Sample records for artificial light-harvesting self-assemble

  1. Self-Assembly Strategies for Integrating Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, Michael R. (NWU)

    2011-09-28

    In natural photosynthesis, organisms optimize solar energy conversion through organized assemblies of photofunctional chromophores and catalysts within proteins that provide specifically tailored environments for chemical reactions. As with their natural counterparts, artificial photosynthetic systems for practical solar fuels production must collect light energy, separate charge, and transport charge to catalytic sites where multielectron redox processes will occur. While encouraging progress has been made on each aspect of this complex problem, researchers have not yet developed self-ordering and self-assembling components and the tailored environments necessary to realize a fully-functional artificial system. Previously researchers have used complex, covalent molecular systems comprised of chromophores, electron donors, and electron acceptors to mimic both the light-harvesting and the charge separation functions of photosynthetic proteins. These systems allow for study of the dependencies of electron transfer rate constants on donor?acceptor distance and orientation, electronic interaction, and the free energy of the reaction. The most useful and informative systems are those in which structural constraints control both the distance and the orientation between the electron donors and acceptors. Self-assembly provides a facile means for organizing large numbers of molecules into supramolecular structures that can bridge length scales from nanometers to macroscopic dimensions. The resulting structures must provide pathways for migration of light excitation energy among antenna chromophores, and from antennas to reaction centers. They also must incorporate charge conduits, that is, molecular 'wires' that can efficiently move electrons and holes between reaction centers and catalytic sites. The central scientific challenge is to develop small, functional building blocks with a minimum number of covalent linkages, which also have the appropriate molecular recognition properties to facilitate self-assembly of complete, functional artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we explore how self-assembly strategies involving ?-stacking can be used to integrate light harvesting with charge separation and transport.

  2. Quantum-dot-induced self-assembly of cricoid protein for light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lu; Han, Jishu; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Linlu; Si, Chengye; Zhang, Xiyu; Hou, Chunxi; Luo, Quan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-04-22

    Stable protein one (SP1) has been demonstrated as an appealing building block to design highly ordered architectures, despite the hybrid assembly with other nano-objects still being a challenge. Herein, we developed a strategy to construct high-ordered protein nanostructures by electrostatic self-assembly of cricoid protein nanorings and globular quantum dots (QDs). Using multielectrostatic interactions between 12mer protein nanoring SP1 and oppositely charged CdTe QDs, highly ordered nanowires with sandwich structure were achieved by hybridized self-assembly. QDs with different sizes (QD1, 3-4 nm; QD2, 5-6 nm; QD3, ?10 nm) would induce the self-assembly protein rings into various nanowires, subsequent bundles, and irregular networks in aqueous solution. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering characterizations confirmed that the size of QDs and the structural topology of the nanoring play critical functions in the formation of the superstructures. Furthermore, an ordered arrangement of QDs provides an ideal scaffold for designing the light-harvesting antenna. Most importantly, when different sized QDs (e.g., QD1 and QD3) self-assembled with SP1, an extremely efficient Förster resonance energy transfer was observed on these protein nanowires. The self-assembled protein nanostructures were demonstrated as a promising scaffold for the development of an artificial light-harvesting system. PMID:24601558

  3. Self-assembled photosynthesis-inspired light harvesting material and solar cells containing the same

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Chinnasamy, Muthiah (Raleigh, NC); Fan, Dazhong (Raleigh, NC)

    2009-12-15

    A solar cell is described that comprises: (a) a semiconductor charge separation material; (b) at least one electrode connected to the charge separation material; and (c) a light-harvesting film on the charge separation material, the light-harvesting film comprising non-covalently coupled, self-assembled units of porphyrinic macrocycles. The porphyrinic macrocycles preferably comprise: (i) an intramolecularly coordinated metal; (ii) a first coordinating substituent; and (iii) a second coordinating substituent opposite the first coordinating substituent. The porphyrinic macrocycles can be assembled by repeating intermolecular coordination complexes of the metal, the first coordinating substituent and the second coordinating substituent.

  4. Multichromophoric organic molecules encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles for artificial light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Jana, Bikash; Patra, Amitava

    2015-03-16

    We designed a self-assembled multichromophoric organic molecular arrangement inside polymer nanoparticles for light-harvesting antenna materials. The self-assembled molecular arrangement of quaterthiophene molecules was found to be an efficient light-absorbing antenna material, followed by energy transfer to Nile red (NR) dye molecules, which was confined in polymer nanoparticles. The efficiency of the antenna effect was found to be 3.2 and the effective molar extinction coefficient of acceptor dye molecules was found to be enhanced, which indicates an efficient light-harvesting system. Based on this energy-transfer process, tunable photo emission and white light emission has been generated with 14?% quantum yield. Such self-assembled oligothiophene-NR systems encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles may open up new possibilities for fabrication of artificial light harvesting system. PMID:25600650

  5. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T

    2014-08-21

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ?120 nm in a 60 ?m length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates. PMID:24909123

  6. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S.; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 ?m length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 ?m length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01661k

  7. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the photocatalytic mechanisms of H2/O2 evolution and CO2 reduction at the molecular level and to bridge natural and artificial photosynthesis. We demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid photocatalyst, biomimetic molecular cocatalysts, and semiconductor light harvester for artificial photosynthesis and therefore provide a promising approach for rational design and construction of highly efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. PMID:23730891

  8. Verification of the vibronic origin of long-lived coherence in an artificial molecular light harvester

    E-print Network

    James Lim; David Pale?ek; Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Craig N. Lincoln; Javier Prior; Hans von Berlepsch; Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio; Donatas Zigmantas; Jürgen Hauer

    2015-02-05

    Is quantum coherence responsible for the surprisingly high efficiency of natural light harvesters? If so, how do such systems avoid the loss of coherence due to interaction with their warm, wet and noisy environments? The answer to these important questions rests in the beneficial interplay between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Here we report experimental and theoretical verification of coherent exciton-vibrational (vibronic) coupling as the origin of long-lasting coherence in an artificial light harvester, a molecular J-aggregate. In this macroscopically aligned tubular system, polarization controlled 2D spectroscopy delivers an uncongested and specific optical response. This clarity of signal provided the opportunity to unambiguously assign the origin of the observed long-lived coherences to vibronic coupling and rule out other explanations based upon correlated fluctuations. The discussed vibronic coupling is functionally relevant, as it describes interaction between vibrations and electronic excited states and hence possesses the potential for enhancing energy transfer.

  9. In vitro self-assembly of the light harvesting pigment-protein LH2 revealed by ultrafast spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Axel; Stenstam, Anna; Beenken, Wichard J D; Herek, Jennifer L; Cogdell, Richard; Pullerits, Tõnu; Sundström, Villy

    2004-04-01

    Controlled ensemble formation of protein-surfactant systems provides a fundamental concept for the realization of nanoscale devices with self-organizing capability. In this context, spectroscopic monitoring of pigment-containing proteins yields detailed structural information. Here we have studied the association behavior of the bacterial light-harvesting protein LH2 from Rhodobacter spheroides in an n,n-dimethyldodecylamine-n-oxide/water environment. Time-resolved studies of the excitation annihilation yielded information about aggregate sizes and packing of the protein complexes therein. The results are compared to transmission electron microscopy images of instantaneously frozen samples. Our data indicate the manifestation of different phases, which are discussed with respect to the thermodynamic equilibrium in ternary protein-surfactant-water systems. Accordingly, by varying the concentration the formation of different types of aggregates can be controlled. Conditions for the appearance of isolated LH2 complexes are defined. PMID:15041674

  10. In Vitro Self-Assembly of the Light Harvesting Pigment-Protein LH2 Revealed by Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Axel; Stenstam, Anna; Beenken, Wichard J. D.; Herek, Jennifer L.; Cogdell, Richard; Pullerits, Tõnu; Sundström, Villy

    2004-01-01

    Controlled ensemble formation of protein-surfactant systems provides a fundamental concept for the realization of nanoscale devices with self-organizing capability. In this context, spectroscopic monitoring of pigment-containing proteins yields detailed structural information. Here we have studied the association behavior of the bacterial light-harvesting protein LH2 from Rhodobacter spheroides in an n,n-dimethyldodecylamine-n-oxide/water environment. Time-resolved studies of the excitation annihilation yielded information about aggregate sizes and packing of the protein complexes therein. The results are compared to transmission electron microscopy images of instantaneously frozen samples. Our data indicate the manifestation of different phases, which are discussed with respect to the thermodynamic equilibrium in ternary protein-surfactant-water systems. Accordingly, by varying the concentration the formation of different types of aggregates can be controlled. Conditions for the appearance of isolated LH2 complexes are defined. PMID:15041674

  11. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    E-print Network

    Perlík, Václav; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Man?al, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The initial energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs between the light-harvesting pigments and on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that F\\"orster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which leads to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited state as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid el...

  12. Light-harvesting nanorods based on pheophorbide-appending cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Keita; Granström, Mari; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Helaja, Juho; Heinilehto, Santtu; Inoue, Rintaro; Kanaya, Toshiji; Hill, Jonathan P; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2013-09-01

    In contrast to the success in artificial DNA- and peptide-based nanostructures, the ability of polysaccharides to self-assemble into one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructures are limited. Here, we describe a strategy for designing and fabricating nanorods using a regioselectively functionalized cellulose derivative at the air-water interface in a stepwise manner. A semisynthetic chlorophyll derivative, pyro-pheophorbide a, was partially introduced into the C-6 position of the cellulose backbone for the design of materials with specific optical properties. Remarkably, controlled formation of cellulose nanorods can be achieved, producing light-harvesting nanorods that display a larger bathochromic shift than their solution counterparts. The results presented here demonstrate that the self-assembly of functionalized polysaccharides on surfaces could lead the nanostructures mimicking the naturally occurring chloroplasts. PMID:23865684

  13. Self-Assembled Local Artificial Substrates of GaAs on Si Substrate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We propose a self-assembling procedure for the fabrication of GaAs islands by Droplet Epitaxy on silicon substrate. Controlling substrate temperature and amount of supplied gallium is possible to tune the base size of the islands from 70 up to 250 nm and the density from 107 to 109 cm?2. The islands show a standard deviation of base size distribution below 10% and their shape evolves changing the aspect ratio from 0.3 to 0.5 as size increases. Due to their characteristics, these islands are suitable to be used as local artificial substrates for the integration of III–V quantum nanostructures directly on silicon substrate. PMID:21170400

  14. Question 9: Quantum Self-Assembly and Photoinduced Electron Tunneling in Photosynthetic Systems of Artificial Minimal Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Tamulis, Vykintas

    2007-10-01

    Natural and artificial living cells and their substructures are self-assembling, due to electron correlation interactions among biological and water molecules, which lead to attractive dispersion forces and hydrogen bonds. Dispersion forces are weak intermolecular forces that arise from the attractive force between quantum multipoles. A hydrogen bond is a special type of quantum attractive interaction that exists between an electronegative atom and a hydrogen atom bonded to another electronegative atom; and this hydrogen atom exist in two quantum states. The best method to simulate these dispersion forces and hydrogen bonds is to perform quantum mechanical non-local density functional potential calculations of artificial minimal living cells consisting of around 1,000 atoms. The cell systems studied are based on peptide nucleic acid and are 3.0-4.2 nm in diameter. The electron tunneling and associated light absorption of the most intense transitions, as calculated by the time dependent density functional theory method, differs from spectroscopic experiments by only 0.2-0.3 nm, which is within the value of experiment errors. This agreement implies that the quantum mechanically self-assembled structures of artificial minimal living cells very closely approximate realistic ones.

  15. Direct Electrochemistry of Artificial Peroxidase Based on Self-Assembled Cytochrome C -SDS-Nano-micelle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Hong; Kun Huang; Wei Wang; Wei-Yun Yang; Ying-Xue Zhao; Bao-Lin Xiao; Zainab Moosavi-Movahedi; Hedayatollah Ghourchian; Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi

    2012-01-01

    A peroxidase activity nano-artificial enzyme (AP) was designed by feeding cytochrome c (Cty c) in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) nano-micelle in 50 mM, pH 10.5 sodium phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and 30% catalytic efficiency of native HRP was achieved. The UV-Vis, Circular Dichroism (CD) specropolarimetry, Surface Tension and Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) methods were utilized for additional characterization of the AP.

  16. Light Harvesting Dendrimers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arpornrat Nantalaksakul; D. Raghunath Reddy; Christopher J. Bardeen; S. Thayumanavan

    2006-01-01

    Tree-like dendrimers with decreasing number of chromophores from periphery to core is an attractive candidate for light-harvesting\\u000a applications. Numerous dendritic designs with different kinds of light-collecting chromophores at periphery and an energy-sink\\u000a at the core have been demonstrated with high energy transfer efficiency. These building blocks are now being developed for\\u000a several applications such as light-emitting diodes, frequency converters and

  17. Tetraphenylethene-Based Star Shaped Porphyrins: Synthesis, Self-assembly, and Optical and Photophysical Study.

    PubMed

    Rananaware, Anushri; Bhosale, Rajesh S; Ohkubo, Kei; Patil, Hemlata; Jones, Lathe A; Jackson, Sam L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Bhosale, Sidhanath V; Bhosale, Sheshanath V

    2015-04-17

    Supramolecular self-assembly and self-organization are simple and convenient ways to design and create controlled assemblies with organic molecules, and they have provoked great interest due to their potential applications in various fields, such as electronics, photonics, and light-energy conversion. Herein, we describe the synthesis of two ?-conjugated porphyrin molecules bearing tetraphenylethene moieties with high fluorescence quantum yield. Photophysical and electrochemical studies were conducted to understand the physical and redox properties of these new materials, respectively. Furthermore, these derivatives were used to investigate self-assembly via the solvophobic effect. The self-assembled aggregation was performed in nonpolar and polar organic solvents and forms nanospheres and ring-like nanostructures, respectively. The solution based aggregation was studied by means of UV-vis absorption, emission, XRD, and DLS analyses. Self-assembled ring-shape structures were visualized by SEM and TEM imaging. This ring-shape morphology of nanosized macromolecules might be a good candidate for the creation of artificial light-harvesting nanodevices. PMID:25822257

  18. Self-Assembly Game

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2008-01-01

    This is a quick game about self-assembly. Like the molecules of DNA, learners will self-assemble into a pattern by following a simple set of rules. The icebreaker game is part of a larger self-assembly lesson plan, and additional self-assembly game ideas and a video can be found in the related links.

  19. Towards a comprehensive insight into efficient hydrogen production by self-assembled Ru(bpy)3(2+)-polymer-Pt artificial photosystems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan; Liu, Dan; Long, Jinlin; Zhang, Zizhong; Zhuang, Huaqiang; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Xuxu

    2015-04-01

    The role of polymers in artificial photosystems has been studied in detail. The photosystems were composed of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(ii) chloride as a photosensitizer (PS), colloidal Pt stabilized by polymer as a hydrogen-evolving catalyst and sodium ascorbate as an electron donor, without the addition of a traditional molecular electron mediator. Comprehensive insights into the production of hydrogen on irradiation with visible light were achieved. Several polymers, including neutral polyvinyl pyrrolidone, anionic poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) and poly(acrylic acid) not only stabilized the nanoparticles, but were also effective in the production of hydrogen. Under the optimum conditions, an outstanding apparent quantum efficiency of 12.8% for the evolution of hydrogen was achieved. The formation of self-assembled and spatially separated donor-acceptor complexes via the non-covalent intermolecular interaction between PS and the polymer-Pt was pivotal in the efficient conversion of solar energy to hydrogen fuel. Important details of the photo-induced electron and energy transfer processes in the self-assembled artificial photosystems were determined by nanosecond transient absorption spectrometry and time-resolved fluorescence spectrometry. The initial step in the photo-catalytic production of hydrogen was a reductive quenching of the triplet excited state of the PS by sodium ascorbate, leading to a reduced form of PS, which could then be quickly quenched by the polymer. The rate-determining step was the electron transfer from PS to the catalyst via the polymer bridge. PMID:25811660

  20. Self-Assembled Peptide Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Nobuyuki; Koga, Tomoyuki

    Molecular self-assembly is a powerful approach being explored for novel supramolecular nanostructures and bio-inspired nanomaterials. In this article, we focus on recent research concerning the self-assembly of de novo designed artificial peptides and peptidomimetics into nanofiber structures, specifically towards developing a new class of soft-materials. These nanofiber architectures have potential use not only in biomedical applications, such as 3D-matrix scaffolds for tissue engineering and biomineralization, but also in nanotechnology such as nano-templates and dimension-regulated functional nano-objects.

  1. Efficient exciton transport in layers of self-assembled porphyrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huijser, Annemarie; Suijkerbuijk, Bart M J M; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M; Savenije, Tom J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2008-02-27

    The photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria, the chlorosome, is generally considered as a highly efficient natural light-harvesting system. The efficient exciton transport through chlorosomes toward the reaction centers originates from self-assembly of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules. The aim of the present work is to realize a long exciton diffusion length in an artificial light-harvesting system using the concept of self-assembled natural chlorosomal chromophores. The ability to transport excitons is studied for porphyrin derivatives with different tendencies to form molecular stacks by self-assembly. A porphyrin derivative denoted as ZnOP, containing methoxymethyl substituents ({meso-tetrakis[3,5-bis(methoxymethyl)phenyl]porphyrinato}zinc(II)) is found to form self-assembled stacks, in contrast to a derivative with tert-butyl substituents, ZnBuP ({meso-tetrakis[3,5-bis(tert-butyl)phenyl]porphyrinato}zinc(II)). Exciton transport and dissociation in a bilayer of these porphyrin derivatives and TiO2 are studied using the time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. For ZnOP layers it is found that excitons undergo diffusive motion between the self-assembled stacks, with the exciton diffusion length being as long as 15 +/- 1 nm, which is comparable to that in natural chlorosomes. For ZnBuP a considerably shorter exciton diffusion length of 3 +/- 1 nm is found. Combining these exciton diffusion lengths with exciton lifetimes of 160 ps for ZnOP and 74 ps for ZnBuP yields exciton diffusion coefficients equal to 1.4 x 10(-6) m2/s and 1 x 10(-7) m2/s, respectively. The larger exciton diffusion coefficient for ZnOP originates from a strong excitonic coupling for interstack energy transfer. The findings show that energy transfer is strongly affected by the molecular organization. The efficient interstack energy transfer shows promising prospects for application of such self-assembled porphyrins in optoelectronics. PMID:18247606

  2. Structural characterization of artificial self-assembling porphyrins that mimic the natural chlorosomal bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Linke-Schaetzel, Myriam; Bhise, Anil D; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Roussel, Christian; Anson, Christopher E; Buth, Gernot; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Foster, Keir; Garab, Gyözö; Gliemann, Hartmut; Goddard, Richard; Javorfi, Tamas; Powell, Annie K; Rösner, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    We report two crystal structures of a synthetic porphyrin molecule which was programmed for self-assembly. The same groups which ensure that bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e can self-assemble into the chlorosomal nanorods, the photosynthetic antenna system of some green bacteria, have been engineered into desired positions of the tetrapyrrolic macrocycle. In the case of the 5,15-meso-substituted anchoring groups, depending upon the concentration, by using the same crystallization solvents, either a tetragonal or a layered structure of porphyrin stacks were encountered. Surprisingly, pi-pi interactions combined with extensive dispersive interactions, which also encompass cyclohexane, one of the crystallization solvents, win over putative hydrogen bonding. We are aware that our compounds differ considerably from the natural bacteriochlorophylls, but based upon our findings, we now question the hydrogen-bonding network, previously proposed to organize stacks of bacteriochlorophylls. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on various isomeric compounds support our challenge of current models for the chlorosomal antenna as these show structures, astonishingly similar to those of chlorosomes. PMID:15635683

  3. Self-assembled lipid bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina A.; Last, Julie A.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is a self-assembling material comprised of stacks of lipid bilayers formed in a columnar structure, where the assembly process is mediated and regulated by chemical recognition events. The material, through the chemical recognition interactions, has a self-regulating system that corrects the radial size of the assembly creating a uniform diameter throughout most of the structure. The materials form and are stable in aqueous solution. These materials are useful as structural elements for the architecture of materials and components in nanotechnology, efficient light harvesting systems for optical sensing, chemical processing centers, and drug delivery vehicles.

  4. Programmable Self-Assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Klavins

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembly is the phenomenon in which a collection of particles spontaneously arrange themselves into a coherent structure. Self-assembly is ubiquitous in nature. In this article we consider the task of programming active self-assembling and self-organizing systems at the level of interactions among particles in the system. To demonstrate the approach, we use it to control an experimental system called the

  5. The chlorosome: a prototype for efficient light harvesting in photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Oostergetel, Gert T.; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Three phyla of bacteria include phototrophs that contain unique antenna systems, chlorosomes, as the principal light-harvesting apparatus. Chlorosomes are the largest known supramolecular antenna systems and contain hundreds of thousands of BChl c/d/e molecules enclosed by a single membrane leaflet and a baseplate. The BChl pigments are organized via self-assembly and do not require proteins to provide a scaffold for efficient light harvesting. Their excitation energy flows via a small protein, CsmA embedded in the baseplate to the photosynthetic reaction centres. Chlorosomes allow for photosynthesis at very low light intensities by ultra-rapid transfer of excitations to reaction centres and enable organisms with chlorosomes to live at extraordinarily low light intensities under which no other phototrophic organisms can grow. This article reviews several aspects of chlorosomes: the supramolecular and molecular organizations and the light-harvesting and spectroscopic properties. In addition, it provides some novel information about the organization of the baseplate. PMID:20130996

  6. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS) to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA) constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS), and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting") software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology. PMID:25161743

  7. Molecular Self-Assembly

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-19

    In this activity, students interact with 12 models to observe emergent phenomena as molecules assemble themselves. Investigate the factors that are important to self-assembly, including shape and polarity. Try to assemble a monolayer by "pushing" the molecules to the substrate (it's not easy!). Rotate complex molecules to view their structure. Finally, create your own nanostructures by selecting molecules, adding charges to them, and observing the results of self-assembly.

  8. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas (UCSD)

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  9. Natural Light Harvesting Systems: Unraveling the quantum puzzles

    E-print Network

    A. Thilagam

    2014-11-23

    In natural light harvesting systems, the sequential quantum events of photon absorption by specialized biological antenna complexes, charge separation, exciton formation and energy transfer to localized reaction centers culminates in the conversion of solar to chemical energy. A notable feature in these processes is the exceptionally high efficiencies ($>$ 95\\%) at which excitation is transferred from the illuminated protein complex site to the reaction centers. The high speeds of excitation propagation within a system of interwoven biomolecular network structures, is yet to be replicated in artificial light harvesting complexes. A clue to unraveling the quantum puzzles of nature may lie in the observations of long lived coherences lasting several picoseconds in the electronic spectra of photosynthetic complexes which occurs even in noisy environmental baths. The exact nature of the association between the high energy propagation rates and strength of quantum coherences remains largely unsolved. This review presents recent developments in quantum theories, and links information-theoretic aspects with photosynthetic light-harvesting processes in biomolecular systems. There is examination of various attempts to pinpoint the processes that underpin coherence features arising from the light harvesting activities of biomolecular systems, with particular emphasis on the effects that factors such non-Markovianity, zeno mechanisms, teleportation, quantum predictability and the role of multipartite states have on the quantum dynamics of biomolecular systems. A discussion of how quantum thermodynamical principles and agent-based modeling and simulation approaches can improve our understanding of natural photosynthetic systems is included.

  10. Self-assembly of fluorescent carbon dots in a N,N-dimethylmethanamide solution via Schiff base reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengliang; Ding, Yanli; Chang, Qing; Trinchi, Adrian; Lin, Kui; Yang, Jinlong; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis.The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and more characterization of carbon dot assemblies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07119k

  11. Modeling Self Assembly

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, covers self-assembly of molecules. Two activity are contained in this lesson. The first is "a hands-on modeling activity designed to introduce students to the area of nanotechnology and give them a basic understanding of how researchers build very small devices by the self-assembly of molecules." The second activity follows up on the first and gives "the students a chance to practice and demonstrate what they have learned." Two Teacher Preparation Guides and Two Student Guides are included. 

  12. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  13. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  14. Energy, Charge, and Spin Transport in Molecules and Self-Assembled Nanostructures Inspired by Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, Michael R. (NWU)

    2008-10-03

    Electron transfer in biological molecules provides both insight and inspiration for developing chemical systems having similar functionality. Photosynthesis is an example of an integrated system in which light harvesting, photoinduced charge separation, and catalysis combine to carry out two thermodynamically demanding processes, the oxidation of water and the reduction of carbon dioxide. The development of artificial photosynthetic systems for solar energy conversion requires a fundamental understanding of electron-transfer reactions between organic molecules. Since these reactions most often involve single-electron transfers, the spin dynamics of photogenerated radical ion pairs provide important information on how the rates and efficiencies of these reactions depend on molecular structure. Given this knowledge, the design and synthesis of large integrated structures to carry out artificial photosynthesis is moving forward. An important approach to achieving this goal is the development of small, functional building blocks, having a minimum number of covalent bonds, which also have the appropriate molecular recognition sites to facilitate self-assembly into a complete, functional artificial photosynthetic system.

  15. Self Assembly of Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanna, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    We are exploring the self assembly of colloidal matter using building blocks with complex shapes and functionalities. Our toolbox includes particles with tunable cavities and protrusions, particles with flexible ball-and-socket joints, colloidal cubes and particles with magnetic patches. Using these building blocks and a variety of interactions, including chemical, steric, magnetic and lock-and-key shape recognition, we aim to develop new assembly schemes to build structures with a reconfigurable structural arrangement.

  16. Binary ionic porphyrin nanosheets: electronic and light-harvesting properties regulated by crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yongming; M. Beavers, Christine; Busani, Tito; Martin, Kathleen E.; Jacobsen, John L.; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; van Swol, Frank; Medforth, Craig J.; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-02-01

    Crystalline solids self-assembled from anionic and cationic porphyrins provide a new class of multifunctional optoelectronic micro- and nanomaterials. A 1 : 1 combination of zinc(ii) tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (ZnTPPS) and tin(iv) tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridiniumyl)porphyrin (SnTNMePyP) gives porphyrin nanosheets with high aspect ratios and varying thickness. The room temperature preparation of the nanosheets has provided the first X-ray crystal structure of a cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solid. The unit cell contains one and one-half molecules of aquo-ZnTPPS4- (an electron donor) and three half molecules of dihydroxy-SnTNMePyP4+ (an electron acceptor). Charge balance in the solid is reached without any non-porphyrinic ions, as previously determined for other CBI nanomaterials by non-crystallographic means. The crystal structure reveals a complicated molecular arrangement with slipped ?-? stacking only occurring in isolated dimers of one of the symmetrically unique zinc porphyrins. Consistent with the crystal structure, UV-visible J-aggregate bands indicative of exciton delocalization and extended ?-? stacking are not observed. XRD measurements show that the structure of the Zn/Sn nanosheets is distinct from that of Zn/Sn four-leaf clover-like CBI solids reported previously. In contrast with the Zn/Sn clovers that do exhibit J-aggregate bands and are photoconductive, the nanosheets are not photoconductive. Even so, the nanosheets act as light-harvesting structures in an artificial photosynthesis system capable of reducing water to hydrogen but not as efficiently as the Zn/Sn clovers.Crystalline solids self-assembled from anionic and cationic porphyrins provide a new class of multifunctional optoelectronic micro- and nanomaterials. A 1 : 1 combination of zinc(ii) tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (ZnTPPS) and tin(iv) tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridiniumyl)porphyrin (SnTNMePyP) gives porphyrin nanosheets with high aspect ratios and varying thickness. The room temperature preparation of the nanosheets has provided the first X-ray crystal structure of a cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solid. The unit cell contains one and one-half molecules of aquo-ZnTPPS4- (an electron donor) and three half molecules of dihydroxy-SnTNMePyP4+ (an electron acceptor). Charge balance in the solid is reached without any non-porphyrinic ions, as previously determined for other CBI nanomaterials by non-crystallographic means. The crystal structure reveals a complicated molecular arrangement with slipped ?-? stacking only occurring in isolated dimers of one of the symmetrically unique zinc porphyrins. Consistent with the crystal structure, UV-visible J-aggregate bands indicative of exciton delocalization and extended ?-? stacking are not observed. XRD measurements show that the structure of the Zn/Sn nanosheets is distinct from that of Zn/Sn four-leaf clover-like CBI solids reported previously. In contrast with the Zn/Sn clovers that do exhibit J-aggregate bands and are photoconductive, the nanosheets are not photoconductive. Even so, the nanosheets act as light-harvesting structures in an artificial photosynthesis system capable of reducing water to hydrogen but not as efficiently as the Zn/Sn clovers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the crystallographic refinement, tables of refinement parameters and bond distances and NSD analysis, and figures showing SEM images of Zn/Sn nanosheets and clovers, the solid grown at different porphyrin concentrations, SEM images of nanosheets at high and low magnification, an ORTEP image showing the five crystallographically distinct porphyrin molecules and the water molecules, and a view of the crystal structure down the b axis are given in the ESI. CCDC reference number 833006. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11826b

  17. A novel artificial nerve graft for repairing long-distance sciatic nerve defects: a self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianghai; Pan, Mengjie; Wen, Jinkun; Tang, Yinjuan; Hamilton, Audra D; Li, Yuanyuan; Qian, Changhui; Liu, Zhongying; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we developed a novel artificial nerve graft termed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS)-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduit (SPC) and used it to bridge a 10-mm-long sciatic nerve defect in the rat. Retrograde tracing, behavioral testing and histomorphometric analyses showed that compared with the empty PLGA conduit implantation group, the SPC implantation group had a larger number of growing and extending axons, a markedly increased diameter of regenerated axons and a greater thickness of the myelin sheath in the conduit. Furthermore, there was an increase in the size of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber diameter in the target muscle. These findings suggest that the novel artificial SPC nerve graft can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination in the transected peripheral nerve and can be used for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25657734

  18. A novel artificial nerve graft for repairing long-distance sciatic nerve defects: a self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianghai; Pan, Mengjie; Wen, Jinkun; Tang, Yinjuan; Hamilton, Audra D.; Li, Yuanyuan; Qian, Changhui; Liu, Zhongying; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel artificial nerve graft termed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS)-containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduit (SPC) and used it to bridge a 10-mm-long sciatic nerve defect in the rat. Retrograde tracing, behavioral testing and histomorphometric analyses showed that compared with the empty PLGA conduit implantation group, the SPC implantation group had a larger number of growing and extending axons, a markedly increased diameter of regenerated axons and a greater thickness of the myelin sheath in the conduit. Furthermore, there was an increase in the size of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber diameter in the target muscle. These findings suggest that the novel artificial SPC nerve graft can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination in the transected peripheral nerve and can be used for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25657734

  19. Binary ionic porphyrin nanosheets: electronic and light-harvesting properties regulated by crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongming; Beavers, Christine M; Busani, Tito; Martin, Kathleen E; Jacobsen, John L; Mercado, Brandon Q; Swartzentruber, Brian S; van Swol, Frank; Medforth, Craig J; Shelnutt, John A

    2012-03-01

    Crystalline solids self-assembled from anionic and cationic porphyrins provide a new class of multifunctional optoelectronic micro- and nanomaterials. A 1?:?1 combination of zinc(II) tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (ZnTPPS) and tin(IV) tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridiniumyl)porphyrin (SnTNMePyP) gives porphyrin nanosheets with high aspect ratios and varying thickness. The room temperature preparation of the nanosheets has provided the first X-ray crystal structure of a cooperative binary ionic (CBI) solid. The unit cell contains one and one-half molecules of aquo-ZnTPPS(4-) (an electron donor) and three half molecules of dihydroxy-SnTNMePyP(4+) (an electron acceptor). Charge balance in the solid is reached without any non-porphyrinic ions, as previously determined for other CBI nanomaterials by non-crystallographic means. The crystal structure reveals a complicated molecular arrangement with slipped ?-? stacking only occurring in isolated dimers of one of the symmetrically unique zinc porphyrins. Consistent with the crystal structure, UV-visible J-aggregate bands indicative of exciton delocalization and extended ?-? stacking are not observed. XRD measurements show that the structure of the Zn/Sn nanosheets is distinct from that of Zn/Sn four-leaf clover-like CBI solids reported previously. In contrast with the Zn/Sn clovers that do exhibit J-aggregate bands and are photoconductive, the nanosheets are not photoconductive. Even so, the nanosheets act as light-harvesting structures in an artificial photosynthesis system capable of reducing water to hydrogen but not as efficiently as the Zn/Sn clovers. PMID:22310932

  20. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random. PMID:25162764

  1. Multiplexing natural orientation: oppositely directed self-assembling peptides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-Jin; Han, Sanghun; Park, Hyeseo; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2014-06-01

    We explore here the possibility that polypeptide chains with directional multiplicity might provide for the control of peptide self-assembly processes. We tested this new possibility using an oppositely directed peptide (ODP) supramolecular system. The ODP could make it possible to form a ??? motif with antiparallel ?-sheets, which does not exist in nature. Furthermore, the designed ODPs were able to self-assemble into discrete, homogeneous, and structured protein-like controlled nano-objects. ODPs represent a simple but powerful unnatural self-assembling peptide system that can become a basic scaffold for fabricating more complex and elaborate artificial nanostructures. PMID:24779590

  2. Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

    2012-11-02

    We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

  3. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  4. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2003-07-22

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: ##EQU1## wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  5. Exploring Fabrication: Self-Assembly

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, learners participate in several full-body interactive games to model the process of self-assembly in nature and nanotechnology. Through these activities learners assemble into a ring, a capsule, and a snowflake. Learners discover that self-assembly is a process by which molecules and cells form themselves into functional structures. Note: this activity requires at least nine learners.

  6. ?-Carotene to bacteriochlorophyll c energy transfer in self-assembled aggregates mimicking chlorosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Alster; T. Polívka; J. B. Arellano; P. Chábera; F. Vácha; J. Pšen?ík

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are together with bacteriochlorophylls important constituents of chlorosomes, the light-harvesting antennae of green photosynthetic bacteria. Majority of bacteriochlorophyll molecules form self-assembling aggregates inside the chlorosomes. Aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with optical properties similar to those of chlorosomes can also be prepared in non-polar organic solvents or in aqueous environments when a suitable non-polar molecule is added. In this work, the

  7. Nanotechnology and Quasicrystals: From self assembly to photonic applications

    E-print Network

    Ron Lifshitz

    2008-10-28

    After providing a concise overview on quasicrystals and their discovery more than a quarter of a century ago, I consider the unexpected interplay between nanotechnology and quasiperiodic crystals. Of particular relevance are efforts to fabricate artificial functional micro- or nanostructures, as well as efforts to control the self-assembly of nanostructures, where current knowledge about the possibility of having long-range order without periodicity can provide significant advantages. I discuss examples of systems ranging from artificial metamaterials for photonic applications, through self-assembled soft matter, to surface waves and optically-induced nonlinear photonic quasicrystals.

  8. Self-Assembling Dessert Toppings

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-12-27

    This is an activity (located on page 3 of the PDF) about self-assembly, the ability of molecules to assemble themselves according to certain rules. Learners will use food-grade components to create delicious dessert topping-filled gel capsules, macroscale relatives of the capsules nanoscientists make in a lab to carry medicine to targeted cells of the body. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV Nano: Self-Assembly.

  9. Self-assembly and nanotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George M. Whitesides

    1996-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly is a strategy for nanofabrication that involves designing molecules and supramolecular entities so that shape-complementarity causes them to aggregate into desired structures. Self-assembly has a number of advantages as a strategy: first, it carries out many of the most difficult steps in nanofabrication -- those involving atomic-level modification of structure -- using the very highly developed techniques of

  10. Self-Assembly with Nanomanufacturing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, by the Concord Consortium's Molecular Literacy project, students learn the "necessary conditions for self-assembly (random motion and molecular stickiness), play with some example models of self-assembling biological structures (quartenary structures such as hemoglobin, fibers, and microtubules), and then design their own self-assembly structures." Upon completion of this activity students should be able to identify and manipulate two key characteristics of molecules that allow them to self assemble; describe the effect of temperature on self-assembly; and give examples of the effect of molecular shape on the larger structures built by self-assembly. The activity itself is a java-based interactive resource built upon the free, open source Molecular Workbench software. In the activity, students are allowed to explore at their own pace in a digital environment full of demonstrations, illustrations, and models they can manipulate. In addition to the activity, visitors will find an overview of the activity, a test and rubric, central concepts, and their correlation to AAAS standards.

  11. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence

    PubMed Central

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment–protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques. PMID:24352671

  12. Gold nanoparticle functionalized artificial nacre: facile in situ growth of nanoparticles on montmorillonite nanosheets, self-assembly, and their multiple properties.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Mao, Li-Bo; Yan, You-Xian; Cong, Huai-Ping; Lei, Xuan; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-09-25

    Artificial nacre based on clay nanosheets have been emerging as a new generation of bioinspired materials due to their super mechanical, fire-retardant, heat-shield, and gas barrier properties. Functional design in artificial nacre is highly demanded to further broaden the applications of these promising bioinspired materials. However, there is rarely a report on the functionalization of artificial nacre at present possibly due to the lack of a feasible strategy to introduce functional components in nacre-like materials without weakening other properties. In this study, we report a feasible method to fabricate artificial nacre-like functional hybrid films by using Au nanoparticle (NP) modified natural clay montmorillonite (MTM) nanosheets as efficient two-dimensional building blocks. First, Au NPs-chitosan-MTM hybrid nanosheets were prepared and homogeneously dispersed in deionized water by the facile in situ growth of Au NPs on chitosan-MTM nanosheets. Then, the obtained Au NPs-chitosan-MTM hybrid nanosheet suspension can be sprayed or vacuum filtrated to form nacre-like layered hybrid nanocoatings or free-standing hybrid films, respectively. Finally, as-fabricated artificial nacre nanocoatings or hybrid films have been demonstrated to behave with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), catalytic, and photothermal conversion properties indicating the successful functionalization of artificial nacre by introducing Au NPs. PMID:22909252

  13. Temperature and Ionic Strength Effects on the Chlorosome Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zhu, Liying; Urban, Volker S; Collins, Aaron M.; Biswas, Pratim; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorosomes, the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex from green photosynthetic bacteria, are the largest and one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes found in nature. In contrast to other light-harvesting antennas, chlorosomes are constructed from more than 150?000 self-assembled bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and contain relatively few proteins that play secondary roles. These unique properties have led to chlorosomes as an attractive candidate for developing biohybrid solar cell devices. In this article, we investigate the temperature and ionic strength effects on the viability of chlorosomes from the photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. Our studies indicate that chlorosomes remain intact up to 75 °C and that salt induces the formation of large aggregates of chlorosomes. No internal structural changes are observed for the aggregates. The salt-induced aggregation, which is a reversible process, is more efficient with divalent metal ions than with monovalent metal ions. Moreover, with treatment at 98 °C for 2 min, the bulk of the chlorosome pigments are undamaged, while the baseplate is destroyed. Chlorosomes without the baseplate remain rodlike in shape and are 30?40% smaller than with the baseplate attached. Further, chlorosomes are stable from pH 5.5 to 11.0. Together, this is the first time such a range of characterization tools have been used for chlorosomes, and this has enabled elucidation of properties that are not only important to understanding their functionality but also may be useful in biohybrid devices for effective light harvesting.

  14. Quantum mechanical light harvesting mechanisms in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    More than 10 million billion photons of light strike a leaf each second. Incredibly, almost every red-coloured photon is captured by chlorophyll pigments and initiates steps to plant growth. Last year we reported that marine algae use quantum mechanics in order to optimize photosynthesis [1], a process essential to its survival. These and other insights from the natural world promise to revolutionize our ability to harness the power of the sun. In a recent review [2] we described the principles learned from studies of various natural antenna complexes and suggested how to utilize that knowledge to shape future technologies. We forecast the need to develop ways to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular organizations that facilitate feedback and control--not easy given that the energy is only stored for a billionth of a second. In this presentation I will describe new results that explain the observation and meaning of quantum-coherent energy transfer. [4pt] [1] Elisabetta Collini, Cathy Y. Wong, Krystyna E. Wilk, Paul M. G. Curmi, Paul Brumer, and Gregory D. Scholes, ``Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature'' Nature 463, 644-648 (2010).[0pt] [2] Gregory D. Scholes, Graham R. Fleming, Alexandra Olaya-Castro and Rienk van Grondelle, ``Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting'' Nature Chem. 3, 763-774 (2011).

  15. Self-Assembling Finite Automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Klein; Martin Kutrib

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a model of self-assembling finite automata. An automaton is assembled on demand during its computation from copies out of a finite set of items. The items are pieces of a finite automaton which are connected to the already existing automaton by overlaying states. Depending on the allowed number of such interface states, the degree, infinite hierarchies of properly

  16. Long range excitonic transport in a biomimetic system inspired by the bacterial light-harvesting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, Elad [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2012-05-07

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light-harvesting I-PufX core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy [S. Bahatyrova et al., Nature (London) 430, 1058 (2004)]. Here, we discuss optimal exciton transfer in a biomimetic system closely modeled on the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane using a Markovian quantum model with dissipation and trapping added phenomenologically. In a deliberate manner, we neglect the high level detail of the bacterial light-harvesting complex and its interaction with the phonon bath in order to elucidate a set of design principles that may be incorporated in artificial pigment-scaffold constructs in a supramolecular assembly. We show that our scheme reproduces many of the most salient features found in their natural counterpart and may be largely explained by simple electrostatic considerations. Most importantly, we show that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robustness with respect to spatial and spectral disorder between and within complexes. The implications of such an arrangement are discussed in the context of biomimetic photosynthetic analogs capable of transferring energy efficiently across tens to hundreds of nanometers.

  17. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Keyao; Boulais, Etienne; Yang, Lun; Bathe, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary chromophore molecules with light-harvesting properties. Like in natural systems, the local and global spatial organization of these synthetic scaffolded chromophore systems plays a crucial role in their emergent excitonic and optical properties. Previously, we introduced a computational model to predict the large-scale 3D solution structure and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures programmed using the principle of scaffolded DNA origami. Here, we use Förster resonance energy transfer theory to simulate the temporal dynamics of dye excitation and energy transfer accounting both for overall DNA nanostructure architecture as well as atomic-level DNA and dye chemical structure and composition. Results are used to calculate emergent optical properties including effective absorption cross-section, absorption and emission spectra and total power transferred to a biomimetic reaction center in an existing seven-helix double stranded DNA-based antenna. This structure-based computational framework enables the efficient in silico evaluation of nucleic acid nanostructures for diverse light-harvesting and photonic applications. PMID:24311563

  18. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Boulais, Etienne; Yang, Lun; Bathe, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary chromophore molecules with light-harvesting properties. Like in natural systems, the local and global spatial organization of these synthetic scaffolded chromophore systems plays a crucial role in their emergent excitonic and optical properties. Previously, we introduced a computational model to predict the large-scale 3D solution structure and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures programmed using the principle of scaffolded DNA origami. Here, we use Förster resonance energy transfer theory to simulate the temporal dynamics of dye excitation and energy transfer accounting both for overall DNA nanostructure architecture as well as atomic-level DNA and dye chemical structure and composition. Results are used to calculate emergent optical properties including effective absorption cross-section, absorption and emission spectra and total power transferred to a biomimetic reaction center in an existing seven-helix double stranded DNA-based antenna. This structure-based computational framework enables the efficient in silico evaluation of nucleic acid nanostructures for diverse light-harvesting and photonic applications. PMID:24311563

  19. Bistable molecular self-assembling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Raudino; Laura Cantù; Mario Corti; Elena Del Favero

    2000-01-01

    Self-assembled aggregates made up of molecules taking different geometrical conformational states are discussed. Besides the well-known order–disorder conformational transition involving the hydrophobic tails, the review focuses on the geometrical variations occurring in the head group region and on the related changes of the whole assembly. These effects are particularly relevant in amphiphile molecules carrying bulky and flexible headgroups like the

  20. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  1. Synthesis and photophysical studies of self-assembled multicomponent supramolecular coordination prisms bearing porphyrin faces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanhui; Sánchez-Molina, Irene; Cao, Changsheng; Cook, Timothy R.; Stang, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent self-assembly, wherein two unique donor precursors are combined with a single metal acceptor instead of the more common two-component assembly, can be achieved by selecting Lewis-basic sites and metal nodes that select for heteroligated coordination spheres. Platinum(II) ions show a thermodynamic preference for mixed pyridyl/carboxylate coordination environments and are thus suitable for such designs. The use of three or more unique building blocks increases the structural complexity of supramolecules. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of rectangular prismatic supramolecular coordination complexes (SCCs) with two faces occupied by porphyrin molecules, motivated by the search for new multichromophore complexes with promising light-harvesting properties. These prisms are obtained from the self-assembly of a 90° Pt(II) acceptor with a meso-substituted tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and dicarboxylate ligands. The generality of this self-assembly reaction is demonstrated using five dicarboxylate ligands, two based on a rigid central phenyl ring and three alkyl-spaced variants, to form a total of five free-base and five Zn-metallated porphyrin prisms. All 10 SCCs are characterized by 31P and 1H multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, confirming the structure of each self-assembly and the stoichiometry of formation. The photophysical properties of the resulting SCCs were investigated revealing that the absorption and emission properties of the free-base and metallated porphyrin prisms preserve the spectral features associated with free TPyP. PMID:24979805

  2. Synthesis and photophysical studies of self-assembled multicomponent supramolecular coordination prisms bearing porphyrin faces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanhui; Sánchez-Molina, Irene; Cao, Changsheng; Cook, Timothy R; Stang, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Multicomponent self-assembly, wherein two unique donor precursors are combined with a single metal acceptor instead of the more common two-component assembly, can be achieved by selecting Lewis-basic sites and metal nodes that select for heteroligated coordination spheres. Platinum(II) ions show a thermodynamic preference for mixed pyridyl/carboxylate coordination environments and are thus suitable for such designs. The use of three or more unique building blocks increases the structural complexity of supramolecules. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of rectangular prismatic supramolecular coordination complexes (SCCs) with two faces occupied by porphyrin molecules, motivated by the search for new multichromophore complexes with promising light-harvesting properties. These prisms are obtained from the self-assembly of a 90° Pt(II) acceptor with a meso-substituted tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and dicarboxylate ligands. The generality of this self-assembly reaction is demonstrated using five dicarboxylate ligands, two based on a rigid central phenyl ring and three alkyl-spaced variants, to form a total of five free-base and five Zn-metallated porphyrin prisms. All 10 SCCs are characterized by (31)P and (1)H multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, confirming the structure of each self-assembly and the stoichiometry of formation. The photophysical properties of the resulting SCCs were investigated revealing that the absorption and emission properties of the free-base and metallated porphyrin prisms preserve the spectral features associated with free TPyP. PMID:24979805

  3. Self-assembling magnetic "snakes"

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-01-01

    Nickel particles float peacefully in a liquid medium until a giant snake seems to swim by and snatch several particles up, adding to its own mass. The self-assembled "snakes" act like biological systems, but they are not alive and are driven by a magnetic field. The research may someday offer some insight into the organization of life itself. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/snakes/ Research and video by Alex Snezhko and Igor Aronson, Argonne National Laboratory.

  4. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Jeffrey Brinker; Alan Sellinger; Yunfeng Lu

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed.

  5. Exciton coupling induces vibronic hyperchromism in light-harvesting complexes

    E-print Network

    Schulze, Jan; Kühn, Oliver; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    The recently suggested possibility that weak vibronic transitions can be excitonically enhanced in light-harvesting complexes is studied in detail. A vibronic exciton dimer model which includes ground state vibrations is investigated using multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method with a parameter set typical to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. Absorption spectra are discussed in dependence on the Coulomb coupling, the detuning of site energies, and the number of vibrational mode. Calculations of the fluorescence spectra show that the spectral densities obtained from the low temperature fluorescence line narrowing measurements of light-harvesting systems need to be corrected for the exciton effects. For the J-aggregate configuration, as in most of the light-harvesting complexes, the true spectral density has larger amplitude than what is obtained from the measurement.

  6. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  7. Self-assembly: Served on a nanoplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunhua; Lin, Jiaping

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled cylinders can generally be extended only from their ends -- growth that is considered to be 'one-dimensional'. Now, platelet-like structures with controlled size and composition have been constructed by growth in two dimensions of self-assembled structures, starting from crystallite seed micelles.

