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Sample records for artificial hair cells

  1. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  2. A Bio-Inspired Electromechanical System: Artificial Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    Inspired by recent biophysical study on the auditory sensory organs, we study electromechanical system which functions similar to the hair cell of the ear. One of the important mechanisms of hair cells, adaptation, is mimicked by an electromechanical feedback loop. The proposed artificial hair cell functions similar to a living sensory organ in the sense that it senses input force signal in spite of the relatively strong noise. Numerical simulation of the proposed system shows otoacoustic sound emission, which was observed in the experiments on the hair cells of the bullfrog. This spontaneous motion is noise-induced periodic motion which is controlled by the time scale of adaptation process and the mechanical damping.

  3. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  4. Formation, encapsulation, and validation of membrane-based artificial hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Kevin L.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2012-04-01

    Hair cell structures are one of the most common forms of sensing elements found in nature. In nearly all vertebrates hair cells are used for auditory and vestibular sensing. In humans, approximately 16,000 auditory hair cells can be found in the cochlea of the ear. Each hair cell contains a stereocilia, which is the primary structure for sound transduction. This study looks to develop and characterize an artificial hair cell that resembles the stereocilia of the human ear. Recently our research group has shown that a single artificial hair cell can be formed in an open substrate using a single aqueous droplet and a hydrogel. In this study, air was blown across the hair and analyzed using spectral analysis. The results of this study provided the foundation for our current work toward an artificial hair cell that uses two aqueous droplets. In the current study a test fixture was created in order to consistently measure various properties of the encapsulated hair cell. The response of the hair cell was measured with an impulse input at various locations on the test fixture. A frequency response function was then created using the impulse input and the output of the sensor. It was found that the vibration of the hair was only detectable if the test fixture was struck at the correct location. By changing the physical parameters of the hair sensor, such as hair length, we were able to alter the response of the sensor. It was also found that the sensitivity of the sensor was reliant on the size of the lipid bilayer.

  5. Bio-inspired piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor fabricated by powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Sae; Oh, Keun Ha; Moon, Won Kyu; Kim, Kyungseop; Joh, Cheeyoung; Seo, Hee Seon; Bollina, Ravi; Park, Seong Jin

    2015-12-01

    A piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor was fabricated by the powder injection molding process in order to make an acoustic vector hydrophone. The entire process of powder injection molding was developed and optimized for PMN-PZT ceramic powder. The artificial hair cell sensor, which consists of high aspect ratio hair cell and three rectangular mechanoreceptors, was precisely fabricated through the developed powder injection molding process. The density and the dielectric property of the fabricated sensor shows 98% of the theoretical density and 85% of reference dielectric property of PMN-PZT ceramic powder. With regard to homogeneity, three rectangular mechanoreceptors have the same dimensions, with 3 μm of tolerance with 8% of deviation of dielectric property. Packaged vector hydrophones measure the underwater acoustic signals from 500 to 800 Hz with -212 dB of sensitivity. Directivity of vector hydrophone was acquired at 600 Hz as analyzing phase differences of electric signals.

  6. Artificial fish skin of self-powered micro-electromechanical systems hair cells for sensing hydrodynamic flow phenomena.

    PubMed

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    Using biological sensors, aquatic animals like fishes are capable of performing impressive behaviours such as super-manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic flow 'vision' and object localization with a success unmatched by human-engineered technologies. Inspired by the multiple functionalities of the ubiquitous lateral-line sensors of fishes, we developed flexible and surface-mountable arrays of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) artificial hair cell flow sensors. This paper reports the development of the MEMS artificial versions of superficial and canal neuromasts and experimental characterization of their unique flow-sensing roles. Our MEMS flow sensors feature a stereolithographically fabricated polymer hair cell mounted on Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 micro-diaphragm with floating bottom electrode. Canal-inspired versions are developed by mounting a polymer canal with pores that guide external flows to the hair cells embedded in the canal. Experimental results conducted employing our MEMS artificial superficial neuromasts (SNs) demonstrated a high sensitivity and very low threshold detection limit of 22 mV/(mm s(-1)) and 8.2 µm s(-1), respectively, for an oscillating dipole stimulus vibrating at 35 Hz. Flexible arrays of such superficial sensors were demonstrated to localize an underwater dipole stimulus. Comparative experimental studies revealed a high-pass filtering nature of the canal encapsulated sensors with a cut-off frequency of 10 Hz and a flat frequency response of artificial SNs. Flexible arrays of self-powered, miniaturized, light-weight, low-cost and robust artificial lateral-line systems could enhance the capabilities of underwater vehicles. PMID:26423435

  7. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Yadav, S.; Cicek, D.; Schneider, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm‑1) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30–50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  8. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Yilmazoglu, O; Yadav, S; Cicek, D; Schneider, J J

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm(-1)) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  9. Artificial sensory hairs based on the flow sensitive receptor hairs of crickets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, M.; van Baar, J. J.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; de Boer, J. H.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling, design, fabrication and characterization of flow sensors based on the wind-receptor hairs of crickets. Cricket sensory hairs are highly sensitive to drag-forces exerted on the hair shaft. Artificial sensory hairs have been realized in SU-8 on suspended SixNy membranes. The movement of the membranes is detected capacitively. Capacitance versus voltage, frequency dependence and directional sensitivity measurements have been successfully carried out on fabricated sensor arrays, showing the viability of the concept.

  10. Survival of auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michelle L; Pereira, Fred A

    2015-07-01

    The inability of mammals to regenerate auditory hair cells creates a pressing need to understand the means of enhancing hair cell survival following insult or injury. Hair cells are easily damaged by noise exposure, by ototoxic medications and as a consequence of aging processes, all of which lead to progressive and permanent hearing impairment as hair cells are lost. Significant efforts have been invested in designing strategies to prevent this damage from occurring since permanent hearing loss has a profound impact on communication and quality of life for patients. In this mini-review, we discuss recent progress in the use of antioxidants, anti-inflammatories and apoptosis inhibitors to enhance hair cell survival. We conclude by clarifying the distinction between protection and rescue strategies and by highlighting important areas of future research. PMID:25743696

  11. Motile responses in outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zenner, H P

    1986-01-01

    Motile responses of cochlear hair cells open new perspectives for the understanding of cochlear hearing mechanisms and hearing disorders located in hair cells. Direct visualization of hair cell motility was achieved by a method for the study of living isolated mammalian outer hair cells (OHCs) which has overcome some of the complexities in dealing with the heterogeneous organ of Corti. Electrophysiological giga-seal whole-cell recordings of single OHC prepared by this approach had revealed negative cell potentials ranging from -32 mV to -70 mV (Gitter et al. (1986) Oto-Rhino-Laryngol. in press). Elucidation of HC motility has come from two lines of experiments. One follows from the observation that exposure of the lateral and basal membrane parts of living OHCs to increasing bath K+ concentrations resulted in a sustained reversible depolarization of the cell. Here, we report that by depolarization of the cell membrane in the presence of 25-125 mM K+/Cl- a sustained contraction of OHC was induced. This was followed by relaxation in the presence of artificial perilymph containing 5.4 mM K+/Cl-. By alternating these procedures OHCs were made to undergo as many as five cycles of contraction and relaxation. External Ca2+ was not required for the initial contraction but was essential for relaxation. Following repeated contraction/relaxation cycles the cytoplasm of individual OHCs exhibited a filamentous network, correlating with a new infracuticular anti-actin binding capacity. The second series of experiments originates in the observation that permeabilized OHCs contracted in the presence of ATP. No response was seen in the presence of control nucleotides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3733547

  12. Hair cell replacement in adult mouse utricles after targeted ablation of hair cells with diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Golub, Justin S; Tong, Ling; Ngyuen, Tot B; Hume, Cliff R; Palmiter, Richard D; Rubel, Edwin W; Stone, Jennifer S

    2012-10-24

    We developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes a hair cell-specific transcription factor. In adult wild-type mice, administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) caused no significant hair cell loss. In adult Pou4f3(+/DTR) mice, DT treatment reduced hair cell numbers to 6% of normal by 14 days post-DT. Remaining hair cells were located primarily in the lateral extrastriola. Over time, hair cell numbers increased in these regions, reaching 17% of untreated Pou4f3(+/DTR) mice by 60 days post-DT. Replacement hair cells were morphologically distinct, with multiple cytoplasmic processes, and displayed evidence for active mechanotransduction channels and synapses characteristic of type II hair cells. Three lines of evidence suggest replacement hair cells were derived via direct (nonmitotic) transdifferentiation of supporting cells: new hair cells did not incorporate BrdU, supporting cells upregulated the pro-hair cell gene Atoh1, and supporting cell numbers decreased over time. This study introduces a new method for efficient conditional hair cell ablation in adult mouse utricles and demonstrates that hair cells are spontaneously regenerated in vivo in regions where there may be ongoing hair cell turnover. PMID:23100430

  13. Physiological Maturation of Regenerating Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The bullfrog saccule, a sensor of gravity and substrate-borne vibration, is a model system for hair cell transduction. Saccular hair cells also increase in number throughout adult life and rapidly recover after hair cell damage, making this organ an ideal system for studying hair cell development, repair, and regeneration. We have used of hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers to identify damaged hair cells and hair cell precursors in organotypic cultures of the bullfrog saccule. We then used an innovative combination of confocal, electron, and time-lapse microscopy to study the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of new hair cells after gentamicin ototoxicity in normal and mitotically blocked saccular cultures. These studies have shown that gentamicin ototoxicity produces both lethal and sublethal hair cell damage. They have also shown that hair cell recovery in this organ takes place by both the repair of sublethally damaged hair cells and by the replacement of lost hair cells by mitotic regeneration. In parallel studies, we have used biophysical and molecular biological techniques to study the differentiation and innervation of developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. More specifically, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the bullfrog homologues of L-type voltage- gated calcium (L-VGCC) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel genes. We have then obtained probes for these genes and, using in situ hybridization, begun to examine their expression in the bullfrog saccule and amphibian papilla. We have also used fluorescent-labeled channel toxins and channel toxin derivatives to determine the time of appearance of L-type voltage-gated calcium (L-VGCC) and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to study dynamic changes in the number, distribution, and co-localization of these proteins in developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we are also studying the dynamic relationship

  14. Glass Probe Stimulation of Hair Cell Stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells are designed to sense mechanical stimuli of sound using their apical stereocilia hair bundles. Mechanical deflection of this hair bundle is converted into an electrical signal through gating of mechano-electric transduction channels. Stiff probe stimulation of hair bundles is an invaluable tool for studying the transduction channel and its associated processes because of the speed and ability to precisely control hair bundle position. Proper construction of these devices is critical to their ultimate performance as is appropriate placement of the probe onto the hair bundle. Here we describe the construction and use of a glass probe coupled to a piezo-electric actuator for stimulating hair bundles, including the basic technique for positioning of the stimulating probe onto the hair bundle. These piezo-electric stimulators can be adapted to other mechanically sensitive systems. PMID:27259944

  15. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  16. Magnetic actuation of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  17. Improved Biolistic Transfection of Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C) and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2) to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells. PMID:23049715

  18. Improved biolistic transfection of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Avenarius, Matthew R; Gillespie, Peter G

    2012-01-01

    Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C) and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2) to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells. PMID:23049715

  19. Comparative Transduction Mechanisms of Vestibular Otolith Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs regenerate following aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells in these organs are differentially sensitive to gentamicin, with saccular hair cells and hair cells in the utricular striola being damaged at lower gentamicin concentrations than hair cells in the utricular extrastriola. Regenerating hair cells in these organs have short hair bundles and can be classified into a number of phenotypes using the same morphological criteria used to identify their mature counterparts. Our studies suggest that some supporting cells can convert, or transdifferentiate,into hair cells without an intervening cell division. By stimulating these processes in humans, clinicians may be able to alleviate human deafness and peripheral vestibular disorders by regenerating and replacing lost hair cells. In vivo and in vitro studies were done on cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration.

  20. Hair Cell Heterogeneity in the Goldfish Saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saidel, William M.; Lanford, Pamela J.; Yan, Hong Y.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    A set of cytological studies performed in the utricle and saccule of Astronotus ocellatus (Teleostei, Percomorphi, Cichlidae) identified two basic types of hair cells and others with some intermediate characteristics. This paper reports on applying the same techniques to the saccule of Carassius auratus (Teleostei, Otophysi, Cyprinidae) and demonstrates similar types of hair cells to those found in Astronotus. Since Carassius and Astronous are species of extreme taxonomic distance within the Euteteostei, two classes of mechanoreceptive hair cells are likely to represent the primitive condition for sensory receptors in the euteleost inner ear and perhaps in all bony fish ears.

  1. Cochlear amplification, outer hair cells and prestin

    PubMed Central

    Dallos, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical amplification of acoustic signals is apparently a common feature of vertebrate auditory organs. In non-mammalian vertebrates amplification is produced by stereociliary processes, related to the mechanotransducer channel complex and probably to the phenomenon of fast adaptation. The extended frequency range of the mammalian cochlea has likely co-evolved with a novel hair cell type, the outer hair cell and its constituent membrane protein, prestin. Cylindrical outer hair cells are motile and their somatic length changes are voltage driven and powered by prestin. One of the central outstanding problems in mammalian cochlear neurobiology is the relation between the two amplification processes. PMID:18809494

  2. Organization of microtubules in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Furness, D N; Hackney, C M; Steyger, P S

    1990-07-01

    The organization of microtubules in hair cells of the guinea-pig cochlea has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and correlated with the location of tubulin-associated immunofluorescence in surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Results from both techniques reveal consistent distributions of microtubules in inner and outer hair cells. In the inner hair cells, microtubules are most concentrated in the apex. Reconstruction from serial sections shows three main groups: firstly, in channels through the cuticular plate and in a discontinuous belt around its upper perimeter; secondly, forming a ring inside a rim extending down from the lower perimeter of the plate; and thirdly, in a meshwork underlying the main body of the plate. In the cell body, microtubules line the inner face of the subsurface cistern and extend longitudinally through a tubulo-vesicular track between the apex and base. In outer hair cells, the pattern of microtubules associated with the cuticular plate is similar, although there are fewer present than in inner hair cells. In outer hair cells from the apex of the cochlea, microtubules occur around an infracuticular protrusion of cuticular plate material. In the cell body, many more microtubules occur in the region below the nucleus compared with inner hair cells. The possible functions of microtubules in hair cells are discussed by comparison with those found in other systems. These include morphogenesis and maintenance of cell shape; intracellular transport, e.g., of neurotransmitter vesicles; providing a possible substrate for motility; mechanical support of structures associated with sensory transduction. PMID:2197374

  3. Gust alleviation of highly flexible UAVs with artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2015-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors (AHS) have been recently developed in Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) using carbon nanotube (CNT). The deformation of CNT in air flow causes voltage and current changes in the circuit, which can be used to quantify the dynamic pressure and aerodynamic load along the wing surface. AFRL has done a lot of essential work in design, manufacturing, and measurement of AHSs. The work in this paper is to bridge the current AFRL's work on AHSs and their feasible applications in flight dynamics and control (e.g., the gust alleviation) of highly flexible aircraft. A highly flexible vehicle is modeled using a strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation, coupled with finite-state inflow aerodynamics. A feedback control algorithm for the rejection of gust perturbations will be developed. A simplified Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller will be implemented based on the state-space representation of the linearized system. All AHS measurements will be used as the control input, i.e., wing sectional aerodynamic loads will be defined as the control output for designing the feedback gain. Once the controller is designed, closed-loop aeroelastic simulations will be performed to evaluate the performance of different controllers with the force feedback and be compared to traditional controller designs with the state feedback. From the study, the feasibility of AHSs in flight control will be assessed. The whole study will facilitate in building a fly-by-feel simulation environment for autonomous vehicles.

  4. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility and Otoacoustic Emissions*

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Outer hair cell electromotility is a rapid, force generating, length change in response to electrical stimulation. DC electrical pulses either elongate or shorten the cell and sinusoidal electrical stimulation results in mechanical oscillations at acoustic frequencies. The mechanism underlying outer hair cell electromotility is thought to be the origin of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. The ability of the cell to change its length requires that it be mechanically flexible. At the same time the structural integrity of the organ of Corti requires that the cell possess considerable compressive rigidity along its major axis. Evolution appears to have arrived at novel solutions to the mechanical requirements imposed on the outer hair cell. Segregation of cytoskeletal elements in specific intracellular domains facilitates the rapid movements. Compressive strength is provided by a unique hydraulic skeleton in which a positive hydrostatic pressure in the cytoplasm stabilizes a flexible elastic cortex with circumferential tensile strength. Cell turgor is required in order that the pressure gradients associated with the electromotile response can be communicated to the ends of the cell. A loss in turgor leads to loss of outer hair cell electromotility. Concentrations of salicylate equivalent to those that abolish spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in patients weaken the outer hair cell’s hydraulic skeleton. There is a significant diminution in the electromotile response associated with the loss in cell turgor. Aspirin’s effect on outer hair cell electromotility attests to the role of the outer hair cell in generating otoacoustic emissions and demonstrates how their physiology can influence the propagation of otoacoustic emissions. PMID:2187727

  5. Artificial hair sensor designs for flow measurement of UAVs with different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors have been developed in the Air Force Research Laboratory for use in prediction of local flow around airfoils and subsequent use in gust rejection applications. The on-going sensor development is based on a micro-sized unmanned vehicle, resulting in a sensor design that is sensitive in that aircraft's nominal flight condition (speed). However, the active, or operating, region of the artificial hair sensor concept is highly dependent on the geometry and properties of the hair, capillary, and carbon nanotubes that make up the sensor design. This paper aims at expanding the flow measurement concept using artificial hair sensors to UAVs with different dimensions by properly sizing the parameters of the sensors, according to the nominal flight conditions of the UAVs. In this work, the hair, made of glass fiber, will be modeled as a cantilever beam with an elastic foundation, subject to external distributed aerodynamic drag. Hair length, diameter, capillary depth, and carbon nanotube length will be scaled by keeping the maximum strain of the carbon nanotubes constant for different sensors under different working conditions. Numerical studies will demonstrate the feasibility of the scaling methodology by designing artificial hair sensors for UAVs with different dimensions and flight conditions, starting from a baseline sensor design.

  6. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  7. Functional development of mechanosensitive hair cells in stem cell-derived organoids parallels native vestibular hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Koehler, Karl R.; Mikosz, Andrew M.; Hashino, Eri; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear sensory epithelia contain mechanosensitive hair cells that transmit information to the brain through innervation with bipolar neurons. Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate and are limited in number. Here we investigate the potential to generate mechanosensitive hair cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. The system faithfully recapitulates mouse inner ear induction followed by self-guided development into organoids that morphologically resemble inner ear vestibular organs. We find that organoid hair cells acquire mechanosensitivity equivalent to functionally mature hair cells in postnatal mice. The organoid hair cells also progress through a similar dynamic developmental pattern of ion channel expression, reminiscent of two subtypes of native vestibular hair cells. We conclude that our 3D culture system can generate large numbers of fully functional sensory cells which could be used to investigate mechanisms of inner ear development and disease as well as regenerative mechanisms for inner ear repair. PMID:27215798

  8. Functional development of mechanosensitive hair cells in stem cell-derived organoids parallels native vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Koehler, Karl R; Mikosz, Andrew M; Hashino, Eri; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear sensory epithelia contain mechanosensitive hair cells that transmit information to the brain through innervation with bipolar neurons. Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate and are limited in number. Here we investigate the potential to generate mechanosensitive hair cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. The system faithfully recapitulates mouse inner ear induction followed by self-guided development into organoids that morphologically resemble inner ear vestibular organs. We find that organoid hair cells acquire mechanosensitivity equivalent to functionally mature hair cells in postnatal mice. The organoid hair cells also progress through a similar dynamic developmental pattern of ion channel expression, reminiscent of two subtypes of native vestibular hair cells. We conclude that our 3D culture system can generate large numbers of fully functional sensory cells which could be used to investigate mechanisms of inner ear development and disease as well as regenerative mechanisms for inner ear repair. PMID:27215798

  9. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  10. Voltage-Mediated Control of Spontaneous Bundle Oscillations in Saccular Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W F; Quiñones, Patricia M; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-10-28

    Hair cells of the vertebrate vestibular and auditory systems convert mechanical inputs into electrical signals that are relayed to the brain. This transduction involves mechanically gated ion channels that open following the deflection of mechanoreceptive hair bundles that reside on top of these cells. The mechano-electrical transduction includes one or more active feedback mechanisms to keep the mechanically gated ion channels in their most sensitive operating range. Coupling between the gating of the mechanosensitive ion channels and this adaptation mechanism leads to the occurrence of spontaneous limit-cycle oscillations, which indeed have been observed in vitro in hair cells from the frog sacculus and the turtle basilar papilla. We obtained simultaneous optical and electrophysiological recordings from bullfrog saccular hair cells with such spontaneously oscillating hair bundles. The spontaneous bundle oscillations allowed us to characterize several properties of mechano-electrical transduction without artificial loading the hair bundle with a mechanical stimulus probe. We show that the membrane potential of the hair cell can modulate or fully suppress innate oscillations, thus controlling the dynamic state of the bundle. We further demonstrate that this control is exerted by affecting the internal calcium concentration, which sets the resting open probability of the mechanosensitive channels. The auditory and vestibular systems could use the membrane potential of hair cells, possibly controlled via efferent innervation, to tune the dynamic states of the cells. PMID:26511238

  11. Regenerated hair cells exhibit a transient resistance to aminoglycoside toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashino, E; Salvi, R J

    1996-05-13

    Recent studies have demonstrated that sensory hair cells in the avian inner ear are reproduced by cell proliferation in response to the death of the original hair cell population. The regenerated hair cells appear to construct functional synaptic contacts, thereby transmitting acoustic signals to the peripheral nervous system. One of the most extraordinary, but overlooked characteristics of these regenerated hair cells, is their ability to survive in a highly ototoxic environment. Here, we report that hair cells regenerated after kanamycin induced hair cell loss can survive for a substantially longer time period than their predecessors during prolonged exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. The prolonged survival, however, belongs solely to the immature status of regenerated hair cells. Once the regenerated hair cells reach morphological maturation, they become vulnerable to aminoglycoside toxicity. Immunohistochemical evaluation of kanamycin suggested that kanamycin may be taken up into hair cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis at their apical surfaces. By contrast, kanamycin was rarely incorporated into the cytoplasm of the regenerated hair cells. These results suggest that the process of a receptor-mediated transmembrane transport at the apical surface of hair cells is developmentally regulated, and that the lack of some of the assembly involved in the transmembrane transport could be responsible for the inhibition of aminoglycoside uptake, leading immature hair cells to be aminoglycoside resistant. PMID:8782910

  12. Hair cell regeneration: Look to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Edwin W.

    2005-04-01

    Less than 2 decades ago it was discovered that birds can regenerate hair cells in the auditory and vestibular parts of the inner ear after the native hair cells are destroyed by exposure to excessive noise or by mechanical trauma of aminoglycoside antibiotics. This discovery issued in a new era of hearing research-it suggested that some day it may be possible to actually restore hearing in people with congenital or acquired hearing loss due to the degeneration of sensory cells or supporting cells in the inner ear. Fifteen years is a very short time in the history of science. Consider the fact that we have actively sought chemical treatments to prevent or cure cancers for well over a half century and the ``war on Cancer,'' resulted in enormous public and private support. Progress has been great, and some forms of cancer can be treated with great success, but the overall 5-year survival rates have only risen from about 50% to 63%. Progress will continue and many more forms of cancer will be cured and prevented during the next half century. Similarly, during the first 15 years of hair cell regeneration research enormous progress has been made, and we now know that postnatal mammalian ears have the capacity to produce new hair cells. We are indeed a long way from restoring hearing through hair cell regeneration, but the future is pretty clear. I will review the progress of this field with an eye toward the future and what it means for treatments of today. In particular, I will address the potential cost versus benefits of bilateral implantation when applied to babies and young children.

