artificial intelligent programmed search engines. Theoretical approach: The approach discusses so called sociocognitive tools in…

  11. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  12. Artificial light sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T F

    1986-04-01

    A wide variety of artificial light sources exists for use in the diagnosis and treatment of photosensitivity disorders. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of these light sources (including gas discharge arcs, fluorescent lamps, and other apparatus) illustrates the importance of matching the emission spectrum of the light source, the spectral response of the radiometer, and the photobiologic action spectrum. Environmental and occupational exposure to artificial light sources may contribute to photosensitivity disorders. PMID:3955892

  13. IAC Library: Some Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M.

    2010-10-01

    Since its beginnings in 1985, the IAC Library has evolved from a traditional library where the physical place and collections were essential, to a hybrid library where users can often get what they need without going to the library. In this paper, we present how the various changes due to information technology advances that occurred in the 1990s, followed by a series of works carried out from 2004 to 2008 at IAC, as well as several internal and external events or decisions, have led the IAC Library to face three new challenges. First, as the library building has been enlarged and new spaces are now available for users and for shelving, we have to decide what we should we do with the new spaces. How we can make them attractive for users at a time when users often don't need to visit the library to access the information they need? Second, as IAC will implement a new integrated information system, we have an opportunity to define how the library system will participate within the IAC global information system, bringing to this great project our knowledge of information management, essential to improve the actual processes. Third, as the Ministry has created a working group on access to electronic resources, with participation by seven affiliated research institutions, we have, as a member of this group, to define how to deal with the Ministry and the other centres to set a library policy that will benefit the IAC Library.

  14. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  15. The chromosome periphery during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Verdun, D; Gautier, T

    1994-03-01

    A complex structure, visible by electron microscopy, surrounds each chromosome during mitosis. The organization of this structure is distinct from that of the chromosomes and the cytoplasm. It forms a perichromosomal layer that can be isolated together with the chromosomes. This layer covers the chromosomes except in centromeric regions. The perichromosomal layer includes nuclear and nucleolar proteins as well as ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). The list of proteins and RNAs identified includes nuclear matrix proteins (perichromin, peripherin), nucleolar proteins (perichro-monucleolin, Ki-67 antigen, B23 protein, fibrillarin, p103, p52), ribosomal proteins (S1) and snRNAs (U3 RNAs). Only limited information is available about how and when the perichromosomal layer is formed. During early prophase, the proteins extend from the nucleoli towards the periphery of the nucleus. Thin cordon-like structures reach the nuclear envelope delimiting areas in which chromosomes condense. At telophase, the proteins are associated with the part of the chromosomes remaining condensed and accumulate in newly formed nucleoli in regions where chromatin is already decondensed. The perichromosomal layer contains several different classes of proteins and RNPs and it has been attributed various roles: (1) in chromosome organization, (2) as a barrier around the chromosomes, (3) involvement in compartmentation of the cells in prophase and telophase and (4) a binding site for chromosomal passenger proteins necessary to the early process of nuclear assembly. PMID:8166671

  16. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  17. The XXXXY Chromosome Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Witold A.; Houston, C. Stuart; Pozsonyi, J.; Ying, K. L.

    1966-01-01

    The majority of abnormal sex chromosome complexes in the male have been considered to be variants of Klinefelter's syndrome but an exception should probably be made in the case of the XXXXY individual who has distinctive phenotypic features. Clinical, radiological and cytological data on three new cases of XXXXY syndrome are presented and 30 cases from the literature are reviewed. In many cases the published clinical and radiological data were supplemented and re-evaluated. Mental retardation, usually severe, was present in all cases. Typical facies was observed in many; clinodactyly of the fifth finger was seen in nearly all. Radiological examination revealed abnormalities in the elbows and wrists in all the 19 personally evaluated cases, and other skeletal anomalies were very frequent. Cryptorchism is very common and absence of Leydig's cells may differentiate the XXXXY chromosome anomaly from polysomic variants of Klinefelter's syndrome. The relationship of this syndrome to Klinefelter's syndrome and to Down's syndrome is discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15 PMID:4222822

  18. X-chromosome workshop.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  19. libdrdc: software standards library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, David; Peng, Tie

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents the libdrdc software standards library including internal nomenclature, definitions, units of measure, coordinate reference frames, and representations for use in autonomous systems research. This library is a configurable, portable C-function wrapped C++ / Object Oriented C library developed to be independent of software middleware, system architecture, processor, or operating system. It is designed to use the automatically-tuned linear algebra suite (ATLAS) and Basic Linear Algebra Suite (BLAS) and port to firmware and software. The library goal is to unify data collection and representation for various microcontrollers and Central Processing Unit (CPU) cores and to provide a common Application Binary Interface (ABI) for research projects at all scales. The library supports multi-platform development and currently works on Windows, Unix, GNU/Linux, and Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This library is made available under LGPL version 2.1 license.

  20. A triallelic genetic male sterility locus in Brassica napus: an integrative strategy for its physical mapping and possible local chromosome evolution around it

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Liu, Jun; Xin, Qiang; Wan, Lili; Hong, Dengfeng; Yang, Guangsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Spontaneous male sterility is an advantageous trait for both constructing efficient pollination control systems and for understanding the developmental process of the male reproductive unit in many crops. A triallelic genetic male-sterile locus (BnMs5) has been identified in Brassica napus; however, its complicated genome structure has greatly hampered the isolation of this locus. The aim of this study was to physically map BnMs5 through an integrated map-based cloning strategy and analyse the local chromosomal evolution around BnMs5. Methods A large F2 population was used to integrate the existing genetic maps around BnMs5. A map-based cloning strategy in combination with comparative mapping among B. napus, Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea was employed to facilitate the identification of a target bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone covering the BnMs5 locus. The genomic sequences from the Brassica species were analysed to reveal the regional chromosomal evolution around BnMs5. Key Results BnMs5 was finally delimited to a 0·3-cM genetic fragment from an integrated local genetic map, and was anchored on the B. napus A8 chromosome. Screening of a B. napus BAC clone library and identification of the positive clones validated that JBnB034L06 was the target BAC clone. The closest flanking markers restrict BnMs5 to a 21-kb region on JBnB034L06 containing six predicted functional genes. Good collinearity relationship around BnMs5 between several Brassica species was observed, while violent chromosomal evolutionary events including insertions/deletions, duplications and single nucleotide mutations were also found to have extensively occurred during their divergence. Conclusions This work represents major progress towards the molecular cloning of BnMs5, as well as presenting a powerful, integrative method to mapping loci in plants with complex genomic architecture, such as the amphidiploid B. napus. PMID:23243189