  8. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Falvo, Michael R.; Broadwell, Bethany; Dotger, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance. This process plays a central role in the construction of biological structures and materials such as cells, viruses, and bone, and also in abiotic processes like phase transitions and crystal formation. The principles of self-assembly help…

  9. Bottom-Up Nanomanufacturing: Self Assembly

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This overview of nanotechnology is presented by the NaMCATE project. "The process of self assembly is defined as the spontaneous association of numerous individual units of material into well organized, well defined structures without external instruction." An understanding of self assembly requires background knowledge in physics, chemistry, and biology and this module focuses on these fields. This lesson introduces these concepts by providing two learning activities on self assembly as well as a pre-test and performance assessment. Additionally, a powerpoint presentation is included.Users must create a free login in order to access the materials.

  10. Randomized Self Assembly of Rectangular Nano Structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vamsi Kundeti; Sanguthevar Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Self assembly systems have numerous critical applications in medicine, circuit design, etc. For example, they can serve as\\u000a nano drug delivery systems. The problem of assembling squares has been well studied. A lower bound on the tile complexity\\u000a of any deterministic self assembly system for an N×N square is \\u000a\\u000a\\u000a\\u000a\\u000a\\u000aW<\\/font\\u000a>(\\\\fraclog(N)log(log(N)))\\\\Omega(\\\\frac{\\\\log(N)}{\\\\log(\\\\log(N))}) (inferred from the Kolmogrov complexity). Deterministic self assembly systems

  11. Self-Assembly of Biomolecular Soft Matter

    PubMed Central

    Zha, R. Helen; Palmer, Liam C.; Cui, Honggang; Bitton, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly programmed by molecular structure and guided dynamically by energy dissipation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems that build functional structures from the nanoscale to macroscopic dimensions. This paper describes examples of one-dimensional self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles and the consequent biological functions that emerge in these systems. We also discuss here hierarchical self-assembly of supramolecular peptide nanostructures and polysaccharides, and some new results are reported on supramolecular crystals formed by highly charged peptide amphiphiles. Reflecting on presentations at this Faraday Discussion, the paper ends with a discussion of some of the future opportunities and challenges of the field. PMID:24611266

  12. Self-Assembly Behavior of Pullulan Abietate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradwell, Sheila; Esker, Alan; Glasser, Wolgang; Heinze, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Wood is one of nature's most fascinating biological composites due to its toughness and resistance to fracture properties. These properties stem from the self-assembly of cellulose microfibrils in an amorphous matrix of hemicellulose and lignin. In recent years, science has looked to nature for guidance in preparing synthetic materials with desirable physical properties. In order to study the self-assembly process in wood, a model system composed of a polysaccharide, pullulan abietate, and a biomimetic cellulose substrate prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique has been developed. Interfacial tension and surface plasmon resonance measurements used to study the self-assembly process will be discussed for different pullulan derivatives.

  13. Design of auxetic polymer self-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gaoyuan

    2005-03-01

    Alternating copolymers having a double-arrow-like hard block and a spring-like soft segment have been designed which can in principle self-assembly into two-dimensional supramolecular networks. Molecular-mechanics calculations show that such self-assemblies can be auxetic when the lengths of the block and the segment are carefully chosen, with one metastable supermolecule having one of its six Poisson ratios as negatively large as -11.86. The underlying principle of designing such auxetic self-assembly of copolymers with specified architecture is also given as are the deciding factors such as the packing geometry and the associated lattice energy in achieving the auxeticity.

  14. Two-dimensional patterning of bacterial light-harvesting 2 complexes on lipid-modified gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Shunsuke; Furukawa, Rei A.; Nagata, Morio; Sakai, Shunsuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Iida, Kouji; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru

    2012-06-01

    In a photosynthetic membrane, nano-scale patterns of light-harvesting (LH) pigment-protein complexes play an essential role in capturing photons and ensuring efficient excitation energy transfer. LH complexes 1 and 2 have drawn attention as building blocks of a nano-scale photoelectric device. For obtaining a device with efficiency comparable to that of the natural photosynthesis, a method has to be established for forming a two-dimensional assembly of LH complexes around a metal electrode. In this study, LH2 complexes isolated from Rb. sphaeroides were immobilized on a patterned gold surface. Quenching of photo-excitation energy by gold was prevented through the placement of a self-assembled phospholipid monolayer between the LH2 complexes and the gold surface.

  15. One-dimensional staged self-assembly

    E-print Network

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We introduce the problem of staged self-assembly of one-dimensional nanostructures, which becomes interesting when the elements are labeled (e.g., representing functional units that must be placed at specific locations). ...

  16. Self-assembling materials for therapeutic delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Monica C.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of medications must be administered through parenteral delivery, i.e., intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous injection, to ensure effectiveness of the therapeutic. For some therapeutics, the use of delivery vehicles in conjunction with this delivery mechanism can improve drug efficacy and patient compliance. Macromolecular self-assembly has been exploited recently to engineer materials for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics. Self-assembled materials offer the advantages of conventional crosslinked materials normally used for release, but also provide the ability to tailor specific bulk material properties, such as release profiles, at the molecular level via monomer design. As a result, the design of materials from the “bottom up” approach has generated a variety of supramolecular devices for biomedical applications. This review provides an overview of self-assembling molecules, their resultant structures, and their use in therapeutic delivery. It highlights the current progress in the design of polymer- and peptide-based self-assembled materials. PMID:19010748

  17. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bethany Broadwell

    2006-12-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance (Goodsell 2000). Presented here is a simple in-class exercise that underlines the basic principles of self-assembly and helps students understand how the scale of molecules and atoms is different than the human-scale world (Campbell, Freidinger, and Querns 2001). Principally, the activity illustrates that nanoscale objects are always moving around (thermal motion) and that they tend to stick to each other (intermolecular bonds). The exercise is also a design project, in which students use their imagination in concert with the basic rules of self-assembly (multiple weak bonds and lock-and-key) to produce complex self-assembled models.

  18. Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction

    E-print Network

    Yin, Peng

    nanotechnology in recent years [1-3], especially in self-assembled nanostructures [4-6], nanorobotics [7- 16-assembled DNA structures for nanofabrication and nanorobotics, and we also discuss their applications

  19. Self-assembled chitin nanofibers and applications.

    PubMed

    Rolandi, Marco; Rolandi, Ranieri

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembled natural biomaterials offer a variety of ready-made nanostructures available for basic science research and technological applications. Most natural structural materials are made of self-assembled nanofibers with diameters in the nanometer range. Among these materials, chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose and is part of the exoskeleton or arthropods and mollusk shells. Chitin has several desirable properties as a biomaterial including mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. However, chitin insolubility in most organic solvents has somewhat limited its use. In this research highlight, we describe recent developments in producing biogenic chitin nanofibers using self-assembly from a solution of squid pen ?-chitin in hexafluoroisopropanol. With this solution based assembly, we have demonstrated chitin-silk composite self-assembly, chitin nanofiber fabrication across length-scales, and manufacturing of chitin nanofiber substrates for tissue engineering. PMID:24556234

  20. Self-assemblies of amphiphilic cyclodextrins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel Roux; Bruno Perly; Florence Djedaïni-Pilard

    2007-01-01

    Cyclodextrins are natural cyclic oligosaccharides widely used as “molecular cages” in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, food\\u000a and cosmetical industries. The optimization of their pharmacological properties has led to the synthesis of numerous analogues.\\u000a Amphiphilic derivatives were designed to improve the cell targeting of the drug-containing cyclodextrin cavities through their\\u000a transportation in the organism, within self-assembling systems. Amphiphilic cyclodextrins can self-assemble into

  1. Self-assembly of discrete metallosupramolecular luminophores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael W. Cooke; Daniel Chartrand; Garry S. Hanan

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the metal-directed self-assembly of luminescent metallosupramolecular structures. A brief overview of the self-assembly process is followed by a discussion of the various types of assemblies based on the nuclearity of the luminophore: dinuclear, trinuclear, tetranuclear and higher nuclearity species. The final assemblies are discussed in light of their synthesis, their photophysical properties, and the role that the

  2. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric M [University of Delaware] [University of Delaware

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the directed self-assembly of anisotropic nanoparticles and their unique physical properties.

  3. From Solvolysis to Self-Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    My sojourn from classical physical-organic chemistry and solvolysis to self-assembly and supramolecular chemistry, over the last forty years, is described. My contributions to unsaturated reactive intermediates, namely vinyl cations and unsaturated carbenes, along with my decade long involvement with polyvalent iodine chemistry, especially alkynyliodonium salts, as well as my more recent research with metal-ligand, coordination driven and directed self-assembly of finite supramolecular ensembles are discussed. PMID:19111062

  4. Light-harvesting materials: Soft support for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolley, Ryan M.; Helm, Monte L.

    2014-11-01

    To convert solar energy into viable fuels, coupling light-harvesting materials to catalysts is a crucial challenge. Now, the combination of an organic supramolecular hydrogel and a non-precious metal catalyst has been demonstrated to be effective for photocatalytic H2 production.

  5. Light-harvesting photocatalysis for water oxidation using mesoporous organosilica.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Masataka; Goto, Yasutomo; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Tani, Takao; Inagaki, Shinji

    2014-07-14

    An organic-based photocatalysis system for water oxidation, with visible-light harvesting antennae, was constructed using periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). PMO containing acridone groups in the framework (Acd-PMO), a visible-light harvesting antenna, was supported with [Ru(II)(bpy)3(2+)] complex (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl) coupled with iridium oxide (IrO(x)) particles in the mesochannels as photosensitizer and catalyst, respectively. Acd-PMO absorbed visible light and funneled the light energy into the Ru complex in the mesochannels through excitation energy transfer. The excited state of Ru complex is oxidatively quenched by a sacrificial oxidant (Na2S2O8) to form Ru(3+) species. The Ru(3+) species extracts an electron from IrO(x) to oxidize water for oxygen production. The reaction quantum yield was 0.34?%, which was improved to 0.68 or 1.2?% by the modifications of PMO. A unique sequence of reactions mimicking natural photosystem?II, 1)?light-harvesting, 2)?charge separation, and 3)?oxygen generation, were realized for the first time by using the light-harvesting PMO. PMID:24890840

  6. Indicators of quantum coherence in light-harvesting dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2011-03-01

    Characterizing quantum dynamics of electronic excitations in a variety of light-harvesting systems is currently of much interest [1]. In particular, it is important to identify measures that appropriately quantify the strength of coherent dynamics and its impact on different time scales of the light-harvesting process. In this talk I will discuss quantum transport performance measures that are defined based on the probability for the dynamics to successfully distinguish different initial photo-excitation conditions. I will also discuss how initial state distinguisability can provide information on spatially correlated phonon fluctuations as well as on the non-markovian character of the quantum dynamics. The prototype systems considered here are cryptophyte light-harvesting antennae isolated from marine algae [2, 3]. Experimental quantification of state distinguishability can be realized by monitoring the evolution of selected off-diagonal density matrix elements and therefore it could be achieved with current two-dimensional spectroscopy techniques. [4pt] [1] A. Olaya-Castro and G. D. Scholes, "Energy transfer from F"orster-Dexter theory to quantum coherent light-harvesting", to appear in Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. (2010) [0pt] [2] E. Collini, C.Y. Wong, K.E. Wilk, P.M.G. Curmi, P. Brumer and G.D. Scholes, "Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature" Nature, 463, 644-647 (2010) [0pt] [3] A. Kolli, A Nazir, F. Fassioli, R. Dinshaw, G D Scholes, and A Olaya-Castro, "Energy transfer dynamics in cryptophyte antennae proteins", submitted for publication (2010)

  7. Biomimetic Branched Hollow Fibers Templated by Self-assembled Fibrous Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) Structures in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Penghe; Mao, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Branched hollow fibers are common in nature, but to form artificial fibers with a similar branched hollow structure is still a challenge. We discovered that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) could self-assemble into branched hollow fibers in an aqueous solution after aging the PVP solution for about two weeks. Based on this finding, we demonstrated two approaches by which the self-assembly of PVP into branched hollow fibers could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. First, inorganic material such as silica with high affinity against the PVP could be deposited on the surface of the branched hollow PVP fibers to form branched hollow silica fibers. To extend the application of PVP self-assembly in templating the formation of hollow branched fibers, we then adopted a second approach where the PVP molecules bound to inorganic nanoparticles (using gold nanoparticles as a model) co-self-assemble with the free PVP molecules in an aqueous solution, resulting in the formation of the branched hollow fibers with the nanoparticles embedded in the PVP matrix constituting the walls of the fibers. Heating the resultant fibers above the glass transition temperature of PVP led to the formation of branched hollow gold fibers. Our work suggests that the self-assembly of the PVP molecules in the solution can serve as a general method for directing the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers. The branched hollow fibers may find potential applications in microfluidics, artificial blood vessel generation, and tissue engineering. PMID:20158250

  8. Self-Assembling Behavior and Inhibition Effect of Dodecanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on Copper Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiulan; Zhang, Heng; Yang, Yihong; Chen, Zhenyu

    2013-08-01

    The self-assembling behavior and inhibition effect of dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on copper surface were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical methods. The assembling process was monitored by AFM phase images. The assembling time influences the corrosion protection efficiency of dodecanethiol SAMs. Surface friction significantly decreases when the copper surface is covered by SAMs.

  9. Molecular self-assembly on graphene.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, J M; Rosei, F

    2014-03-26

    The formation of ordered arrays of molecules via self-assembly is a rapid, scalable route towards the realization of nanoscale architectures with tailored properties. In recent years, graphene has emerged as an appealing substrate for molecular self-assembly in two dimensions. Here, the first five years of progress in supramolecular organization on graphene are reviewed. The self-assembly process can vary depending on the type of graphene employed: epitaxial graphene, grown in situ on a metal surface, and non-epitaxial graphene, transferred onto an arbitrary substrate, can have different effects on the final structure. On epitaxial graphene, the process is sensitive to the interaction between the graphene and the substrate on which it is grown. In the case of graphene that strongly interacts with its substrate, such as graphene/Ru(0001), the inhomogeneous adsorption landscape of the graphene moiré superlattice provides a unique opportunity for guiding molecular organization, since molecules experience spatially constrained diffusion and adsorption. On weaker-interacting epitaxial graphene films, and on non-epitaxial graphene transferred onto a host substrate, self-assembly leads to films similar to those obtained on graphite surfaces. The efficacy of a graphene layer for facilitating planar adsorption of aromatic molecules has been repeatedly demonstrated, indicating that it can be used to direct molecular adsorption, and therefore carrier transport, in a certain orientation, and suggesting that the use of transferred graphene may allow for predictible molecular self-assembly on a wide range of surfaces. PMID:24155272

  10. Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Peng; Park, Sung Ha; Li, Hanying; Feng, Liping; Guan, Xiaoju; Liu, Dage; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years, a number of research groups have begun developing nanofabrication methods based on DNA self-assembly. Here we review our recent experimental progress to utilize novel DNA nanostructures for self-assembly as well as for templates in the fabrication of functional nano-patterned materials. We have prototyped a new DNA nanostructure known as a cross structure. This nanostructure has a 4-fold symmetry which promotes its self-assembly into tetragonal 2D lattices. We have utilized the tetragonal 2D lattices as templates for highly conductive metallic nanowires and periodic 2D protein nano-arrays. We have constructed and characterized a DNA nanotube, a new self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. We have also demonstrated an aperiodic DNA lattice composed of DNA tiles assembled around a long scaffold strand; the system translates information encoded in the scaffold strand into a specific and reprogrammable barcode pattern. We have achieved metallic nanoparticle linear arrays templated on self-assembled 1D DNA arrays. We have designed and demonstrated a 2-state DNA lattice, which displays expand/contract motion switched by DNA nanoactuators. We have also achieved an autonomous DNA motor executing unidirectional motion along a linear DNA track.

  11. Programming biomolecular self-assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Choi, Harry M T; Calvert, Colby R; Pierce, Niles A

    2008-01-17

    In nature, self-assembling and disassembling complexes of proteins and nucleic acids bound to a variety of ligands perform intricate and diverse dynamic functions. In contrast, attempts to rationally encode structure and function into synthetic amino acid and nucleic acid sequences have largely focused on engineering molecules that self-assemble into prescribed target structures, rather than on engineering transient system dynamics. To design systems that perform dynamic functions without human intervention, it is necessary to encode within the biopolymer sequences the reaction pathways by which self-assembly occurs. Nucleic acids show promise as a design medium for engineering dynamic functions, including catalytic hybridization, triggered self-assembly and molecular computation. Here, we program diverse molecular self-assembly and disassembly pathways using a 'reaction graph' abstraction to specify complementarity relationships between modular domains in a versatile DNA hairpin motif. Molecular programs are executed for a variety of dynamic functions: catalytic formation of branched junctions, autocatalytic duplex formation by a cross-catalytic circuit, nucleated dendritic growth of a binary molecular 'tree', and autonomous locomotion of a bipedal walker. PMID:18202654

  12. Temperature dependent coordinating self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijie; Gao, Xuedong; Xiao, Yunlong; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Jiang; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2015-03-25

    Self-assemblies dominated by coordination interaction are hardly responsive to thermal stimuli. We show that in case the coordinating mode changes with temperature, the resultant assemblies also exhibit temperature dependence. The self-assemblies are constructed with perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. Compounds containing a perylene skeleton often self-assemble into micro-belts, which is also true for the combination of perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. However, a unique pinecone structure was observed upon increasing the temperature of the coordinating system. The structural transition is triggered by the change of coordinating mode between the carboxylate group and the metal ion. At low temperature, intermolecular coordination occurs which favours the growth of the coordinating self-assembly along the long axis of the perylene. However, upon the elevation of temperature, the coordination is overwhelmed by intra-molecular mode. This is against the extension of the coordinating assembly due to the loss of connection between neighbouring perylenes. As a result, the pinecone structure is observed. We expect that the cases introduced in this work may inspire the design of structurally controllable temperature-dependent soft materials based on coordinating self-assembly. PMID:25703770

  13. Structure and interactions in biomaterials based on membrane-biopolymer self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilya Koltover

    1998-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of artificial pure lipid membranes have been extensively studied during the last two decades and are relatively well understood. However, most real membrane systems of biological and biotechnological importance incorporate macromolecules either embedded into the membranes or absorbed onto their surfaces. We have investigated three classes of self-assembled membrane-biopolymer biomaterials: (i) Structure, interactions and stability of

  14. ?-Carotene to bacteriochlorophyll c energy transfer in self-assembled aggregates mimicking chlorosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alster, J.; Polívka, T.; Arellano, J. B.; Chábera, P.; Vácha, F.; Pšen?ík, J.

    2010-07-01

    Carotenoids are together with bacteriochlorophylls important constituents of chlorosomes, the light-harvesting antennae of green photosynthetic bacteria. Majority of bacteriochlorophyll molecules form self-assembling aggregates inside the chlorosomes. Aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with optical properties similar to those of chlorosomes can also be prepared in non-polar organic solvents or in aqueous environments when a suitable non-polar molecule is added. In this work, the ability of ?-carotene to induce aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll c in aqueous buffer was studied. Excitation relaxation and energy transfer in the carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll assemblies were measured using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A fast, ˜100-fs energy transfer from the S 2 state of ?-carotene to bacteriochlorophyll c was revealed, while no evidence for significant energy transfer from the S 1 state was found. Picosecond formation of the carotenoid triplet state (T 1) was observed, which was likely generated by singlet homo-fission from the S 1 state of ?-carotene.

  15. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Sellinger, Alan (Palo Alto, CA); Lu, Yunfeng (New Orleans, LA)

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed. Importantly, in the reaction mixture, the amphiphilic surfactant has an initial concentration below the critical micelle concentration to allow formation of the liquid-phase micellar mesophase material. A variety of nanocomposite structures can be formed, depending upon the solvent evaporazation process, including layered mesophases, tubular mesophases, and a hierarchical composite coating composed of an isotropic worm-like micellar overlayer bonded to an oriented, nanolaminated underlayer.

  16. Dendrimers: a mimic natural light-harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Li, Ying-Ying; Chen, Jinping; Yang, Guoqiang; Li, Yi

    2010-05-01

    In natural photosynthetic systems, a large array of chlorophyll molecules surrounds a single reaction center and channels the absorbed solar energy to the reaction center, ultimately resulting in ATP production. Dendrimers are well-defined tree-like macromolecules having numerous chain ends all emanating from a single core, which makes them an attractive candidate for light-harvesting applications. More importantly, their synthesis is controllable and the accurate positioning of chromophores can be achieved. Photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer are main processes involved in photosynthesis. Studies on these processes in dendritic systems are important for the future application of dendrimers in optoelectronic devices. In this Focus Review we will discuss recent advances of light-harvesting dendrimers and emphasize the energy transfer and electron transfer characteristics in these systems. PMID:20397185

  17. Cascade exciton-pumping engines with manipulated speed and efficiency in light-harvesting porous ?-network films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Cheng; Huang, Ning; Xu, Fei; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-03-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are the machinery for exciton pumping in natural photosynthesis, whereas cascade energy transfer through chlorophyll is key to long-distance, efficient energy transduction. Numerous artificial antennae have been developed. However, they are limited in their cascade energy-transfer abilities because of a lack of control over complex chromophore aggregation processes, which has impeded their advancement. Here we report a viable approach for addressing this issue by using a light-harvesting porous polymer film in which a three-dimensional ?-network serves as the antenna and micropores segregate multiple dyes to prevent aggregation. Cascade energy-transfer engines are integrated into the films; the rate and efficiency of the energy-funneling engines are precisely manipulated by tailoring the dye components and contents. The nanofilms allow accurate and versatile luminescence engineering, resulting in the production of thirty emission hues, including blue, green, red and white. This advance may open new pathways for realising photosynthesis and photoenergy conversion.

  18. Early events in the biosynthesis and assembly of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lamont

    1996-02-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic procaryotes that employ a mechanism of photosynthesis which is essentially identical to the systems found in plant chloroplasts and the eukaryotic green algae. Cyanobacteria can drive photosynthesis with light energy from a broad region of the visible spectrum (500 - 650 nm wavelength) that is not available to plants and green algae, which are limited to the narrow band of light energy that is absorbed by chlorophyll (660-680 nm). The light-harvesting capacity of the cyanobacteria is a function of a complex protein structure that resides on the surface of the photosynthetic membrane in contact with the PSII chlorophyll reaction centers. This light-harvesting complex is called a phycobilisome and functions as a protein scaffold for a rigid array of chromophores that absorbs light energy and transfers it to chlorophyll. The chromophores are linear tetrapyrroles (the bilins) that are covalently attached to the biliproteins, which comprise 80 - 85% of the total phycobilisome mass. There are three major classes of spectrally distinct biliproteins [phycoerythrin (PE), (lambda) max equals 565 nm; phycocyanin (PC), (lambda) max equals 617 nm; and allophycocyanin (AP), (lambda) max equals 650 nm] and their spatial organization within the phycobilisome creates an array of donor and acceptor chromophores that is optimized for resonance energy transfer to chlorophyll on a picosecond timescale and at close to 100% efficiency. The cyanobacteria can exert control over the biliprotein composition of the phycobilisomes in response to both light quality and light quantity, and they do so primarily by light-responsive transcription control mechanisms. The biosynthesis and assembly of a phycobilisome is an interesting example of self-assembly in a complex protein system. A phycobilisome from Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 can contain 400 proteins derived from a repertoire of 16 different polypeptides that includes the (alpha) and (beta) subunits for each major biliprotein and the achromic linker proteins that mediate assembly throughout the structure. The biliprotein subunit structures all show an identical motif that is reflected by significant amino acid sequence similarities across the different classes. Since phycobilisomes can comprise up to 40% of the cyanobacterial dry mass, assembly of these complexes must occur in the presence of high localized concentrations of components that are very similar in structure. That phycobilisome assembly is an efficient process with no evidence of significant misassembly suggests that effective molecular recognition during phycobilisome biosynthesis is based upon the subtle differences between subunits of different class biliproteins. We are using a protein engineering approach to examine structural features that mediate molecular recognition in two of the earliest steps of phycobilisome assembly, the docking of (alpha) and (beta) subunits and the selective attachment of chromophores.

  19. Noise-assisted energy transfer in quantum networks and light-harvesting complexes

    E-print Network

    Alex W. Chin; Animesh Datta; Filippo Caruso; Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio

    2010-06-23

    We provide physically intuitive mechanisms for the effect of noise on excitation energy transfer (EET) in networks. Using these mechanisms of dephasing-assisted transport (DAT) in a hybrid basis of both excitons and sites, we develop a detailed picture of how noise enables energy transfer with efficiencies well above $90%$ across the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex, a type of light harvesting molecule. We demonstrate explicitly how noise alters the pathways of energy transfer across the complex, suppressing ineffective pathways and facilitating direct ones to the reaction centre. We explain that the fundamental mechanisms underpinning DAT are expected to be robust with respect to the considered noise model but show that the specific details of the exciton-phonon coupling, which remain largely unknown in these type of complexes, and in particular the impact of non-Markovian effects, results in variations of dynamical features that should be amenable to experimental verification within current or planned technology. A detailed understanding of DAT in natural compounds should open up a new paradigm of `noise-engineering' by which EET can be optimized in artificial light-harvesting structures.

  20. Light-harvesting materials: Soft support for energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stolley, Ryan M.; Helm, Monte L.

    2014-11-10

    To convert solar energy into viable fuel sources, coupling light-harvesting materials to catalysts is a critical challenge. Now, coupling between an organic supramolecular hydrogel and a non precious metal catalyst has been demonstrated to be effective for photocatalytic H2 production. Ryan M. Stolley and Monte L. Helm are at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA, USA 99352. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. e-mail: Monte.Helm@pnnl.gov

  1. Amphipols and photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Opa?i?, Milena; Durand, Grégory; Bosco, Michael; Polidori, Ange; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    The trimeric light-harvesting complexes II (LHCII) of plants and green algae are pigment-protein complexes involved in light harvesting and photoprotection. Different conformational states have been proposed to be responsible for their different functions. At present, detergent-solubilized LHCII is used as a model for the "light-harvesting conformation", whereas the "quenched conformation" is mimicked by LHCII aggregates. However, none of these conditions seem to perfectly reproduce the properties of LHCII in vivo. In addition, several monomeric LHC complexes are not fully stable in detergent. There is thus a need to find conditions that allow analyzing LHCs in vitro in stable and, hopefully, more native-like conformations. Here, we report a study of LHCII, the major antenna complex of plants, in complex with amphipols. We have trapped trimeric LHCII and monomeric Lhcb1 with either polyanionic or non-ionic amphipols and studied the effect of these polymers on the properties of the complexes. We show that, as compared to detergent solutions, amphipols have a stabilizing effect on LHCII. We also show that the average fluorescence lifetime of LHCII trapped in an anionic amphipol is ~30% shorter than in ?-dodecylmaltoside, due to the presence of a conformation with 230-ps lifetime that is not present in detergent solutions. PMID:25107304

  2. Guided self-assembly of diblock copolymer thin films on chemically patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Dzenis, Yuris A

    2006-11-01

    We study the guided self-assembly of symmetric/asymmetric diblock copolymer (BCP) films on heterogeneous substrates with chemically patterned surface by using a coarse-grained phase-separation model. During the procedure, the free energy employed for the BCP films was modeled by the Ginzburg-Landau free energy with nonlocal interaction, and the flat, chemically patterned surface was considered as a heterogeneous surface with short-range interaction with the BCP molecules. The resulting Cahn-Hilliard equation was solved by means of an efficient semi-implicit Fourier-spectral algorithm. Effects of pattern scale, surface chemical potential, and BCP asymmetry on the self-assembly process were explored in detail and compared with those without chemically patterned substrate surfaces. It was found that the morphology of both symmetric and asymmetric BCP films is strongly influenced by the commensurability between the unconstrained natural period lambda* of the bulk BCP and the artificial pattern period. Simulation shows that patterned surface with period close to lambda* leads to highly ordered morphology after self-assembly for both symmetric and asymmetric BCP films, and it also dramatically accelerates the guided self-assembly process. The present simulation is in a very good agreement with the recent experimental observation in BCP nanolithography. Finally, the present study also expects an innovative nanomanufacturing method to produce highly ordered nanodots based on the guided self-assembly of asymmetric BCP films on chemically patterned substrates. PMID:17100461

  3. Molecular Dynamics in Self-Assembled Monolayers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Bochinski; Derrick Stevens; Mary Scott; Laura Guy; Casey Dedeugd; Laura Clarke

    2007-01-01

    Silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are an important tool for both scientific research and technological applications. Despite their widespread use, few experimental investigations have addressed molecular motion within these films, which offer a unique and useful physical system for fundamental scientific studies, such as observing dipolar and other glass transitions in two-dimensions. In addition, relaxations such as ``rotator'' phases where molecular

  4. Self-assembled Monolayer Films: Microcontact Printing

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Self-assembled Monolayer Films: Microcontact Printing , Microcontact printing (PCP), one of the non to generate two-dimensional patterns by print- * ing the molecules of an "ink" onto the surface of a solid(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), the "ink" is an alkanethiol, and the substrate on which the printing occurs is a thin

  5. Diblock copolymer based self-assembled nanomagnetoelectric

    E-print Network

    Ren, Shenqiang; Briber, Robert M.; Wuttig, Manfred

    2008-10-31

    O4 (CFO)] nano cylinders within a matrix of ferroelectric lead zirconium titanate [Pb1.1(Zr(0.53)Ti(0.47))O3(PZT)] when thin films were prepared by spin coating. The initial magnetic permeability of the self-assembled CFO/PZT nanocomposite changes...

  6. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

  7. Hierarchical molecular self-assemblies: construction and advantages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andong; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2014-05-21

    Hierarchical molecular self-assembly offers many exotic and complicated nanostructures which are of interest in nanotechnology and material science. In the past decade, various strategies leading to hierarchical molecular self-assemblies have been developed. In this review we summarize the recent advances in the creation and application of solution-based self-assembled nanostructures that involve more than one level of arrangement of building blocks. The strategies for construction hierarchical self-assembled structures and the advantages brought up by these assemblies are focused on. The following contents are included: (1) general approaches to fabricate hierarchical self-assembly, including self-assemblies based on supramolecules and specially designed block copolymers; (2) the advantages brought about by the hierarchical self-assembly, including the fabrication of special self-assembled structures, rich responsiveness to external stimuli, and the materials' performance. PMID:24806718

  8. A design for self-assembling robots in a system

    E-print Network

    Kim, Myunghee, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, construction, control, and application for a novel concept of self-assembling robots in a system. The system is composed of multiple cooperative robots that are designed to self-assemble ...

  9. Templated self-assembly of sub-10 nm quantum dots

    E-print Network

    Leu, Joshua C. (Joshua Chung)

    2008-01-01

    Patterned templates can guide the self-assembly of nanoparticles into ordered arrays. Our motivation in pursuing templated self-assembly is to develop a robust method for the creation of ordered structures at length scales ...

  10. Three-dimensional micro-self-assembly using hydrophobic interaction controlled by self-assembled monolayers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroaki Onoe; Kiyoshi Matsumoto; Isao Shimoyama

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes three-dimensional micro-self-assembly using hydrophobic interaction. The interaction between microparticles was controlled using self-assembled monolayers formed on the particles. The particles were stirred in a dispersion liquid to create a binding for connecting their surfaces directly. The interaction between the particles was described by the thermodynamic free energy of adhesion, which was calculated using the surface free energies

  11. Amphiphilic, hydrophilic, or hydrophobic synthetic bacteriochlorins in biohybrid light-harvesting architectures: consideration of molecular designs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Pavan, M Phani; Lubian, Elisa; Harris, Michelle A; Jiao, Jieying; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Kirmaier, Christine; Parkes-Loach, Pamela S; Loach, Paul A; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2014-11-01

    Biohybrid light-harvesting architectures can be constructed that employ native-like bacterial photosynthetic antenna peptides as a scaffold to which synthetic chromophores are attached to augment overall spectral coverage. Synthetic bacteriochlorins are attractive to enhance capture of solar radiation in the photon-rich near-infrared spectral region. The effect of the polarity of the bacteriochlorin substituents on the antenna self-assembly process was explored by the preparation of a bacteriochlorin-peptide conjugate using a synthetic amphiphilic bacteriochlorin (B1) to complement prior studies using hydrophilic (B2, four carboxylic acids) or hydrophobic (B3) bacteriochlorins. The amphiphilic bioconjugatable bacteriochlorin B1 with a polar ammonium-terminated tail was synthesized by sequential Pd-mediated reactions of a 3,13-dibromo-5-methoxybacteriochlorin. Each bacteriochlorin bears a maleimido-terminated tether for attachment to a cysteine-containing analog of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides antenna ?-peptide to give conjugates ?-B1, ?-B2, and ?-B3. Given the hydrophobic nature of the ?-peptide, the polarity of B1 and B2 facilitated purification of the respective conjugate compared to the hydrophobic B3. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) associates with each conjugate in aqueous micellar media to form a dyad containing two ?-peptides, two covalently attached synthetic bacteriochlorins, and a datively bonded BChl-a pair, albeit to a limited extent for ?-B2. The reversible assembly/disassembly of dyad (?-B2/BChl)2 was examined in aqueous detergent (octyl glucoside) solution by temperature variation (15-35 °C). The energy-transfer efficiency from the synthetic bacteriochlorin to the BChl-a dimer was found to be 0.85 for (?-B1/BChl)2, 0.40 for (?-B2/BChl)2, and 0.85 for (?-B3/BChl)2. Thus, in terms of handling, assembly and energy-transfer efficiency taken together, the amphiphilic design examined herein is more attractive than the prior hydrophilic or hydrophobic designs. PMID:24997120

  12. Self-assembling membranes and related methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Capito, Ramille M; Azevedo, Helena S; Stupp, Samuel L

    2013-08-20

    The present invention relates to self-assembling membranes. In particular, the present invention provides self-assembling membranes configured for securing and/or delivering bioactive agents. In some embodiments, the self-assembling membranes are used in the treatment of diseases, and related methods (e.g., diagnostic methods, research methods, drug screening).

  13. Self-assembly approaches to photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yadong

    Self-assembly of spherical colloids has been demonstrated as a simple and effective strategy for fabricating a variety of photonic structures that include photonic crystals, arrayed microlenses, and waveguides. Unlike the top-down fabrication techniques, self-assembly approaches can produce functional structures under ambient conditions of pressure and temperature without the need for costly instruments. A confined self-assembly approach was developed to organize spherical colloids into highly ordered three-dimensional photonic crystals. Such colloidal photonic crystals can block the propagation of photons for a range of wavelengths along specific directions. The capability of this method has been demonstrated with monodispersed spherical colloids of various materials and a range of dimensions. The orientation of the crystals can be controlled by assembling the colloids against two-dimensional arrays of templates patterned in the surfaces of substrates. The colloidal crystals were further explored to fabricate inverse opals with complementary structures. Photonic bandgap properties of these crystals have been characterized by measuring their transmission and reflectance spectra. Self-assembly of nonspherical building blocks may lead to the formation of photonic crystals that can prohibit a band of optical frequencies in all directions of propagation. As the first step along this direction, a general approach based on physical confinement and attractive capillary force has been developed to produce nonspherical building blocks with well-defined structures and dimensions. Complex aggregates such as polygonal and polyhedral clusters, zigzag or helical chains have been fabricated using monodispersed polymer or silica colloids. Arrayed microlenses were fabricated by self-assembling monodispersed polymer colloids in two-dimensional arrays of cylindrical holes patterned on substrates. The spherical colloids were subsequently transformed into mushroom-shaped and then hemispherical microlenses by annealing the samples at elevated temperatures. The optical parameters of these microlenses could be precisely controlled by changing the annealing time. The minimization of waveguiding structures would allow the fabrication of highly integrated lightwave circuits. A number of methods have been developed based on the self-assembly approaches, including coupled resonator optical waveguide constructed from arrays of plain colloids, plasmon waveguide built from arrays of gold@silica core-shell colloids, and photonic crystal waveguide generated by introducing line defects into a photonic crystal.

  14. Self-assembly of Fmoc-diphenylalanine inside liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Cardoso, André Zamith

    2012-09-01

    Liquid marbles made from Lycopodium clavatum spores are used to encapsulate aqueous solutions of 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF). Acidification of the Fmoc-FF solution at the liquid/air interface of the liquid marble triggers the self-assembly of ribbon-like peptide fibrils into an ultrathin peptide membrane (50-500 nm). The membrane incorporates the lycopodium microparticles and as a result stabilizes the liquid marble against collapse, that could otherwise occur through particle disintegration at the floating interphase. Ultrathin nanostructured peptide membrane formation at the liquid/air interface is also observed within artificial microstructured floating objects. Thus, peptide membranes formed were inspected by SEM and TEM. Electron diffraction data reveal information about the molecular organization inside the oligopeptide membranes. PMID:22584262

  15. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  16. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the ``photonic hyper-crystal'', which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  17. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Gresock, Thomas; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  18. Engineering building blocks for self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Like natural viruses, manmade protein cages for drug delivery are to be ideally formed by repetitive subunits with self-assembling properties, mimicking viral functions and molecular organization. Naturally formed nanostructures (such as viruses, flagella or simpler protein oligomers) can be engineered to acquire specific traits of interest in biomedicine, for instance through the addition of cell targeting agents for desired biodistribution and specific delivery of associated drugs. However, fully artificial constructs would be highly desirable regarding finest tuning and adaptation to precise therapeutic purposes. Although engineering of protein assembling is still in its infancy, arising principles and promising strategies of protein manipulation point out the rational construction of nanoscale protein cages as a feasible concept, reachable through conventional recombinant DNA technologies and microbial protein production. PMID:21192790

  19. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  20. Simulating self-assembly of porphyrin nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthe, Gregory K.; Subhas, Adam V.; Smith, Walter F.; Schrier, Joshua

    2009-03-01

    Diacid meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine (TPPS4^2- ) monomers have been shown to self assemble into nanorods with well-defined cross-section^1 and intriguing photoelectronic properties^2. However, the structure and conduction mechanism of these nanorods is poorly understood, and questions remain about the aggregation process. Using density functional theory (DFT), we first obtain optimized geometries and atomic-charges for the monomers, which we then use for subsequent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to observe the initial stages of the self-assembly process. This work uses the resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. ^1A.D. Schwab et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107, 11339 (2003). ^2A.D. Schwab et al., Nano Letters 4, 1261 (2004).

  1. Computer Simulations of Self-Assembled Membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-M. Drouffe; A. C. Maggs; S. Leibler

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in three dimensions of particles that self-assemble to form two-dimensional, membrane-like objects are presented. Anisotropic, multibody forces, chosen so as to mimic real interactions between amphiphilic molecules, generate a finite rigidity and compressibility of the assembled membranes, as well as a finite line tension at their free edges. This model and its generalizations can be used to

  2. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  3. Self-assembled biomimetic antireflection coatings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas C. Linn; Chih-Hung Sun; Peng Jiang; Bin Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a simple self-assembly technique for fabricating antireflection coatings that mimic antireflective moth eyes. Wafer-scale, nonclose-packed colloidal crystals with remarkable large hexagonal domains are created by a spin-coating technology. The resulting polymer-embedded colloidal crystals exhibit highly ordered surface modulation and can be used directly as templates to cast poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Moth-eye antireflection coatings with adjustable reflectivity can

  4. Engineered Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A critical need in nanotechnology is the development of new tools and methods to organize, connect, and integrate solid-state nanocomponents. Self-assembly -- where components spontaneously organize themselves -- can be carried out on a massively parallel scale to construct large-scale architectures using solid-state nanocrystal building blocks. I will present our recent work on the synthesis and self-assembly of nanocrystals for plasmonics, where light is propagated, manipulated, and confined by solid-state components that are smaller than the wavelength of light itself. We show the organization of polymer-grafted metal nanocrystals into hierarchical nanojunction arrays that possess intense ``hot spots'' due to electromagnetic field localization. We also show that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can serve as a new class of plasmonic building blocks, where shape and carrier density can be actively tuned to engineer plasmon resonances. These examples demonstrate that nanocrystals possess unique electromagnetic properties that rival top-down structures, and the potential of self-assembly for fabricating designer plasmonic materials.

  5. Green grasses as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Sharafali, A.; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophylls, the major pigments presented in plants are responsible for the process of photosynthesis. The working principle of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is analogous to natural photosynthesis in light-harvesting and charge separation. In a similar way, natural dyes extracted from three types of grasses viz. Hierochloe Odorata (HO), Torulinium Odoratum (TO) and Dactyloctenium Aegyptium (DA) were used as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to characterize the dyes. The electron transport mechanism and internal resistance of the DSSCs were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The performance of the cells fabricated with the grass extract shows comparable efficiencies with the reported natural dyes. Among the three types of grasses, the DSSC fabricated with the dye extracted from Hierochloe Odorata (HO) exhibited the maximum efficiency. LC-MS investigations indicated that the dominant pigment present in HO dye was pheophytin a (Pheo a).

  6. Green grasses as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Sharafali, A; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-25

    Chlorophylls, the major pigments presented in plants are responsible for the process of photosynthesis. The working principle of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is analogous to natural photosynthesis in light-harvesting and charge separation. In a similar way, natural dyes extracted from three types of grasses viz. Hierochloe Odorata (HO), Torulinium Odoratum (TO) and Dactyloctenium Aegyptium (DA) were used as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to characterize the dyes. The electron transport mechanism and internal resistance of the DSSCs were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The performance of the cells fabricated with the grass extract shows comparable efficiencies with the reported natural dyes. Among the three types of grasses, the DSSC fabricated with the dye extracted from Hierochloe Odorata (HO) exhibited the maximum efficiency. LC-MS investigations indicated that the dominant pigment present in HO dye was pheophytin a (Pheo a). PMID:25168231

  7. Regulation of photosystem I light harvesting by zeaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Ballottari, Matteo; Alcocer, Marcelo J. P.; D’Andrea, Cosimo; Viola, Daniele; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Petrozza, Annamaria; Polli, Dario; Fleming, Graham R.; Cerullo, Giulio; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In oxygenic photosynthetic eukaryotes, the hydroxylated carotenoid zeaxanthin is produced from preexisting violaxanthin upon exposure to excess light conditions. Zeaxanthin binding to components of the photosystem II (PSII) antenna system has been investigated thoroughly and shown to help in the dissipation of excess chlorophyll-excited states and scavenging of oxygen radicals. However, the functional consequences of the accumulation of the light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) proteins in the photosystem I (PSI) antenna have remained unclarified so far. In this work we investigated the effect of zeaxanthin binding on photoprotection of PSI–LHCI by comparing preparations isolated from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (i.e., with violaxanthin) and those isolated from the A. thaliana nonphotochemical quenching 2 mutant, in which violaxanthin is replaced by zeaxanthin. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements showed that zeaxanthin binding leads to a previously unrecognized quenching effect on PSI–LHCI fluorescence. The efficiency of energy transfer from the LHCI moiety of the complex to the PSI reaction center was down-regulated, and an enhanced PSI resistance to photoinhibition was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, zeaxanthin was shown to be effective in inducing dissipative states in PSI, similar to its well-known effect on PSII. We propose that, upon acclimation to high light, PSI–LHCI changes its light-harvesting efficiency by a zeaxanthin-dependent quenching of the absorbed excitation energy, whereas in PSII the stoichiometry of LHC antenna proteins per reaction center is reduced directly. PMID:24872450

  8. Fractal self-assembly of single-stranded DNA on hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chunyan; Qiao, Haiyan; Li, Yongjun; Ke, Xi; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2012-09-27

    The self-assembled structures possess superior stability, biocompatibility and mechanical strength, and their study can provide insight into the use of creating novel biomaterials. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) nanostructures show that well-ordered organization, high homogeneity, and molecular dimensions fractal-shaped fibers formed on a gold substrate covered with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-hexadecanethiol (HDT). The nanoscaled architectures of ssDNA on HDT/Au changed remarkably following the process of diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLA) over time. The ssDNA fibers prefer to form on hydrophobic SAMs instead of hydrophilic SAMs, and the ssDNA has to have complementary regions in their sequences. This method might not be used only for the construction of fractal patterns, but also for the design and fabrication of functional DNA-based, self-assembled materials that exhibit self-similarity at multiple length scales. PMID:22954149

  9. Pigment Interactions in Light-harvesting Complex II in Different Molecular Environments.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Parveen; Dorogi, Márta; Pawlak, Krzysztof; Kovács, László; Bóta, Attila; Kiss, Teréz; Garab, Gy?z?; Lambrev, Petar H

    2015-02-20

    Extraction of plant light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) from the native thylakoid membrane or from aggregates by the use of surfactants brings about significant changes in the excitonic circular dichroism (CD) spectrum and fluorescence quantum yield. To elucidate the cause of these changes, e.g. trimer-trimer contacts or surfactant-induced structural perturbations, we compared the CD spectra and fluorescence kinetics of LHCII aggregates, artificial and native LHCII-lipid membranes, and LHCII solubilized in different detergents or trapped in polymer gel. By this means we were able to identify CD spectral changes specific to LHCII-LHCII interactions, at (-)-437 and (+)-484 nm, and changes specific to the interaction with the detergent n-dodecyl-?-maltoside (?-DM) or membrane lipids, at (+)-447 and (-)-494 nm. The latter change is attributed to the conformational change of the LHCII-bound carotenoid neoxanthin, by analyzing the CD spectra of neoxanthin-deficient plant thylakoid membranes. The neoxanthin-specific band at (-)-494 nm was not pronounced in LHCII in detergent-free gels or solubilized in the ? isomer of DM but was present when LHCII was reconstituted in membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine or plant thylakoid lipids, indicating that the conformation of neoxanthin is sensitive to the molecular environment. Neither the aggregation-specific CD bands, nor the surfactant-specific bands were positively associated with the onset of fluorescence quenching, which could be triggered without invoking such spectral changes. Significant quenching was not active in reconstituted LHCII proteoliposomes, whereas a high degree of energetic connectivity, depending on the lipid:protein ratio, in these membranes allows for efficient light harvesting. PMID:25525277

  10. A model system to study transport of self-assembled cargos.

    PubMed

    Conway, Leslie; Ross, Jennifer L

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular transport is the process by which cellular cargos, such as organelles and proteins, are moved throughout the cell. Motor proteins bind these cargos and walk along microtubule tracks to deliver them to specific regions of the cell. In axons, cargos are transported by either fast or slow axonal transport. Fast axonal transport is performed by fixed teams of motors bound to membranous cargos, whereas slow axonal transport is thought to be performed by motors that transiently self-assemble with cargos, assembling and disassembling throughout transport. While recent studies have begun to shed light on the nature of slow axonal transport, there are many open questions about the mechanism of action for transient motor association, and how they could result in effective, yet slow, long-range transport. Here, we describe an in vitro system to study self-assembled cargos using quantum dots (Qdots) as artificial cargos. In this system, kinesin motors are able to form transient interactions with Qdot cargos, allowing for the study of self-assembled cargos that assemble and disassemble during transport. Using this system, we can begin to probe the effects of self-assembly on cargo transport properties. PMID:24265853

  11. Perspective: Detecting and measuring exciton delocalization in photosynthetic light harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Scholes, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.scholes@utoronto.ca; Smyth, Cathal [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-03-21

    Photosynthetic units perform energy transfer remarkably well under a diverse range of demanding conditions. However, the mechanism of energy transfer, from excitation to conversion, is still not fully understood. Of particular interest is the possible role that coherence plays in this process. In this perspective, we overview photosynthetic light harvesting and discuss consequences of excitons for energy transfer and how delocalization can be assessed. We focus on challenges such as decoherence and nuclear-coordinate dependent delocalization. These approaches complement conventional spectroscopy and delocalization measurement techniques. New broadband transient absorption data may help uncover the difference between electronic and vibrational coherences present in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy data. We describe how multipartite entanglement from quantum information theory allows us to formulate measures that elucidate the delocalization length of excitation and the details of that delocalization even from highly averaged information such as the density matrix.

