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Sample records for artificial numerical length

  1. Introducing artificial length scales to tailor magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, J.; Strache, T.; Liedke, M. O.; Markó, D.; Wintz, S.; Lenz, K.; Keller, A.; Facsko, S.; Mönch, I.; McCord, J.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetism is a collective phenomenon. Hence, a local variation on the nanoscale of material properties, which act on the magnetic properties, affects the overall magnetism in an intriguing way. Of particular importance are the length scales on which a material property changes. These might be related to the exchange length, the domain wall width, a typical roughness correlation length, or a length scale introduced by patterning of the material. Here we report on the influence of two artificially created length scales: (i) ion erosion templates that serve as a source of a predefined surface morphology (ripple structure) and hence allow for the investigation of roughness phenomena. It is demonstrated that the ripple wave length can be easily tuned over a wide range (25-175 nm) by varying the primary ion erosion energy. The effect of this ripple morphology on the induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic Permalloy films is studied. Only below a ripple wavelength threshold (≈60 nm) is a significant induced magnetic anisotropy found. Above this threshold the corrugated Permalloy film acts as a flat film. This cross-over is discussed in the frame of dipolar interactions giving rise to the induced anisotropies. (ii) Ion implantation through a lithographically defined mask, which is used for a magnetic property patterning on various length scales. The resulting magnetic properties are neither present in non-implanted nor in homogeneously implanted films. Here new insight is gained by the comparison of different stripe patterning widths ranging from 1 to 10 μm. In addition, the appearance of more complicated magnetic domain structures, i.e. spin-flop domain configurations and head-on domain walls, during hard axis magnetization reversal is demonstrated. In both cases the magnetic properties, the magnetization reversal process as well as the magnetic domain configurations depend sensitively on the artificially introduced length scale.

  2. Numerical study of a microscopic artificial swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Erik; Stark, Holger

    2006-08-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of a microscopic artificial swimmer realized recently by Dreyfus in experiments [Dreyfus , Nature 437, 862 (2005)]. It consists of an elastic filament composed of superparamagnetic particles that are linked together by DNA strands. Attached to a load particle, the resulting swimmer is actuated by an oscillating external magnetic field so that it performs a nonreciprocal motion in order to move forward. We model the superparamagnetic filament by a bead-spring configuration that resists bending like a rigid rod and whose beads experience friction with the surrounding fluid and hydrodynamic interactions with each other. We show that, aside from finite-size effects, its dynamics is governed by the dimensionless sperm number, the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the angular amplitude of the field’s oscillating direction. Then we study the mean velocity and the efficiency of the swimmer as a function of these parameters and the size of the load particle. In particular, we clarify that the real velocity of the swimmer is influenced by two main factors, namely the shape of the beating filament (determined by the sperm number and the magnetic-field strength) and the oscillation frequency. Furthermore, the load size influences the performance of the swimmer and has to be chosen as a compromise between the largest swimming velocity and the best efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that the direction of the swimming velocity changes in a symmetry-breaking transition when the angular amplitude of the field’s oscillating direction is increased, in agreement with experiments.

  3. Numerical evaluation of gas core length in free surface vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    The formation and evolution of free surface vortices represent an important topic in many hydraulic intakes, since strong whirlpools introduce swirl flow at the intake, and could cause entrainment of floating matters and gas. In particular, gas entrainment phenomena are an important safety issue for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors, because the introduction of gas bubbles within the core causes dangerous reactivity fluctuation. In this paper, a numerical evaluation of the gas core length in free surface vortices is presented, according to two different approaches. In the first one, a prediction method, developed by the Japanese researcher Sakai and his team, has been applied. This method is based on the Burgers vortex model, and it is able to estimate the gas core length of a free surface vortex starting from two parameters calculated with single-phase CFD simulations. The two parameters are the circulation and the downward velocity gradient. The other approach consists in performing a two-phase CFD simulation of a free surface vortex, in order to numerically reproduce the gas- liquid interface deformation. Mapped convergent mesh is used to reduce numerical error and a VOF (Volume Of Fluid) method was selected to track the gas-liquid interface. Two different turbulence models have been tested and analyzed. Experimental measurements of free surface vortices gas core length have been executed, using optical methods, and numerical results have been compared with experimental measurements. The computational domain and the boundary conditions of the CFD simulations were set consistently with the experimental test conditions.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kutler, Paul; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    1989-01-01

    A solution procedure was developed that solves the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and was used to numerically simulate viscous incompressible flow through a model of the Pennsylvania State artificial heart. The solution algorithm is based on the artificial compressibility method, and uses flux-difference splitting to upwind the convective terms; a line-relaxation scheme is used to solve the equations. The time-accuracy of the method is obtained by iteratively solving the equations at each physical time step. The artificial heart geometry involves a piston-type action with a moving solid wall. A single H-grid is fit inside the heart chamber. The grid is continuously compressed and expanded with a constant number of grid points to accommodate the moving piston. The computational domain ends at the valve openings where nonreflective boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics are applied. Although a number of simplifing assumptions were made regarding the geometry, the computational results agreed reasonably well with an experimental picture. The computer time requirements for this flow simulation, however, are quite extensive. Computational study of this type of geometry would benefit greatly from improvements in computer hardware speed and algorithm efficiency enhancements.

  5. A hybrid artificial bee colony algorithm for numerical function optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqattan, Zakaria N.; Abdullah, Rosni

    2015-02-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is one of the swarm intelligence algorithms; it has been introduced by Karaboga in 2005. It is a meta-heuristic optimization search algorithm inspired from the intelligent foraging behavior of the honey bees in nature. Its unique search process made it as one of the most competitive algorithm with some other search algorithms in the area of optimization, such as Genetic algorithm (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). However, the ABC performance of the local search process and the bee movement or the solution improvement equation still has some weaknesses. The ABC is good in avoiding trapping at the local optimum but it spends its time searching around unpromising random selected solutions. Inspired by the PSO, we propose a Hybrid Particle-movement ABC algorithm called HPABC, which adapts the particle movement process to improve the exploration of the original ABC algorithm. Numerical benchmark functions were used in order to experimentally test the HPABC algorithm. The results illustrate that the HPABC algorithm can outperform the ABC algorithm in most of the experiments (75% better in accuracy and over 3 times faster).

  6. Numerical Simulation Of Flow Through An Artificial Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart; Kutler, Paul; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Centin

    1991-01-01

    Research in both artificial hearts and fluid dynamics benefits from computational studies. Algorithm that implements Navier-Stokes equations of flow extended to simulate flow of viscous, incompressible blood through articifial heart. Ability to compute details of such flow important for two reasons: internal flows with moving boundaries of academic interest in their own right, and many of deficiencies of artificial hearts attributable to dynamics of flow.

  7. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models. PMID:24671676

  8. Numerical solution of differential equations by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Conventionally programmed digital computers can process numbers with great speed and precision, but do not easily recognize patterns or imprecise or contradictory data. Instead of being programmed in the conventional sense, artificial neural networks (ANN's) are capable of self-learning through exposure to repeated examples. However, the training of an ANN can be a time consuming and unpredictable process. A general method is being developed by the author to mate the adaptability of the ANN with the speed and precision of the digital computer. This method has been successful in building feedforward networks that can approximate functions and their partial derivatives from examples in a single iteration. The general method also allows the formation of feedforward networks that can approximate the solution to nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations to desired accuracy without the need of examples. It is believed that continued research will produce artificial neural networks that can be used with confidence in practical scientific computing and engineering applications.

  9. A numerical investigation of the prompt oblique detonation wave sustained by a finite-length wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Han, Xudong; Yao, Songbai; Wang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The prompt oblique detonation wave (PODW) sustained by a finite-length wedge is investigated by numerical simulation. The numerical results show that it is possible to stabilize a PODW on a finite-length wedge shorter than the induction length of the mixture behind the inert shock by numerically imposing a premature initiation of combustion in the initial flow field. The fully coupled and the partially coupled PODWs are observed in the numerical results. For the fully coupled PODW, the upstream facing transverse waves (UF TW) are swept downstream and consequently a fully coupled PODW can persist. For the partially coupled PODW, the UF TWs propagate upstream and the downstream facing transverse waves are weakened by the expansion wave emanating from the corner. As a result, a partially coupled PODW forms. Further, it is found that the stability of the partially coupled PODW is weak. The configuration of the partially coupled PODW can be altered by local explosions occurring downstream.

  10. Bit-parallel ASCII code artificial numeric keypad

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.

    1981-03-01

    Seven integrated circuits and a voltage regulator are combined with twelve reed relays to allow the ASCII encoded numerals 0 through 9 and characters ''.'' and R or S to momentarily close switches to an applications device, simulating keypad switch closures. This invention may be used as a PARALLEL TLL (Transistor Transistor Logic) data acqusition interface to a standard Hewlett-Packard HP-97 Calculator modified with a cable.

  11. Length of Hospital Stay Prediction at the Admission Stage for Cardiology Patients Using Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Fang Jennifer; Chen, Po-Chia; Chen, Yen-You; Song, Hao-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Fu-Man; Huang, Qiou-Pieng

    2016-01-01

    For hospitals' admission management, the ability to predict length of stay (LOS) as early as in the preadmission stage might be helpful to monitor the quality of inpatient care. This study is to develop artificial neural network (ANN) models to predict LOS for inpatients with one of the three primary diagnoses: coronary atherosclerosis (CAS), heart failure (HF), and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a cardiovascular unit in a Christian hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. A total of 2,377 cardiology patients discharged between October 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, were analyzed. Using ANN or linear regression model was able to predict correctly for 88.07% to 89.95% CAS patients at the predischarge stage and for 88.31% to 91.53% at the preadmission stage. For AMI or HF patients, the accuracy ranged from 64.12% to 66.78% at the predischarge stage and 63.69% to 67.47% at the preadmission stage when a tolerance of 2 days was allowed. PMID:27195660

  12. Parametric effects of CFL number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions using implicit approximate factorization algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit approximate factorization algorithm is employed to quantify the parametric effects of Courant number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions of the unsteady 3-D Euler equations for a windmilling propeller (low speed) flow field. The results show that propeller global or performance chracteristics vary strongly with Courant number and artificial dissipation parameters, though the variation is such less severe at high Courant numbers. Candidate sets of Courant number and dissipation parameters could result in parameter-dependent solutions. Parameter-independent numerical solutions can be obtained if low values of the dissipation parameter-time step ratio are used in the computations. Furthermore, it is realized that too much artificial damping can degrade numerical stability. Finally, it is demonstrated that highly resolved meshes may, in some cases, delay convergence, thereby suggesting some optimum cell size for a given flow solution. It is suspected that improper boundary treatment may account for the cell size constraint.

  13. Numerical Comparison of Artificial Recharge by Small-diameter Wells to Common Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, F.; Liu, G.; Dietrich, P.; Liedl, R.; Fank, J.; Fank, A.; Butler, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scarcity of potable water has reached to a critical level all around the world. To address the temporal inequality of demand and availability of water resources, as well as additional purposes like enhancing water quality, artificial recharge is increasingly used. For shallow infiltration, such recharge methods as surface infiltration basins and trenches are commonly applied. However, these methods have significant disadvantages, e.g., enhanced clogging, evaporation, and an increased need of land use. Therefore, a new method for artificial recharge using shallow small-diameter wells is investigated. Such wells can be installed by Direct Push (DP) and water is allowed to infiltrate into aquifers by natural gravity, so that their installation and operation costs are very low. In this work, this method is compared numerically to a surface infiltration basin and a system applying horizontal filter pipes. For this, the work is divided into two parts. First, a rigorous comparison is done between the DP well and the infiltration basin. The simulated aquifer is composed of an unsaturated zone of 12 m and a saturated zone of 8 m. The results show the dependency of both methods on different components of the hydraulic conductivity, and highlight the advantages of the DP well over the basin. A small number of 5-cm shallow wells of 12 m length can be used to recharge water at the same infiltration rate as from a 60 m2 basin. When a layer of low hydraulic conductivity is present, the infiltration capacity of surface basins is significantly reduced while the adverse impacts on the wells are less pronounced due to the horizontal flow above the low conductivity layer (larger distance of water movement away from the screen). In the second part of this work, the DP wells will be compared to an operating horizontal, vadose zone artificial recharge system in Southern Styria, Austria. The water table is 3 m deep and horizontal filter pipes are used to recharge water into the shallow

  14. Numerical Modeling of Dependence of Separative Power of the Gas Centrifuge on the Length of Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the rotor is taken to be constant.

  15. Coupling artificial intelligence and numerical computation for engineering design (Invited paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of combining artificial intelligence (AI) systems and numerical computation methods for engineering designs is considered. Attention is given to three possible areas of application involving fan design, controlled vortex design of turbine stage blade angles, and preliminary design of turbine cascade profiles. Among the AI techniques discussed are: knowledge-based systems; intelligent search; and pattern recognition systems. The potential cost and performance advantages of an AI-based design-generation system are discussed in detail.

  16. Length of Selection Around Candidate Genes for Artificial Selection During Domestication and Crop Improvement in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic screens for artificial selection have been successful in identifying candidate genes for agronomic traits in maize (Zea mays L). However, the validity of the candidates identified requires that selection sweeps are very short, only containing the candidate gene with the nearest neighboring g...

  17. Numerical modeling of artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-power HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Mishin, E. V.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present a multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere observed during high-power high frequency heating experiments at HAARP. Ordinary mode electromagnetic waves excite parametric instabilities and strong Langmuir turbulence near the reflection point. The coupling between high frequency electromagnetic and Langmuir waves and low-frequency ion acoustic waves is numerically simulated using a generalized Zakharov equation. The acceleration of plasma electrons is described by a Fokker-Planck model with an effective diffusion coefficient constructed using the simulated Langmuir wave spectrum. The propagation of the accelerated electrons through the non-uniform ionosphere is simulated by a kinetic model accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutrals. The resulting ionization of neutral gas increases the plasma density below the acceleration region, so that the pump wave is reflected at a lower altitude. This leads to a new turbulent layer at the lower altitude, resulting in a descending artificial ionized layer, that moves from near 230 km to about 150 km. At the terminal altitude, ionization, recombination, and ambipolar diffusion reach equilibrium, so the descent stops. The modeling results reproduce artificial ionospheric layers produced for similar sets of parameters during the high-power HF experiments at HAARP.

  18. Numerical modeling of artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-power HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shao, Xi; Milikh, G.; Mishin, E. V.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2012-10-01

    We present a multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere observed during high-power high frequency (HF) heating experiments at HAARP. Ordinary mode electromagnetic waves excite parametric instabilities and strong Langmuir turbulence near the reflection point. The coupling between high frequency electromagnetic and Langmuir waves and low-frequency ion acoustic waves is numerically simulated using a generalized Zakharov equation. The acceleration of plasma electrons is described by a Fokker-Planck model with an effective diffusion coefficient constructed using the simulated Langmuir wave spectrum. The propagation of the accelerated electrons through the non-uniform ionosphere is simulated by a kinetic model accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutrals. The resulting ionization of neutral gas increases the plasma density below the acceleration region, so that the pump wave is reflected at a lower altitude. This leads to a new turbulent layer at the lower altitude, resulting in a descending artificial ionized layer that moves from near 230 km to about 150 km. The modeling results reproduce artificial ionospheric layers produced for similar sets of parameters during the high-power HF experiments at HAARP.

  19. Numerical modeling of artificial ionospheric layers driven by high-power HF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G.; Mishin, E. V.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2012-10-01

    We present a multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere observed during high-power high-frequency (HF) heating experiments at HAARP. Ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic (EM) waves excite parametric instabilities and strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) near the reflection point. The coupling between high-frequency electromagnetic and Langmuir waves and low-frequency ion acoustic waves is numerically simulated using a generalized Zakharov equation. The acceleration of plasma electrons is described by a Fokker-Planck model with an effective diffusion coefficient constructed using the simulated Langmuir wave spectrum. The propagation of the accelerated electrons through the non-uniform ionosphere is simulated by a kinetic model accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutrals. The resulting ionization of neutral gas increases the plasma density below the acceleration region, so that the pump wave is reflected at a lower altitude. This leads to a new turbulent layer at the lower altitude, resulting in a descending artificial ionized layer (DAIL), that moves from near 230 km to about 150 km. At the terminal altitude, ionization, recombination, and ambipolar diffusion reach equilibrium, so the descent stops. The modeling results reproduce artificial ionospheric layers produced for similar sets of parameters during the high-power HF experiments at HAARP.