  13. The Micromachinery of Mechanotransduction in Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Melissa A.; Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Corey, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli generated by head movements and changes in sound pressure are detected by hair cells with amazing speed and sensitivity. The mechanosensitive organelle, the hair bundle, is a highly elaborated structure of actin-based stereocilia arranged in precise rows of increasing height. Extracellular linkages contribute to its cohesion and convey forces to mechanically gated channels. Channel opening is nearly instantaneous and is followed by a process of sensory adaptation that keeps the channels poised in their most sensitive range. This process is served by motors, scaffolds, and homeostatic mechanisms. The molecular constituents of this process are rapidly being elucidated, especially by the discovery of deafness genes and antibody targets. PMID:17428178

  14. Evaluating Shaver Sharpness by Measuring the Pulling Force on Artificial Hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Mohd, Norhaswira; Umehara, Noritsugu

    Demands for shaver blade durability are constantly increasing. Current blades are processed with a variety of coatings, and evaluating the resultant sharpness has become important. When whiskers are cut with a shaver, the blades are known to draw out the whiskers while shaving them off. JIS-C9614 (Japanese Industrial Standards Committee) states that a blade is sharp if, when cutting 15 artificial hairs, it can shave 11 or more of them to less than 0.4 mm. However, this method of evaluating the length of drawn and cut hairs requires observation of one hair at a time, and is thus very inconvenient. As a simpler method of evaluating sharpness, we propose a method of measuring the force to pull a whisker into the shaver as it is cut. It was assumed that artificial hairs are pulled when the shaver blade cuts them. We carried out a test to measure the amount of the pulling force when an artificial hair is cut, and confirmed that there was indeed a pulling force when the whisker and the pulling force, and showed that the relationship was proportional. The above result demonstrated that measuring pulling force to determine shaving effectiveness is more convenient than the conventional method of observation.

  15. Transcription factors in the development of inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuna; Qian, Wei; Jiang, Guochang; Ma, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells are the sensory receptors that detect and convert sound vibrations and head movements into neural signals. However, in humans, these cells are unable to regenerate if they are damaged or lost. Over thepast decade,there has been an exponential increase in interest and progress in understanding of the development of the inner ear and of hair cells, aiming to gain insights into hair cell repair or even regeneration. In hair cell development, various transcription factors have been found to be involved in the processes of hair cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Among these transcription factors, Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1 have been highlighted for their crucial role in the fate of hair cells. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the role of transcription factors in hair cell development, focusing on the role and possible mechanisms of Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1. PMID:27100495

  16. Polybrene: Observations on cochlear hair cell necrosis and minimal lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Miaomiao; Yu, Dongzhen; Song, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Dong, Pin; He, Jingchun

    2015-07-23

    Polybrene is widely used to enhance viral transduction; however, little is known about the utility thereof, in enhancing lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of polybrene, and the further effects thereof, on lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells, especially sensory hair cells. Cochlear basilar membranes of newborn rats were cultured and treated with 0.1-10 μg/mL polybrene for 24h to explore the potential development of ototoxicity. PI staining and TUNEL detection were used to evaluate necrosis or apoptosis of hair cell. Various doses of lentivirus-GFP were added to cochlear organotypic cultures with safe concentrations of polybrene, incubated for 24h, and cultured (in the absence of the virus and polybrene) for a further 48 h. Transduction efficiencies were evaluated. The results showed that polybrene at 0.1 μg/mL was safe to cochlear cells, and 0.5-10 μg/mL concentration induced hair cell necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, supporting cells were not damaged. Lentiviral vectors transduced into cochlear cells and 0.1 μg/mL polybrene enhanced transduction efficiency. However, hair cells were hardly transduced with lentiviral vectors either alone or in the presence of 0.1 μg/mL polybrene. The use of polybrene to aid lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells requires further attention. PMID:26071903

  17. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  18. Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla, and modulate hair type.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Waleed; Abbasi, Sepideh; Hagner, Andrew; Raharjo, Eko; Kumar, Ranjan; Hotta, Akitsu; Magness, Scott; Metzger, Daniel; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) provide instructive signals required to activate epithelial progenitors and initiate hair follicle regeneration. DP cell numbers fluctuate over the hair cycle, and hair loss is associated with gradual depletion/atrophy of DP cells. How DP cell numbers are maintained in healthy follicles remains unclear. We performed in vivo fate mapping of adult hair follicle dermal sheath (DS) cells to determine their lineage relationship with DP and found that a subset of DS cells are retained following each hair cycle, exhibit self-renewal, and repopulate the DS and the DP with new cells. Ablating these hair follicle dermal stem cells and their progeny retarded hair regrowth and altered hair type specification, suggesting that they function to modulate normal DP function. This work identifies a bipotent stem cell within the adult hair follicle mesenchyme and has important implications toward restoration of hair growth after injury, disease, and aging. PMID:25465495

  19. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function. PMID:27189205

  20. LSD1 is Required for Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Cai, Chengfu; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) plays an important role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. It has recently been demonstrated that during development, downregulation of LSD1 inhibits cell proliferation, modulates the expression of cell cycle regulators, and reduces hair cell formation in the zebrafish lateral line, which suggests that LSD1-mediated epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the development of hair cells. However, the role of LSD1 in hair cell regeneration after hair cell loss remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the effect of LSD1 on hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced hair cell loss. We show that the LSD1 inhibitor trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (2-PCPA) significantly decreases the regeneration of hair cells in zebrafish after neomycin damage. In addition, immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that 2-PCPA administration suppresses supporting cell proliferation and alters cell cycle progression. Finally, in situ hybridization shows that 2-PCPA significantly downregulates the expression of genes related to Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf activation. Altogether, our data suggest that downregulation of LSD1 significantly decreases hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced hair cell loss through inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf signaling pathways. Thus, LSD1 plays a critical role in hair cell regeneration and might represent a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:26008620

  1. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog uticulus. 2: Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was motivated by an interest in seeing whether hair cell types in the bullfrog utriculus might differ in their voltage responses to hair bundle displacement. Particular interest was in assessing the contributions of two factors to the responses of utricular hair cells. First, interest in examining the effect of hair bundle morphology on the sensitivity of hair cells to natural stimulation was motivated by the observation that vestibular hair cells, unlike many auditory hair cells, are not free-standing but rather linked to an accessory cupular or otolithic membrane via the tip of their kinocilium. Interest also laid in examining the contribution, if any, of adaptation to the response properties of utricular hair cells. Hair cells in auditory and vibratory inner ear endorgans adapt to maintained displacements of their hair bundles, sharply limiting their low frequency sensitivity. This adaptation is mediated by a shift in the displacement-response curve (DRC) of the hair cell along the displacement axis. Observations suggest that the adaptation process occurs within the hair bundle and precedes mechanoelectric transduction. Recent observations of time-dependent changes in hair bundle stiffness are consistent with this conclusion. Adaptation would be expected to be most useful in inner ear endorgans in which hair cells are subject to large static displacements that could potentially saturate their instantaneous response and compromise their sensitivity to high frequency stimulation. The adaptation process also permits hair cells to maintain their sensory hair bundle in the most sensitive portion of their DRC. In vestibular otolith organs in which static sensitivity is desirable, any adaptation process in the hair cells may be undesirable. The rate and extent of the decline of the voltage responses was measured of utricular hair cells to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements. Then for similar resting potentials and response amplitudes, the

  2. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  3. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  4. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Suli, Arminda; Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E; Hailey, Dale W; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-06-01

    Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse. PMID:27103160

  5. Activating Hair Follicle Stem Cells via R-spondin2 to Stimulate Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew A; Li, Jingtao; Liu, Bo; Hunter, Daniel; Pyles, Malcolm; Gillette, Martin; Dhamdhere, Girija R; Abo, Arie; Oro, Anthony; Helms, Jill A

    2016-08-01

    Wnt signaling is required for the development of the hair follicle, and for inciting the growth (anagen) phase of the hair cycle. Most strategies to enhance Wnt signaling for hair growth create a state of constitutive Wnt activation, which leads to neoplastic transformation of the epithelial hair matrix. Using Axin2(LacZ/+) and Axin2(Cre/+)R26R(mTmG/+) reporter mice and RNA analyses, we show that Wnt signaling is elevated during anagen, is reduced at the onset of catagen, and can be reamplified in the skin and surrounding hair follicles via intradermal injection of recombinant R-spondin2 protein. Using Lgr5(LacZ/+) reporter mice, we demonstrate that this amplified Wnt environment leads to activation of leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive stem cells in the hair follicle. The onset of catagen is repressed by R-spondin2 injection, and the anagen phase persists. As a consequence, hair shafts grow longer. We conclude that R-spondin2 treatment activates hair follicle stem cells and therefore may have therapeutic potential to promote hair growth. PMID:27109869

  6. Functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q X; He, X J; Wong, H C; Kindt, K S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair-cell development, function, and regeneration are fundamental processes that are challenging to study in mammalian systems. Zebrafish are an excellent alternative model to study hair cells because they have an external auxiliary organ called the lateral line. The hair cells of the lateral line are easily accessible, which makes them suitable for live, function-based fluorescence imaging. In this chapter, we describe methods to perform functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells. We compare genetically encoded calcium indicators that have been used previously to measure calcium in lateral-line hair cells. We also outline equipment required for calcium imaging and compare different imaging systems. Lastly, we discuss how to set up optimal imaging parameters and how to process and visualize calcium signals. Overall, using these methods, in vivo calcium imaging is a powerful tool to examine sensory hair-cell function in an intact organism. PMID:27263415

  7. Retinoic Acid Stimulates Regeneration of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Philippe P.; Malgrange, Brigitte; Staecker, Hinrich; Moonen, Gustave; van de Water, Thomas R.

    1993-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss resulting from the loss of auditory hair cells is thought to be irreversible in mammals. This study provides evidence that retinoic acid can stimulate the regeneration in vitro of mammalian auditory hair cells in ototoxic-poisoned organ of Corti explants in the rat. In contrast, treatment with retinoic acid does not stimulate the formation of extra hair cells in control cultures of Corti's organ. Retinoic acid-stimulated hair cell regeneration can be blocked by cytosine arabinoside, which suggests that a period of mitosis is required for the regeneration of auditory hair cells in this system. These results provide hope for a recovery of hearing function in mammals after auditory hair cell damage.

  8. Stochastic resonance in the mechanoelectrical transduction of hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Bennett, Matthew; Wiesenfeld, Kurt

    2005-11-01

    In transducing mechanical stimuli into electrical signals, at least some hair cells in vertebrate auditory and vestibular systems respond optimally to weak periodic signals at natural, nonzero noise intensities. We understand this stochastic resonance by constructing a faithful mechanical model reflecting the hair cell geometry and described by a nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This Langevin description elucidates the mechanism of hair cell stochastic resonance while supporting the hypothesis that noise plays a functional role in hearing.

  9. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  10. Systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked via endolymph into cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics rapidly enter and kill cochlear hair cells via apical mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) channels in vitro. In vivo, it remains unknown whether systemically-administered aminoglycosides cross the blood-labyrinth barrier into endolymph and enter hair cells. Here we show, for the first time, that systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked across the blood-endolymph barrier and preferentially enter hair cells across their apical membranes. This trafficking route is predominant compared to uptake via hair cell basolateral membranes during perilymph infusion. PMID:22355674

  11. A bio-inspired aquatic flow sensor using an artificial cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Preston A.; Garrison, Kevin; Leo, Donald J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2012-04-01

    Receptors known as hair cells give many animals this ability to sense a wide range of stimuli, such as sound, orientation, vibration, and flow. Previous researchers have mimicked natural hair cells by building electromechanical sensor systems that produce an electric response due to the bending of artificial hairs. Inspired by the roles of sensory hairs in fish, this work builds on previous research by investigating the flow dependent electrical response of a 'skin'-encapsulated artificial hair cell in an aqueous flow. This study presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a flow sensor that will help close the loop between the sensing mechanisms and control strategies that aquatic organisms employ for functions such as locomotion regulation, prey capture, and particulate capture. The system is fabricated with a durable, artificial bilayer that forms at the interface between lipid-encased aqueous volumes contained in a flexible encapsulated polyurethane substrate. Flow experiments are conducted by placing the bio-inspired sensor in a flow chamber and subjecting it to pulse-like flows. Specifically, through temporal responses of the measured current and power spectral density (PSD) analysis, our results show that the amplitude and frequency of the current response are related to the flow over the hair. This preliminary study demonstrates that the encapsulated artificial hair cell flow sensor is capable of sensing changes in flow through a mechanoelectrical response and that its sensing capabilities may be altered by varying its surface morphology.

  12. Detection of flow separation and stagnation points using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. M.; Ray, C. W.; Hagen, B. J.; Su, W.; Baur, J. W.; Reich, G. W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent interest in fly-by-feel approaches for aircraft control has motivated the development of novel sensors for use in aerial systems. Artificial hair sensors (AHSs) are one type of device that promise to fill a unique niche in the sensory suite for aerial systems. In this work, we investigate the capability of an AHS based on structural glass fibers to directly identify flow stagnation and separation points on a cylindrical domain in a steady flow. The glass fibers are functionalized with a radially aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forest and elicit a piezoresistive response as the CNT forest impinges on electrodes in a micropore when the hair is deflected due to viscous drag forces. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow field allowing for the resulting moment and force acting on the hair to be correlated with the electrical response. It is demonstrated that the AHS provides estimates for the locations of both the stagnation and separation in steady flow. From this, a simulation of a heading estimation is presented to demonstrate a potential application for hair sensors. These results motivate the construction of large arrays of hair sensors for imaging and resolving flow structures in real time.

  13. Voltage-Mediated Control of Spontaneous Bundle Oscillations in Saccular Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Quiñones, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the vertebrate vestibular and auditory systems convert mechanical inputs into electrical signals that are relayed to the brain. This transduction involves mechanically gated ion channels that open following the deflection of mechanoreceptive hair bundles that reside on top of these cells. The mechano-electrical transduction includes one or more active feedback mechanisms to keep the mechanically gated ion channels in their most sensitive operating range. Coupling between the gating of the mechanosensitive ion channels and this adaptation mechanism leads to the occurrence of spontaneous limit-cycle oscillations, which indeed have been observed in vitro in hair cells from the frog sacculus and the turtle basilar papilla. We obtained simultaneous optical and electrophysiological recordings from bullfrog saccular hair cells with such spontaneously oscillating hair bundles. The spontaneous bundle oscillations allowed us to characterize several properties of mechano-electrical transduction without artificial loading the hair bundle with a mechanical stimulus probe. We show that the membrane potential of the hair cell can modulate or fully suppress innate oscillations, thus controlling the dynamic state of the bundle. We further demonstrate that this control is exerted by affecting the internal calcium concentration, which sets the resting open probability of the mechanosensitive channels. The auditory and vestibular systems could use the membrane potential of hair cells, possibly controlled via efferent innervation, to tune the dynamic states of the cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The sensation of sound and balance starts by converting minute mechanical motions into electrical signals. This is accomplished by sensory hair cells, in which the opening and closing of mechanosensitive channels follows the motion of their hair bundles. These hair bundles can exhibit motility without an external drive. Underlying these spontaneous bundle oscillations are two

  14. Eps8 Regulates Hair Bundle Length and Functional Maturation of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldhaus, Jörg; Xiong, Hao; Hackney, Carole M.; Holley, Matthew C.; Offenhauser, Nina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Knipper, Marlies; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells. PMID:21526224

  15. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment. PMID:27057177

  16. Functional Hair Cell Mechanotransducer Channels Are Required for Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Markus; Monfared, Ashkan; Steyger, Peter S.; Cheng, Alan G.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET) channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR) uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride) significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss. PMID:21818312

  17. Functional hair cell mechanotransducer channels are required for aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alharazneh, Abdelrahman; Luk, Lauren; Huth, Markus; Monfared, Ashkan; Steyger, Peter S; Cheng, Alan G; Ricci, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET) channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR) uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride) significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss. PMID:21818312

  18. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  19. Using injectoporation to deliver genes to mechanosensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Wagner, Thomas; Yan, Linxuan; Grillet, Nicolas; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensation, the transduction of mechanical force into electrochemical signals, allows organisms to detect touch and sound, to register movement and gravity, and to sense changes in cell volume and shape. the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear are the mechanosensors for the detection of sound and head movement. the analysis of gene function in hair cells has been hampered by the lack of an efficient gene transfer method. Here we describe a method termed injectoporation that combines tissue microinjection with electroporation to express cDNAs and shRNAs in mouse cochlear hair cells. Injectoporation allows for gene transfer into dozens of hair cells, and it is compatible with the analysis of hair cell function using imaging approaches and electrophysiology. Tissue dissection and injectoporation can be carried out within a few hours, and the tissue can be cultured for days for subsequent functional analyses. PMID:25232939

  20. TMC function in hair cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jeffrey R; Pan, Bifeng; Koussa, Mounir A; Asai, Yukako

    2014-05-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins 1 and 2 are necessary for hair cell mechanotransduction but their precise function is controversial. A growing body of evidence supports a direct role for TMC1 and TMC2 as components of the transduction complex. However, a number of important questions remain and alternate hypotheses have been proposed. Here we present an historical overview of the identification and cloning of Tmc genes, a discussion of mutations in TMC1 that cause deafness in mice and humans and a brief review of other members of the Tmc gene superfamily. We also examine expression of Tmc mRNAs and localization of the protein products. The review focuses on potential functions of TMC proteins and the evidence from Beethoven mice that suggests a direct role for TMC1 in hair cell mechanotransduction. Data that support alternate interpretations are also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions for TMC research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:24423408

  1. Artificial Cells: Prospects for Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they also have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nano-scale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  2. Artificial cells: prospects for biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David

    2002-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nanoscale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Mechanotransduction by Hair Cells: Models, Molecules, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Müller, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the transformation of mechanical force into an electrical signal, allows living organisms to hear, register movement and gravity, detect touch, and sense changes in cell volume and shape. Hair cells in the inner ear are specialized mechanoreceptor cells that detect sound and head movement. The mechanotransduction machinery of hair cells is extraordinarily sensitive and responds to minute physical displacements on a submillisecond timescale. The recent discovery of several molecular constituents of the mechanotransduction machinery of hair cells provides a new framework for the interpretation of biophysical data and necessitates revision of prevailing models of mechanotransduction. PMID:19804752

  4. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  5. Artificial gametes from stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn. PMID:26161331

  6. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes. PMID:26611069

  7. Inner Ear Hair Cell-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  8. Inner ear hair cell-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  9. Aqueous extract of red deer antler promotes hair growth by regulating the hair cycle and cell proliferation in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-jie; Li, Zheng; Gu, Li-juan; Wang, Yun-bo; Lee, Mi-ra; Sung, Chang-keun

    2014-01-01

    Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendage capable of regeneration. We aimed to investigate the effect of red deer antler extract in regulating hair growth, using a mouse model. The backs of male mice were shaved at eight weeks of age. Crude aqueous extracts of deer antler were prepared at either 4 °C or 100 °C and injected subcutaneously to two separate groups of mice (n = 9) at 1 mL/day for 10 consecutive days, with water as a vehicle control group. The mice skin quantitative hair growth parameters were measured and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine was used to identify label-retaining cells. We found that, in both the 4 °C and the 100 °C deer antler aqueous extract-injection groups, the anagen phase was extended, while the number of BrdU-incorporated cells was dramatically increased. These results indicate that deer antler aqueous extract promotes hair growth by extending the anagen phase and regulating cell proliferation in the hair follicle region. PMID:24695964