  12. Self-assembled nanostructures of oligopyridine molecules.

    PubMed

    Ziener, Ulrich

    2008-11-27

    The high potential of self-assembly processes of molecular building blocks is reflected in the vast variety of different functional nanostructures reported in the literature. The constituting units must fulfill several requirements like synthetic accessibility, presence of functional groups for appropriate intermolecular interactions and depending on the type of self-assembly processsignificant chemical and thermal stability. It is shown that oligopyridines are versatile building blocks for two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) self-assembly. They can be employed for building up different architectures like gridlike metal complexes in solution. By the appropriate tailoring of the heterocycles, further metal coordinating and/or hydrogen bonding capabilities to the heteroaromatic molecules can be added. Thus, the above-mentioned architectures can be extended in one-step processes to larger entities, or in a hierarchical fashion to infinite assemblies in the solid state, respectively. Besides the organizational properties of small molecules in solution, 2D assemblies on surfaces offer certain advantages over 3D arrays. By precise tailoring of the molecular structures, the intermolecular interactions can be fine-tuned expressed by a large variety of resulting 2D patterns. Oligopyridines prove to be ideal candidates for 2D assemblies on graphite and metal sufaces, respectively, expressing highly ordered structures. A slight structural variation in the periphery of the molecules leads to strongly changed 2D packing motifs based on weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Such 2D assemblies can be exploited for building up host-guest networks which are attractive candidates for manipulation experiments on the single-molecule level. Thus, "erasing" and "writing" processes by the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip at the liquid/solid interface are shown. The 2D networks are also employed for performing coordination chemistry experiments at surfaces. PMID:18989910

  13. Molecular Basis of Light Harvesting and Photoprotection in CP24

    PubMed Central

    Passarini, Francesca; Wientjes, Emilie; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Croce, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    CP24 is a minor antenna complex of Photosystem II, which is specific for land plants. It has been proposed that this complex is involved in the process of excess energy dissipation, which protects plants from photodamage in high light conditions. Here, we have investigated the functional architecture of the complex, integrating mutation analysis with time-resolved spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture is obtained about the nature, the spectroscopic properties, and the role in the quenching in solution of the pigments in the individual binding sites. The lowest energy absorption band in the chlorophyll a region corresponds to chlorophylls 611/612, and it is not the site of quenching in CP24. Chlorophylls 613 and 614, which are present in the major light-harvesting complex of Photosystem appear to be absent in CP24. In contrast to all other light-harvesting complexes, CP24 is stable when the L1 carotenoid binding site is empty and upon mutations in the third helix, whereas mutations in the first helix strongly affect the folding/stability of the pigment-protein complex. The absence of lutein in L1 site does not have any effect on the quenching, whereas substitution of violaxanthin in the L2 site with lutein or zeaxanthin results in a complex with enhanced quenched fluorescence. Triplet-minus-singlet measurements indicate that zeaxanthin and lutein in site L2 are located closer to chlorophylls than violaxanthin, thus suggesting that they can act as direct quenchers via a strong interaction with a neighboring chlorophyll. The results provide the molecular basis for the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching in isolated CP24. PMID:19700403

  14. Self-assembled biomimetic antireflection coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, Nicholas C.; Sun, Chih-Hung; Jiang, Peng; Jiang, Bin

    2007-09-01

    The authors report a simple self-assembly technique for fabricating antireflection coatings that mimic antireflective moth eyes. Wafer-scale, nonclose-packed colloidal crystals with remarkable large hexagonal domains are created by a spin-coating technology. The resulting polymer-embedded colloidal crystals exhibit highly ordered surface modulation and can be used directly as templates to cast poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Moth-eye antireflection coatings with adjustable reflectivity can then be molded against the PDMS master. The specular reflection of replicated nipple arrays matches the theoretical prediction using a thin-film multilayer model. These biomimetic films may find important technological application in optical coatings and solar cells.

  15. Self-assembly of magnetic biofunctional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Thode, C. J.; Mabry, J. K.; Harrell, J. W.; Nikles, D. E.; Sun, K.; Wang, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Spherical, ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles with a particle size of 3 nm were prepared by the simultaneous polyol reduction of Fe(acac)3 and Pt(acac)2 in phenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The oleic acid ligands can be replaced with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, giving particles that can be dispersed in water. Both x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicated that FePt particles were not affected by ligands replacement. Dispersions of the FePt particles with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid ligands and ammonium counter ions gave self-assembled films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal arrays of particles.

  16. Self-assembled Au nanorods - polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heung-Shik; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Agarwal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    The unique optoelectronic properties of the anisotropic metallic nanorods (NRs) are of great interest because of their potential applications in biological sensing, solar energy conversion, cloaking devices, etc. In order to utilize NRs, tuning their properties and immobilizing NRs into polymer matrix are essential. We present a simple and universal process for formation of self-assembled nanorods polymer composite. This approach is based on the anisotropic electrostatic interaction between aggregates of chromonic molecules and NRs that lead to either end-to-end or side-by-side assembly of NRs. We discuss encapsulation of these structures with polymer matrices.

  17. Self-Assembly of Organic Nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Wan, Albert

    2012-10-19

    nanoribbon. (c) Transfer characteristics of the device measured at a fixed source–drain voltage VSD = 10 V (right axis). The solid circles represent the square root of the source–drain current (ISD) in the saturation regime as a function of the gate...……………………………………………………….. 20 1.12 Self-assembly of porphyrin nanorods via direct acidification of TSPP… 21 1.13 SEM images of micrometer-scale columns assembled from Sn porphyrin nanowires in 0.1 mM aqueous solution of Pluro F127………. 22 1.14 SEM images...

  18. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Carvajal

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to

  19. Structural and functional characterization of self-assembling amphiphilic oligopeptides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. van Hell

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to design amphiphilic peptides that self-assemble into supramolecular structures, like nano-sized vesicles that can be of use for drug delivery purposes. The oligopeptides were produced by recombinant techniques and are shown to spontaneously self-assemble upon hydration into vesicles in which hydrophillic molecules could be entrapped. Detailed analysis of the obtained self-assembled, vesicular structures has

  20. Sambot: A self-assembly modular robot for swarm robot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongxing Wei; Yingpeng Cai; Haiyuan Li; Dezhong Li; Tianmiao Wang

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel self-assembly modular robot (Sambot) that also shares characteristics with self-reconfigurable and self-assembly and swarm robots. Each Sambot can move autonomously and connect with the others. Multiple Sambot can be self-assembled to form a robotic structure, which can be reconfigured into different configurable robots and can locomote. A novel mechanical design is described to realize function

  1. Microstructure to substrate self-assembly using capillary forces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uthara Srinivasan; Dorian Liepmann; Roger T. Howe

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated the fluidic self-assembly of micromachined silicon parts onto silicon and quartz substrates in a preconfigured pattern with submicrometer positioning precision. Self-assembly is accomplished using photolithographically defined part and substrate binding sites that are complementary shapes of hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers. The patterned substrate is passed through a film of hydrophobic adhesive on water, causing the adhesive to selectively

  2. Ion current behaviors of mesoporous zeolite-polymer composite nanochannels prepared by water-assisted self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Meng, Zheyi; Zhai, Jin; Heng, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Inspired by the asymmetry of biological ion channels in structure and composition, we designed a novel type of artificial asymmetric nanochannels based on mesoporous zeolite (MCM-41) and polyimide (PI) by water-assisted self-assembly. Meanwhile, we studied ionic current behaviors and rectifying characteristics of the mesoporous zeolite-polymer composite nanochannels. PMID:24394328

  3. Beyond molecules: Self-assembly of mesoscopic and macroscopic components

    PubMed Central

    Whitesides, George M.; Boncheva, Mila

    2002-01-01

    Self-assembly is a process in which components, either separate or linked, spontaneously form ordered aggregates. Self-assembly can occur with components having sizes from the molecular to the macroscopic, provided that appropriate conditions are met. Although much of the work in self-assembly has focused on molecular components, many of the most interesting applications of self-assembling processes can be found at larger sizes (nanometers to micrometers). These larger systems also offer a level of control over the characteristics of the components and over the interactions among them that makes fundamental investigations especially tractable. PMID:11959929

  4. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  5. Bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly towards soft nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiyang; Mao, Chuanbin

    2011-09-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly has proven to be a reliable approach towards versatile nanomaterials based on multiple weak intermolecular forces. In this review, the development of bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly into soft materials and their applications are summarized. Molecular systems used in bio-inspired "bottom-up self-assembly" involve small organic molecules, peptides or proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses. Self-assembled soft nanomaterials have been exploited in various applications such as inorganic nanomaterial synthesis, drug or gene delivery, tissue engineering, and so on.

  6. Bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly towards soft nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Yiyang; MAO, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly has proven to be a reliable approach towards versatile nanomaterials based on multiple weak intermolecular forces. In this review, the development of bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly into soft materials and their applications are summarized. Molecular systems used in bio-inspired “bottom-up self-assembly” involve small organic molecules, peptides or proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses. Self-assembled soft nanomaterials have been exploited in various applications such as inorganic nanomaterial synthesis, drug or gene delivery, tissue engineering, and so on. PMID:21980594

  7. Self-assembled Nanofibrils for Immunomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan

    This thesis has been mainly focused on applying self-assembled nanofibrils as unique depots for controlled release to modulate immune system, with two major chapters on modulation of innate immunity in chapter 2 and adaptive immunity in chapter 3, respectively. There are 5 chapters in the thesis. Chapter 1 gives a detailed review on the discovery, synthesis and application of self-assembled nanofibrils of therapeutic agents (termed as "self-delivery drugs"), including bioactive molecules; Chapter 2 demonstrates the supramolecular hydrogel of chemotactic peptides as a prolonged inflammation model through proper molecular engineering; Chapter 3 reports a suppressive antibody response achieved by encapsulation of antigens by supramolecular hydrogel of glycopeptide; Chapter 4 illustrates an example of supramolecular hydrogel formation of molecules with extremely low solubility, based on the fact that many small organic drugs have poor solubility. Chapter 5 used beta-galatosidase as a model to study glycosidase-instructed supramolecular hydrogel formation, with potential to target cancer cells due to their distinct metabolic profile.

  8. Transmetalation of self-assembled, supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Matthew E; Collins, Mary S; Johnson, Darren W

    2014-03-21

    Substituting one metal for another in inorganic and organometallic systems is a proven strategy for synthesizing complex molecules, and in some cases, provides the only route to a particular system. The multivalent nature of the coordination in metal-ligand assemblies lends itself more readily to some types of transmetalation. For instance, a binding site can open up for exchange without greatly effecting the many other interactions holding the structure together. In addition to exchanging the metal and altering the local binding environment, transmetalation in supramolecular systems can also lead to substantial changes in the nature of the secondary and tertiary structure of a larger assembly. In this tutorial review we will cover discrete supramolecular assemblies in which metals are exchanged. First we will address fully formed structures where direct substitution replaces one type of metal for another without changing the overall supramolecular assembly. We will then address systems where the disruptive exchange of one metal for another leads to a larger change in the supramolecular assembly. When possible we have tried to highlight systems that use supramolecular self-assembly in tandem with transmetalation to synthesize new structures not accessible through a more direct approach. At the end of this review, we highlight the use of transmetalation in self-assembled aqueous inorganic clusters and discuss the consequences for material science applications. PMID:24346298

  9. Self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvisati, Guido; Vissers, Teun; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-02-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells interacting via a modified Kern-Frenkel potential by probing the system concentration and dumbbell shape. We consider dumbbells consisting of one attractive sphere with diameter ?1 and one repulsive sphere with diameter ?2 and center-to-center distance d between the spheres. For three different size ratios, we study the self-assembled structures for different separations l = 2d/(?1 + ?2) between the two spheres. In particular, we focus on structures that can be assembled from the homogeneous fluid, as these might be of interest in experiments. We use cluster order parameters to classify the shape of the formed structures. When the size of the spheres is almost equal, q = ?2/?1 = 1.035, we find that, upon increasing l, spherical micelles are transformed to elongated micelles and finally to vesicles and bilayers. For size ratio q = 1.25, we observe a continuously tunable transition from spherical to elongated micelles upon increasing the sphere separation. For size ratio q = 0.95, we find bilayers and vesicles, plus faceted polyhedra and liquid droplets. Our results identify key parameters to create colloidal vesicles with attractive dumbbells in experiments.

  10. Micropatterning of bioactive self-assembling gels†

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Hsu, Lorraine; Capito, Ramille; Aparicio, Conrado; Henrikson, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Microscale topographical features have been known to affect cell behavior. An important target in this area is to integrate top down techniques with bottom up self-assembly to create three-dimensional (3D) patterned bioactive mimics of extracellular matrices. We report a novel approach toward this goal and demonstrate its use to study the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). By incorporating polymerizable acetylene groups in the hydrophobic segment of peptide amphiphiles (PAs), we were able to micro-pattern nanofiber gels of these bioactive materials. PAs containing the cell adhesive epitope arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (RGDS) were allowed to self-assemble within microfabricated molds to create networks of either randomly oriented or aligned ~30 nm diameter nanofiber bundles that were shaped into topographical patterns containing holes, posts, or channels up to 8 ?m in height and down to 5 ?m in lateral dimensions. When topographical patterns contained nanofibers aligned through flow prior to gelation, the majority of hMSCs aligned in the direction of the nanofibers even in the presence of hole microtextures and more than a third of them maintained this alignment when encountering perpendicular channel microtextures. Interestingly, in topographical patterns with randomly oriented nanofibers, osteoblastic differentiation was enhanced on hole microtextures compared to all other surfaces. PMID:20047022

  11. Self-assembled virus-membrane complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lihua; Liang, Hongjun; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Coridan, Robert; Tang, Jay; Wong, Gerard (UIUC); (Brown)

    2010-11-16

    Anionic polyelectrolytes and cationic lipid membranes can self-assemble into lamellar structures ranging from alternating layers of membranes and polyelectrolytes to 'missing layer' superlattice structures. We show that these structural differences can be understood in terms of the surface-charge-density mismatch between the polyelectrolyte and membrane components by examining complexes between cationic membranes and highly charged M13 viruses, a system that allowed us to vary the polyelectrolyte diameter independently of the charge density. Such virus-membrane complexes have pore sizes that are about ten times larger in area than DNA-membrane complexes, and can be used to package and organize large functional molecules; correlated arrays of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} macroionic dyes have been directly observed within the virus-membrane complexes using an electron-density reconstruction. These observations elucidate fundamental design rules for rational control of self-assembled polyelectrolyte-membrane structures, which have applications ranging from non-viral gene therapy to biomolecular templates for nanofabrication.

  12. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  13. Self-Assembly of Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Mondal, Jagannath; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of Gemini (dimeric or twin-tail) dicarboxylate disodium surfactants is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. This gemini architecture, in which two single tailed surfactants are joined through a flexible hydrophobic linker, has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent aqueous self-assembly into lyotropic phases including hexagonal, gyroid, and lamellar morphologies. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed phases at similar amphiphile concentrations in water, including the unusual ability of these surfactants to form gyroid phases over unprecedentedly large amphiphile concentration windows. We demonstrate quanitative agreement between the predicted and experimentally observed domain spacings of these nanostructured materials. Through careful conformation analyses of the surfactant molecules, we show that the gyroid phase is electrostatically stabilized related to the lamellar phase. By starting with a lamellar phase, we show that decreasing the charge on the surfactant headgroups by carboxylate protonation or use of a bulkier tetramethyl ammonium counterion in place of sodium drives the formation of a gyroid phase.

  14. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids.

  15. Fabrication of bioinspired nanostructured materials via colloidal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Han

    Through millions of years of evolution, nature creates unique structures and materials that exhibit remarkable performance on mechanicals, opticals, and physical properties. For instance, nacre (mother of pearl), bone and tooth show excellent combination of strong minerals and elastic proteins as reinforced materials. Structured butterfly's wing and moth's eye can selectively reflect light or absorb light without dyes. Lotus leaf and cicada's wing are superhydrophobic to prevent water accumulation. The principles of particular biological capabilities, attributed to the highly sophisticated structures with complex hierarchical designs, have been extensively studied. Recently, a large variety of novel materials have been enabled by natural-inspired designs and nanotechnologies. These advanced materials will have huge impact on practical applications. We have utilized bottom-up approaches to fabricate nacre-like nanocomposites with "brick and mortar" structures. First, we used self-assembly processes, including convective self-assembly, dip-coating, and electrophoretic deposition to form well oriented layer structure of synthesized gibbsite (aluminum hydroxide) nanoplatelets. Low viscous monomer was permeated into layered nanoplatelets and followed by photo-curing. Gibbsite-polymer composite displays 2 times higher tensile strength and 3 times higher modulus when compared with pure polymer. More improvement occurred when surface-modified gibbsite platelets were cross-linked with the polymer matrix. We observed ˜4 times higher strength and nearly 1 order of magnitude higher modulus than pure polymer. To further improve the mechanical strength and toughness of inorganicorganic nanocomposites, we exploited ultrastrong graphene oxide (GO), a single atom thick hexagonal carbon sheet with pendant oxidation groups. GO nanocomposite is made by co-filtrating GO/polyvinyl alcohol suspension on 0.2 im pore-sized membrane. It shows ˜2 times higher strength and ˜15 times higher ultimate strains than nacre and pure GO paper (also synthesized by filtration). Specifically, it exhibits ˜30 times higher fracture energy than filtrated graphene paper and nacre, ˜100 times tougher than filtrated GO paper. Besides reinforced nanocomposites, we further explored the self-assembly of spherical colloids and the templating nanofabrication of moth-eye-inspired broadband antireflection coatings. Binary crystalline structures can be easily accomplished by spin-coating double-layer nonclose-packed colloidal crystals as templates, followed by colloidal templating. The polymer matrix between self-assembled colloidal crystal has been used as a sacrificial template to define the resulting periodic binary nanostructures, including intercalated arrays of silica spheres and polymer posts, gold nanohole arrays with binary sizes, and dimple-nipple antireflection coatings. The binary-structured antireflection coatings exhibit better antireflective properties than unitary coatings. Natural optical structures and nanocomposites teach us a great deal on how to create high performance artificial materials. The bottom-up technologies developed in this thesis are scalable and compatible with standard industrial processes, promising for manufacturing high-performance materials for the benefits of human beings.

  16. Catalysis by Self-Assembled Structures in Emergent Reaction Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gianluca Gazzola; Andrew Buchanan; Norman H. Packard; Mark A. Bedau

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new variant of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model that includes the possibility of dynamically forming and breaking strong bonds. The emergent reaction kinetics may then interact with self- assembly processes. We observe that self-assembled amphiphilic aggregations such as micelles have a catalytic effect on chemical reaction networks, chang- ing both equilibrium concentrations and reaction frequencies. These

  17. Hierarchical self-assembly of DNA into symmetric supramolecular polyhedra

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    LETTERS Hierarchical self-assembly of DNA into symmetric supramolecular polyhedra Yu He1 , Tao Ye1 approach to forming DNA polyhedra is a one-pot self- assembly process illustrated in Fig. 1: individual then further assemble into polyhedra through sticky-end asso- ciation between the tiles. The three

  18. On the Decidability of Self-Assembly of Infinite Ribbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonard M. Adleman; Jarkko Kari; Lila Kari; Dustin Reishus

    2002-01-01

    Self-assembly, the process by which objects au- tonomously come together to form complex structures, is omnipresent in the physical world. A systematic study of self-assembly as a mathematical process has been initiated . The individual components are modelled as square tiles on the infinite two-dimensional plane. Each side of a tile is covered by a specific \\

  19. Helical nanostructures based on DNA self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Shen, Xibo; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Kuzyk, Anton; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in design and fabrication of helical nanostructures based on DNA self-assembly are reviewed. These helical nanostructures are either constructed entirely by DNA or based on DNA guided metal nanoparticles self-assembly. Biophysical properties and optical responses of corresponding helical nanostructures are also discussed.

  20. Local Energy Transfer in Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Thin

    E-print Network

    Buratto, Steve

    Local Energy Transfer in Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Thin Films Probed by Near-Field Optics properties of self-assembled polyelectrolyte films consisting of poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and poly highlight the unique multilayer interpenetration properties of thin films constructed using the layer

  1. Dynamic Self-Assembly of Rings of Charged Metallic Spheres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bartosz A. Grzybowski; Jason A. Wiles; George M. Whitesides

    2003-01-01

    This Letter describes dynamic self-assembly in a system of stainless steel spheres (˜1 mm in diameter) rolling on a flat dielectric surface under the influence of an external magnetic field that rotates parallel to the plane of the surface. As the spheres move, they charge triboelectrically. Self-assembly is mediated by two types of electrostatic interactions among these charges: (i) attraction

  2. Self-assembled single-crystal silicon circuits on plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauth, Sean A.; Parviz, Babak A.

    2006-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of self-assembly for the integration of freestanding micrometer-scale components, including single-crystal, silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) and diffusion resistors, onto flexible plastic substrates. Preferential self-assembly of multiple microcomponent types onto a common platform is achieved through complementary shape recognition and aided by capillary, fluidic, and gravitational forces. We outline a microfabrication process that yields single-crystal, silicon FETs in a freestanding, powder-like collection for use with self-assembly. Demonstrations of self-assembled FETs on plastic include logic inverters and measured electron mobility of 592 cm2/V-s. Finally, we extend the self-assembly process to substrates each containing 10,000 binding sites and realize 97% self-assembly yield within 25 min for 100-?m-sized elements. High-yield self-assembly of micrometer-scale functional devices as outlined here provides a powerful approach for production of macroelectronic systems. macroelectronics | plastic electronics | self-assembly

  3. Trifluoromethylated Nucleic Acid Analogues Capable of Self-Assembly through Hydrophobic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, RuoWen; Wang, Chunming; Cao, Yang; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong; Chen, Jianzhong; Qing, Feng-Ling; Tan, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    An artificial nucleic acid analogue capable of self-assembly into duplex merely through hydrophobic interactions is presented. The replacement of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with strictly hydrophobic interactions has the potential to confer new properties and facilitate the construction of complex DNA nanodevices. To study how the hydrophobic effect works during the self-assembly of nucleic acid bases, we have designed and synthesized a series of fluorinated nucleic acids (FNA) containing 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl) benzene (F) and nucleic acids incorporating 3,5-dimethylbenzene (M) as hydrophobic base surrogates. Our experiments illustrate that two single-stranded nucleic acid oligomers could spontaneously organize into a duplex entirely by hydrophobic base pairing if the bases were size-complementary and the intermolecular forces were sufficiently strong. PMID:25285193

  4. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of chemical reaction and reaction-induced self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Koizumi, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kurosaki, K.; Ohmae, M.; Kobayashi, S.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a self-assembling process of cellulose artificially synthesized via enzymatic polymerization by means of in-situ and time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results elucidated the following: (i) cellulose molecules were synthesized at a special reaction site of the enzyme (cellulase) located on or near the smooth surface of the self-assembled enzymes formed in the reaction medium; (ii) the synthesized molecules associated themselves via diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and crystallized into fibrils and (iii) the fibrils formed the aggregates, which had the surface fractal dimension Ds increasing from 2 to 2.3 with the reaction time, on the smooth surface of the enzyme aggregates.

  5. Robotics. Programmable self-assembly in a thousand-robot swarm.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Michael; Cornejo, Alejandro; Nagpal, Radhika

    2014-08-15

    Self-assembly enables nature to build complex forms, from multicellular organisms to complex animal structures such as flocks of birds, through the interaction of vast numbers of limited and unreliable individuals. Creating this ability in engineered systems poses challenges in the design of both algorithms and physical systems that can operate at such scales. We report a system that demonstrates programmable self-assembly of complex two-dimensional shapes with a thousand-robot swarm. This was enabled by creating autonomous robots designed to operate in large groups and to cooperate through local interactions and by developing a collective algorithm for shape formation that is highly robust to the variability and error characteristic of large-scale decentralized systems. This work advances the aim of creating artificial swarms with the capabilities of natural ones. PMID:25124435

  6. Self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Belkin, M.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-03-20

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation.

  7. Supramolecular self-assemblies as functional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busseron, Eric; Ruff, Yves; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we survey the diversity of structures and functions which are encountered in advanced self-assembled nanomaterials. We highlight their flourishing implementations in three active domains of applications: biomedical sciences, information technologies, and environmental sciences. Our main objective is to provide the reader with a concise and straightforward entry to this broad field by selecting the most recent and important research articles, supported by some more comprehensive reviews to introduce each topic. Overall, this compilation illustrates how, based on the rules of supramolecular chemistry, the bottom-up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale is currently producing highly sophisticated materials oriented towards a growing number of applications with high societal impact.

  8. Self-assembled Metal Shell Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, S. J.; Sarkar, Dipankar; Averitt, Richard D.; Halas, N. J.

    1997-03-01

    Metal coated dielectric nanoparticles exhibit large plasmon resonance shifts related to the relative thickness of the metallic shell and the dielectric core. These plasmon resonance shifts are classical in nature and have been studied in the naturally occurring Au/Au_2S metal nanoshell system in detail.(R. D. Averitt, D. Sarkar, and N. J. Halas, submitted.) In this talk we report the fabrication and properties of metal nanoshells that have been contructed via chemical attachment of metal colloid monolayers onto 50-200 nm monodisperse SiO2 nanoparticles. The challenges unique to the construction of this 3D version of colloid monolayer self-assembly will be discussed with reference to issues of monolayer coverage, continuity and stability. The optical properties of these metal shell nanoparticles will be compared to the properties of naturally occurring continuous shell nanoparticles.

  9. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  10. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  11. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  12. Light Harvesting in Anacystis nidulans Studied in Pigment Mutants 12

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jack; Graham, Jo-Ruth; Wang, Richard T.

    1980-01-01

    Spontaneous pigment mutants of Anacystis nidulans were self-selected for improved growth in far red light (> 650 nanometers). Questions were asked about those features of the light-harvesting mechanism which altered to give the mutants improved photosynthetic performance in far red. Answers were sought by comparing pigment and reaction center concentrations for the parent and six mutants grown in gold fluorescent and in far red light. Three significant results emerged. The ratio of reaction centers for photoreactions I and II (RC1/RC2) varied by a value of about 2.1 for all clones grown in gold and a value of about 1.1 for all clones grown in far red. Alteration of the ratio was not evident in any of the mutants. Phycobilisome alterations were evident as decreased phycocyanin content in all mutants. In three mutants, allophycocyanin became the major remaining phycobilisome component. Action spectra for photoreactions I and II allowed estimates of chlorophylls serving each of the two reaction centers. Ratios of chlorophylls to reaction centers within each photosystem were chlorophyll I/RC1 = 118 ± 11 and chlorophyll II/RC2 = 52 ± 9 for all seven clones grown in both gold and far red light. Remarkable constancy of these ratios, in spite of wide variation in cell material, supports an hypothesis that in A. nidulans there are two chlorophyll proteins, each bearing a reaction center and chlorophylls in fixed ratio. PMID:16661593

  13. Light harvesting and energy transfer in large multidomain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanggaard, Holger; Krebs, Frederik C.; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Larsen, Niels B.; Hagemann, Ole

    2005-10-01

    Light harvesting and energy transfer in two oligomer-dye assemblies has been investigated. In both cases the oligomer was a poly(terphenylenecyanovinylene) derivative while two different dyes was used, a porphyrin and an ionic dye. It is well known that the efficiency of solar cells consisting of a single homopolymer is limited. To increase overall efficiency different strategies have been used. One possible strategy aims at covalently linking different domains. With careful design, this type of assemblies is envisaged to show improved charge separation and charge transport properties. We have shown how photophysical measurements can be used to determine what happens to an exciton formed on any of the domains. From fluorescence and absorption measurements on the assemblies, along with model compounds, it was possible to quantify the number of excitons that are emitted (fluorescence), transferred between domains or lost in internal transfer processes. Both steady state and lifetime measurements were performed in solution and on solid films. The effect of acid was investigated in the cases of the oligomer-porphyrin assembly. We found that in solution the effect of acid was an increase in the time of energy transfer, probably due to acid induced structural change of the porphyrin moiety. It was possible to make LB-films of the ionic dye-assembly, which made it possible to investigate a monolayer of the assembly.

  14. Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic amphiphiles. One possibility is photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons.

  15. Self-Assembly of Optical Molecules with Supramolecular Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Chithra, Parayalil; Richards, Gary J.; Hill, Jonathan P.; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of nano-sized objects is one of the most important issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Soft nanomaterials with flexible properties have been given much attention and can be obtained through bottom-up processing from functional molecules, where self-assembly based on supramolecular chemistry and designed assembly have become crucial processes and techniques. Among the various functional molecules, dyes have become important materials in certain areas of nanotechnology and their self-assembling behaviors have been actively researched. In this short review, we briefly introduce recent progress in self-assembly of optical molecules and dyes, based mainly on supramolecular concepts. The introduced examples are classified into four categories: self-assembly of (i) low-molecular-weight dyes and (ii) polymeric dyes and dye self-assembly (iii) in nanoscale architectures and (iv) at surfaces. PMID:19564931

  16. Strong antenna-enhanced fluorescence of a single light-harvesting complex shows photon antibunching

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G.; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the highly efficient energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is a subject of intense research. Unfortunately, the low fluorescence efficiency and limited photostability hampers the study of individual light-harvesting complexes at ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an over 500-fold fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) at the single-molecule level by coupling to a gold nanoantenna. The resonant antenna produces an excitation enhancement of circa 100 times and a fluorescence lifetime shortening to ~\

  17. Cascade exciton-pumping engines with manipulated speed and efficiency in light-harvesting porous ?-network films.

    PubMed

    Gu, Cheng; Huang, Ning; Xu, Fei; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are the machinery for exciton pumping in natural photosynthesis, whereas cascade energy transfer through chlorophyll is key to long-distance, efficient energy transduction. Numerous artificial antennae have been developed. However, they are limited in their cascade energy-transfer abilities because of a lack of control over complex chromophore aggregation processes, which has impeded their advancement. Here we report a viable approach for addressing this issue by using a light-harvesting porous polymer film in which a three-dimensional ?-network serves as the antenna and micropores segregate multiple dyes to prevent aggregation. Cascade energy-transfer engines are integrated into the films; the rate and efficiency of the energy-funneling engines are precisely manipulated by tailoring the dye components and contents. The nanofilms allow accurate and versatile luminescence engineering, resulting in the production of thirty emission hues, including blue, green, red and white. This advance may open new pathways for realising photosynthesis and photoenergy conversion. PMID:25746459

  18. Characterization of alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan Manuel; Klos, Mischa; Jacobs, Karin; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2015-03-10

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTS) and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on silica are studied by molecular dynamics simulations at 298 K and 1 bar. The coverage (number of alkylsilane molecules per surface area) is systematically varied. The results yield insight into the properties of the alkylsilane SAMs, which complement experimental studies from the literature. Relationships are reported between thickness, tilt angle, and coverage of alkylsilane SAMs, which also hold for alkylsilanes other than DTS and OTS. They are interpreted based on the information on molecular ordering in the SAMs taken form the simulation data. System size and simulation time are much larger than in most former simulation works on the topic. This reduces the influence of the initial configuration as well as the periodic boundary conditions and hence minimizes the risk of artificial ordering. At the same time, more reliable statistics for the calculated properties can be provided. The evaluation of experimental data in the field is often based on strongly simplified models. The present simulation results suggest that some of these lead to errors, concerning the interpretation of experimental results, which could be avoided by introducing more realistic models. PMID:25668124

  19. Atomic structures of peptide self-assembly mimics

    PubMed Central

    Makabe, Koki; McElheny, Dan; Tereshko, Valentia; Hilyard, Aaron; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Yan, Shude; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei

    2006-01-01

    Although the ?-rich self-assemblies are a major structural class for polypeptides and the focus of intense research, little is known about their atomic structures and dynamics due to their insoluble and noncrystalline nature. We developed a protein engineering strategy that captures a self-assembly segment in a water-soluble molecule. A predefined number of self-assembling peptide units are linked, and the ?-sheet ends are capped to prevent aggregation, which yields a mono-dispersed soluble protein. We tested this strategy by using Borrelia outer surface protein (OspA) whose single-layer ?-sheet located between two globular domains consists of two ?-hairpin units and thus can be considered as a prototype of self-assembly. We constructed self-assembly mimics of different sizes and determined their atomic structures using x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Highly regular ?-sheet geometries were maintained in these structures, and peptide units had a nearly identical conformation, supporting the concept that a peptide in the regular ?-geometry is primed for self-assembly. However, we found small but significant differences in the relative orientation between adjacent peptide units in terms of ?-sheet twist and bend, suggesting their inherent flexibility. Modeling shows how this conformational diversity, when propagated over a large number of peptide units, can lead to a substantial degree of nanoscale polymorphism of self-assemblies. PMID:17093048

  20. Self-assembly and interactions of biomimetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Hitesh

    Bilayer lipid membranes create the natural environment for the immobilization of functional proteins and have been used as a model for understanding structure and properties of cell membranes. The development of biomimetic surfaces requires in depth knowledge of surface science, self-assembly, immobilization techniques, nanofabrication, biomolecular interactions and analytical techniques. This research is focused on synthesizing and characterizing biomimetic artificial surfaces for fundamental studies in membrane structure and better understanding of specific and non-specific interactions. The other main focus is on surface engineering of self-assembled, nanostructured interfaces that mimic cell membranes. These structures provide a powerful bottom-up approach to the studies of the structure and functionality of cell membranes and their interactions with other molecules. One of the advantages of this approach is that the complexity of the system can be controlled and gradually increased to add functionalities. This dissertation provides a first single molecule force measurement of the specific interactions between Salmonella typhimurium and P22 bacteriophage. This dissertation also provides a novel model system for the confined crystallization of drug molecules such as aspirin using the concept of phospholipid bilayer assembly at surfaces. The results will impact the development of biosensors and drug delivery. The defense will focus on the preparation and bio-recognition interactions between a monolayer of bacteriophage P22, covalently bound to glass substrates through a bifunctional cross linker 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, and the outer membrane of Salmonella, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The LPS bilayer was deposited on poly (ethylenimine)-modified mica from their sonicated unilamellar vesicle solution. The specific binding of Salmonella typhimurium to the phage monolayer was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM force measurements discrete unbinding forces between surface attached P22 and LPS were obtained. Both whole P22 and tailspike proteins separated from the P22 capsid were used. The unbinding force histograms point to discrete forces between substrate-supported P22 and LPS. The unit unbinding force was found to decrease with decreasing force loading rate and increasing temperature. By fitting the force data with the Bell model, an energy barrier of approximately 55 KJ/mol was obtained. The resilience of phage binding to pH variation and hydration/dehydration cycles argues for the robustness of potential phage-based devices.

  1. Solvent mediated self-assembly of solids

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J.; Wilson, W.D.; Palmore, T.

    1997-12-12

    Solvent-mediated crystallization represents a robust approach to self-assembly of nanostructures and microstructures. In organic systems, the relative ease with which the structure of hydrogen- bonded molecules can be manipulated allows for generation of a wide variety of nanoscale crystal structures. In living organisms, control over the micron-to-millimeter form of inorganic crystals is achieved through introduction of bio-organic molecules. The purpose of this proposal is to understand the interplay between solution chemistry, molecular structure, surface chemistry, and the processes of nucleation and crystal growth in solvent-mediated systems, with the goal of developing the atomic and molecular basis of a solvent-mediated self-assembly technology. We will achieve this purpose by: (1) utilizing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach that provides in situ, real time imaging during growth from solutions, (2) by modifying kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to include solution-surface kinetics, (3) by introducing quantum chemistry (QC) calculations of the potentials of the relevant chemical species and the near-surface structure of the solution, and (4) by utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify the minimum energy pathways to the solid state. Our work will focus on two systems chosen to address both the manometer and micron-to-millimeter length scales of assembly, the family of 2,5- diketopiperazines (X-DKPs) and the system of CaCO{sub 3} with amino acids. Using AFM, we will record the evolution of surface morphology, critical lengths, step speeds, and step-step interactions as a function of supersaturation and temperature. In the case of the X-DKPs, these measurements will be repeated as the molecular structure of the growth unit is varied. In the case of CaCO{sub 3}, they will be performed as a function of solution chemistry including pH, ionic strength, and amino acid content. In addition, we will measure nucleation rates and orientations of CaCO{sub 3} on polyamino acid templates. From these measurements, we will extract fundamental growth parameters for input into KMC simulations whose predictions will in turn be compared to the experimental observations. The KMC simulations will incorporate atomic processes representing the minimum energy pathways as determined from the MD calculations. The interaction potentials of the relevant chemical species as well as the hydrated surface, including the electrochemical double layer, used in the MD simulations will be determined using coupled solutions to the Schrodinger and Poisson-Boltzmann equations which take account of electronic relaxation effects.

  2. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such as the ribosome, large ribozymes, and riboswitches. Thus, the next step in synthetic RNA design will involve new ways to implement these same types of dynamic and responsive architectures into nanostructures functioning as real nanomachines in and outside the cell. RNA nanotechnology will likely garner broader utility and influence with a greater focus on the interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic influences on RNA self-assembly and using natural RNAs as guiding principles. PMID:24856178

  3. IRON-INDUCED CHANGES IN LIGHT HARVESTING AND PHOTOCHEMICAL ENERGY CONVERSION IN EUKARYOTIC MARINE ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of iron in regulating light harvesting and photochemical energy conversion process was examined in the marine unicellular chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta and the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. In both species, iron limitation led to a reduction in cellular c...

  4. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria

    E-print Network

    Huh, Joonsuk; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have multiple functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimic a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains about 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the...

  5. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-01

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (?CP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 ?m edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA functionalization and hybridization. The yield of formed aggregates was found to be about 44%, with a relative fraction of dimers of some 30%. Finally, the electrical properties of the formed dimers were characterized using probe tips inside a scanning electron microscope. PMID:23786592

  6. Peptide-directed self-assembly of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kope?ek, Jind?ich; Yang, Jiyuan

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the self-assembly of macromolecules mediated by the biorecognition of peptide/protein domains. Structures forming ?-helices and ?-sheets have been used to mediate self-assembly into hydrogels of peptides, reactive copolymers and peptide motifs, block copolymers, and graft copolymers. Structural factors governing the self-assembly of these molecules into precisely defined three-dimensional structures (hydrogels) are reviewed. The incorporation of peptide motifs into hybrid systems, composed of synthetic and natural macromolecules, enhances design opportunities for new biomaterials when compared to individual components. PMID:18952513

  7. Molecularly engineered self-assembling membranes for cell-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela S; Lin, Yi-An; Cui, Honggang; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Reis, Rui L; Azevedo, Helena S

    2015-03-01

    The use of peptide engineering to develop self-assembling membranes that are responsive to cellular enzyme activities is reported. The membranes are obtained by combining hyaluronan (HA) and a rationally designed peptide amphiphile (PA) containing a proteolytic domain (GPQGIWGQ octapeptide) sensitive to matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). Insertion of an octapeptide in a typical PA structure does not disturb its self-assembly into fibrillar nanostructures neither the ability to form membranes with HA. In vitro enzymatic degradation with hyaluronidase and MMP-1 shows that membranes containing the MMP-1 substrate exhibit enhanced enzymatic degradation, compared with control membranes (absence of MMP-1 cleavable peptide or containing a MMP-1 insensitive sequence), being completely degraded after 7 days. Cell viability and proliferation is minimally affected by the enzymatically cleavable functionality of the membrane, but the presence of MMP-1 cleavable sequence does stimulate the secretion of MMP-1 by fibroblasts and interfere with matrix deposition, particularly the deposition of collagen. By showing cell-responsiveness to biochemical signals presented on self-assembling membranes, this study highlights the ability of modulating certain cellular activities through matrix engineering. This concept can be further explored to understand the cellular remodeling process and as a strategy to develop artificial matrices with more biomimetic degradation for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25413155

  8. Phosphorylation Controls the Three-dimensional Structure of Plant Light Harvesting Complex II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Nilsson; Dalibor Stys; Torbjorn Drakenberg; Michael D. Spangfort; Sture Forsen; John F. Allen

    1997-01-01

    The most abundant chlorophyll-binding complex in plants is the intrinsic membrane protein light-harvest- ing complex II (LHC II). LHC II acts as a light-harvesting antenna and has an important role in the distribution of absorbed energy between the two photosystems of pho- tosynthesis. We used spectroscopic techniques to study a synthetic peptide with identical sequence to the LHC IIb N

  9. Metal-organic framework materials for light-harvesting and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    So, Monica C; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Mondloch, Joseph E; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-02-28

    A critical review of the emerging field of MOFs for photon collection and subsequent energy transfer is presented. Discussed are examples involving MOFs for (a) light harvesting, using (i) MOF-quantum dots and molecular chromophores, (ii) chromophoric MOFs, and (iii) MOFs with light-harvesting properties, and (b) energy transfer, specifically via the (i) Förster energy transfer and (ii) Dexter exchange mechanism. PMID:25578391

  10. Self-assembled monolayers of rigid thiols.

    PubMed

    Ulman, A; Kang, J F; Shnidman, Y; Liao, S; Jordan, R; Choi, G Y; Zaccaro, J; Myerson, A S; Rafailovich, M; Sokolov, J; Fleischer, C

    2000-09-01

    The preparation, structure, properties and applications of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of rigid 4-mercapto-biphenyls are briefly reviewed. The rigid character of the biphenyl moiety results in a molecular dipole moment that affects both the adsorption kinetics on gold surfaces, as well as the equilibrium structure of mixed SAMs. Due to repulsive intermolecular interaction, the Langmuir isotherm model does not fit the adsorption kinetics of these biphenyl thiols, and a new Ising model was developed to fit the kinetics data. The equilibrium structures of SAMs and mixed SAMs depend on the polarity of the solution from which they were assembled. Infrared spectroscopy suggests that biphenyl moieties in SAMs on gold have small tilt angles with respect to the surfaces normal. Wetting studies shows that surfaces of these SAMs are stable for months, thus providing stable model surfaces that can be engineered at the molecular level. Such molecular engineering is important for nucleation and growth studies. The morphology of glycine crystals grown on SAM surfaces depends on the structure of the nucleating glycine layer, which, in turn, depends on the H-bonding of these molecules with the SAM surface. Finally, the adhesion of PDMS cross-linked networks to SAM surfaces depends on the concentration of interfacial H-bonding. This non-linear relationship suggests that the polymeric nature of the elastomer results in a collective H-bonding effect. PMID:11143796

  11. Self-assembling holographic biosensors and biocomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Trent, Amanda M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-01

    We present concepts for self-assembly of diffractive optics with potential uses in biosensors and biocomputers. The simplest such optics, diffraction gratings, can potentially be made from chemically-stabilized microtubules migrating on nanopatterned tracks of the motor protein kinesin. We discuss the fabrication challenges involved in patterning sub-micron-scale structures with proteins that must be maintained in aqueous buffers to preserve their activity. A novel strategy is presented that employs dry contact printing onto glass-supported amino-silane monolayers of heterobifunctional crosslinkers, followed by solid-state reactions of these cross-linkers, to graft patterns of reactive groups onto the surface. Successive solution-phase addition of cysteine-mutant proteins and amine-reactive polyethylene glycol allows assembly of features onto the printed patterns. We present data from initial experiments showing successful micro- and nanopatterning of lines of single-cysteine mutants of kinesin interleaved with lines of polyethylene, indicating that this strategy can be employed to arrays of features with resolutions suitable for gratings.

  12. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongta; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Jiang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Here, we report a simple and inexpensive bottom-up technology for fabricating superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical micro-/nano-structures, which are inspired by the binary periodic structure found on the superhydrophobic compound eyes of some insects (e.g., mosquitoes and moths). Binary colloidal arrays consisting of exemplary large (4 and 30 ?m) and small (300 nm) silica spheres are first assembled by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology in a layer-by-layer manner. After surface modification with fluorosilanes, the self-assembled hierarchical particle arrays become superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle (CA) larger than 150°. The throughput of the resulting superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical structures can be significantly improved by templating the binary periodic structures of the LB-assembled colloidal arrays into UV-curable fluoropolymers by a soft lithography approach. Superhydrophobic perfluoroether acrylate hierarchical arrays with large CAs and small CA hysteresis can be faithfully replicated onto various substrates. Both experiments and theoretical calculations based on the Cassie's dewetting model demonstrate the importance of the hierarchical structure in achieving the final superhydrophobic surface states. PMID:23786830

  13. Nanostructure engineering by templated self-assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joy Y.; Mayes, Anne M.; Ross, Caroline A.

    2004-11-01

    Self-assembling materials are the building blocks for bottom-up nanofabrication processes, but many self-assembled nanostructures contain defects and lack sufficient long-range order for certain nanotechnology applications. Here we investigate the formation of defects in a self-assembled array of spherical block-copolymer microdomains, using topographical templates to control the local self-assembly. Perfect ordered sphere arrays can form in both constant-width templates and width-modulated templates. For modulated templates, transition between configurations having a constant number of rows and configurations of stable arrays with varying numbers of rows is shown to be analogous to dislocation formation in an epitaxial thin film system. Based on the configuration transition energy and fluctuation energy, designed templates with a high tolerance for lithographical imperfections can direct precisely modulated block-copolymer nanostructures. This study provides insights into the design of hybrid systems combining top-down and bottom-up fabrication.

  14. Host-Guest Self-assembly in Block Copolymer Blends

    E-print Network

    Park, Woon Ik

    Ultrafine, uniform nanostructures with excellent functionalities can be formed by self-assembly of block copolymer (BCP) thin films. However, extension of their geometric variability is not straightforward due to their ...

  15. Enabling complex nanoscale pattern customization using directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Doerk, Gregory S; Cheng, Joy Y; Singh, Gurpreet; Rettner, Charles T; Pitera, Jed W; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Arellano, Noel; Sanders, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Block copolymer directed self-assembly is an attractive method to fabricate highly uniform nanoscale features for various technological applications, but the dense periodicity of block copolymer features limits the complexity of the resulting patterns and their potential utility. Therefore, customizability of nanoscale patterns has been a long-standing goal for using directed self-assembly in device fabrication. Here we show that a hybrid organic/inorganic chemical pattern serves as a guiding pattern for self-assembly as well as a self-aligned mask for pattern customization through cotransfer of aligned block copolymer features and an inorganic prepattern. As informed by a phenomenological model, deliberate process engineering is implemented to maintain global alignment of block copolymer features over arbitrarily shaped, 'masking' features incorporated into the chemical patterns. These hybrid chemical patterns with embedded customization information enable deterministic, complex two-dimensional nanoscale pattern customization through directed self-assembly. PMID:25512171

  16. Simulating self-assembly of nanoparticles in tumor environments

    E-print Network

    Nachum, Ofir

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly is important in nanomedicine and increasingly plays a role in drug-delivery or imaging applications in tumors. Predicting behavior and dynamics of nanoparticle systems is very difficult, especially when ...

  17. Differentially photo-crosslinked polymers enable self-assembling microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Mustapha; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2012-01-01

    An important feature of naturally self-assembled systems such as leaves and tissues is that they are curved and have embedded fluidic channels that enable the transport of nutrients to, or removal of waste from, specific three-dimensional (3D) regions. Here, we report the self-assembly of photopatterned polymers, and consequently microfluidic devices, into curved geometries. We discovered that differentially photo-crosslinked SU-8 films spontaneously and reversibly curved upon film de-solvation and re-solvation. Photolithographic patterning of the SU-8 films enabled the self-assembly of cylinders, cubes, and bidirectionally folded sheets. We integrated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels with these SU-8 films to self-assemble curved microfluidic networks. PMID:22068594

  18. Self-assembly of helical ribbons from chiral amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Zastavker, Yevgeniya Vladimirovna, 1971-

    2001-01-01

    The study of the self-assembly of helical structures has been motivated by their newly found biological and technological importance. In many systems, helical ribbons are precursors to the formation of tubules, which may ...

  19. Assessment of colloidal self-assembly for photonic crystal

    E-print Network

    Yip, Chan Hoe

    2006-01-01

    A suspension of monodisperse colloids has an interesting property of self-assembling into a three-dimensional ordered structure. This crystalline material has attracted significant interest on the implementation of photonic ...

  20. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  1. The Statistical Mechanics of Dynamic Pathways to Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen; Jack, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    This review describes some important physical characteristics of the pathways (i.e., dynamical processes) by which molecular, nanoscale, and micrometer-scale self-assembly occurs. We highlight the existence of features of self-assembly pathways that are common to a wide range of physical systems, even though those systems may differ with respect to their microscopic details. We summarize some existing theoretical descriptions of self-assembly pathways and highlight areas-notably, the description of self-assembly pathways that occur far from equilibrium-that are likely to become increasingly important. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Volume 66 is March 31, 2015. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates. PMID:25493714

  2. Self-assembly of globular protein-polymer diblock copolymers

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Carla S. (Carla Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of protein-polymer block copolymers provides a simple bottom-up approach towards protein nanopatteming for the fabrication of more effective and efficient bioelectronic and biocatalytic devices. Changes in ...

  3. Enabling complex nanoscale pattern customization using directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerk, Gregory S.; Cheng, Joy Y.; Singh, Gurpreet; Rettner, Charles T.; Pitera, Jed W.; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Arellano, Noel; Sanders, Daniel P.