  20. Euler solutions for blunt bodies using triangular meshes - Artificial viscosity forms and numerical boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterstein, R.; Hafez, M.

    1993-01-01

    A finite volume method is used to calculate compressible inviscid flows over blunt bodies using, in general, unstructured grids. Artificial viscosity forms are derived based on a simplified least squares procedure. The extra second order terms are consistent with the governing equations, hence a systematic treatment of the numerical boundary conditions can be easily implemented. A special treatment of blunt bodies may be required. The discrete equations are linearized and the resulting system is solved by a relaxation method. Preliminary results indicate that the effect of the numerical dissipation is minimal. For subsonic flows over smooth bodies, the solution is practically vorticity-free and the total pressure loss is of the same order as the truncation error. Finally, some extensions of the present method are briefly discussed.

  1. Evolution of length scales and statistics of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, V K; Zubel, M; Hickel, S; Adams, N A

    2014-12-01

    In this study we present direct numerical simulation results of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) initiated by Ma=1.05,Ma=1.2, and Ma=1.5 shock waves interacting with a perturbed planar interface between air and SF(6). At the lowest shock Mach number the fluids slowly mix due to viscous diffusion, whereas at the highest shock Mach number the mixing zone becomes turbulent. When a minimum critical Taylor microscale Reynolds number is exceeded, an inertial range spectrum emerges, providing further evidence of transition to turbulence. The scales of turbulent motion, i.e., the Kolmogorov length scale, the Taylor microscale, and the integral length, scale are presented. The separation of these scales is found to increase as the Reynolds number is increased. Turbulence statistics, i.e., the probability density functions of the velocity and its longitudinal and transverse derivatives, show a self-similar decay and thus that turbulence evolving from RMI is not fundamentally different from isotropic turbulence, though nominally being only isotropic and homogeneous in the transverse directions. PMID:25615181

  2. A simple numerical model for membrane oxygenation of an artificial lung machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subraveti, Sai Nikhil; Sai, P. S. T.; Viswanathan Pillai, Vinod Kumar; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Optimal design of membrane oxygenators will have far reaching ramification in the development of artificial heart-lung systems. In the present CFD study, we simulate the gas exchange between the venous blood and air that passes through the hollow fiber membranes on a benchmark device. The gas exchange between the tube side fluid and the shell side venous liquid is modeled by solving mass, momentum conservation equations. The fiber bundle was modelled as a porous block with a bundle porosity of 0.6. The resistance offered by the fiber bundle was estimated by the standard Ergun correlation. The present numerical simulations are validated against available benchmark data. The effect of bundle porosity, bundle size, Reynolds number, non-Newtonian constitutive relation, upstream velocity distribution etc. on the pressure drop, oxygen saturation levels etc. are investigated. To emulate the features of gas transfer past the alveoli, the effect of pulsatility on the membrane oxygenation is also investigated.

  3. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics. 2: Artificial diffusion and discrete shock structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The effect of artificial diffusion on discrete shock structures is examined for a family of schemes which includes scalar diffusion, convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) schemes, and upwind schemes with characteristics splitting. The analysis leads to conditions on the diffusive flux such that stationary discrete shocks can contain a single interior point. The simplest formulation which meets these conditions is a CUSP scheme in which the coefficients of the pressure differences is fully determined by the coefficient of convective diffusion. It is also shown how both the characteristic and CUSP schemes can be modified to preserve constant stagnation enthalpy in steady flow, leading to four variants, the E and H-characteristic schemes, and the E and H-CUSP schemes. Numerical results are presented which confirm the properties of these schemes.

  4. Proof of concept of an artificial muscle: theoretical model, numerical model, and hardware experiment.

    PubMed

    Haeufle, D F B; Günther, M; Blickhan, R; Schmitt, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE), a parallel damper element (PDE), and a serial element (SE) exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, the contraction dynamics of this CE concept were analyzed in a numerical simulation of quick release experiments against different loads. A hyperbolic force-velocity relation was found. The results correspond to measurements of the contraction dynamics of a technical prototype. Deviations from the theoretical prediction could partly be explained by the low stiffness of the SE, which was modeled analog to the metal spring in the hardware prototype. The numerical model and hardware prototype together, are a proof of this CE concept and can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles. This opens up new vistas for the technical realization of natural movements with rehabilitation devices. PMID:22275541

  5. Numerical modelling of the flow and isotope separation in centrifuge Iguasu for different lengths of the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the gas is taken to be constant.

  6. Run-length encoding graphic rules, biochemically editable designs and steganographical numeric data embedment for DNA-based cryptographical coding system.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-03-01

    There have been a wide variety of approaches for handling the pieces of DNA as the "unplugged" tools for digital information storage and processing, including a series of studies applied to the security-related area, such as DNA-based digital barcodes, water marks and cryptography. In the present article, novel designs of artificial genes as the media for storing the digitally compressed data for images are proposed for bio-computing purpose while natural genes principally encode for proteins. Furthermore, the proposed system allows cryptographical application of DNA through biochemically editable designs with capacity for steganographical numeric data embedment. As a model case of image-coding DNA technique application, numerically and biochemically combined protocols are employed for ciphering the given "passwords" and/or secret numbers using DNA sequences. The "passwords" of interest were decomposed into single letters and translated into the font image coded on the separate DNA chains with both the coding regions in which the images are encoded based on the novel run-length encoding rule, and the non-coding regions designed for biochemical editing and the remodeling processes revealing the hidden orientation of letters composing the original "passwords." The latter processes require the molecular biological tools for digestion and ligation of the fragmented DNA molecules targeting at the polymerase chain reaction-engineered termini of the chains. Lastly, additional protocols for steganographical overwriting of the numeric data of interests over the image-coding DNA are also discussed. PMID:23750303

  7. Effect of coherence length and numerical aperture on the formation of OCT signals from model biotissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Y.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllyla, Risto

    2007-05-01

    Maximal depth of non-distorted imaging is an important characteristic, which shows the efficiency of an application of a certain OCT setup for imaging the given object. This characteristic depends on the setup parameters and the properties of the studied object. The definition of the maximal depth of non-distorted imaging based on the classifications of photons contributing to the signal in dependence on the relations of their optical travel pathlength in the object and maximal reached depth was used in this work. We studied the effect of the coherence length and the detection angle on the formation of OCT signals and images from model biotissues as well as on the maximal depth of non-distorted imaging. The signals and images were obtained by implementing the Monte Carlo technique developed in our earlier works. The following single- and multilayer biotissue phantoms were considered as the studied objects: erythrocyte suspension at physiological hematocrit (35%), 2% intralipid solution reported to have optical properties close to those of skin in optical and NIR range, and multilayer human skin phantoms. For the simulations, the parameters of the OCT setup were chosen in accordance with real ones. The wavelengths of the light sources were chosen 820 and 910 nm. The conducted simulations show that a decrease in the detection angle and an increase in the coherence length increase the maximal probing depth in the studied objects due to smaller role of multiple scattering photons in the formation of the OCT signals. The obtained value of maximal depth of non-distorted imaging varies in the range from 50 to 600 μm depending on the values of the setup parameters.

  8. Run-length encoding graphic rules, biochemically editable designs and steganographical numeric data embedment for DNA-based cryptographical coding system

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    There have been a wide variety of approaches for handling the pieces of DNA as the “unplugged” tools for digital information storage and processing, including a series of studies applied to the security-related area, such as DNA-based digital barcodes, water marks and cryptography. In the present article, novel designs of artificial genes as the media for storing the digitally compressed data for images are proposed for bio-computing purpose while natural genes principally encode for proteins. Furthermore, the proposed system allows cryptographical application of DNA through biochemically editable designs with capacity for steganographical numeric data embedment. As a model case of image-coding DNA technique application, numerically and biochemically combined protocols are employed for ciphering the given “passwords” and/or secret numbers using DNA sequences. The “passwords” of interest were decomposed into single letters and translated into the font image coded on the separate DNA chains with both the coding regions in which the images are encoded based on the novel run-length encoding rule, and the non-coding regions designed for biochemical editing and the remodeling processes revealing the hidden orientation of letters composing the original “passwords.” The latter processes require the molecular biological tools for digestion and ligation of the fragmented DNA molecules targeting at the polymerase chain reaction-engineered termini of the chains. Lastly, additional protocols for steganographical overwriting of the numeric data of interests over the image-coding DNA are also discussed. PMID:23750303

  9. Numerical Study of Artificial Seal Formation to Remedy Leakage from Geological CO2 Storage Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Tanaka, H.; Xu, T.

    2011-12-01

    In the Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), the CO2 is captured from emission source and stored into geological reservoirs at a depth below 800 m. The injected CO2 is less dense than water, and as a result, it tends to migrate upward. For trapping to inhibit the upward migration of CO2, the reservoirs should be covered with a sufficiently impermeable seal, i.e. caprock. However, the caprock may contain imperfections such as faults and fractures which will play a role of a high permeability path to arise leakage of the injected CO2 from the reservoirs. Pressurization with the injected CO2 can create fissures that may transmit CO2 through the caprock (Zoback and Zinke, 2002). Preparing for such risk of CO2 leakage through pre-existing and/or induced fractures, the International Energy Agency (IEA) has pointed out the importance of establishing a ready-to-use strategy for remediation of leakage from CO2 storage reservoirs (IEA, 2007). As one possibility to realize the strategy, we have proposed a concept to use an aqueous solution (Ito et al., 2006). The solution will have a sufficiently-low viscosity for passing through even small aperture, and it will not impact formation permeability as long as the solution is left as it is. When the solution encounters dissolved CO2, precipitation will occur due to chemical reaction. As a result, the permeability will be reduced by filling the pores and fractures in the rocks with the precipitates. In the present study, we demonstrated first this idea through laboratory experiments simulating subsurface condition at 1000 m deep, i.e. 10 MPa and 40 deg. C, and using a silicate solution reacting with CO2. In this case, the solution - CO2 reaction will produce precipitates of amorphous silica. The results of laboratory experiments show that the present method led to a 99 % permeability reduction in a glass-bead artificial rock even its initially-high permeability of few darcy. Such reduction of permeability was reproduced

  10. Radio wave refraction caused by artificial disturbances of the ionosphere - A numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. B.; Svistunov, K. V.

    The method of trajectory calculations is used to study short-wave propagation in the ionosphere, in the presence of large-scale inhomogeneities, due to plasma heating by means of high-power transmissions. It is shown that the refraction caused by the artificial disturbances can result in variations of the radio path distances, the occurrence of ricochet trajectories, and the focusing and defocusing of the radiation.

  11. Artificial compressibility methods for numerical solutions of transonic full potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Murman, E.; South, J.

    1979-01-01

    New methods for transonic flow computations based on the full potential equation in conservation form are presented. The idea is to modify slightly the density (due to the artificial viscosity in the supersonic region), and solve the resulting elliptic-like problem iteratively. It is shown that standard discretization techniques (central differencing) as well as some standard iterative procedures (SOR, ADI, and explicit methods) are applicable to the modified transonic mixed-type equation. Calculations of transonic flows around cylinders and airfoils are discussed with special emphasis on the explicit methods that are suitable for vector processing on the STAR 100 computer.

  12. THEONA—a numerical-analytical theory of motion of artificial satellites of celestial bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golikov, A. R.

    2012-11-01

    Basic principles of operation of the numerical-analytical theory THEONA (THéorie Numérique-Analytique) are presented, as well as force models taken into account and special functions used. Possibilities of applying the THEONA in problems of ballistic and navigation support are discussed. The accuracy of predicting the motion of the Earth's satellites is estimated for various classes of orbits.

  13. Confocal imaging and numerical simulations of converging flows in artificial microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1997-03-01

    A number of computational and experimental studies on flows in venular bifurcations have concentrated on the distribution of blood components and the formation of a 'separation surface' between two converging flows with different red blood cell concentrations and viscosities. To better understand these phenomena, we have used microfabrication techniques to construct artificial venular bifurcations with physiologically realistic dimensions. The current apparatus consists of a single bifurcation formed from tubes with semicircular cross sections of radius 50 (mu) . The vessels are fabricated from two glass slides using an abrasive etching process and a low melting point glass as sealant. Using a laser scanning confocal microscope, we have obtained the first three-dimensional images of flow structures in microscopic vessels; in particular we have imaged the separation surface for converging Newtonian fluids. A quantitative comparison is made between finite element simulations and experimental results of the position of the separation surface for different inlet flow ratios. Computed positions of the separation surface at the mid- depth of the outlet branch are in excellent agrement with experiment results obtained by confocal microscopy.

  14. Using an Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) Model for Prediction of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outcome and Length of Stay at Hospital in Traumatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Changiz; Rahim, Fakher; Fakhree, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Currently applications of artificial neural network (ANN) models in outcome predicting of patients have made considerable strides in clinical medicine. This project aims to use a neural network for predicting survival and length of stay of patients in the ward and the intensive care unit (ICU) of trauma patients and to obtain predictive power of the current method. Materials and Methods We used Neuro-Solution software (NS), a leading-edge neural network software for data mining to create highly accurate and predictive models using advanced preprocessing techniques, intelligent automated neural network topology through cutting-edge distributed computing. This ANN model was used based on back-propagation, feed forward, and fed by Trauma and injury severity score (TRISS) components, biochemical findings, risk factors and outcome of 95 patients. In the next step a trained ANN was used to predict outcome, ICU and ward length of stay for 30 test group patients by processing primary data. Results The sensitivity and specificity of an ANN for predicting the outcome of traumatic patients in this study calculated 75% and 96.26%, respectively. 93.33% of outcome predictions obtained by ANN were correct. In 3.33% of predictions, results of ANN were optimistic and 3.33% of cases predicted ANN results were worse than the actual outcome of patients. Neither difference in average length of stay in the ward and ICU with predicted ANN results, were statistically significant. Correlation coefficient of two variables of ANN prediction and actual length of stay in hospital was equal to 0.643. Conclusion Using ANN model based on clinical and biochemical variables in patients with moderate to severe traumatic injury, resulted in satisfactory outcome prediction when applied to a test set. PMID:26023581

  15. Numerical analysis of blood flow in the clearance regions of a continuous flow artificial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Olsen, D B

    2000-06-01

    The CFVAD3 is the third prototype of a continuous flow ventricular assist device being developed for implantation in humans. The pump consists of a fully shrouded 4-blade impeller supported by magnetic bearings. On either side of this suspended rotating impeller is a small clearance region through which the blood flows. The spacing and geometry of these clearance regions are very important to the successful operation of this blood pump. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions for this flow were obtained using TascFlow, a software package available from AEA Technology, U.K. Flow in these clearance regions was studied parametrically by varying the size of the clearance, the blood flow rate into the pump, and the rotational speed of the pump. The numerical solutions yield the direction and magnitude of the flow and the dynamic pressure. Experimentally measured pump flow rates are compared to the numerical study. The results of the study provide guidance for improving pump efficiency. It is determined that current clearances can be significantly reduced to improve pump efficiency without negative impacts. PMID:10886072

  16. Numerical modelling of chirality-induced bi-directional swimming of artificial flagella.

    PubMed

    Namdeo, S; Khaderi, S N; Onck, P R

    2014-02-01

    Biomimetic micro-swimmers can be used for various medical applications, such as targeted drug delivery and micro-object (e.g. biological cells) manipulation, in lab-on-a-chip devices. Bacteria swim using a bundle of flagella (flexible hair-like structures) that form a rotating cork-screw of chiral shape. To mimic bacterial swimming, we employ a computational approach to design a bacterial (chirality-induced) swimmer whose chiral shape and rotational velocity can be controlled by an external magnetic field. In our model, we numerically solve the coupled governing equations that describe the system dynamics (i.e. solid mechanics, fluid dynamics and magnetostatics). We explore the swimming response as a function of the characteristic dimensionless parameters and put special emphasis on controlling the swimming direction. Our results provide fundamental physical insight on the chirality-induced propulsion, and it provides guidelines for the design of magnetic bi-directional micro-swimmers. PMID:24511253

  17. River flow forecasting with artificial neural networks using satellite observed precipitation pre-processed with flow length and travel time information: case study of the Ganges river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, M. K.; Corzo, G. A.; van Andel, S. J.; Jonoski, A.