  10. Hair regeneration using adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-Eon; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been used in tissue repair and regeneration. Recently, it was reported that ASC transplantation promotes hair growth in animal experiments, and a conditioned medium of ASCs (ASC-CM) induced the proliferation of hair-compositing cells in vitro. However, ASCs and their conditioned medium have shown limited effectiveness in clinical settings. ASC preconditioning is one strategy that can be used to enhance the efficacy of ASCs and ASC-CM. Therefore, we highlighted the functional role of ASCs in hair cycle progression and also the advantages and disadvantages of their application in hair regeneration. In addition, we introduced novel ASC preconditioning methods to enhance hair regeneration using ASC stimulators, such as vitamin C, platelet-derived growth factor, hypoxia, and ultraviolet B. PMID:26536569

  11. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  12. Aberrant cochlear hair cell attachments caused by Nectin-3 deficiency result in hair bundle abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Terunobu; Kominami, Kanoko; Wang, Shujie; Togashi, Hideru; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti consists of sensory hair cells (HCs) interdigitated with nonsensory supporting cells (SCs) to form a checkerboard-like cellular pattern. HCs are equipped with hair bundles on their apical surfaces. We previously reported that cell-adhesive nectins regulate the checkerboard-like cellular patterning of HCs and SCs in the mouse auditory epithelium. Nectin-1 and -3 are differentially expressed in normal HCs and SCs, respectively, and in Nectin-3-deficient mice a number of HCs are aberrantly attached to each other. We show here that these aberrantly attached HCs in Nectin-3-deficient mice, but not unattached ones, show disturbances of the orientation and morphology of the hair bundles and the positioning of the kinocilium, with additional abnormal localisation of cadherin-catenin complexes and the apical-basal polarity proteins Pals1 and Par-3. These results indicate that, owing to the loss of Nectin-3, hair cells contact each other inappropriately and form abnormal junctions, ultimately resulting in abnormal hair bundle orientation and morphology. PMID:24381198

  13. Ovine Hair Follicle Stem Cells Derived from Single Vibrissae Reconstitute Haired Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huishan; Zhang, Shoubing; Zhao, Huashan; Qiao, Jingqiao; Liu, Shuang; Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Yong; Duan, Enkui

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) possess fascinating self-renewal capacity and multipotency, which play important roles in mammalian hair growth and skin wound repair. Although HFSCs from other mammalian species have been obtained, the characteristics of ovine HFSCs, as well as the methods to isolate them have not been well addressed. Here, we report an efficient strategy to obtain multipotent ovine HFSCs. Through microdissection and organ culture, we obtained keratinocytes that grew from the bulge area of vibrissa hair follicles, and even abundant keratinocytes were harvested from a single hair follicle. These bulge-derived keratinocytes are highly positive for Krt15, Krt14, Tp63, Krt19 and Itga6; in addition to their strong proliferation abilities in vitro, these keratinocytes formed new epidermis, hair follicles and sebaceous glands in skin reconstitution experiments, showing that these are HFSCs from the bulge outer root sheath. Taken together, we developed an efficient in vitro system to enrich ovine HFSCs, providing enough HFSCs for the investigations about the ovine hair cycle, aiming to promote wool production in the future. PMID:26247934

  14. Electrical tuning in hair cells isolated from the chick cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P A; Nagai, T; Evans, M G

    1988-07-01

    Tall (inner) hair cells were isolated from specific locations in the chick cochlea. The electrical membrane properties of these cells were recorded using the tight-seal whole-cell technique. Depolarizing current steps elicited damped voltage oscillations that ranged in frequency from 100 to 250 Hz among cells from the middle third of the cochlea (basal cells). The current-voltage relation obtained under voltage clamp was dominated by calcium-activated potassium current in the voltage range over which these oscillations occurred. Tall hair cells isolated from the apical tip of the cochlea (apical cells) exhibited action potentials and lower frequency voltage oscillations (5-14 Hz) during depolarizing current steps. Outward currents in these cells were 20-fold slower than those found in the basal cells. These results suggest that electrical tuning of hair cells may play a role in determining the frequency selectivity of the chick cochlea. PMID:3249237

  15. Stem cell dynamics in the hair follicle niche

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicles are skin appendages of the mammalian skin that have the ability to periodically and stereotypically regenerate in order to continuously produce new hair over our lifetime. The ability of the hair follicle to regenerate is due to the presence of stem cells that along with other cell populations and non-cellular components, including molecular signals and extracellular material, make up a niche microenvironment. Mounting evidence suggests that the niche is critical for regulating stem cell behavior and thus the process of regeneration. Here we review the literature concerning past and current studies that have utilized mouse genetic models, combined with other approaches to dissect the molecular and cellular composition of the hair follicle niche. We also discuss our current understanding of how stem cells operate within the niche during the process of tissue regeneration and the factors that regulate their behavior. PMID:24361866

  16. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  17. JNK Inhibition Inhibits Lateral Line Neuromast Hair Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chengfu; Lin, Jinchao; Sun, Shaoyang; He, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    JNK signaling is known to play a role in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, and recent studies have suggested important roles for JNK signaling in embryonic development. However, the precise function of JNK signaling in hair cell development remains poorly studied. In this study, we used the small molecule JNK inhibitor SP600125 to examine the effect of JNK signaling abrogation on the development of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line neuromast. Our results showed that SP600125 reduced the numbers of both hair cells and supporting cells in neuromasts during larval development in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, JNK inhibition strongly inhibited the proliferation of neuromast cells, which likely explains the decrease in the number of differentiated hair cells in inhibitor-treated larvae. Furthermore, western blot and in situ analysis showed that JNK inhibition induced cell cycle arrest through induction of p21 expression. We also showed that SP600125 induced cell death in developing neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and this was accompanied with an induction of p53 gene expression. Together these results indicate that JNK might be an important regulator in the development of hair cells in the lateral line in zebrafish by controlling both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:26903805

  18. Designer aminoglycosides prevent cochlear hair cell loss and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Markus E.; Han, Kyu-Hee; Sotoudeh, Kayvon; Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Effertz, Thomas; Vu, Andrew A.; Verhoeven, Sarah; Hsieh, Michael H.; Greenhouse, Robert; Cheng, Alan G.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent a rapidly growing challenge to human health. Aminoglycosides are widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, but they inflict permanent hearing loss in up to ~50% of patients by causing selective sensory hair cell loss. Here, we hypothesized that reducing aminoglycoside entry into hair cells via mechanotransducer channels would reduce ototoxicity, and therefore we synthesized 9 aminoglycosides with modifications based on biophysical properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel and interactions between aminoglycosides and the bacterial ribosome. Compared with the parent aminoglycoside sisomicin, all 9 derivatives displayed no or reduced ototoxicity, with the lead compound N1MS 17 times less ototoxic and with reduced penetration of hair cell mechanotransducer channels in rat cochlear cultures. Both N1MS and sisomicin suppressed growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with N1MS exhibiting superior activity against extended spectrum β lactamase producers, despite diminished activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Moreover, systemic sisomicin treatment of mice resulted in 75% to 85% hair cell loss and profound hearing loss, whereas N1MS treatment preserved both hair cells and hearing. Finally, in mice with E. coli–infected bladders, systemic N1MS treatment eliminated bacteria from urinary tract tissues and serially collected urine samples, without compromising auditory and kidney functions. Together, our findings establish N1MS as a nonototoxic aminoglycoside and support targeted modification as a promising approach to generating nonototoxic antibiotics. PMID:25555219

  19. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2016-01-19

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. PMID:26789771

  20. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  1. Protocols for Cryopreservation of Intact Hair Follicle That Maintain Pluripotency of Nestin-Expressing Hair-Follicle-Associated Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Satoshi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Li, Lingna; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells, the origin of which is above the bulge area, below the sebaceous gland. We have termed these cells hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. Cryopreservation methods of the hair follicle that maintain the pluripotency of HAP stem cells are described in this chapter. Intact hair follicles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were cryopreserved by slow-rate cooling in TC-Protector medium and storage in liquid nitrogen. After thawing, the upper part of the hair follicle was isolated and cultured in DMEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS). After 4 weeks culture, cells from the upper part of the hair follicles grew out. The growing cells were transferred to DMEM/F12 without FBS. After 1 week culture, the growing cells formed hair spheres, each containing approximately 1 × 10(2) HAP stem cells. The hair spheres contained cells which could differentiate to neurons, glial cells, and other cell types. The formation of hair spheres by the thawed and cultured upper part of the hair follicle produced almost as many pluripotent hair spheres as fresh follicles. The hair spheres derived from cryopreserved hair follicles were as pluripotent as hair spheres from fresh hair follicles. These results suggest that the cryopreservation of the whole hair follicle is an effective way to store HAP stem cells for personalized regenerative medicine, enabling any individual to maintain a bank of pluripotent stem cells for future clinical use. PMID:27431257

  2. Functional conservation of a root hair cell-specific cis-element in angiosperms with different root hair distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Sang Ho; Choi, Sang-Bong; Won, Su-Kyung; Heo, Yoon-Kyung; Cho, Misuk; Park, Youn-Il; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2006-11-01

    Vascular plants develop distinctive root hair distribution patterns in the root epidermis, depending on the taxon. The three patterns, random (Type 1), asymmetrical cell division (Type 2), and positionally cued (Type 3), are controlled by different upstream fate-determining factors that mediate expression of root hair cell-specific genes for hair morphogenesis. Here, we address whether these root hair genes possess a common transcriptional regulatory module (cis-element) determining cell-type specificity despite differences in the final root hair pattern. We identified Arabidopsis thaliana expansinA7 (At EXPA7) orthologous (and paralogous) genes from diverse angiosperm species with different hair distribution patterns. The promoters of these genes contain conserved root hair-specific cis-elements (RHEs) that were functionally verified in the Type-3 Arabidopsis root. The promoter of At EXPA7 (Type-3 pattern) also showed hair cell-specific expression in the Type 2 rice (Oryza sativa) root. Root hair-specific genes other than EXPAs also carry functionally homologous RHEs in their promoters. The RHE core consensus was established by a multiple alignment of functionally characterized RHEs from different species and by high-resolution analysis of At EXPA7 RHE1. Our results suggest that this regulatory module of root hair-specific genes has been conserved across angiosperms despite the divergence of upstream fate-determining machinery. PMID:17098810

  3. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  4. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  5. Dermal papilla cells improve the wound healing process and generate hair bud-like structures in grafted skin substitutes using hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda; Balañá, María Eugenia

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. PMID:25161315

  6. Dermal Papilla Cells Improve the Wound Healing Process and Generate Hair Bud-Like Structures in Grafted Skin Substitutes Using Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. PMID:25161315

  7. Proliferation of Functional Hair Cells in Vivo in the Absence of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Cyrille; Huang, Mingqian; Karimi, Kambiz; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Hinds, Philip W.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.; Corey, David P.; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2005-02-01

    In mammals, hair cell loss causes irreversible hearing and balance impairment because hair cells are terminally differentiated and do not regenerate spontaneously. By profiling gene expression in developing mouse vestibular organs, we identified the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as a candidate regulator of cell cycle exit in hair cells. Differentiated and functional mouse hair cells with a targeted deletion of Rb1 undergo mitosis, divide, and cycle, yet continue to become highly differentiated and functional. Moreover, acute loss of Rb1 in postnatal hair cells caused cell cycle reentry. Manipulation of the pRb pathway may ultimately lead to mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  8. Directional cell migration, but not proliferation, drives hair placode morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Laura; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Lindfors, Päivi H; Renvoisé, Elodie; Shirokova, Vera; Vartiainen, Maria K; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2014-03-10

    Epithelial reorganization involves coordinated changes in cell shapes and movements. This restructuring occurs during formation of placodes, ectodermal thickenings that initiate the morphogenesis of epithelial organs including hair, mammary gland, and tooth. Signaling pathways in ectodermal placode formation are well known, but the cellular mechanisms have remained ill defined. We established imaging methodology for live visualization of embryonic skin explants during the first wave of hair placode formation. We found that the vast majority of placodal cells were nonproliferative throughout morphogenesis. We show that cell compaction and centripetal migration are the main cellular mechanisms associated with hair placode morphogenesis and that inhibition of actin remodeling suppresses placode formation. Stimulation of both ectodysplasin/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling increased cell motility and the number of cells committed to placodal fate. Thus, cell fate choices and morphogenetic events are controlled by the same molecular pathways, providing the framework for coordination of these two processes. PMID:24636260

  9. Outer hair cells as potential targets of inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Dulon, D; Schacht, J

    1990-06-01

    Inner ear sequelae with temporary or permanent sensorineural hearing loss can result from inflammatory processes in the middle ear. Loss of outer hair cells in the base of the cochlea has been noted in otitis media, but it is not known how this damage occurs. Evidence supports the permeability of the round window membrane to substances mediating inflammation in the middle ear, and the presence of white blood cells has been reported in the perilymph. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effects of two representative inflammatory mediators, endotoxin and free radicals, have been evaluated by use of short-term culture of isolated outer hair cells from the guinea pig cochlea model. Incubation with endotoxins from two gram-negative pathogens increased the rate of hair cell death fourfold to sixfold. Free radicals (generated by exposure of cells to UV light or by excitation of intracellular fluorescent dyes) produced morphologic damage to hair cells within 60 seconds. These latter effects were delayed by addition of free-radical scavengers. It is concluded that inflammatory mediators are cytotoxic to hair cells and therefore are potentially ototoxic if permeating the round window membrane. PMID:2112361

  10. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  11. Radixin is a constituent of stereocilia in hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, F.; Pironkova, R.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Proteins of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family are ubiquitous constituents of the submembrane cortex, especially in epithelial cells. Earlier biochemical results suggested that a protein of this family occurs in the hair bundle, the cluster of actin-filled stereocilia that serves as the mechanoreceptive organelle of each hair cell in the inner ear. We prepared antipeptide antisera directed against chicken radixin and ezrin and demonstrated their specificity and absence of crossreactivity. When used in immunocytochemical studies of isolated hair cells, anti-radixin produced an intense band of labeling at the bases of hair bundles from the chicken, frog, mouse, and zebrafish. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry disclosed that radixin labeling commenced in the stereociliary taper, peaked in the lower stereociliary shaft, and declined progressively toward the hair bundle's top. Labeling with anti-ezrin produced no signal in hair bundles. Radixin is thus a prominent constituent of stereocilia, where it may participate in anchoring the “pointed” ends of actin filaments to the membrane. PMID:14983055

  12. Regeneration of Hair Cells: Making Sense of All the Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Benjamin; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide by dampening or cutting off their auditory connection to the world. Current treatments for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with cochlear implants are not perfect, leaving regenerative medicine as the logical avenue to a perfect cure. Multiple routes to regeneration of damaged hair cells have been proposed and are actively pursued. Each route not only requires a keen understanding of the molecular basis of ear development but also faces the practical limitations of stem cell regulation in the delicate inner ear where topology of cell distribution is essential. Improvements in our molecular understanding of the minimal essential genes necessary for hair cell formation and recent advances in stem cell manipulation, such as seen with inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs), have opened new possibilities to advance research in translational stem cell therapies for individuals with hearing loss. Despite this, more detailed network maps of gene expression are needed, including an appreciation for the roles of microRNAs (miRs), key regulators of transcriptional gene networks. To harness the true potential of stem cells for hair cell regeneration, basic science and clinical medicine must work together to expedite the transition from bench to bedside by elucidating the full mechanisms of inner ear hair cell development, including a focus on the role of miRs, and adapting this knowledge safely and efficiently to stem cell technologies. PMID:21966254

  13. Mechanical amplification by hair cells in the semicircular canals

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, Richard D.; Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are the essential mechanotransducers of the inner ear, responsible not only for the transduction of sound and motion stimuli but also, remarkably, for nanomechanical amplification of sensory stimuli. Here we show that semicircular canal hair cells generate a mechanical nonlinearity in vivo that increases sensitivity to angular motion by amplification at low stimulus strengths. Sensitivity at high stimulus strengths is linear and shows no evidence of amplification. Results suggest that the mechanical work done by hair cells contributes ∼97 zJ/cell of amplification per stimulus cycle, improving sensitivity to angular velocity stimuli below ∼5°/s (0.3-Hz sinusoidal motion). We further show that mechanical amplification can be inhibited by the brain via activation of efferent synaptic contacts on hair cells. The experimental model was the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. Physiological manifestation of mechanical amplification and efferent control in a teleost vestibular organ suggests the active motor process in sensory hair cells is ancestral. The biophysical basis of the motor(s) remains hypothetical, but a key discriminating question may involve how changes in somatic electrical impedance evoked by efferent synaptic action alter function of the motor(s). PMID:20133682

  14. Structure and Function of the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Nouvian, R.; Beutner, D.; Parsons, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Faithful information transfer at the hair cell afferent synapse requires synaptic transmission to be both reliable and temporally precise. The release of neurotransmitter must exhibit both rapid on and off kinetics to accurately follow acoustic stimuli with a periodicity of 1 ms or less. To ensure such remarkable temporal fidelity, the cochlear hair cell afferent synapse undoubtedly relies on unique cellular and molecular specializations. While the electron microscopy hallmark of the hair cell afferent synapse — the electron-dense synaptic ribbon or synaptic body — has been recognized for decades, dissection of the synapse’s molecular make-up has only just begun. Recent cell physiology studies have added important insights into the synaptic mechanisms underlying fidelity and reliability of sound coding. The presence of the synaptic ribbon links afferent synapses of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to photoreceptors and bipolar neurons of the retina. This review focuses on major advances in understanding the hair cell afferent synapse molecular anatomy and function that have been achieved during the past years. PMID:16773499

  15. Molecular anatomy and physiology of exocytosis in sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Mark A; Pangršič, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Hair cells mediate our senses of hearing and balance by synaptic release of glutamate from somatic active zones (AZs). They share conserved mechanisms of exocytosis with neurons and other secretory cells of diverse form and function. Concurrently, AZs of these neuro-epithelial hair cells employ several processes that differ remarkably from those of neuronal synaptic terminals of the brain. Their unique molecular anatomy enables them to better respond to small, graded changes in membrane potential and to produce unsurpassed rates of exocytosis. Here, we focus on the AZs of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs). As in other hair cells, these AZs are occupied by a cytoplasmic extension of the presynaptic density, called the synaptic ribbon: a specialized protein complex required for normal physiological function. Some proteins found at IHC synapses are uniquely expressed or enriched there, where their disruption can beget deafness in humans and in animal models. Other proteins, essential for regulation of conventional neuronal Ca(2+)-triggered fusion, are apparently absent from IHCs. Certain common synaptic proteins appear to have extra significance at ribbon-type AZs because of their interactions with unique molecules, their unusual concentrations, or their atypical localization and regulation. We summarize the molecular-anatomical specializations that underlie the unique synaptic physiology of hair cells. PMID:22682011

  16. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  17. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  18. Imaging dipole flow sources using an artificial lateral-line system made of biomimetic hair flow sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dagamseh, Ahmad; Wiegerink, Remco; Lammerink, Theo; Krijnen, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, fish have the ability to localize prey, school, navigate, etc., using the lateral-line organ. Artificial hair flow sensors arranged in a linear array shape (inspired by the lateral-line system (LSS) in fish) have been applied to measure airflow patterns at the sensor positions. Here, we take advantage of both biomimetic artificial hair-based flow sensors arranged as LSS and beamforming techniques to demonstrate dipole-source localization in air. Modelling and measurement results show the artificial lateral-line ability to image the position of dipole sources accurately with estimation error of less than 0.14 times the array length. This opens up possibilities for flow-based, near-field environment mapping that can be beneficial to, for example, biologists and robot guidance applications. PMID:23594816

  19. Derivation of hair-inducing cell from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gnedeva, Ksenia; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina; Cimadamore, Flavio; Cattarossi, Giulio; Giusto, Elena; Terskikh, Vasiliy V; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    Dermal Papillae (DP) is a unique population of mesenchymal cells that was shown to regulate hair follicle formation and growth cycle. During development most DP cells are derived from mesoderm, however, functionally equivalent DP cells of cephalic hairs originate from Neural Crest (NC). Here we directed human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to generate first NC cells and then hair-inducing DP-like cells in culture. We showed that hESC-derived DP-like cells (hESC-DPs) express markers typically found in adult human DP cells (e.g., p-75, nestin, versican, SMA, alkaline phosphatase) and are able to induce hair follicle formation when transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient NUDE mice. Engineered to express GFP, hESC-derived DP-like cells incorporate into DP of newly formed hair follicles and express appropriate markers. We demonstrated that BMP signaling is critical for hESC-DP derivation since BMP inhibitor dorsomorphin completely eliminated hair-inducing activity from hESC-DP cultures. DP cells were proposed as the cell-based treatment for hair loss diseases. Unfortunately human DP cells are not suitable for this purpose because they cannot be obtained in necessary amounts and rapidly loose their ability to induce hair follicle formation when cultured. In this context derivation of functional hESC-DP cells capable of inducing a robust hair growth for the first time shown here can become an important finding for the biomedical science. PMID:25607935

  20. Derivation of Hair-Inducing Cell from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gnedeva, Ksenia; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina; Cimadamore, Flavio; Cattarossi, Giulio; Giusto, Elena; Terskikh, Vasiliy V.; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Dermal Papillae (DP) is a unique population of mesenchymal cells that was shown to regulate hair follicle formation and growth cycle. During development most DP cells are derived from mesoderm, however, functionally equivalent DP cells of cephalic hairs originate from Neural Crest (NC). Here we directed human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to generate first NC cells and then hair-inducing DP-like cells in culture. We showed that hESC-derived DP-like cells (hESC-DPs) express markers typically found in adult human DP cells (e.g. p-75, nestin, versican, SMA, alkaline phosphatase) and are able to induce hair follicle formation when transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient NUDE mice. Engineered to express GFP, hESC-derived DP-like cells incorporate into DP of newly formed hair follicles and express appropriate markers. We demonstrated that BMP signaling is critical for hESC-DP derivation since BMP inhibitor dorsomorphin completely eliminated hair-inducing activity from hESC-DP cultures. DP cells were proposed as the cell-based treatment for hair loss diseases. Unfortunately human DP cells are not suitable for this purpose because they cannot be obtained in necessary amounts and rapidly loose their ability to induce hair follicle formation when cultured. In this context derivation of functional hESC-DP cells capable of inducing a robust hair growth for the first time shown here can become an important finding for the biomedical science. PMID:25607935

  1. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  2. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  3. Semicircular Canals Circumvent Brownian Motion Overload of Mechanoreceptor Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500 nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (< 10 μm vs. <400 nm). We have developed biomechanical models of vertebrate hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (<10 Hz) signals. We observe that very low frequency mechanoreception requires increased stimulus amplitude, and argue that this is adaptive to circumvent Brownian motion overload at the hair bundles. We suggest that the selective advantage of detecting such low frequency stimuli may have favoured the evolution of large guiding structures such as semicircular canals and otoliths to overcome Brownian Motion noise at the level of the mechanoreceptors of the SCC. PMID:27448330

  4. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G

    2015-08-01

    The hair bundle--the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates--exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved. PMID:26229154

  5. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G.