    2014-12-01

    Block copolymer directed self-assembly is an attractive method to fabricate highly uniform nanoscale features for various technological applications, but the dense periodicity of block copolymer features limits the complexity of the resulting patterns and their potential utility. Therefore, customizability of nanoscale patterns has been a long-standing goal for using directed self-assembly in device fabrication. Here we show that a hybrid organic/inorganic chemical pattern serves as a guiding pattern for self-assembly as well as a self-aligned mask for pattern customization through cotransfer of aligned block copolymer features and an inorganic prepattern. As informed by a phenomenological model, deliberate process engineering is implemented to maintain global alignment of block copolymer features over arbitrarily shaped, ‘masking’ features incorporated into the chemical patterns. These hybrid chemical patterns with embedded customization information enable deterministic, complex two-dimensional nanoscale pattern customization through directed self-assembly.

  4. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns.

  5. Mechanical behavior and microstructure of self-assembling oligopeptide gels

    E-print Network

    Hammond, Nathan Allen

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogels have become widely used in the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery. One class of hydrogel is formed from synthetic oligopeptides that self-assemble into a solution of beta-sheet filaments. These filaments ...

  6. Communications to the Editor Electrical Detection of Self-Assembled

    E-print Network

    Bausch, Andreas

    Communications to the Editor Electrical Detection of Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Multilayers applications of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs), a detailed understanding of the buildup process within the PEMs, the potential drop within polyelectrolyte films composed of poly

  7. Directed flexibility: self-assembly of a supramolecular tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Ludlow Iii, James M; Xie, Tingzheng; Guo, Zaihong; Guo, Kai; Saunders, Mary Jane; Moorefield, Charles N; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Newkome, George R

    2015-02-17

    Self-assembly of a tribenzo-27-crown-9 ether functionalized with six terpyridines generated (85%) an expanded tetrahedral structure comprised of four independent triangular surfaces interlinked by crown ether vertices. PMID:25649012

  8. Self-assembled elastin-like polypeptide particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill L. Osborne; Robin Farmer; Kimberly A. Woodhouse

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the self-assembly of a recombinant elastin-based block copolymer containing both hydrophobic and cross-linking domains from the human elastin protein was investigated. The particle formation and dynamic behavior were characterized using inverted microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The morphology and stability were evaluated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Above a critical temperature the molecules self-assembled into a

  9. Self-assembly of amphiphilic peanut-shaped nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Stephen Whitelam; Stefan A. F. Bon

    2010-02-19

    We use computer simulation to investigate the self-assembly of Janus-like amphiphilic peanut-shaped nanoparticles, finding phases of clusters, bilayers and micelles in accord with ideas of packing familiar from the study of molecular surfactants. However, packing arguments do not explain the hierarchical self-assembly dynamics that we observe, nor the coexistence of bilayers and faceted polyhedra. This coexistence suggests that experimental realizations of our model can achieve multipotent assembly of either of two competing ordered structures.

  10. Effect of polymerization on hierarchical self-assembly into nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Taichi

    2015-01-20

    The oligomers consisting of phenyl-capped bithiophene and tetra(ethylene glycol)s linked by azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition were synthesized. The relationship between the degree of polymerization and self-assembling ability was investigated in o-dichlorobenzene and dimethyl sulfoxide. From the absorption spectrum, it was confirmed that the critical degree of polymerization (CDP) for thiophene unit aggregation was 4. The morphology of the aggregated product was observed by atomic force microscopy. The oligomers 4mer and 5mer could not self-assemble into well-defined structures due to the weak driving force for the self-assembly. In the cases of 6mer and 7mer, aggregates with nonwell-defined and nanosheet structures coexisted. In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, the nanosheet was the main product. The critical point between 7mer and 8mer could be confirmed by different aggregation behaviors in the cooling process of the solution (nonsigmoidal and sigmoidal). In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, polymer folding prior to intermolecular self-assembly, which was supported by sigmoidal aggregation behavior, leads to the nanosheet formation. On the contrary, shorter oligomers than 8mer experience intermolecular aggregation prior to intramolecular polymer folding, which was supported by the nonsigmoidal aggregation behavior. This is the first report to prove the existence of CDP for folded polymer nanosheet formation which requires hierarchical self-assembly, i.e., polymer folding followed by intermolecular self-assembly. PMID:25526560

  11. Self-assembly of graphene oxide at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiao-Jing; Lv, Wei; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-08-27

    Due to its amphiphilic property, graphene oxide (GO) can achieve a variety of nanostructures with different morphologies (for example membranes, hydrogel, crumpled particles, hollow spheres, sack-cargo particles, Pickering emulsions, and so on) by self-assembly. The self-assembly is mostly derived from the self-concentration of GO sheets at various interfaces, including liquid-air, liquid-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces. This paper gives a comprehensive review of these assembly phenomena of GO at the three types of interfaces, the derived interfacial self-assembly techniques, and the as-obtained assembled materials and their properties. The interfacial self-assembly of GO, enabled by its fantastic features including the amphiphilicity, the negatively charged nature, abundant oxygen-containing groups and two-dimensional flexibility, is highlighted as an easy and well-controlled strategy for the design and preparation of functionalized carbon materials, and the use of self-assembly for uniform hybridization is addressed for preparing hybrid carbon materials with various functions. A number of new exciting and potential applications are also presented for the assembled GO-based materials. This contribution concludes with some personal perspectives on future challenges before interfacial self-assembly may become a major strategy for the application-targeted design and preparation of functionalized carbon materials. PMID:24852899

  12. Functionalized fullerenes in self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Räisänen, Minna T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Weber, Uli; Lebedeva, Maria; Rance, Graham A; Briggs, G Andrew D; Pettifor, David; Burlakov, Victor; Buck, Manfred; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2011-09-01

    Anisotropy of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions holds the key to controlling the arrangement of fullerenes into 2D self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The chemical reactivity of fullerenes allows functionalization of the carbon cages with sulfur-containing groups, thiols and thioethers, which facilitates the reliable adsorption of these molecules on gold substrates. A series of structurally related molecules, eight of which are new fullerene compounds, allows systematic investigation of the structural and functional parameters defining the geometry of fullerene SAMs. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) measurements reveal that the chemical nature of the anchoring group appears to be crucial for the long-range order in fullerenes: the assembly of thiol-functionalized fullerenes is governed by strong molecule-surface interactions, which prohibit formation of ordered molecular arrays, while thioether-functionalized fullerenes, which have a weaker interaction with the surface than the thiols, form a variety of ordered 2D molecular arrays owing to noncovalent intermolecular interactions. A linear row of fullerene molecules is a recurring structural feature of the ordered SAMs, but the relative alignment and the spacing between the fullerene rows is strongly dependent on the size and shape of the spacer group linking the fullerene cage and the anchoring group. Careful control of the chemical functionality on the carbon cages enables positioning of fullerenes into at least four different packing arrangements, none of which have been observed before. Our new strategy for the controlled arrangement of fullerenes on surfaces at the molecular level will advance the development of practical applications for these nanomaterials. PMID:21744819

  13. Self assembly: An approach to terascale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.

    1993-09-01

    Surely one of the most remarkable accomplishments of modern times has been the miniaturization of electronic components, starting with discrete transistors and leading to Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) Circuits which will soon contain almost 100 million components in a few square centimeters. It led to an information processing industry that fuels almost every aspect of industrial societies and that has brought manifold benefits to their citizens. Although continuation of the miniaturization process is likely to produce even greater benefits, many experts are concerned that extrapolation of traditional silicon VLSI techniques will meet with increasingly severe difficulties. Some of these are fundamental in nature, e. g., granularity and fluctuations in semiconductors and interconnects and proximity effects such as tunneling. The first major difficulty to be encountered will be a rising cost of products due to increased complexity and difficulty of manufacturing and assembly. Such difficulties are likely to be seen in about 10 years when minimum component sizes are expected to decrease below 0.15--0.2 {mu}m. If alternatives to present VLSI techniques are to be available when needed, work on them must start now. At Los Alamos, we are exploring the feasibility of ultrasmall wires and switches that self-assemble themselves into computing elements and circuits. Their operation is based on the quantum properties of nanometer scale molecular clusters. This paper will describe our efforts in the development of these components and will summarize our work in four areas: (1) the development of conducting molecular wires, (2) conducting nanoparticle wires and switches based on the Coulomb Blockade principle, (3) the development of advanced architectures that benefit from the use of such components and that significantly advance the art of high performance computing, and (4) the development of novel methods for attaining sub-Angstrom 3-D non-destructive imaging.

  14. Insight into the Structure of Light Harvesting Complex II and its Stabilization in Detergent Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Mateus B [ORNL; Smolensky, Dmitriy [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The structure of spinach light-harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in a solution of the detergent n-octyl-{beta}-d-glucoside (BOG), was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Physicochemical characterization of the isolated complex indicated that it was pure (>95%) and also in its native trimeric state. SANS with contrast variation was used to investigate the properties of the protein-detergent complex at three different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast match points, enabling the scattering properties of the protein and detergent to be investigated independently. The topological shape of LHC II, determined using ab initio shape restoration methods from the SANS data at the contrast match point of BOG, was consistent with the X-ray crystallographic structure of LHC II (Liu et al. Nature 2004 428, 287-292). The interactions of the protein and detergent were investigated at the contrast match point for the protein and also in 100% D{sub 2}O. The data suggested that BOG micelle structure was altered by its interaction with LHC II, but large aggregate structures were not formed. Indirect Fourier transform analysis of the LHC II/BOG scattering curves showed that the increase in the maximum dimension of the protein-detergent complex was consistent with the presence of a monolayer of detergent surrounding the protein. A model of the LHC II/BOG complex was generated to interpret the measurements made in 100% D{sub 2}O. This model adequately reproduced the overall size of the LHC II/BOG complex, but demonstrated that the detergent does not have a highly regular shape that surrounds the hydrophobic periphery of LHC II. In addition to demonstrating that natively structured LHC II can be produced for functional characterization and for use in artificial solar energy applications, the analysis and modeling approaches described here can be used for characterizing detergent-associated {alpha}-helical transmembrane proteins.

  15. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  16. Insights into the Photoprotective Switch of the Major Light-harvesting Complex II (LHCII)

    PubMed Central

    Sunku, Kiran; de Groot, Huub. J. M.; Pandit, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Light-harvesting antennae of the LHC family form transmembrane three-helix bundles of which two helices are interlocked by conserved arginine-glutamate (Arg-Glu) ion pairs that form ligation sites for chlorophylls. The antenna proteins of photosystem II have an intriguing dual function. In excess light, they can switch their conformation from a light-harvesting into a photoprotective state, in which the excess and harmful excitation energies are safely dissipated as heat. Here we applied magic angle spinning NMR and selective Arg isotope enrichment as a noninvasive method to analyze the Arg structures of the major light-harvesting complex II (LHCII). The conformations of the Arg residues that interlock helix A and B appear to be preserved in the light-harvesting and photoprotective state. Several Arg residues have very downfield-shifted proton NMR responses, indicating that they stabilize the complex by strong hydrogen bonds. For the Arg C? chemical shifts, differences are observed between LHCII in the active, light-harvesting and in the photoprotective, quenched state. These differences are attributed to a conformational change of the Arg residue in the stromal loop region. We conclude that the interlocked helices of LHCII form a rigid core. Consequently, the LHCII conformational switch does not involve changes in A/B helix tilting but likely involves rearrangements of the loops and helical segments close to the stromal and lumenal ends. PMID:23629658

  17. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Pan, Keyao

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary ...

  18. Self-Assembly for the Synthesis of Functional Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Ortony, Julia H.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of functional biomaterials is a highly promising and exciting area of research, with great potential for the treatment of injury or disease. By using multiple noncovalent interactions, coded into the molecular design of the constituent components, self-assembly allows for the construction of complex, adaptable, and highly tunable materials with potent biological effects. This review describes some of the seminal advances in the use of self-assembly to make novel systems for regenerative medicine and biology. Materials based on peptides, proteins, DNA, or hybrids thereof have found application in the treatment of a wide range of injuries and diseases, and this review outlines the design principles and practical applications of these systems. Most of the examples covered focus on the synthesis of hydrogels for the scaffolding or transplantation of cells, with an emphasis on the biological, mechanical, and structural properties of the resulting materials. In addition, we will discuss the distinct advantages conferred by self-assembly (compared with traditional covalent materials), and present some of the challenges and opportunities for the next generation of self-assembled biomaterials. PMID:23457423

  19. Perfluoroalkyl chains direct novel self-assembly of insulin.

    PubMed

    Malik, Leila; Nygaard, Jesper; Hoiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Arleth, Lise; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Knud J

    2012-01-10

    The self-assembly of biopharmaceutical peptides into multimeric, nanoscale objects, as well as their disassembly to monomers, is central for their mode of action. Here, we describe a bioorthogonal strategy, using a non-native recognition principle, for control of protein self-assembly based on intermolecular fluorous interactions and demonstrate it for the small protein insulin. Perfluorinated alkyl chains of varying length were attached to desB30 human insulin by acylation of the ?-amine of the side-chain of LysB29. The insulin analogues were formulated with Zn(II) and phenol to form hexamers. The self-segregation of fluorous groups directed the insulin hexamers to self-assemble. The structures of the systems were investigated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. Also, the binding affinity to the insulin receptor was measured. Interestingly, varying the length of the perfluoroalkyl chain provided three different scenarios for self-assembly; the short chains hardly affected the native hexameric structure, the medium-length chains induced fractal-like structures with the insulin hexamer as the fundamental building block, while the longest chains lead to the formation of structures with local cylindrical geometry. This hierarchical self-assembly system, which combines Zn(II) mediated hexamer formation with fluorous interactions, is a promising tool to control the formation of high molecular weight complexes of insulin and potentially other proteins. PMID:22129241

  20. Self-Assembled Surfactant Cyclic Peptide Nanostructures as Stabilizing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Dindyal; Oh, Donghoon; Ye, Guofeng; Banerjee, Antara; Yadav, Arpita; Parang, Keykavous

    2013-01-01

    A number of cyclic peptides including [FR]4, [FK]4, [WR]4, [CR]4, [AK]4, and [WK]n (n = 3-5) containing L-amino acids were produced using solid-phase peptide synthesis. We hypothesized that an optimal balance of hydrophobicity and charge could generate self-assembled nanostructures in aqueous solution by intramolecular and/or intermolecular interactions. Among all the designed peptides, [WR]n (n = 3-5) generated self-assembled vesicle-like nanostructures at room temperature as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and/or dynamic light scattering (DLS). This class of peptides represents the first report of surfactant-like cyclic peptides that self-assemble into nanostructures. A plausible mechanistic insight into the self-assembly of [WR]5 was obtained by molecular modeling studies. Modified [WR]5 analogues, such as [WMeR]5, [WR(Me)2]5, [WMeR(Me)2]5, and [WdR]5, exhibited different morphologies to [WR]5 as shown by TEM observations. [WR]5 exhibited a significant stabilizing effect for generated silver nanoparticles and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. These studies established a new class of surfactant-like cyclic peptides that self-assembled into nanostructures and could have potential applications for the stabilization of silver nanoparticles and protein biomolecules. PMID:24187575

  1. Rapid self-assembly of DNA on a microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yao; Footz, Tim; Manage, Dammika P; Backhouse, Christopher James

    2005-01-01

    Background DNA self-assembly methods have played a major role in enabling methods for acquiring genetic information without having to resort to sequencing, a relatively slow and costly procedure. However, even self-assembly processes tend to be very slow when they rely upon diffusion on a large scale. Miniaturisation and integration therefore hold the promise of greatly increasing this speed of operation. Results We have developed a rapid method for implementing the self-assembly of DNA within a microfluidic system by electrically extracting the DNA from an environment containing an uncharged denaturant. By controlling the parameters of the electrophoretic extraction and subsequent analysis of the DNA we are able to control when the hybridisation occurs as well as the degree of hybridisation. By avoiding off-chip processing or long thermal treatments we are able to perform this hybridisation rapidly and can perform hybridisation, sizing, heteroduplex analysis and single-stranded conformation analysis within a matter of minutes. The rapidity of this analysis allows the sampling of transient effects that may improve the sensitivity of mutation detection. Conclusions We believe that this method will aid the integration of self-assembly methods upon microfluidic chips. The speed of this analysis also appears to provide information upon the dynamics of the self-assembly process. PMID:15717935

  2. A self-assembling peptide acting as an immune adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, Jai S.; Tian, Ye F.; Jung, Jangwook P.; Collier, Joel H.

    2010-01-01

    The development of vaccines and other immunotherapies has been complicated by heterogeneous antigen display and the use of incompletely defined immune adjuvants with complex mechanisms of action. We have observed strong antibody responses in mice without the coadministration of any additional adjuvant by noncovalently assembling a T and B cell epitope peptide into nanofibers using a short C-terminal peptide extension. Self-assembling peptides have been explored recently as scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but our results indicate that these materials may also be useful as chemically defined adjuvants. In physiological conditions, these peptides self-assembled into long, unbranched fibrils that displayed the epitope on their surfaces. IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG3 were raised against epitope-bearing fibrils in levels similar to the epitope peptide delivered in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and IgM production was even greater for the self-assembled epitope. This response was dependent on self-assembly, and the self-assembling sequence was not immunogenic by itself, even when delivered in CFA. Undetectable levels of interferon-gamma, IL-2, and IL-4 in cultures of peptide-challenged splenocytes from immunized mice suggested that the antibody responses did not involve significant T cell help. PMID:20080728

  3. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: a quantum heat engine picture

    E-print Network

    Nathan Killoran; Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio

    2014-12-12

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle, and quantify its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's applicability for realistic biological structures.

  4. Self-assembly of tunable protein suprastructures from recombinant oleosin

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, Kevin B.; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Using recombinant amphiphilic proteins to self-assemble suprastructures would allow precise control over surfactant chemistry and the facile incorporation of biological functionality. We used cryo-TEM to confirm self-assembled structures from recombinantly produced mutants of the naturally occurring sunflower protein, oleosin. We studied the phase behavior of protein self-assembly as a function of solution ionic strength and protein hydrophilic fraction, observing nanometric fibers, sheets, and vesicles. Vesicle membrane thickness correlated with increasing hydrophilic fraction for a fixed hydrophobic domain length. The existence of a bilayer membrane was corroborated in giant vesicles through the localized encapsulation of hydrophobic Nile red and hydrophilic calcein. Circular dichroism revealed that changes in nanostructural morphology in this family of mutants was unrelated to changes in secondary structure. Ultimately, we envision the use of recombinant techniques to introduce novel functionality into these materials for biological applications. PMID:22753512

  5. Self-assembled tunable networks of sticky colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Demortière, Arnaud; Snezhko, Alexey; Sapozhnikov, Maksim V; Becker, Nicholas; Proslier, Thomas; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-01-01

    Surfaces decorated with dense arrays of microscopic fibres exhibit unique materials properties, including superhydrophobicity and low friction. Nature relies on 'hairy' surfaces to protect blood capillaries from wear and infection (endothelial glycocalyx). Here we report on the discovery of self-assembled tunable networks of microscopic polymer fibres ranging from wavy colloidal 'fur' to highly interconnected networks. The networks emerge via dynamic self-assembly in an alternating electric field from a non-aqueous suspension of 'sticky' polymeric colloidal particles with a controlled degree of polymerization. The resulting architectures are tuned by the frequency and amplitude of the electric field and surface properties of the particles. We demonstrate, using atomic layer deposition, that the networks can serve as a template for a transparent conductor. These self-assembled tunable materials are promising candidates for large surface area electrodes in batteries and organic photovoltaic cells, as well as for microfluidic sensors and filters. PMID:24445324

  6. Self-assembled ordered polymer nanocomposites directed by attractive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Knorowski, C.; Anderson, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-04-24

    We theoretically investigate general conditions under which an inorganic phase can direct the self-assembly of an ordered polymer nanocomposite. For this purpose, we consider a solution of triblock copolymers forming a hexagonal phase of micelles and investigate the effect of adding attractive particles. We show that if the triblock is functionalized at its ends by attaching groups with specific affinity for the particles, thus effectively becoming a pentablock, the particles direct the self-assembly of the system into phases where both the polymers and the particles exhibit mesoscopic order. Different lamellar and gyroid phases (both with Iad and I4132 space symmetries) are presented in detail. Our results show that functionalization is a very powerful route for directing self-assembly of polymer nanocomposites. We briefly discuss the connections with recent theoretical and experimental results in diblock melts with nanoparticles as well as for problems where polymers are used to template the growth of an inorganic phase in solution.

  7. Nanostructures formed by cyclodextrin covered aminobenzophenones through supramolecular self assembly.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Sankaranarayanan, R K; Saravanan, J

    2014-06-01

    Cyclodextrin (? and ?) based nanostructures formed with 2-aminobenzophenone, 3-aminobenzophenone through the supramolecular self assembly are studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, DSC, PXRD and (1)H NMR. The unequal layer by layer nanosheets and nanoribbons are formed through self assembly of 3ABP/CD inclusion complexes. 2ABP/?-CD complex nanostructures show the self assembly hierarchical thread structure and ?-CD complexes displays a nanobrick structure. The formation of nanostructures are prearranged to HO?H, NH2?O and H2N?H intermolecular hydrogen bond between individual complexes. The absorption and fluorescence spectral changes explicit formation of 1:1 inclusion complexes and solvent study demonstrate the ESIPT and TICT present in both molecules. The thermodynamic parameters (?H, ?G and ?S) of 2ABP and 3ABP molecule and the inclusion complexes were determined from semiempirical PM3 calculations. PMID:24632156

  8. Nanostructures formed by cyclodextrin covered aminobenzophenones through supramolecular self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Sankaranarayanan, R. K.; Saravanan, J.

    2014-06-01

    Cyclodextrin (? and ?) based nanostructures formed with 2-aminobenzophenone, 3-aminobenzophenone through the supramolecular self assembly are studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, DSC, PXRD and 1H NMR. The unequal layer by layer nanosheets and nanoribbons are formed through self assembly of 3ABP/CD inclusion complexes. 2ABP/?-CD complex nanostructures show the self assembly hierarchical thread structure and ?-CD complexes displays a nanobrick structure. The formation of nanostructures are prearranged to Hsbnd O⋯H, NH2⋯O and H2N⋯H intermolecular hydrogen bond between individual complexes. The absorption and fluorescence spectral changes explicit formation of 1:1 inclusion complexes and solvent study demonstrate the ESIPT and TICT present in both molecules. The thermodynamic parameters (?H, ?G and ?S) of 2ABP and 3ABP molecule and the inclusion complexes were determined from semiempirical PM3 calculations.

  9. Actinide sequestration using self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Glen E; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandy; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Wu, Hong; Kemner, Ken; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometalate anions, and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis, and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental cleanup necessary after 40 years of weapons-grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented. PMID:15787373

  10. Self-assembling peptide scaffolds for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Matson, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials made from self-assembling, short peptides and peptide derivatives have great potential to generate powerful new therapies in regenerative medicine. The high signaling capacity and therapeutic efficacy of peptidic scaffolds has been established in several animal models, and the development of more complex, hierarchical structures based on peptide materials is underway. This highlight discusses several classes of self-assembling peptide-based materials, including peptide amphiphiles, Fmoc-peptides, self-complementary ionic peptides, hairpin peptides, and others. The self-assembly designs, bioactive signalling strategies, and cell signalling capabilities of these bioactive materials are reported. The future challenges of the field are also discussed, including short-term goals such as integration with biopolymers and traditional implants, and long term goals, such as immune system programming, subcellular targeting, and the development of highly integrated scaffold systems. PMID:22080255

  11. Self-assembly of DNA-functionalized Colloids

    E-print Network

    Panagiotis E. Theodorakis; Nikolaos G. Fytas; Gerhard Kahl; Christoph Dellago

    2015-03-18

    Colloidal particles grafted with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) chains can self-assemble into a number of different crystalline structures, where hybridization of the ssDNA chains creates links between colloids stabilizing their structure. Depending on the geometry and the size of the particles, the grafting density of the ssDNA chains, and the length and choice of DNA sequences, a number of different crystalline structures can be fabricated. However, understanding how these factors contribute synergistically to the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized nano- or micro-sized particles remains an intensive field of research. Moreover, the fabrication of long-range structures due to kinetic bottlenecks in the self-assembly are additional challenges. Here, we discuss the most recent advances from theory and experiment with particular focus put on recent simulation studies.

  12. Directed Self-Assembly of Gradient Concentric Carbon Nanotube Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Suck Won; Jeong, Wonje; Ko, Hyunhyub; Tsukruk, Vladimir; Kessler, Michael; Lin, Zhiqun

    2008-03-01

    Hundreds of gradient concentric rings of linear conjugated polymer, (poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4- phenylenevinylene], i.e., MEH-PPV) with remarkable regularity over large areas were produced by controlled, repetitive ``stick- slip'' motions of the contact line in a confined geometry consisting of a sphere on a flat substrate (i.e., sphere-on-flat geometry). Subsequently, MEH-PPV rings exploited as template to direct the formation of gradient concentric rings of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with controlled density. This method is simple, cost effective, and robust, combining two consecutive self-assembly processes, namely, evaporation-induced self- assembly of polymers in a sphere-on-flat geometry, followed by subsequent directed self-assembly of MWNTs on the polymer- templated surfaces.

  13. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  14. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, S; Yu, C H; Gungordu, H I; Guven, S; Vural, T; Demirci, U

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call 'magnetoceptive' materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  15. Comparing open and closed molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, M.; Verdier, T.; Foret, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study theoretically in the present work the self-assembly of molecules in an open system, which is fed by monomers and depleted in partial or complete clusters. Such a scenario is likely to occur for example in the context of viral self-assembly. We provide a general formula for the mean-field size distribution which is valid both at equilibrium in a closed system, and in the stationary state in an open system. This allows us to explore in a simple way out-of-equilibrium features for self-assembly and compare them to equilibrium properties. In particular, we identify a region of parameter space for which the out-of-equilibrium size distribution in the presence of external fluxes is equal to the equilibrium size distribution in the absence of external fluxes, up to a constant renormalization factor. The range of validity of this result and its consequences are discussed.

  16. Hierarchical self-assembly of chiral fibres from achiral particles

    PubMed Central

    Prybytak, P.; Frith, W. J.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, by molecular dynamics simulation, the behaviour of discotic particles in a solvent of Lennard-Jones spheres. When chromonic disc–sphere interactions are imposed on these systems, three regimes of self-assembly are observed. At moderate temperatures, numerous short threads of discs develop, but these threads remain isolated from one another. Quenching to low temperatures, alternatively, causes all of the discs to floc into a single extended aggregate which typically comprises several distinct sections and contains numerous packing defects. For a narrow temperature range between these regimes, however, defect-free chiral fibres are found to freely self-assemble. The spontaneous chirality of these fibres results from frustration between the hexagonal packing and interdigitation of neighbouring threads, the pitch being set by the particle shape. This demonstration of aggregate-wide chirality emerging owing to packing alone is pertinent to many biological and synthetic hierarchically self-assembling systems. PMID:24098850

  17. Hierarchical self-assembly of chiral fibres from achiral particles.

    PubMed

    Prybytak, P; Frith, W J; Cleaver, D J

    2012-10-01

    We investigate, by molecular dynamics simulation, the behaviour of discotic particles in a solvent of Lennard-Jones spheres. When chromonic disc-sphere interactions are imposed on these systems, three regimes of self-assembly are observed. At moderate temperatures, numerous short threads of discs develop, but these threads remain isolated from one another. Quenching to low temperatures, alternatively, causes all of the discs to floc into a single extended aggregate which typically comprises several distinct sections and contains numerous packing defects. For a narrow temperature range between these regimes, however, defect-free chiral fibres are found to freely self-assemble. The spontaneous chirality of these fibres results from frustration between the hexagonal packing and interdigitation of neighbouring threads, the pitch being set by the particle shape. This demonstration of aggregate-wide chirality emerging owing to packing alone is pertinent to many biological and synthetic hierarchically self-assembling systems. PMID:24098850

  18. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  19. Self-assembly of colloidal one-dimensional nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Regulacio, Michelle D; Han, Ming-Yong

    2014-04-01

    The ability of nanoscopic materials to self-organize into large-scale assembly structures that exhibit unique collective properties has opened up new and exciting opportunities in the field of nanotechnology. Although earlier work on nanoscale self-assembly has focused on colloidal spherical nanocrystals as building blocks, there has been significant interest in recent years in the self-assembly of colloidal nanocrystals having well-defined facets or anisotropic shapes. In this review, particular attention is drawn to anisotropic one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals, notably nanorods and nanowires, which can be arranged into a multitude of higher-order assembly structures. Different strategies have been developed to realize self-assembly of colloidal 1D nanocrystals and these are highlighted in the first part of this review. Self-assembly can take place (1) on substrates through evaporation control, external field facilitation and template use; (2) at interfaces, such as the liquid-liquid and the gas-liquid interface; and (3) in solutions via chemical bonding, depletion attraction forces and linker-mediated interactions. The choice of a self-assembly approach is pivotal to achieving the desired assembly configuration with properties that can be exploited for functional device applications. In the subsequent sections, the various assembly structures that have been created through 1D nanocrystal self-assembly are presented. These organized structures are broadly categorized into non-close-packed and close-packed configurations, and are further classified based on the different types of 1D nanocrystal alignment (side-by-side and end-to-end), orientation (horizontal and vertical) and ordering (nematic and smectic), and depending on the dimensionality of the structure (2D and 3D). The conditions under which different types of arrangements are achieved are also discussed. PMID:24413386

  20. Hydrazine-mediated construction of nanocrystal self-assembly materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ding; Liu, Min; Lin, Min; Bu, Xinyuan; Luo, Xintao; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembly is the basic feature of supramolecular chemistry, which permits to integrate and enhance the functionalities of nano-objects. However, the conversion of self-assembled structures to practical materials is still laborious. In this work, on the basis of studying one-pot synthesis, spontaneous assembly, and in situ polymerization of aqueous semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), NC self-assembly materials are produced and applied to design high performance white light-emitting diode (WLED). In producing self-assembly materials, the additive hydrazine (N2H4) is curial, which acts as the promoter to achieve room-temperature synthesis of aqueous NCs by favoring a reaction-controlled growth, as the polyelectrolyte to weaken inter-NC electrostatic repulsion and therewith facilitate the one-dimensional self-assembly, and in particular as the bifunctional monomers to polymerize with mercapto carboxylic acid-modified NCs via in situ amidation reaction. This strategy is versatile for mercapto carboxylic acid-modified aqueous NCs, for example CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CdSe(x)Te(1-x), and Cd(y)Hg(1-y)Te. Because of the multisite modification with carboxyl, the NCs act as macromonomers, thus producing cross-linked self-assembly materials with excellent thermal, solvent, and photostability. The assembled NCs preserve strong luminescence and avoid unpredictable fluorescent resonance energy transfer, the main problem in design WLED from multiple NC components. These advantages allow the fabrication of NC-based WLED with high color rendering index (86), high luminous efficacy (41 lm/W), and controllable color temperature. PMID:25296278

  1. Probing peptide amphiphile self-assembly in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arijit; Buettner, Christian J; Manos, Aaron A; Wallace, Ashley J; Tweedle, Michael F; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2014-12-01

    There has been recent interest in designing smart diagnostic or therapeutic self-assembling peptide or polymeric materials that can selectively undergo morphological transitions to accumulate at a disease site in response to specific stimuli. Developing approaches to probe these self-assembly transitions in environments that accurately amalgamate the diverse plethora of proteins, biomolecules, and salts of blood is essential for creating systems that function in vivo. Here, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy approach to probe the pH-dependent self-assembly transition of peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules that transform from spherical micelles at pH 7.4 to nanofibers under more acidic pH's in blood serum. By mixing small concentrations of a Ru(bipy)3(2+)-tagged PA with a Gd(DO3A)-tagged PA having the same lipid-peptide sequence, we showed that the pH dependence of self-assembly is minimally affected and can be monitored in mouse blood serum. These PA vehicles can be designed to transition from spherical micelles to nanofibers in the pH range 7.0-7.4 in pure serum. In contrast to the typical notion of serum albumin absorbing isolated surfactant molecules and disrupting self-assembly, our experiments showed that albumin does not bind these anionic PAs and instead promotes nanofibers due to a molecular crowding effect. Finally, we created a medium that replicates the transition pH in serum to within 0.08 pH units and allows probing self-assembly behavior using conventional spectroscopic techniques without conflicting protein signals, thus simplifying the development pathway from test tube to in vivo experimentation for stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:25347387

  2. Large Femtosecond Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Sections of Fullerosome Vesicle Nanostructures Derived from Highly Photoresponsive Amphiphilic C60-Light-Harvesting Fluorene Dyad

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Nalla, Venkatram; Jeon, Seaho; Mamidala, Venkatesh; Ji, Wei; Tan, Loon-Seng; Cooper, Thomas; Chiang, Long Y.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated ultrafast femtosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption characteristics of bilayered fullerosome vesicle nanostructures derived from molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic oligo(ethylene glycolated) C60-(light-harvesting diphenylaminofluorene antenna). Fullerene conjugates were designed to enhance photoresponse in a femtosecond time scale by applying an isomerizable periconjugation linker between the C60 cage and diphenylaminofluorene antenna subunit in an intramolecular contact distance of only < 3.0 Å. Morphology of C60(>DPAF-EG12C1)-based fullerosome nanovesicles in H2O was characterized to consist of a bilayered shell with a sphere diameter of 20–70 nm and a chromophore shell-width of 9.0–10 nm, fitting well with a head-to-head packing configuration of the molecular length. At the estimated effective nanovesicle concentration as low as 5.5 × 10?8 MV (molecular molar concentration of 5.0 × 10?4 M) in H2O, two-photon absorption (2PA) phenomena were found to be the dominating photophysical events showing a large molar concentration-insensitive 2PA cross-section value equivalent to 8500 GM in a form of nanovesicles, on average. The observed NLO characteristics led to a sharp trend of efficient light-transmittance intensity reduction at the input laser intensity above 100 GW/cm2. PMID:22022620

  3. Self-assembly of graphene nanoribbon ring on metallic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfang

    2014-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that metallic nanowires (NWs) can activate and guide the self-assembly of graphene nanoribbon rings (GNR), allowing them to adopt a bilayered helical configuration on NWs. This unique technology attributes to the combined effects of the van der Waals force and the ?-? stacking interaction. The size and chirality effects of GNR on the self-assembly of GNR-NW system are calculated. Diverse NWs, acting as an external force, can initiate the conformational change of the GNRs to form bilayered helical structures. The stability of the formed nanosystems is further analyzed for numerous possible applications.

  4. CCMR: Interfacial Study of Self-Assembled Monolayers and Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cagle, Courtney

    2010-08-15

    This project is a study of the ultrafast dynamics of water at hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using sum-frequency generation and surface-specific 2D spectroscopy that is being developed in Dr. Poul Petersen’s lab. By determining the dynamics of water, many theories and models of water and interfacial processes can be corrected. This summer, the methods of making hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers was determined. These self-assembled monolayers will be the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces used in the study to look at water.

  5. Intrinsic Defect Formation in Peptide Self-Assembly

    E-print Network

    Li Deng; Yurong Zhao; Hai Xu; Yanting Wang

    2015-01-09

    In contrast to extensively studied defects in traditional materials, we report here for the first time a systematic study of the formation mechanism of intrinsic defects in self-assembled peptide nanostructures. We found that the symmetry breaking of layer bending mode at both ends during morphological transformation is responsible for the intrinsic defect formation, whose microscopic origin is the mismatch between layer stacking along the side-chain direction and layer growth along the hydrogen bond direction, and defect formation does not affect the chirality of the self-assembled structure.

  6. Self-assembly of flagellin on Au(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    González Orive, Alejandro; Pissinis, Diego E; Diaz, Carolina; Miñán, Alejandro; Benítez, Guillermo A; Rubert, Aldo; Daza Millone, Antonieta; Rumbo, Martin; Hernández Creus, Alberto; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Schilardi, Patricia L

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of flagellin monomers from Pseudomonas fluorescens on Au(111) has been studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. Results show that flagellin monomers spontaneously self-assemble forming a monolayer thick protein film bounded to the Au surface by the more hydrophobic subunit and exposed to the environment the hydrophilic subunit. The films are conductive and allow allocation of electrochemically active cytochrome C. The self-assembled films could be used as biological platforms to build 3D complex molecular structures on planar metal surfaces and to functionalize metal nanoparticles. PMID:25112916

  7. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  8. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Dunn, Elissa (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Park, Jin-Gyu (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Merrill, Jason (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Dufresne, Eric (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Lele, Pushkar (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Mittal, Manish (University of Delaware, Newark, DE)

    2009-09-01

    Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

  9. Ultrafast Energy-Electron Transfer Cascade in a Multichromophoric Light-Harvesting Molecular Square

    E-print Network

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Ultrafast Energy-Electron Transfer Cascade in a Multichromophoric Light-Harvesting Molecular Square, 2004; E-mail: wuerthner@chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de; williams@science.uva.nl Abstract: A molecular square with the closely packed structure of 20 chromophoric units, indicate that we can consider the molecular square

  10. Remodeling of Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes in Chlamydomonas in Response to Environmental Changes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Nield; Kevin Redding; Michael Hippler

    2004-01-01

    Photosynthesis is dependent on light. Photosynthetic organ- isms struggle their entire lives to optimize photosynthetic func- tion and minimize photooxidative damage in response to light quantity and quality. When the absorbed light energy exceeds the capacity of photosynthetic energy consumption, overreduc- tion of electron transport carriers and accumulation of excita- tion energy in the light-harvesting-antennae may occur. The latter favors

  11. Optimization of light harvesting and photoprotection: molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive lateral organization of the protein complexes in the thylakoid membrane investigated by Jan Anderson and co-workers is dependent on the balance of various attractive and repulsive forces. Modulation of these forces allows critical physiological regulation of photosynthesis that provides efficient light-harvesting in limiting light but dissipation of excess potentially damaging radiation in saturating light. The light-harvesting complexes (LHCII) are central to this regulation, which is achieved by phosphorylation of stromal residues, protonation on the lumen surface and de-epoxidation of bound violaxanthin. The functional flexibility of LHCII derives from a remarkable pigment composition and configuration that not only allow efficient absorption of light and efficient energy transfer either to photosystem II or photosystem I core complexes, but through subtle configurational changes can also exhibit highly efficient dissipative reactions involving chlorophyll–xanthophyll and/or chlorophyll–chlorophyll interactions. These changes in function are determined at a macroscopic level by alterations in protein–protein interactions in the thylakoid membrane. The capacity and dynamics of this regulation are tuned to different physiological scenarios by the exact protein and pigment content of the light-harvesting system. Here, the molecular mechanisms involved will be reviewed, and the optimization of the light-harvesting system in different environmental conditions described. PMID:23148272

  12. Light-harvesting antenna composition controls the macrostructure and dynamics of thylakoid membranes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Goral, Tomasz K; Johnson, Matthew P; Duffy, Christopher D P; Brain, Anthony P R; Ruban, Alexander V; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2012-01-01

    We characterized a set of Arabidopsis mutants deficient in specific light-harvesting proteins, using freeze-fracture electron microscopy to probe the organization of complexes in the membrane and confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to probe the dynamics of thylakoid membranes within intact chloroplasts. The same methods were used to characterize mutants lacking or over-expressing PsbS, a protein related to light-harvesting complexes that appears to play a role in regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting. We found that changes in the complement of light-harvesting complexes and PsbS have striking effects on the photosystem II macrostructure, and that these effects correlate with changes in the mobility of chlorophyll proteins within the thylakoid membrane. The mobility of chlorophyll proteins was found to correlate with the extent of photoprotective non-photochemical quenching, consistent with the idea that non-photochemical quenching involves extensive re-organization of complexes in the membrane. We suggest that a key feature of the physiological function of PsbS is to decrease the formation of ordered semi-crystalline arrays of photosystem II in the low-light state. Thus the presence of PsbS leads to an increase in the fluidity of the membrane, accelerating the re-organization of the photosystem II macrostructure that is necessary for induction of non-photochemical quenching. PMID:21919982

  13. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria

    E-print Network

    Joonsuk Huh; Semion K. Saikin; Jennifer C. Brookes; Stéphanie Valleau; Takatoshi Fujita; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2013-11-22

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have several functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimics a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains approximately 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the transfer between collective excited states of pigments can result in robust energy funneling. Energy transfer is robust on the initial excitation conditions and temperature changes. Moreover, the same mechanism describes the coexistence of multiple timescales of excitation dynamics frequently observed in ultrafast optical experiments. While our findings support the hypothesis of supertransfer, the model reveals energy transport through multiple channels on different length scales.

  14. Bio serves nano: biological light-harvesting complex as energy donor for semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Werwie, Mara; Xu, Xiangxing; Haase, Mathias; Basché, Thomas; Paulsen, Harald

    2012-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants is attached to type-II core-shell CdTe/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) exhibiting an absorption band at 710 nm and carrying a dihydrolipoic acid coating for water solubility. LHCII stays functional upon binding to the QD surface and enhances the light utilization of the QDs significantly, similar to its light-harvesting function in photosynthesis. Electronic excitation energy transfer of about 50% efficiency is shown by donor (LHCII) fluorescence quenching as well as sensitized acceptor (QD) emission and corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The energy transfer efficiency is commensurable with the expected efficiency calculated according to Förster theory on the basis of the estimated donor-acceptor separation. Light harvesting is particularly efficient in the red spectral domain where QD absorption is relatively low. Excitation over the entire visible spectrum is further improved by complementing the biological pigments in LHCII with a dye attached to the apoprotein; the dye has been chosen to absorb in the "green gap" of the LHCII absorption spectrum and transfers its excitation energy ultimately to QD. This is the first report of a biological light-harvesting complex serving an inorganic semiconductor nanocrystal. Due to the charge separation between the core and the shell in type-II QDs the presented LHCII-QD hybrid complexes are potentially interesting for sensitized charge-transfer and photovoltaic applications. PMID:22401299

  15. Crystal structure of an integral membrane light-harvesting complex from photosynthetic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. McDermott; S. M. Prince; A. A. Freer; A. M. Hawthornthwaite-Lawless; M. Z. Papiz; R. J. Cogdell; N. W. Isaacs

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structure of the light-harvesting antenna complex (LH2) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 shows that the active assembly consists of two concentric cylinders of helical protein subunits which enclose the pigment molecules. Eighteen bacteriochlorophyll a molecules sandwiched between the helices form a continuous overlapping ring, and a further nine are positioned between the outer helices with the bacteriochlorin rings

  16. Regulation of the Structure and Function of the Light Harvesting Complexes of Photosystem II by the Xanthophyll Cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Horton; Alexander V. Ruban; Andrew J. Young

    The xanthophyll cycle is a relatively simple process whereby the interconversion of violaxanthin into zeaxanthin in the light harvesting complexes serves to regulate light harvesting and subsequent energy dissipation in different light environments. In order to determine how these carotenoids can regulate such processes it is first important to ascertain what differences exist between these two xanthophylls. Deepoxidation brings about

  17. Multiscale Simulation on a Light-Harvesting Molecular Triad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guoxiong; Czader, Arkadiusz; Homouz, Dirar; Bernardes, Gabriela; Mateen, Sana; Cheung, Margaret

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of solvation and confinement on an artificial photosynthetic material, carotenoid-porphyrin-C60 molecular triad, by a multiscale approach and an enhanced sampling technique (Replica Exchange Method). We have developed a combined approach of quantum chemistry, statistical physics, and all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to determine the partial atomic charges of the ground-state triad. The confinement effects on the triad were modeled by imposing three sizes of spherocylindrical nanocapsules. The triad is structurally flexible under ambient conditions and its conformation distribution is manipulated by the choice of water models and confinement. Two types of water models (SPC/E and TIP3P) are used for solvation. We have shown that a slight structural difference in the two water models with the same dipole moment can have great distinction in water density, water orientation and the number of hydrogen bonds in the proximity of a large flexible compound such as the triad. Subsequently, it has direct impact on the position of the triad in a confinement as well as the distribution of conformations at the interface of liquid and solid in a finite-size system.

  18. Hidden symmetries enhance quantum transport in Light Harvesting systems

    E-print Network

    Tobias Zech; Roberto Mulet; Thomas Wellens; Andreas Buchleitner

    2012-05-23

    For more than 50 years we have known that photosynthetic systems harvest solar energy with almost unit {\\it quantum efficiency}. However, recent experimental evidence of {\\it quantum coherence} during the excitonic energy transport in photosynthetic organisms challenges our understanding of this fundamental biological function. Currently, and despite numerous efforts, the causal connection between coherence and efficiency is still a matter of debate. We show, through the study of extensive simulations of quantum coherent transport on networks, that three dimensional structures characterized by centro-symmetric Hamiltonians are statistically more efficient than random arrangements. Moreover, we demonstrate that the experimental data available for the electronic Hamiltonians of the Fenna-Mathew-Olson (FMO) complex of sulfur bacteria and of the crypophyte PC645 complex of marine algae are consistent with this strong correlation of centro-symmetry with quantum efficiency. These results show that what appears to be geometrically disordered complexes may well exhibit a hidden symmetry which enhances the energy transport between chromophores. We are confident that our results will motivate research to explore the properties of nearly centro-symmetric Hamiltonians in more realistic environments, and to unveil the role of symmetries for quantum effects in biology. The unravelling of such symmetries may open novel perspectives and suggest new design principles in the development of artificial devices.

  19. Differential Self-Assembly of Novel Redox Crown Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merithew, Andrew William

    Retinal prosthesis relies on the stimulation of living nerve tissue behind the rods and cones of the eye. The current state of the art relies on electrodes controlled by cameras which directly stimulate the nerve tissue to elicit a response to an image. These types of retinal implants have allowed for short-term crude vision in patients but have had limited long term success due to external battery packs and electroplating of the implanted electrodes. Ionic stimulation is one of the principle mechanisms that sensory neurons utilize in the generation of an action potential. In a complex transduction pathway, ionic gradients are constantly altered inside the neuron by voltage sensors or mechanically controlled gates embedded in the neuronal cell membrane; responsible for the open and close state of these ion channels. It has been demonstrated that local concentration increases of K + by direct injection proximal to the nerve can elicit nerve firing at a concentration of 15-20 mM (3-4X normal concentration) increase in K + concentration. As part of a larger concept of integrating biotechnology with nanofabrication, the materials for the development of potassium selective sequestration/storage and delivery were developed in the form of a redox-gated K+ selective crown ether. The structure of the anthraquinone-based crown was deduced by computational simulation and stoichiometry of the complex confirmed by mass spec. along with 2D diffusion NMR techniques. In this instance, the stoichiometry could be controlled by the addition of different salts to give a 1:1 complex with large, aromatic anions and a 2:1 complex with smaller anions such as triflate. The synthesis of the molecule was optimized by computational modeling and simulations of transport through an artificial membrane. The selectivity of the architecture developed was specific for K+ over Na+, the other major ionic species present in the blood. The mechanism influencing the self-assembly of this class of compounds has much to do with the breakage of intramolecular pi-stacking interactions and the formation of stronger intermolecular pi-stacking interactions. Finally, the transport of K+ through nanoporous membranes and single nanopores with novel PEG-type polymeric dispersions is demonstrated. This thesis concludes with future work toward developing more advanced transporters and proposes novel uses for anthraquinone-appended polymers as proton exchange membranes and DNA-base pair interchelators.

  20. Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Scott L.; Hou Wong, Kok; Thordarson, Pall; Ladouceur, François

    2010-12-01

    We have assessed the potential of self-assembling hydrogels for use in conformal displays. The self-assembling process can be used to alter the transparency of the material to all visible light due to scattering by fibres. The reversible transition is shown to be of low energy by differential scanning calorimetry. For use in technology it is imperative that this transition is controlled electrically. We have thus synthesized novel self-assembling hydrogelator molecules which contain an electroactive group. The well-known redox couple of anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone has been used as the hydrophobic component for a series of small molecule gelators. They are further functionalized with peptide combinations of L-phenylalanine and glycine to provide the hydrophilic group to complete 'head-tail' models of self-assembling gels. The gelation and electroactive characteristics of the series were assessed. Cyclic voltammetry shows the reversible redox cycle to be only superficially altered by functionalization. Additionally, spectroelectrochemical measurements show a reversible transparency and colour change induced by the redox process.

  1. Self-assembly in additive manufacturing: opportunities and obstacles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. B. Crane; J. Tuckerman; G. N. Nielson

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Additive manufacturing (AM) offers substantial flexibility in shape, but much less flexibility in materials and functionality – particularly at small size scales. A system for automatically incorporating microscale components would enable the fabrication of objects with more functionality. The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of self-assembly to serve as an automated programmable integration method.