    2009-09-01

    This paper explores the use of flow length and travel time as a pre-processing step for incorporating spatial precipitation information into Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models used for river flow forecasting. Spatially distributed precipitation is commonly required when modelling large basins, and it is usually incorporated in distributed physically-based hydrological modelling approaches. However, these modelling approaches are recognised to be quite complex and expensive, especially due to the data collection of multiple inputs and parameters, which vary in space and time. On the other hand, ANN models for flow forecasting are frequently developed only with precipitation and discharge as inputs, usually without taking into consideration the spatial variability of precipitation. Full inclusion of spatially distributed inputs into ANN models still leads to a complex computational process that may not give acceptable results. Therefore, here we present an analysis of the flow length and travel time as a basis for pre-processing remotely sensed (satellite) rainfall data. This pre-processed rainfall is used together with local stream flow measurements of previous days as input to ANN models. The case study for this modelling approach is the Ganges river basin. A comparative analysis of multiple ANN models with different hydrological pre-processing is presented. The ANN showed its ability to forecast discharges 3-days ahead with an acceptable accuracy. Within this forecast horizon, the influence of the pre-processed rainfall is marginal, because of dominant influence of strongly auto-correlated discharge inputs. For forecast horizons of 7 to 10 days, the influence of the pre-processed rainfall is noticeable, although the overall model performance deteriorates. The incorporation of remote sensing data of spatially distributed precipitation information as pre-processing step showed to be a promising alternative for the setting-up of ANN models for river flow

  18. River flow forecasting with Artificial Neural Networks using satellite observed precipitation pre-processed with flow length and travel time information: case study of the Ganges river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, M. K.; Corzo, G. A.; van Andel, S. J.; Jonoski, A.

    2009-04-01

    This paper explores the use of flow length and travel time as a pre-processing step for incorporating spatial precipitation information into Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models used for river flow forecasting. Spatially distributed precipitation is commonly required when modelling large basins, and it is usually incorporated in distributed physically-based hydrological modelling approaches. However, these modelling approaches are recognised to be quite complex and expensive, especially due to the data collection of multiple inputs and parameters, which vary in space and time. On the other hand, ANN models for flow forecasting are frequently developed only with precipitation and discharge as inputs, usually without taking into consideration the spatial variability of precipitation. Full inclusion of spatially distributed inputs into ANN models still leads to a complex computational process that may not give acceptable results. Therefore, here we present an analysis of the flow length and travel time as a basis for pre-processing remotely sensed (satellite) rainfall data. This pre-processed rainfall is used together with local stream flow measurements of previous days as input to ANN models. The case study for this modelling approach is the Ganges river basin. A comparative analysis of multiple ANN models with different hydrological pre-processing is presented. The ANN showed its ability to forecast discharges 3-days ahead with an acceptable accuracy. Within this forecast horizon, the influence of the pre-processed rainfall is marginal, because of dominant influence of strongly auto-correlated discharge inputs. For forecast horizons of 7 to 10 days, the influence of the pre-processed rainfall is noticeable, although the overall model performance deteriorates. The incorporation of remote sensing data of spatially distributed precipitation information as pre-processing step showed to be a promising alternative for the setting-up of ANN models for river flow

  19. A novel numerical technique for the high-precision simulation of flow processes related to artificial recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, David; Orsini, Paolo; Power, Henry; Morvan, Herve; Bensabat, Jacob

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical technique for large-scale groundwater flow simulations, in the frame of artificial recharge planning. The implementation is demonstrated using two test-sites from the EU funded GABARDINE project (FP6): The Sindos test site, near Thessaloniki, Greece, examines the infiltration of water towards the water table, through several unsaturated soil layers. The test site at Campina de Faro, Portugal, investigates phreatic surface movement around a large-diameter well. For both test cases a numerical simulation is constructed, and the local subsurface flow regime is investigated. Numerical methods for solving PDEs using interpolation with radial basis functions (RBFs) will typically provide high accuracy solutions, achieve excellent convergence rates, and offer great flexibility with regards to the enforcement of arbitrary boundary conditions. However, RBF methods have traditionally been limited to the solution of small academic problems, due to issues of computational cost and numerical conditioning. Recent developments in locally supported RBF methods have led to techniques which can be scaled to the largest problem sizes, while maintaining many of the flexibilities of traditional RBF methods. As a contribution to the GABARDINE project, two such numerical techniques have been developed; the meshless LHI method and the control-volume based CV-RBF method. These numerical techniques are capable of modelling flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media, and are of order-N computational complexity, allowing problems to be solved on large and irregular datasets. For both numerical techniques, the RBF Hermitian collocation method is utilised to perform interpolation at the local level, allowing the simultaneous imposition of pressure and mass-flux matching conditions at soil-layer interfaces. The non-overlapping stencil configuration then allows the accurate capture of non-smooth solution profiles across layer interfaces, to a high

  20. Application of a roughness-length representation to parameterize energy loss in 3-D numerical simulations of large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandbach, S. D.; Lane, S. N.; Hardy, R. J.; Amsler, M. L.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J. L.; Nicholas, A. P.; Orfeo, O.; Parsons, D. R.; Reesink, A. J. H.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    Recent technological advances in remote sensing have enabled investigation of the morphodynamics and hydrodynamics of large rivers. However, measuring topography and flow in these very large rivers is time consuming and thus often constrains the spatial resolution and reach-length scales that can be monitored. Similar constraints exist for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of large rivers, requiring maximization of mesh- or grid-cell dimensions and implying a reduction in the representation of bedform-roughness elements that are of the order of a model grid cell or less, even if they are represented in available topographic data. These "subgrid" elements must be parameterized, and this paper applies and considers the impact of roughness-length treatments that include the effect of bed roughness due to "unmeasured" topography. CFD predictions were found to be sensitive to the roughness-length specification. Model optimization was based on acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements and estimates of the water surface slope for a variety of roughness lengths. This proved difficult as the metrics used to assess optimal model performance diverged due to the effects of large bedforms that are not well parameterized in roughness-length treatments. However, the general spatial flow patterns are effectively predicted by the model. Changes in roughness length were shown to have a major impact upon flow routing at the channel scale. The results also indicate an absence of secondary flow circulation cells in the reached studied, and suggest simpler two-dimensional models may have great utility in the investigation of flow within large rivers.

  1. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading. PMID:26249362

  2. Accuracy In Numerical Prediction Of Cavity Length and Vapor Cloud Shedding Frequency Of Cavitating Flows Over Various Geometries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Mahalatkar, Kathikeya

    2006-11-01

    Standard two-equation turbulence models have been found to be incapable of predicting cavitating flow due to high compressibility in the vapor region. In order to predict the dynamics of vapor cloud shedding, Courtier-Delgosha (J. of Fluid Eng, 125, 2003) suggested a modification for the eddy viscosity for k-epsilon turbulence model. Though the modification works in capturing the dynamic behavior of cavitation sheet, the accuracy of cavity length and frequency is not achieved for a wide range of cavitation numbers. This is due to the complex flow features present during a cavitating flow and the incapability of Couitier-Delgosh's turbulence modification to account for these factors. A tuning factor is introduced in the turbulence modification of Coutier-Delgosha, which can be adjusted for different types of geometries. This modified form is then tuned and tested on prediction of cavitating flow over several geometries including NACA 0015 hydrofoil, Convergent-Divergent Nozzle, and Wedge. Good comparisons for both cavity length and frequency of vapor cloud shedding were obtained for wide range of cavitation numbers in all the geometries. The commercial CFD software Fluent has been used for this analysis. Comparisons of cavity length and vapor cloud shedding frequency as predicted by the present turbulence modification and those observed in experimental studies will be presented.

  3. Steady-state response attenuation of a linear oscillator-nonlinear absorber system by using an adjustable-length pendulum in series: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, R. P.; Sun, C.; Dick, A. J.; Nagarajaiah, S.

    2015-05-01

    Response attenuation of a linear primary structure (PS)-nonlinear tuned mass damper (NTMD) dynamic system with and without an adaptive-length pendulum tuned mass damper (ALPTMD) in a series configuration is studied by using numerical and experimental methods. In the PS-NTMD system, coexisting high and low amplitude solutions are observed in the experiment, validating previous numerical efforts. In order to eliminate the potentially dangerous high amplitude solutions, a series ALPTMD with a mass multiple orders of magnitude smaller than the PS is added to the NTMD. The ALPTMD is used in order to represent the steady-state behavior of a smart tuned mass damper (STMD). In the experiment, the length of the pendulum is adjusted such that its natural frequency matches the dominant frequency of the harmonic ground motions. In the present study, the proposed ALPTMD can be locked so that it is unable to oscillate and influence the dynamics of the system in order to obtain the benefits provided by the NTMD. The experimental data show good qualitative agreement with numerical predictions computed with parameter continuation and time integration methods. Activation of the ALPTMD can successfully prevent the transition of the response from the low amplitude solution to the high amplitude solution or return the response from the high amplitude solution to the low amplitude solution, thereby protecting the PS.

  4. Numerical Simulation and Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Predicting Welding-Induced Distortion in Butt-Welded 304L Stainless Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanareddy, V. V.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthukumaran, S.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, artificial neural network modeling has been employed for predicting welding-induced angular distortions in autogenous butt-welded 304L stainless steel plates. The input data for the neural network have been obtained from a series of three-dimensional finite element simulations of TIG welding for a wide range of plate dimensions. Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis was carried out for 304L stainless steel plates during autogenous TIG welding employing double ellipsoidal heat source. The simulated thermal cycles were validated by measuring thermal cycles using thermocouples at predetermined positions, and the simulated distortion values were validated by measuring distortion using vertical height gauge for three cases. There was a good agreement between the model predictions and the measured values. Then, a multilayer feed-forward back propagation neural network has been developed using the numerically simulated data. Artificial neural network model developed in the present study predicted the angular distortion accurately.

  5. Numerical estimates of secular effects in the translational-rotational motion of an orbital station with artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenov, D. Z.

    The coefficients of the secular terms in the translational-rotational motion of an orbital station with artificial gravity were determined. It is shown that the mean anomaly M = 1 of the mass center of the station for every mean solar day increases by about 5179.25 deg. This indicates that the station makes more than 14 revolutions about the earth in the course of a mean solar day.

  6. Comparative evaluation of numerical model and artificial neural network for simulating groundwater flow in Kathajodi-Surua Inter-basin of Odisha, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S.; Jha, Madan K.; Kumar, Ashwani; Panda, D. K.

    2013-07-01

    In view of worldwide concern for the sustainability of groundwater resources, basin-wide modeling of groundwater flow is essential for the efficient planning and management of groundwater resources in a groundwater basin. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the performance of finite difference-based numerical model MODFLOW and the artificial neural network (ANN) model developed in this study in simulating groundwater levels in an alluvial aquifer system. Calibration of the MODFLOW was done by using weekly groundwater level data of 2 years and 4 months (February 2004 to May 2006) and validation of the model was done using 1 year of groundwater level data (June 2006 to May 2007). Calibration of the model was performed by a combination of trial-and-error method and automated calibration code PEST with a mean RMSE (root mean squared error) value of 0.62 m and a mean NSE (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency) value of 0.915. Groundwater levels at 18 observation wells were simulated for the validation period. Moreover, artificial neural network models were developed to predict groundwater levels in 18 observation wells in the basin one time step (i.e., week) ahead. The inputs to the ANN model consisted of weekly rainfall, evaporation, river stage, water level in the drain, pumping rate of the tubewells and groundwater levels in these wells at the previous time step. The time periods used in the MODFLOW were also considered for the training and testing of the developed ANN models. Out of the 174 data sets, 122 data sets were used for training and 52 data sets were used for testing. The simulated groundwater levels by MODFLOW and ANN model were compared with the observed groundwater levels. It was found that the ANN model provided better prediction of groundwater levels in the study area than the numerical model for short time-horizon predictions.

  7. Oxygenation to Bovine Blood in Artificial Heart and Lung Using Vibrating Flow Pump: Experiment and Numerical Analysis Based on Non-Newtonian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Yonemura, Tsubasa; Tsuru, Kazuaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    In this study, we construct an experimental apparatus for a prototype artificial heart and lung (AHL) by installing hollow fibers into the cylindrical tube of the vibrating flow pump (VFP). The oxygenation characteristics are investigated both by experiments using bovine blood and by numerical analyses based on the computational fluid dynamics. The analyses are carried out at the Reynolds numbers Re ranged from O(1) to O(103), which are determined based on the experimental conditions. The blood flow and the diffusion of oxygen gas are analyzed based on the Newtonian/non-Newtonian, unsteady, incompressible and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, and the advection-diffusion equation. The results show that the oxygenation rate increases in proportion to Re1/3, where the phenomenon corresponds to the decreasing thickness of the concentration boundary layer with Re. Although the effects of the vibrating flow and the rheology of the blood are clearly appeared on the velocity field, their effects on the gas exchange are relatively small at the ranges of prescribed Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, the numerical results in terms of the oxygenation rate are compared with the experimental ones. The basic design data of VFP were accumulated for the development of AHL in the clinical applications.

  8. Optimal Length of Low Reynolds Number Nanopropellers.

    PubMed

    Walker, D; Kübler, M; Morozov, K I; Fischer, P; Leshansky, A M

    2015-07-01

    Locomotion in fluids at the nanoscale is dominated by viscous drag. One efficient propulsion scheme is to use a weak rotating magnetic field that drives a chiral object. From bacterial flagella to artificial drills, the corkscrew is a universally useful chiral shape for propulsion in viscous environments. Externally powered magnetic micro- and nanomotors have been recently developed that allow for precise fuel-free propulsion in complex media. Here, we combine analytical and numerical theory with experiments on nanostructured screw-propellers to show that the optimal length is surprisingly short-only about one helical turn, which is shorter than most of the structures in use to date. The results have important implications for the design of artificial actuated nano- and micropropellers and can dramatically reduce fabrication times, while ensuring optimal performance. PMID:26030270

  9. Effect of Coulomb screening length on nuclear "pasta" simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcain, P. N.; Giménez Molinelli, P. A.; Nichols, J. I.; Dorso, C. O.

    2014-05-01

    We study the role of the effective Coulomb interaction strength and length on the dynamics of nucleons in conditions according to those in a neutron star's crust. Calculations were made with a semiclassical molecular dynamics model, studying isospin symmetric matter at subsaturation densities and low temperatures. The electrostatic interaction between protons is included as a screened Coulomb potential in the spirit of the Thomas-Fermi approximation, but the screening length is artificially varied to explore its effect on the formation of the nonhomogeneous nuclear structures known as "nuclear pasta." As the screening length increases, we can see a transition from a one-per-cell pasta regime (due exclusively to finite-size effects) to a more appealing multiple pasta per simulation box. This qualitative difference in the structure of neutron star matter at low temperatures shows that special caution should be taken when the screening length is estimated for numerical simulations.

  10. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as ...

  11. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  12. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  13. Numerical study of sub-millimeter Gunn oscillations in InP and GaN vertical diodes: Dependence on bias, doping, and length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, S.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Pérez, S.; Mateos, J.; González, T.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report on Monte Carlo simulations of InP and GaN vertical Gunn diodes to optimize their oscillation frequency and DC to AC conversion efficiency. We show that equivalent operating conditions are achieved by the direct application of a sinusoidal AC voltage superimposed to the DC bias and by the simulation of the intrinsic device coupled with the consistent solution of a parallel RLC resonant circuit connected in series. InP diodes with active region about 1 μm offer a conversion efficiency up to 5.5% for frequencies around 225 GHz. By virtue of the larger saturation velocity, for a given diode length, oscillation frequencies in GaN diodes are higher than for InP structures. Current oscillations at frequencies as high as 675 GHz, with 0.1% efficiency, are predicted at the sixth generation band in a 0.9 μm-long GaN diode, corroborating the suitability of GaN to operate near the THz band. At the first generation band, structures with notch, in general, provide lower oscillation frequencies and efficiencies in comparison with the same structures without notch. However, a higher number of generation bands are originated in notched diodes, thus, typically reaching larger frequencies. Self-heating effects reduce the performance, but in GaN diodes the efficiency is not significantly degraded.