    2015-01-01

    The hair bundle—the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates—exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved. PMID:26229154

  6. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity and hair cell ablation in the adult gerbil: A simple model to study hair cell loss and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Leila; Rivolta, Marcelo N.

    2015-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, has been widely employed as a model for studies of the inner ear. In spite of its established use for auditory research, no robust protocols to induce ototoxic hair cell damage have been developed for this species. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of an aminoglycoside-induced model of hair cell loss, using kanamycin potentiated by the loop diuretic furosemide. Interestingly, we show that the gerbil is relatively insensitive to gentamicin compared to kanamycin, and that bumetanide is ineffective in potentiating the ototoxicity of the drug. We also examine the pathology of the spiral ganglion after chronic, long-term hair cell damage. Remarkably, there is little or no neuronal loss following the ototoxic insult, even at 8 months post-damage. This is similar to the situation often seen in the human, where functioning neurons can persist even decades after hair cell loss, contrasting with the rapid, secondary degeneration found in rats, mice and other small mammals. We propose that the combination of these factors makes the gerbil a good model for ototoxic damage by induced hair cell loss. PMID:25783988

  7. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity and hair cell ablation in the adult gerbil: A simple model to study hair cell loss and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Leila; Rivolta, Marcelo N

    2015-07-01

    The Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, has been widely employed as a model for studies of the inner ear. In spite of its established use for auditory research, no robust protocols to induce ototoxic hair cell damage have been developed for this species. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of an aminoglycoside-induced model of hair cell loss, using kanamycin potentiated by the loop diuretic furosemide. Interestingly, we show that the gerbil is relatively insensitive to gentamicin compared to kanamycin, and that bumetanide is ineffective in potentiating the ototoxicity of the drug. We also examine the pathology of the spiral ganglion after chronic, long-term hair cell damage. Remarkably, there is little or no neuronal loss following the ototoxic insult, even at 8 months post-damage. This is similar to the situation often seen in the human, where functioning neurons can persist even decades after hair cell loss, contrasting with the rapid, secondary degeneration found in rats, mice and other small mammals. We propose that the combination of these factors makes the gerbil a good model for ototoxic damage by induced hair cell loss. PMID:25783988

  8. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Megason, Sean G.; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  9. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G.; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike

    2015-01-01

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of

  10. Characterization of transcriptomes of cochlear inner and outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhan; Pecka, Jason L; Zhang, Qian; Soukup, Garrett A; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2014-08-13

    Inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) are the two types of sensory receptor cells that are critical for hearing in the mammalian cochlea. IHCs and OHCs have different morphology and function. The genetic mechanisms that define their morphological and functional specializations are essentially unknown. The transcriptome reflects the genes that are being actively expressed in a cell and holds the key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of the biological properties of the cell. Using DNA microarray, we examined the transcriptome of 2000 individually collected IHCs and OHCs from adult mouse cochleae. We show that 16,647 and 17,711 transcripts are expressed in IHCs and OHCs, respectively. Of those genes, ∼73% are known genes, 22% are uncharacterized sequences, and 5.0% are noncoding RNAs in both populations. A total of 16,117 transcripts are expressed in both populations. Uniquely and differentially expressed genes account for <15% of all genes in either cell type. The top 10 differentially expressed genes include Slc17a8, Dnajc5b, Slc1a3, Atp2a3, Osbpl6, Slc7a14, Bcl2, Bin1, Prkd1, and Map4k4 in IHCs and Slc26a5, C1ql1, Strc, Dnm3, Plbd1, Lbh, Olfm1, Plce1, Tectb, and Ankrd22 in OHCs. We analyzed commonly and differentially expressed genes with the focus on genes related to hair cell specializations in the apical, basolateral, and synaptic membranes. Eighty-three percent of the known deafness-related genes are expressed in hair cells. We also analyzed genes involved in cell-cycle regulation. Our dataset holds an extraordinary trove of information about the molecular mechanisms underlying hair cell morphology, function, pathology, and cell-cycle control. PMID:25122905

  11. A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Staecker, Hinrich; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration. PMID:24956306

  12. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. 1: Responses to intracellular current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus are specifically adapted to sense small-amplitude, high-frequency linear accelerations. These hair cells display many properties that are undesirable or inappropriate for hair cells that must provide static gravity sensitivity. This study resulted in part due to an interest in seeing how the transduction mechanisms of hair cells in a gravity-sensing otolith endorgan would differ from those in the bullfrog sacculus. The bullfrog utriculus is an appropriate model for these studies, because its structure is representative of higher vertebrates in general and its function as a sensor of static gravity and dynamic linear acceleration is well known. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus, classifiable as Type 2 by cell body and synapse morphology, differ markedly in hair bundle morphology from those in the bullfrog sacculus. Moreover, the hair bundle morphologies of utricular hair cells, unlike those in the sacculus, differ in different membrane regions.

  13. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  14. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Niksch, Paul D; Webber, Roxanna M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  15. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells are novel processing units in mammalian vestibular organs.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells vary in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending three to four hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Furthermore, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network among type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3-6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells and suggest that type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. PMID:24825750

  16. Supporting cells eliminate dying sensory hair cells to maintain epithelial integrity in the avian inner ear.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Daudet, Nicolas; Warchol, Mark E; Gale, Jonathan E

    2010-09-15

    Epithelial homeostasis is essential for sensory transduction in the auditory and vestibular organs of the inner ear, but how it is maintained during trauma is poorly understood. To examine potential repair mechanisms, we expressed β-actin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the chick inner ear and used live-cell imaging to study how sensory epithelia responded during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell trauma. We found that glial-like supporting cells used two independent mechanisms to rapidly eliminate dying hair cells. Supporting cells assembled an actin cable at the luminal surface that extended around the pericuticular junction and constricted to excise the stereocilia bundle and cuticular plate from the hair cell soma. Hair bundle excision could occur within 3 min of actin-cable formation. After bundle excision, typically with a delay of up to 2-3 h, supporting cells engulfed and phagocytosed the remaining bundle-less hair cell. Dual-channel recordings with β-actin-EGFP and vital dyes revealed phagocytosis was concurrent with loss of hair cell integrity. We conclude that supporting cells repaired the epithelial barrier before hair cell plasmalemmal integrity was lost and that supporting cell activity was closely linked to hair cell death. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 did not prevent bundle excision but prolonged phagocytic engulfment and resulted in hair cell corpses accumulating within the epithelium. Our data show that supporting cells not only maintain epithelial integrity during trauma but suggest they may also be an integral part of the hair cell death process itself. PMID:20844149

  17. Estimation of morphing airfoil shapes and aerodynamic loads using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Nathan Scott

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape, as well as the aerodynamic loads, in real time. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors (AHS) developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this study, AHS measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the AHS measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network (ANN) based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Additionally, an aerodynamic formulation based on the finite-state inflow theory has been developed to calculate the aerodynamic loads on thin airfoils with arbitrary camber deformations. Various aerodynamic properties approximated from the AHS/ANN system will be compared with the results of the finite-state inflow aerodynamic formulation in order to validate the approximation approach.

  18. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiardi, Dominic A.; Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are commonly used because of their ability to treat bacterial infections, yet they also are a major cause of deafness. Aminoglycosides selectively damage the cochlea's sensory hair cells, the receptors that respond to the fluid movement in the cochlea to produce neural signals that are relayed to the brain. Sensory hair…

  19. Is TMC1 the Hair Cell Mechanotransducer Channel?

    PubMed

    Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane channel-like protein isoform-1 (TMC1) has emerged over the past five years as a prime contender for the mechano-electrical transducer (MET) channel in hair cells of the inner ear. TMC1 is thought to have a six-transmembrane domain structure reminiscent of some other ion-channel subunits, and is targeted to the tips of the stereocilia in the sensory hair bundle, where the MET channel is located. Moreover, there are TMC1 mutations linked to human deafness causing loss of conventional MET currents, hair cell degeneration, and deafness in mice. Finally, mutations of Tmc1 can alter the conductance and Ca(2+) selectivity of the MET channels. For several reasons though, it is unclear that TMC1 is indeed the MET channel pore: 1) in other animals or tissues, mutations of TMC family members do not directly affect cellular mechanosensitivity; 2) there are residual manifestations of mechanosensitivity in hair cells of mouse Tmc1:Tmc2 double knockouts; 3) there is so far no evidence that expression of mammalian Tmc1 generates a mechanically sensitive ion channel in the plasma membrane when expressed in heterologous cells; and 4) there are other proteins, such as TMIE and LHFPL5, which behave similarly to TMC1, their mutation also leading to loss of MET current and deafness. This review will present these disparate lines of evidence and describes recent work that addresses the role of TMC1. PMID:27410728

  20. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation. PMID:25557326

  1. [High resolution scanning electron microscopy of isolated outer hair cells].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Müller, H

    1996-11-01

    Isolated hair cell preparations have gained wide acceptance as a model for studying physiological and molecular properties of the sensory cells involved in the hearing process. Ultrastructural details, such as stereocilia links, lateral membrane substructure or synaptic links are of crucial importance for normal sensory transduction. For this reason, we developed a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) procedure to study the surface of isolated hair cells. Cells were mechanically and/or enzymatically separated, isolated and immobilized on cover slips by alcian blue and fixed by 2% glutardialdehyde or 1% OsO4. After dehydration, preparations were critical point-dried and sputter-coated with gold-palladium (2-4 nm). Up to 5 nm resolution was achieved. Optimal fixation kept the cells in their typical cylindrical forms. Preservation of the stereocilia and the apical plates of the outer hair cells depended strongly on the fixation process. Tip- and side-links were observed only sporadically because of the aggressive preparation procedure. The lateral plasma membranes of the cell bodies showed regular granular structures of 5-7 nm diameter at maximal magnification. The granular structure of the cell membrane seemed to correspond to putative transmembrane proteins believed to generate membrane-based motility. The remnants of the nerve endings and/or supporting cells usually covered the cell base. The preservation of the cells was better when enzymatic isolation was omitted. The technique used allowed for high resolution ultrastructural examination of isolated hair cells and, when combined with immunological labeling, may permit the identification of proteins at a molecular level. PMID:9064297

  2. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Adult bullfrog were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 microM gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence or absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest stereocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  3. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  4. Role of Wnt and Notch signaling in regulating hair cell regeneration in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Zhang, Shasha; He, Zuhong; Tang, Mingliang; Chai, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Sensory hair cells in the inner ear are responsible for sound recognition. Damage to hair cells in adult mammals causes permanent hearing impairment because these cells cannot regenerate. By contrast, newborn mammals possess limited regenerative capacity because of the active participation of various signaling pathways, including Wnt and Notch signaling. The Wnt and Notch pathways are highly sophisticated and conserved signaling pathways that control multiple cellular events necessary for the formation of sensory hair cells. Both signaling pathways allow resident supporting cells to regenerate hair cells in the neonatal cochlea. In this regard, Wnt and Notch signaling has gained increased research attention in hair cell regeneration. This review presents the current understanding of the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways in the auditory portion of the inner ear and discusses the possibilities of controlling these pathways with the hair cell fate determiner Atoh1 to regulate hair cell regeneration in the mammalian cochlea. PMID:27527363

  5. Nfatc1 orchestrates aging in hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Brice E.; Segal, Jeremy P.; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Chang, Chiung-Ying; Guo, Xingyi; Oristian, Dan S.; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Hair production is fueled by stem cells (SCs), which transition between cyclical bouts of rest and activity. Here, we explore why hair growth wanes with age. We show that aged hair follicle SCs (HFSCs) in mice exhibit enhanced resting and abbreviated growth phases and are delayed in response to tissue-regenerating cues. Aged HFSCs are poor at initiating proliferation and show diminished self-renewing capacity upon extensive use. Only modestly restored by parabiosis, these features are rooted in elevated cell-intrinsic sensitivity and local elevation in bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. Transcriptional profiling presents differences consistent with defects in aged HFSC activation. Notably, BMP-/calcium-regulated, nuclear factor of activated T-cell c1 (NFATc1) in HFSCs becomes recalcitrant to its normal down-regulating cues, and NFATc1 ChIP-sequencing analyses reveal a marked enrichment of NFATc1 target genes within the age-related signature. Moreover, aged HFSCs display more youthful levels of hair regeneration when BMP and/or NFATc1 are inhibited. These results provide unique insights into how skin SCs age. PMID:24282298

  6. Derivation of cochlea hair cell for in vitro expansion and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ibnubaidah, M A; Chua, K H; Mazita, A; Azida, Z N; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I; Lokman, B S

    2008-07-01

    A potential cure for hearing loss would be to regenerate hair cells by stimulating cells of the damaged inner ear sensory epithelia to proliferate and differentiate into hair cells. Here, we investigated the possibility to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the cells from the cochlea membrane of adult mice. Our results showed that the cultured cells isolated from mouse cochlea membrane were heterogenous in nature. Morphologically there were epithelial like cells, hair cell like, nerve cell like and fibroblastic cells observed in the culture. The cultured cells were immunopositive for specific hair cell markers including Myosin 7a, Calretinin and Espin. PMID:19025012

  7. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives Isl1 overexpression specifically in hair cells. Isl1 overexpressing hair cells develop normally, as seen by morphology and cochlear functions (auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions). As the mice aged to 17 months, wild-type (WT) controls showed the progressive threshold elevation and outer hair cell loss characteristic of the age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the background strain (C57BL/6J). In contrast, the Isl1 transgenic mice showed significantly less threshold elevation with survival of hair cells. Further, the Isl1 overexpression protected the ear from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL): both ABR threshold shifts and hair cell death were significantly reduced when compared with WT littermates. Our model suggests a common mechanism underlying ARHL and NIHL, and provides evidence that hair cell-specific Isl1 expression can promote hair cell survival and therefore minimize the hearing impairment that normally occurs with aging and/or acoustic overexposure. PMID:24048839

  8. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  9. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  10. Coupling a sensory hair-cell bundle to cyber clones enhances nonlinear amplification

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Jérémie; Dierkes, Kai; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The vertebrate ear benefits from nonlinear mechanical amplification to operate over a vast range of sound intensities. The amplificatory process is thought to emerge from active force production by sensory hair cells. The mechano-sensory hair bundle that protrudes from the apical surface of each hair cell can oscillate spontaneously and function as a frequency-selective, nonlinear amplifier. Intrinsic fluctuations, however, jostle the response of a single hair bundle to weak stimuli and seriously limit amplification. Most hair bundles are mechanically coupled by overlying gelatinous structures. Here, we assayed the effects of mechanical coupling on the hair-bundle amplifier by combining dynamic force clamp of a hair bundle from the bullfrog’s saccule with real-time stochastic simulations of hair-bundle mechanics. This setup couples the hair bundle to two virtual hair bundles, called cyber clones, and mimics a situation in which the hair bundle is elastically linked to two neighbors with similar characteristics. We found that coupling increased the coherence of spontaneous hair-bundle oscillations. By effectively reducing noise, the synergic interplay between the hair bundle and its cyber clones also enhanced amplification of sinusoidal stimuli. All observed effects of coupling were in quantitative agreement with simulations. We argue that the auditory amplifier relies on hair-bundle cooperation to overcome intrinsic noise limitations and achieve high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity. PMID:20404191

  11. Culture and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Renfu; Zheng, Xuan; Ni, Yueming; Xie, Shangju; Li, Changming

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish methods for isolation, culture, expansion, and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells (rHFSCs). Hair follicles were harvested from 1-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats and digested with dispase and collagenase IV. The bulge of the hair follicle was dissected under a microscope and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 supplemented with KnockOut™ Serum Replacement serum substitute, penicillin-streptomycin, L-glutamine, non-essential amino acids, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, polyhydric alcohol, and hydrocortisone. The rHFSCs were purified using adhesion to collagen IV. Cells were characterized by detecting marker genes with immunofluorescent staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The proliferation and vitality of rHFSCs at different passages were evaluated. The cultured rHFSCs showed typical cobblestone morphology with good adhesion and colony-forming ability. Expression of keratin 15, integrin α6, and integrin β1 were shown by immunocytochemistry staining. On day 1-2, the cells were in the latent phase. On day 5-6, the cells were in the logarithmic phase. Cell vitality gradually decreased from the 7th passage. Real-time PCR showed that the purified rHFSCs had good vitality and proliferative capacity and contained no keratinocytes. Highly purified rHFSCs can be obtained using tissue culture and adhesion to collagen IV. The cultured cells had good proliferative capacity and could therefore be a useful cell source for tissue-engineered hair follicles, vessels, and skin. PMID:25407732

  12. Sound-induced length changes in outer hair cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Hakizimana, Pierre; Brownell, William E; Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Hearing relies on mechanical stimulation of stereocilia bundles on the sensory cells of the inner ear. When sound hits the ear, each stereocilium pivots about a neck-like taper near their base. More than three decades of research have established that sideways deflection of stereocilia is essential for converting mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Here we show that mammalian outer hair cell stereocilia not only move sideways but also change length during sound stimulation. Currents that enter stereocilia through mechanically sensitive ion channels control the magnitude of both length changes and bundle deflections in a reciprocal manner: the smaller the length change, the larger is the bundle deflection. Thus, the transduction current is important for maintaining the resting mechanical properties of stereocilia. Hair cell stimulation is most effective when bundles are in a state that ensures minimal length change. PMID:23033070

  13. Sound-induced length changes in outer hair cell stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Hakizimana, Pierre; Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Hearing relies on mechanical stimulation of stereocilia bundles on the sensory cells of the inner ear. When sound hits the ear, these stereocilia pivot about a neck-like taper near their base. More than three decades of research have established that sideways deflection of stereocilia is essential for converting mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Here we show that mammalian outer hair cell stereocilia not only move sideways but also change length during sound stimulation. Currents that enter stereocilia through mechanically sensitive ion channels control the magnitude of both length changes and bundle deflections in a reciprocal manner: the smaller the length change, the larger is the bundle deflection. Thus, the transduction current is important for maintaining the resting mechanical properties of stereocilia. Hair cell stimulation is most effective when bundles are in a state that ensures minimal length change. PMID:23033070

  14. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. II. Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. Hair cells in whole-mount in vitro preparations of the utricular macula of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were selected according to their macular location and hair bundle morphology. The sensitivity and response dynamics of selected hair cells to natural stimulation were examined by recording their voltage responses to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements applied to their longest stereocilia. 2. The voltage responses of 31 hair cells to sinusoidal hair bundle displacements were characterized by their gains and phases, taken with respect to peak hair bundle displacement. The gains of Type B and Type C cells at both 0.5 and 5.0 Hz were markedly lower than those of Type F and Type E cells. Phases, with the exception of Type C cells, lagged hair bundle displacement at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had phase leads of 25-40 degrees. At 5.0 Hz, response phases in all cells were phase lagged with respect to those at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had larger gains and smaller phase leads at 5.0 Hz than at 0.5 Hz, suggesting the presence of low-frequency adaptation. 3. Displacement-response curves, derived from the voltage responses to 5.0-Hz sinusoids, were sigmoidal in shape and asymmetrical, with the depolarizing response having a greater magnitude and saturating less abruptly than the hyperpolarizing response. When normalized to their largest displacement the linear ranges of these curves varied from < 0.5 to 1.25 microns and were largest in Type B and smallest in Type F and Type E cells. Sensitivity, defined as the slope of the normalized displacement-response curve, was inversely correlated with linear range. 4. The contribution of geometric factors associated with the hair bundle to linear range and sensitivity were predicted from realistic models of utricular hair bundles created using morphological data obtained from light and electron microscopy. Three factors, including 1) the inverse ratio of the lengths of the kinocilium and longest stereocilia, representing the

  15. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-Lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies. PMID:25666161

  16. Epigenetic DNA Demethylation Causes Inner Ear Stem Cell Differentiation into Hair Cell-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Hu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) causes genomic demethylation to regulate gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether 5-aza affects gene expression and cell fate determination of stem cells. In this study, 5-aza was applied to mouse utricle sensory epithelia-derived progenitor cells (MUCs) to investigate whether 5-aza stimulated MUCs to become sensory hair cells. After treatment, MUCs increased expression of hair cell genes and proteins. The DNA methylation level (indicated by percentage of 5-methylcytosine) showed a 28.57% decrease after treatment, which causes significantly repressed DNMT1 protein expression and DNMT activity. Additionally, FM1-43 permeation assays indicated that the permeability of 5-aza-treated MUCs was similar to that of sensory hair cells, which may result from mechanotransduction channels. This study not only demonstrates a possible epigenetic approach to induce tissue specific stem/progenitor cells to become sensory hair cell-like cells, but also provides a cell model to epigenetically modulate stem cell fate determination. PMID:27536218

  17. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. PMID:27489215

  18. Actin Filaments Regulate Exocytosis at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Marie; Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Exocytosis at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse is achieved through the functional coupling between calcium channels and glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles. Using membrane capacitance measurements, we investigated whether the actin network regulates the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles at the mouse auditory hair cell. Our results suggest that actin network disruption increases exocytosis and that actin filaments may spatially organize a subfraction of synaptic vesicles with respect to the calcium channels. Significance statement: Inner hair cells (IHCs), the auditory sensory cells of the cochlea, release glutamate onto the afferent auditory nerve fibers to encode sound stimulation. To achieve this task, the IHC relies on the recruitment of glutamate-filled vesicles that can be located in close vicinity to the calcium channels or more remotely from them. The molecular determinants responsible for organizing these vesicle pools are not fully identified. Using pharmacological tools in combination with membrane capacitance measurements, we show that actin filament disruption increases exocytosis in IHCs and that actin filaments most likely position a fraction of vesicles away from the calcium channels. PMID:26791198

  19. Inexhaustible hair-cell regeneration in young and aged zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Teixeira, Filipe; Viader-Llargués, Oriol; Torres-Mejía, Elen; Turan, Melissa; González-Gualda, Estela; Pola-Morell, Laura; López-Schier, Hernán

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animals have evolved two general strategies to counter injury and maintain physiological function. The most prevalent is protection by isolating vital organs into body cavities. However, protection is not optimal for sensory systems because their external components need to be exposed to the environment to fulfill their receptive function. Thus, a common strategy to maintain sensory abilities against persistent environmental insult involves repair and regeneration. However, whether age or frequent injuries affect the regenerative capacity of sensory organs remains unknown. We have found that neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line regenerate mechanosensory hair cells after recurrent severe injuries and in adulthood. Moreover, neuromasts can reverse transient imbalances of Notch signaling that result in defective organ proportions during repair. Our results reveal inextinguishable hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line, and suggest that the neuromast epithelium is formed by plastic territories that are maintained by continuous intercellular communication. PMID:26002931

  20. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  1. Foxi3 Deficiency Compromises Hair Follicle Stem Cell Specification and Activation.