  2. Chloride-catalyzed, multicomponent self-assembly of arsenic thiolates.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Matthew E; Collins, Mary S; Lindquist, Nathan R; Guzmán-Percástegui, Edmundo; Pluth, Michael D; Johnson, Darren W

    2014-01-01

    We present the observation that chloride serves as a simple catalyst for the acceleration of a self-assembly reaction between AsCl3 and dithiolate ligands (H2L) to form As2L3 assemblies. Studies on a model monomeric arsenic complex suggest that chloride may accelerate ligand exchange dynamics in pnictogen thiolates in general. PMID:24201472

  3. pH-directed self-assembling helical peptide conformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beta-sheet and alpha-helix peptide conformation are two of the most fundamentally ordered secondary structures found in proteins and peptides. They also give rise to self-assembling motifs that form macromolecular channels and nanostructures. Through design these conformations can yield enhance...

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol) Self-Assembled Monolayer Island Growth

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    Hopkins School of Medicine. (1) PEG is also referred to as poly(ethylene oxide) (POE) or polyPoly(ethylene glycol) Self-Assembled Monolayer Island Growth Jonas Rundqvist, Jan H. Hoh, and David. This height change can be associated with a molecular conformational transition. Introduction Poly(ethylene

  5. Self-assembled materials from thermosensitive and biohybrid block copolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. de Graaf

    2012-01-01

    In this research, several block copolymers were synthesized and characterized with regard to possible pharmaceutical applications. All block copolymers were thermosensitive and self-assembled at 37 °C into structures like micelles and hydrogels, which can be used for innovative drug delivery purposes. Some of the synthesized polymers were biohybrid, in the sense that they contained peptide segments which enabled their cleavage

  6. Evolutionary experiments for self-assembling amphiphilic systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Forlin; I. Poli; D. De March; N. Packard; G. Gazzola; R. Serra

    2008-01-01

    Some amphiphilic molecules in particular environments may self-assemble and originate chemical entities, such as vesicles, which are relevant in technological applications. Experimentation in this field is difficult because of the high dimensionality of the search space and the high cost of each experiment. To tackle the problem of designing a relatively small number of experiments to achieve the relevant information

  7. Developmental self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, John P; Calvert, Colby R; Zhang, David Yu; Pierce, Niles A; Yin, Peng

    2014-04-22

    Kinetically controlled isothermal growth is fundamental to biological development, yet it remains challenging to rationally design molecular systems that self-assemble isothermally into complex geometries via prescribed assembly and disassembly pathways. By exploiting the programmable chemistry of base pairing, sophisticated spatial and temporal control have been demonstrated in DNA self-assembly, but largely as separate pursuits. By integrating temporal with spatial control, here we demonstrate the "developmental" self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron, where a prescriptive molecular program orchestrates the kinetic pathways by which DNA molecules isothermally self-assemble into a well-defined three-dimensional wireframe geometry. In this reaction, nine DNA reactants initially coexist metastably, but upon catalysis by a DNA initiator molecule, navigate 24 individually characterizable intermediate states via prescribed assembly pathways, organized both in series and in parallel, to arrive at the tetrahedral final product. In contrast to previous work on dynamic DNA nanotechnology, this developmental program coordinates growth of ringed substructures into a three-dimensional wireframe superstructure, taking a step toward the goal of kinetically controlled isothermal growth of complex three-dimensional geometries. PMID:24720462

  8. Molecule-Mimetic Chemistry and Mesoscale Self-Assembly

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Molecule-Mimetic Chemistry and Mesoscale Self-Assembly NED B. BOWDEN, MARCUS WECK, INSUNG S. CHOI, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 Received April 24, 2000 ABSTRACT Molecules are structured aggregates of atoms joined by chemical bonds; crystals are aggregates of molecules, interacting covalently or noncovalently

  9. Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion Xia Tong,1 Jong Won Chung,2 emulsion. Fig. S1. Image a is the photomicrograph (reflection mode) of an emulsion cast on a glass slide. Polarizing photomicrographs showing (a) the droplets of liquid crystal emulsion without gelator and (b

  10. Multistep hierarchical self-assembly of chiral nanopore arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanim; Lee, Sunhee; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.; Lee, Sang Bok; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2014-01-01

    A series of simple hierarchical self-assembly steps achieve self-organization from the centimeter to the subnanometer-length scales in the form of square-centimeter arrays of linear nanopores, each one having a single chiral helical nanofilament of large internal surface area and interfacial interactions based on chiral crystalline molecular arrangements. PMID:25246585

  11. Structure, function, self-assembly, and applications of bottlebrush copolymers.

    PubMed

    Verduzco, Rafael; Li, Xianyu; Pesek, Stacy L; Stein, Gila E

    2015-04-10

    Bottlebrush polymers are a type of branched or graft polymer with polymeric side-chains attached to a linear backbone, and the unusual architectures of bottlebrushes provide a number of unique and potentially useful properties. These include a high entanglement molecular weight, enabling rapid self-assembly of bottlebrush block copolymers into large domain structures, the self-assembly of bottlebrush block copolymer micelles in a selective solvent even at very low dilutions, and the functionalization of bottlebrush side-chains for recognition, imaging, or drug delivery in aqueous environments. This review article focuses on recent developments in the field of bottlebrush polymers with an emphasis on applications of bottlebrush copolymers. Bottlebrush copolymers contain two (or more) different types of polymeric side-chains. Recent work has explored the diverse properties and functions of bottlebrush polymers and copolymers in solutions, films, and melts, and applications explored include photonic materials, bottlebrush films for lithographic patterning, drug delivery, and tumor detection and imaging. We provide a brief introduction to bottlebrush synthesis and physical properties and then discuss work related to: (i) bottlebrush self-assembly in melts and bulk thin films, (ii) bottlebrushes for photonics and lithography, (iii) bottlebrushes for small molecule encapsulation and delivery in solution, and (iv) bottlebrush micelles and assemblies in solution. We briefly discuss three potential areas for future research, including developing a more quantitative model of bottlebrush self-assembly in the bulk, studying the properties of bottlebrushes at interfaces, and investigating the solution assembly of bottlebrush copolymers. PMID:25688538

  12. Porphyrins Affect the Self-Assembly of Tubulin in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Rolando; Johnson, Eric M.; Belcher, John A.; Fuini, John F.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembly of tubulin heterodimers in solution has been studied in the past to predict the effects that ligands and/or conformational changes have on the formation of tubulin filaments. Self-assembly of tubulin in solution has produced formations similar to cellular microtubules (MTs). The present study reports on the effects that two porphyrins (protoporphyrin IX, PPIX and tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin, TPPS) produce on the self-assembly of tubulin ?,?-heterodimers in buffer solution. The study shows that, when incubated simultaneously with MT-stabilizing ligands (i.e., paclitaxel and guanosine triphosphate, GTP), porphyrins do not affect the ability of tubulin to form MT. However, if paclitaxel and GTP are added after tubulin has been allowed to self-assemble in the presence of either porphyrin, the ability to form MT-like structures is reduced or suppressed. We suggest that this effect is due to the formation of porphyrin-mediated aggregates that cannot be broken or elongated by the addition of GTP or paclitaxel. PMID:19819610

  13. Photoresponsive self-assemblies based on fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fameau, A-L; Arnould, A; Lehmann, M; von Klitzing, R

    2015-02-01

    Photoresponsive surfactant system based on fatty acids has been developed by the introduction in aqueous solution of a photoacid generator (PAG). Self-assembly transitions are triggered by UV irradiation due to a pH change induced by the presence of PAG. PMID:25582497

  14. Phosphorescent self-assembled Pt(II) tetranuclear metallocycles.

    PubMed

    Goeb, Sébastien; Prusakova, Valentina; Wang, Xianghuai; Vézinat, Aurélie; Sallé, Marc; Castellano, Felix N

    2011-04-21

    A series of rigid Pt(II) diimine diacetylide complexes and their corresponding metallocyclic derivatives were synthesized through coordination-driven self-assembly. The photophysical properties of these complexes have been studied in detail, revealing exceptionally high RT phosphorescence quantum yields and lifetimes when the excited state becomes localized on the ?-conjugated bridging-ligand following intramolecular charge-transfer sensitization. PMID:21373692

  15. Fabrication of a Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayer Diode Using

    E-print Network

    Fabrication of a Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayer Diode Using Nanoimprint Lithography Michael D ABSTRACT We report a simple parallel process for the fabrication of nanoscale electrical contacts to probe), a patterning technology capable of sub-10 nm resolution. We fabricated multiple samples, each with 40 gold

  16. An exactly solvable model of hierarchical self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Douglas, Jack F.; Freed, Karl F.

    2009-06-01

    Many living and nonliving structures in the natural world form by hierarchical organization, but physical theories that describe this type of organization are scarce. To address this problem, a model of equilibrium self-assembly is formulated in which dynamically associating species organize into hierarchical structures that preserve their shape at each stage of assembly. In particular, we consider symmetric m-gons that associate at their vertices into Sierpinski gasket structures involving the hierarchical association of triangles, squares, hexagons, etc., at their corner vertices, thereby leading to fractal structures after many generations of assembly. This rather idealized model of hierarchical assembly yields an infinite sequence of self-assembly transitions as the morphology progressively organizes to higher levels of the hierarchy, and these structures coexists at dynamic equilibrium, as found in real hierarchically self-assembling systems such as amyloid fiber forming proteins. Moreover, the transition sharpness progressively grows with increasing m, corresponding to larger and larger loops in the assembled structures. Calculations are provided for several basic thermodynamic properties (including the order parameters for assembly for each stage of the hierarchy, average mass of clusters, specific heat, transition sharpness, etc.) that are required for characterizing the interaction parameters governing this type of self-assembly and for elucidating other basic qualitative aspects of these systems. Our idealized model of hierarchical assembly gives many insights into this ubiquitous type of self-organization process.

  17. Electrochemical impedance sensing of DNA at PNA self assembled monolayer

    E-print Network

    Kwak, Juhyoun

    of the target DNA. The results showed that without any modification to the target DNA, the complementaryElectrochemical impedance sensing of DNA at PNA self assembled monolayer Tesfaye Hailu Degefa acid (PNA) assembled on gold electrodes were investigated for the sensing of DNA recognition

  18. Self-Assembly of Globular Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. S.; Olsen, B. D.

    2011-03-01

    The self-assembly of globular protein-polymer diblock copolymers into nanostructured phases is demonstrated as an elegant and simple method for structural control in biocatalysis or bioelectronics. In order to fundamentally investigate self-assembly in these complex block copolymer systems, a red fluorescent protein was expressed in E. coli and site-specifically conjugated to a low polydispersity poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) block using thiol-maleimide coupling to form a well-defined model globular protein-polymer diblock. Functional protein materials are obtained by solvent evaporation and solvent annealing above and below the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM in order to access different pathways toward self-assembly. Small angle x-ray scattering and microscopy are used to show that the diblock forms lamellar nanostructures and to explore dependence of nanostructure formation on processing conditions. Circular dichroism and UV-vis show that a large fraction of the protein remains in its folded state after conjugation, and wide angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that diblock copolymer self-assembly changes the protein packing symmetry.

  19. Roles of partly unfolded conformations in macromolecular self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiichi Namba

    2001-01-01

    From genes to cells there are many steps of hierarchical increments in building up complex frameworks that provide intricate networks of macromolecular interactions, through which cellular activities such as gene expression, signal processing, energy transduction and material conversion are dynamically organized and regulated. The self-assembly of macromolecules into large complexes is one such important step, but this process is by

  20. Self-assembly of nanoscale cuboctahedra by coordination chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bogdan Olenyuk; Jeffery A. Whiteford; Andreas Fechtenkötter; Peter J. Stang

    1999-01-01

    Self-assembled polyhedral structures are common in biology. The coats of many viruses, for example, have a structure based on icosahedral symmetry. The preparation of synthetic polyhedral molecular assemblies represents a challenging problem, but supramolecular chemistry,, has now advanced to the point where the task may be addressed. Macromolecular and supramolecular entities of predefined geometric shape and with well-defined internal environments

  1. Cooperative Self-Assembly of Peptide Gelators and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly provides a versatile route for the production of nanoscale materials for medical and technological applications. Herein, we demonstrate that the cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic small molecules and proteins can have drastic effects on supramolecular nanostructuring of resulting materials. We report that mesoscale, fractal-like clusters of proteins form at concentrations that are orders of magnitude lower compared to those usually associated with molecular crowding at room temperature. These protein clusters have pronounced effects on the molecular self-assembly of aromatic peptide amphiphiles (fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl- dipeptides), resulting in a reversal of chiral organization and enhanced order through templating and binding. Moreover, the morphological and mechanical properties of the resultant nanostructured gels can be controlled by the cooperative self-assembly of peptides and protein fractal clusters, having implications for biomedical applications where proteins and peptides are both present. In addition, fundamental insights into cooperative interplay of molecular interactions and confinement by clusters of chiral macromolecules is relevant to gaining understanding of the molecular mechanisms of relevance to the origin of life and development of synthetic mimics of living systems. PMID:24256076

  2. Supporting Information Electrical Detection of Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte

    E-print Network

    Bausch, Andreas

    models for the detection of polyelectrolyte multilayers by the SOI-based thin film resistor 1.1 Model aSupporting Information Electrical Detection of Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Multilayers by a Thin: Alternating layers with volume charges We model the polyelectrolyte multilayers sensor system as a series of N

  3. Templated self-assembly for complex pattern fabrication

    E-print Network

    Chang, Jae-Byum

    2014-01-01

    The long-term goal of my Ph.D. study has been controlling the self-assembly of various materials using state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques. Electron-beam lithography has been used for decades to generate nanoscale ...

  4. Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device Mila Boncheva, David H a biomimetic strategy for the fabrication of asymmetrical, three-dimensional electronic devices modeled as a shift register. This example demonstrates that biomimetic principles of design and self-organization can

  5. Bicontinuous Surfaces in Self-assembling Amphiphilic Systems

    E-print Network

    Schwarz, Ulrich

    Bicontinuous Surfaces in Self-assembling Amphiphilic Systems Ulrich Schwarz1 and Gerhard Gompper2 1¨orperforschung, Forschungszentrum J¨ulich, D-52425 J¨ulich Abstract. Amphiphiles are molecules which have both hydrophilic due to the hydrophobic effect. The free energy of an amphiphilic system can be written as a functional

  6. BULK TITANIUM MICROFLUIDIC NETWORKS FOR PROTEIN SELF-ASSEMBLY STUDIES

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    BULK TITANIUM MICROFLUIDIC NETWORKS FOR PROTEIN SELF-ASSEMBLY STUDIES E.R. Parker1 , L.S. Hirst2 developed micromachining technique to fabricate microfluidic networks in thin titanium foils. These devices been integrated into the fabrication process in order to minimize protein adsorption to the titanium

  7. Casting Metal Nanowires Within Discrete Self-Assembled Peptide Nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meital Reches; Ehud Gazit

    2003-01-01

    Tubular nanostructures are suggested to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology. We report our observation of the self-assembly of a very short peptide, the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid diphenylalanine structural motif, into discrete and stiff nanotubes. Reduction of ionic silver within the nanotubes, followed by enzymatic degradation of the peptide backbone, resulted in the production of discrete nanowires with a

  8. New and Notable Self-Assembly in Vivo

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    . Of particular interest is the packing of the genetic material into a cell. In some cases a millimeter of DNA is that in equilibrium at cellular concen- trations the NCPs are in complex, self- assembled structures. Of course, the cell is far from equilibrium, but to un- derstand cellular structure it is neces- sary to first

  9. MICROACTUATED SELF-ASSEMBLING OF 3D POLYSILICON STRUCTURES

    E-print Network

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    (b) Elastic deformationby actuator The batch fabrication of integrated three-dimensional (3D a permanent 3D shape, plastic deformation of the beam is produced. A current resulting in Joule heatingMICROACTUATED SELF-ASSEMBLING OF 3D POLYSILICON STRUCTURES WITH RESHAPING TECHNOLOGY Y. Fukuta, D

  10. Engineering building blocks for self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Vázquez; Antonio Villaverde

    2010-01-01

    Like natural viruses, manmade protein cages for drug delivery are to be ideally formed by repetitive subunits with self-assembling properties, mimicking viral functions and molecular organization. Naturally formed nanostructures (such as viruses, flagella or simpler protein oligomers) can be engineered to acquire specific traits of interest in biomedicine, for instance through the addition of cell targeting agents for desired biodistribution

  11. Thermally and Photochemically Triggered Self-Assembly of Peptide Hydrogels

    E-print Network

    , 2001 Self-assembling systems present attractive platforms for engi- neering stimulus-responsive materials with controlled nano- and microstructures. Recent efforts to design such systems include synthetic by the strictly alternating hydrophobic-hydrophilic primary structure of the peptide, which positions all

  12. The Self-Made Puzzle: Integrating Self-Assembly and Pattern Formation Under Non-Random Genetic Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doursat, René

    On the one hand, research in self-assembling systems, whether natural or artificial, has traditionally focused on pre-existing components endowed with fixed shapes. Biological development, by contrast, dynamically creates new cells that acquire selective adhesion properties through differentiation induced by their neighborhood. On the other hand, pattern formation phenomena are generally construed as orderly states of activity on top of a continuous 2-D or 3-D substrate. Yet, again, the spontaneous patterning of an organism into domains of gene expression arises within a multicellular medium in perpetual expansion and reshaping. Finally, both phenomena are often thought in terms of stochastic events, whether mixed components that randomly collide in self-assembly, or spots and stripes that occur unpredictably from instabilities in pattern formation. Here too, these notions need significant revision if they are to be extended and applied to embryogenesis. Cells are not randomly mixed but pre-positioned where cell division occurs. Genetic identity domains are not randomly distributed but highly regulated in number and position. In this work, I present a computational model of program-mable and reproducible artificial morphogenesis that integrates self-assembly and pattern formation under the control of a nonrandom gene regulatory network. The specialized properties of cells (division, adhesion, migration) are determined by the gene expression domains to which they belong, while at the same time these domains further expand and segment into subdomains due to the self-assembly of specialized cells. Through this model, I also promote a new discipline, embryomorphic engineering to solve the paradox of "meta-designing" decentralized, autonomous systems.

  13. Nanostructured gene and drug delivery systems based on molecular self-assembly

    E-print Network

    Wood, Kris Cameron

    2007-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly describes the assembly of molecular components into complex, supramolecular structures governed by weak, non-covalent interactions. In recent years, molecular self-assembly has been used extensively ...

  14. Building polyhedra by self-assembly: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ryan; Klobušický, Joseph; Pandey, Shivendra; Gracias, David H; Menon, Govind

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the utility of a mathematical framework based on discrete geometry to model biological and synthetic self-assembly. Our primary biological example is the self-assembly of icosahedral viruses; our synthetic example is surface-tension-driven self-folding polyhedra. In both instances, the process of self-assembly is modeled by decomposing the polyhedron into a set of partially formed intermediate states. The set of all intermediates is called the configuration space, pathways of assembly are modeled as paths in the configuration space, and the kinetics and yield of assembly are modeled by rate equations, Markov chains, or cost functions on the configuration space. We review an interesting interplay between biological function and mathematical structure in viruses in light of this framework. We discuss in particular: (i) tiling theory as a coarse-grained description of all-atom models; (ii) the building game-a growth model for the formation of polyhedra; and (iii) the application of these models to the self-assembly of the bacteriophage MS2. We then use a similar framework to model self-folding polyhedra. We use a discrete folding algorithm to compute a configuration space that idealizes surface-tension-driven self-folding and analyze pathways of assembly and dominant intermediates. These computations are then compared with experimental observations of a self-folding dodecahedron with side 300 ?m. In both models, despite a combinatorial explosion in the size of the configuration space, a few pathways and intermediates dominate self-assembly. For self-folding polyhedra, the dominant intermediates have fewer degrees of freedom than comparable intermediates, and are thus more rigid. The concentration of assembly pathways on a few intermediates with distinguished geometric properties is biologically and physically important, and suggests deeper mathematical structure. PMID:25148546

  15. Functional Analysis of Light-harvesting-like Protein 3 (LIL3) and Its Light-harvesting Chlorophyll-binding Motif in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kaori; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tanaka, Ryouichi

    2014-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex (LHC) constitutes the major light-harvesting antenna of photosynthetic eukaryotes. LHC contains a characteristic sequence motif, termed LHC motif, consisting of 25–30 mostly hydrophobic amino acids. This motif is shared by a number of transmembrane proteins from oxygenic photoautotrophs that are termed light-harvesting-like (LIL) proteins. To gain insights into the functions of LIL proteins and their LHC motifs, we functionally characterized a plant LIL protein, LIL3. This protein has been shown previously to stabilize geranylgeranyl reductase (GGR), a key enzyme in phytol biosynthesis. It is hypothesized that LIL3 functions to anchor GGR to membranes. First, we conjugated the transmembrane domain of LIL3 or that of ascorbate peroxidase to GGR and expressed these chimeric proteins in an Arabidopsis mutant lacking LIL3 protein. As a result, the transgenic plants restored phytol-synthesizing activity. These results indicate that GGR is active as long as it is anchored to membranes, even in the absence of LIL3. Subsequently, we addressed the question why the LHC motif is conserved in the LIL3 sequences. We modified the transmembrane domain of LIL3, which contains the LHC motif, by substituting its conserved amino acids (Glu-171, Asn-174, and Asp-189) with alanine. As a result, the Arabidopsis transgenic plants partly recovered the phytol-biosynthesizing activity. However, in these transgenic plants, the LIL3-GGR complexes were partially dissociated. Collectively, these results indicate that the LHC motif of LIL3 is involved in the complex formation of LIL3 and GGR, which might contribute to the GGR reaction. PMID:24275650

  16. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Karoly; Marga, Francoise; Norotte, Cyrille; Murphy, Keith; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life, medical and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are being pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and lately bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore scaffolds populated with differentiated cells or stem cells of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, scaffolds, no matter how sophisticated they are, can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach is to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bioink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. PMID:20811127

  17. Self-assembling Nanostructures to Deliver Angiogenic Factors to Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Lesley W.; Wang, Ling-jia; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2010-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly of nanoscale filaments offers a vehicle to signal cells within dense cell aggregates such as pancreatic islets. We previously developed a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile (HBPA) that self-assembles into nanofiber gels at concentrations of 1% by weight when mixed with heparin and activates heparin-binding, angiogenic growth factors. We report here on the use of these molecules at concentrations 100 times lower to drive delivery of the nanofibers into the dense islet interior. Using fluorescent markers, HBPA molecules, heparin, and FGF2 were shown to be present in and on the surface of murine islets. The intraislet nanofibers were found to be necessary to retain FGF2 within the islet for 48 hours and to increase cell viability significantly for at least 7 days in culture. Furthermore, enhanced insulin secretion was observed with the nanofibers for 3 days in culture. Delivery of FGF2 and VEGF in conjunction with the HBPA/heparin nanofibers also induced a significant amount of islet endothelial cell sprouting from the islets into a peptide amphiphile 3-D matrix. We believe the infiltration of bioactive nanofibers in the interior of islets as an artificial ECM can improve cell viability and function in vitro and enhance their vascularization in the presence of growth factors such as FGF2 and VEGF. The approach described here may have significant impact on islet transplantation to treat type 1 diabetes. PMID:20552727

  18. Self-assembly and mineralization of genetically modifiable biological nanofibers driven by beta-structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cao, Binrui; George, Anne; Mao, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Bio-inspired mineralization is an innovative approach to the fabrication of bone biomaterials mimicking the natural bone. Bone mineral hydroxylapatite (HAP) is preferentially oriented with c-axis parallel to collagen fibers in natural bone. However, such orientation control is not easy to achieve in artificial bone biomaterials. To overcome the lack of such orientation control, we fabricated a phage-HAP composite by genetically engineering M13 phage, a non-toxic bio-nanofiber, with two HAP-nucleating peptides derived from one of the non-collagenous proteins, Dentin Matrix Protein-1 (DMP1). The phage is a biological nanofiber that can be mass produced by infecting bacteria and is non-toxic to human beings. The resultant HAP-nucleating phages are able to self-assemble into bundles by forming ?-structure between the peptides displayed on their side walls. The ?-structure further promotes the oriented nucleation and growth of HAP crystals within the nanofibrous phage bundles with their c-axis preferentially parallel to the bundles. We proposed that the preferred orientation resulted from the stereochemical matching between the negatively charged amino acid residues within the ?-structure and the positively charged calcium ions on the (001) plane of HAP crystals. The self-assembly and mineralization driven by the ?-structure formation represent a new route for fabricating mineralized fibers that can serve as building blocks in forming bone repair biomaterials and mimic the basic structure of natural bones. PMID:21520924

  19. Bimolecular based heparin and self-assembling hydrogel for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Muiños, Teresa; Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; López-Chicón, Patricia; Castells-Sala, Cristina; Mata, Alvaro; Semino, Carlos E

    2015-04-01

    One major goal of tissue engineering is to develop new biomaterials that are similar structurally and functionally to the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mimic natural cell environments. Recently, different types of biomaterials have been developed for tissue engineering applications. Among them, self-assembling peptides are attractive candidates to create artificial cellular niches, because their nanoscale network and biomechanical properties are similar to those of the natural ECM. Here, we describe the development of a new biomaterial for tissue engineering composed by a simple combination of the self-assembling peptide RAD16-I and heparin sodium salt. As a consequence of the presence of heparin moieties the material acquired enhances the capacity of specific binding and release of growth factors (GFs) with heparin binding affinity such as VEGF165. Promising results were obtained in the vascular tissue engineering area, where the new composite material supported the development of tubular-like structures within a three dimensional (3D) culture model. Moreover, the new scaffold enhances the cell survival and chondrogenic commitment of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). Interestingly, the expression of specific markers of mature cartilage tissue including collagen type II was confirmed by western blot and real-time PCR. Furthermore, positive staining for proteoglycans (PGs) indicated the synthesis of cartilage tissue ECM components. Finally, the constructs did not mineralize and exhibited mechanical properties of a tissue undergoing chondrogenesis. Altogether, these results suggest that the new composite is a promising "easy to prepare" material for different reparative and regenerative applications. PMID:25595471

  20. Algorithm for elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange based on DNA tile self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhen Cheng; Yufang Huang; Jin Xu

    2008-01-01

    DNA tile self-assembly is a promising paradigm for nanotechnology. Recently, many researches show that computation by DNA tile self-assembly maybe scalable. In this paper, we propose the algorithm for elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange based on DNA tile self-assembly. First we give the DNA tile self-assembly model to compute the scalar multiplication, then we can successfully implement the Diffie-Hellman key

  1. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter ?n) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  2. Heirarchical Self Assembly: Self Organized nano-structures in a nematically ordered matrix of self assembled polymeric chains

    E-print Network

    Shaikh Mubeena; Apratim Chatterji

    2014-12-04

    We report many different nano-structures which are formed when model nano-particles of different sizes (diameter {\\sigma} n ) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semi-flexible self assembled polymeric worm like micellar chains. The different nano-structures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nano-particles. The different mor- phologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nano-particles in the polymer ma- trix and, of course, the ratio of the size of self assembling nano-particles and self avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (non-equilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nano-structures. We observe rod-like structures of nano-particles which get self assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nano-particles and monomers, in which each crytal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the con- dition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nano-structures in the lab.

  3. Construction Of Micro- And Nanoporous Hydrogels Via Designed Diblock Copolypeptide Self-Assembly And Oligopeptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochan, Darrin; Deming, Tim; Schneider, Joel

    2002-03-01

    The design, synthesis, and self-assembly of polypeptides as synthetic materials that possess the ability to aggregate and/or “fold” into specifically defined, a priori designed, functional nanostructures is being pursued via two avenues. First, synthetic block copolypeptides will be discussed that are observed to form novel hydrogels with structural and biological properties tailorable by the choice of amino acid (and consequent secondary structure) in the respective blocks. Specifically ionic, amphiphilic diblocks have been designed for tissue engineering hydrogels on assembly in aqueous solution. A bicontinuous morphology is observed at both the nanoscale and microscale. Second, de novo designed oligopeptides that undergo specific folding events triggered by pH, preceding or concurrent with self-assembly, will be discussed. Specifically, the ability of small (20 amino acid residues) molecules to produce relatively very large (approximately 100 micron diameter) spheres and tubes in additino to hydrogels via a hierarchical self-assembly process will be discussed. The assembled oligopeptides have the added design attribute of being responsive to pH, unfolding/disassembling at pH below 6. Both classes of peptide-based self-assembled materials were characterized via laser scanning confocal and cryotransmission electron microscopy combined with small angle neutron and x-ray scattering.

  4. Self-assembled photosystem-I biophotovoltaics on nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Mershin, Andreas; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Kaiser, Liselotte; Yu, Daoyong; Vaughn, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md. K.; Bruce, Barry D.; Graetzel, Michael; Zhang, Shuguang

    2012-01-01

    The abundant pigment-protein membrane complex photosystem-I (PS-I) is at the heart of the Earth’s energy cycle. It is the central molecule in the “Z-scheme” of photosynthesis, converting sunlight into the chemical energy of life. Commandeering this intricately organized photosynthetic nanocircuitry and re-wiring it to produce electricity carries the promise of inexpensive and environmentally friendly solar power. We here report that dry PS-I stabilized by surfactant peptides functioned as both the light-harvester and charge separator in solar cells self-assembled on nanostructured semiconductors. Contrary to previous attempts at biophotovoltaics requiring elaborate surface chemistries, thin film deposition, and illumination concentrated into narrow wavelength ranges the devices described here are straightforward and inexpensive to fabricate and perform well under standard sunlight yielding open circuit photovoltage of 0.5?V, fill factor of 71%, electrical power density of 81?µW/cm2 and photocurrent density of 362?µA/cm2, over four orders of magnitude higher than any photosystem-based biophotovoltaic to date. PMID:22355747

  5. Chin. Phys. B Vol. 20, No. 9 (2011) 096401 Self-assembly and growth of manganese

    E-print Network

    Gao, Hongjun

    Chin. Phys. B Vol. 20, No. 9 (2011) 096401 Self-assembly and growth of manganese phthalocyanine manuscript received 25 May 2011) Self-assembly and growth of manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecules islands with second and third layers are observed. Keywords: self-assembly, manganese phthalocyanine

  6. Chromatic Studies of a Polymerizable Diacetylene Hydrogen Bonding Self-Assembly: A "Self-Folding" Process

    E-print Network

    Rusell, K.C.

    and crystal engineering.1 As one notable example, the complementary hydrogen bonding self-assembly betweenChromatic Studies of a Polymerizable Diacetylene Hydrogen Bonding Self-Assembly: A "Self diacetylene compound (PDATAZ), which readily forms a complementary hydrogen bonding self-assembly at the air

  7. Novel trimethyl lock based enzyme switch for the self-assembly and disassembly of gold nanoparticlesw

    E-print Network

    Xing, Bengang

    Novel trimethyl lock based enzyme switch for the self-assembly and disassembly of gold-responsive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugate was developed to control the self-assembly and disassembly of Au and surface enhanced Raman scatter- ing (SERS) measurements. The programmed self-assembly of gold

  8. DNA-BASED SELF-ASSEMBLY AND NANOROBOTICS: THEORY AND EXPERIMENTS

    E-print Network

    Reif, John H.

    DNA-BASED SELF-ASSEMBLY AND NANOROBOTICS: THEORY AND EXPERIMENTS by Sudheer Sahu Department School of Duke University 2007 #12;ABSTRACT DNA-BASED SELF-ASSEMBLY AND NANOROBOTICS: THEORY-assembly and nanorobotics: How to control errors in self-assembly? How to construct complex nanoscale objects in simpler

  9. Hydrotropic salt promotes anionic surfactant self-assembly into vesicles and ultralong fibers

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianbin

    Hydrotropic salt promotes anionic surfactant self-assembly into vesicles and ultralong fibers November 2011 Available online 6 December 2011 Keywords: Surfactant self-assembly Hydrotropic salt Fiber and functional nanoarchitec- tures. In this work, the self-assembly behavior of an anionic surfactant (sodium

  10. Development of self-assembling nanowires containing electronically active oligothiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wei-Wen

    This dissertation discusses the development of conductive one-dimensional nanowires from self-assembling oligothiophene molecules. Self-assembly has been demonstrated to be a promising alternative approach towards high performance, solution processable, and low-cost organic electronics. One of the many challenges in this field is the control of supramolecular morphologies of ordered structures containing pi-conjugated moieties. This research demonstrated several successful strategies to achieve self assembly of conductive nanowires using synergistic interactions combining pi stacking and hydrogen bonding. The first approach used was to develop a hairpin-shaped sexithiophene molecule, which features two arms of the conjugated structure. The diamidocyclohexyl headgroup of this molecule successfully directs the self-assembly from hydrogen bonding among the amides, forming high-aspect-ratio one-dimensional nanowires with well-defined diameters of 3.0 +/- 0.3 nm. The molecular orientation in the nanostructures promotes formation of sexithiophene H and J aggregates that facilitate efficient charge transport. Organic field-effect transistors were fabricated to reveal improved intrinsic hole mobility from films of the nanostructures, 3.46 x 10-6 cm2V-1s-1, which is one order of magnitude higher than films cast from unassembled molecules. Bulk heterojunction solar cells were developed from this molecule and fullerenes utilizing solution-phase fabrication methods. Intimate mix of the molecule and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester creates structured interfaces for efficient exciton splitting. The charge carrier mobilities of each material are improved by self-assembly in solution and thermal-energy assisted phase separation.The photovoltaic devices achieved the highest open-circuit voltage of 0.62 V, short-circuit current of 1.79 mA/cm2, fill factor of 35%, and power conversion efficiency of 0.48%. Another strategy to one-dimensional nanowires studied here involved the modification of a class of peptide lipids. The tripeptide segments in the molecular structure promote beta-sheet formation in nonpolar organic solvents, which is the main driving force for their self-assembly into 1D nanowires. Left-handed helical nanowires were formed with diameters of 8.9 nm and pitches between 50--150 nm. Substitutions of oligothiophenes lead to unprecedented supercoiling phenomena manifested as the transformation from helical to coiled or curved nanowires. We proposed that the curving of the nanowires is the consequence of relaxation from torsionally strained nanohelices, a process similar to supercoiling of strained DNA double helix. This process is governed by the mismatch in intermolecular distances required for peptide beta-sheets vs. pi-pi interactions of the conjugated segments decorating the periphery of the nanowires. Circular dichroism revealed helical arrangements of the conjugated moieties in these peptide lipids manifesting supercoiling phenomena. Peptide lipids without helical arrangement of the conjugated segments only exhibit helical morphologies. The self-assembly process of peptide lipids also leads to hierarchical assemblies of energetically favored single, double, and triple-helical nanostructures with well-defined dimensions. Self-assembled nanowires from oligothiophene-substituted peptide lipids revealed increased conductivity of 1.39--1.41 x 10-5 S/cm, two orders of magnitude higher than unassembled films and one order of magnitude higher than unsubstituted peptide lipids. The role of the primary beta-helix in controlling supramolecular organization was investigated by varying the chirality of the tripeptide segments, GAA. Four diastereomers of a peptide lipid substituted with p-toluene carboxylates were compared using L or D-alanines. Molecules with all L residues self-assemble into left-handed helical nanofibers with a pitch of 160 +/- 30 nm. Substitution of one or two D-alanines leads to assemblies of cylindrical nanofibers without any twisting, left-handed helices with smaller pitches (40 +/- 6 nm), or aggregates with

  11. A simple artificial light-harvesting dyad as a model for excess energy dissipation in

    E-print Network

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    photosynthesis Rudi Berera , Christian Herrero , Ivo H. M. van Stokkum , Mikas Vengris , Gerdenis Kodis , Rodrigo and Center for the Study of Early Events in Photosynthesis, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 length of the carotenoid is critical to the quenching process. Remarkably, the addition of only one

  12. Versatile bisethynyl[60]fulleropyrrolidine scaffolds for mimicking artificial light-harvesting photoreaction centers.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Adrian; Bietlot, Emerance; Zanelli, Alberto; Malicka, Joanna M; Armaroli, Nicola; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-01-12

    Fullerene-based tetrads, triads, and dyads are presented in which [60]fulleropyrrolidine synthons are linked to an oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) antenna at the nitrogen atom and to electron-donor phenothiazine (PTZ) and/or ferrocene (Fc) moieties at the ? carbon of the pyrrolidine cycle through an acetylene spacer. Cyclic voltammetry and UV/ Vis absorption spectra evidence negligible ground-state electronic interactions among the subunits. By contrast, strong excited-state interactions are detected upon selective light irradiation of the antenna (UV) or of the fullerene scaffold (Vis). When only PTZ is present as electron donor, photoinduced electron transfer to the fullerene unit is unambiguously detected in benzonitrile, but this is not the case when Fc is part of the multicomponent system. These results suggest that Fc is a formidable energy transfer quencher and caution should be used in choosing it as electron donor to promote efficient charge separation in multicomponent arrays. PMID:25418041

  13. Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Self-assembled drug delivery systems 1. Properties and in vitro\\/in vivo behavior of acyclovir self-assembled nanoparticles (SAN)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiguang Jin; Miao Li; Xinpu Hou

    Self-assembled drug delivery systems (SADDS) were designed in the paper. They can be prepared from the amphiphilic conjugates of hydrophilic drugs and lipids through self-assembling into small-scale aggregates in aqueous media. The outstanding characteristic of SADDS is that they are nearly wholly composed of amphiphilic prodrugs. The self-assembled nanoparticles (SAN) as one of SADDS had been prepared from the lipid

  14. Predicting supramolecular self-assembly on reconstructed metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Thomas J.; Barrena, Esther; Ocal, Carmen; Faraudo, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The prediction of supramolecular self-assembly onto solid surfaces is still challenging in many situations of interest for nanoscience. In particular, no previous simulation approach has been capable to simulate large self-assembly patterns of organic molecules over reconstructed surfaces (which have periodicities over large distances) due to the large number of surface atoms and adsorbing molecules involved. Using a novel simulation technique, we report here large scale simulations of the self-assembly patterns of an organic molecule (DIP) over different reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. We show that on particular reconstructions, the molecule-molecule interactions are enhanced in a way that long-range order is promoted. Also, the presence of a distortion in a reconstructed surface pattern not only induces the presence of long-range order but also is able to drive the organization of DIP into two coexisting homochiral domains, in quantitative agreement with STM experiments. On the other hand, only short range order is obtained in other reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. The simulation strategy opens interesting perspectives to tune the supramolecular structure by simulation design and surface engineering if choosing the right molecular building blocks and stabilising the chosen reconstruction pattern.The prediction of supramolecular self-assembly onto solid surfaces is still challenging in many situations of interest for nanoscience. In particular, no previous simulation approach has been capable to simulate large self-assembly patterns of organic molecules over reconstructed surfaces (which have periodicities over large distances) due to the large number of surface atoms and adsorbing molecules involved. Using a novel simulation technique, we report here large scale simulations of the self-assembly patterns of an organic molecule (DIP) over different reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. We show that on particular reconstructions, the molecule-molecule interactions are enhanced in a way that long-range order is promoted. Also, the presence of a distortion in a reconstructed surface pattern not only induces the presence of long-range order but also is able to drive the organization of DIP into two coexisting homochiral domains, in quantitative agreement with STM experiments. On the other hand, only short range order is obtained in other reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. The simulation strategy opens interesting perspectives to tune the supramolecular structure by simulation design and surface engineering if choosing the right molecular building blocks and stabilising the chosen reconstruction pattern. GA image adapted from refs: (a) Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2001, 3, 3399-3404, with permission from the PCCP Owner Societies, and (b) J. Phys. Chem. C, 2008, 112 (18), 7168-7172, reprinted with permission from the American Chemical Society, copyright © 2008.

  15. Energy transfer in an LH4-like light harvesting complex from the aerobic purple photosynthetic bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Fuciman, Marcel; Frank, Harry A; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A peripheral light-harvesting complex from the aerobic purple bacterium Roseobacter (R.) denitrificans was purified and its photophysical properties characterized. The complex contains two types of pigments, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and the carotenoid (Car) spheroidenone and possesses unique spectroscopic properties. It appears to lack the B850 bacteriochlorophyll a Q{sub y} band that is typical for similar light-harvesting complex 2 antennas. Circular dichroism and low temperature steady-state absorption spectroscopy revealed that the B850 band is present but is shifted significantly to shorter wavelengths and overlaps with the B800 band at room temperature. Such a spectral signature classifies this protein as a member of the light-harvesting complex 4 class of peripheral light-harvesting complexes, along with the previously known light-harvesting complex 4 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The influence of the spectral change on the light-harvesting ability was studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, femtosecond and microsecond time-resolved absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The results were compared to the properties of the similar (in pigment composition) light-harvesting complex 2 from aerobically grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides and are understood within the context of shared similarities and differences and the putative influence of the pigments on the protein structure and its properties.

  16. Intramolecular energy transfer with butadiyne-linked chlorophyll and porphyrin dimer-faced, self-assembled prisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R. F.; Lee, S. J.; Wilson, T. M.; Nakamura, Y.; Tiede, D. M.; Osuka, A.; Hupp, J. T.; Wasielewski, M. R.; SUF-USR; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.; Kyoto Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of butadiyne-linked chlorophyll and porphyrin dimers in toluene solution and in several self-assembled prismatic structures are described. The butadiyne linkage between the 20-positions of the macrocycles results in new electronic transitions polarized along the long axes of the dimers. These transitions greatly increase the ability of these dimers to absorb the solar spectrum over a broad wavelength range. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy reveals the relative rate of rotation of the macrocycles around the butadiyne bond joining them. Following addition of 3-fold symmetric, metal-coordinating ligands, both macrocyclic dimers self-assemble into prismatic structures in which the dimers comprise the faces of the prisms. These structures were confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering experiments in solution using a synchrotron source. Photoexcitation of the prismatic assemblies reveals that efficient, through-space energy transfer occurs between the macrocyclic dimers within the prisms. The distance dependence of energy transfer between the faces of the prisms was observed by varying the size of the prismatic assemblies through the use of 3-fold symmetric ligands having arms with different lengths. These results show that self-assembly of discrete macrocyclic prisms provides a useful new strategy for controlling singlet exciton flow in antenna systems for artificial photosynthesis and solar cell applications.

  17. MALDI-TOF MS sample preparation by using alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyan, Yu-Chang; Yang, Ming-Hui; Liao, Pao-Chi; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Ming-Chen; Grunze, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Samples originating from body fluids often contain a complex mixture of inorganic salts, buffers, chaotropic agents, surfactant/detergents, preservatives, and other solubilizing agents. The presence of those contaminants often precludes direct analysis by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on coinage metal can provide versatile modeling systems for studies of interfacial electron transfer, biological interactions, molecular recognition and other interfacial phenomena. In this study, SAMs surface was used for MALDI-TOF MS sample cleanup application. Experimental results from MALDI-TOF MS have revealed the better S/N ratio and resolution of using functionalized SAMs surface for the demonstration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in artificial human urine sample. This paper reports a surface modification and cleanup method that greatly simplifies this sample preparation process.

  18. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  19. A New Form of Chlorophyll c Involved in Light-Harvesting 1

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, Marvin W.

    1989-01-01

    A new form of chlorophyll c has been isolated from the pyrmnesiophyte Pavlova gyrans Butcher. This pigment is spectrally similar to chlorophyll c2, but all the absorption maxima (454, 583, and 630 nm in diethyl ether) are shifted 4 to 6 nanometers to longer wavelengths. The new pigment can be separated from other chlorophyll c-type pigments by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography. Both chlorophylls c1 and c2 are found with the new chlorophyll c pigment in P. gyrans, and it has also been detected in the chrysophyte Synura petersenii Korsh. The light-harvesting function of the new chlorophyll c pigment is indicated by its presence along with chlorophyll c1 and c2 in a light-harvesting pigment-protein complex isolated from P. gyrans in which chlorophyll c pigments efficiently transfer absorbed light energy to chlorophyll a. PMID:16667093

  20. Self-Assembly: Nature's Way to Do It

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Biology operates at two levels: the large scale which we can see and the underlying microscopic one. This video lecture describes how intermolecular forces cause protein arrays to self-assemble, enabling nature to fabricate the large scale components of living systems. The lecturer explains how scale, forces and information cooperate to form complex structures. There are demonstrations of gravity, surface tension and capillary forces assembling materials, as well as experiments producing thin films from a ferritin solution. The presenter introduces his Protein Array Project, which attempts to fabricate thin hexagonal lattice films by imitating the beauty and utility of nature. Links to resources on self-assembly and nanotechnology are provided. The lecture is 58 minutes in length.

  1. Self-assembly of amorphous calcium carbonate microlens arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubock; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Masic, Admir; Kommareddy, Krishna P.; Bennet, Mathieu; Manjubala, Inderchand; Lee, Seung-Woo; Park, Seung B.; Cölfen, Helmut; Fratzl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Biological materials are often based on simple constituents and grown by the principle of self-assembly under ambient conditions. In particular, biomineralization approaches exploit efficient pathways of inorganic material synthesis. There is still a large gap between the complexity of natural systems and the practical utilization of bioinspired formation mechanisms. Here we describe a simple self-assembly route leading to a CaCO3 microlens array, somewhat reminiscent of the brittlestars' microlenses, with uniform size and focal length, by using a minimum number of components and equipment at ambient conditions. The formation mechanism of the amorphous CaCO3 microlens arrays was elucidated by confocal Raman spectroscopic imaging to be a two-step growth process mediated by the organic surfactant. CaCO3 microlens arrays are easy to fabricate, biocompatible and functional in amorphous or more stable crystalline forms. This shows that advanced optical materials can be generated by a simple mineral precipitation. PMID:22395616

  2. Self-assembled porous media from particle-stabilized emulsions

    E-print Network

    Frijters, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism to create self-assembled porous media with highly tunable geometrical properties and permeabilities: We first allow a particle-stabilized emulsion to form from a mixture of two fluids and colloidal particles. Then, either one fluid phase or the particle layer is solidified, which can be achieved by techniques such as polymerization or freezing. Based on computer simulations we demonstrate that modifying only the particle wettability or concentration results in porous structures with a wide range of pore sizes and a permeability that can be varied by up to three orders of magnitude. We then discuss optimization of these properties for self-assembled filters or reactors and conclude that structures based on so-called "bijels" are most suitable candidates.

  3. Programmed self-assembly of a quadruplex DNA nanowire.

    PubMed

    Hessari, Nason Ma'ani; Spindler, Lea; Troha, Tinkara; Lam, Wan-Chi; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; da Silva, Mateus Webba

    2014-03-24

    The ability to produce, reproducibly and systematically, well-defined quadruplex DNA nanowires through controlled rational design is poorly understood despite potential utility in structural nanotechnology. The programmed hierarchical self-assembly of a long four-stranded DNA nanowire through cohesive self-assembly of GpC and CpG "sticky" ends is reported. The encoding of bases within the quadruplex stem allows for an uninterrupted ?-stacking system with rectilinear propagation for hundreds of nanometers in length. The wire is mechanically stable and features superior nuclease resistance to double-stranded DNA. The study indicates the feasibility for programmed assembly of uninterrupted quadruplex DNA nanowires. This is fundamental to the systematic investigation of well-defined DNA nanostructures for uses in optoelectronic and electronic devices as well as other structural nanotechnology applications. PMID:24615753

  4. Mixed self-assembled monolayers in chemical separations.

    PubMed

    Wirth, M J; Fairbank, R W; Fatunmbi, H O

    1997-01-01

    Chemical separations of many biomolecules and pharmaceuticals are limited by their electrostatic interaction with the surfaces of the separation medium. Mixed self-assembled monolayers of octadecyl and methyl chains organize into a dense, two-dimensionally cross-linked network over the chromatographic silica surface to reduce acid dissociation of the surface silanols. Molecular models predict that two-dimensional cross-linking is sterically possible for pure methylsiloxane monolayers, silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements show that cross-linking predominates for mixed monolayers of primarily methylsiloxane, and chromatographic measurements confirm that electrostatic interactions are reduced when the monolayer is primarily methylsiloxane. Chromatographic separation of genetic variants of a highly charged protein, cytochrome c, demonstrates the promise of self-assembled monolayers in separations of biomolecules. PMID:8974384

  5. Self-assembled liquid-crystal microlasers, microresonators, and microfibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muševi?, I.; Peng, Huang; Nikkhou, M.; Humar, M.

    2014-03-01

    When liquid crystals are dispersed in an immiscible fluid, microdroplets of liquid crystal are spontaneously formed in a fraction of a second. They have optically anisotropic internal structure, which is determined by the ordering of liquid crystal molecules at the interface. Spherical droplets of a nematic liquid crystal can function as whispering-gallery-mode microresonators with an unprecedented width of wavelength tunability by an electric field. WGM pulsed lasing in dyedoped nematic microdroplets is sensitive to strain, temperature and presence of molecules that change molecular orientation at the interface. Omnidirectional 3D lasing was demonstrated in droplets of chiral nematic liquid crystals that form 3D Bragg-onion resonators. We present recent progress in this field, including electric tuning of 3D lasing from chiral nematic droplets and self-assembly of ferroelectric smectic-C* microdroplets with the onion-Bragg structure. We show that anisotropic fibres could be self-assembled from smectic liquid crystals.