  14. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  15. Stability Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2002-06-03

    Accurate multi-dimensional modeling of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical models of detonation waves must be accurate, stable, and insensitive to details of the modeling such as the mesh spacing, and mesh aspect ratio for multi-dimensional simulations. Studies we have performed show that numerical simulations of detonation waves can be very sensitive to the form of the artificial viscosity term used. The artificial viscosity term is included in our ALE hydrocode to treat shock discontinuities. We show that a monotonic, second order artificial viscosity model derived from an approximate Riemann solver scheme can strongly damp unphysical oscillations in the detonation wave reaction zone, improving the detonation wave boundary wall interaction. These issues are demonstrated in 2D model simulations presented of the 'Bigplate' test. Results using LX-I 7 explosives are compared with numerical simulation results to demonstrate the affects of the artificial viscosity model.

  16. An artificial compound eye of photon Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenbo; Hu, Song; He, Yu; Bu, Yun

    2015-11-01

    The compound eye of insects has numerous extraordinary optical performances, such as minimum chromatic aberration, wide-angle field of view, and high sensitivity to the incidence light. Inspired by these unique performances, we present a novel artificial compound eye of photon sieves in this paper, where the photon sieves play the roles of insects' ommatidia. These photon sieves have the same focal length. The incidence light can be focused into the same focal plane and produce the superposition effect, the utilization ratio of energy can be largely improved. Through the numerical simulation, the results show that this novel structure has similar focusing performance with the conventional photon sieves, but has higher utilization ratio of energy and wider angle field of view than that of the conventional photon sieves. Our findings provide a new direction for optics and biology researchers, which will be beneficial for medical imaging, astronomy, etc.

  17. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  18. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are also briefly…

  19. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of articles focuses on artificial intelligence research and development to enhance information systems and services. Topics discussed include knowledge base designs, expert system development tools, natural language processing, expert systems for reference services, and the role that artificial intelligence concepts should have in…

  20. Artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Firschein, O.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on artificial intelligence. Topics considered include knowledge engineering, expert systems, applications of artificial intelligence to scientific reasoning, planning and problem solving, error recovery in robots through failure reason analysis, programming languages, natural language, speech recognition, map-guided interpretation of remotely-sensed imagery, and image understanding architectures.

  1. Numerical Model of Full Cardiac Cycle Hemodynamics in a Total Artificial Heart and the Effect of Its Size on Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Crosby, Jessica R.; DeCook, Katrina J.; Prabhakar, Saurabh; Horner, Marc; Slepian, Marvin J.; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) is the only FDA approved device for replacing hearts in patients with congestive heart failure. It pumps blood via pneumatically driven diaphragms and controls the flow with mechanical valves. While it has been successfully implanted in more than 1,300 patients, its size precludes implantation in smaller patients. This study’s aim was to evaluate the viability of scaled-down TAHs by quantifying thrombogenic potentials from flow patterns. Simulations of systole were first conducted with stationary valves, followed by an advanced full-cardiac-cycle model with moving valves. All the models included deforming diaphragms and platelet suspension in the blood flow. Flow stress-accumulations were computed for the platelet trajectories and thrombogenic potentials were assessed. The simulations successfully captured complex flow patterns during various phases of the cardiac-cycle. Increased stress-accumulations, but within the safety margin of acceptable thrombogenicity, were found in smaller TAHs, indicating that they are clinically viable. PMID:25354999

  2. Numerical model of full-cardiac cycle hemodynamics in a total artificial heart and the effect of its size on platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Crosby, Jessica R; DeCook, Katrina J; Prabhakar, Saurabh; Horner, Marc; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-12-01

    The SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved device for replacing hearts in patients with congestive heart failure. It pumps blood via pneumatically driven diaphragms and controls the flow with mechanical valves. While it has been successfully implanted in more than 1300 patients, its size precludes implantation in smaller patients. This study's aim was to evaluate the viability of scaled-down TAHs by quantifying thrombogenic potentials from flow patterns. Simulations of systole were first conducted with stationary valves, followed by an advanced full-cardiac cycle model with moving valves. All the models included deforming diaphragms and platelet suspension in the blood flow. Flow stress accumulations were computed for the platelet trajectories and thrombogenic potentials were assessed. The simulations successfully captured complex flow patterns during various phases of the cardiac cycle. Increased stress accumulations, but within the safety margin of acceptable thrombogenicity, were found in smaller TAHs, indicating that they are clinically viable. PMID:25354999

  3. Numerical Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Assessment of the Effects of Artificial Recharge in the Rialto-Colton Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    The Rialto?Colton Basin, in western San Bernardino County, California, was chosen for storage of imported water because of the good quality of native ground water, the known storage capacity for additional ground-water storage in the basin, and the availability of imported water. To supplement native ground-water resources and offset overdraft conditions in the basin during dry periods, artificial-recharge operations during wet periods in the Rialto?Colton Basin were begun in 1982 to store surplus imported water. Local water purveyors recognized that determining the movement and ultimate disposition of the artificially recharged imported water would require a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. In this study, a finite-difference model was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Rialto?Colton Basin to gain a better understanding of the ground-water flow system and to evaluate the hydraulic effects of artificial recharge of imported water. The ground-water basin was simulated as four horizontal layers representing the river- channel deposits and the upper, middle, and lower water-bearing units. Several flow barriers bordering and internal to the Rialto?Colton Basin influence the direction of ground-water flow. Ground water may flow relatively unrestricted in the shallow parts of the flow system; however, the faults generally become more restrictive at depth. A particle-tracking model was used to simulate advective transport of imported water within the ground-water flow system and to evaluate three artificial-recharge alternatives. The ground-water flow model was calibrated to transient conditions for 1945?96. Initial conditions for the transient-state simulation were established by using 1945 recharge and discharge rates, and assuming no change in storage in the basin. Average hydrologic conditions for 1945?96 were used for the predictive simulations (1997?2027). Ground-water-level measurements made during 1945 were used for comparison with the

  4. Artificial urushi.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity. PMID:11763444

  5. Intracardiac calipers for artificial chordae replacement in mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Doi, Atsuo; Iida, Hiroshi; Sunazawa, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Length adjustment of artificial chordae is crucial in the outcome of anterior mitral valve repair. Herein, a simple and reproducible method of artificial chordal replacement using polytetrafluoroethylene suture is described. With this technique, the length of the neo-chordae is easily decided and the knot can be tied surely without change in the length using only one instrument. PMID:19101333

  6. Artificial noses.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, Shannon E; Aernecke, Matthew J; Walt, David R

    2011-08-15

    The mammalian olfactory system is able to detect many more odorants than the number of receptors it has by utilizing cross-reactive odorant receptors that generate unique response patterns for each odorant. Mimicking the mammalian system, artificial noses combine cross-reactive sensor arrays with pattern recognition algorithms to create robust odor-discrimination systems. The first artificial nose reported in 1982 utilized a tin-oxide sensor array. Since then, however, a wide range of sensor technologies have been developed and commercialized. This review highlights the most commonly employed sensor types in artificial noses: electrical, gravimetric, and optical sensors. The applications of nose systems are also reviewed, covering areas such as food and beverage quality control, chemical warfare agent detection, and medical diagnostics. A brief discussion of future trends for the technology is also provided. PMID:21417721

  7. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  8. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve. PMID:26957450

  9. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared in this work. Each method is described in detail along with appropriate physical and numerical boundary conditions. Analysis of well-posedness and numerical solutions to test problems for each method are provided. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, stability and robustness is used to establish the relative positive and negative characteristics of each method.

  10. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  11. Artificial halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmke, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Judged by their frequency and beauty, ice halos easily rival rainbows as a prominent atmospheric optics phenomenon. This article presents experimental halo demonstrations of varying complexity. Using a single commercially available hexagonal glass prism, a variety of artificial halos can be simulated. The experiments include laser beam path analysis, a modified classic spinning prism experiment, and a novel Monte-Carlo machine for three-dimensional rotations. Each of these experiments emulates different conditions of certain halo displays, and in combination, they allow a thorough understanding of these striking phenomena.

  12. Numerical model of the earth artificial satellite.New version. (Russian Title: Численная модель движения ИСЗ. Новая версия . 2007. Т.50. № 12/2. С. 60-65.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovitsyna, T. V.; Baturin, A. P.; Avdyushev, V., A.; Kulikova, P. V.

    2007-12-01

    Describing of the new version of the program complex "Numerical model of the earth artificial satellite (EAS) motion" is present. Modifications are connected with increasing models of forces acting at earth's artificial satellite. Models are constructed with agreement of IERS standart-2003 and national atmospheric GOST P25645.166-2004. The program complex may be used for the calculation space positions of EAS and the improvement of their orbit.

  13. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731

  14. Artificial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Pine, David J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  15. Artificial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  16. Artificial Respiration and Artificial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Joseph; Brook, Morris H.; Lopez, Jose F.

    1965-01-01

    A training program in the newer methods of treatment of acute cardiopulmonary emergencies which was developed at the University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, is reported. Artificial respiration by the chance rescuer, primary and secondary resuscitation, and post-resuscitation measures involving the use of special drugs and equipment by trained personnel are described. Figures and tables designed for wall-mounting and ready reference in an emergency situation are presented. Firstaid ventilatory adjuncts for use by trained personnel are classified and critically appraised, and the propriety of their use is emphasized. A plea is made to the medical profession and allied agencies to assume the responsibility of spreading knowledge of the new techniques more widely. Unless effective treatment is instituted early enough to prevent death or permanent anoxic damage to heart and brain, follow-through therapy will often be fruitless. PMID:14339303

  17. Artificial hair sensor designs for flow measurement of UAVs with different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors have been developed in the Air Force Research Laboratory for use in prediction of local flow around airfoils and subsequent use in gust rejection applications. The on-going sensor development is based on a micro-sized unmanned vehicle, resulting in a sensor design that is sensitive in that aircraft's nominal flight condition (speed). However, the active, or operating, region of the artificial hair sensor concept is highly dependent on the geometry and properties of the hair, capillary, and carbon nanotubes that make up the sensor design. This paper aims at expanding the flow measurement concept using artificial hair sensors to UAVs with different dimensions by properly sizing the parameters of the sensors, according to the nominal flight conditions of the UAVs. In this work, the hair, made of glass fiber, will be modeled as a cantilever beam with an elastic foundation, subject to external distributed aerodynamic drag. Hair length, diameter, capillary depth, and carbon nanotube length will be scaled by keeping the maximum strain of the carbon nanotubes constant for different sensors under different working conditions. Numerical studies will demonstrate the feasibility of the scaling methodology by designing artificial hair sensors for UAVs with different dimensions and flight conditions, starting from a baseline sensor design.

  18. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart And Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum discusses computations of flow of blood through artificial heart and through tilting-disk artificial heart valve. Represents further progress in research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478). One purpose of research to exploit advanced techniques of computational fluid dynamics and capabilities of supercomputers to gain understanding of complicated internal flows of viscous, essentially incompressible fluids like blood. Another to use understanding to design better artificial hearts and valves.

  19. Numerical simulation of the system artificial satellites motion by parallel computing. (Russian Title: Численное моделирование движения систем ИСЗ в среде параллельных вычислений)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovitsyna, T. V.; Avdyushev, V. A.; Chuvashov, I. N.; Aleksandrova, A. G.; Tomilova, I. V.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper features of numerical simulation of the large-scale system artificial satellites motion by parallel computing is discussed per example instantiation program complex "Numerical model of the system artificial satellites motion" in cluster "Skiff Cyberia". It is shown that using of parallel computing allows to implement simultaneously high-precision numerical simulation of the motion of large-scale system artificial satellites. It opens comprehensive facilities in solve direct and regressive problems of dynamics such satellite system as GLONASS and objects of space debris.

  20. Effective Cavity Length of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotron oscillators for electron cyclotron heating and non-inductive current drive (ECH&CD) in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas have relatively low cavity quality factors in the range of 1000 to 2000. The effective length of their cavities cannot be simply deduced from the cavity electric field profile, since this has by far not a Gaussian shape. The present paper presents a novel method to estimate the effective length of a gyrotron cavity just from the eigenvalue of the operating TEm,n mode, the cavity radius and the exact oscillation frequency which may be numerically computed or precisely measured. This effective cavity length then can be taken to calculate the Fresnel parameter in order to confirm that the cavity is not too short so that the transverse structure of any mode in the cavity is the same as that of the corresponding mode in a long circular waveguide with the same diameter.

  1. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  2. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  3. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  4. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... works well. When you need to urinate, the cuff of the artificial sphincter can be relaxed so ... pain. An artificial sphincter has three parts: A cuff, which fits around your urethra, the tube that ...

  5. Artificial graphene with tunable interactions.

    PubMed

    Uehlinger, Thomas; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Greif, Daniel; Hofstetter, Walter; Bissbort, Ulf; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-11-01

    We create an artificial graphene system with tunable interactions and study the crossover from metallic to Mott insulating regimes, both in isolated and coupled two-dimensional honeycomb layers. The artificial graphene consists of a two-component spin mixture of an ultracold atomic Fermi gas loaded into a hexagonal optical lattice. For strong repulsive interactions, we observe a suppression of double occupancy and measure a gapped excitation spectrum. We present a quantitative comparison between our measurements and theory, making use of a novel numerical method to obtain Wannier functions for complex lattice structures. Extending our studies to time-resolved measurements, we investigate the equilibration of the double occupancy as a function of lattice loading time. PMID:24237536

  6. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  7. Numeric Databases in the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, John B.; Kovacs, Gabor J.

    1982-01-01

    Defining a numeric database as a computer-readable collection of data predominantly numeric in nature, this article reviews techniques and technologies having a positive influence on the growth of numeric databases, such as videotex, mini- and microcomputers, artificial intelligence, improved software, telecommunications, and office automation.…

  8. Spiral swimming of an artificial micro-swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaveny, Eric E.; Maxey, Martin R.

    A device constructed from a filament of paramagnetic beads connected to a human red blood cell will swim when subject to an oscillating magnetic field. Bending waves propagate from the tip of the tail toward the red blood cell in a fashion analogous to flagellum beating, making the artificial swimmer a candidate for studying what has been referred to as micro-swimming. In this study, we demonstrate that under the influence of a rotating field the artificial swimmer will perform -type swimming. We conduct numerical simulations of the swimmer where the paramagnetic tail is represented as a series of rigid spheres connected by flexible but inextensible links. An optimal range of parameters governing the relative strength of viscous, elastic and magnetic forces is identified for swimming speed. A parameterization of the motion is extracted and examined as a function of the driving frequency. With a continuous elastica/resistive force model, we obtain an expression for the swimming speed in the low-frequency limit. Using this expression we explore further the effects of the applied field, the ratio of the transverse field to the constant field, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to the length of the filament tail on the resulting dynamics.

  9. Elastic-Tether Suits for Artificial Gravity and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrance, Paul; Biesinger, Paul; Rybicki, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    Body suits harnessed to systems of elastic tethers have been proposed as means of approximating the effects of normal Earth gravitation on crewmembers of spacecraft in flight to help preserve the crewmembers physical fitness. The suits could also be used on Earth to increase effective gravitational loads for purposes of athletic training. The suit according to the proposal would include numerous small tether-attachment fixtures distributed over its outer surface so as to distribute the artificial gravitational force as nearly evenly as possible over the wearer s body. Elastic tethers would be connected between these fixtures and a single attachment fixture on a main elastic tether that would be anchored to a fixture on or under a floor. This fixture might include multiple pulleys to make the effective length of the main tether great enough that normal motions of the wearer cause no more than acceptably small variations in the total artificial gravitational force. Among the problems in designing the suit would be equalizing the load in the shoulder area and keeping tethers out of the way below the knees to prevent tripping. The solution would likely include running tethers through rings on the sides. Body suits with a weight or water ballast system are also proposed for very slight spinning space-station scenarios, in which cases the proposed body suits will easily be able to provide the equivalency of a 1-G or even greater load.

  10. Some orbital characteristics of lunar artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. P. S.; Vilhena de Moraes, R.; Prado, A. F. B. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present an analytical theory with numerical simulations to study the orbital motion of lunar artificial satellites. We consider the problem of an artificial satellite perturbed by the non-uniform distribution of mass of the Moon and by a third-body in elliptical orbit (Earth is considered). Legendre polynomials are expanded in powers of the eccentricity up to the degree four and are used for the disturbing potential due to the third-body. We show a new approximated equation to compute the critical semi-major axis for the orbit of the satellite. Lie-Hori perturbation method up to the second-order is applied to eliminate the terms of short-period of the disturbing potential. Coupling terms are analyzed. Emphasis is given to the case of frozen orbits and critical inclination. Numerical simulations for hypothetical lunar artificial satellites are performed, considering that the perturbations are acting together or one at a time.