    PubMed

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K; Mikkola, Marja L

    2016-07-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ (HG). Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here, we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary HG marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary HG activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1896-1908. PMID:26992132

  2. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity and Targets of Hair Cell Protection

    PubMed Central

    Huth, M. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Cheng, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are commonly prescribed antibiotics with deleterious side effects to the inner ear. Due to their popular application as a result of their potent antimicrobial activities, many efforts have been undertaken to prevent aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Over the years, understanding of the antimicrobial as well as ototoxic mechanisms of aminoglycosides has increased. These mechanisms are reviewed in regard to established and potential future targets of hair cell protection. PMID:22121370

  3. Variable deflection response of sensitive CNT-on-fiber artificial hair sensors from CNT synthesis in high aspect ratio microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Keith; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kondash, Corey; Severin, Benjamin; Phillips, David; Dickinson, Benjamin T.; Reich, Gregory; Baur, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Crickets, locusts, bats, and many other animals detect changes in their environment with distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hairs. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a relatively new class of pore-based, artificial hair sensors that take advantage of the mechanical properties of structural microfibers and the electromechanical properties of self-aligned carbon nanotube arrays to rapidly transduce changes in low speed air flow. The radially aligned nanotubes are able to be synthesized along the length of the fibers inside the high aspect ratio cavity between the fiber surface and the wall of a microcapillary pore. The growth self-positions the fibers within the capillary and forms a conductive path between detection electrodes. As the hair is deflected, nanotubes are compressed to produce a typical resistance change of 1-5% per m/s of air speed which we believe are the highest sensitivities reported for air velocities less than 10 m/s. The quasi-static response of the sensors to point loads is compared to that from the distributed loads of air flow. A plane wave tube is used to measure their dynamic response when perturbed at acoustic frequencies. Correlation of the nanotube height profile inside the capillary to a diffusion transport model suggests that the nanotube arrays can be controllably tapered along the fiber. Like their biological counterparts, many applications can be envisioned for artificial hair sensors by tailoring their individual response and incorporating them into arrays for detecting spatio-temporal flow patterns over rigid surfaces such as aircraft.

  4. Cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the ear of the goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, P. J.; Presson, J. C.; Popper, A. N.

    1996-01-01

    Cell proliferation and hair cell addition have not been studied in the ears of otophysan fish, a group of species who have specialized hearing capabilities. In this study we used the mitotic S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify proliferating cells in the ear of one otophysan species, Carassius auratus (the goldfish). Animals were sacrificed at 3 h or 5 days postinjection with BrdU and processed for immunocytochemistry. The results of the study show that cell proliferation occurs in all of the otic endorgans and results in the addition of new hair cells. BrdU-labeled cells were distributed throughout all epithelia, including the primary auditory endorgan (saccule), where hair cell phenotypes vary considerably along the rostrocaudal axis. This study lays the groundwork for our transmission electron microscopy study of proliferative cells in the goldfish ear (Presson et al., Hearing Research 100 (1996) 10-20) as well as future studies of hair cell development in this species. The ability to predict, based on epithelial location, the future phenotype of developing hair cells in the saccule of the goldfish make that endorgan a particularly powerful model system for the investigation of early hair cell differentiation.

  5. Different uptake of gentamicin through TRPV1 and TRPV4 channels determines cochlear hair cell vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Han; Park, Channy; Kim, Se-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells at the base of the cochlea appear to be more susceptible to damage by the aminoglycoside gentamicin than those at the apex. However, the mechanism of base-to-apex gradient ototoxicity by gentamicin remains to be elucidated. We report here that gentamicin caused rodent cochlear hair cell damages in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hair cells at the basal turn were more vulnerable to gentamicin than those at the apical turn. Gentamicin-conjugated Texas Red (GTTR) uptake was predominant in basal turn hair cells in neonatal rats. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and 4 (TRPV4) expression was confirmed in the cuticular plate, stereocilia and hair cell body of inner hair cells and outer hair cells. The involvement of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in gentamicin trafficking of hair cells was confirmed by exogenous calcium treatment and TRPV inhibitors, including gadolinium and ruthenium red, which resulted in markedly inhibited GTTR uptake and gentamicin-induced hair cell damage in rodent and zebrafish ototoxic model systems. These results indicate that the cytotoxic vulnerability of cochlear hair cells in the basal turn to gentamicin may depend on effective uptake of the drug, which was, in part, mediated by the TRPV1 and TRPV4 proteins. PMID:23470714

  6. Insensitivity of the Audiogram to Carboplatin Induced Inner hair cell loss in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    Lobarinas, Edward; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2013-01-01

    Noise trauma, aging, and ototoxicity preferentially damage the outer hair cells of the inner ear, leading to increased hearing thresholds and poorer frequency resolution. Whereas outer hair cells make synaptic connections with less than 10% of afferent auditory nerve fibers (type-II), inner hair cells make connections with over 90% of afferents (type-I). Despite these extensive connections, little is known about how selective inner hair cell loss impacts hearing. In chinchillas, moderate to high doses of the anticancer compound carboplatin produce selective inner hair cell and type-I afferent loss with little to no effect on outer hair cells. To determine the effects of carboplatin-induced inner hair cell loss on the most widely used clinical measure of hearing, the audiogram, pure-tone thresholds were determined behaviorally before and after 75 mg/kg carboplatin. Following carboplatin treatment, small effects on audiometric thresholds were observed even with extensive inner hair cell losses that exceed 80%. These results suggest that conventional audiometry is insensitive to inner hair cell loss and that only small populations of inner hair cells appear to be necessary for detecting tonal stimuli in a quiet background. PMID:23566980

  7. Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Henry; Owens, Kelly N.; Santos, Felipe; Simon, Julian A.; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from degeneration and to regenerate new hair cells, replacing those that are lost due to aging, disease, or environmental challenges. One limitation of research in the auditory field has been the relative inaccessibility of the mechanosensory systems in the inner ear. Zebrafish possess hair cells in both their inner ear and their lateral line system that are morphologically and functionally similar to human hair cells. The external location of the mechanosensory hair cells in the lateral line and the ease of in vivo labeling and imaging make the zebrafish lateral line a unique system for the study of hair cell toxicity, protection, and regeneration. This review focuses on the lateral line system as a model for understanding loss and protection of mechanosensory hair cells. We discuss chemical screens to identify compounds that induce hair cell loss and others that protect hair cells from known toxins and the potential application of these screens to human medicine. PMID:20192852

  8. Streptomycin ototoxicity and hair cell regeneration in the adult pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, T. C.; Dye, B. J.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to investigate the regeneration of utricular hair cells in the adult pigeon (Columba livia) following complete hair cell loss through administration of streptomycin. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental animal study. METHODS: Animals were divided into four groups. Group 1 received 10 to 15 days of systemic streptomycin injections. Animals in Groups 2 and 3 received a single direct placement of a 1-, 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose into the perilymphatic space. Animals in Groups 1 and 2 were analyzed within 1 week from injection to investigate hair cell destruction, whereas Group 3 was investigated at later dates to study hair cell recovery. Group 4 animals received a control injection of saline into the perilymphatic space. Damage and recovery were quantified by counting hair cells in isolated utricles using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Although systemic injections failed to reliably achieve complete utricular hair cell destruction, a single direct placement of a 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose caused complete destruction within the first week. Incomplete hair cell loss was observed with the 1-mg dose. Over the long term, regeneration of the hair cells was seen with the 2-mg dose but not the 8-mg dose. Control injections of saline into the perilymphatic space caused no measurable hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS: Direct placement of streptomycin into the perilymph is an effective, reliable method for complete destruction of utricular hair cells while preserving the regenerative potential of the neuroepithelium.

  9. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  10. Runx1 modulates developmental, but not injury-driven, hair follicle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Karen M; Lee, Song Eun; McDermitt, David J; Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Zhang, Ying V; Woo, Hyun Nyun; Tumbar, Tudorita

    2008-03-01

    Aml1/Runx1 controls developmental aspects of several tissues, is a master regulator of blood stem cells, and plays a role in leukemia. However, it is unclear whether it functions in tissue stem cells other than blood. Here, we have investigated the role of Runx1 in mouse hair follicle stem cells by conditional ablation in epithelial cells. Runx1 disruption affects hair follicle stem cell activation, but not their maintenance, proliferation or differentiation potential. Adult mutant mice exhibit impaired de novo production of hair shafts and all temporary hair cell lineages, owing to a prolonged quiescent phase of the first hair cycle. The lag of stem cell activity is reversed by skin injury. Our work suggests a degree of functional overlap in Runx1 regulation of blood and hair follicle stem cells at an equivalent time point in the development of these two tissues. PMID:18256199

  11. Feathers and Fins: Non-mammalian models for hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brignull, Heather R.; Raible, David W.; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Death of mechanosensory cells in the inner ear results in two profound disabilities: hearing loss and balance disorders. Although mammals lack the capacity to regenerate hair cells, recent studies in mice and other rodents have offered valuable insight into strategies for stimulating hair cell regeneration in mammals. Investigations of model organisms that retain the ability to form new hair cells after embryogenesis, such as fish and chicks, are equally important and have provided clues as to the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may block hair cell regeneration in mammals. Here, we summarize studies on hair cell regeneration in the chicken and the zebrafish, discuss specific advantages of each model, and propose future directions for the use of non-mammalian models in understanding hair cell regeneration. PMID:19245801

  12. Calbindin and parvalbumin are early markers of non-mitotically regenerating hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyger, P. S.; Burton, M.; Hawkins, J. R.; Schuff, N. R.; Baird, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated hair cell regeneration in the absence of cell proliferation, and suggested that supporting cells could phenotypically convert into hair cells following hair cell loss. Because calcium-binding proteins are involved in gene up-regulation, cell growth, and cell differentiation, we wished to determine if these proteins were up-regulated in scar formations and regenerating hair cells following gentamicin treatment. Calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was examined in control or gentamicin-treated (GT) bullfrog saccular and utricular explants cultured for 3 days in amphibian culture medium or amphibian culture medium supplemented with aphidicolin, a blocker of nuclear DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In control cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeled the hair bundles and, less intensely, the cell bodies of mature hair cells. In GT or mitotically-blocked GT (MBGT) cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was also seen in the hair bundles, cuticular plates, and cell bodies of hair cells with immature hair bundles. Thus, these antigens were useful markers for both normal and regenerating hair cells. Supporting cell immunolabeling was not seen in control cultures nor in the majority of supporting cells in GT cultures. In MBGT cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was up-regulated in the cytosol of single supporting cells participating in scar formations and in supporting cells with hair cell-like characteristics. These data provide further evidence that non-mitotic hair cell regeneration in cultures can be accomplished by the conversion of supporting cells into hair cells.

  13. Two Adaptation Processes in Auditory Hair Cells Together Can Provide an Active Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals. Two adaptation mechanisms are known to modify the ionic current flowing through the transduction channels of the hair bundles: a rapid process involves Ca2+ ions binding to the channels; and a slower adaptation is associated with the movement of myosin motors. We present a mathematical model of the hair cell which demonstrates that the combination of these two mechanisms can produce “self-tuned critical oscillations”, i.e., maintain the hair bundle at the threshold of an oscillatory instability. The characteristic frequency depends on the geometry of the bundle and on the Ca2+ dynamics, but is independent of channel kinetics. Poised on the verge of vibrating, the hair bundle acts as an active amplifier. However, if the hair cell is sufficiently perturbed, other dynamical regimes can occur. These include slow relaxation oscillations which resemble the hair bundle motion observed in some experimental preparations. PMID:12829475

  14. Selective Inner Hair Cell Dysfunction in Chinchillas Impairs Hearing-in-Noise in the Absence of Outer Hair Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lobarinas, Edward; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2016-04-01

    Poorer hearing in the presence of background noise is a significant problem for the hearing impaired. Ototoxic drugs, ageing, and noise exposure can damage the sensory hair cells of the inner ear that are essential for normal hearing sensitivity. The relationship between outer hair cell (OHC) loss and progressively poorer hearing sensitivity in quiet or in competing background noise is supported by a number of human and animal studies. In contrast, the effect of moderate inner hair cell (IHC) loss or dysfunction shows almost no impact on behavioral measures of hearing sensitivity in quiet, when OHCs remain intact, but the relationship between selective IHC loss and hearing in noise remains relatively unknown. Here, a moderately high dose of carboplatin (75 mg/kg) that produced IHC loss in chinchillas ranging from 40 to 80 % had little effect on thresholds in quiet. However, when tested in the presence of competing broadband (BBN) or narrowband noise (NBN), thresholds increased significantly. IHC loss >60 % increased signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for tones (500-11,300 Hz) in competing BBN by 5-10 dB and broadened the masking function under NBN. These data suggest that IHC loss or dysfunction may play a significant role in listening in noise independent of OHC integrity and that these deficits may be present even when thresholds in quiet are within normal limits. PMID:26691159

  15. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  16. Isolation of Mouse Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells and Their Functional Analysis in a Reconstitution Assay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Escandon, Julia; Cotsarelis, George

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic structure readily accessible within the skin, and contains various pools of stem cells that have a broad regenerative potential during normal homeostasis and in response to injury. Recent discoveries demonstrating the multipotent capabilities of hair follicle stem cells and the easy access to skin tissue make the HF an attractive source for isolating stem cells and their subsequent application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we describe the isolation and purification of hair follicle bulge stem cells from mouse skin, and hair reconstitution assays that allows the functional analysis of multipotent stem cells. PMID:27431247

  17. High-Pass Filtering at Vestibular Frequencies by Transducer Adaptation in Mammalian Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian saccule detects head tilt and low-frequency head accelerations as well as higher-frequency bone vibrations and sounds. It has two different hair cell types, I and II, dispersed throughout two morphologically distinct regions, the striola and extrastriola. Afferents from the two zones have distinct response dynamics which may arise partly from zonal differences in hair cell properties. We find that type II hair cells in the rat saccular epithelium adapt with a time course appropriate for influencing afferent responses to head motions. Moreover, striolar type II hair cells adapted by a greater extent than extrastriolar type II hair cells and had greater phase leads in the mid-frequency range (5-50 Hz). These differences suggest that hair cell transduction may contribute to zonal differences in the adaptation of vestibular afferents to head motions.

  18. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Na; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zhengmin; Chen, Guoling; Lin, Qin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Li, Huawei

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  19. Inner ear hair cells deteriorate in mice engineered to have no or diminished innervation

    PubMed Central

    Kersigo, Jennifer; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The innervation of the inner ear critically depends on the two neurotrophins Ntf3 and Bdnf. In contrast to this molecularly well-established dependency, evidence regarding the need of innervation for long-term maintenance of inner ear hair cells is inconclusive, due to experimental variability. Mutant mice that lack both neurotrophins could shed light on the long-term consequences of innervation loss on hair cells without introducing experimental variability, but do not survive after birth. Mutant mice with conditional deletion of both neurotrophins lose almost all innervation by postnatal day 10 and show an initially normal development of hair cells by this stage. No innervation remains after 3 weeks and complete loss of all innervation results in near complete loss of outer and many inner hair cells of the organ of Corti within 4 months. Mutants that retain one allele of either neurotrophin have only partial loss of innervation of the organ of Corti and show a longer viability of cochlear hair cells with more profound loss of inner hair cells. By 10 months, hair cells disappear with a base to apex progression, proportional to the residual density of innervation and similar to carboplatin ototoxicity. Similar to reports of hair cell loss after aminoglycoside treatment, blobbing of stereocilia of apparently dying hair cells protrude into the cochlear duct. Denervation of vestibular sensory epithelia for several months also resulted in variable results, ranging from unusual hair cells resembling the aberrations found in the organ of Corti, to near normal hair cells in the canal cristae. Fusion and/or resorption of stereocilia and loss of hair cells follows a pattern reminiscent of Myo6 and Cdc42 null mice. Our data support a role of innervation for long-term maintenance but with a remarkable local variation that needs to be taken into account when attempting regeneration of the organ of Corti. PMID:25852547

  20. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  1. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of non-mammalian inner ear hair cells for the full frequency range.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Lisa F

    2004-09-01

    The effect of the size and the shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear of non-mammals on its motion for the full range of frequencies is determined thereby extending the results of a previous analysis of hair bundle motion for high and low frequencies [Hear Res. 141 (2000) 39-50]. A hemispheroid is used to represent the hair bundle because it can represent a full range of shapes, from thin, pencil-like shapes to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Boundary element methods are used to approximate the solution for the hydrodynamics. For physiologically relevant parameters, an excellent match is obtained between the model's predictions and measurements of hair bundle motion in the free-standing region of the basilar papilla of the alligator lizard [Aranyosi, Measuring sound-induced motions of the alligator lizard cochlea. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, PhD Thesis, 2002]. Neither in the model's predictions nor in experimental measurements is sharp tuning observed. The model predicted the low frequency region of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard and bobtail lizard, but could not predict the sharp tuning or the high frequency region. An element that represents an active mechanism is added to the hair bundle model to predict neural tuning curves, which are sharply tuned, and an excellent match is obtained for all the characteristics of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard, and for the low and high frequency regions for the bobtail lizard. The model does not predict well the sharp tuning of the shorter hair bundles of the bobtail lizard, possibly because it does not represent tectorial sallets. PMID:15350278

  2. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  3. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  4. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. PMID:10526320

  5. Damage and Recovery of Hair Cells in Fish Canal (But Not Superficial) Neuromasts after Gentamicin Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Jiakun; Yan, Hong Young; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrating the presence of two types of sensory hair cells in the ear of a telcost fish (Astronotus ocellatus, the oscar) indicates that hair cell heterogeneity may exist not only in amniotic vertebrates but also in anamniotes. Here we report that a similar heterogeneity between hair cell types may also occur in the other mechanosensory organ of the oscar, the lateral line. We exposed oscars to the aminoglycoside (ototoxic) antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and found damaged sensory hair cells in one class of the lateral line receptors, the canal neuromasts, but not in the other class, the superficial neuromasts. This effect was not due to the canal environment. Moreover, new ciliary bundles on hair cells of the canal neuromasts were found after, and during, gentamicin exposure. The pattern of hair cell destruction and recovery in canal neuromasts is similar to that of type 1-like hair cells found in the striolar region of the utricle and lagena of the oscar after gentamicin treatment. These results suggest that the hair cells in the canal and superficial neuromasts may be similar to type 1-like and type 2 hair cells, respectively, in the fish ear.

  6. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  7. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  8. A study in motion sickness - Saccular hair cells in the adult bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. M.; Reschke, M.; Homick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The bullfrog's saccule were examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. No evidence of a striola was found. Type A hair cells were not only distributed peripherally, but also throughout the central macula, though far less frequently than the dominant type D. Two primary hair cell types were distinguished, which corresponded to the ciliary patterns: type A cilia are associated with short, conical hair cells, and type D cilia are associated with long, cylindrical hair cells. Each displays at least one subtype, which may represent developmental precursors. The otolithic membrane is crisscrossed with tunnels and topped with statoconia.