  6. Self-Assembly of Graphene on Carbon Nanotube Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD. PMID:23912638

  7. Electrostatic Control of Structure in Self-Assembled Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Ronit; Chow, Lesley W.; Zha, R. Helen; Velichko, Yuri S.; Pashuck, E. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs) can form hierarchically ordered membranes when brought in contact with aqueous polyelectrolytes of the opposite charge by rapidly creating a diffusion barrier composed of filamentous nanostructures parallel to the plane of the incipient membrane. Following this event, osmotic forces and charge complexation template nanofiber growth perpendicular to the plane of the membrane in a dynamic self-assembly process. In this work, we show that this hierarchical structure requires strong interactions between PA molecules and polyelectrolyte molecules, suggesting the importance of rapid diffusion barrier formation. Strong interactions are introduced here through the use of heparin-binding PAs with heparin and also with polyelectrolytes of varying charge density. Small angle x-ray scattering shows that in the case of weak PA-polyelectrolyte interaction, membranes formed display a cubic phase ordering on the nanoscale that likely results from clusters of PA nanostructures surrounded by polyelectrolyte chains. PMID:24022896

  8. Self-assembly and semiconductivity of an oligothiophene supergelator.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Pampa; Ghosh, Suhrit; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Patwardhan, Sameer; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Würthner, Frank

    2010-01-01

    A bis(trialkoxybenzamide)-functionalized quaterthiophene derivative was synthesized and its self-assembly properties in solution were studied. In non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane, this quaterthiophene ?-system formed fibril aggregates with an H-type molecular arrangement due to synergistic effect of hydrogen bonding and ?-stacking. The self-assembled fibres were found to gelate numerous organic solvents of diverse polarity. The charge transport ability of such elongated fibres of quaterthiophene ?-system was explored by the pulse radiolysis time resolved microwave conductivity (PR-TRMC) technique and moderate mobility values were obtained. Furthermore, initial AFM and UV-vis spectroscopic studies of a mixture of our electron-rich quaterthiophene derivative with the electron acceptor [6,6]-phenyl-C??-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) revealed a nanoscale segregated assembly of the individual building blocks in the blend. PMID:21160557

  9. Self-assembly and semiconductivity of an oligothiophene supergelator

    PubMed Central

    Pratihar, Pampa; Ghosh, Suhrit; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Patwardhan, Sameer; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2010-01-01

    Summary A bis(trialkoxybenzamide)-functionalized quaterthiophene derivative was synthesized and its self-assembly properties in solution were studied. In non-polar solvents such as cyclohexane, this quaterthiophene ?-system formed fibril aggregates with an H-type molecular arrangement due to synergistic effect of hydrogen bonding and ?-stacking. The self-assembled fibres were found to gelate numerous organic solvents of diverse polarity. The charge transport ability of such elongated fibres of quaterthiophene ?-system was explored by the pulse radiolysis time resolved microwave conductivity (PR-TRMC) technique and moderate mobility values were obtained. Furthermore, initial AFM and UV-vis spectroscopic studies of a mixture of our electron-rich quaterthiophene derivative with the electron acceptor [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) revealed a nanoscale segregated assembly of the individual building blocks in the blend. PMID:21160557

  10. A Bioactive Self-assembled Membrane to Promote Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Lesley W.; Bitton, Ronit; Webber, Matthew J.; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth R.; Sharma, Arun K.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the formation of a bioactive hierarchically structured membrane by self-assembly. The membrane is formed with hyaluronic acid and peptide amphiphiles with binding affinity for heparin, and its hierarchical structure contains both an amorphous zone and a layer of fibrils oriented perpendicular to the membrane plane. The design of bioactivity is based on the potential ability to bind and slowly release heparin-binding growth factors. Human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on these membranes attached and remained viable. Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were incorporated within the membrane structure prior to self-assembly and released into media over a prolonged period of time (14 days). Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, we also found that these membranes induced a significant and rapid enhancement of angiogenesis relative to controls. PMID:21093042

  11. Self-reproduction of nanoparticles through synergistic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2015-01-13

    We describe a self-reproduction mechanism of nanometer-sized particles (i.e., nanodiscs) through chemical ligation of the precursors and self-assembly of the building blocks. The ligation reaction was accelerated on lipid bilayer surfaces, and the products spontaneously assembled into nanodiscs with lipid molecules. With the increase in the number of nanodiscs, a rapid proliferation of the nanodiscs occurred through the spatial rearrangements of the molecules between the pre-existing nanodiscs and the unreacted materials, rather than template- or complex-enhanced ligation of the precursors. The subsequent process of surface-enhanced ligation of integrated precursors matured the nanoparticles into identical copies of the pre-existing assembly. Our study showed that the synergistic self-assembly mechanism probably underlie the self-replication principles for heterogeneous multimolecular systems. PMID:25541673

  12. Self-Assembly of Graphene on Carbon Nanotube Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-08-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD.

  13. Biomolecular decision-making process for self assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2005-01-01

    The brain is often identified with decision-making processes in the biological world. In fact, single cells, single macromolecules (proteins) and populations of molecules also make simple decisions. These decision processes are essential to survival and to the biological self-assembly and self-repair processes that we seek to emulate. How do these tiny systems make effective decisions? How do they make decisions in concert with a cooperative network of other molecules or cells? How can we emulate the decision-making behaviors of small-scale biological systems to program and self-assemble microsystems? This LDRD supported research to answer these questions. Our work included modeling and simulation of protein populations to help us understand, mimic, and categorize molecular decision-making mechanisms that nonequilibrium systems can exhibit. This work is an early step towards mimicking such nanoscale and microscale biomolecular decision-making processes in inorganic systems.

  14. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  15. DNA Self-Assembly: From Chirality to Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, Youri

    2013-01-01

    Transient or long-term DNA self-assembly participates in essential genetic functions. The present review focuses on tight DNA-DNA interactions that have recently been found to play important roles in both controlling DNA higher-order structures and their topology. Due to their chirality, double helices are tightly packed into stable right-handed crossovers. Simple packing rules that are imposed by DNA geometry and sequence dictate the overall architecture of higher order DNA structures. Close DNA-DNA interactions also provide the missing link between local interactions and DNA topology, thus explaining how type II DNA topoisomerases may sense locally the global topology. Finally this paper proposes that through its influence on DNA self-assembled structures, DNA chirality played a critical role during the early steps of evolution. PMID:23591841

  16. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V., E-mail: podzorov@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices for Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A. [Department of Physics and NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (?100?cm{sup 2}V{sup ?1}s{sup ?1}). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ?1.8?×?10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?2}. We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  17. Electrostatic control of structure in self-assembled membranes.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Ronit; Chow, Lesley W; Zha, R Helen; Velichko, Yuri S; Pashuck, E Thomas; Stupp, Samuel I

    2014-02-12

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs) can form hierarchically ordered membranes when brought in contact with aqueous polyelectrolytes of the opposite charge by rapidly creating a diffusion barrier composed of filamentous nanostructures parallel to the plane of the incipient membrane. Following this event, osmotic forces and charge complexation template nanofiber growth perpendicular to the plane of the membrane in a dynamic self-assembly process. In this work, we show that this hierarchical structure requires massive interfacial aggregation of PA molecules, suggesting the importance of rapid diffusion barrier formation. Strong PA aggregation is induced here through the use of heparin-binding PAs with heparin and also with polyelectrolytes of varying charge density. Small angle X-ray scattering shows that in the case of weak PA-polyelectrolyte interaction, membranes formed display a cubic phase ordering on the nanoscale that likely results from clusters of PA nanostructures surrounded by polyelectrolyte chains. PMID:24022896

  18. Self-assembling enzymes and the origins of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael; Gitai, Zemer

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial cytoskeleton is composed of a complex and diverse group of proteins that self-assemble into linear filaments. These filaments support and organize cellular architecture and provide a dynamic network controlling transport and localization within the cell. Here, we review recent discoveries related to a newly appreciated class of self-assembling proteins that expand our view of the bacterial cytoskeleton and provide potential explanations for its evolutionary origins. Specifically, several types of metabolic enzymes can form structures similar to established cytoskeletal filaments and, in some cases, these structures have been repurposed for structural uses independent of their normal role. The behaviors of these enzymes suggest that some modern cytoskeletal proteins may have evolved from dual-role proteins with catalytic and structural functions. PMID:22014508

  19. Synthesis of perylene-porphyrin building blocks and polymers thereof for the production of light-harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Loewe, Robert S.; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2005-07-12

    The present invention provides methods, compounds, and compositions for the synthesis of light harvesting arrays, such arrays comprising: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to said first electrode, each of said light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: wherein m is at least 1; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores. At least one of X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 has at least one perylene group coupled thereto.

  20. Reinforcement of Shear Thinning Protein Hydrogels by Responsive Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, Matthew J.; Chan, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Shear thinning hydrogels are promising materials that exhibit rapid self-healing following the cessation of shear, making them attractive for a variety of applications including injectable biomaterials. In this work, self-assembly is demonstrated as a strategy to introduce a reinforcing network within shear thinning artificially engineered protein gels, enabling a responsive transition from an injectable state at low temperatures with a low yield stress to a stiffened state at physiological temperatures with resistance to shear thinning, higher toughness, and reduced erosion rates and creep compliance. Protein-polymer triblock copolymers capable of the responsive self-assembly of two orthogonal networks have been synthesized by conjugating poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to the N- and C- termini of a protein midblock decorated with coiled-coil self-associating domains. Midblock association forms a shear-thinning network, while endblock aggregation at elevated temperatures introduces a second, independent physical network into the protein hydrogel. These new, reversible crosslinks introduce extremely long relaxation times and lead to a five-fold increase in the elastic modulus, significantly larger than is expected from transient network theory. Thermoresponsive reinforcement reduces the high temperature creep compliance by over four orders of magnitude, decreases the erosion rate by at least a factor of five, and increases the yield stress by up to a factor of seven. The reinforced hydrogels also exhibit enhanced resistance to plastic deformation and failure in uniaxial compression. Combined with the demonstrated potential of shear thinning artificial protein hydrogels for various uses, including the minimally-invasive implantation of bioactive scaffolds, this reinforcement mechanism broadens the range of applications that can be addressed with shear-thinning physical gels. PMID:25568642

  1. Involvement of the light-harvesting complex in cation regulation of excitation energy distribution in chloroplasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Burke; C. L. Ditto; C. J. Arntzen

    1978-01-01

    A highly purified light-harvesting pigment--protein complex (LHC) was obtained by fractionation of cation-depleted chloroplast membranes using the nonionic detergent, Triton X-100. The isolated LHC had a chlorophyll a\\/b ratio of 1.2 and exhibited no photochemical activity. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the LHC revealed three polypeptides in the molecular weight classes of 23, 25, and 30 x 10³. Antibodies were prepared

  2. Atomistic mechanisms of rapid energy transport in light-harvesting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Koga, Shiro; Akai, Ichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic supermolecules such as ?-conjugated light-harvesting dendrimers efficiently harvest energy from sunlight, which is of significant importance for the global energy problem. Key to their success is rapid transport of electronic excitation energy from peripheral antennas to photochemical reaction cores, the atomistic mechanisms of which remains elusive. Here, quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals the key molecular motion that significantly accelerates the energy transport based on the Dexter mechanism.

  3. Atomistic mechanisms of rapid energy transport in light-harvesting molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Koga, Shiro; Akai, Ichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic supermolecules such as ?-conjugated light-harvesting dendrimers efficiently harvest energy from sunlight, which is of significant importance for the global energy problem. Key to their success is rapid transport of electronic excitation energy from peripheral antennas to photochemical reaction cores, the atomistic mechanisms of which remains elusive. Here, quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals the key molecular motion that significantly accelerates the energy transport based on the Dexter mechanism.

  4. Atomic model of plant light-harvesting complex by electron crystallography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Werner Kühlbrandt; Da Neng Wang; Yoshinori Fujiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a\\/b-protein complex, an integral membrane protein, has been determined at 3.4 Å resolution by electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals. Two of the three membrane-spanning alpha-helices are held together by ion pairs formed by charged residues that also serve as chlorophyll ligands. In the centre of the complex, chlorophyll a is in close contact with

  5. Excitation energy transfer and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes — A theoretical perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Wormit; Philipp H. P. Harbach; Jan M. Mewes; Sergiu Amarie; Josef Wachtveitl; Andreas Dreuw

    2009-01-01

    Light harvesting complexes have been identified in all chlorophyll-based photosynthetic organisms. Their major function is the absorption of light and its transport to the reaction centers, however, they are also involved in excess energy quenching, the so-called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In particular, electron transfer and the resulting formation of carotenoid radical cations have recently been discovered to play an important

  6. A thioredoxin-like/?-propeller protein maintains the efficiency of light harvesting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Matthew D.; Sylak-Glassman, Emily J.; Fleming, Graham R.; Niyogi, Krishna K.

    2013-01-01

    The light-harvesting complexes of plants have evolved the ability to switch between efficient light harvesting and quenching forms to optimize photosynthesis in response to the environment. Several distinct mechanisms, collectively termed “nonphotochemical quenching” (NPQ), provide flexibility in this response. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a mutant, suppressor of quenching 1 (soq1), that has high NPQ even in the absence of photosystem II subunit S (PsbS), a protein that is necessary for the rapidly reversible component of NPQ. The formation of NPQ in soq1 was light intensity-dependent, and it exhibited slow relaxation kinetics and other characteristics that distinguish it from known NPQ components. Treatment with chemical inhibitors or an uncoupler, as well as crosses to mutants known to affect other NPQ components, showed that the NPQ in soq1 does not require a transthylakoid pH gradient, zeaxanthin formation, or the phosphorylation of light-harvesting complexes, and it appears to be unrelated to the photosystem II damage-and-repair cycle. Measurements of pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence lifetimes indicated that the additional NPQ in soq1 is the result of a decrease in chlorophyll excited-state lifetime and not pigment bleaching. The SOQ1 gene was isolated by map-based cloning, and it encodes a previously uncharacterized thylakoid membrane protein with thioredoxin-like and ?-propeller domains located in the lumen and a haloacid-dehalogenase domain exposed to the chloroplast stroma. We propose that the role of SOQ1 is to prevent formation of a slowly reversible form of antenna quenching, thereby maintaining the efficiency of light harvesting. PMID:23818601

  7. Self-assembly of phenylalanine-based molecules.

    PubMed

    German, Helen W; Uyaver, Sahin; Hansmann, And Ulrich H E

    2015-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we study the self-assembly of phenylalanine with charged end-groups at various temperatures and concentrations. As in the case of diphenylalanine, we observe the formation of nanotubes; however, phenylalanine aggregates in layers of four, not six, molecules. The observed aggregates are consistent with recent experimental measurements of fibrils obtained from mice with phenylketonuria. We investigate the stability and the mechanism by which these tubular structures form and discuss potential toxicity mechanisms. PMID:25347763

  8. Self-assembly of condensed actin rod phases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerard C. L. Wong

    2000-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phase behavior, structure, and governing interactions in a novel class of high-order biomolecular self-assemblies, where new condensed phases of cytoskeletal biopolymers are formed through their interactions with oppositely charged ions of varying complexity. Intuitively, two like-charged macromolecules in aqueous solution are expected to repel one another, which is essentially the prediction of prevailing mean-field

  9. Bicontinuous Surfaces in Self-assembling Amphiphilic Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Schwarz; Gerhard Gompper

    2002-01-01

    Amphiphiles are molecules which have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts. In water- and\\/or oil-like solvent, they self-assemble\\u000a into extended sheet-like structures due to the hydrophobic effect. The free energy of an amphiphilic system can be written\\u000a as a functional of its interfacial geometry, and phase diagrams can be calculated by comparing the free energies following\\u000a from different geometries. Here we

  10. Bose–Einstein-like statistics of amphiphilic self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Varela; V. Fuentes; M. García; O. Cabeza; J. R. Rodríguez

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, we formulate a statistical mechanical framework of amphiphilic self-assembly that allows a proper understanding of surfactant self-association processes on the basis of an occupation number formalism. In this model, amphiphilic molecules in solution can occupy different levels of well-defined energies corresponding to aggregates of different aggregation numbers. Due to its definition, the occupation number of a

  11. Applications of molecular self-assembly in tissue engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Anton Harrington

    2004-01-01

    This thesis studied the application of three self-assembling molecular systems, as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid)n molecules form thermotropic liquid crystals, which could be coated onto the inner and outer pores of biodegradable PLLA scaffolds, while retaining the lamellar order of the neat material. Primary bovine chondrocytes were cultured on these structures, demonstrating improved attachment and extended

  12. Liquid Crystal Phases of Self-Assembled Amphiphilic Aggregates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas L. Madden; Judith Herzfeld

    1993-01-01

    Long-range order in solutions of reversibly self-assembling molecules results from interactions among the asymmetric aggregates. Even for electrically neutral species, repulsions between the aggregates become significant at high concentrations. At the very least, the excluded volume of asymmetric aggregates creates formidable packing constraints which are relieved by orientational and positional alignment. Aggregate growth thus promotes long-range order, and long-range order

  13. Lighting up cells with lanthanide self-assembled helicates

    PubMed Central

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide bioprobes and bioconjugates are ideal luminescent stains in view of their low propensity to photobleaching, sharp emission lines and long excited state lifetimes permitting time-resolved detection for enhanced sensitivity. We show here how the interplay between physical, chemical and biochemical properties allied to microfluidics engineering leads to self-assembled dinuclear lanthanide luminescent probes illuminating live cells and selectively detecting biomarkers expressed by cancerous human breast cells. PMID:24511387

  14. Functional Materials Based on Self-Assembly of Polymeric Supramolecules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olli Ikkala; Gerrit ten Brinke

    2002-01-01

    Self-assembly of polymeric supramolecules is a powerful tool for producing functional materials that combine several properties and may respond to external conditions. We illustrate the concept using a comb-shaped architecture. Examples include the hexagonal self-organization of conjugated conducting polymers and the polarized luminance in solid-state films of rodlike polymers obtained by removing the hydrogen-bonded side chains from the aligned thermotropic

  15. Mechanical properties of a self-assembling oligopeptide matrix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erasmo J. Leon; Neeta Verma; Shuguang Zhang; Douglas A. Lauffenburger; Roger D. Kamm

    1998-01-01

    We have begun studies of a novel type of biomaterial derived from a recently-discovered class of ionic self-complementary oligopeptides. These short peptides (typically 8, 16, 24, or 32 amino acid residues with internally-repeating sequences) self-assemble in aqueous salt solution into three-dimensional matrices capable of favorable interactions with cells, and offer promise for useful bioengineering design based on rational changes in

  16. On stability of self-assembled nanoscale patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaowen Hu; Girish Nathan; Fazle Hussain; Donald J. Kouria; Pradeep Sharma; Gemunu H. Gunaratne

    2007-01-01

    We conduct linear and nonlinear stability analyses on a paradigmatic model of nanostructure self-assembly. We focus on the spatio-temporal dynamics of the concentration field of deposition on a substrate. The physical parameter of interest is the mean concentration C0 of the monolayer. Linear stability analysis of the system shows that a homogeneous monolayer is unstable when C0 lies within a

  17. Simulation of metal-organic framework self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Yoneya, Makoto; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Aoyagi, Masaru

    2015-04-14

    Spontaneous growth of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of metal ions and 4,4'-bipyridine ligands was successfully demonstrated by molecular dynamics simulations, starting from a random initial placement of the metals and the ligands. The effect of the metal-ligand binding strength upon the MOF self-assembly was investigated. We found that the metal-ligand binding strength should be within a window around the optimum values for the regular MOF growth. PMID:25766115

  18. Challenges for Capillary Self-Assembly of Microsystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massimo Mastrangeli; Wouter Ruythooren; Jean-Pierre Celis; Chris Van Hoof

    2011-01-01

    Within the currently rising trend of heterogeneous microsystem integration and packaging, capillary self-assembly emerges as an innovative technique to enhance, complement and eventually replace pick-and-place assembly. Vast literature and experimental data support such claim. Still, the technique needs to overcome some important limitations in order to fully express its potential and earn wide industrial recognition. In this paper, we review

  19. Self-assembled thin films of organo-metal complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Salditt; Qingrui An; Anton Plecha; Johann Peisl; Christian Eschbaumer; Christian H. Weidl; Ulrich S. Schubert

    1999-01-01

    Organo-metal complexes have been self-assembled into thin monomolecular films by adsorption onto polyelectrolyte covered substrates. The basic molecular building blocks of these systems consist of octahedral coordinating metal ions (Cu(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and Hg(II)) and terpyridines or fused terpyridines, held together by non-covalent interactions. The structure of the films has been characterized by synchroton based X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence techniques,

  20. Computation via dynamic self-assembly of idealized protein networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2003-08-01

    We describe stochastic agent-based simulations of protein-emulating agents to perform computation via dynamic self-assembly. The binding and actuation properties of the types of agents required to construct a RAM machine (equivalent to a Turing machine) are described. We present an example computation and describe the molecular biology and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, and information science properties of this system.

  1. Blue luminescence induced by confinement in self-assembled films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Hong; D. Davidov; H. Chayet; E. Z. Faraggi; M. Tarabia; Y. Avny; R. Neumann; S. Kirstein

    1997-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization by means of photoluminescence (PL), UV-vis absorption, electro-luminescence (EL) and X-ray reflectivity of multilayer heterostructures consisting of alternate layers of conjugated and non-conjugated polymers have been studied. The heterostructures are prepared by the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using two types of polyelectrolytes. The first are precursors of conjugated polymers such as poly(phenylenevinylene) (PPV) and other poly(arylenevinylene) polymers,

  2. Surface-assisted coordination chemistry and self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nian Lin; Sebastian Stepanow; Franck Vidal; Klaus Kern; Mohammad S. Alam; Viacheslav Dremov; Aitor Landa; Mario Ruben

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses different approaches to build up supramolecular nanoarchitectures on surfaces, which were simultaneously investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on the single-molecule level. Following this general road map, first, the hydrogen-bonding guided self-assembly of two different, structural-equivalent molecular building blocks, azobenzene dicarboxylic acid and stilbene dicarboxylic acid, was studied. Secondly, the coordination chemistry of the same building blocks,

  3. Self-Assembly of biologically inspired complex functional materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brinker; C. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Nature combines hard and soft materials, often in hierarchical architectures, to get synergistic, optimized properties with proven, complex functionalities. Emulating such natural designs in robust engineering materials using efficient processing approaches represents a fundamental challenge to materials chemists. This presentation will review progress on understanding so-called 'evaporation-induced silica\\/surfactant self-assembly' (EISA) as a simple, general means to prepare porous thin-film nanostructures.

  4. Model-checking and control of self-assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John-Michael McNew; Eric Klavins

    2006-01-01

    Graph grammars can be used to model highly distributed systems where local interaction rules control formation or self-assembly tasks. In this paper, we explore model-checking graph grammar systems, introducing the zero-one-many collapse as a way of reducing the usually enormous number of states and transitions produced by a graph grammar system. From this collapse, we also define a canonical initial

  5. Electrochemistry of redox-active self-assembled monolayers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda L. Eckermann; Daniel J. Feld; Justine A. Shaw; Thomas J. Meade

    2010-01-01

    Redox-active self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) provide an excellent platform for investigating electron transfer kinetics. Using a well-defined bridge, a redox center can be positioned at a fixed distance from the electrode and electron transfer kinetics probed using a variety of electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry, AC voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry are most commonly used to determine the rate of electron

  6. The Thermodynamics of Self Assembly at the Si(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, James

    2004-03-01

    Spontaneous self-assembly at surfaces has received considerable attention, in part, because it represents a possible route to creating highly-periodic nanostructures with narrow size distributions. While much of the physics that drives self assembly is understood qualitatively (e.g. the role of surface stress), the complexity of 'real' systems can make quantitative analysis difficult. For example, for many systems the relative importance of kinetic and thermodynamic effects is unknown. In this talk I will describe in situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) investigations of 2D self assembly in an ideal model system: Si(111) near Tc. Close to the surface phase transition temperature (Tc = 860 C) domains of the low-temperature 7x7 phase and high-temperature 1x1 phase coexist. Phase coexistence is driven by elastic relaxation [1], which also leads to self-organized hexagonal arrays of triangular domains [2]. Because the key thermodynamic parameters of the Si(111) surface are known, and domain structures are easily equilibrated near Tc, the physics of self assembly in this system can be investigated quantitatively. I will describe experiments and modeling that illustrate the role of surface stress [1], surface energy [3], boundary energy, and shape [4] in determining the size and stability of domain patterns. Furthermore, I will show how domain structures can be reversibly tuned by changing the temperature or adatom density at the surface. [1] Hannon, Tersoff, Tromp, Science, v. 295 (2002) 299. [2] Hannon, Tersoff, Tromp, J. Cryst. Growth, v. 237-239 (2002) 181. [3] Hannon, Tersoff, Reuter, Tromp. Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 89 (2002) 266103. [4] Thayer, Hannon, Tromp, Nature Materials, to appear in 2004.

  7. Self-assembly of semiconductor nanocrystals into ordered superstructures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena V. Shevchenko; Dmitri V. Talapin

    Organization of uniform objects into periodic structures can be found in many natural systems, such as atomic and molecular\\u000a solids, opals, sponges and bacterial colonies — self-assembly is the fundamental phenomenon that generates structural organization\\u000a on all scales [1]. In this chapter we discuss the structures spontaneously formed by nanoparticles which attracted significant interest from\\u000a different branches of science and

  8. Toward self-assembly of phage-like nanorobot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hirabayashi; K. Oiwa; A. Nishikawa; F. Tanaka; M. Hagiya

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of DNA nanostructures can allow for promising nanometer-sized machines. Synthetic DNA motifs are known to assemble into a wide range of nanoarchitectures by sequence programming. For the purpose of constructing strictly-controlled biological nanomachines, we design the self-assembly system consisting of DNA strands with the ability of producing a functional molecule. In this work we demonstrate that DNA motifs

  9. Self-Assembled and Nanostructured siRNA Delivery Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji Hoon Jeong; Tae Gwan Park; Sun Hwa Kim

    A wide range of organic and inorganic materials have been used in the development of nano-scale self-assembling gene delivery\\u000a systems to improve the therapeutic efficacy of nucleic acid drugs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has recently been recognized\\u000a as a promising and potent nucleic acid medicine for the treatment of incurable genetic disorders including cancer; however,\\u000a siRNA-based therapeutics suffer from the

  10. Electrostatic self-assembly of macroscopic crystals using contact electrification.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Winkleman, Adam; Wiles, Jason A; Brumer, Yisroel; Whitesides, George M

    2003-04-01

    Self-assembly of components larger than molecules into ordered arrays is an efficient way of preparing microstructured materials with interesting mechanical and optical properties. Although crystallization of identical particles or particles of different sizes or shapes can be readily achieved, the repertoire of methods to assemble binary lattices of particles of the same sizes but with different properties is very limited. This paper describes electrostatic self-assembly of two types of macroscopic components of identical dimensions using interactions that are generated by contact electrification. The systems we have examined comprise two kinds of objects (usually spheres) made of different polymeric materials that charge with opposite electrical polarities when agitated on flat, metallic surfaces. The interplay of repulsive interactions between like-charged objects and attractive interactions between unlike-charged ones results in the self-assembly of these objects into highly ordered, closed arrays. Remarkably, some of the assemblies that form are not electroneutral-that is, they possess a net charge. We suggest that the stability of these unusual structures can be explained by accounting for the interactions between electric dipoles that the particles in the aggregates induce in their neighbours. PMID:12690397

  11. DNA assisted self-assembly of PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2014-10-01

    We report DNA assisted self-assembly of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers using all atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and present a molecular level picture of a DNA-linked PAMAM dendrimer nanocluster, which was first experimentally reported by Choi et al. (Nano Lett., 2004, 4, 391-397). We have used single stranded DNA (ssDNA) to direct the self-assembly process. To explore the effect of pH on this mechanism, we have used both the protonated (low pH) and nonprotonated (high pH) dendrimers. In all cases studied here, we observe that the DNA strand on one dendrimer unit drives self-assembly as it binds to the complementary DNA strand present on the other dendrimer unit, leading to the formation of a DNA-linked dendrimer dimeric complex. However, this binding process strongly depends on the charge of the dendrimer and length of the ssDNA. We observe that the complex with a nonprotonated dendrimer can maintain a DNA length dependent inter-dendrimer distance. In contrast, for complexes with a protonated dendrimer, the inter-dendrimer distance is independent of the DNA length. We attribute this observation to the electrostatic complexation of a negatively charged DNA strand with the positively charged protonated dendrimer. PMID:25205346

  12. Controlling Self-Assembly in Al(110) Homoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Yogesh; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2010-03-01

    Homoepitaxial growth on Al(110) exhibits nanoscale self-assembly into huts with well-defined (100) and (111) facets [1]. Although some of the diffusion mechanisms underlying this kinetic self-assembly were identified and incorporated into a two-dimensional model [2], we used density-functional theory (DFT) to identify many other mechanisms that are needed to describe the three-dimensional assembly seen experimentally [3]. We developed a three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of Al(110) homoepitaxy. The inputs to the model were obtained from DFT [3,4]. Our model is in agreement with experimentally observed trends for this system. We used KMC to predict self-assembly under various growth conditions. To achieve precise placement of Al nanohuts, we simulated thermal-field-directed assembly [5]. Our results indicate that this technique can be used to create uniform arrays of nanostructures. [1] F. Buatier de Mongeot, W. Zhu, A. Molle, R. Buzio, C. Boragno, U. Valbusa, E. Wang, and Z. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 016102 (2003). [2] W. Zhu, F. Buatier de Mongeot, U. Valbusa, E. G. Wang, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 106102 (2004). [3] Y. Tiwary and K. A. Fichthorn, submitted to Phys. Rev. B. [4] Y. Tiwary and K. A. Fichthorn, Phys. Rev. B 78, 205418 (2008). [5] C. Zhang and R. Kalyanaraman, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 4827 (2003).

  13. Engineering hierarchical nanostructures by elastocapillary self-assembly.

    PubMed

    De Volder, Michaël; Hart, A John

    2013-02-25

    Surfaces coated with nanoscale filaments such as silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes are potentially compelling for high-performance battery and capacitor electrodes, photovoltaics, electrical interconnects, substrates for engineered cell growth, dry adhesives, and other smart materials. However, many of these applications require a wet environment or involve wet processing during their synthesis. The capillary forces introduced by these wet environments can lead to undesirable aggregation of nanoscale filaments, but control of capillary forces can enable manipulation of the filaments into discrete aggregates and novel hierarchical structures. Recent studies suggest that the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments can be a versatile and scalable means to build complex and robust surface architectures. To enable a wider understanding and use of elastocapillary self-assembly as a fabrication technology, we give an overview of the underlying fundamentals and classify typical implementations and surface designs for nanowires, nanotubes, and nanopillars made from a wide variety of materials. Finally, we discuss exemplary applications and future opportunities to realize new engineered surfaces by the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments. PMID:23339106

  14. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Dhotel, Alexandre; Chen, Ziguang; Delbreilh, Laurent; Youssef, Boulos; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Tan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted. PMID:23348927

  15. Polymer adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A K; Golumbfskie, A J

    2001-01-01

    Driven by prospective applications, there is much interest in developing materials that can perform specific functions in response to external conditions. One way to design such materials is to create systems which, in response to external inputs, can self-assemble to form structures that are functionally useful. This review focuses on the principles that can be employed to design macromolecules that when presented with an appropriate two-dimensional surface, will self-assemble to form nanostructures that may be functionally useful. We discuss three specific examples: (a) biomimetic recognition between polymers and patterned surfaces. (b) control and manipulation of nanomechanical motion generated by biopolymer adsorption and binding, and (c) creation of patterned nanostructuctures by exposing molten diblock copolymers to patterned surfaces. The discussion serves to illustrate how polymer sequence can be manipulated to affect self-assembly characteristics near adsorbing surfaces. The focus of this review is on theoretical and computational work aimed toward elucidating the principles underlying the phenomena pertinent to the three topics noted above. However, synergistic experiments are also described in the appropriate context. PMID:11326074

  16. Self-assembly of strongly dipolar molecules on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Donna A.; Hooper, James; Simpson, Scott; Miller, Daniel P.; Routaboul, Lucie; Braunstein, Pierre; Doudin, Bernard; Beniwal, Sumit; Dowben, Peter; Skomski, Ralph; Zurek, Eva; Enders, Axel

    2015-03-01

    The role of dipole-dipole interactions in the self-assembly of dipolar organic molecules on surfaces is investigated. As a model system, strongly dipolar model molecules, p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterions (ZI) of type C6H2(⋯ NHR)2(⋯ O)2 on crystalline coinage metal surfaces were investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations. Depending on the substrate, the molecules assemble into small clusters, nano gratings, and stripes, as well as in two-dimensional islands. The alignment of the molecular dipoles in those assemblies only rarely assumes the lowest electrostatic energy configuration. Based on calculations of the electrostatic energy for various experimentally observed molecular arrangements and under consideration of computed dipole moments of adsorbed molecules, the electrostatic energy minimization is ruled out as the driving force in the self-assembly. The structures observed are mainly the result of a competition between chemical interactions and substrate effects. The substrate's role in the self-assembly is to (i) reduce and realign the molecular dipole through charge donation and back donation involving both the molecular HOMO and LUMO, (ii) dictate the epitaxial orientation of the adsorbates, specifically so on Cu(111), and (iii) inhibit attractive forces between neighboring chains in the system ZI/Cu(111), which results in regularly spaced molecular gratings.

  17. Synthesis and self-assembly of a DNA molecular brush.

    PubMed

    Kedracki, Dawid; Chekini, Mahshid; Maroni, Plinio; Schlaad, Helmut; Nardin, Corinne

    2014-09-01

    We report herein on the polymer-crystallization-assisted thiol-ene photosynthesis of an amphiphilic comb/graft DNA copolymer, or molecular brush, composed of a hydrophobic poly(2-oxazoline) backbone and hydrophilic short single-stranded nucleic acid grafts. Coupling efficiencies are above 60% and thus higher as compared with the straight solid-phase-supported synthesis of amphiphilic DNA block copolymers. The DNA molecular brushes self-assemble into sub-micron-sized spherical structures in water as evidenced by light scattering as well as atomic force and electron microscopy imaging. The nucleotide sequences remain functional, as assessed by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy subsequent to isoindol synthesis at the surface of the structures. The determination of a vesicular morphology is supported by encapsulation and subsequent spectroscopy monitoring of the release of a water-soluble dye and spectroscopic quantification of the hybridization efficiency (30% in average) of the functional nucleic acid strands engaged in structure formation: about one-half of the nucleotide sequences are available for hybridization, whereas the other half are hindered within the self-assembled structure. Because speciation between complementary and non complementary sequences in the medium could be ascertained by confocal laser scanning microscopy, the stable self-assembled molecular brushes demonstrate the potential for sensing applications. PMID:25105945

  18. Simulating droplet dynamics during evaporation-driven self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyreby, John J.; Turner, Kevin T.; Nellis, Gregory F.

    2007-03-01

    A modeling methodology based on the coupling of free surface energy minimization techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been developed for simulating the macro-regime of evaporation-driven self-assembly processes; specifically, those processes that use lithographically defined features to precisely direct the self-assembly of particles on a substrate. Because surface tension dominates the gravitational, inertial, and viscous forces acting on the droplet, the shape of the droplet is determined as a function of its volume and pinning geometry by minimizing its surface energy. The evolution of droplet shape during evaporation is used to define the deforming control volume, over which the governing partial differential equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and particle concentration are solved. By decoupling the free surface and the flow models, a diverse range of problems can be investigated. The macro-scale model is envisioned as one part of a hierarchical model that can be used to study the entire lithographically-directed, evaporation-driven self-assembly process.

  19. Self-assembly of strongly dipolar molecules on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Donna A; Hooper, James; Simpson, Scott; Miller, Daniel P; Routaboul, Lucie; Braunstein, Pierre; Doudin, Bernard; Beniwal, Sumit; Dowben, Peter; Skomski, Ralph; Zurek, Eva; Enders, Axel

    2015-03-14

    The role of dipole-dipole interactions in the self-assembly of dipolar organic molecules on surfaces is investigated. As a model system, strongly dipolar model molecules, p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterions (ZI) of type C6H2(??NHR)2(??O)2 on crystalline coinage metal surfaces were investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations. Depending on the substrate, the molecules assemble into small clusters, nano gratings, and stripes, as well as in two-dimensional islands. The alignment of the molecular dipoles in those assemblies only rarely assumes the lowest electrostatic energy configuration. Based on calculations of the electrostatic energy for various experimentally observed molecular arrangements and under consideration of computed dipole moments of adsorbed molecules, the electrostatic energy minimization is ruled out as the driving force in the self-assembly. The structures observed are mainly the result of a competition between chemical interactions and substrate effects. The substrate's role in the self-assembly is to (i) reduce and realign the molecular dipole through charge donation and back donation involving both the molecular HOMO and LUMO, (ii) dictate the epitaxial orientation of the adsorbates, specifically so on Cu(111), and (iii) inhibit attractive forces between neighboring chains in the system ZI/Cu(111), which results in regularly spaced molecular gratings. PMID:25770510

  20. Spectroscopic critical dimension technology (SCD) for directed self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibe, Senichi; Dziura, Thaddeus; Nagaswami, Venkat; Gronheid, Roel

    2014-04-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) is being actively investigated as a potential patterning solution for future generation devices. While SEM based CD measurement is currently used in research and development, scatterometry-based techniques like spectroscopic CD (SCD) are preferred for high volume manufacturing. SCD can offer information about sub-surface features that are not available from CD-SEM measurement. Besides, SCD is a non-destructive, high throughput technique already adopted in HVM in several advanced nodes. The directed self assembly CD measurement can be challenging because of small dimensions and extremely thin layers in the DSA stack. In this study, the SCD technology was investigated for a 14 nm resolution PS-b-PMMA chemical epitaxy UW process optimized by imec. The DSA stack involves new materials such as cross-linkable polysterene (XPS) of thickness approximately 5 nm, ArF immersion resist (subsequently removed), -OH terminated neutral brush layer, and BCP material (Polystyrene-blockmethyl methacrylate of thickness roughly 20 to 30 nm). The mask contains a large CD and pitch matrix, for studying the quality of self-assembly as a function of the guide pattern dimensions. We report on the ability of SCD to characterize the dimensional variation in these targets and hence provide a viable process control solution.

  1. Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence of Chlorophylls in Light-Harvesting Complexes Coupled to Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Dorota; Krajnik, Bartosz; Olejnik, Maria; Czechowski, Nikodem; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate metal-enhanced fluorescence of peridinin-chlorophyll protein coupled to silver nanowires using optical microscopy combined with spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In particular we study two different sample geometries: first, in which the light-harvesting complexes are deposited onto silver nanowires, and second, where solution of both nanostructures are mixed prior deposition on a substrate. The results indicate that for the peridinin-chlorophyll complexes placed in the vicinity of the silver nanowires we observe higher intensities of fluorescence emission as compared to the reference sample, where no nanowires are present. Enhancement factors estimated for the sample where the light-harvesting complexes are mixed together with the silver nanowires prior deposition on a substrate are generally larger in comparison to the other geometry of a hybrid nanostructure. While fluorescence spectra are identical both in terms of overall shape and maximum wavelength for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes both isolated and coupled to metallic nanostructures, we conclude that interaction with plasmon excitations in the latter remains neutral to the functionality of the biological system. Fluorescence transients measured for the PCP complexes coupled to the silver nanowires indicate shortening of the fluorescence lifetime pointing towards modifications of radiative rate due to plasmonic interactions. Our results can be applied for developing ways to plasmonically control the light-harvesting capability of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:23533354

  2. Quantum coherence spectroscopy reveals complex dynamics in bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2)

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Elad; Engel, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes transfer energy from sunlight to photosynthetic reaction centers where charge separation drives cellular metabolism. The process through which pigments transfer excitation energy involves a complex choreography of coherent and incoherent processes mediated by the surrounding protein and solvent environment. The recent discovery of coherent dynamics in photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae has motivated many theoretical models exploring effects of interference in energy transfer phenomena. In this work, we provide experimental evidence of long-lived quantum coherence between the spectrally separated B800 and B850 rings of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria. Spectrally resolved maps of the detuning, dephasing, and the amplitude of electronic coupling between excitons reveal that different relaxation pathways act in concert for optimal transfer efficiency. Furthermore, maps of the phase of the signal suggest that quantum mechanical interference between different energy transfer pathways may be important even at ambient temperature. Such interference at a product state has already been shown to enhance the quantum efficiency of transfer in theoretical models of closed loop systems such as LH2. PMID:22215585

  3. Circular dichroism of carotenoids in bacterial light-harvesting complexes: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulou, S; van Grondelle, R; van der Zwan, G

    2004-11-01

    In this work we investigate the origin and characteristics of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of rhodopin glucoside and lycopene in the light-harvesting 2 complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, respectively. We successfully model their absorption and CD spectra based on the high-resolution structures. We assume that these spectra originate from seven interacting transition dipole moments: the first corresponds to the 0-0 transition of the carotenoid, whereas the remaining six represent higher vibronic components of the S2 state. From the absorption spectra we get an estimate of the Franck-Condon factors of these transitions. Furthermore, we investigate the broadening mechanisms that lead to the final shape of the spectra and get an insight into the interaction energy between carotenoids. Finally, we examine the consequences of rotations of the carotenoid transition dipole moment and of deformations in the light-harvesting 2 complex rings. Comparison of the modeled carotenoid spectra with modeled spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll QY region leads to a refinement of the modeling procedure and an improvement of all calculated results. We therefore propose that the combined carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll CD can be used as an accurate reflection of the overall structure of the light-harvesting complexes. PMID:15326029

  4. Circular Dichroism of Carotenoids in Bacterial Light-Harvesting Complexes: Experiments and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulou, S.; van Grondelle, R.; van der Zwan, G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we investigate the origin and characteristics of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of rhodopin glucoside and lycopene in the light-harvesting 2 complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, respectively. We successfully model their absorption and CD spectra based on the high-resolution structures. We assume that these spectra originate from seven interacting transition dipole moments: the first corresponds to the 0-0 transition of the carotenoid, whereas the remaining six represent higher vibronic components of the S2 state. From the absorption spectra we get an estimate of the Franck-Condon factors of these transitions. Furthermore, we investigate the broadening mechanisms that lead to the final shape of the spectra and get an insight into the interaction energy between carotenoids. Finally, we examine the consequences of rotations of the carotenoid transition dipole moment and of deformations in the light-harvesting 2 complex rings. Comparison of the modeled carotenoid spectra with modeled spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll QY region leads to a refinement of the modeling procedure and an improvement of all calculated results. We therefore propose that the combined carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll CD can be used as an accurate reflection of the overall structure of the light-harvesting complexes. PMID:15326029

  5. Directed assembly of hierarchical light-harvesting complexes using virus capsid scaffolds and DNA origami tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Debin; Capehart, Stacy; Pal, Suchetan; Liu, Minghui; Lau, Jolene; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew; Deyoreo, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Directed assembly of nanostructures with molecular precision is of great importance to develop an insightful understanding of assembly pathways and dynamics as well as to derive new functionalities. In this work, we explore the use of virus capsids and DNA origami tiles as 3D scaffolds and 2D templates for directed assembly of light-harvesting molecules and plasmonic gold nanoparticles to achieve tunable photoemission. Bacteriophage MS2 virus capsids with well-defined spherical macromolecular structures are genetically modified to provide predictable steric arrangements of light-harvesting molecules. DNA origami tiles act as programmable planar templates to provide higher-order organization of oligonucleotide-functionalized light-harvesting capsids and plasmonic gold nanoparticles. The direct observation of distance dependent photoluminescence emission is carried out by our correlative approach combining atomic force microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, which is in good agreement with our numerical simulation and theoretical calculation. This work will facilitate the construction of multicomponent biological-metal hybrid plasmonic nanostructures for nanophotonics and biosensing applications.

  6. Mixed-organic-cation perovskite photovoltaics for enhanced solar-light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Pellet, Norman; Gao, Peng; Gregori, Giuliano; Yang, Tae-Youl; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Maier, Joachim; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite APbX3 pigments, such as methylammonium lead iodide, have recently emerged as excellent light harvesters in solid-state mesoscopic solar cells. An important target for the further improvement of the performance of perovskite-based photovoltaics is to extend their optical-absorption onset further into the red to enhance solar-light harvesting. Herein, we show that this goal can be reached by using a mixture of formamidinium (HN=CHNH3 (+), FA) and methylammonium (CH3 NH3 (+), MA) cations in the A?position of the APbI3 perovskite structure. This combination leads to an enhanced short-circuit current and thus superior devices to those based on only CH3 NH3 (+). This concept has not been applied previously in perovskite-based solar cells. It shows great potential as a versatile tool to tune the structural, electrical, and optoelectronic properties of the light-harvesting materials. PMID:24554633

  7. Design principles and fundamental trade-offs in biomimetic light harvesting

    E-print Network

    Mohan Sarovar; K. Birgitta Whaley

    2013-03-25

    Recent developments in synthetic and supramolecular chemistry have created opportunities to design organic systems with tailored nanoscale structure for various technological applications. A key application area is the capture of light energy and its conversion into electrochemical or chemical forms for photovoltaic or sensing applications. In this work we consider cylindrical assemblies of chromophores that model structures produced by several supramolecular techniques. Our study is especially guided by the versatile structures produced by virus-templated assembly. We use a multi-objective optimization framework to determine design principles and limitations in light harvesting performance for such assemblies, both in the presence and absence of disorder. We identify a fundamental trade-off in cylindrical assemblies that is encountered when attempting to maximize both efficiency of energy transfer and absorption bandwidth. We also rationalize the optimal design strategies and provide explanations for why various structures provide optimal performance. Most importantly, we find that the optimal design strategies depend on the amount of energetic and structural disorder in the system. The aim of these studies is to develop a program of quantum-informed rational design for construction of organic assemblies that have the same degree of tailored nanoscale structure as biological photosynthetic light harvesting complexes, and also have the potential to reproduce their remarkable light harvesting performance.

  8. Functional quantum dot-protein nano bio-assembly for superior light harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlugun, Evren; Ozgur Safak Seker, Urartu; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmuller, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-03-01

    The formation of functional bio-assemblies is crucial for the advanced biophotonic applications. In this work, we formed a nano bio-assembly, consisting of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and inorganic quantum dots (QDs), to employ as an excitonic biofunctional composite to use for light harvesting and biosensing applications. Using QDs as donor molecules with the acceptor GFP in the formed bio-assembly, we observed up-to 15-fold enhancement on the GFP emission, mediated by the strong nonradiative energy transfer. The lifetime modifications of the donor-acceptor pair were studied as a function of the number of proteins per quantum dot, and in good agreement with the proposed theoretical model based on the excitonic interaction among the species. Apart from the light harvesting system, a biosensing medium was also established, facilitated by the enzymatic activity destructing the light harvesting complex. The energy transferring QD-GFP complex was controllably modified by the addition of trypsin, by destroying the bond in between the QD-GFP complex, as verified by the observation of lifetime modifications. In summary, we developed functional excitonic nano-bio-assemblies, which we believe will open up new possibilities for advanced biophotonic applications.

  9. Self-Assembly of biologically inspired complex functional materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2004-08-01

    Nature combines hard and soft materials, often in hierarchical architectures, to get synergistic, optimized properties with proven, complex functionalities. Emulating such natural designs in robust engineering materials using efficient processing approaches represents a fundamental challenge to materials chemists. This presentation will review progress on understanding so-called 'evaporation-induced silica/surfactant self-assembly' (EISA) as a simple, general means to prepare porous thin-film nanostructures. Such porous materials are of interest for membranes, low-dielectric-constant (low-k) insulators, and even 'nano-valves' that open and close in response to an external stimulus. EISA can also be used to simultaneously organize hydrophilic and hydrophobic precursors into hybrid nanocomposites that are optically or chemically polymerizable, patternable, or adjustable. In constructing composite structures, a significant challenge is how to controllably organize or define multiple materials on multiple length scales. To address this challenge, we have combined sol-gel chemistry with molecular self-assembly in several evaporation-driven processing procedures collectively referred to as evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA). EISA starts with a silica/water/surfactant system diluted with ethanol to create a homogeneous solution. We rely on ethanol and water evaporation during dip-coating (or other coating methods) to progressively concentrate surfactant and silica in the depositing film, driving micelle formation and subsequent continuous self-assembly of silica/surfactant thin film mesophases. One of the crucial aspects of this process, in terms of the sol-gel chemistry, is to work under conditions where the condensation rate of the hydrophilic silicic acid precursors (Si-OH) is minimized. The idea is to avoid gelation that would kinetically trap the system at an intermediate non-equilibrium state. We want the structure to self-assemble then solidify, with the addition of a siloxane condensation catalyst or by heating, to form the desired mesostructured product. Operating at an acidic pH (pH = 2) minimizes the condensation rate of silanols to form siloxanes Si-O-SiIn addition, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between silanols and hydrophilic surfactant head groups can further reduce the condensation rate. These combined factors maintain the depositing film in a fluid state, even beyond the point where ethanol and water are largely evaporated. This allows the deposited film to be self-healing and enables the use of virtually any evaporation-driven process (spin-coating, inkjet printing, or aerosol processing) to create ordered nanostructured films, patterns, or particles.