  11. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  12. Improving designer productivity. [artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary C.

    1992-01-01

    Designer and design team productivity improves with skill, experience, and the tools available. The design process involves numerous trials and errors, analyses, refinements, and addition of details. Computerized tools have greatly speeded the analysis, and now new theories and methods, emerging under the label Artificial Intelligence (AI), are being used to automate skill and experience. These tools improve designer productivity by capturing experience, emulating recognized skillful designers, and making the essence of complex programs easier to grasp. This paper outlines the aircraft design process in today's technology and business climate, presenting some of the challenges ahead and some of the promising AI methods for meeting these challenges.

  13. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  14. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  15. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  16. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  17. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  18. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  19. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  20. Equine artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Merkt, H

    1976-07-24

    The use and techniques of artificial insemination for horses in Germany over the last 30 years is described. Artificial insemination appears to produce pregnancy percentages equal to those from normal breeding methods and its continued availability under veterinary supervision is recommended in conditions where disease, disability or distance debar normal service. PMID:960520

  1. DIC image reconstruction using an energy minimization framework to visualize optical path length distribution

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Krisztian; Molnár, József; Kelemen, Lóránd; Tamás, Gábor; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Label-free microscopy techniques have numerous advantages such as low phototoxicity, simple setup and no need for fluorophores or other contrast materials. Despite their advantages, most label-free techniques cannot visualize specific cellular compartments or the location of proteins and the image formation limits quantitative evaluation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) is a qualitative microscopy technique that shows the optical path length differences within a specimen. We propose a variational framework for DIC image reconstruction. The proposed method largely outperforms state-of-the-art methods on synthetic, artificial and real tests and turns DIC microscopy into an automated high-content imaging tool. Image sets and the source code of the examined algorithms are made publicly available. PMID:27453091

  2. DIC image reconstruction using an energy minimization framework to visualize optical path length distribution.

    PubMed

    Koos, Krisztian; Molnár, József; Kelemen, Lóránd; Tamás, Gábor; Horvath, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Label-free microscopy techniques have numerous advantages such as low phototoxicity, simple setup and no need for fluorophores or other contrast materials. Despite their advantages, most label-free techniques cannot visualize specific cellular compartments or the location of proteins and the image formation limits quantitative evaluation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) is a qualitative microscopy technique that shows the optical path length differences within a specimen. We propose a variational framework for DIC image reconstruction. The proposed method largely outperforms state-of-the-art methods on synthetic, artificial and real tests and turns DIC microscopy into an automated high-content imaging tool. Image sets and the source code of the examined algorithms are made publicly available. PMID:27453091

  3. Wave Speeds, Riemann Solvers and Artificial Viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.

    1999-07-18

    A common perspective on the numerical solution of the equation Euler equations for shock physics is examined. The common viewpoint is based upon the selection of nonlinear wavespeeds upon which the dissipation (implicit or explicit) is founded. This perspective shows commonality between Riemann solver based method (i.e. Godunov-type) and artificial viscosity (i.e. von Neumann-Richtmyer). As an example we derive an improved nonlinear viscous stabilization of a Richtmyer-Lax-Wendroff method. Additionally, we will define a form of classical artificial viscosity based upon the HLL Riemann solver.

  4. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  5. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  6. Impedance of finite length resistive cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, S.; Podobedov, B.; Gluckstern, R. L.

    2004-11-01

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity σ attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency (k≫1/a). In the equilibrium regime, ka2≪g, the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity σ. In the transient regime, ka2≫g, where the contribution of transition radiation arising from the discontinuity in conductivity is important, we derive an analytic expression for the impedance and compute the short-range wakefield. The analytic results are shown to agree with numerical evaluation of the impedance.

  7. Artificial ecosystem selection.

    PubMed

    Swenson, W; Wilson, D S; Elias, R

    2000-08-01

    Artificial selection has been practiced for centuries to shape the properties of individual organisms, providing Darwin with a powerful argument for his theory of natural selection. We show that the properties of whole ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially are composed of thousands of species and millions of individuals. Artificial ecosystem selection can be used for practical purposes, illustrates an important role for complex interactions in evolution, and challenges a widespread belief that selection is most effective at lower levels of the biological hierarchy. PMID:10890915

  8. Light-driven artificial molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Hao, Qingzhen; Yang, Ying-Wei; Kiraly, Brian; Chiang, I.-Kao; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-08-01

    Artificial molecular machines represent a growing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Stimulated by chemical reagents, electricity, or light, artificial molecular machines exhibit precisely controlled motion at the molecular level; with this ability molecular machines have the potential to make significant impacts in numerous engineering applications. Compared with molecular machines powered by chemical or electrical energy, light-driven molecular machines have several advantages: light can be switched much faster, work without producing chemical waste, and be used for dual purposes-inducing (writing) as well as detecting (reading) molecular motions. The following issues are significant for light-driven artificial molecular machines in the following aspects: their chemical structures, motion mechanisms, assembly and characterization on solid-state surfaces. Applications in different fields of nanotechnology such as molecular electronics, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS), nanophotonics, and nanomedicine are envisaged.

  9. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1987-09-01

    The author discusses the development of artificial intelligence (AI). He explains the basic elements of AI: Heuristic search, knowledge representation, AI languages and tools, Natural Language Processing, computer vision, expert systems and problem solving and planning.

  10. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  11. Artificial Sweeteners and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... artificial sweeteners and cancer? Saccharin Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the ... cause cancer in laboratory animals .” Subsequent studies in rats showed an increased incidence of urinary bladder cancer ...

  12. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  13. Artificial light sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T F

    1986-04-01

    A wide variety of artificial light sources exists for use in the diagnosis and treatment of photosensitivity disorders. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of these light sources (including gas discharge arcs, fluorescent lamps, and other apparatus) illustrates the importance of matching the emission spectrum of the light source, the spectral response of the radiometer, and the photobiologic action spectrum. Environmental and occupational exposure to artificial light sources may contribute to photosensitivity disorders. PMID:3955892

  14. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  15. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient's clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  16. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient’s clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  17. A variable mixing-length ratio for convection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. L.; Wolff, C. L.; Sofia, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a natural choice for the local mixing length in the mixing-length theory of convection has a value proportional to the local density scale height of the convective bubbles. The resultant variable mixing-length ratio (the ratio between the mixing length and the pressure scale height) of this theory is enhanced in the superadiabatic region and approaches a constant in deeper layers. Numerical tests comparing the new mixing length successfully eliminate most of the density inversion that typically plagues conventional results. The new approach also seems to indicate the existence of granular motion at the top of the convection zone.

  18. Artificial Compressibility with Entropic Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan; Roberts, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Artificial Compressibility (AC) methods relax the strict incompressibility constraint associated with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Instead, they rely on an artificial equation of state relating pressure and density fluctuations through a numerical Mach number. Such methods are not new: the first AC methods date back to Chorin (1967). More recent applications can be found in the lattice-Boltzmann method, which is a kinetic/mesoscopic method that converges to an AC form of the Navier-Stokes equations. With computing hardware trending towards massively parallel architectures in order to achieve high computational throughput, AC style methods have become attractive due to their local information propagation and concomitant parallelizable algorithms. In this work, we examine a damped form of AC in the context of finite-difference and finite-element methods, with a focus on achieving time-accurate simulations. Also, we comment on the scalability of the various algorithms. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Computational Hemodynamics Involving Artificial Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Feiereisen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in human, especially, in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended in the recent past to the analysis and development of mechanical devices. The blood flow in these devices is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus various incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedures can be selected depending on the choice of formulations, variables and numerical schemes. Two primitive variable formulations used are discussed as well as the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. This procedure has been applied to several artificial devices. Among these, recent progress made in developing DeBakey axial flow blood pump will be presented from computational point of view. Computational and clinical issues will be discussed in detail as well as additional work needed.

  20. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  1. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  2. An artificial energy method for calculating flows with shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The artificial-viscosity method, first proposed by von Neumann and Richtmyer, introduces an artificial viscous pressure term in regions of compression such that an increase in entropy occurs in shock transition zones. The paper describes how dissipative flows can be induced by reducing the total energy available for adiabatic processes in shock zones. A class of inviscid fluid flows, called semiflows, is described in which the flows exhibit thermodynamic differences. Induced dissipative flows modify the pressure in regions of compression in a manner analogous to the artificial-viscosity method and for a gas, the effect is equivalent to suitably modifying the gas constant in the equation of state. By employing MacCormack's method and the usual non-adiabatic equations, numerical solutions of a Riemann problem are compared with the modified artificial energy method, showing that the dissipation effect predicted by the analytical formulation is reflected in the numerical method as well.

  3. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  4. Artificial consciousness, artificial emotions, and autonomous robots.

    PubMed

    Cardon, Alain

    2006-12-01

    Nowadays for robots, the notion of behavior is reduced to a simple factual concept at the level of the movements. On another hand, consciousness is a very cultural concept, founding the main property of human beings, according to themselves. We propose to develop a computable transposition of the consciousness concepts into artificial brains, able to express emotions and consciousness facts. The production of such artificial brains allows the intentional and really adaptive behavior for the autonomous robots. Such a system managing the robot's behavior will be made of two parts: the first one computes and generates, in a constructivist manner, a representation for the robot moving in its environment, and using symbols and concepts. The other part achieves the representation of the previous one using morphologies in a dynamic geometrical way. The robot's body will be seen for itself as the morphologic apprehension of its material substrata. The model goes strictly by the notion of massive multi-agent's organizations with a morphologic control. PMID:17016730

  5. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  6. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  7. An artificial molecular pump.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R; Schneebeli, Severin T; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration. PMID:25984834

  8. An artificial molecular pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R.; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration.

  9. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  10. A physically consistent model for artificial dissipation in transonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Mortara, Karl W.; Marraffa, Lionel

    1988-01-01

    The effect that artificial dissipation has on numerical solutions of the transonic Full Potential Equation (FPE) are investigated by comparing the artificially dissipative FPE to a Physically Dissipative Potential (PDP) equation. Analytic expressions were derived from the variables C and M sub c that are used in the artificial density formulation. It was shown that these new values generate artificial dissipation which is equivalent to the physical dissipation existing in the PDP equation. The new expression for the variables C and M sub c can easily be incorporated into the existing full potential codes which are based either on the artificial density or on the artificial viscosity formulation. A comparison of Physically Dissipative Potential (PDP), Artificial Density or Viscosity (ADV), Artificial Mass Flux (AMF), and ADV with variable C and M sub c formulation (MCC) is also presented.

  11. Incompressible viscous flow computations for the pump components and the artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference, three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation to calculate the flow through turbopump components is utilized. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Both steady and unsteady flow calculations can be performed using the current algorithm. In this work, the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames by using the steady-state formulation in order to simulate the flow through a turbopump inducer. Eddy viscosity is computed by using an algebraic mixing-length turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found between the two. Included in the appendix is a paper on incompressible viscous flow through artificial heart devices with moving boundaries. Time-accurate calculations, such as impeller and diffusor interaction, will be reported in future work.

  12. Artificial Intelligence and CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, John H.

    The potential application of artificial intelligence (AI) to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is explored. Two areas of AI that hold particular interest to those who deal with language meaning--knowledge representation and expert systems, and natural-language processing--are described and examples of each are presented. AI contribution…

  13. Applications of artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on expert systems and artificial intelligence. Topics considered at the conference included the location of multiple faults by diagnostic expert systems, knowledge-based systems, natural language, image processing, computer vision, and identification systems.

  14. The Artificial Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, D. R.

    An interim milestone for interstellar space travel is proposed: the artificial planet. Interstellar travel will require breakthroughs in the areas of propulsion systems, energy systems, construction of large space structures, protection from space & radiation effects, space agriculture, closed environmental & life support systems, and many other areas. Many difficult problems can be attacked independently of the propulsion and energy challenges through a project to establish an artificial planet in our solar system. Goals of the project would include construction of a large space structure, development of space agriculture, demonstration of closed environmental & life support systems over long time periods, selection of gravity level for long-term spacecraft, demonstration of a self-sufficient colony, and optimization of space colony habitat. The artificial planet would use solar energy as a power source. The orbital location will be selected to minimize effects of the Earth, yet be close enough for construction, supply, and rescue operations. The artificial planet would start out as a construction station and evolve over time to address progressive goals culminating in a self-sufficient space colony.

  15. Micromachined Artificial Haircell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor); Chen, Nannan (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A micromachined artificial sensor comprises a support coupled to and movable with respect to a substrate. A polymer, high-aspect ratio cilia-like structure is disposed on and extends out-of-plane from the support. A strain detector is disposed with respect to the support to detect movement of the support.

  16. Artificial intelligence and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, I.C.; Braddock, J.V.; Brown, W.; Langendorf, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report examines the state-of-the-art in artificial intelligence and robotics technologies and their potential in terms of Army needs. Assessment includes battlefield technology, research and technology insertions, management considerations and recommendations related to research and development personnel, and recommendations regarding the Army's involvement in the automated plant.

  17. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  18. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  19. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  20. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  1. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  2. Artificial intelligence. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of the field of artificial intelligence. It contains material covering the latest advances in control, representation, language, vision, and problem solving. Problem solving in design and analysis systems is addressed. Mitcell's version-space learning procedure, Morevec's reduced-images stereo procedure, and the Strips problem solver are covered.

  3. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  4. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  5. Nature-inspired micro-fluidic manipulation using artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Toonder, Jaap; de Goede, Judith; Khatavkar, Vinayak; Anderson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    One particular micro-fluidics manipulation mechanism ``designed'' by nature is that due to a covering of beating cilia over the external surface of micro-organisms (e.g. Paramecium). A cilium can be viewed as a small hair or flexible rod (in protozoa: typical length 10 μm and diameter 0.1 μm) which is attached to the surface. We have developed polymer micro-actuators, made with standard micro-technology processing, which respond to an applied electrical or magnetic field by changing their shape. The shape and size of the polymer actuators mimics that of cilia occurring in nature. We have shown experimentally that, indeed, our artificial cilia can induce significant flow velocities of at least 75 μm/s in a fluid with a viscosity of 10 mPas. In this paper we will give an overview of our activities in developing the polymer actuators and the corresponding technology, show experimental and numerical fluid flow results, and finally assess the feasibility of applying this new and attractive micro-fluidic actuation method in functional biosensors.

  6. Biologically inspired robots as artificial inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2002-06-01

    Imagine an inspector conducting an NDE on an aircraft where you notice something is different about him - he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your first reaction would probably be to say 'it's unbelievable but he looks real' just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. This science fiction scenario could become a reality at the trend in the development of biologically inspired technologies, and terms like artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. For many years, the trend has been to automate processes in order to increase the efficiency of performing redundant tasks where various systems have been developed to deal with specific production line requirements. Realizing that some parts are too complex or delicate to handle in small quantities with a simple automatic system, robotic mechanisms were developed. Aircraft inspection has benefitted from this evolving technology where manipulators and crawlers are developed for rapid and reliable inspection. Advancement in robotics towards making them autonomous and possibly look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures that are beyond the capability of today's technology with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of these robots may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Making such robots is becoming increasingly feasible and in this paper the state of the art will be reviewed.

  7. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for the development of artificial gravity environments on spacecraft are outlined. The physiological effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular skeletal, and vestibular systems are enumerated. Design options for creating artificial gravity environments are shown.

  8. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "molecules".