  9. Calcium channels in mouse hair cells: function, properties and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jutta; Michna, Marcus; Platzer, Josef; Striessnig, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Adult inner hair cells (IHCs) possess voltage-activated Ca2+ currents that couple receptor potentials to transmitter release at the afferent synapses. Before the onset of hearing both IHCs and outer hair cells (OHCs) exhibit Ca2+ currents. More than 90% of neonatal hair cell (HC) currents flow through alpha1D Ca2+ channel subunits because they are absent in both IHCs and OHCs from alpha1D-/- mice and residual currents are insensitive to L-type agonists. Since lack of the alpha1D-subunit leads to HC degeneration and profound deafness, class D L-type Ca2+ currents seem to be crucial for the development and functioning of the inner ear. Neonatal HC Ca2+ currents were studied using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. They showed rapid activation, rapid deactivation and very little inactivation. They started activating as negative as -65mV. In contrast to alpha1C-mediated (classical L-type) Ca2+ currents, they showed a rather low sensitivity to various L-type antagonists. 10 microM nifedipine e.g. blocked HC Ca2+ currents by about 40% whereas class C L-type Ca2+ currents are completely blocked by 100nM nifedipine. The L-type channel agonist Bay K 8644 increased the HC Ca2+ current by 100-200% and shifted the IV curve to more negative potentials which is similar to its effects in alpha1C-mediated Ca2+ currents. PMID:11885659

  10. Sensory Transduction and Adaptation in Inner and Outer Hair Cells of the Mouse Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Eric A.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory function in the mammalian inner ear is optimized by collaboration of two classes of sensory cells known as inner and outer hair cells. Outer hair cells amplify and tune sound stimuli that are transduced and transmitted by inner hair cells. Although they subserve distinct functions, they share a number of common properties. Here we compare the properties of mechanotransduction and adaptation recorded from inner and outer hair cells of the postnatal mouse cochlea. Rapid outer hair bundle deflections of about 0.5 micron evoked average maximal transduction currents of about 325 pA, whereas inner hair bundle deflections of about 0.9 micron were required to evoke average maximal currents of about 310 pA. The similar amplitude was surprising given the difference in the number of stereocilia, 81 for outer hair cells and 48 for inner hair cells, but may be reconciled by the difference in single-channel conductance. Step deflections of inner and outer hair bundles evoked adaptation that had two components: a fast component that consisted of about 60% of the response occurred over the first few milliseconds and a slow component that consisted of about 40% of the response followed over the subsequent 20 –50 ms. The rate of the slow component in both inner and outer hair cells was similar to the rate of slow adaptation in vestibular hair cells. The rate of the fast component was similar to that of auditory hair cells in other organisms and several properties were consistent with a model that proposes calcium-dependent release of tension allows transduction channel closure. PMID:17942617

  11. Regeneration of Sensory Hair Cells Requires Localized Interactions between the Notch and Wnt Pathways.

    PubMed

    Romero-Carvajal, Andrés; Navajas Acedo, Joaquín; Jiang, Linjia; Kozlovskaja-Gumbrienė, Agnė; Alexander, Richard; Li, Hua; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2015-08-10

    In vertebrates, mechano-electrical transduction of sound is accomplished by sensory hair cells. Whereas mammalian hair cells are not replaced when lost, in fish they constantly renew and regenerate after injury. In vivo tracking and cell fate analyses of all dividing cells during lateral line hair cell regeneration revealed that support and hair cell progenitors localize to distinct tissue compartments. Importantly, we find that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in these compartments is controlled by spatially restricted Notch signaling and its inhibition of Wnt-induced proliferation. The ability to simultaneously study and manipulate individual cell behaviors and multiple pathways in vivo transforms the lateral line into a powerful paradigm to mechanistically dissect sensory organ regeneration. The striking similarities to other vertebrate stem cell compartments uniquely place zebrafish to help elucidate why mammals possess such low capacity to regenerate hair cells. PMID:26190147

  12. Activation and adaptation of transducer currents in turtle hair cells.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A C; Evans, M G; Fettiplace, R

    1989-12-01

    1. Transducer currents were recorded in turtle cochlear hair cells during mechanical stimulation of the hair bundle. The currents were measured under whole-cell voltage clamp in isolated cells that were firmly stuck to the floor of the recording chamber. 2. Stimuli were calibrated by projecting the image of the hair bundle onto a rapidly scanned 128 photodiode array. This technique showed that, while the cell body was immobilized, the tip of the bundle would follow faithfully the motion of an attached glass probe up to frequencies of more than 1 kHz. 3. The relationship between inward transducer current and bundle displacement was sigmoidal. Maximum currents of 200-400 pA were observed for deflections of the tip of the bundle of 0.5 microns, equivalent to rotating the bundle by about 5 deg. 4. In response to a step deflection of the bundle, the current developed with a time constant (about 0.4 ms for small stimuli) that decreased with the size of displacement. This suggests that the onset of the current was limited by the gating kinetics of the transduction channel. The onset time course was slowed about fourfold for a 20 degrees C drop in temperature. 5. For small maintained displacements, the current relaxed to about a quarter of the peak level with a time constant of 3-5 ms. This adaptation was associated with a shift of the current-displacement relationship in the direction of the stimulus. The rate and extent of adaptation were decreased by lowering external Ca2+. 6. Adaptation was strongly voltage sensitive, and was abolished at holding potentials positive to the reversal potential of the transducer current of about 0 mV. It was also diminished by loading cells with 10 mM of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. These observations suggest that adaptation may be partly controlled by influx of Ca2+ through the transducer channels. 7. Removal of adaptation produced asymmetric responses, with fast onsets but slow decays following return of the bundle to its resting position

  13. Interaction of mechanical and electrical oscillations and sensitivity in a model of sensory hair cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amro, Rami M.; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2013-03-01

    Sensory hair cells are the first stage in conveying the mechanical stimuli into the electrical signals in auditory and vestibular organs of vertebrates. Experiments showed that hair cells rely on active processes in hair bundles to achieve high selective sensitivity, e.g. due to myosin molecular motors inside stereocilia. In lower vertebrates these active processes result in spontaneous oscillations of hair bundles which can be accompanied by oscillations of the cells' membrane potentials. We use modeling to study how the dynamics of both the membrane potential and the hair bundle interact to produce coherent self-sustained oscillations and how this interaction contributes to the cell's sensitivity to external mechanical perturbations. The model incorporates a mechanical stochastic hair bundle system coupled to a Hodgkin-Huxley type system for the membrane potential. We show that oscillatory regimes result in enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to harmonic stimuli.

  14. Roles of MED1 in quiescence of hair follicle stem cells and maintenance of normal hair cycling.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takeshi; Inui, Shigeki; Fushimi, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Fumihito; Kitagawa, Yutaka; Reddy, Janardan K; Itami, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    MED1 (mediator complex subunit 1) is expressed by human epidermal keratinocytes and functions as a coactivator of several transcription factors. To elucidate the role of MED1 in keratinocytes, we established keratinocyte-specific Med1-null (Med1(epi-/-)) mice using the K5Cre/LoxP system. Development of the epidermis and appendages of Med1(epi-/-) mice were macroscopically and microscopically normal until the second catagen of the hair cycle. However, the hair cycle of Med1(epi-/-) mice was spontaneously repeated after the second telogen, which does not occur in wild-type (WT) mice. Hair follicles of Med1(epi-/-) mice could not enter anagen after 6 months of age, resulting in sparse pelage hair in older Med1(epi-/-) mice. Interfollicular epidermis (IFE) of Med1(epi-/-) mice was acanthotic and more proliferative than that of WT mice, whereas these findings were less evident in older Med1(epi-/-) mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the numbers of hair follicle bulge stem cells were reduced in Med1(epi-/-) mice from a few months after birth. These results suggest that MED1 has roles in maintaining quiescence of keratinocytes and preventing depletion of the follicular stem cells. PMID:22931914

  15. Power Efficiency of Outer Hair Cell Somatic Electromotility

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, Richard D.; Clifford, Sarah; Breneman, Kathryn D.; Farrell, Brenda; Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are fast biological motors that serve to enhance the vibration of the organ of Corti and increase the sensitivity of the inner ear to sound. Exactly how OHCs produce useful mechanical power at auditory frequencies, given their intrinsic biophysical properties, has been a subject of considerable debate. To address this we formulated a mathematical model of the OHC based on first principles and analyzed the power conversion efficiency in the frequency domain. The model includes a mixture-composite constitutive model of the active lateral wall and spatially distributed electro-mechanical fields. The analysis predicts that: 1) the peak power efficiency is likely to be tuned to a specific frequency, dependent upon OHC length, and this tuning may contribute to the place principle and frequency selectivity in the cochlea; 2) the OHC power output can be detuned and attenuated by increasing the basal conductance of the cell, a parameter likely controlled by the brain via the efferent system; and 3) power output efficiency is limited by mechanical properties of the load, thus suggesting that impedance of the organ of Corti may be matched regionally to the OHC. The high power efficiency, tuning, and efferent control of outer hair cells are the direct result of biophysical properties of the cells, thus providing the physical basis for the remarkable sensitivity and selectivity of hearing. PMID:19629162

  16. Macrophage Recruitment Contributes to Regeneration of Mechanosensory Hair Cells in the Zebrafish Lateral Line.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Simón A; Anguita-Salinas, Consuelo; Peña, Oscar A; Morales, Rodrigo A; Muñoz-Sánchez, Salomé; Muñoz-Montecinos, Carlos; Paredes-Zúñiga, Susana; Tapia, Karina; Allende, Miguel L

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, damage to mechanosensory hair cells elicits an inflammatory response, including rapid recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils. While hair cells in amniotes usually become permanently lost, they readily regenerate in lower vertebrates such as fish. Damage to hair cells of the fish lateral line is followed by inflammation and rapid regeneration; however the role of immune cells in this process remains unknown. Here, we show that recruited macrophages are required for normal regeneration of lateral line hair cells after copper damage. We found that genetic ablation or local ablation using clodronate liposomes of macrophages recruited to the site of injury, significantly delays hair cell regeneration. Neutrophils, on the other hand, are not needed for this process. We anticipate our results to be a starting point for a more detailed description of extrinsic signals important for regeneration of mechanosensory cells in vertebrates. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1880-1889, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26755079

  17. Genetically Induced Cell Death in Bulge Stem Cells Reveals Their Redundancy for Hair and Epidermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent. Stem Cells 2015;33:988–998 PMID:25447755

  18. Electrical resonance and membrane currents in turtle cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Art, J J; Crawford, A C; Fettiplace, R

    1986-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical properties of single hair cells from the turtle's cochlea were examined to investigate the basis of their electrical resonance. Receptor potentials were measured with intracellular micropipettes in the isolated basilar papilla. At the onset and termination of a step displacement of the ciliary bundle the receptor potential showed a damped oscillation reflecting the frequency selectivity of the cell. Resonance frequencies increased systematically from apex to base of the cochlea. Similar oscillations could be elicited by a current step injected through the recording electrode. Solitary hair cells enzymatically isolated from the papilla were investigated with the tight-seal whole-cell recording method. Cells retained their properties in response to current steps and had resonance frequencies between 10 and 350 Hz. In voltage clamp such cells displayed a large outward K+ current and an inward Ca2+ current both activated by depolarization from the resting potential. The relaxation time constant of the K+ current was inversely correlated with the resonance frequency of the cell, varying from 150 ms in the lowest frequency cells to less than 1 ms in the highest ones. It is argued that variation in the kinetics of this current is the major factor responsible for the range of resonance frequencies. In preparations of the isolated papilla a flexible glass fibre, attached to the tip of a ciliary bundle, was used to deliver constant force steps to the bundle and to monitor its displacement. Receptor potentials were simultaneously recorded. At the beginning and end of a force step towards the kinocilium, the bundle vibrated at a frequency which coincided with the electrical resonance frequency of the cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2426237

  19. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter's cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  20. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter’s cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  1. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  2. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-05-26

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients' psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  3. The mechanism of pneumolysin-induced cochlear hair cell death in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Hafidi, Aziz; Skinner, Liam; Cowan, Graeme; Hondarrague, Yannick; Mitchell, Tim J; Dulon, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Streptoccocus pneumoniae infection can result in local and systemic diseases such as otitis media, pneumonia and meningitis. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with this infection is mediated by the release of an exotoxin, pneumolysin. The goal of the present study was to characterize the mechanisms of pneumolysin toxicity in cochlear hair cells in vitro. Pneumolysin induced severe damage in cochlear hair cells, ranging from stereocilia disorganization to total cell loss. Surprisingly, pneumolysin-induced cell death preferentially targeted inner hair cells. Pneumolysin triggered in vitro cell death by an influx of calcium. Extracellular calcium appeared to enter the cell through a pore formed by the toxin. Buffering intracellular calcium with BAPTA improved hair cell survival. The mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involved in pneumolysin-induced cell death was demonstrated by the use of bongkrekic acid. Binding of pneumolysin to the hair cell plasma membrane was required to induce cell death. Increasing external calcium reduced cell toxicity by preventing the binding of pneumolysin to hair cell membranes. These results showed the significant role of calcium both in triggering pneumolysin-induced hair cell apoptosis and in preventing the toxin from binding to its cellular target. PMID:16051626

  4. The mechanism of pneumolysin-induced cochlear hair cell death in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beurg, Maryline; Hafidi, Aziz; Skinner, Liam; Cowan, Graeme; Hondarrague, Yannick; Mitchell, Tim J; Dulon, Didier

    2005-10-01

    Streptoccocus pneumoniae infection can result in local and systemic diseases such as otitis media, pneumonia and meningitis. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with this infection is mediated by the release of an exotoxin, pneumolysin. The goal of the present study was to characterize the mechanisms of pneumolysin toxicity in cochlear hair cells in vitro. Pneumolysin induced severe damage in cochlear hair cells, ranging from stereocilia disorganization to total cell loss. Surprisingly, pneumolysin-induced cell death preferentially targeted inner hair cells. Pneumolysin triggered in vitro cell death by an influx of calcium. Extracellular calcium appeared to enter the cell through a pore formed by the toxin. Buffering intracellular calcium with BAPTA improved hair cell survival. The mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involved in pneumolysin-induced cell death was demonstrated by the use of bongkrekic acid. Binding of pneumolysin to the hair cell plasma membrane was required to induce cell death. Increasing external calcium reduced cell toxicity by preventing the binding of pneumolysin to hair cell membranes. These results showed the significant role of calcium both in triggering pneumolysin-induced hair cell apoptosis and in preventing the toxin from binding to its cellular target. PMID:16051626

  5. Transitory endolymph leakage induced hearing loss and tinnitus: depolarization, biphasic shortening and loss of electromotility of outer hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenner, H. P.; Reuter, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Gitter, A. H.; Fermin, C.; LePage, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    There are types of deafness and tinnitus in which ruptures or massive changes in the ionic permeability of the membranes lining the endolymphatic space [e.g., of the reticular lamina (RL)] are believed to allow potassium-rich endolymph to deluge the low [K+] perilymphatic fluid (e.g., in the small spaces of Nuel). This would result in a K+ intoxication of sensory and neural structures. Acute attacks of Meniere's disease have been suggested to be an important example for this event. The present study investigated the effects of transiently elevated [K+] due to the addition of artificial endolymph to the basolateral cell surface of outer hair cells (OHC) in replicating endolymph-induced K+ intoxication of the perilymph in the small spaces of Nuel. The influence of K+ intoxication of the basolateral OHC cell surface on the transduction was then examined. Intoxication resulted in an inhibition of the physiological repolarizing K+ efflux from hair cells. This induced unwanted depolarizations of the hair cells, interfering with mechanoelectrical transduction. A pathological longitudinal OHC shortening was also found, with subsequent compression of the organ of Corti possibly influencing the micromechanics of the mechanically active OHC. Both micromechanical and electrophysiological alterations are proposed to contribute to endolymph leakage induced attacks of deafness and possibly also to tinnitus. Moreover, repeated or long-lasting K+ intoxications of OHC resulted in a chronic and complete loss of OHC motility. This is suggested to be a pathophysiological basis in some patients with chronic hearing loss resulting from Meniere's syndrome.

  6. Establishment of a Protein Reference Map for Soybean Root Hair Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root hairs are single tubular cells formed from the differentiation of epidermal cells on roots. They are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and represent the infection site on leguminous roots by rhizobia, soil bacteria that establish a nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Root hairs develop by polar cel...

  7. A brief history of hair cell regeneration research and speculations on the future.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Edwin W; Furrer, Stephanie A; Stone, Jennifer S

    2013-03-01

    Millions of people worldwide suffer from hearing and balance disorders caused by loss of the sensory hair cells that convert sound vibrations and head movements into electrical signals that are conveyed to the brain. In mammals, the great majority of hair cells are produced during embryogenesis. Hair cells that are lost after birth are virtually irreplaceable, leading to permanent disability. Other vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, produce hair cells throughout life. However, hair cell replacement after damage to the mature inner ear was either not investigated or assumed to be impossible until studies in the late 1980s proved this to be false. Adult birds were shown to regenerate lost hair cells in the auditory sensory epithelium after noise- and ototoxic drug-induced damage. Since then, the field of hair cell regeneration has continued to investigate the capacity of the auditory and vestibular epithelia in vertebrates (fishes, birds, reptiles, and mammals) to regenerate hair cells and to recover function, the molecular mechanisms governing these regenerative capabilities, and the prospect of designing biologically-based treatments for hearing loss and balance disorders. Here, we review the major findings of the field during the past 25 years and speculate how future inner ear repair may one day be achieved. PMID:23321648

  8. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J.; Sommers, Thomas F.; Trapani, Josef G.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20–30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  9. Discussion: Changes in Vocal Production and Auditory Perception after Hair Cell Regeneration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryals, Brenda M.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A bird study found that with sufficient time and training after hair cell and hearing loss and hair cell regeneration, the mature avian auditory system can accommodate input from a newly regenerated periphery sufficiently to allow for recognition of previously familiar vocalizations and the learning of new complex acoustic classifications.…

  10. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, the author provides a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, the author presents a review of stem…

  11. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J; Sommers, Thomas F; Trapani, Josef G; Coffin, Allison B

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  12. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients. PMID:26966437

  13. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  14. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  15. Inhibition of Notch activity promotes nonmitotic regeneration of hair cells in the adult mouse utricles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vincent; Golub, Justin S; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Hume, Clifford R; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2011-10-26

    The capacity of adult mammals to regenerate sensory hair cells is not well defined. To explore early steps in this process, we examined reactivation of a transiently expressed developmental gene, Atoh1, in adult mouse utricles after neomycin-induced hair cell death in culture. Using an adenoviral reporter for Atoh1 enhancer, we found that Atoh1 transcription is activated in some hair cell progenitors (supporting cells) 3 d after neomycin treatment. By 18 d after neomycin, the number of cells with Atoh1 transcriptional activity increased significantly, but few cells acquired hair cell features (i.e., accumulated ATOH1 or myosin VIIa protein or developed stereocilia). Treatment with DAPT, an inhibitor of γ-secretase, reduced notch pathway activity, enhanced Atoh1 transcriptional activity, and dramatically increased the number of Atoh1-expressing cells with hair cell features, but only in the striolar/juxtastriolar region. Similar effects were seen with TAPI-1, an inhibitor of another enzyme required for notch activity (TACE). Division of supporting cells was rare in any control or DAPT-treated utricles. This study shows that mature mammals have a natural capacity to initiate vestibular hair cell regeneration and suggests that regional notch activity is a significant inhibitor of direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells following damage. PMID:22031879

  16. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  17. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  18. Active hair-bundle movements can amplify a hair cell’s response to oscillatory mechanical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pascal; Hudspeth, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    To enhance their mechanical sensitivity and frequency selectivity, hair cells amplify the mechanical stimuli to which they respond. Although cell-body contractions of outer hair cells are thought to mediate the active process in the mammalian cochlea, vertebrates without outer hair cells display highly sensitive, sharply tuned hearing and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. In these animals the amplifier must reside elsewhere. We report physiological evidence that amplification can stem from active movement of the hair bundle, the hair cell’s mechanosensitive organelle. We performed experiments on hair cells from the sacculus of the bullfrog. Using a two-compartment recording chamber that permits exposure of the hair cell’s apical and basolateral surfaces to different solutions, we examined active hair-bundle motion in circumstances similar to those in vivo. When the apical surface was bathed in artificial endolymph, many hair bundles exhibited spontaneous oscillations of amplitudes as great as 50 nm and frequencies in the range 5 to 40 Hz. We stimulated hair bundles with a flexible glass probe and recorded their mechanical responses with a photometric system. When the stimulus frequency lay within a band enclosing a hair cell’s frequency of spontaneous oscillation, mechanical stimuli as small as ±5 nm entrained the hair-bundle oscillations. For small stimuli, the bundle movement was larger than the stimulus. Because the energy dissipated by viscous drag exceeded the work provided by the stimulus probe, the hair bundles powered their motion and therefore amplified it. PMID:10588701

  19. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-08-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of growth factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and integrin α8. After a 2-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin compared to control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was up-regulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells. PMID:27312243

  20. ER–Mitochondrial Calcium Flow Underlies Vulnerability of Mechanosensory Hair Cells to Damage

    PubMed Central

    Esterberg, Robert; Hailey, Dale W.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells are vulnerable to environmental insult, resulting in hearing and balance disorders. We demonstrate that directional compartmental flow of intracellular Ca2+ underlies death in zebrafish lateral line hair cells after exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, a well characterized hair cell toxin. Ca2+ is mobilized from the ER and transferred to mitochondria via IP3 channels with little cytoplasmic leakage. Pharmacological agents that shunt ER-derived Ca2+ directly to cytoplasm mitigate toxicity, indicating that high cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels alone are not cytotoxic. Inhibition of the mitochondrial transition pore sensitizes hair cells to the toxic effects of aminoglycosides, contrasting with current models of excitotoxicity. Hair cells display efficient ER–mitochondrial Ca2+ flow, suggesting that tight coupling of these organelles drives mitochondrial activity under physiological conditions at the cost of increased susceptibility to toxins. PMID:25031409