  10. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of DNA Self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Harish

    The control of matter and phenomena at the nanoscale is fast becoming one of the most important challenges of the 21st century with wide-ranging applications from energy and health care to computing and material science. Conventional top-down approaches to nanotechnology, having served us well for long, are reaching their inherent limitations. Meanwhile, bottom-up methods such as self-assembly are emerging as viable alternatives for nanoscale fabrication and manipulation. A particularly successful bottom up technique is DNA self-assembly where a set of carefully designed DNA strands form a nanoscale object as a consequence of specific, local interactions among the different components, without external direction. The final product of the self-assembly process might be a static nanostructure or a dynamic nanodevice that performs a specific function. Over the past two decades, DNA self-assembly has produced stunning nanoscale objects such as 2D and 3D lattices, polyhedra and addressable arbitrary shaped substrates, and a myriad of nanoscale devices such as molecular tweezers, computational circuits, biosensors and molecular assembly lines. In this dissertation we study multiple problems in the theory, simulations and experiments of DNA self-assembly. We extend the Turing-universal mathematical framework of self-assembly known as the Tile Assembly Model by incorporating randomization during the assembly process. This allows us to reduce the tile complexity of linear assemblies. We develop multiple techniques to build linear assemblies of expected length N using far fewer tile types than previously possible. We abstract the fundamental properties of DNA and develop a biochemical system, which we call meta-DNA, based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecule. We further develop various enzyme-free protocols to manipulate meta-DNA systems and provide strand level details along with abstract notations for these mechanisms. We simulate DNA circuits by providing detailed designs for local molecular computations that involve spatially contiguous molecules arranged on addressable substrates via enzyme-free DNA hybridization reaction cascades. We use the Visual DSD simulation software in conjunction with localized reaction rates obtained from biophysical modeling to create chemical reaction networks of localized hybridization circuits that are then model checked using the PRISM model checking software. We develop a DNA detection system employing the triggered self-assembly of a novel DNA dendritic nanostructure. Detection begins when a specific, single-stranded target DNA strand triggers a hybridization chain reaction between two distinct DNA hairpins. Each hairpin opens and hybridizes up to two copies of the other, and hence each layer of the growing dendritic nanostructure can in principle accommodate an exponentially increasing number of cognate molecules, generating a nanostructure with high molecular weight. We build linear activatable assemblies employing a novel protection/deprotection strategy to strictly enforce the direction of tiling assembly growth to ensure the robustness of the assembly process. Our system consists of two tiles that can form a linear co-polymer. These tiles, which are initially protected such that they do not react with each other, can be activated to form linear co-polymers via the use of a strand displacing enzyme.

  11. Combustion and self-assembly of nanoenergetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malchi, Jonathan Yaniv

    The recent worldwide interest in nanotechnology spans a wide variety of scientific fields such as electronics, biology, materials science and medicine. Because of their extremely small dimensions, nanoparticles demonstrate properties different from matter at larger scales. Understanding these unusual properties and utilizing them for macroscale devices is an overall goal for nanotechnology. Moreover, manipulating these small particles into organized structures is crucial for taking full advantage of what nanotechnology has to offer, however it has proven to be a difficult task. Recent work utilizing electrostatic forces shows great potential for the self-assembly of nanoparticles into organized two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Overall, this work examines how nanotechnology and self-assembly can benefit the field of energetic materials. Because of aluminum's high energy density and low cost, it has been used in the field of energetic materials for several decades. In order to achieve sufficient energy release rates, aluminum is typically manufactured as a powder having spherical particles with diameters on the micron scale. It is well-known that decreasing the original particle diameter of a fuel particle will increase the burning time and, thus, energy release rate. Therefore, aluminum particles have recently been made to have diameters on the nanoscale, and shown to be advantageous for several applications. The combustion of nanoaluminum (nAl) in various systems is the primary focus of this study. A progression of experiments is used to analyze the combustion of nAl: (1) a fully heterogeneous flame spread system, (2) a semi-homogeneous sonicated thermite system and (3) a quasi-homogeneous self-assembled thermite system. The flame spread experiment physically separates the nAl from the gaseous oxidizer allowing for a well-understood convective, diffusive, reactive system to be analyzed. Because of the simplicity of the experimental setup, variables are easily changed and their effects on the flame spread rate are observed. Overall, spread rates are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than what is demonstrated with typical solid fuels due to the high reactivity of the nAl. This large difference in spread rate brings about a fingering combustion instability in normal gravity conditions that has only been shown to occur in microgravity conditions. Moreover, a stability map is created based on the nondimensional Lewis and Damkohler numbers that predicts when a continuous flame front will transition to a fingering instability. This, along with the various other trends, is predicted using a simple scaling analysis. A nanoscale thermite is created via sonication of nAl and nanocopper-oxide (nCuO) particles. Although the mixture is unorganized and random, these materials boast extremely exothermic reactions with propagation rates on the order of 1 km/s. Experiments are performed to examine the effect of adding a diluent to the system. Two types of materials are added, a stable end product, aluminum-oxide, and long alkyl chain hydrocarbons. Both materials severely hinder the propagation rate, however, experiments suggest that hydrocarbon addition could help with the material's sensitivity to electrostatic discharge. Equilibrium calculations suggest that a dual temperature and gas production criteria must be met to allow for the convective propagation mechanism to take place and fast propagation rates to occur. Because of the hydrocarbons required for self-assembly, these experiments also give an indication of how the self-assembled material will react. To electrostatically self-assemble a nAl/nCuO thermite, the constituents are first coated with an o-functionalized alkyl chain ligand and suspended in a separate solutions. Upon mixing, the opposite electrostatic charges agglomerate the two constituents, which subsequently precipitate out of solution. Analyzing the material with Scanning Electron Microscopy shows that a portion has self-assembled into microspheres having diameters from 1-5mum. This is the first know

  12. Optimal thermal bath for robust excitation energy transfer in disordered light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria

    E-print Network

    Cleary, Liam

    The existence of an optimal thermal bath to facilitate robust energy transfer between the spectrally separated B800 and B850 rings in light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is investigated via the multichromophoric ...

  13. A Structure-Based Model of Energy Transfer Reveals the Principles of Light Harvesting in Photosystem II Supercomplexes

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Graham R.

    to fluorescence lifetime data cannot be used to derive mechanistic insight on light harvesting in PSII. This model light with 90% efficiency3 and can respond to changes in incident sunlight intensity and wavelength.4

  14. The family of light-harvesting-related proteins (LHCs, ELIPs, HLIPs): was the harvesting of light their primary function?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Hélène Montané; Klaus Kloppstech

    2000-01-01

    Light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCs) and early light-induced proteins (ELIPs) are essential pigment-binding components of the thylakoid membrane and are encoded by one of the largest and most complex higher plant gene families. The functional diversification of these proteins corresponded to the transition from extrinsic (phycobilisome-based) to intrinsic (LHC-based) light-harvesting antenna systems during the evolution of chloroplasts from cyanobacteria, yet the

  15. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, —fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, “common frequency point” is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future. PMID:25466883

  16. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, --fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, "common frequency point" is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future. PMID:25466883

  17. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-12-01

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, --fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, ``common frequency point'' is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future.

  18. Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in organic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Huang

    2007-12-01

    Amphiphilic molecules are well-known for their ability to self-assemble in water to form structures such as micelles and vesicles. In comparison, much less is known about amphiphilic self-assembly in nonpolar organic liquids. Such "reverse" self assembly can produce many of the counterparts to structures found in water. In this dissertation, we focus on the formation and dynamics of such reverse structures. We seek to obtain fundamental insight into the driving forces for reverse self-assembly processes. Three specific types of reverse structures are studied: (a) reverse wormlike micelles, i.e., long, flexible micellar chains; (b) reverse vesicles, i.e., hollow containers enclosed by reverse bilayers; and (c) organogel networks. While our focus is on the fundamentals, we note that reverse structures can be useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery, controlled release, hosts for enzymatic reactions, and templates for nanomaterials synthesis. In the first part of this study, we describe a new route for forming reverse wormlike micelles in nonpolar organic liquids. This route involves the addition of trace amounts of a bile salt to solutions of the phospholipid, lecithin. We show that bile salts, due to their unique "facially amphiphilic" structure, can promote the aggregation of lecithin molecules into these reverse micellar chains. The resulting samples are viscoelastic and show interesting rheological properties. Unusual trends are seen in the temperature dependence of their rheology, which indicates the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the formation of these micelles. Another remarkable feature of their rheology is the presence of strain-stiffening, where the material becomes stiffer at high deformations. Strain-stiffening has been seen before for elastic gels of biopolymers; here, we demonstrate the same properties for viscoelastic micellar solutions. The second reverse aggregate we deal with is the reverse vesicle. We present a new route for forming stable unilamellar reverse vesicles, and this involves mixing short- and long-chain lipids (lecithins) with a trace of sodium chloride. The ratio of the short to long-chain lipid controls the type and size of self-assembled structure formed, and as this ratio is increased, a transition from reverse micelles to vesicles occurs. The structural changes can be explained in terms of molecular geometry, with the sodium chloride acting as a "glue" in binding lipid headgroups together through electrostatic interactions. The final part of this dissertation focuses on organogels. The two-tailed anionic surfactant, AOT, is well-known to form spherical reverse micelles in organic solvents. We have found that trace amounts (e.g., less than 1 mM) of the dihydroxy bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (SDC) can transform these dilute micellar solutions into self-supporting, transparent organogels. The structure and rheology of these organogels is reminiscent of the self-assembled networks formed by proteins such as actin in water. The organogels are based on networks of long, rigid, cylindrical filaments, with SDC molecules stacked together in the filament core.

  19. Redox control of GPx catalytic activity through mediating self-assembly of Fmoc-phenylalanine selenide into switchable supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zupeng; Luo, Quan; Guan, Shuwen; Gao, Jianxiong; Wang, Yongguo; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Liang; Xu, Jiayun; Dong, Zeyuan; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-12-28

    Artificial enzymes capable of achieving tunable catalytic activity through stimuli control of enzymatic structure transition are of significance in biosensor and biomedicine research. Herein we report a novel smart glutathione peroxidise (GPx) mimic with modulatory catalytic activity based on redox-induced supramolecular self-assembly. First, an amphiphilic Fmoc-phenylalanine-based selenide was designed and synthesized, which can self-assemble into nanospheres (NSs) in aqueous solution. The NSs demonstrate extremely low GPx activity. Upon the oxidation of hydroperoxides (ROOH), the selenide can be quickly transformed into the selenoxide form. The change of the molecular structure induces complete morphology transition of the self-assemblies from NSs to nanotubes (NTs), resulting in great enhancement in the GPx catalytic activity. Under the reduction of GSH, the selenoxide can be further reversibly reduced back into the selenide; therefore the reversible switch between the NSs and NTs can be successfully accomplished. The relationship between the catalytic activity and enzymatic structure was also investigated. The dual response nature makes this mimic play roles of both a sensor and a GPx enzyme at the same time, which can auto-detect the signal of ROOH and then auto-change its activity to achieve quick or slow/no scavenging of ROOH. The dynamic balance of ROOH is vital in organisms, in which an appropriate amount of ROOH does benefit to the metabolism, whereas surplus ROOH can cause oxidative damage of the cell instead and this smart mimic is of remarkable significance. We expect that such a mimic can be developed into an effective antioxidant drug and provide a new platform for the construction of intelligent artificial enzymes with multiple desirable properties. PMID:25366375

  20. Self-Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Particles under Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly—the spontaneous organization of microscopic units into well-defined mesoscopic structures—is a fundamental mechanism for a broad variety of nanotechnology applications in material science. The central role played by the anisotropy resulting from asymmetric shapes of the units and/or well-defined bonding sites on the particle surface has been widely investigated, highlighting the importance of properly designing the constituent entities in order to control the resulting mesoscopic structures. Anisotropy driven self-assembly can also result from the multipolar interactions characterizing many naturally occurring systems, such as proteins and viral capsids, as well as experimentally synthesized colloidal particles. Heterogeneously charged particles represent a class of multipolar units that are characterized by a competitive interplay between anisotropic attractive and repulsive interactions, due to the repulsion/attraction between charged-like/oppositely charged regions on the particle surface. In the present work, axially symmetric quadrupolar colloids are considered in a confined planar geometry; the role of both the overall particle charge and the patch extension as well as the effect of the substrate charge are studied in thermodynamic conditions such that the formation of extended structures is favored. A general tendency to form quasi-two-dimensional aggregates where particles align their symmetry axes within the plane is observed; among these planar self-assembled scenarios, a clear distinction between the formation of microcrystalline gels—branched networks consisting of purely crystalline domains—as opposed to disordered aggregates can be observed based on the specific features of the particle–particle interaction. Additionally, the possible competition of interparticle and particle–substrate interactions affects the size and the internal structure of the aggregates and can possibly inhibit the aggregation process. PMID:23627740

  1. Bacterial expression of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Cem

    For tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications, various architectures are explored to serve as biomaterial tools. Via de novo design, functional peptide hydrogel materials have been developed as scaffolds for biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to investigate bacterial expression as an alternative method to chemical synthesis for the recombinant production of self-assembling peptides that can form rigid hydrogels under physiological conditions. The Schneider and Pochan Labs have designed and characterized a 20 amino acid beta-hairpin forming amphiphilic peptide containing a D-residue in its turn region (MAX1). As a result, this peptide must be prepared chemically. Peptide engineering, using the sequence of MAX1 as a template, afforded a small family of peptides for expression (EX peptides) that have different turn sequences consisting of natural amino acids and amenable to bacterial expression. Each sequence was initially chemically synthesized to quickly assess the material properties of its corresponding gel. One model peptide EX1, was chosen to start the bacterial expression studies. DNA constructs facilitating the expression of EX1 were designed in such that the peptide could be expressed with different fusion partners and subsequently cleaved by enzymatic or chemical means to afford the free peptide. Optimization studies were performed to increase the yield of pure peptide that ultimately allowed 50 mg of pure peptide to be harvested from one liter of culture, providing an alternate means to produce this hydrogel-forming peptide. Recombinant production of other self-assembling hairpins with different turn sequences was also successful using this optimized protocol. The studies demonstrate that new beta-hairpin self-assembling peptides that are amenable to bacterial production and form rigid hydrogels at physiological conditions can be designed and produced by fermentation in good yield at significantly reduced cost when compared to chemical synthesis.

  2. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.; (Yale)

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  3. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (?5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ?35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with excellent mechanical properties at high porosity. PMID:23313642

  4. Nanostructured artificial photosynthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Imahori; Yukie Mori; Yoshihiro Matano

    2003-01-01

    We have proposed a novel strategy for artificial photosynthesis where porphyrins and fullerenes are assembled as building blocks into nanostructured artificial photosynthetic systems by the help of self-assembled monolayers. Photodynamical studies on porphyrin–fullerene-linked systems revealed that fullerenes accelerate photo-induced electron transfer and charge-shift and slow down charge recombination, which is in sharp contrast with the modalities of conventional two-dimensional aromatic

  5. Synthesis, properties and supramolecular self-assembly of novel n-type organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Nisha

    In the quest to develop low cost energy production, utilization of solar energy to generate electrical energy has gained wide attention in recent years. Artificial photosynthetic systems, mimicking natural photosynthesis, are emerging as a promising approach for efficient photoinduced electron transfer and, consequently, a powerful technique to afford low cost electrical energy. Hydrogen-bonded supramolecular systems hold great promise in this application due to the involvement of H-bonds in electronic communication. Therefore, such a system possessing multi-point, hydrogen-bonded groups have the potential to enhance the photo conversion efficiency significantly. Among the small organic molecule n-type semiconductors, perylene tetracarboxylic diimides (PDIs) and perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydrides (PTCDs) possess great potential due to the combination of a variety of desirable characteristics such as excellent thermal and photostability, high molar absorptivities and good electron accepting properties. Because of these attractive properties, PDIs are being heavily researched as materials in the burgeoning field of organic electronics such as organic photovoltaic, n-channel materials, organic thin film transistors, etc. PDIs have great potential due to their ability to form self-assembled complex architectures via their high propensity for pi-pi stacking which can be coupled with other intermolecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, to form ordered functional systems. This dissertation focuses on the convenient synthesis and separation of 1,6- and 1,7-regioisomers of PDIs and PTCDs, the comparison of their anonymous properties, the effect of multi-point hydrogen bonding motifs on the self-assembly of PDIs, and the electron transport properties of novel derivatives of PTCDs.

  6. Dynamics of nanoparticle self-assembly into superhydrophobic liquid marbles during water condensation.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Chinn, Jeff; Walker, Marlon L; Scott, John Henry J; Chinn, Amy; Jones, Wanda

    2011-12-27

    Nanoparticles adsorbed onto the surface of a drop can fully encapsulate the liquid, creating a robust and durable soft solid with superhydrophobic characteristics referred to as a liquid marble. Artificially created liquid marbles have been studied for about a decade but are already utilized in some hair and skin care products and have numerous other potential applications. These soft solids are usually formed in small quantity by depositing and rolling a drop of liquid on a layer of hydrophobic particles but can also be made in larger quantities in an industrial mixer. In this work, we demonstrate that microscale liquid marbles can also form through self-assembly during water condensation on a superhydrophobic surface covered with a loose layer of hydrophobic nanoparticles. Using in situ environmental scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, we study the dynamics of liquid marble formation and evaporation as well as their interaction with condensing water droplets. We demonstrate that the self-assembly of nanoparticle films into three-dimensional liquid marbles is driven by multiple coalescence events between partially covered droplets and is aided by surface flows causing rapid nanoparticle film redistribution. We also show that droplet and liquid marble coalescence can occur due to liquid-to-liquid contact or squeezing of the two objects into each other as a result of compressive forces from surrounding droplets and marbles. Irrelevant of the mechanism, coalescence of marbles and drops can cause their rapid movement across and rolling off the edge of the surface. We also demonstrate that the liquid marbles randomly moving across the surface can be captured and immobilized by hydrophilic surface patterns. PMID:22035295

  7. Model for dynamic self-assembled magnetic surface structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Glatz, A.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-07

    We propose a first-principles model for the dynamic self-assembly of magnetic structures at a water-air interface reported in earlier experiments. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equation for liquids in shallow water approximation coupled to Newton equations for interacting magnetic particles suspended at a water-air interface. The model reproduces most of the observed phenomenology, including spontaneous formation of magnetic snakelike structures, generation of large-scale vortex flows, complex ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of the snake, and self-propulsion of bead-snake hybrids.

  8. Organic-phase synthesis of self-assembled gold nanosheets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TamilSelvi Selvam; Chao-Ming Chiang; Kai-Ming Chi

    Amphiphilic gold nanoclusters with the diameter of 1.8 ± 0.2 nm were prepared by decomposition of organometallic gold precursor\\u000a CH3AuPPh3 in the presence of mercaptoacids in o-xylene. Self-assembly of the 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid protected gold clusters led to the formation of the nanosheets\\u000a consisted of aligned gold clusters. The hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic groups attached on the adjacent gold clusters\\u000a likely drives the

  9. Self-assembled calixarene derivative as a supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Villari, Valentina; Gattuso, Giuseppe; Notti, Anna; Pappalardo, Andrea; Micali, Norberto

    2012-05-10

    A light scattering study shows that the HCl-promoted self-assembly of an amino-calix[5]arene monomer precursor UC5-NH(2), bearing an ancillary ureido binding site, efficiently yields supramolecular polymers with a concentration-independent average mass. These polymers adopt a random-coil conformation and interact among themselves via the adhesive hard sphere pair potential. The findings also indicate the formation of polymer clusters, coexisting in low concentration with the polymers and resulting from the adhesive interpolymer interactions. Unlike polymers, the size of these clusters depends on the monomer concentration. PMID:22506913

  10. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthen Veettil, B.; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; McCamey, Dane; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes.

  11. Unifying Interfacial Self-Assembly and Surface Freezing

    SciTech Connect

    B Ocko; H Hlaing; P Jepsen; S Kewalramani; A Tkachenko; D Pontoni; H Reichert; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    X-ray investigations reveal that the monolayers formed at the bulk alkanol-sapphire interface are densely packed with the surface-normal molecules hydrogen bound to the sapphire. About 30-35 C above the bulk, these monolayers both melt reversibly and partially desorb. This system exhibits balanced intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions which are intermediate between self-assembled and surface-frozen monolayers, each dominated by one interaction. The phase behavior is rationalized within a thermodynamic model comprising interfacial interactions, elasticity, and entropic effects. Separating the substrate from the melt leaves the monolayer structurally intact.

  12. Buckling Instability of Self-Assembled Colloidal Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-09-01

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state.

  13. Preface: Special Topic on Supramolecular Self-Assembly at Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Gao, Hong-Jun; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is one of the most exciting and active fields in Surface Science today. Applications can take advantage of two key properties: (i) versatile pattern formation over a broad length scale and (ii) tunability of electronic structure and transport properties, as well as frontier orbital alignment. It provides a new frontier for Chemical Physics as it uniquely combines the versatility of Organic Synthesis and the Physics of Interfaces. The Journal of Chemical Physics is pleased to publish this Special Topic Issue, showcasing recent advances and new directions.

  14. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Kathrin; Kind, Martin; Pfeiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol. PMID:25161861

  15. Self-assembled GaN hexagonal micropyramid and microdisk

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Ikai; Hsieh, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-C.; Pang, W.-Y.; Chou, M.-C. [Department of Physics, Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China)

    2009-02-09

    The self-assembled GaN hexagonal micropyramid and microdisk were grown on LiAlO{sub 2} by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. It was found that the (0001) disk was established with the capture of N atoms by most-outside Ga atoms as the (1x1) surface was constructing, while the pyramid was obtained due to the missing of most-outside N atoms. The intensity of cathode luminescence excited from the microdisk was one order of amplitude greater than that from M-plane GaN.

  16. Programmed self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Cheng

    DNA has served as an excellent building block to self-assemble into a wide range of one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures with the bottom-up method. Due to the specificity of base pairing, the DNA assembly system is predictable and robust. These DNA structures with higher diversity and complexity have potential applications as templates to organize guest molecules or nanoparticles for the nanofabrication, as biosensors for the genetic diagnosis and environmental detection, and as nanocarriers to deliver and release drugs for the therapy. My major researches focus on designing a novel building block and assembly strategies to self-assemble DNA into complex nanostructures to increase the diversity and complexity. A novel building block was first constructed, which is a parallel, left-handed DNA helix containing multiple domains of half-turn-long standard B-DNA. Such a structure can be used to introduce left-handed crossings in order to increase the diversity and complexity of DNA nanostructures, and can be taken into consideration when predicting the secondary structure of DNA/RNA molecules in cells. In addition, a tile-based directed self-assembly strategy was developed to construct DNA nanocages. In this strategy, directing building blocks were employed to control the self-assembly process of assembly building blocks. This strategy greatly expands the scope of accessible DNA nanostructures and would facilitate technological applications such as nano-guest encapsulation, drug delivery, and nanoparticle organization. As the complexity of DNA nanostructures increases, more errors might be involved in the assembly process. Therefore, a simplified design system based on T-junction was designed to build DNA arrays and minimize the assembly errors. In such system, due to the sequence symmetry, only one DNA single strand is employed and assembled into predesigned 1D and 2D arrays. This design system can be applied to assemble a wide range of DNA nanostructures with varieties of features.

  17. Electrochromic Behavior of Ionically Self-Assembled Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, J. A.; Heflin, J. R.; Marciu, D.; Miller, M. B.; Davis, R. M.

    2001-03-01

    Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs), fabricated by alternate adsorption of cationic and anionic components, yield exceptionally homogeneous thin films with sub-nanometer control of the thickness and relative special location of the component materials. Using organic electrochromic materials such as polyaniline, we report studies of electrochromic responses in ISAM films. Reversible changes in the absorption spectrum are observed with the application of voltages on the order of 1.0 V. Measurements are made using both liquid electrolytes and in all-solid state devices incorporating solid polyelectrolytes such as poly(2-acylamido 2-methyl propane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS).

  18. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Jiang, P.; Liu, D. F.; Yuan, H. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Zhou, Z. P.; Wang, J. X.; Song, L.; Liu, L. F.; Zhou, W. Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, C. Y.; Xie, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    Silver nanowires with an average length of 6 ?m and diameter of about 70 nm have been synthesized by polyol reduction of silver nitrate in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction have been employed to elucidate the structure of the Ag nanowires. The results show that the Ag nanowire capped by PVP are truncated decahedron with fivefold symmetry, bounded by {1 0 0} planes with [1 1 0] growth direction. The monodispersed Ag nanowires can self-assemble into ordered arrays on n-Si(1 0 0) wafer due to the strong interaction of PVP on the surface of them.

  19. Response of a self-assembling to mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, Yves; Packard, Ross; Manchu, Sreedhar; Cowley, Leonie

    2009-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics is used to characterize the mechanical properties of a solution of phospholipids and polyelectrolytes under shear and compression. DPPC (1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine), polyelectrolyes and water are coarse-grained using the MARTINI force field. Simulations are performed using both GROMACS and LAMMPS. In our simulation, the solution is confined by two rigid walls. The objective of this work is (i) to study influence of the electrostatic nature of the wall on the self-assembling structure of the solution and (ii) to define the rheological and structural response of the solution under shear and compression by moving one wall.

  20. Preface: special topic on supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Gao, Hong-Jun; Thiel, Patricia A

    2015-03-14

    Supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is one of the most exciting and active fields in Surface Science today. Applications can take advantage of two key properties: (i) versatile pattern formation over a broad length scale and (ii) tunability of electronic structure and transport properties, as well as frontier orbital alignment. It provides a new frontier for Chemical Physics as it uniquely combines the versatility of Organic Synthesis and the Physics of Interfaces. The Journal of Chemical Physics is pleased to publish this Special Topic Issue, showcasing recent advances and new directions. PMID:25770489

  1. Rapid self-assembly of uranyl polyhedra into crown clusters.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system. PMID:21608972

  2. Customizing mesoscale self-assembly with 3D printing

    E-print Network

    M. Poty; G. Lumay; N. Vandewalle

    2013-10-17

    Self-assembly due to capillary forces is a common method for generating 2D mesoscale structures from identical floating particles at the liquid-air interface. Designing building blocks to obtain a desired mesoscopic structure is a scientific challenge. We show herein that it is possible to shape the particles with a low cost 3D printer, for composing specific mesoscopic structures. Our method is based on the creation of capillary multipoles inducing either attractive or repulsive forces. Since capillary interactions can be downscaled, our method opens new ways to low cost microfabrication.

  3. Surfactant Two-Dimensional Self-Assembly under Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-28

    Confinement-induced structural rearrangements in supported self-assembled surfactant layers in aqueous salt solutions are investigated using classical Density Functional Theory. The systematic study of the influence of the nature of electrolyte revealed that 2:1 electrolyte stabilizes the hemicylindrical configuration of ionic surfactant layers, while a confinement-induced transition to a tilted monolayer configuration was found in symmetric 1:1 and 2:2 electrolytes. On the basis of this study we formulate a general model for the energetics of structural rearrangements in supported surfactant layers.

  4. Novel nanostructures from self-assembly of chiral block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rong-Ming; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chiang, Yeo-Wan

    2009-09-01

    A diblock copolymer system constituting both achiral and chiral blocks, polystyrene-block-poly(L-lactide) (PS-PLLA), was designed for the examination of chiral effects on the self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs). A unique phase with three-dimensional hexagonally packed PLLA helices in PS matrix, a helical phase (H*), can be obtained from the self-assembly of PS-rich PS-PLLA with volume fraction of PLLA f?PLLAv?=?0.34, whereas no such phase was found in racemic polystyrene-block-poly(D.L-lactide) (PS-PLA) BCPs. Moreover, various interesting crystalline PS-PLLA nanostructures can be obtained by controlling the crystallization temperature of PLLA (T(c,PLLA) ), leading to the formation of crystalline helices (PLLA crystallization directed by helical confined microdomain) and crystalline cylinders (phase transformation of helical nanostructure dictated by crystallization) when T(c,PLLA) ?self-assembly of PLLA-rich PS-PLLA BCPs. The formation of those novel phases: helix and core-shell cylinder is attributed to the chiral effect on the self-assembly of BCPs, so we named this PS-PLLA BCP as chiral BCP (BCP*). For potential applications of those materials, the spring-like behavior with thermal reversibility might provide a method for the design of switchable nanodevices, such as nanoscale actuators. In addition, the PLLA blocks can be hydrolyzed. After hydrolysis, helical nanoporous PS bulk and PS tubular texture can be obtained and used as templates for the formation of nanocomposites. PMID:21638404

  5. Molecular self-assembly routes to optically functional thin films: Electroluminescent multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Malinsky, J.E.; Chou, H. [and others

    1998-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of layer-by-layer self-limiting siloxane chemisorption processes to self-assemble structurally regular multilayer organic LED (OLED) devices. Topics discussed include: (1) the synthesis of silyl-functionalized precursor molecules for hole transport layer (HTL), emissive layer (EML), and electron transport layer (ETL) self-assembly, (2) the use of layer-by-layer self-assembly for ITO electrode modification/passivation/hole-electron balancing in a vapor-deposited device, (3) the microstructure/chemical characterization of HTL self-assembly using a prototype triarylamine precursor, (4) fabrication and properties of a hybrid self-assembled + vapor deposited two-layer LED, and (5) fabrication and properties of a fully self-assembled two-layer OLED.

  6. Self-Assembly of Channel Type ?-CD Dimers Induced by Dodecane

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Cheng, Xinhao; Zhao, Qiang; Yan, Yun; Wang, Jide; Huang, Jianbin

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can hardly self-assemble into well-defined structures. Here we report if they preassemble into channel type dimers assisted by dodecane, well-defined vesicles and bricks can be formed. Unlike the traditional self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules driven by hydrophobic effect, the self-assembly of the channel type dodecane@2?-CD supramolecular building block is predoninantly driven by hydrogen-bonds. More water molecules are found in the lyophilized vesicles than in the bricks, suggesting water molecules play an important role in the self-assembly of the channel-type dimers of ?-CD. The amount of structural water in the self-assembly is closely related to the curvature of the final self-assembled structures. Our work reveals that the channel-type dimer of ?-CD may represent a new sort of building block for advanced structures. PMID:25532046

  7. Long-distance electronic energy transfer in light-harvesting supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Winiger, Christian B; Li, Shaoguang; Kumar, Ganesh R; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2014-12-01

    The efficient collection of solar energy relies on the design and construction of well-organized light-harvesting systems. Herein we report that supramolecular phenanthrene polymers doped with pyrene are effective collectors of light energy. The linear polymers are formed through the assembly of short amphiphilic oligomers in water. Absorption of light by phenanthrene residues is followed by electronic energy transfer along the polymer over long distances (>100?nm) to the accepting pyrene molecules. The high efficiency of the energy transfer, which is documented by large fluorescence quantum yields, suggests a quantum coherent process. PMID:25345576

  8. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  9. Toward understanding as photosynthetic biosignatures: light harvesting and energy transfer calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Umemura, M.; Shoji, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kayanuma, M.; Yabana, K.

    2014-03-01

    Among several proposed biosignatures, red edge is a direct evidence of photosynthetic life if it is detected (Kiang et al 2007). Red edge is a sharp change in reflectance spectra of vegetation in NIR region (about 700-750 nm). The sign of red edge is observed by Earthshine or remote sensing (Wolstencroft & Raven 2002, Woolf et al 2002). But, why around 700-750 nm? The photosynthetic organisms on Earth have evolved to optimize the sunlight condition. However, if we consider about photosynthetic organism on extrasolar planets, they should have developed to utilize the spectra of its principal star. Thus, it is not strange even if it shows different vegetation spectra. In this study, we focused on the light absorption mechanism of photosynthetic organisms on Earth and investigated the fundamental properties of the light harvesting mechanisms, which is the first stage for the light absorption. Light harvesting complexes contain photosynthetic pigments like chlorophylls. Effective light absorption and the energy transfer are accomplished by the electronic excitations of collective photosynthetic pigments. In order to investigate this mechanism, we constructed an energy transfer model by using a dipole-dipole approximation for the interactions between electronic excitations. Transition moments and transition energies of each pigment are calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) level (Marques & Gross 2004). Quantum dynamics simulation for the excitation energy transfer was calculated by the Liouvelle's equation. We adopted the model to purple bacteria, which has been studied experimentally and known to absorb lower energy. It is meaningful to focus on the mechanism of this bacteria, since in the future mission, M planets will become a important target. We calculated the oscillator strengths in one light harvesting complex and confirmed the validity by comparing to the experimental data. This complex is made of an inner and an outer ring. The energy transfer from the outer to the inner ring can be reproduced. To deal with a realistic system, we calculated at a macro structural model. The energy transfer between light harvesting complexes is accomplished rapidly via inner rings. By exchange the original pigment to a pigment absorb lower energy, faster energy transfer occurs and the density was trapped in pigment having lower energy. We will compare the result of purple bacteria, which is considered to show longer red edge, cyanobacteria and plants.

  10. Light-harvesting in bacteria exploits a critical interplay between transport and trapping dynamics

    E-print Network

    Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Neil F. Johnson

    2010-03-11

    Light-harvesting bacteria Rhodospirillum Photometricum were recently found to adopt strikingly different architectures depending on illumination conditions. We present analytic and numerical calculations which explain this observation by quantifying a dynamical interplay between excitation transfer kinetics and reaction center cycling. High light-intensity membranes (HLIM) exploit dissipation as a photo-protective mechanism, thereby safeguarding a steady supply of chemical energy, while low light-intensity membranes (LLIM) efficiently process unused illumination intensity by channelling it to open reaction centers. More generally, our analysis elucidates and quantifies the trade-offs in natural network design for solar energy conversion.

  11. Colloidal self-assembly on internal surfaces of partially sealed microchannels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih-Jung Kuo; King Yiu Lam; Srikar Vengallatore; Yoav Peles

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of micro- and nanoparticles on internal surfaces of micromachined structures can enhance the functionality of a wide range of microfluidic systems. Here, we report experimental investigations of the self-assembly of colloidal microspheres on the sidewalls of partially sealed silicon microfluidic channels. Two different approaches were studied. The first, convective self-assembly, is known to be effective in open-domain microsystems, but

  12. Real time monitoring of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly on surfaces of magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Crawford, T. M., E-mail: crawftm@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Qi, B.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 161 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), 91 Technology Dr., Anderson, South Carolina 29625 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Nanoparticle self-assembly dynamics are monitored in real-time by detecting optical diffraction from an all-nanoparticle grating as it self-assembles on a grating pattern recorded on a magnetic medium. The diffraction efficiency strongly depends on concentration, pH, and colloidal stability of nanoparticle suspensions, demonstrating the nanoparticle self-assembly process is highly tunable. This metrology could provide an alternative for detecting nanoparticle properties such as colloidal stability.

  13. The distributed control and experiments of directional self-assembly for modular swarm robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongxing Wei; Dezhong Li; Jindong Tan; Tianmiao Wang

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly is a process during which pre-existing components are autonomously organized into some special patterns or structures without human intervention. In this paper, we propose a new control algorithm on distributed self-assembly which is implemented on the Sambot robot platform. A directional self-assembly control model is proposed, in which a configuration connection state table is used to represent the configuration

  14. Amphiphilic Janus gold nanoparticles prepared by interface-directed self-assembly: synthesis and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guannan; Tian, Jia; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Hanying

    2014-09-01

    Materials with Janus structures are attractive for wide applications in materials science. Although extensive efforts in the synthesis of Janus particles have been reported, the synthesis of sub-10?nm Janus nanoparticles is still challenging. Herein, the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on interface-directed self-assembly is reported. Polystyrene (PS) colloidal particles with AuNPs on the surface were prepared by interface-directed self-assembly, and the colloidal particles were used as templates for the synthesis of Janus AuNPs. To prepare colloidal particles, thiol-terminated polystyrene (PS-SH) was dissolved in toluene and citrate-stabilized AuNPs were dispersed in aqueous solution. Upon mixing the two solutions, PS-SH chains were grafted to the surface of AuNPs and amphiphilic AuNPs were formed at the liquid-liquid interface. PS colloidal particles decorated with AuNPs on the surfaces were prepared by adding the emulsion to excess methanol. On the surface, AuNPs were partially embedded in the colloidal particles. The outer regions of the AuNPs were exposed to the solution and were functionalized through the grafting of atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Poly[2-(dimethamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) on AuNPs were prepared by surface-initiated ATRP. After centrifugation and dissolving the colloidal particles in tetrahydrofuran (THF), Janus AuNPs with PS and PDMAEMA on two hemispheres were obtained. In acidic pH, Janus AuNPs are amphiphilic and are able to emulsify oil droplets in water; in basic pH, the Janus AuNPs are hydrophobic. In mixtures of THF/methanol at a volume ratio of 1:5, the Janus AuNPs self-assemble into bilayer structures with collapsed PS in the interiors and solvated PDMAEMA at the exteriors of the structures. PMID:25044923

  15. Developing novel polymer architectures for applications In magnetic resonance imaging and self-assembly

    E-print Network

    McCombs, Jessica R. (Jessica Rose)

    2013-01-01

    Macromolecular scaffolds for drug delivery, self-assembly, and imaging applications have attracted significant attention over the last several decades. As polymerization techniques become more sophisticated, it becomes ...

  16. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Mesostructured Spherical Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Fan,; H.; Lu, Y.; Rieker, T.; Stump, A.; Ward, T.L.

    1999-03-23

    Nanostructured particles exhibiting well-defined pore sizes and pore connectivities (1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional) are of interest for catalysis, chromatography, controlled release, low dielectric constant fillers, and custom-designed pigments and optical hosts. During the last several years considerable progress has been made on controlling the macroscopic forms of mesoporous silicas prepared by surfactant and block copolymer liquid crystalline templating procedures. Typically interfacial phenomena are used to control the macroscopic form (particles, fibers, or films), while self-assembly of amphiphilic surfactants or polymers is used to control the mesostructure. To date, although a variety of spherical or nearly-spherical particles have been prepared, their extent of order is limited as is the range of attainable mesostructures. They report a rapid, aerosol process that results in solid, completely ordered spherical particles with stable hexagonal, cubic, or vesicular mesostructures. The process relies on evaporation-induced interfacial self-assembly (EISA) confined to a spherical aerosol droplet. The process is simple and generalizable to a variety of materials combinations. Additionally, it can be modified to provide the first aerosol route to the formation of ordered mesostructured films.

  17. Controlled nanometric fibers of self-assembled designed protein scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejías, Sara H.; Sot, Begoña; Guantes, Raul; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2014-09-01

    The use of biological molecules as platforms for templating and nanofabrication is an emerging field. Here, we use designed protein building blocks based on small repetitive units (consensus tetratricopeptide repeat - CTPR) to generate fibrillar linear nanostructures by controlling the self-assembly properties of the units. We fully characterize the kinetics and thermodynamics of the assembly and describe the polymerization process by a simple model that captures the features of the structures formed under defined conditions. This work, together with previously established functionalization potential, sets up the basis for the application of these blocks in the fabrication and templating of complex hybrid nanostructures.The use of biological molecules as platforms for templating and nanofabrication is an emerging field. Here, we use designed protein building blocks based on small repetitive units (consensus tetratricopeptide repeat - CTPR) to generate fibrillar linear nanostructures by controlling the self-assembly properties of the units. We fully characterize the kinetics and thermodynamics of the assembly and describe the polymerization process by a simple model that captures the features of the structures formed under defined conditions. This work, together with previously established functionalization potential, sets up the basis for the application of these blocks in the fabrication and templating of complex hybrid nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed Materials and methods section. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01210k

  18. The multiple faces of self-assembled lipidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Tresset, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Lipids, the building blocks of cells, common to every living organisms, have the propensity to self-assemble into well-defined structures over short and long-range spatial scales. The driving forces have their roots mainly in the hydrophobic effect and electrostatic interactions. Membranes in lamellar phase are ubiquitous in cellular compartments and can phase-separate upon mixing lipids in different liquid-crystalline states. Hexagonal phases and especially cubic phases can be synthesized and observed in vivo as well. Membrane often closes up into a vesicle whose shape is determined by the interplay of curvature, area difference elasticity and line tension energies, and can adopt the form of a sphere, a tube, a prolate, a starfish and many more. Complexes made of lipids and polyelectrolytes or inorganic materials exhibit a rich diversity of structural morphologies due to additional interactions which become increasingly hard to track without the aid of suitable computer models. From the plasma membrane of archaebacteria to gene delivery, self-assembled lipidic systems have left their mark in cell biology and nanobiotechnology; however, the underlying physics is yet to be fully unraveled. PACS Codes: 87.14.Cc, 82.70.Uv PMID:19374753

  19. Facile self-assembly and stabilization of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Cecile; Holliman, Peter J; Davies, Matthew L; Watson, Trystan M; Worsley, David A

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes a facile method of self-assembling different metal oxide nanoparticles into nanostructured materials via di-carboxylate linkers (oxalic acid) using TiO2 as an example. In this method, the di-carboxylate linkers react with surface hydroxyls on metal oxide nanoparticles forming covalent, ester-like bonds, which enable the binding of two metal oxide particles, one at either end of the linker and facilitates efficient self-assembly of one group of metal oxide nanoparticles homogeneously distributed onto the surface of another group. The oxalate linkers can then be removed by thermal decomposition. This approach is shown to be effective using differently-sized TiO2 nanoparticles, namely in-house synthesized 3-5nm anatase nanocrystals and Degussa P25 titania particles (mean 21nm particle size). Our data show that the application of a high temperature heat treatment (450°C for 30min), conventionally applied to achieve a stable porous structure by thermal decomposition of the linker molecules and by inducing inter-particle necking, damages the surface area of the nanostructured material. However, here we show that sintering at 300°C for 30min or by flash near infrared radiation sintering for 12s efficiently decomposes the oxalate linkers and stabilizes the nanostructure of the material whilst maintaining its high surface area. PMID:25525978

  20. Self-assembly scenarios of patchy colloidal particles

    E-print Network

    G. Doppelbauer; E. G. Noya; E. Bianchi; G. Kahl

    2012-06-13

    The rapid progress in precisely designing the surface decoration of patchy colloidal particles offers a new, yet unexperienced freedom to create building entities for larger, more complex structures in soft matter systems. However, it is extremely difficult to predict the large variety of ordered equilibrium structures that these particles are able to undergo under the variation of external parameters, such as temperature or pressure. Here we show that, by a novel combination of two theoretical tools, it is indeed possible to predict the self-assembly scenario of patchy colloidal particles: on one hand, a reliable and efficient optimization tool based on ideas of evolutionary algorithms helps to identify the ordered equilibrium structures to be expected at T = 0; on the other hand, suitable simulation techniques allow to estimate via free energy calculations the phase diagram at finite temperature. With these powerful approaches we are able to identify the broad variety of emerging self-assembly scenarios for spherical colloids decorated by four patches and we investigate and discuss the stability of the crystal structures on modifying in a controlled way the tetrahedral arrangement of the patches.

  1. Self assembly of highly-ordered nanoparticle monolayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Bigioni, T. P.; Lin, X.-M.; Nguyen, T. T.; Corwin, E. I.; Witten, T. A.; Jaeger, H. M.; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    When a drop of a colloidal solution of nanoparticles dries on a surface, it leaves behind coffee-stain-like rings of material with lace-like patterns or clumps of particles in the interior. These non-uniform mass distributions are manifestations of far-from-equilibrium effects, such as fluid flows and solvent fluctuations during late-stage drying. However, recently a strikingly different drying regime promising highly uniform, long-range-ordered nanocrystal monolayers has been found. Here we make direct, real-time and real-space observations of nanocrystal self-assembly to reveal the mechanism. We show how the morphology of drop-deposited nanoparticle films is controlled by evaporation kinetics and particle interactions with the liquid-air interface. In the presence of an attractive particle-interface interaction, rapid early-stage evaporation dynamically produces a two-dimensional solution of nanoparticles at the liquid-air interface, from which nanoparticle islands nucleate and grow. This self-assembly mechanism produces monolayers with exceptional long-range ordering that are compact over macroscopic areas, despite the far-from-equilibrium evaporation process. This new drop-drying regime is simple, robust and scalable, is insensitive to the substrate material and topography, and has a strong preference for forming monolayer films. As such, it stands out as an excellent candidate for the fabrication of technologically important ultra thin film materials for sensors, optical devices and magnetic storage media.

  2. Self-assembly of hydrogensquarates: crystal structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Koleva, B B; Kolev, T; Seidel, R W; Spiteller, M; Mayer-Figge, H; Sheldrick, W S

    2009-04-01

    The self-assembly of the hydrogensquarates is elucidated by means of linear-polarized infrared (IR-LD) spectroscopy of oriented colloids in nematic host and the so-called reducing-difference procedure for polarized IR-LD spectra interpretation. The scopes and limitation are discussed on five novel derivatives of squaric acid and its anions, that is, 2-chloro-3-aminopyridinium hydrogensquarate (1), bis (1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinium) squarate (2), bis hydrogensquarate dihydrate salt of 4-(aminomethyl)pyridine (3), N-(2-ammoniumethyl)-piperazinium monohydrate hydrogensquarate squarate (4), and 3-nitropyridinium hydrogensquarate monohydrate (5), respectively. The structures of these compounds 1-5 were solved by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the crystallographic data were used for the experimental elucidation of the corresponding IR spectra of crystals with respect to studying Fermi-resonance (FR), Davydov splitting (DS), and Fermi-Davydov (FD) as well as Evans' hole effects. The various motifs for self-assembly of squaric acid and its anions in the organic crystals are discussed together with their IR-spectroscopic properties. PMID:19278235

  3. Silver nanoprisms self-assembly on differently functionalized silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipavicius, J.; Chodosovskaja, A.; Beganskiene, A.; Kareiva, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work colloidal silica/silver nanoprisms (NPRs) composite coatings were made. Firstly colloidal silica sols were synthesized by sol-gel method and produced coatings on glass by dip-coating technique. Next coatings were silanized by (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (AEAPTMS), (3- Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Silver NPRs where synthesized via seed-mediated method and high yield of 94±15 nm average edge length silver NPRs were obtained with surface plasmon resonance peak at 921 nm. Silica-Silver NPRs composite coatings obtained by selfassembly on silica coated-functionalized surface. In order to find the most appropriate silanization way for Silver NPRs self-assembly, the composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), water contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) methods. Results have showed that surface functionalization is necessary to achieve self-assembled Ag NPRs layer. MPTMS silanized coatings resulted sparse distribution of Ag NPRs. Most homogeneous, even distribution composite coatings obtained on APTES functionalized silica coatings, while AEAPTMS induced strong aggregation of Silver NPRs.