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Dual band metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption bands are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual band metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual band metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric "molecules" with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric "molecule" consists of four "atoms" of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption bands with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-band metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence. PMID:27406699

  9. Artificial fibrous proteins: a review.

    PubMed

    Heslot, H

    1998-01-01

    Several kinds of natural fibrous proteins have been chosen as models: silk fibroin from Bombyx mori, silks from various species of spiders and collagens. The dragline silk of the spider Nephila clavipes is able to stretch by 30% before breaking and has a high tensile strength. It is stronger per unit weight than high tensile steel. Although the partial sequence of the two components of dragline silk is known, its molecular structure is still far from being clearly established. It is however demonstrated that it contains beta-sheet crystals composed of polyalanine residues. Artificial fibrous proteins have been prepared in vivo using either Escherichia coli or the yeast Pichia pastoris. As these proteins contain repetitive sequences, there is a risk of deletion at the DNA level. This difficulty has been solved by making use of the genetic code degeneracy. One group has successfully synthesized silk-like polymers; prolastin polymers containing both silk-like and elastin-like blocks; proNectin polymers containing the RGD triplet coming from fibronectin and able to fix numerous mammalian cell types; and synthetic collagen analogs. Some of these polymers have been spun into fibers that, up-to-now, do not display any measurable molecular orientation. Another group has studied artificial fibrous proteins able to form beta-sheet crystals of defined thickness and bearing functional groups at their surface, for instance Glu residues, selenomethionine or p-fluorophenylalanine. Apart from university laboratories, a venture capital society, an industrial research center and a US army research center are quite active in this field. A number of patents has been deposited. PMID:9587659

  10. Rearing insects on artificial diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects are reared in the laboratory for various purposes. They may be reared either on their natural food or artificial diets. Developing artificial diets may be difficult and time consuming but once optimized, artificial diets usually are simple to prepare and easy to use. Because they are process...

  11. Artificial Intelligence and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorescu, Ioana

    1987-01-01

    Compares artificial intelligence and information retrieval paradigms for natural language understanding, reviews progress to date, and outlines the applicability of artificial intelligence to question answering systems. A list of principal artificial intelligence software for database front end systems is appended. (CLB)

  12. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Weightlessness produces significant physiological changes. Whether these changes will stabilize or achieve medical significance is not clear. Artificial gravity is the physiological countermeasure, and the tether system represents an attractive approach to artificial gravity. The need for artificial gravity is examined.

  13. Swimming dynamics of bidirectional artificial flagella.

    PubMed

    Namdeo, S; Khaderi, S N; Onck, P R

    2013-10-01

    We study magnetic artificial flagella whose swimming speed and direction can be controlled using light and magnetic field as external triggers. The dependence of the swimming velocity on the system parameters (e.g., length, stiffness, fluid viscosity, and magnetic field) is explored using a computational framework in which the magnetostatic, fluid dynamic, and solid mechanics equations are solved simultaneously. A dimensionless analysis is carried out to obtain an optimal combination of system parameters for which the swimming velocity is maximal. The swimming direction reversal is addressed by incorporating photoresponsive materials, which in the photoactuated state can mimic natural mastigonemes. PMID:24229282

  14. Artificial neural superposition eye.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-09-17

    We propose an ultra-thin imaging system which is based on the neural superposition compound eye of insects. Multiple light sensitive pixels in the footprint of each lenslet of this multi-channel configuration enable the parallel imaging of the individual object points. Together with the digital superposition of related signals this multiple sampling enables advanced functionalities for artificial compound eyes. Using this technique, color imaging and a circumvention for the trade-off between resolution and sensitivity of ultra-compact camera devices have been demonstrated in this article. The optical design and layout of such a system is discussed in detail. Experimental results are shown which indicate the attractiveness of microoptical artificial compound eyes for applications in the field of machine vision, surveillance or automotive imaging. PMID:19547555

  15. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  16. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  17. Developing better artificial bones.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Edward D

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space at the Colorado School of Mines are preparing the Space-DRUMS (Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix Systems) materials processing facility for transport to the International Space Station. The Space-DRUMS uses acoustic pressure beams to maintain the position of a suspended liquid or solid. Space-DRUMS will be used to extend experiments with tricalcium phosphate in the development of artificial bone material. PMID:12524712

  18. Artificial gravity Mars spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1989-01-01

    Experience gained in the study of artificial gravity for a manned trip to Mars is reviewed, and a snowflake-configured interplanetary vehicle cluster of habitat modules, descent vehicles, and propulsion systems is presented. An evolutionary design is described which permits sequential upgrading from five to nine crew members, an increase of landers from one to as many a three per mission, and an orderly, phased incorporation of advanced technologies as they become available.

  19. Applications Of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Mohan M.; Gilmore, John F.

    1986-03-01

    Intelligence evolves out of matter, so said the Sankhya philosophers of ancient India. The discipline of artificial intelligence (Al), which was established some 30 years ago, has confirmed the validity of the above assertion. Recently, a number of AI applications have been successfully demonstrated, generating a great deal of excitement and interest in scientific and technical circles. In this special issue of Optical Engineering a representative set of applications that incorporate Al principles is presented.

  20. Whither Artificial Reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Percival-Smith, Robin

    1985-01-01

    Artificial reproduction now offers sub fertile couples a number of options which raise scientific and ethical questions. This article discusses the Canadian and British experiences in formulating regulations and legislation in this important field. Current work on mammalian embryo research foretells the direction which human research will take. This article stresses the need for family physicians' participation in the ethical decisions that accompany these new developments. PMID:21274181

  1. Polish artificial heart program.

    PubMed

    El Fray, Miroslawa; Czugala, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the development of artificial heart substitutes, anthrombogenic materials and surfaces remain to be the main challenge for implants, which can prevent thrombosis that leads to rejection. The goal of material engineering is essentially to design polymeric materials of high durability and optimal thrombogenicity in mechanical heart prosthesis, being developed recently in a frame of the polish artificial heart program. For these reasons, various surface modifications are being continuously developed for a 'gold standard' material, which is a polyurethane (PU) thermoplastic elastomer and they will be shortly reviewed. However, new polymeric materials can meet medical word's attention if they are able to provide similar or better characteristics in term of bulk and surface properties. Specifically, if they will show appropriate surface topography, which is the most influential in determining the response of live tissues toward biomaterials. Nanostructured polyester thermoplastic elastomers of high biodurability as an alternative to PU materials for artificial heart are challenging new materials, and they will be discussed briefly. PMID:22110047

  2. [Liver and artificial liver].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A

    1998-06-01

    Despite good results of orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure the need still exists for an effective and safe artificial liver, able to temporarily take over the complex liver function so as to bridge the gap with transplantation or regeneration. Attempts to develop non-biological artificial livers have failed, mostly when controlled clinical trials were performed. In the last decade several different types of bioartificial livers have been devised, in which the biocomponent consists of freshly isolated porcine hepatocytes or a human hepatoblastoma cell line. The majority use semipermeable hollow fibers known from artificial kidney devices. The liver cells may lie either inside or outside the lumen of these fibers. In vitro analysis of liver function and animal experimental work showing that the bioartificial liver increases survival justify clinical application. Bioartificial livers are connected to patients extracorporeally by means of plasmapheresis circuit for periods of about 6 hours. In different trials about 40 patients with severe liver failure have been treated. No important adverse effects have not been reported in these phase I trials. Results of controlled studies are urgently needed. As long as no satisfactory immortalised human liver cell line with good function is available, porcine hepatocytes will remain the first choice, provided transmission of porcine pathogens to man is prevented. PMID:9752034

  3. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  4. Insect attachment on crystalline bioinspired wax surfaces formed by alkanes of varying chain lengths

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sandro; Jacky, Nadine; Maier, Louis-Philippe; Dening, Kirstin; Pechook, Sasha; Pokroy, Boaz; Gorb, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Summary The impeding effect of plant surfaces covered with three-dimensional wax on attachment and locomotion of insects has been shown previously in numerous experimental studies. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different parameters of crystalline wax coverage on insect attachment. We performed traction experiments with the beetle Coccinella septempunctata and pull-off force measurements with artificial adhesive systems (tacky polydimethylsiloxane semi-spheres) on bioinspired wax surfaces formed by four alkanes of varying chain lengths (C36H74, C40H82, C44H90, and C50H102). All these highly hydrophobic coatings were composed of crystals having similar morphologies but differing in size and distribution/density, and exhibited different surface roughness. The crystal size (length and thickness) decreased with an increase of the chain length of the alkanes that formed these surfaces, whereas the density of the wax coverage, as well as the surface roughness, showed an opposite relationship. Traction tests demonstrated a significant, up to 30 fold, reduction of insect attachment forces on the wax surfaces when compared with the reference glass sample. Attachment of the beetles to the wax substrates probably relied solely on the performance of adhesive pads. We found no influence of the wax coatings on the subsequent attachment ability of beetles. The obtained data are explained by the reduction of the real contact between the setal tips of the insect adhesive pads and the wax surfaces due to the micro- and nanoscopic roughness introduced by wax crystals. Experiments with polydimethylsiloxane semi-spheres showed much higher forces on wax samples when compared to insect attachment forces measured on these surfaces. We explain these results by the differences in material properties between polydimethylsiloxane probes and tenent setae of C. septempunctata beetles. Among wax surfaces, force experiments showed stronger insect attachment and higher pull

  5. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  6. Novel sensors for the Artificial Mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeghlaf, Lyes; Mielle, Patrick; Maratray, Jacques; Launay, Jérôme; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Salles, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Similarly to human chewing, tasty compounds are released in saliva during the food piece mastication in the `Artificial Mouth', and so, are available continuously. Glutamate is present in numerous food, as taste enhancer, has a nice and sought "umami" taste, specific receptors and different inter individual sensitivities, and is a fair marker of the release of tasty compounds. The three sensors (for pH, salt, or glutamate concentration) have the same size, so they are easily interchangeable. Up to now, only one kind of parameter may be analysed at a time by the different sensors. Nevertheless, combined electrodes may be developed in the future.

  7. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems. PMID:16203606

  8. Length sensing and control for Einstein Telescope Low Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adya, Vaishali; Leavey, Sean; Lück, Harald; Gräf, Christian; Hild, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we describe a feasible length sensing and control scheme for the low frequency interferometers of the Einstein Telescope (ET-LF) along with the techniques used to optimise several optical parameters, including the length of the recycling cavities and the modulation frequencies, using two numerical interferometer simulation packages: Optickle and Finesse. The investigations have suggested the use of certain combinations of sidebands to obtain independent information about the different degrees of freedom.

  9. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  10. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  11. Analytical solution of average path length for Apollonian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Chen, Lichao; Zhou, Shuigeng; Fang, Lujun; Guan, Jihong; Zou, Tao

    2008-01-01

    With the help of recursion relations derived from the self-similar structure, we obtain the solution of average path length, dmacr t , for Apollonian networks. In contrast to the well-known numerical result dmacr t∝(lnNt)3/4 [J. S. Andrade, Jr. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 018702 (2005)], our rigorous solution shows that the average path length grows logarithmically as dmacr t∝lnNt in the infinite limit of network size Nt . The extensive numerical calculations completely agree with our closed-form solution.

  12. Spreading lengths of Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Dehesa, J. S.; Manzano, D.; Yáñez, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    The Renyi, Shannon and Fisher spreading lengths of the classical or hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials, which are quantifiers of their distribution all over the orthogonality interval, are defined and investigated. These information-theoretic measures of the associated Rakhmanov probability density, which are direct measures of the polynomial spreading in the sense of having the same units as the variable, share interesting properties: invariance under translations and reflections, linear scaling and vanishing in the limit that the variable tends towards a given definite value. The expressions of the Renyi and Fisher lengths for the Hermite polynomials are computed in terms of the polynomial degree. The combinatorial multivariable Bell polynomials, which are shown to characterize the finite power of an arbitrary polynomial, play a relevant role for the computation of these information-theoretic lengths. Indeed these polynomials allow us to design an error-free computing approach for the entropic moments (weighted Lq-norms) of Hermite polynomials and subsequently for the Renyi and Tsallis entropies, as well as for the Renyi spreading lengths. Sharp bounds for the Shannon length of these polynomials are also given by means of an information-theoretic-based optimization procedure. Moreover, the existence of a linear correlation between the Shannon length (as well as the second-order Renyi length) and the standard deviation is computationally proved. Finally, the application to the most popular quantum-mechanical prototype system, the harmonic oscillator, is discussed and some relevant asymptotical open issues related to the entropic moments, mentioned previously, are posed.

  13. When does length cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-03-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining evidence for time-based decay. However, previous studies investigating this effect have confounded length with orthographic neighborhood size. In the present study, Experiments 1A and 1B revealed typical effects of length when short and long words were equated on all relevant dimensions previously identified in the literature except for neighborhood size. In Experiment 2, consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words with a large orthographic neighborhood were better recalled than were CVC words with a small orthographic neighborhood. In Experiments 3 and 4, using two different sets of stimuli, we showed that when short (1-syllable) and long (3-syllable) items were equated for neighborhood size, the word length effect disappeared. Experiment 5 replicated this with spoken recall. We suggest that the word length effect may be better explained by the differences in linguistic and lexical properties of short and long words rather than by length per se. These results add to the growing literature showing problems for theories of memory that include decay offset by rehearsal as a central feature. PMID:21171805

  14. Numerical anomalies mimicking physical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menikoff, R.

    Numerical simulations of flows with shock waves typically use finite-difference shock-capturing algorithms. These algorithms give a shock a numerical width in order to generate the entropy increase that must occur across a shock wave. For algorithms in conservation form, steady-state shock waves are insensitive to the numerical dissipation because of the Hugoniot jump conditions. However, localized numerical errors occur when shock waves interact. Examples are the 'excess wall heating' in the Noh problem (shock reflected from rigid wall), errors when a shock impacts a material interface or an abrupt change in mesh spacing, and the start-up error from initializing a shock as a discontinuity. This class of anomalies can be explained by the entropy generation that occurs in the transient flow when a shock profile is formed or changed. The entropy error is localized spatially but under mesh refinement does not decrease in magnitude. Similar effects have been observed in shock tube experiments with partly dispersed shock waves. In this case, the shock has a physical width due to a relaxation process. An entropy anomaly from a transient shock interaction is inherent in the structure of the conservation equations for fluid flow. The anomaly can be expected to occur whenever heat conduction can be neglected and a shock wave has a non-zero width, whether the width is physical or numerical. Thus, the numerical anomaly from an artificial shock width mimics a real physical effect.

  15. Applicability of nonresonant artificial diamagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, L.; Lapine, M.; McPhedran, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    Artificial diamagnetics are prominent for achieving extraordinarily strong diamagnetism in a wide frequency range. However, as far as the magnetic fields outside the artificial medium are concerned, bulk conductors show a very similar pattern. The question arises whether the complicated internal structure of artificial diamagnetics can, to this end, be replaced by a simpler object. We show that for an electrically small body, internal structuring is likely to make the effective diamagnetic response weaker than that of a simple conducting object.

  16. Development of artificial empathy.

    PubMed

    Asada, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been advocating cognitive developmental robotics to obtain new insight into the development of human cognitive functions by utilizing synthetic and constructive approaches. Among the different emotional functions, empathy is difficult to model, but essential for robots to be social agents in our society. In my previous review on artificial empathy (Asada, 2014b), I proposed a conceptual model for empathy development beginning with emotional contagion to envy/schadenfreude along with self/other differentiation. In this article, the focus is on two aspects of this developmental process, emotional contagion in relation to motor mimicry, and cognitive/affective aspects of the empathy. It begins with a summary of the previous review (Asada, 2014b) and an introduction to affective developmental robotics as a part of cognitive developmental robotics focusing on the affective aspects. This is followed by a review and discussion on several approaches for two focused aspects of affective developmental robotics. Finally, future issues involved in the development of a more authentic form of artificial empathy are discussed. PMID:25498950

  17. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  18. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  19. Artificial organs: recent progress in artificial hearing and vision.

    PubMed

    Ifukube, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    Artificial sensory organs are a prosthetic means of sending visual or auditory information to the brain by electrical stimulation of the optic or auditory nerves to assist visually impaired or hearing-impaired people. However, clinical application of artificial sensory organs, except for cochlear implants, is still a trial-and-error process. This is because how and where the information transmitted to the brain is processed is still unknown, and also because changes in brain function (plasticity) remain unknown, even though brain plasticity plays an important role in meaningful interpretation of new sensory stimuli. This article discusses some basic unresolved issues and potential solutions in the development of artificial sensory organs such as cochlear implants, brainstem implants, artificial vision, and artificial retinas. PMID:19330498

  20. Applications of network analysis for adaptive management of artificial drainage systems in landscapes vulnerable to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulter, Benjamin; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Halpin, Patrick N.