  1. Gene Therapy Restores Hair Cell Stereocilia Morphology in Inner Ears of Deaf Whirler Mice.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wade W; Isgrig, Kevin; Roy, Soumen; Belyantseva, Inna A; Drummond, Meghan C; May, Lindsey A; Fitzgerald, Tracy S; Friedman, Thomas B; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary deafness is one of the most common disabilities affecting newborns. Many forms of hereditary deafness are caused by morphological defects of the stereocilia bundles on the apical surfaces of inner ear hair cells, which are responsible for sound detection. We explored the effectiveness of gene therapy in restoring the hair cell stereocilia architecture in the whirlin mouse model of human deafness, which is deaf due to dysmorphic, short stereocilia. Wild-type whirlin cDNA was delivered via adeno-associated virus (AAV8) by injection through the round window of the cochleas in neonatal whirler mice. Subsequently, whirlin expression was detected in infected hair cells (IHCs), and normal stereocilia length and bundle architecture were restored. Whirlin gene therapy also increased inner hair cell survival in the treated ears compared to the contralateral nontreated ears. These results indicate that a form of inherited deafness due to structural defects in cochlear hair cells is amenable to restoration through gene therapy. PMID:26307667

  2. Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Is Necessary for Membrane Homeostasis in Cochlear Inner Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Fan, Chi; Peng, Ya-Jing; Chen, Jie; He, Wei-Qi; Guo, Shi-Ying; Zuo, Jian; Gao, Xia; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The structural homeostasis of the cochlear hair cell membrane is critical for all aspects of sensory transduction, but the regulation of its maintenance is not well understood. In this report, we analyzed the cochlear hair cells of mice with specific deletion of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in inner hair cells. MLCK-deficient mice showed impaired hearing, with a 5- to 14-dB rise in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to clicks and tones of different frequencies and a significant decrease in the amplitude of the ABR waves. The mutant inner hair cells produced several ball-like structures around the hair bundles in vivo, indicating impaired membrane stability. Inner hair cells isolated from the knockout mice consistently displayed less resistance to hypoosmotic solution and less membrane F-actin. Myosin light-chain phosphorylation was also reduced in the mutated inner hair cells. Our results suggest that MLCK is necessary for maintaining the membrane stability of inner hair cells. PMID:22485190

  3. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Dominique J.; Doherr, Marcus G.; Müller, Eliane J.; Welle, Monika M.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  4. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique J; Doherr, Marcus G; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  5. Spontaneous hair cell regeneration in the mouse utricle following gentamicin ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Beyer, Lisa A.; Atkin, Graham M.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-01-01

    Whereas most epithelial tissues turn-over and regenerate after a traumatic lesion, this restorative ability is diminished in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear; it is absent in the cochlea and exists only in a limited capacity in the vestibular epithelium. The extent of regeneration in vestibular hair cells has been characterized for several mammalian species including guinea pig, rat, and chinchilla, but not yet in mouse. As the fundamental model species for investigating hereditary disease, the mouse can be studied using a wide variety of genetic and molecular tools. To design a mouse model for vestibular hair cell regeneration research, an aminoglycoside-induced method of complete hair cell elimination was developed in our lab and applied to the murine utricle. Loss of utricular hair cells was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and corroborated by a loss of fluorescent signal in utricles from transgenic mice with GFP-positive hair cells. Regenerative capability was characterized at several time points up to six months following insult. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed that as early as two weeks after insult, a few immature hair cells, demonstrating the characteristic immature morphology indicative of regeneration, could be seen in the utricle. As time progressed, larger numbers of immature hair cells could be seen along with some mature cells resembling surface morphology of type II hair cells. By six months post-lesion, numerous regenerated hair cells were present in the utricle, however, neither their number nor their appearance was normal. A BrdU assay suggested that at least some of the regeneration of mouse vestibular hair cells involved mitosis. Our results demonstrate that the vestibular sensory epithelium in mice can spontaneously regenerate, elucidate the time course of this process, and identify involvement of mitosis in some cases. These data establish a road map of the murine vestibular regenerative process, which can be

  6. Reinnervation of Hair Cells by Auditory Neurons after Selective Removal of Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Cuajungco, Math P.; Heller, Stefan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Hearing loss can be caused by primary degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons or by secondary degeneration of these neurons after hair cell loss. The replacement of auditory neurons would be an important step in any attempt to restore auditory function in patients with damaged inner ear neurons or hair cells. Application of β-bungarotoxin, a toxin derived from snake venom, to an explant of the cochlea eradicates spiral ganglion neurons while sparing the other cochlear cell types. The toxin was found to bind to the neurons and to cause apoptotic cell death without affecting hair cells or other inner ear cell types as indicated by TUNEL staining, and, thus, the toxin provides a highly specific means of deafferentation of hair cells. We therefore used the denervated organ of Corti for the study of neuronal regeneration and synaptogenesis with hair cells and found that spiral ganglion neurons obtained from the cochlea of an untreated newborn mouse reinnervated hair cells in the toxin-treated organ of Corti and expressed synaptic vesicle markers at points of contact with hair cells. These findings suggest that it may be possible to replace degenerated neurons by grafting new cells into the organ of Corti. PMID:16408287

  7. Phoenix Is Required for Mechanosensory Hair Cell Regeneration in the Zebrafish Lateral Line

    PubMed Central

    Behra, Martine; Bradsher, John; Sougrat, Rachid; Gallardo, Viviana; Allende, Miguel L.; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the absence or irreversible loss of hair cells, the sensory mechanoreceptors in the cochlea, accounts for a large majority of acquired and congenital hearing disorders. In the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelia of the inner ear, hair cells are accompanied by another cell type called supporting cells. This second cell population has been described as having stem cell-like properties, allowing efficient hair cell replacement during embryonic and larval/fetal development of all vertebrates. However, mammals lose their regenerative capacity in most inner ear neuroepithelia in postnatal life. Remarkably, reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish are different in that they can regenerate hair cells throughout their lifespan. The lateral line in amphibians and in fish is an additional sensory organ, which is used to detect water movements and is comprised of neuroepithelial patches, called neuromasts. These are similar in ultra-structure to the inner ear's neuroepithelia and they share the expression of various molecular markers. We examined the regeneration process in hair cells of the lateral line of zebrafish larvae carrying a retroviral integration in a previously uncharacterized gene, phoenix (pho). Phoenix mutant larvae develop normally and display a morphologically intact lateral line. However, after ablation of hair cells with copper or neomycin, their regeneration in pho mutants is severely impaired. We show that proliferation in the supporting cells is strongly decreased after damage to hair cells and correlates with the reduction of newly formed hair cells in the regenerating phoenix mutant neuromasts. The retroviral integration linked to the phenotype is in a novel gene with no known homologs showing high expression in neuromast supporting cells. Whereas its role during early development of the lateral line remains to be addressed, in later larval stages phoenix defines a new class of proteins implicated in hair cell regeneration. PMID:19381250

  8. Underestimated Sensitivity of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells Due to Splay between Stereociliary Columns

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong-Hoon; Peng, Anthony W.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Current-displacement (I-X) and the force-displacement (F-X) relationships characterize hair-cell mechano-transduction in the inner ear. A common technique for measuring these relationships is to deliver mechanical stimulations to individual hair bundles with microprobes and measure whole cell transduction currents through patch pipette electrodes at the basolateral membrane. The sensitivity of hair-cell mechano-transduction is determined by two fundamental biophysical properties of the mechano-transduction channel, the stiffness of the putative gating spring and the gating swing, which are derived from the I-X and F-X relationships. Although the hair-cell stereocilia in vivo deflect <100 nm even at high sound pressure levels, often it takes >500 nm of stereocilia displacement to saturate hair-cell mechano-transduction in experiments with individual hair cells in vitro. Despite such discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro data, key biophysical properties of hair-cell mechano-transduction to define the transduction sensitivity have been estimated from in vitro experiments. Using three-dimensional finite-element methods, we modeled an inner hair-cell and an outer hair-cell stereocilia bundle and simulated the effect of probe stimulation. Unlike the natural situation where the tectorial membrane stimulates hair-cell stereocilia evenly, probes deflect stereocilia unevenly. Because of uneven stimulation, 1) the operating range (the 10–90% width of the I-X relationship) increases by a factor of 2–8 depending on probe shapes, 2) the I-X relationship changes from a symmetric to an asymmetric function, and 3) the bundle stiffness is underestimated. Our results indicate that the generally accepted assumption of parallel stimulation leads to an overestimation of the gating swing and underestimation of the gating spring stiffness by an order of magnitude. PMID:26039165

  9. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26739040

  10. Effect of bidirectional mechanoelectrical coupling on spontaneous oscillations and sensitivity in a model of hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amro, Rami M.; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2014-11-01

    Sensory hair cells of amphibians exhibit spontaneous activity in their hair bundles and membrane potentials, reflecting two distinct active amplification mechanisms employed in these peripheral mechanosensors. We use a two-compartment model of the bullfrog's saccular hair cell to study how the interaction between its mechanical and electrical compartments affects the emergence of distinct dynamical regimes, and the role of this interaction in shaping the response of the hair cell to weak mechanical stimuli. The model employs a Hodgkin-Huxley-type system for the basolateral electrical compartment and a nonlinear hair bundle oscillator for the mechanical compartment, which are coupled bidirectionally. In the model, forward coupling is provided by the mechanoelectrical transduction current, flowing from the hair bundle to the cell soma. Backward coupling is due to reverse electromechanical transduction, whereby variations of the membrane potential affect adaptation processes in the hair bundle. We isolate oscillation regions in the parameter space of the model and show that bidirectional coupling affects significantly the dynamics of the cell. In particular, self-sustained oscillations of the hair bundles and membrane potential can result from bidirectional coupling, and the coherence of spontaneous oscillations can be maximized by tuning the coupling strength. Consistent with previous experimental work, the model demonstrates that dynamical regimes of the hair bundle change in response to variations in the conductances of basolateral ion channels. We show that sensitivity of the hair cell to weak mechanical stimuli can be maximized by varying coupling strength, and that stochasticity of the hair bundle compartment is a limiting factor of the sensitivity.

  11. Hair & skin derived progenitor cells: In search of a candidate cell for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Mohanty, Sujata; Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Gupta, Somesh; Khaitan, Binod K.; Sharma, Shilpa; Bhargava, Balram; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Skin is an established tissue source for cell based therapy. The hair follicle has been introduced later as a tissue source for cell based therapy. The ease of tissue harvest and multipotent nature of the resident stem cells in skin and hair follicle has promoted basic and clinical research in this area. This study was conducted to evaluate skin stem cells (SSCs) and hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) as candidate cells appropriate for neuronal and melanocyte lineage differentiation. Methods: In this study, SSCs and hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) were expanded in vitro by explant culture method and were compared in terms of proliferative potential and stemness; differentiation potential into melanocytes and neuronal lineage. Results: SSCs were found to be more proliferative in comparison to HFSCs, however, telomerase activity was more in HFSCs in comparison to SSCs. Capacity to differentiate into two lineages of ectoderm origin (neuronal and melanocyte) was found to be different. HFSCs cells showed more propensities towards melanocyte lineage, whereas SSCs were more inclined towards neuronal lineage. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed that SSCs had differential advantage over the HFSCs for neuronal cell differentiation, whereas, the HFSCs were better source for melanocytic differentiation. PMID:27121515

  12. Distinct roles of Eps8 in the maturation of cochlear and vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Tavazzani, Elisa; Spaiardi, Paolo; Zampini, Valeria; Contini, Donatella; Manca, Marco; Russo, Giancarlo; Prigioni, Ivo; Marcotti, Walter; Masetto, Sergio

    2016-07-22

    Several genetic mutations affecting the development and function of mammalian hair cells have been shown to cause deafness but not vestibular defects, most likely because vestibular deficits are sometimes centrally compensated. The study of hair cell physiology is thus a powerful direct approach to ascertain the functional status of the vestibular end organs. Deletion of Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8), a gene involved in actin remodeling, has been shown to cause deafness in mice. While both inner and outer hair cells from Eps8 knockout (KO) mice showed abnormally short stereocilia, inner hair cells (IHCs) also failed to acquire mature-type ion channels. Despite the fact that Eps8 is also expressed in vestibular hair cells, Eps8 KO mice show no vestibular deficits. In the present study we have investigated the properties of vestibular Type I and Type II hair cells in Eps8-KO mice and compared them to those of cochlear IHCs. In the absence of Eps8, vestibular hair cells show normally long kinocilia, significantly shorter stereocilia and a normal pattern of basolateral voltage-dependent ion channels. We have also found that while vestibular hair cells from Eps8 KO mice show normal voltage responses to injected sinusoidal currents, which were used to mimic the mechanoelectrical transducer current, IHCs lose their ability to synchronize their responses to the stimulus. We conclude that the absence of Eps8 produces a weaker phenotype in vestibular hair cells compared to cochlear IHCs, since it affects the hair bundle morphology but not the basolateral membrane currents. This difference is likely to explain the absence of obvious vestibular dysfunction in Eps8 KO mice. PMID:27132230

  13. Hair Regeneration Treatment Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Conditioned Medium: Follow-up With Trichograms

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Adipose-derived stem cells secrete various growth factors that promote hair growth. This study examined the effects of adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium on alopecia. Methods: Adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium was intradermally injected in 22 patients (11 men and 11 women) with alopecia. Patients received treatment every 3 to 5 weeks for a total of 6 sessions. Hair numbers were counted using trichograms before and after treatment. A half-side comparison study was also performed in 10 patients (8 men and 2 women). Results: Hair numbers were significantly increased after treatment in both male (including those without finasteride administration) and female patients. In the half-side comparison study, the increase in hair numbers was significantly higher on the treatment side than on the placebo side. Conclusion: Treatment using adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium appears highly effective for alopecia and may represent a new therapy for hair regeneration. PMID:25834689

  14. Current strategies for the protection, regeneration, and replacement of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Maniu, Alma; Cosgarea, Marcel

    2012-08-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, which is often caused by degeneration of hair cells in the auditory epithelium, is permanent because lost hair cells cannot be replaced in mammals. In recent years, important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in hair cell damage and, more importantly, the reasons why hair cells cannot be regenerated spontaneously in mammals. The knowledge of the factors implicated in hair cell fate determination and of the mechanisms of hair cell regeneration in birds could help in the effort to find a treatment for hearing loss. Although cochlear implant technology is advanced, it still provides only moderate hearing capacity in sensorineural deaf individuals. Inducible stem cells and molecular therapies are appealing alternatives to the cochlear implant as they hold the promise of a cure. It is important to develop a safe and effective means to deliver stem cells or genes to the correct sites to stimulate regeneration in the right place. This review aims to synthesize the present knowledge in the field of sensorineural hearing loss, focusing on the mechanisms involved in hair cell development and regeneration, with the specific purpose of identifying new therapeutic strategies. Despite tremendous progress in this field, most of the concepts discussed in this review are still in the experimental stage. PMID:22935173

  15. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  16. Age-related Changes in Auditory Nerve – Inner Hair Cell Connections, Hair Cell Numbers, Auditory Brain Stem Response and Gap Detection in UM-HET4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, RA; Dolan, DF; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, DC; Miller, RA; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in Gap Detection, the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons, and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell – auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in Gap Detection. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in gap detection, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of gap detection or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  17. Age-related changes in auditory nerve-inner hair cell connections, hair cell numbers, auditory brain stem response and gap detection in UM-HET4 mice.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, R A; Dolan, D F; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, D C; Miller, R A; Schacht, J

    2015-04-30

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in gap detection (GD), the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in the auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in GD. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in GD, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of GD or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  18. Acute copper exposure induces oxidative stress and cell death in lateral line hair cells of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Olivari, Francisco A; Hernández, Pedro P; Allende, Miguel L

    2008-12-01

    Numerous physical and chemical agents can destroy mechanosensory hair cells in the inner ear of vertebrates, a process that is irreversible in mammals. Few experimental systems allow the observation of hair cell death mechanisms in vivo, in the intact animal, one of these being the lateral line system in the zebrafish. In this work we characterize the behavior of dying lateral line hair cells in fish exposed to low doses of copper in the water. The concentration of copper used in our study kills hair cells in a few hours, but removal of the metal is followed by robust regeneration of new hair cells. We use a combination of membrane and nuclear live stains, ultrastructural analysis and measurement of reactive oxygen species to characterize the events leading to the death of hair cells under these conditions. Our results show that a combination of necrotic cell death, accompanied by apoptotic features such as rapid DNA fragmentation, lead to the loss of these cells. We also show that hair cells exposed to copper undergo oxidative stress and that antioxidants can protect these cells from the effects of the metal. The study of this process in the zebrafish lateral line allows rapid morphological analysis of hair cell death and may be used as an efficient end point for molecule screens aimed at preventing these effects. PMID:18848822

  19. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  20. Magnetic Force Nanoprobe for Direct Observation of Audio Frequency Tonotopy of Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ma, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Eunna; Choi, Hongsuh; Bok, Jinwoong; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2016-06-01

    Sound perception via mechano-sensation is a remarkably sensitive and fast transmission process, converting sound as a mechanical input to neural signals in a living organism. Although knowledge of auditory hair cell functions has advanced over the past decades, challenges remain in understanding their biomechanics, partly because of their biophysical complexity and the lack of appropriate probing tools. Most current studies of hair cells have been conducted in a relatively low-frequency range (<1000 Hz); therefore, fast kinetic study of hair cells has been difficult, even though mammalians have sound perception of 20 kHz or higher. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic force nanoprobe (MFN) has superb spatiotemporal capabilities to mechanically stimulate spatially-targeted individual hair cells with a temporal resolution of up to 9 μs, which is equivalent to approximately 50 kHz; therefore, it is possible to investigate avian hair cell biomechanics at different tonotopic regions of the cochlea covering a full hearing frequency range of 50 to 5000 Hz. We found that the variation of the stimulation frequency and amplitude of hair bundles creates distinct mechanical responsive features along the tonotopic axis, where the kinetics of the hair bundle recovery motion exhibits unique frequency-dependent characteristics: basal, middle, and apical hair bundles can effectively respond at their respective ranges of frequency. We revealed that such recovery kinetics possesses two different time constants that are closely related to the passive and active motilities of hair cells. The use of MFN is critical for the kinetics study of free-standing hair cells in a spatiotemporally distinct tonotopic organization. PMID:27215487

  1. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO. PMID:23383324

  2. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  3. The many paths to alopecia, with compromised hair stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji; Jiang, Ting Xin; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia can be caused by defective formation or increased destruction of hair follicles. Much work has elucidated the control of alopecia caused by regenerative problems due to morphogen signaling. Recently investigators started to reveal nuclear pathways required for the activation and progression of hair stem cells. Taken together these studies will provide new clues to the design of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23673497

  4. Root hair formation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) differs between root types and is altered in artificial growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Josefine; Keyes, Samuel David; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Root hairs are important sites for nutrient uptake, especially in P limiting conditions. Here we provide first insights into root hair development for the diverse root types of rice grown under different conditions, and show the first in situ images of rice root hairs in intact soil. Roots of plants grown in upland fields produced short root hairs that showed little responsiveness to P deficiency, and had a higher root hair density in the high P condition. These results were reproducible in rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions. Synchrotron-based in situ analysis of root hairs in intact soil further confirmed this pattern of root hair formation. In contrast, plants grown in nutrient solution produced more and longer root hairs in low P conditions, but these were unequally distributed among the different root types. While nutrient solution-grown main roots had longer hairs compared to upland field-grown main roots, second order lateral roots did not form any root hairs in nutrient solution-grown plants. Furthermore, root hair formation for plants grown in flooded lowland fields revealed few similarities with those grown in nutrient solution, thus defining nutrient solution as a possible measure of maximal, but not natural root hair development. By combining root hair length and density as a measure for root hair impact on the whole soil-grown root system we show that lateral roots provided the majority of root hair surface. PMID:26976815

  5. The zebrafish merovingian mutant reveals a role for pH regulation in hair cell toxicity and function.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Owens, Kelly N; Linbo, Tor; Reinhart, Katherine E; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2014-07-01

    Control of the extracellular environment of inner ear hair cells by ionic transporters is crucial for hair cell function. In addition to inner ear hair cells, aquatic vertebrates have hair cells on the surface of their body in the lateral line system. The ionic environment of these cells also appears to be regulated, although the mechanisms of this regulation are less understood than those of the mammalian inner ear. We identified the merovingian mutant through genetic screening in zebrafish for genes involved in drug-induced hair cell death. Mutants show complete resistance to neomycin-induced hair cell death and partial resistance to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. This resistance is probably due to impaired drug uptake as a result of reduced mechanotransduction ability, suggesting that the mutants have defects in hair cell function independent of drug treatment. Through genetic mapping we found that merovingian mutants contain a mutation in the transcription factor gcm2. This gene is important for the production of ionocytes, which are cells crucial for whole body pH regulation in fish. We found that merovingian mutants showed an acidified extracellular environment in the vicinity of both inner ear and lateral line hair cells. We believe that this acidified extracellular environment is responsible for the defects seen in hair cells of merovingian mutants, and that these mutants would serve as a valuable model for further study of the role of pH in hair cell function. PMID:24973752