  4. 1-Dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayers on cobalt.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Sébastien; Hennart, Alexandre; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2011-12-20

    Cobalt and its alloys are used in a broad range of application fields. However, the use of this metal is especially limited by its strongly oxidizable nature. The use of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is a very efficient way to protect against such oxidation and/or to inhibit corrosion. This surface modification method has been particularly applied to oxidizable metals such as copper or nickel, yet the modification of cobalt surfaces by alkanethiol SAMs received limited attention up to now. In this work, we study the influence of parameters by which to control the self-assembly process of 1-dodecanethiol monolayers on cobalt: nature of the surface pretreatment, solvent, immersion time, and concentration. Each of these parameters has been optimized to obtain a densely packed and stable monolayer able to efficiently prevent the reoxidation of the modified cobalt substrates. The obtained monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The stability of the optimized 1-dodecanethiol monolayer upon air exposure for 28 days has been confirmed by XPS. PMID:22040160

  5. Liposomes self-assembled from electrosprayed composite microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deng-Guang; Yang, Jun-He; Wang, Xia; Tian, Feng

    2012-03-01

    Composite microparticles, consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), naproxen (NAP) and lecithin (PC), have been successfully prepared using an electrospraying process and exploited as templates to manipulate molecular self-assembly for the synthesis of liposomes in situ. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations demonstrate that the microparticles have an average diameter of 960 ± 140 nm and a homogeneous structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) results verify that the building blocks NAP and PC are scattered in the polymer matrix in a molecular way owing to the very fast drying of the electrospraying process and the favorable secondary interactions among the components. FESEM, scanning probe microscope (SPM) and TEM observations demonstrate that the liposomes can be achieved through molecular self-assembly in situ when the microparticles contact water thanks to ‘like prefers like’ and by means of the confinement effect of the microparticles. The liposomes have an encapsulation rate of 91.3%, and 80.7% of the drug in the liposomes can be freed into the dissolution medium in a sustained way and by a diffusion mechanism over a period of 24 h. The developed strategy not only provides a new, facile, and effective method to assemble and organize molecules of multiple components into liposomes with electrosprayed microparticles as templates, but also opens a new avenue for nanofabrication in a step-by-step and controllable way.

  6. Self-assembling and self-limiting monolayer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foest, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Martin; Gargouri, Hassan

    2014-02-01

    Effects of spatial ordering of molecules on surfaces are commonly utilized to deposit ultra-thin films with a thickness of a few nm. In this review paper, several methods are discussed, that are distinguished from other thin film deposition processes by exactly these effects that lead to self-assembling and self-limiting layer growth and eventually to coatings with unique and fascinating properties and applications in micro-electronics, optics, chemistry, or biology. Traditional methods for the formation of self-assembled films of ordered organic molecules, such as the Langmuir-Blodgett technique along with thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of inorganic molecules are evaluated. The overview is complemented by more recent developments for the deposition of organic or hybrid films by molecular layer deposition. Particular attention is given to plasma assisted techniques, either as a preparative, supplementary step or as inherent part of the deposition as in plasma enhanced ALD or plasma assisted, repeated grafting deposition. The different methods are compared and their film formation mechanisms along with their advantages are presented from the perspective of a plasma scientist. The paper contains lists of established film compounds and a collection of the relevant literature is provided for further reading.

  7. Modeling the self-assembly of the cellulosome enzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Bomble, Yannick J; Beckham, Gregg T; Matthews, James F; Nimlos, Mark R; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2011-02-18

    Most bacteria use free enzymes to degrade plant cell walls in nature. However, some bacteria have adopted a different strategy wherein enzymes can either be free or tethered on a protein scaffold forming a complex called a cellulosome. The study of the structure and mechanism of these large macromolecular complexes is an active and ongoing research topic, with the goal of finding ways to improve biomass conversion using cellulosomes. Several mechanisms involved in cellulosome formation remain unknown, including how cellulosomal enzymes assemble on the scaffoldin and what governs the population of cellulosomes created during self-assembly. Here, we present a coarse-grained model to study the self-assembly of cellulosomes. The model captures most of the physical characteristics of three cellulosomal enzymes (Cel5B, CelS, and CbhA) and the scaffoldin (CipA) from Clostridium thermocellum. The protein structures are represented by beads connected by restraints to mimic the flexibility and shapes of these proteins. From a large simulation set, the assembly of cellulosomal enzyme complexes is shown to be dominated by their shape and modularity. The multimodular enzyme, CbhA, binds statistically more frequently to the scaffoldin than CelS or Cel5B. The enhanced binding is attributed to the flexible nature and multimodularity of this enzyme, providing a longer residence time around the scaffoldin. The characterization of the factors influencing the cellulosome assembly process may enable new strategies to create designers cellulosomes. PMID:21098021

  8. Glycosylated Self-Assembled Monolayers for Arrays and Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, carbohydrates (glycans) have received growing attention for their many roles in biological systems, including pathogenesis, receptor-ligand interactions, and cell signaling. To unravel the biology of this important category of biomolecules, a host of new tools have been developed for glycomics investigation. At the forefront is the carbohydrate microarray, developed to immobilize functional glycans on a solid substrate to rapidly screen a variety of potential binding partners (carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, cells, and viruses). The essential role played by surface modification on glycan microarray performance requires new methods to rigorously characterize glycan surface chemistries. Due to their highly reproducible nature and well-studied properties, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold are powerful models for presenting glycans on a solid substrate, engineering biomimetic microenvironments and exploring the bioactivity of immobilized carbohydrates via surface plasmon resonance (SPR). However, it can be challenging to prepare high quality glycosylated SAMs (glyco-SAMs) that retain their biological function following surface immobilization. Herein, a selection of versatile methods for the preparation of glyco-SAMs using natural and chemically modified glycans is described. This chapter will highlight the following three immobilization techniques: (1) direct self assembly using thiolated glycosides onto gold, (2) tethering aminated glycosides onto amine-reactive SAMs, and (3) conjugating natural glycan onto divinyl sulfone-activated SAMs. PMID:22057519

  9. Molecular Self-Assembly at Metal-Electrolyte Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thanh Hai; Wandelt, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of molecular layers has become an important strategy in modern design of functional materials. However, in particular, large organic molecules may no longer be sufficiently volatile to be deposited by vapor deposition. In this case, deposition from solution may be a promising route; in ionic form, these molecules may even be soluble in water. In this contribution, we present and discuss results on the electrochemical deposition of viologen- and porphyrin molecules as well as their co-adsorption on chloride modified Cu(100) and Cu(111) single crystal electrode surfaces from aqueous acidic solutions. Using in situ techniques like cyclic voltametry and high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, as well as ex-situ photoelectron spectroscopy data the highly ordered self-assembled organic layers are characterized with respect to their electrochemical behavior, lateral order and inner conformation as well as phase transitions thereof as a function of their redox-state and the symmetry of the substrate. As a result, detailed structure models are derived and are discussed in terms of the prevailing interactions. PMID:23439555

  10. Packing and self-assembly of truncated triangular bipyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by breakthroughs in the synthesis of faceted nano- and colloidal particles, as well as theoretical and computational studies of their packings, we investigate a family of truncated triangular bipyramids. We report dense periodic packings with small unit cells that were obtained via numerical and analytical optimization. The maximal packing fraction ?max changes continuously with the truncation parameter t. Eight distinct packings are identified based on discontinuities in the first and second derivatives of ?max(t). These packings differ in the number of particles in the fundamental domain (unit cell) and the type of contacts between the particles. In particular, we report two packings with four particles in the unit cell for which both ?max(t) and ?max'(t) are continuous and the discontinuity occurs in the second derivative only. In the self-assembly simulations that we perform for larger boxes with 2048 particles, only one out of eight packings is found to assemble. In addition, the degenerate quasicrystal reported previously for triangular bipyramids without truncation [Haji-Akbari , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.215702 107, 215702 (2011)] assembles for truncations as high as 0.45. The self-assembly propensities for the structures formed in the thermodynamic limit are explained using the isoperimetric quotient of the particles and the coordination number in the disordered fluid and in the assembled structure.

  11. Engineering protocells: prospects for self-assembly and nanoscale production-lines.

    PubMed

    Miller, David M; Gulbis, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing ease of producing nucleic acids and proteins to specification offers potential for design and fabrication of artificial synthetic "organisms" with a myriad of possible capabilities. The prospects for these synthetic organisms are significant, with potential applications in diverse fields including synthesis of pharmaceuticals, sources of renewable fuel and environmental cleanup. Until now, artificial cell technology has been largely restricted to the modification and metabolic engineering of living unicellular organisms. This review discusses emerging possibilities for developing synthetic protocell "machines" assembled entirely from individual biological components. We describe a host of recent technological advances that could potentially be harnessed in design and construction of synthetic protocells, some of which have already been utilized toward these ends. More elaborate designs include options for building self-assembling machines by incorporating cellular transport and assembly machinery. We also discuss production in miniature, using microfluidic production lines. While there are still many unknowns in the design, engineering and optimization of protocells, current technologies are now tantalizingly close to the capabilities required to build the first prototype protocells with potential real-world applications. PMID:25815781

  12. Anisotropic nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis we consider the influence of anisotropy on the behaviour of colloids using theory and simulations. The recent increase in the ability to synthesize anisotropic particles (cubes, caps, octapods, etc.) has led to samples of sufficient quality to perform self-assembly experiments. Our investigation is therefore particularly relevant to current and future experimental studies of colloids. We examine several topics for which shape anisotropy plays an important role: (1.) - Interfacial adsorption. We introduced the triangular-tessellation technique to approximate the surface areas and line length which are associated with a plane-particle intersection. Our method allowed us to determine the free energy of adsorption for a single irregular colloid with heterogeneous surface properties adsorbed at a flat liquid-liquid interface in the Pieranski approximation. Ellipsoids only adsorbed at the interface perpendicular to the interfacial normal. However, for cylinders we could find a metastable adsorption minimum corresponding to parallel adsorption. We also considered the possible time dependence of the adsorption process using simple dynamics. Finally, we studied the adsorption of truncated nanocubes with a contact-angle surface pattern and we observed that there are three prototypical equilibrium adsorption configurations for these particles. (2.) - Crystal-structure prediction. We extended an existing crystal-structure-prediction algorithm to predict structures for systems comprised of irregular hard particles. Using this technique we examined the high-density crystal structures for 17 irregular nonconvex shapes and we confirmed several mathematical conjectures for the packings of a large set of 142 convex polyhedra. We also proved that we have obtained the densest configurations for rhombicuboctahedra and rhombic enneacontrahedra, respectively. Moreover, we considered a family of truncated cubes, which interpolates between a cube and an octahedron, for which we obtained a fascinating richness in crystal structures. For the octahedron we determined the equation of state and we obtained a liquid, a (metastable) body-centred-cubic rotator phase, and a crystal phase. (3.) - Octapod hierarchical self-assembly. We analysed the recently observed hierarchical self-assembly of octapod-shaped nanocrystals (octapods) into three-dimensional (3D) superstructures. We constructed an empirical simulation model capable of reproducing the initial chain-formation step of the self-assembly. The van-der-Waals (vdW) interactions between octapods suspended in an (a)polar medium were obtained by means of a Hamaker-de-Boer-type integration and the nature of these interactions allowed us to justify elements of our empirical model. We used the theoretical vdW calculation, together with the experimental and simulation results, to formulate a mechanism which explained the observed self-assembly in terms of the solvent-dependence and directionality of the octapod-octapod interactions. (4.) - Ionic screening of charged Janus particles. We studied the screening of charged Janus particles in an electrolyte by primitive-model Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a wide variety of parameters. We also introduced a method to compare these results to the predictions of nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. The comparison of MC and PB results allowed us to probe the range of validity of the PB approximation. This range of validity corresponds well to the range that was predicted by field-theoretical studies of homogeneously charged flat surfaces.

  13. Polyelectrolyte-assisted noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with ordered self-assemblies of a water-soluble porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Suzana M; Raja, Perumal; Saini, Vipin K; Viana, Ana S; Serp, Philippe; Costa, Sílvia M B

    2012-11-12

    The self-assembly and induced supramolecular chirality of meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) on both single-wall (SWCNT) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are investigated. Under mild pH conditions (pH 3), TSPP forms aggregates when CNTs are dispersed in an aqueous solution containing positively charged polyelectrolytes such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) or poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). Evidence for the geometry of the porphyrin aggregates is obtained from absorption spectra, whereby the fingerprints of J- and H-aggregates are clearly seen only in the presence of smaller-diameter nanotubes. J-aggregates are better stabilized with PLL, whereas in the presence of PAH mainly H-aggregates prevail. Excited-state interactions within these nanohybrids are studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. The porphyrin emission intensity in the nanohybrid solution is significantly quenched compared to that of TSPP alone, and this implies strong electronic interaction between CNTs and porphyrin molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) further supports that porphyrin arrays are associated with the MWCNT sidewalls wrapped in PLL. In the case of the SWCNT hybrid, spherical structures associated with longer fluorescence lifetime appeared after one week, indicative of H-aggregates of TSPP. The latter are the result of ?-? stacking of porphyrin units on neighboring nanotubes facilitated by the strong tendency of these nanotubes to interact with each other. These results highlight the importance of optimum dimensions and surface-area architectures of CNTs in the control/stability of the porphyrin aggregates with promising properties for light harvesting. PMID:22887177

  14. Engineering of Ru(II) dyes for interfacial and light-harvesting optimization.

    PubMed

    Lobello, Maria Grazia; Wu, Kuan-Lin; Reddy, Marri Anil; Marotta, Gabriele; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Chi, Yun; Chandrasekharam, Malapaka; Vitillaro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-02-21

    A new Ru(II) dye, Ru(L1)(L2) (NCS)2, L1 = (4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)-4'(4-carboxyl-phenyl 2,2'-bipyridine) and L2 = (4-4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine), labelled MC112, based on a dissymmetric bipyridine ligand for improved interfacial and optical properties, was synthesized and used in DSCs, yielding photovoltaic efficiencies of 7.6% under standard AM 1.5 sunlight and an excellent device stability. Increased light harvesting and IPCE maximum were observed with MC112 compared to the prototypical homoleptic N719 dye, due to the functionalized bipyridyne ligand acting as an antenna. In addition, the mixed bipyridyne ligand allowed MC112 binding to TiO2 to occur via three anchoring carboxylic groups, thus exhibiting similar interfacial properties to those of the N719 dye. DFT/TDDFT calculations were performed on the new dye, both in solution and adsorbed on a TiO2 surface model, revealing that the peculiar photovoltaic properties of the MC112 dye are related to its anchoring mode. The new design rule thus allows us to engineer both light-harvesting and interfacial properties in the same dye. PMID:24366343

  15. Light-Harvesting Antenna System from the Phototrophic Bacterium Roseiflexus castenholzii

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Aaron M.; Qian, Pu; Tang, Q; Bocian, David F; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, R. E.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved diverse light-harvesting complexes to harness light of various qualities and intensities. Photosynthetic bacteria can have (bacterio)chlorophyll Q{sub y} antenna absorption bands ranging from ?650 to ?1100 nm. This broad range of wavelengths has allowed many organisms to thrive in unique light environments. Roseiflexus castenholzii is a niche-adapted, filamentous anoxygenic phototroph (FAP) that lacks chlorosomes, the dominant antenna found in most green bacteria, and here we describe the purification of a full complement of photosynthetic complexes: the light-harvesting (LH) antenna, reaction center (RC), and core complex (RC-LH). By high-performance liquid chromatography separation of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin pigments extracted from the core complex and the RC, the number of subunits that comprise the antenna was determined to be 15 ± 1. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of the carbonyl stretching region displayed modes indicating that 3C-acetyl groups of BChl a are all involved in molecular interactions probably similar to those found in LH1 complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria. Finally, two-dimensional projections of negatively stained core complexes and the LH antenna revealed a closed, slightly elliptical LH ring with an average diameter of 130 ± 10 Å surrounding a single RC that lacks an H-subunit but is associated with a tetraheme c-type cytochrome.

  16. Chlorophyll a and carotenoid triplet states in light-harvesting complex II of higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, E J; Dukker, F M; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1995-01-01

    Laser-flash-induced transient absorption measurements were performed on trimeric light-harvesting complex II to study carotenoid (Car) and chlorophyll (Chl) triplet states as a function of temperature. In these complexes efficient transfer of triplets from Chl to Car occurs as a protection mechanism against singlet oxygen formation. It appears that at room temperature all triplets are being transferred from Chl to Car; at lower temperatures (77 K and below) the transfer is less efficient and chlorophyll triplets can be observed. In the presence of oxygen at room temperature the Car triplets are partly quenched by oxygen and two different Car triplet spectral species can be distinguished because of a difference in quenching rate. One of these spectral species is replaced by another one upon cooling to 4 Ki demonstrating that at least three carotenoids are in close contact with chlorophylls. The triplet minus singlet absorption (T-S) spectra show maxima at 504-506 nm and 517-523 nm, respectively. In the Chl Qy region absorption changes can be observed that are caused by Car triplets. The T-S spectra in the Chl region show an interesting temperature dependence which indicates that various Car's are in contact with different Chl a molecules. The results are discussed in terms of the crystal structure of light-harvesting complex II. PMID:8599673

  17. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1.

    PubMed

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-14

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC. PMID:22897312

  18. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Nature-Like Photosynthesis of Water and Carbon Dioxide with Femtosecond Laser Induced Self-Assembled Metal Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Mengyan; Huo, Haibin; Ren, Haizhou; Yan, Fadong; Johnson, Michael

    Large-scale replication of the natural process of photosynthesis is a crucial subject of storing solar energy and saving our environment. Here, we report femtosecond laser induced self-assembled metal nanostructure arrays, which are easily mass producible on earth-abundant metals, can directly synthesize liquid and solid hydrocarbon compounds from carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight at a production rate of more than 1 × 105 ?L/(gh) that is significantly (103-106 times) higher than those in previous studies.1,2 The efficiency for storing solar energy of the photosynthesis is about 10% in the present simple experimental setup which can be further improved. Moreover, different from previous artificial photosynthesis works, this phenomenon presents a new mechanism that, through a surface-enhanced photodissociation process, nature-like photosynthesis can be performed artificially.

  20. Light-harvesting regulation from leaf to molecule with the emphasis on rapid changes in antenna size.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-Quan; Chen, Yue; Chen, Gen-Yun

    2015-05-01

    In the sunlight-fluctuating environment, plants often encounter both light-deficiency and light-excess cases. Therefore, regulation of light harvesting is absolutely essential for photosynthesis in order to maximize light utilization at low light and avoid photodamage of the photosynthetic apparatus at high light. Plants have developed a series of strategies of light-harvesting regulation during evolution. These strategies include rapid responses such as leaf movement and chloroplast movement, state transitions, and reversible dissociation of some light-harvesting complex of the photosystem II (LHCIIs) from PSII core complexes, and slow acclimation strategies such as changes in the protein abundance of light-harvesting antenna and modifications of leaf morphology, structure, and compositions. This review discusses successively these strategies and focuses on the rapid change in antenna size, namely reversible dissociation of some peripheral light-harvesting antennas (LHCIIs) from PSII core complex. It is involved in protective role and species dependence of the dissociation, differences between the dissociation and state transitions, relationship between the dissociation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation, and possible mechanism for thermal dissipation by the dissociated LHCIIs. PMID:25773873

  1. Construction of energy transfer pathways self-assembled from DNA-templated stacks of anthracene.

    PubMed

    Iwaura, Rika; Yui, Hiroharu; Someya, Yuu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    We describe optical properties of anthracene stacks formed from single-component self-assembly of thymidylic acid-appended anthracene 2,6-bis[5-(3'-thymidylic acid)pentyloxy] anthracene (TACT) and the binary self-assembly of TACT and complementary 20-meric oligoadenylic acid (TACT/dA20) in an aqueous buffer. UV-Vis and emission spectra for the single-component self-assembly of TACT and the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20 were very consistent with stacked acene moieties in both self-assemblies. Interestingly, time-resolved fluorescence spectra from anthracene stacks exhibited very different features of the single-component and binary self-assemblies. In the single-component self-assembly of TACT, a dynamic Stokes shift (DSS) and relatively short fluorescence lifetime (?=0.35ns) observed at around 450nm suggested that the anthracene moieties were flexible. Moreover, a broad emission at 530nm suggested the formation of an excited dimer (excimer). In the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20, we detected a broad, red-shifted emission component at 534nm with a lifetime (?=0.4ns) shorter than that observed in the TACT single-component self-assembly. Combining these results with the emission spectrum of the binary self-assembly of TACT/5'-HEX dA20, we concluded that the energy transfer pathway was constructed by columnar anthracene stacks formed from the DNA-templated self-assembly of TACT. PMID:24342131

  2. Electrochemical Properties of Organosilane Self Assembled Monolayers on Aluminum 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2004-01-01

    Self assembled monolayers are commonly used to modify surfaces. Within the last 15 years, self assembled monolayers have been investigated as a way to protect from corrosion[1,2] or biofouling.[3] In this study, self assembled monolayers of decitriethoxysilane (C10H21Si(OC2H5)3) and octadecyltriethoxysilane (C18H37Si(OC2H5)3) were formed on aluminum 2024-T3. The modified surfaces and bare Al 2024 were characterized by dynamic water contact angle measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XIPS) and infrared spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M NaCl was used to characterize the monolayers and evaluate their corrosion protection properties. The advancing water contact angle and infrared measurements show that the mono layers form a surface where the hydrocarbon chains are packed and oriented away from the surface, consistent with what is found in similar systems. The contact angle hysteresis measured in these systems is relatively large, perhaps indicating that the hydrocarbon chains are not as well packed as monolayers formed on other substrates. The results of the EIS measurements were modeled using a Randle's circuit modified by changing the capacitor to a constant phase element. The constant phase element values were found to characterize the monolayer. The capacitance of the monolayer modified surface starts lower than the bare Al 2024, but approaches values similar to the bare Al 2024 within 24 hours as the monolayer is degraded. The n values found for bare Al 2024 quickly approach the value of a true capacitor and are greater than 0.9 within hours after the start of exposure. For the monolayer modified structure, n can stay lower than 0.9 for a longer period of time. In fact, n for the monolayer modified surfaces is different from the bare surface even after the capacitance values have converged. This indicates that the deviation from ideal capacitance is the most sensitive indicator of the presence of the monolayer.

  3. From self-assembly fundamental knowledge to nanomedicine developments.

    PubMed

    Monduzzi, Maura; Lampis, Sandrina; Murgia, Sergio; Salis, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    This review highlights the key role of NMR techniques in demonstrating the molecular aspects of the self-assembly of surfactant molecules that nowadays constitute the basic knowledge which modern nanoscience relies on. The aim is to provide a tutorial overview. The story of a rigorous scientific approach to understand self-assembly in surfactant systems and biological membranes starts in the early seventies when the progresses of SAXRD and NMR technological facilities allowed to demonstrate the existence of ordered soft matter, and the validity of Tanford approach concerning self-assembly at a molecular level. Particularly, NMR quadrupolar splittings, NMR chemical shift anisotropy, and NMR relaxation of dipolar and quadrupolar nuclei in micellar solutions, microemulsions, and liquid crystals proved the existence of an ordered polar-apolar interface, on the NMR time scale. NMR data, rationalized in terms of the two-step model of relaxation, allowed to quantify the dynamic aspects of the supramolecular aggregates in different soft matter systems. In addition, NMR techniques allowed to obtain important information on counterion binding as well as on size of the aggregate through molecular self-diffusion. Indeed NMR self-diffusion proved without any doubt the existence of bicontinuous microemulsions and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals, suggested by pioneering and brilliant interpretation of SAXRD investigations. Moreover, NMR self-diffusion played a fundamental role in the understanding of microemulsion and emulsion nanostructures, phase transitions in phase diagrams, and particularly percolation phenomena in microemulsions. Since the nineties, globalization of the knowledge along with many other technical facilities such as electron microscopy, particularly cryo-EM, produced huge progresses in surfactant and colloid science. Actually we refer to nanoscience: bottom up/top down strategies allow to build nanodevices with applications spanning from ICT to food technology. Developments in the applied fields have also been addressed by important progresses in theoretical skills aimed to understand intermolecular forces, and specific ion interactions. Nevertheless, this is still an open question. Our predictive ability has however increased, hence more ambitious targets can be planned. Nanomedicine represents a major challenging field with its main aims: targeted drug delivery, diagnostic, theranostics, tissue engineering, and personalized medicine. Few recent examples will be mentioned. Although the real applications of these systems still need major work, nevertheless new challenges are open, and perspectives based on integrated multidisciplinary approaches would enable both a deeper basic knowledge and the expected advances in biomedical field. PMID:24182715

  4. Charge conduction and breakdown mechanisms in self-assembled nanodielectrics.

    PubMed

    DiBenedetto, Sara A; Facchetti, Antonio; Ratner, Mark A; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-05-27

    Developing alternative high dielectric constant (k) materials for use as gate dielectrics is essential for continued advances in conventional inorganic CMOS and organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Thicker films of high-k materials suppress tunneling leakage currents while providing effective capacitances comparable to those of thin films of lower-k materials. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and multilayers offer attractive options for alternative OTFT gate dielectrics. One class of materials, organosilane-based self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs), has been shown to form robust films with excellent insulating and surface passivation properties, enhancing both organic and inorganic TFT performance and lowering device operating voltages. Since gate leakage current through the dielectric is one factor limiting continued TFT performance improvements, we investigate here the current (voltage, temperature) (I (V,T)) transport characteristics of SAND types II (pi-conjugated layer) and III (sigma-saturated + pi-conjugated layers) in Si/native SiO(2)/SAND/Au metal-insulator-metal (MIS) devices over the temperature range -60 to +100 degrees C. It is found that the location of the pi-conjugated layer with respect to the Si/SiO(2) substrate surface in combination with a saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier is crucial in controlling the overall leakage current through the various SAND structures. For small applied voltages, hopping transport dominates at all temperatures for the pi-conjugated system (type II). However, for type III SANDs, the sigma- and pi-monolayers dominate the transport in two different transport regimes: hopping between +25 degrees C and +100 degrees C, and an apparent switch to tunneling for temperatures below 25 degrees C. The sigma-saturated alkylsilane tunneling barrier functions to reduce type III current leakage by blocking injected electrons, and by enabling bulk-dominated (Poole-Frenkel) transport vs electrode-dominated (Schottky) transport in type II SANDs. These observations provide insights for designing next-generation self-assembled gate dielectrics, since the bulk-dominated transport resulting from combining sigma- and pi-layers should enable realization of gate dielectrics with further enhanced performance. PMID:19408943

  5. Force microscopy of self-assembled amphiphilic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Richard Kenton

    Scanning force microscopy is a powerful technique to study surfaces in vacuum, air or liquids because of its nanometer spatial resolution and piconewton force resolution. The work presented here uses colloidal (steric and double layer) forces to investigate the shape of surfactant micelles on an isotropic hydrophobic surface (Chapter 3). Frictional forces are used in this work as a useful contrast mechanism in the study of monolayer water films (Chapter 4), self-assembled monolayers (Chapter 6), and to detect the presence and concentration of a 2D gas phase of molecules on a surface (Chapter 5). The invention of "soft contact" mode Atomic Force Microscopy imaging allows the direct imaging of surfactant micelles at the solid-liquid interface. One of the results in this work was the determination of the structure of surface micelles on an isotropic hydrophobic surface. This model system is useful for comparison to crystalline surfaces to determine the relative importance of simple hard-wall confinement versus the influence of the underlying substrate lattice. Lateral (friction) forces have also proven to be a useful contrast mechanism in imaging surfaces. The results presented here demonstrate the use of lateral force (friction) microscopy as a highly sensitive method to detect a 2D gas of amphiphiles on a mica surface, making this technique useful in studying the early stages of monolayer formation. This sensitivity also makes friction a useful contrast mechanism when imaging patterned self-assembled monolayers and ultra-thin water films. A simple and inexpensive method of creating micrometer to sub-micrometer structures was reported by Kumar and Whitesides in 1993. This technique, called microcontact printing, uses an elastomeric replica of a master to pattern a surface, typically with self-assembled, covalently bonded molecules. Microcontact printing of non-covalently bonding molecules has not been as extensively studied, with the exceptions of lipid bilayers of phosphatidylcholine and proteins. Chapters 5 and 6 will show results of stamping several types of alkyl derivatives on a model surface (mica). These non-covalently bonding molecules show much greater diffusion and spreading during stamping, which reveal details of the mechanisms of microcontact printing that are obscured with the strongly interacting, covalently bonding systems.

  6. Molecular engineering and characterization of self-assembled biorecognition surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sheng

    The development of molecular engineering techniques for the fabrication of biomaterial surfaces is of importance in the field of biomaterials. It offers opportunities for better understanding of biological processes on material surfaces and rational design of contemporary biomaterials. Our work in this area aims to develop novel engineering strategies to design biorecognition surfaces via self-assembly and surface derivatization. Fundamental issues regarding self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure, formation kinetics, and chemical derivatization were investigated systematically using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle measurements. Novel engineering concepts based on multifunctionality and statistical pattern matching were introduced and applied to develop biomimetic surfaces. Our study illustrated that molecules underwent structural transition and orientation development during self-assembly formation, from a disordered, low-density, more liquid-like structure to a highly ordered, closed-packed crystalline-like structure. Surface properties, such as wettability and the reactivity of outermost functional groups can be related to film structure, packing density, as well as molecular orientation. Given the order and organization of SAMs, the accessibility and reactivity of the outermost functional groups, reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and SAMs stability were studied systematically by surface derivatization of trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The TFAA derivatization reactions exhibited rapid kinetics on the hydroxyl-terminated SAMs. The data from complementary surface analytical techniques consistently indicated a nearly complete surface reaction. Biomimetic surfaces were made by random immobilization of amino acid of arginine (R), glycine (G), and aspartic acid (D) on well-defined SAMs. The surface reaction process was systematically characterized by ESCA. In vitro cell adhesion studies demonstrated that the designed surfaces had the capability to stimulate cell attachment and spreading, even in the absence of serum proteins. The biospecific recognition between the surface and the cell receptors was attributed to the appropriate chemical environment and statistical pattern matching between the randomly distributed R+G+D groups on the surface and cell receptors.

  7. Growth and characterization of self-assembled ferromagnetic iron nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaddes Ardabili, Ladan

    In recent years perpendicular ferromagnetic nanowires have attracted considerable interest due to their potential use in many areas of advanced nanotechnology, specifically high-density recording media. An ideal recording medium in this regard consists of a densely organized assembly of nanometer-scale ferromagnets with high magnetization and suitable coercivity. In this dissertation a novel and simple approach to create self-assembled nanowires of alpha-Fe through the decomposition of a suitably chosen perovskite is reported. We illustrate the principle behind this approach using the reaction 2La0.5Sr0.5FeO3 ? LaSrFeO4 + Fe + O2 that occurs during the deposition of La0.5Sr 0.5FeO3 under reducing conditions. This leads to the spontaneous formation of an array of single crystalline alpha-Fe nanowires embedded in LaSrFeO4 matrix, which grow perpendicular to the substrate. The embedded iron nanowires are an illustration of three-dimensional heteroepitaxy. The lateral diameter and spacing of the nanowires are strongly dependent on growth temperature. By reducing the temperature of deposition, the size and spacing between the iron nanowires decrease. The changes in the diameter of the nanowires follow an Arrhenius behavior and suggest that the growth of the nanowires is kinetically controlled by diffusion. In addition, their in-plane shape evolves from circular to octahedral and square shape with [110] facets dominating as the growth temperature increases and the elastic energy dominates over the surface energy. The iron nanowires exhibit square shaped out-of-plane hysteresis loops with a relatively large uniaxial anisotropy with the easy access normal to the film plane. The calculated anisotropy field indicates that the anisotropy observed is due to the cylindrical shape of the nanowires and shape anisotropy. The nanowires are also used as the nucleation sites for growth of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes for field emission applications. The diameter and shape of the carbon nanotubes are controlled by the diameter and length of the nanowires. It is believed that this approach to self-assembly of the ferromagnetic nanowires is generic and can be expected to yield epitaxial nanocomposites from other complex oxides as well. This opens a new and exciting path for processing of a broad range of nanomaterials through self-assembly.

  8. Principles Governing the Self Assembly of Polypeptide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahome, Newton

    Self assembling systems on the nanometer scale afford the advantage of being able to control submicron level events. In this study, we focus on the self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles (SAPN). The SAPN scaffold is made up of oligomerizing domains that align along the principle rotational axes of icosahedral symmetry. By aligning them along these axes, a particle with spherical geometry can be achieved. This particle can be utilized as a vaccine, as a drug delivery vehicle, or as a biomedical imaging device. This research will try to answer why the SAPN self-assembles into distinct molecular weight ranges while mostly maintaining a spherical morphology. The first means will be theoretical and computational, where we will utilize a mathematical formalism to find out how the packing of SAPN's monomeric units can occur within symmetric space. Then molecular dynamics will be run within this symmetric space to test the per amino acid residue susceptibility of SAPN towards becoming polymorphic in nature. Means for examining the aggregation propensity of SAPN will be also be tested. Specifically, the relationship of different sequences of SAPN with pH will be elucidated. Co-assembly of SAPN to reduce the surface density of an aggregation prone epitope will be tested. Also, aggregation reduction consisting of the exchange of an anionic denaturant with a positively charged suppressor in order to mitigate a priori peptide association and misfolding, will also be attempted. SAPN has been shown to be an immunogenic platform for the presentation of pathogen derived antigens. We will attempt to show the efficacy of presenting an antigen from HIV-1 which is structurally restrained to best match the native conformation on the virus. Immunological studies will be performed to test the effect of this approach, as well testing the antigenicity of the nanoparticle in the absence of adjuvant. Finally, the antigen presenting nanoparticles will undergo formulation testing, to measure the feasibility of SAPN for lyophilization. The regular buffers for refolding will be optimized, or replaced, in order to enhance the formation of a uniform powder, one that will not enhance the aggregation potential of the peptide species once freeze-drying has occurred.

  9. The Self-assembly of a Mini-fibril with Axial Periodicity from a Designed Collagen-mimetic Triple Helix.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder Jeet; Strawn, Rebecca; Bai, Hanying; Xu, Ke; Ordas, Gabriel; Matsui, Hiroshi; Xu, Yujia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we describe the self-assembly of a collagen-like periodic mini-fibril from a recombinant triple helix. The triple helix, designated Col108, is expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial gene and consists of a 378-residue triple helix domain organized into three pseudo-repeating sequence units. The peptide forms a stable triple helix with a melting temperature of 41 °C. Upon increases of pH and temperature, Col108 self-assembles in solution into smooth mini-fibrils with the cross-striated banding pattern typical of fibrillar collagens. The banding pattern is characterized by an axially repeating feature of ?35 nm as observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Both the negatively stained and the positively stained transmission electron microscopy patterns of the Col108 mini-fibrils are consistent with a staggered arrangement of triple helices having a staggering value of 123 residues, a value closely connected to the size of one repeat sequence unit. A mechanism is proposed for the mini-fibril formation of Col108 in which the axial periodicity is instigated by the built-in sequence periodicity and stabilized by the optimized interactions between the triple helices in a 1-unit staggered arrangement. Lacking hydroxyproline residues and telopeptides, two factors implicated in the fibrillogenesis of native collagen, the Col108 mini-fibrils demonstrate that sequence features of the triple helical domain alone are sufficient to "code" for axially repeating periodicity of fibrils. To our knowledge, Col108 is the first designed triple helix to self-assemble into periodic fibrils and offers a unique opportunity to unravel the specific molecular interactions of collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:25673694

  10. Directed assembly of functional light harvesting antenna complexes onto chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, Maryana; Maury, Pascale; Bruinink, Christiaan M.; van der Werf, Kees; Olsen, John D.; Timney, John A.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Hunter, C. Neil; Subramaniam, Vinod; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We report the directed assembly of the photosynthetic membrane proteins LH1 and LH2 isolated from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides onto chemically patterned substrates. Nanoimprint lithography was used to pattern discrete regions of amino- and fluoro-terminated or poly(ethylene glycol) self-assembled monolayers onto a glass substrate. Densely packed layers of assembled protein complexes were observed with atomic force microscopy. The protein complexes attached selectively to the amino-terminated regions by electrostatic interactions. Spectral images generated with a hybrid scanning probe and fluorescence microscope confirmed that the patterned proteins retained their native optical signatures.

  11. Student Learning about Biomolecular Self-Assembly Using Two Different External Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Gunnar E.; Larsson, Caroline; Olson, Arthur; Tibell, Lena A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly is the fundamental but counterintuitive principle that explains how ordered biomolecular complexes form spontaneously in the cell. This study investigated the impact of using two external representations of virus self-assembly, an interactive tangible three-dimensional model and a static two-dimensional image, on student learning…

  12. Atomically precise self-assembly of one-dimensional structures on silicon

    E-print Network

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    Atomically precise self-assembly of one-dimensional structures on silicon I. Barke, T.K. Ru-magnetic surface. An interesting by-product is a memory structure with self-assembled tracks that are five atom: Low-dimensional structures; Atomic wires; Silicon surfaces; One-dimensional physics; Scanning

  13. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy on a single self-assembled charge-tunable quantum dot

    E-print Network

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy on a single self-assembled charge-tunable quantum dot PL and absorption spectroscopy on the same single self- assembled quantum dot in a charge the corresponding transition in absorption. We have developed a model of the Coulomb blockade to account

  14. Macroscopic Synthesis of Self-Assembled Dissipative Structures Bartosz A. Grzybowski and George M. Whitesides*

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Macroscopic Synthesis of Self-Assembled Dissipative Structures Bartosz A. Grzybowski and George M coexisting, dynamically self-assembled aggregates of millimeter-sized, magnetized disks floating at a liquid order only when dissipating energyscan lead to multiple final structures; the structure(s) reached

  15. Biomimetic organization: Octapeptide self-assembly into nanotubes of viral capsid-like dimension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Céline Valéry; Maïté Paternostre; Bruno Robert; Thaddée Gulik-Krzywicki; Theyencheri Narayanan; Jean-Claude Dedieu; Gérard Keller; Maria-Luisa Torres; Roland Cherif-Cheikh; Pilar Calvo; Franck Artzner

    2003-01-01

    The controlled self-assembly of complex molecules into well defined hierarchical structures is a promising route for fabricating nanostructures. These nanoscale structures can be realized by naturally occurring proteins such as tobacco mosaic virus, capsid proteins, tubulin, actin, etc. Here, we report a simple alternative method based on self-assembling nanotubes formed by a synthetic therapeutic octapeptide, Lanreotide in water. We used

  16. Design and characterization of self-assembled nanostructures of block copolymers in solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly D. Hales

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembling amphiphilic block copolymers have been studied extensively due to their ability to form a wide range of morphologies including spheres, cylinders, and vesicles. Changing the molecular composition of the block copolymer, the relative block lengths, and the solution conditions can alter the assembly behavior. The main goal of this dissertation is to investigate the self-assembly of two different amphiphilic

  17. Error Rate Reduction in DNA Self-Assembly by Non-Constant Monomer Concentrations and Profiling

    E-print Network

    Ayers, Joseph

    Error Rate Reduction in DNA Self-Assembly by Non-Constant Monomer Concentrations and Profiling B based on profil- ing the monomers for reducing the error rate in DNA self- assembly. This technique utilizes the average concentration of the monomers (tiles) for a specific pattern as found by profiling its

  18. Langmuir 1994,10, 2041-2043 2041 Simulations of Self-AssembledMonolayers under

    E-print Network

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Langmuir 1994,10, 2041-2043 2041 Simulations of Self-AssembledMonolayers under Compression: Effect organicmoleculesin self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)and Langmuir-Blodgett films ob- served during tunneling,A.; Tomitori, M.; Ogletree,D. F.; Sautet, P. Langmuir 1993,9,3600. (3)Joyce, S. A.;Thomas, R. C.; Houston, J. E

  19. Self-assembly on Demand in a Group of Physical Autonomous Mobile Robots

    E-print Network

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    incapable of self-assembly. Yim et al.'s system [16] can climb near vertical walls. Individual modulesSelf-assembly on Demand in a Group of Physical Autonomous Mobile Robots Navigating Rough Terrain. Consider a group of autonomous, mobile robots with the ability to physically connect to one another (self

  20. The Self-Assembly Properties of a Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide Derivative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stals, Patrick J. M.; Haveman, Jan F.; Palmans, Anja R. A.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments involving the synthesis and characterization of a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative and its self-assembly properties are reported. These laboratory experiments combine organic synthesis, self-assembly, and physical characterization and are designed for upper-level undergraduate students to introduce the topic of…

  1. A Design Path for Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Patchy Colloids

    E-print Network

    Erik Edlund; Oskar Lindgren; Martin Nilsson Jacobi

    2014-05-12

    Patchy colloids are promising candidates for building blocks in directed self-assembly. To be successful the surface patterns need to both be simple enough to be synthesized, while feature-rich enough to cause the colloids to self-assemble into desired structures. Achieving this is a challenge for traditional synthesis methods. Recently it has been suggested that the surface pattern themselves can be made to self-assemble. In this paper we show that a wide range of functional structures can be made to self-assemble using this approach. More generally we present a design path for hierarchical targeted self-assembly of patchy colloids. At the level of the surface structure, we use a predictive method utilizing universality of patterns of stripes and spots, coupled with stoichiometric constraints, to cause highly specific and functional patterns to self-assemble on spherical surfaces. We use a minimalistic model of an alkanethiol on gold as a model system and demonstrate that, even with limited control over the interaction between surface constituents, we can obtain patterns that causes the colloids themselves to self-assemble into various complex geometric structures. We demonstrate how variations of the same design path cause in-silico self-assembly of strings, membranes, cubic and spherical aggregates, as well as various crystalline patterns.

  2. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature11619 Linking synchronization to self-assembly using

    E-print Network

    Granick, Steve

    . Ourunderstanding of self-assembly hasevolved independently in the fieldsof chemistry and materials, and with a few synchronization and self-assembly are inextricably linked and led to a new type of colloidal assembly. As proof to it (Supplementary Fig. 2), yielding a discoid symmetry. Suspended in deionized water, the spheres sedimented close

  3. Evolving Functional Self-Assembling in a Swarm of Autonomous Robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vito Trianni; Elio Tuci; Marco Dorigo

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study is the design of controllers for robots capable of physically connecting to each other, any time environmental contingencies prevent a single robot to achieve its goal. This phenomenon is referred to as functional self-assembling. Despite its relevance as an adaptive response, functional self-assembling has been rarely investigated within the context of collective robotics. Our task

  4. Structure of cholesterol helical ribbons and self-assembling biological springs and George B. Benedek

    E-print Network

    Benedek, George B.

    Structure of cholesterol helical ribbons and self-assembling biological springs and George B of cholesterol helical ribbons and self-assembling biological springs Boris Khaykovich , Chintan Hossain of individual helical ribbons formed in multicomponent solutions of cholesterol solubilized by various

  5. Gold Mesostructures with Tailored Surface Topography and Their Self-Assembly Arrays

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei Hua

    , sea urchin-like, surface topography, self-assembly, SERS S urface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERSGold Mesostructures with Tailored Surface Topography and Their Self-Assembly Arrays for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Jixiang Fang,*,,§ Shuya Du, Sergei Lebedkin,§ Zhiyuan Li, Robert Kruk,§ Manfred

  6. DNA nanotubes self-assembled from triple-crossover tiles as templates for conductive nanowires

    E-print Network

    Reif, John H.

    DNA nanotubes self-assembled from triple-crossover tiles as templates for conductive nanowires Dage on the construction and characterization of DNA nanotubes, a self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles plane were used as the basic building blocks. Triple-crossover nanotubes display a constant diameter

  7. Adhesion forces controlled by chemical self-assembly and pH, application to robotic

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adhesion forces controlled by chemical self-assembly and pH, application to robotic microhandling and the gripper surface chemical composition. We propose to control adhesion by using chemical self- assembly the adhesion and to switch from an attractive behaviour to a repulsive behaviour. The pH control can thus

  8. Novel Polymer Patterns Formed by Lithographically Induced Self-Assembly (LISA)

    E-print Network

    Novel Polymer Patterns Formed by Lithographically Induced Self-Assembly (LISA) Lei Chen,* Lei, 2004 A variety of self-assembly patterns, e.g., concentric rings, rods, and pillars, in polymer thin of the LISA patterns are controlled by many operation factors, such as the choice of the polymers, mask

  9. Biological-like vesicular structures self-assembled from DNA-block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cottenye, Nicolas; Syga, Marie-Isabel; Nosov, Sergey; Müller, Axel H E; Ploux, Lydie; Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The polymer modification of short nucleotide sequences has been achieved for future use as self-assembled biologically active structures with sizes in the nanometre range. Co-assembly of the resulting DNA-based amphiphilic block copolymers with native proteins demonstrates the self-assembly of biological-like vesicular structures. PMID:22293656

  10. Conducting nanowires built by controlled self-assembly of amyloid fibers and

    E-print Network

    Lindquist, Susan

    Conducting nanowires built by controlled self-assembly of amyloid fibers and selective metal-assembling amyloid protein fibers to construct nanowire elements. Self-assembly of a prion determinant from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the N-terminal and middle region (NM) of Sup35p, produced 10-nm-wide protein fibers

  11. Fluorescent peptides to investigate amyloid self-assembly using two-photon microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Liang; David G. Lynn; Keith Berland

    2007-01-01

    While the growth and structure of amyloid fibers with ß-sheet secondary structure has been widely investigated in recent years, the mechanism of self-assembly remains poorly understood. Multiple intermediate species have been proposed to play important roles in the self assembly process, yet many of these remain poorly defined or have not been clearly observed. Fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy should provide

  12. Dynamic Materials through Metal-Directed and Solvent-Driven Self-Assembly of Cavitands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Pirondini; Anna G. Stendardo; Silvano Geremia; Paolo Samori; Jürgen P. Rabe; Roel Fokkens; Enrico Dalcanale

    2003-01-01

    A dual-coded dynamic material was created by the bimodal self-assembly protocol sketched in the scheme. The combination of two orthogonal and reversible interactions, namely solvophobic aggregation (SA) and metal coordination (MC), allows precise control at each step of the self-assembly cycle, leading to the formation of rodlike supramolecular architectures.

  13. Metal ion templated self-assembly of crown ether functionalized perylene bisimide dyes.

    PubMed

    Weissenstein, Annike; Würthner, Frank

    2015-02-25

    Two new perylene bisimide (PBI) derivatives possessing crown ether receptors at the 1,7 bay-positions and solubilizing ionic imide substituents were synthesized and their self-assembly properties in the presence of different metal ions were studied, revealing highly selective barium ion templated self-assembly of 15-crown-5 functionalized PBI into H-type dimer aggregates. PMID:25624111

  14. Autonomous Programmable Biomolecular Devices Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructures1

    E-print Network

    Reif, John H.

    - based technology of today's computers. This conventional view forgets the past, when computing machinesAutonomous Programmable Biomolecular Devices Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructures1 John H Reif2 in this area that makes use of synthetic DNA to self-assemble into DNA nanostructure devices. Recently

  15. Self-Assembled Monolayers deposition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Paper ID: 114 (Page 1 / 4)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Self-Assembled Monolayers deposition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Paper ID: 114 (Page 1 / 4 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Self-Assembled Monolayers deposition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide L. Rabbia1 , V. Perrut1 , P. Pons2 in supercritical carbon dioxide. Deposition method and apparatus are described. The layers are characterized by AFM

  16. CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE ORIENTED BY SELF-ASSEMBLING DIBLOCK COPOLYMERS,

    E-print Network

    Amrhein, Valentin

    CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE ORIENTED BY SELF-ASSEMBLING DIBLOCK COPOLYMERS, IN SOLUTION. MINERALIZATION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN PRESENCE OF DHBC 28 B. AMPHIPHILIC POLY(ETHYLENE OXIDE)-BLOCK-POLY(VALEROLACTONE) DIBLOCK COPOLYMERS AS TEMPLATE FOR CALCIUM PHOSPHATE MINERALIZATION 30 1. SELF-ASSEMBLY IN AQUEOUS

  17. DNA nanotubes and helical nanotapes via self-assembly of ssDNA-amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    DNA nanotubes and helical nanotapes via self- assembly of ssDNA-amphiphiles Timothy R. Pearcea and Efrosini Kokkoli*b DNA nanotubes were created using molecular self-assembly of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-amphiphiles. The nanotube structures were formed by bilayers of amphiphiles, with the hydrophobic components forming

  18. Controllable self-assembled laminated nanoribbons from dipeptide-amphiphile bearing azobenzene moiety

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianbin

    Controllable self-assembled laminated nanoribbons from dipeptide-amphiphile bearing azobenzene nanostructures and biomaterials. In this paper, a dipeptide- amphiphile incorporated with an azobenzene moiety, Stupp has reported pH-induced self-assembly of a peptide-amphiphile to make nanostructured fibrous

  19. Self-assembly and applications of biomimetic and bioactive peptide-amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Self-assembly and applications of biomimetic and bioactive peptide- amphiphiles Efrosini Kokkoli October 2006 DOI: 10.1039/b608929a Peptide-amphiphiles are amphiphilic structures with a hydrophilic conformations. In this paper we review the different self-assembled structures of peptide-amphiphiles that range

  20. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Dendrimers Based on Aliphatic Polyether-Type Dendritic Cores

    E-print Network

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Dendrimers Based on Aliphatic Polyether-Type Dendritic Manuscript Received February 22, 2004 ABSTRACT: We have prepared a series of amphiphilic dendrimers-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments. Amphiphilic dendrimer self-assembly in the solid state