    2008-08-01

    SummaryThe vulnerability of coastal landscapes to sea level rise is compounded by the existence of extensive artificial drainage networks initially built to lower water tables for agriculture, forestry, and human settlements. These drainage networks are found in landscapes with little topographic relief where channel flow is characterized by bi-directional movement across multiple time-scales and related to precipitation, wind, and tidal patterns. The current configuration of many artificial drainage networks exacerbates impacts associated with sea level rise such as salt-intrusion and increased flooding. This suggests that in the short-term, drainage networks might be managed to mitigate sea level rise related impacts. The challenge, however, is that hydrologic processes in regions where channel flow direction is weakly related to slope and topography require extensive parameterization for numerical models which is limited where network size is on the order of a hundred or more kilometers in total length. Here we present an application of graph theoretic algorithms to efficiently investigate network properties relevant to the management of a large artificial drainage system in coastal North Carolina, USA. We created a digital network model representing the observation network topology and four types of drainage features (canal, collector and field ditches, and streams). We applied betweenness-centrality concepts (using Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm) to determine major hydrologic flowpaths based off of hydraulic resistance. Following this, we identified sub-networks that could be managed independently using a community structure and modularity approach. Lastly, a betweenness-centrality algorithm was applied to identify major shoreline entry points to the network that disproportionately control water movement in and out of the network. We demonstrate that graph theory can be applied to solving management and monitoring problems associated with sea level rise

  1. Target fishes on artificial reefs: evidences of impacts over nearby natural environments.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thiony; Pinheiro, Hudson Tercio; Joyeux, Jean-Christophe

    2011-10-01

    Topics in artificial reef research have included a wide number of themes but a major portion of published works are about the attraction that artificial reefs exert over fishes that reside in natural reefs. In the present work, underwater visual censuses of fishes were conducted at both artificial and natural reefs, aiming at verifying whether fishes are attracted or and produced on artificial reefs. Length frequency, mean biomass and frequency of occurrence of four fish genera targeted by local fisheries (Caranx, Haemulon, Lutjanus and Mycteroperca) were compared between two artificial and two natural reefs. Evidences of both production and attraction of target reef fishes by artificial reefs were found. Production is evidenced by the enormous abundance of recruits of a single grunt species, the tomtate (Haemulon aurolineatum Cuvier). The high concentration of adults of predator demersal fishes (Mycteroperca spp. and Lutjanus spp.), present at low density on natural reefs, is the main evidence for attraction by artificial reefs. Results are inconclusive for the pelagic predators Caranx spp. The attraction that artificial reefs exert over large demersal predators can negatively affect nearby natural areas through shifts in predation, competition or nutrient input. Production can affect benthic communities in soft bottoms adjacent to artificial reefs by foraging of reef-associated fishes. Even when unplanned for fisheries purposes artificial reefs are often submitted to commercial and recreational fisheries and, due to the strong attraction they exert over large predators, these structures need harvest regulations. PMID:21871652

  2. Dynamics of neutral atoms in artificial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zi-Fa; Hu, Fang-Qi; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-02-01

    Cyclotron dynamics of neutral atoms in a harmonic trap potential with artificial magnetic field is studied theoretically. The cyclotron orbit is obtained analytically and confirmed numerically. When the external harmonic potential is absent, artificial magnetic field can result in the singly periodic circular motion of Bose gas with the emergence of a Lorentz-like force, which is similar to particles with electric charge moving in a magnetic field. However, the coupling between artificial magnetic field and harmonic trap potential leads to rich and complex cyclotron trajectory, which depends on √{B2 + 1 }, where B is the rescaled artificial magnetic field. When √{B2 + 1 } is a rational number, the cyclotron orbit is multiply periodic and closed. However, when √{B2 + 1 } is an irrational number, the cyclotron orbit is quasiperiodic, i.e., the cyclotron motion of Bose gas is limited in a annular region, and eventually, the motion is ergodic in this region. Furthermore, the cyclotron orbits also depend on the initial conditions of Bose gas. Thus, the cyclotron dynamics of Bose gas can be manipulated in a controllable way by changing the artificial magnetic field, harmonic trap potential and initial conditions. Our results provide a direct theoretical evidence for the cyclotron dynamics of neutral atoms in the artificial gauge field.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Photonic Band gaps in Artificial Opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Arammash, Fouzi; Datta, Timir

    2014-03-01

    Photonic band structure and band gap were numerically computed for a number of closed packed simple cubic and Hexagonal arrangements of non-conducting spheres using ``Finite Difference Time Domain Method''. Photonic gaps were found to exist in the simple cubic overlapping spheres with index of refraction (n) >3.2. Gap increased linearly from 0.117- 0.161 (1/micron) as lattice constant decreased from 0.34 to 0.18 (micron). For less than 3.2 no gap was obtained. Also, no gaps were obtained for hexagonal packing. UV-VIS reflectivity and transmission measurements of polycrystalline bulk artificial opals of silica (SiO2) spheres, ranging from 250nm to 300nm in sphere diameter indicate a reflection peak in the 500-600 nm regimes. Consistent with photonic band gap behavior we find that reflectivity is enhanced in the same wavelength where transmission is reduced. To the best of our knowledge this is the first observation of photonic gap in the visible wave length under ambient conditions. The wave length at the reflectance peak increases with the diameter of the SiO2 spheres, and is approximately twice the diameter following Bragg reflection. DOD Award No 60177-RT-H from ARO.

  4. Molecular artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Serena; Drouet, Samuel; Francàs, Laia; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Guttentag, Miguel; Richmond, Craig; Stoll, Thibaut; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-11-21

    The replacement of fossil fuels by a clean and renewable energy source is one of the most urgent and challenging issues our society is facing today, which is why intense research has been devoted to this topic recently. Nature has been using sunlight as the primary energy input to oxidise water and generate carbohydrates (solar fuel) for over a billion years. Inspired, but not constrained, by nature, artificial systems can be designed to capture light and oxidise water and reduce protons or other organic compounds to generate useful chemical fuels. This tutorial review covers the primary topics that need to be understood and mastered in order to come up with practical solutions for the generation of solar fuels. These topics are: the fundamentals of light capturing and conversion, water oxidation catalysis, proton and CO2 reduction catalysis and the combination of all of these for the construction of complete cells for the generation of solar fuels. PMID:24473472

  5. Artificial Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Balzani; Credi; Raymo; Stoddart

    2000-10-01

    The miniaturization of components used in the construction of working devices is being pursued currently by the large-downward (top-down) fabrication. This approach, however, which obliges solid-state physicists and electronic engineers to manipulate progressively smaller and smaller pieces of matter, has its intrinsic limitations. An alternative approach is a small-upward (bottom-up) one, starting from the smallest compositions of matter that have distinct shapes and unique properties-namely molecules. In the context of this particular challenge, chemists have been extending the concept of a macroscopic machine to the molecular level. A molecular-level machine can be defined as an assembly of a distinct number of molecular components that are designed to perform machinelike movements (output) as a result of an appropriate external stimulation (input). In common with their macroscopic counterparts, a molecular machine is characterized by 1) the kind of energy input supplied to make it work, 2) the nature of the movements of its component parts, 3) the way in which its operation can be monitored and controlled, 4) the ability to make it repeat its operation in a cyclic fashion, 5) the timescale needed to complete a full cycle of movements, and 6) the purpose of its operation. Undoubtedly, the best energy inputs to make molecular machines work are photons or electrons. Indeed, with appropriately chosen photochemically and electrochemically driven reactions, it is possible to design and synthesize molecular machines that do work. Moreover, the dramatic increase in our fundamental understanding of self-assembly and self-organizational processes in chemical synthesis has aided and abetted the construction of artificial molecular machines through the development of new methods of noncovalent synthesis and the emergence of supramolecular assistance to covalent synthesis as a uniquely powerful synthetic tool. The aim of this review is to present a unified view of the field

  6. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities. PMID:24741154

  7. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  8. Mechanical performance of artificial pneumatic muscles to power an ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    We developed a powered ankle-foot orthosis that uses artificial pneumatic muscles to produce active plantar flexor torque. The purpose of this study was to quantify the mechanical performance of the orthosis during human walking. Three subjects walked at a range of speeds wearing ankle-foot orthoses with either one or two artificial muscles working in parallel. The orthosis produced similar total peak plantar flexor torque and network across speeds independent of the number of muscles used. The orthosis generated approximately 57% of the peak ankle plantar flexor torque during stance and performed approximately 70% of the positive plantar flexor work done during normal walking. Artificial muscle bandwidth and force-length properties were the two primary factors limiting torque production. The lack of peak force and work differences between single and double muscle conditions can be explained by force-length properties. Subjects altered their ankle kinematics between conditions resulting in changes in artificial muscle length. In the double muscle condition greater plantar flexion yielded shorter artificial muscles lengths and decreased muscle forces. This finding emphasizes the importance of human testing in the design and development of robotic exoskeleton devices for assisting human movement. The results of this study outline the mechanical performance limitations of an ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles. This orthosis could be valuable for gait rehabilitation and for studies investigating neuromechanical control of human walking. PMID:16023126

  9. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  10. A Primer on Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Ralph A.

    A survey of literature on recent advances in the field of artificial intelligence provides a comprehensive introduction to this field for the non-technical reader. Important areas covered are: (1) definitions, (2) the brain and thinking, (3) heuristic search, and (4) programing languages used in the research of artificial intelligence. Some…

  11. In Pursuit of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watstein, Sarah; Kesselman, Martin

    1986-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence and reviews current research in natural language processing, expert systems, and robotics and sensory systems. Discussion covers current commercial applications of artificial intelligence and projections of uses and limitations in library technical and public services, e.g., in cataloging and online information and…

  12. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  13. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  14. Instructional Applications of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halff, Henry M.

    1986-01-01

    Surveys artificial intelligence and the development of computer-based tutors and speculates on the future of artificial intelligence in education. Includes discussion of the definitions of knowledge, expert systems (computer systems that solve tough technical problems), intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), and specific ITSs such as GUIDON, MYCIN,…

  15. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  16. Conservative smoothing versus artificial viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report was stimulated by some recent investigations of S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method). Solid dynamics computations with S.P.H. show symptoms of instabilities which are not eliminated by artificial viscosities. Both analysis and experiment indicate that conservative smoothing eliminates the instabilities in S.P.H. computations which artificial viscosities cannot. Questions were raised as to whether conservative smoothing might smear solutions more than artificial viscosity. Conservative smoothing, properly used, can produce more accurate solutions than the von Neumann-Richtmyer-Landshoff artificial viscosity which has been the standard for many years. The authors illustrate this using the vNR scheme on a test problem with known exact solution involving a shock collision in an ideal gas. They show that the norms of the errors with conservative smoothing are significantly smaller than the norms of the errors with artificial viscosity.

  17. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  18. Does length or neighborhood size cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-10-01

    Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, and Surprenant (2011) suggested that past demonstrations of the word length effect, the finding that words with fewer syllables are recalled better than words with more syllables, included a confound: The short words had more orthographic neighbors than the long words. The experiments reported here test two predictions that would follow if neighborhood size is a more important factor than word length. In Experiment 1, we found that concurrent articulation removed the effect of neighborhood size, just as it removes the effect of word length. Experiment 2 demonstrated that this pattern is also found with nonwords. For Experiment 3, we factorially manipulated length and neighborhood size, and found only effects of the latter. These results are problematic for any theory of memory that includes decay offset by rehearsal, but they are consistent with accounts that include a redintegrative stage that is susceptible to disruption by noise. The results also confirm the importance of lexical and linguistic factors on memory tasks thought to tap short-term memory. PMID:21461875

  19. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  20. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  1. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems. PMID:27139677

  2. Graduated compression stockings: knee length or thigh length.

    PubMed

    Benkö, T; Cooke, E A; McNally, M A; Mollan, R A

    2001-02-01

    The mechanisms by which graduated compression stockings prevent deep venous thrombosis are not completely understood. In the current study the physiologic effect of low-pressure graduated compression stockings on the venous blood flow in the lower limb and the practical aspects of their use were assessed. Patients having elective orthopaedic surgery at a university orthopaedic department were randomized into five groups to wear two different types of graduated compression stockings in thigh and knee lengths. Patients in the fifth control group did not wear graduated compression stockings. Venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography was used to measure venous flow. After 20-minutes bed rest there was a highly significant increase in venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in all of the four groups wearing stockings. There was no difference in the mean of the percentage change of venous capacitance in patients in the four groups wearing stockings. The knee length Brevet stockings were less efficient in increasing the venous outflow. There was no significant change in the venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in the control group. Visual assessment of the fit and use of stockings was done, and patients' subjective opinion of comfort was sought. The knee length graduated compression stockings wrinkled significantly less, and significantly fewer patients reported discomfort with them. All stockings were reported to be difficult to use. Thigh and knee length stockings have a significant effect on decreasing venous stasis of the lower limb. Knee length graduated compression stockings are similarly efficient in decreasing venous stasis, but they are more comfortable to wear, and they wrinkle less. PMID:11210954

  3. Coherence length of neutron superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    De Blasio, F.V.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Lazzari, G.; Baldo, M.; Schulze, H.

    1997-10-01

    The coherence length of superfluid neutron matter is calculated from the microscopic BCS wave function of a Cooper pair in momentum space making use of recent nucleon-nucleon potential models and including polarization (RPA) effects. We find as our main result that the coherence length is proportional to the Fermi momentum to pairing gap ratio, in good agreement with simple estimates used in the literature, with a nearly interaction independent constant of proportionality. Our calculations can be applied to the problem of inhomogeneous superfluidity of hadronic matter in the crust of a neutron star. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Overview of bunch length measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-02-19

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed.

  5. Optimization of the artificial urinary sphincter: modelling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Florian; Leippold, Thomas; John, Hubert; Blunschi, Nadine; Müller, Bert

    2006-03-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter should be long enough to prevent strangulation effects of the urethral tissue and short enough to avoid the improper dissection of the surrounding tissue. To optimize the sphincter length, the empirical three-parameter urethra compression model is proposed based on the mechanical properties of the urethra: wall pressure, tissue response rim force and sphincter periphery length. In vitro studies using explanted animal or human urethras and different artificial sphincters demonstrate its applicability. The pressure of the sphincter to close the urethra is shown to be a linear function of the bladder pressure. The force to close the urethra depends on the sphincter length linearly. Human urethras display the same dependences as the urethras of pig, dog, sheep and calf. Quantitatively, however, sow urethras resemble best the human ones. For the human urethras, the mean wall pressure corresponds to (-12.6 ± 0.9) cmH2O and (-8.7 ± 1.1) cmH2O, the rim length to (3.0 ± 0.3) mm and (5.1 ± 0.3) mm and the rim force to (60 ± 20) mN and (100 ± 20) mN for urethra opening and closing, respectively. Assuming an intravesical pressure of 40 cmH2O, and an external pressure on the urethra of 60 cmH2O, the model leads to the optimized sphincter length of (17.3 ± 3.8) mm.

  6. The artificial leaf.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  7. Effects of the pitch length of superhydrophobic surfaces on the effective slip length and skin-friction drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Taeyong; Choi, Haecheon; Kim, John

    2015-11-01

    Many numerical studies have been conducted to investigate the effect of the grating parameters of superhydrophobic surfaces, such as the pitch length and gas fraction, on the slip velocity and its effect on skin-friction drag. However, the pitch lengths considered numerically so far are much larger, varying from p+ = O (10) to O (102) in wall units, than those in experiments (p+ = O (1)). In the present study, we perform a direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over superhydrophobic surfaces with longitudinal microgrates having the actual grating parameters of p+ = 3.8. The air layer inside the cavity (d+ = 18; d+ is the cavity depth) is also solved with the assumption of zero interface curvature. The minimal flow unit by Jimenez & Moin (1991) is adopted to resolve the small pitch length. Since small pitch length is accompanied by small cavity width, the growth of the slip velocity at the air-water interface is inhibited. As a result, the slip velocity (us+) is less than 2 for p+ = 3.8, whereas us+ is greater than 15 for p+ = 540. The effective slip length is an order of the viscous sublayer thickness, and the drag reduction is less than 20%. The detailed results for the cases of p+ ~ O (1) to O (102) will be presented. Supported by NRF-2012M2A8A4055647.