  6. Synthetic Biology: A Bridge between Artificial and Natural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yunfeng; Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial cells are simple cell-like entities that possess certain properties of natural cells. In general, artificial cells are constructed using three parts: (1) biological membranes that serve as protective barriers, while allowing communication between the cells and the environment; (2) transcription and translation machinery that synthesize proteins based on genetic sequences; and (3) genetic modules that control the dynamics of the whole cell. Artificial cells are minimal and well-defined systems that can be more easily engineered and controlled when compared to natural cells. Artificial cells can be used as biomimetic systems to study and understand natural dynamics of cells with minimal interference from cellular complexity. However, there remain significant gaps between artificial and natural cells. How much information can we encode into artificial cells? What is the minimal number of factors that are necessary to achieve robust functioning of artificial cells? Can artificial cells communicate with their environments efficiently? Can artificial cells replicate, divide or even evolve? Here, we review synthetic biological methods that could shrink the gaps between artificial and natural cells. The closure of these gaps will lead to advancement in synthetic biology, cellular biology and biomedical applications. PMID:25532531

  7. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  8. Reconstitution of intracellular environments in vitro and in artificial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kei; Yanagisawa, Miho; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2014-01-01

    Toward reconstitution of living cells by artificial cells technology, it is critical process to understand the differences between mixtures of biomolecules and living cells. For the aim, we have developed procedures for preparation of an additive-free cell extract (AFCE) and for concentrating biomacromolecules in artificial cells. In this review, we introduce our recent progress to reconstitute intracellular environments in vitro and in artificial cells. PMID:27493497

  9. Efferent Control of Hair Cell and Afferent Responses in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Richard; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Highstein, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The sensations of sound and motion generated by the inner ear are controlled by the brain through extensive centripetal innervation originating within the brain stem. In the semicircular canals, brain stem efferent neurons make synaptic contacts with mechanosensory hair cells and with the dendrites of afferent neurons. Here, we examine the relative contributions of efferent action on hair cells and afferents. Experiments were performed in vivo in the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The efferent system was activated via electrical pulses to the brain stem and sensory responses to motion stimuli were quantified by simultaneous voltage recording from afferents and intracellular current- and/or voltage-clamp recordings from hair cells. Results showed synaptic inputs to both afferents and hair cells leading to relatively long-latency intracellular signaling responses: excitatory in afferents and inhibitory in hair cells. Generally, the net effect of efferent action was an increase in afferent background discharge and a simultaneous decrease in gain to angular motion stimuli. Inhibition of hair cells was likely the result of a ligand-gated opening of a major basolateral conductance. The reversal potential of the efferent-evoked current was just below the hair cell resting potential, thus resulting in a small hyperpolarization. The onset latency averaged about 90 ms and latency to peak response was 150–400 ms. Hair cell inhibition often outlasted afferent excitation and, in some cases, latched hair cells in the “off” condition for >1 s following cessation of stimulus. These features endow the animal with a powerful means to adjust the sensitivity and dynamic range of motion sensation. PMID:19571186

  10. Cochlear hair cells: The sound-sensing machines.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Elgoyhen, A Belén; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia

    2015-11-14

    The sensory epithelium of the mammalian inner ear contains two types of mechanosensory cells: inner (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC). They both transduce mechanical force generated by sound waves into electrical signals. In their apical end, these cells possess a set of stereocilia representing the mechanosensing organelles. IHC are responsible for detecting sounds and transmitting the acoustic information to the brain by converting graded depolarization into trains of action potentials in auditory nerve fibers. OHC are responsible for the active mechanical amplification process that leads to the fine tuning and high sensitivity of the mammalian inner ear. This active amplification is the consequence of the ability of OHC to alter their cell length in response to changes in membrane potential, and is controlled by an efferent inhibitory innervation. Medial olivocochlear efferent fibers, originating in the brainstem, synapse directly at the base of OHC and release acetylcholine. A very special type of nicotinic receptor, assembled by α9α10 subunits, participates in this synapse. Here we review recent knowledge and the role of both afferent and efferent synapse in the inner ear. PMID:26335749

  11. Voltage oscillations and ionic conductances in hair cells isolated from the alligator cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P A; Evans, M G

    1988-12-01

    Tall hair cells were isolated by enzymatic and mechanical dissociation from selected regions of the apical half of the alligator (A. mississippiensis) cochlea. Single cells were subjected to voltage-clamp and current-clamp using the tight-seal whole-cell recording technique. Most hair cells isolated from the apex of the cochlea produced slowly regenerative depolarizations or Na action potentials during current injection, whereas hair cells isolated from more basal regions usually produced voltage oscillations (ringing) in response to depolarizing current injection, an indication of electrical resonance. Resonant frequencies ranged from 50 to 157 Hz in different cells. The higher-frequency cells tended to have larger and more rapidly activating outward currents than did the lower-frequency cells. An inward Ca current and an outward Ca-activated K current were present in all hair cells. In addition, an inwardly rectifying current and a small, transient outward current were often seen. Thus, we conclude that an electrical tuning mechanism is present in alligator hair cells. The role of the ionic conductances in shaping hair cell responses to current injection, and the possible contributions of these electrical responses to cochlear function are discussed. PMID:3244125

  12. Genetic analysis of vertebrate sensory hair cell mechanosensation: the zebrafish circler mutants.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, T; Rüsch, A; Friedrich, R W; Granato, M; Ruppersberg, J P; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1998-02-01

    The molecular basis of sensory hair cell mechanotransduction is largely unknown. In order to identify genes that are essential for mechanosensory hair cell function, we characterized a group of recently isolated zebrafish motility mutants. These mutants are defective in balance and swim in circles but have no obvious morphological defects. We examined the mutants using calcium imaging of acoustic-vibrational and tactile escape responses, high resolution microscopy of sensory neuroepithelia in live larvae, and recordings of extracellular hair cell potentials (microphonics). Based on the analyses, we have identified several classes of genes. Mutations in sputnik and mariner affect hair bundle integrity. Mutant astronaut and cosmonaut hair cells have relatively normal microphonics and thus appear to affect events downstream of mechanotransduction. Mutant orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae have normal hair cell morphology and yet do not respond to acoustic-vibrational stimuli. The microphonics of lateral line hair cells of orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae are absent or strongly reduced. Therefore, these genes may encode components of the transduction apparatus. PMID:9491988

  13. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Zlatka P; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-10-15

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration. PMID:26487780

  14. Donor-derived DNA in hair follicles of recipients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, R; Lewandowski, K; Rupa-Matysek, J; Jedrzejczyk, M; Brzezinski, P M; Dobosz, T; Jonkisz, A; Szram, S; Komarnicki, M; Berent, J

    2010-11-01

    The hair follicles of recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) constitute the tissue with the greatest need for regeneration after high-dose chemotherapy. Previous studies have shown a lack of donor-derived DNA in the hair follicles of recipients. Therefore, we carried out a study to determine whether male donor-derived genetic material can be found in female recipients' hair follicles after HSCT. Fluorescent-based PCR with analyses of Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR) and RQ-PCR with the sex-determining region Y (SRY) were used independently to evaluate chimerism status. Our results proved the existence of donor-derived stem DNA in the recipients' hair follicle cells. This report undermines the validity of data indicating that hair follicle cells maintain 100% of recipient origin. PMID:20173789

  15. Patterns of light interference produced by damaged cuticle cells in human hair.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Garcia, Manuel; Lu, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Colorful patterns of light interference have been observed to occur in human hair cuticle cells. The light interference phenomenon has been analyzed by optical microscopy. The strong patterns of light interference appeared only in cuticle cells that had been damaged either mechanically or by thermal stresses. Cuticle cells that were not damaged did not produce this phenomenon. The zones of light interference on the hair surface were seen to extend to cuticle sheath areas whose damage was not apparent when analyzed under the Scanning Electron Microscope. The presence of oils and other hydrophobic materials in the hair had a strong effect in the appearance or disappearance of the interference patterns. PMID:17728927

  16. An adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway predicts direct dopaminergic input to vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Drescher, M J; Cho, W J; Folbe, A J; Selvakumar, D; Kewson, D T; Abu-Hamdan, M D; Oh, C K; Ramakrishnan, N A; Hatfield, J S; Khan, K M; Anne, S; Harpool, E C; Drescher, D G

    2010-12-29

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling pathways have been identified in a model hair cell preparation from the trout saccule, for which the hair cell is the only intact cell type. The use of degenerate primers targeting cDNA sequence conserved across AC isoforms, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with cloning of amplification products, indicated expression of AC9, AC7 and AC5/6, with cloning efficiencies of 11:5:2. AC9 and AC5/6 are inhibited by Ca(2+), the former in conjunction with calcineurin, and message for calcineurin has also been identified in the trout saccular hair cell layer. AC7 is independent of Ca(2+). Given the lack of detection of calcium/calmodulin-activated isoforms previously suggested to mediate AC activation in the absence of Gαs in mammalian cochlear hair cells, the issue of hair-cell Gαs mRNA expression was re-examined in the teleost vestibular hair cell model. Two full-length coding sequences were obtained for Gαs/olf in the vestibular type II-like hair cells of the trout saccule. Two messages for Gαi have also been detected in the hair cell layer, one with homology to Gαi1 and the second with homology to Gαi3 of higher vertebrates. Both Gαs/olf protein and Gαi1/Gαi3 protein were immunolocalized to stereocilia and to the base of the hair cell, the latter consistent with sites of efferent input. Although a signaling event coupling to Gαs/olf and Gαi1/Gαi3 in the stereocilia is currently unknown, signaling with Gαs/olf, Gαi3, and AC5/6 at the base of the hair cell would be consistent with transduction pathways activated by dopaminergic efferent input. mRNA for dopamine receptors D1A4 and five forms of dopamine D2 were found to be expressed in the teleost saccular hair cell layer, representing information on vestibular hair cell expression not directly available for higher vertebrates. Dopamine D1A receptor would couple to Gαolf and activation of AC5/6. Co-expression with dopamine D2 receptor, which

  17. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field will be provided in order to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, a review of stem cell and gene therapy will be presented and a critical appraisal of their application to hair cell regeneration will be provided. The methodologies used in these approaches will be highlighted. Method Narrative review of the fields of cellular, molecular, and developmental biology, tissue engineering, and stem cell and gene therapy using the PubMed database. Results The use of biotechnological approaches to the treatment of hearing loss, such as stem cell and gene therapy, has led to new methods of regenerating cochlear hair cells in mammals. Conclusions There have been incredible strides made in assembling important pieces of the puzzle that comprise hair cell regeneration. However, mammalian hair cell regeneration using stem cell and gene therapy are years if not decades away from being clinically feasible. If the goals of the biological approaches are met, these therapies may represent the future treatments for hearing loss. PMID:21386039

  18. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  19. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D; Brownell, William E

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 μm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400–800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons. PMID:16705263

  20. Spontaneous Activity of Cochlear Hair Cells Triggered by Fluid Secretion Mechanism in Adjacent Support Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl(-) efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. Release of Cl(-) from ISCs also forces K(+) efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that supporting cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  1. Foxp1 Regulates the Proliferation of Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Response to Oxidative Stress during Hair Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Li, Hanjun; Zhou, Rujiang; Ma, Gang; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the bugle circularly generate outer root sheath (ORS) through linear proliferation within limited cycles during anagen phases. However, the mechanisms controlling the pace of HFSC proliferation remain unclear. Here we revealed that Foxp1, a transcriptional factor, was dynamically relocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of HFSCs in phase transitions from anagen to catagen, coupled with the rise of oxidative stress. Mass spectrum analyses revealed that the S468 phosphorylation of Foxp1 protein was responsive to oxidative stress and affected its nucleocytoplasmic translocation. Foxp1 deficiency in hair follicles led to compromised ROS accrual and increased HFSC proliferation. And more, NAC treatment profoundly elongated the anagen duration and HFSC proliferation in Foxp1-deficient background. Molecularly, Foxp1 augmented ROS levels through suppression of Trx1-mediated reductive function, thereafter imposing the cell cycle arrest by modulating the activity of p19/p53 pathway. Our findings identify a novel role for Foxp1 in controlling HFSC proliferation with cellular dynamic location in response to oxidative stress during hair cycling. PMID:26171970

  2. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and valproic acid on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish lateral line neuromasts

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingzi; Cai, Chengfu; Tang, Dongmei; Sun, Shan; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    In humans, auditory hair cells are not replaced when injured. Thus, cochlear hair cell loss causes progressive and permanent hearing loss. Conversely, non-mammalian vertebrates are capable of regenerating lost sensory hair cells. The zebrafish lateral line has numerous qualities that make it well-suited for studying hair cell development and regeneration. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been shown to have an important role in regenerative processes in vertebrates, but its function in hair cell regeneration in vivo is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the role of HDAC activity in hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line. We eliminated lateral line hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization larvae using neomycin and then treated the larvae with HDAC inhibitors. To assess hair cell regeneration, we used 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in zebrafish larvae to label mitotic cells after hair cell loss. We found that pharmacological inhibition of HDACs using trichostatin A (TSA) or valproic acid (VPA) increased histone acetylation in the regenerated neuromasts following neomycin-induced damage. We also showed that treatment with TSA or VPA decreased the number of supporting cells and regenerated hair cells in response to hair cell damage. Additionally, BrdU immunostaining and western blot analysis showed that TSA or VPA treatment caused a significant decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells and induced p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, both of which are likely to explain the decrease in the amount of newly regenerated hair cells in treated embryos. Finally, we showed that HDAC inhibitors induced no observable cell death in neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC activity has an important role in the regeneration of hair cells in the lateral line. PMID:25431550

  3. Ionic currents and electromotility in inner ear hair cells from humans.

    PubMed

    Oghalai, J S; Holt, J R; Nakagawa, T; Jung, T M; Coker, N J; Jenkins, H A; Eatock, R A; Brownell, W E

    1998-04-01

    The upright posture and rich vocalizations of primates place demands on their senses of balance and hearing that differ from those of other animals. There is a wealth of behavioral, psychophysical, and CNS measures characterizing these senses in primates, but no prior recordings from their inner ear sensory receptor cells. We harvested human hair cells from patients undergoing surgical removal of life-threatening brain stem tumors and measured their ionic currents and electromotile responses. The hair cells were either isolated or left in situ in their sensory epithelium and investigated using the tight-seal, whole cell technique. We recorded from both type I and type II vestibular hair cells under voltage clamp and found four voltage-dependent currents, each of which has been reported in hair cells of other animals. Cochlear outer hair cells demonstrated electromotility in response to voltage steps like that seen in rodent animal models. Our results reveal many qualitative similarities to hair cells obtained from other animals and justify continued investigations to explore quantitative differences that may be associated with normal or pathological human sensation. PMID:9535985

  4. A novel cholinergic receptor mediates inhibition of chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P A; Murrow, B W

    1992-04-22

    The central nervous system provides feedback regulation at several points within the peripheral auditory apparatus. One component of that feedback is inhibition of cochlear hair cells by release of acetylcholine (ACh) from efferent brainstem neurons. The mechanism of hair cell inhibition, and the character of the presumed cholinergic receptor, however, have eluded understanding. Both nicotinic and muscarinic, as well as some non-cholinergic ligands can affect the efferent action. We have made whole-cell, tight-seal recordings from short (outer) hair cells isolated from the chick's cochlea. These are the principal targets of cochlear efferents in birds. ACh hyperpolarizes short hair cells by opening a cation channel through which Ca2+ enters the cell and subsequently activates Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (Fuchs & Murrow 1991, 1992). Both curare and atropine are effective-antagonists of cholinergic inhibition at 3 microM, whereas trimethaphan camsylate and strychnine block at 1 microM. The normally irreversible nicotinic antagonist, alpha-bungarotoxin, reversibly blocked the hair cell response, as did kappa-bungarotoxin. The half-blocking concentration for alpha-bungarotoxin was 26 nM. It is proposed that the hair cell AChR is a ligand-gated cation channel related to the nicotinic receptor of nerve and muscle. PMID:1355909

  5. Voltage-dependent potassium currents in cochlear hair cells of the embryonic chick.

    PubMed

    Griguer, C; Fuchs, P A

    1996-01-01

    1. Hair cells were isolated from apical and basal regions of the embryonic chick's cochlea. Outward potassium currents were recorded using whole cell tight-seal voltage clamp. 2. Outward currents in basal hair cells activated and inactivated rapidly. The average time to half-maximum at 0 mV was 2.9 ms. The time constant of inactivation at 0 mV was 71 ms. Boltzmann fits to conductance-voltage curves gave an average half-activation voltage of -36 mV, and steady-state inactivation was half-maximal at -62 mV. 3. Potassium currents in apical hair cells had slower kinetics, with a time to half-maximum of 6.7 ms and an inactivation time constant of 242 ms at + 10 mV. The half-activation voltage derived from Boltzmann fits was -16 mV and that for inactivation was -43 mV. 4. With respect to kinetic and voltage-dependent properties, the rapidly and slowly activating potassium currents of embryonic cells were similar to the rapidly inactivating "A" current of mature short hair cells and to the delayed rectifier of mature tall hair cells. However, unlike the adult currents, the embryonic currents did not show differential sensitivities to tetraethylammonium chloride and 4-aminopyridine. As early as the tenth day of embryogenesis, hair cells at the apical and basal extremes of the cochlea produced functionally distinct voltage-gated potassium currents. PMID:8822574

  6. The transcriptome of utricle hair cell regeneration in the avian inner ear.

    PubMed

    Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Renaud, Nicole A; Veile, Rose A; Helms, Cynthia; Voelker, Courtney C J; Warchol, Mark E; Lovett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Sensory hair cell loss is the major cause of hearing and balance disorders. Mammals are incapable of sustained hair cell regeneration, but lower vertebrates can regenerate these mechano-electrical transducers. We present the first comprehensive transcriptome (by mRNA-Seq) of hair cell regeneration in the chick utricle. We provide pathway and pattern annotations and correlate these with the phenotypic events that occur during regeneration. These patterns are surprisingly synchronous and highly punctuated. We show how these patterns are a new resource for identifying components of the hair cell transcriptome and identify 494 new putative hair-cell-specific genes and validate three of these (of three tested) by immunohistochemical staining. We describe many surprising new components and dynamic expression patterns, particularly within NOTCH signaling. For example, we show that HES7 is specifically expressed during utricle hair cell regeneration and closely parallels the expression of HES5. Likewise, the expression of ATOH1 is closely correlated with HEYL and the HLH inhibitory transcription factors ID1, ID2, and ID4. We investigate the correlation between fibroblast growth factor signaling and supporting cell proliferation and show that FGF20 inhibits supporting cell proliferation. We also present an analysis of 212 differentially expressed transcription factor genes in the regenerative time course that fall into nine distinct gene expression patterns, many of which correlate with phenotypic events during regeneration and represent attractive candidates for future analysis and manipulation of the regenerative program in sensory epithelia and other vertebrate neuroepithelia. PMID:24599453

  7. Gene-expression analysis of hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linjia; Romero-Carvajal, Andres; Haug, Jeff S; Seidel, Christopher W; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-04-01

    Deafness caused by the terminal loss of inner ear hair cells is one of the most common sensory diseases. However, nonmammalian animals (e.g., birds, amphibians, and fish) regenerate damaged hair cells. To understand better the reasons underpinning such disparities in regeneration among vertebrates, we set out to define at high resolution the changes in gene expression associated with the regeneration of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line. We performed RNA-Seq analyses on regenerating support cells purified by FACS. The resulting expression data were subjected to pathway enrichment analyses, and the differentially expressed genes were validated in vivo via whole-mount in situ hybridizations. We discovered that cell cycle regulators are expressed hours before the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling following hair cell death. We propose that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not involved in regulating the onset of proliferation but governs proliferation at later stages of regeneration. In addition, and in marked contrast to mammals, our data clearly indicate that the Notch pathway is significantly down-regulated shortly after injury, thus uncovering a key difference between the zebrafish and mammalian responses to hair cell injury. Taken together, our findings lay the foundation for identifying differences in signaling pathway regulation that could be exploited as potential therapeutic targets to promote either sensory epithelium or hair cell regeneration in mammals. PMID:24706903

  8. Glutamatergic signaling at the vestibular hair cell calyx synapse.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Soroush G; Pyott, Sonja J; Yu, Zhou; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2014-10-29

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamatergic transmission, K(+) or H(+) accumulation in the synaptic cleft as mechanisms of transmission. Here the role of glutamatergic transmission at the calyx synapse is investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from calyx endings were performed in an in vitro whole-tissue preparation of the rat vestibular crista, the sensory organ of the semicircular canals that sense head rotation. AMPA-mediated EPSCs showed an unusually wide range of decay time constants, from <5 to >500 ms. Decay time constants of EPSCs increased (or decreased) in the presence of a glutamate transporter blocker (or a competitive glutamate receptor blocker), suggesting a role for glutamate accumulation and spillover in synaptic transmission. Glutamate accumulation caused slow depolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane potentials, and thereby substantially increased calyx firing rates. Finally, antibody labelings showed that a high percentage of presynaptic ribbon release sites and postsynaptic glutamate receptors were not juxtaposed, favoring a role for spillover. These findings suggest a prominent role for glutamate spillover in integration of inputs and synaptic transmission in the vestibular periphery. We propose that similar to other brain areas, such as the cerebellum and hippocampus, glutamate spillover may play a role in gain control of calyx afferents and contribute to their high-pass properties. PMID:25355208

  9. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  10. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Peng, A.W.; Effertz, T.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca2+ entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence of adaptation in the mammalian auditory system. Recordings from rat cochlear hair cells, demonstrate that altering Ca2+ entry or internal Ca2+ buffering has little effect on either adaptation kinetics or steady state adaptation responses. Two additional findings include a voltage dependent process and an extracellular Ca2+ binding site both modulating the resting open probability independent of adaptation. These data suggest that slow motor adaptation is negligible in mammalian auditory cells and that the remaining adaptation process is independent of calcium entry. PMID:24267652