  8. Amplification of large artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D R; Smyth, A P; Moir, D T

    1990-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome cloning is an attractive technology for genomic mapping studies because very large DNA segments can be readily propagated. However, detailed analyses often require the extensive application of blotting-hybridization techniques because artificial chromosomes are normally present at only one copy per haploid genome. We have developed a cloning vector and host strain that alleviate this problem by permitting copy number amplification of artificial chromosomes. The vector includes a conditional centromere that can be turned on or off by changing the carbon source. Strong selective pressure for extra copies of the artificial chromosome can be applied by selecting for the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase gene. When this system was used, artificial chromosomes ranging from about 100 to 600 kilobases in size were readily amplified 10- to 20-fold. The selective conditions did not induce obvious rearrangements in any of the clones tested. Reactivation of the centromere in amplified artificial chromosome clones resulted in stable maintenance of an elevated copy number for 20 generations. Applications of copy number control to various aspects of artificial chromosome analysis are addressed. Images PMID:2236036

  9. Numerical simulation of flow through biofluid devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1990-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of flow through an artificial heart and through an artificial tilting-disk heart valve are presented. The simulation involves solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations; the solution process is described. The details and difficulties of modeling these particular geometries are discussed. The artificial heart geometry uses a single moving grid, and the valve computation uses an overlaid-grid approach with one moving grid and one stationary grid. The equations must be solved iteratively for each discrete time step of the computations, requiring a significant amount of computing time. It is particularly difficult to analyze and present the fluid physics represented by these calculations because of the time-varying nature of the flow, and because the flows are internal. Three-dimensional graphics and scientific visualization techniques have become instrumental in solving these problems.

  10. Quantum criticality with two length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hui; Guo, Wenan; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2016-04-01

    The theory of deconfined quantum critical (DQC) points describes phase transitions at absolute temperature T = 0 outside the standard paradigm, predicting continuous transformations between certain ordered states where conventional theory would require discontinuities. Numerous computer simulations have offered no proof of such transitions, instead finding deviations from expected scaling relations that neither were predicted by the DQC theory nor conform to standard scenarios. Here we show that this enigma can be resolved by introducing a critical scaling form with two divergent length scales. Simulations of a quantum magnet with antiferromagnetic and dimerized ground states confirm the form, proving a continuous transition with deconfined excitations and also explaining anomalous scaling at T > 0. Our findings revise prevailing paradigms for quantum criticality, with potential implications for many strongly correlated materials.

  11. Quantum criticality with two length scales.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hui; Guo, Wenan; Sandvik, Anders W

    2016-04-01

    The theory of deconfined quantum critical (DQC) points describes phase transitions at absolute temperature T = 0 outside the standard paradigm, predicting continuous transformations between certain ordered states where conventional theory would require discontinuities. Numerous computer simulations have offered no proof of such transitions, instead finding deviations from expected scaling relations that neither were predicted by the DQC theory nor conform to standard scenarios. Here we show that this enigma can be resolved by introducing a critical scaling form with two divergent length scales. Simulations of a quantum magnet with antiferromagnetic and dimerized ground states confirm the form, proving a continuous transition with deconfined excitations and also explaining anomalous scaling at T > 0. Our findings revise prevailing paradigms for quantum criticality, with potential implications for many strongly correlated materials. PMID:26989196

  12. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  13. Artificial Bee Colony Optimization for Short-Term Hydrothermal Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Artificial bee colony optimization is applied to determine the optimal hourly schedule of power generation in a hydrothermal system. Artificial bee colony optimization is a swarm-based algorithm inspired by the food foraging behavior of honey bees. The algorithm is tested on a multi-reservoir cascaded hydroelectric system having prohibited operating zones and thermal units with valve point loading. The ramp-rate limits of thermal generators are taken into consideration. The transmission losses are also accounted for through the use of loss coefficients. The algorithm is tested on two hydrothermal multi-reservoir cascaded hydroelectric test systems. The results of the proposed approach are compared with those of differential evolution, evolutionary programming and particle swarm optimization. From numerical results, it is found that the proposed artificial bee colony optimization based approach is able to provide better solution.

  14. Artificial frustrated spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Y.; Chioar, I. A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Montaigne, F.; Canals, B.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-09-01

    Complex architectures of nanostructures are routinely elaborated using bottom-up or nanofabrication processes. This technological capability allows scientists to engineer materials with properties that do not exist in nature, but also to manufacture model systems to explore fundamental issues in condensed matter physics. Two-dimensional frustrated arrays of magnetic nanostructures are one class of systems for which theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally. These systems have been the subject of intense research in the last few years and allowed the investigation of a rich physics and fascinating phenomena, such as the exploration of the extensively degenerate ground-state manifolds of spin ice systems, the evidence of new magnetic phases in purely two-dimensional lattices, and the observation of pseudoexcitations involving classical analogues of magnetic monopoles. We show here, experimentally and theoretically, that simple magnetic geometries can lead to unconventional, non-collinear spin textures. For example, kagome arrays of inplane magnetized nano-islands do not show magnetic order. Instead, these systems are characterized by spin textures with intriguing properties, such as chirality, coexistence of magnetic order and disorder, and charge crystallization. Magnetic frustration effects in lithographically patterned kagome arrays of nanomagnets with out-of-plane magnetization also lead to an unusal, and still unknown, magnetic ground state manifold. Besides the influence of the lattice geometry, the micromagnetic nature of the elements constituting the arrays introduce the concept of chiral magnetic monopoles, bringing additional complexity into the physics of artificial frustrated spin systems.

  15. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for grasping and manipulating objects. The hand includes left and right thumbs that are operatively connected to an engagement assembly which causes movement of the left and right thumbs. The left thumb has a left thumb base and is movable about three separate first left thumb axes which run through the left thumb base. Correspondingly, the right thumb has a right thumb base and is movable about three separate first right thumb axes which run through the right thumb base. The engagement assembly has a gear assembly which is operatively connected to a motor assembly. Upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly causes movement of the left and right thumbs about the first left thumb axes and first right thumb axes respectively. The hand can also have a center finger which is operatively connected to the engagement assembly and which is interposed between the left and right thumbs. The finger has a finger base and is movable about two separate first finger axes running through the finger base. Therefore, upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly will also cause movement of the finger about the first finger axes.

  16. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  17. Nanostructured artificial nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyong; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Magonov, Sergei; Ozturk, Birol

    2003-06-01

    Finding a synthetic pathway to artificial analogs of nacre and bones represents a fundamental milestone in the development of composite materials. The ordered brick-and-mortar arrangement of organic and inorganic layers is believed to be the most essential strength- and toughness-determining structural feature of nacre. It has also been found that the ionic crosslinking of tightly folded macromolecules is equally important. Here, we demonstrate that both structural features can be reproduced by sequential deposition of polyelectrolytes and clays. This simple process results in a nanoscale version of nacre with alternating organic and inorganic layers. The macromolecular folding effect reveals itself in the unique saw-tooth pattern of differential stretching curves attributed to the gradual breakage of ionic crosslinks in polyelectrolyte chains. The tensile strength of the prepared multilayers approached that of nacre, whereas their ultimate Young modulus was similar to that of lamellar bones. Structural and functional resemblance makes clay- polyelectrolyte multilayers a close replica of natural biocomposites. Their nanoscale nature enables elucidation of molecular processes occurring under stress.

  18. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for conformally engaging and manipulating objects. The hand includes an articulated digit which is connected to an engagement sub-assembly and has a first shape adaption mechanism associated with it. The digit has a digit base and first and second phalanges. The digit base is operatively interconnected to the first phalange by a base joint having a base pulley. The phalanges are operatively interconnected by a separate first phalange joint having a first phalange pulley. The engagement sub-assembly includes a tendon, which is received by the base pulley and by the first phalange pulley, and an actuation device for selectively tensioning the tendon. The first shape adaption mechanism is responsive to and receives the tendon. It is also situated between the base joint and the first phalange joint and is connected to the first phalange. Upon actuation by the actuation device, the phalanges are caused to pivot relative to the base joint and the second phalange is caused to pivot relative to the first phalange. At the same time, the first shape adaption mechanism controls the sequence of the aforementioned pivoting of the phalanges through application of braking force to the tendon.

  19. Folding of Layers of Finite Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, D. W.; Podladchikov, Yu. Yu.; Marques, F.

    All existing folding theories assume that the layers are infinitely long or, which is mathematically equivalent, that the compression is directly applied to the lateral boundaries. These assumptions are not always justified for natural geological sys- tems. In fact we can observe that on all scales, from veins to sub-ducting slabs, the layers are of finite length and that there are no distinct, rigid walls pushing the lay- ers from the side. Using the method of Muskhelishvili we have derived the complete two-dimensional solution of an elliptic object embedded in a matrix and subject to far field boundary conditions; pure shear, simple shear and arbitrary combinations thereof. The rheology of the matrix is viscous, the layer may behave either elastically or viscous. Using the values from this background state analysis, stress, pressure and strain rate, we performed the classical linear stability analysis to examine the mech- anism of folding in the described setup. The resulting expressions maximum growth rates and dominant wavelengths are applicable to general geological systems; in the limit of an infinite aspect ratio of the layer the classical expressions of Biot are ob- tained for all other cases new expressions result. Our main results are: 1. Folding of finite length layers is controlled by the ratio of aspect ratio to competence contrast. 2. The described setup explains why in nature only folds can be observed with a rela- tively small wavelength to thickness ratio, suggesting small viscosity contrast 3. The problem of the unknown compressive stress value for the elastic layer is solved. 4. For finite length elastic layers the dominant wavelength selection shows a cubic, instead of square, root dependence. 5. A complete table, describing the folding in all the possible limits is presented and the applicability to natural systems discussed. All the presented results were checked numerically and/or with analogue models.

  20. Artificial intelligence: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdami, M.

    1985-01-01

    The book covers the principles of AI, the main areas of application, as well as considering some of the social implications. The applications chapters have a common format structured as follows: definition of the topic; approach with conventional computing techniques; why 'intelligence' would provide a better approach; and how AI techniques would be used and the limitations. The contents discussed are: Principles of artificial intelligence; AI programming environments; LISP, list processing and pattern-making; AI programming with POP-11; Computer processing of natural language; Speech synthesis and recognition; Computer vision; Artificial intelligence and robotics; The anatomy of expert systems - Forsyth; Machine learning; Memory models of man and machine; Artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; Breaking out of the chinese room; Social implications of artificial intelligence; and Index.

  1. Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-01

    This contribution was presented as the closing lecture at the Faraday Discussion 155 on artificial photosynthesis, held in Edinburgh Scotland, September 5-7 2011. The world needs new, environmentally friendly and renewable fuels to exchange for fossil fuels. The fuel must be made from cheap and "endless" resources that are available everywhere. The new research area of solar fuels aims to meet this demand. This paper discusses why we need a solar fuel and why electricity is not enough; it proposes solar energy as the major renewable energy source to feed from. The scientific field concerning artificial photosynthesis expands rapidly and most of the different scientific visions for solar fuels are briefly overviewed. Research strategies and the development of artificial photosynthesis research to produce solar fuels are overviewed. Some conceptual aspects of research for artificial photosynthesis are discussed in closer detail. PMID:22470985

  2. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  3. Inflatable artificial sphincter - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An artificial sphincter consists of three parts: a cuff that fits around the bladder neck a pressure regulating balloon a pump that inflates the cuff. To treat urinary incontinence, the cuff is placed ...

  4. Darwin, artificial selection, and poverty.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Luis

    2010-03-01

    This paper argues that the processes of evolutionary selection are becoming increasingly artificial, a trend that goes against the belief in a purely natural selection process claimed by Darwin's natural selection theory. Artificial selection is mentioned by Darwin, but it was ignored by Social Darwinists, and it is all but absent in neo-Darwinian thinking. This omission results in an underestimation of probable impacts of artificial selection upon assumed evolutionary processes, and has implications for the ideological uses of Darwin's language, particularly in relation to poverty and other social inequalities. The influence of artificial selection on genotypic and phenotypic adaptations arguably represents a substantial shift in the presumed path of evolution, a shift laden with both biological and political implications. PMID:20812798

  5. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  6. An artificial gravity demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, C.; Lemke, L.; Penzo, P.

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gravity experiment which is tethered to a Delta second stage and which uses the Small Expendable Deployer System is proposed. Following tether deployment, the Delta vehicle performs the required spin-up maneuver and can then be passivated. A surplus reentry vehicle houses the artificial gravity life science experiments. When the experiments are completed, the reentry phase of the experiment is initiated by synchronizing the spin of the configuration with the required deorbit impulse.

  7. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Slaughter, M

    2011-09-01

    In the 1960s, cardiac surgeons and biomedical engineers pioneered the development of total artificial hearts (TAH) for the treatment of left and right heart failure. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the first implantation of the AbioCor device, the use of TAH has been limited, having failed to reach its envisioned potential and promise as an alternative therapy to heart transplantation. The Syncardia/CardioWest device, originally developed 30 years ago as the Jarvik TAH and later renamed the CardioWest TAH, continues to be used clinically in over 50 centers within the US and Europe having supported over 900 patients worldwide. Syncardia continues to develop TAH technology as evidenced by their recent introduction of a new portable pneumatic driver that enables patients to be discharged from the hospital. In contrast to TAH devices, continuous flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have made tremendous technological strides and are rapidly gaining widespread clinical acceptance. The VAD technology has demonstrated extraordinary safety and reliability records through evolving technologies, advanced biocompatible materials, and improved patient management. Subsequently, the number of TAH implantations remains low compared to the growth in LVAD implants. Nonetheless, the Syncardia/CardioWest TAH remains an important and viable option for patients with severe biventricular failure and end organ dysfunction. Overall, a 79% survival rate has been achieved in patients supported with a Syncardia/CardioWest TAH as bridge-to-transplantation. In this review article, a brief history on the evolution of TAH devices, their current use and emerging use of evolving continuous flow VAD technology as chronic biventricular and TAH device systems are presented. PMID:21775941

  8. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion. PMID:21331419

  9. Hiding the squid: patterns in artificial cephalopod skin

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Aaron; Rossiter, Jonathan; Homer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods employ their chromomorphic skins for rapid and versatile active camouflage and signalling effects. This is achieved using dense networks of pigmented, muscle-driven chromatophore cells which are neurally stimulated to actuate and affect local skin colouring. This allows cephalopods to adopt numerous dynamic and complex skin patterns, most commonly used to blend into the environment or to communicate with other animals. Our ultimate goal is to create an artificial skin that can mimic such pattern generation techniques, and that could produce a host of novel and compliant devices such as cloaking suits and dynamic illuminated clothing. This paper presents the design, mathematical modelling and analysis of a dynamic biomimetic pattern generation system using bioinspired artificial chromatophores. The artificial skin is made from electroactive dielectric elastomer: a soft, planar-actuating smart material that we show can be effective at mimicking the actuation of biological chromatophores. The proposed system achieves dynamic pattern generation by imposing simple local rules into the artificial chromatophore cells so that they can sense their surroundings in order to manipulate their actuation. By modelling sets of artificial chromatophores in linear arrays of cells, we explore the capability of the system to generate a variety of dynamic pattern types. We show that it is possible to mimic patterning seen in cephalopods, such as the passing cloud display, and other complex dynamic patterning. PMID:26063823

  10. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  11. Softness Correlations Across Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, Robert; Shavit, Amit; Rieser, Jennifer; Schoenholz, Samuel; Cubuk, Ekin; Durian, Douglas; Liu, Andrea; Riggleman, Robert

    In disordered systems, it is believed that mechanical failure begins with localized particle rearrangements. Recently, a machine learning method has been introduced to identify how likely a particle is to rearrange given its local structural environment, quantified by softness. We calculate the softness of particles in simulations of atomic Lennard-Jones mixtures, molecular Lennard-Jones oligomers, colloidal systems and granular systems. In each case, we find that the length scale characterizing spatial correlations of softness is approximately a particle diameter. These results provide a rationale for why localized rearrangements--whose size is presumably set by the scale of softness correlations--might occur in disordered systems across many length scales. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  12. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  13. Biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeob; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-02-01

    originating from the carbon nanotubes. This biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle offers a versatile platform for the recognition of various types of biomolecules by replacing the enzyme, because an exothermic reaction is a general property accompanying a biochemical transformation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental sections; a schematic drawing of the custom-built flow injection system; the change in the length of the yarn correlated with the wetting and drying of the entrapped PNIPAm-GOx particle versus time; the particle size distribution of PNIPAm-GOx hydrogel in a pure PBS solution and in a PBS solution containing 100 mM glucose at 36 °C biothermal sensing torsional actuation of a carbon nanotube yarn (video). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07195j

  14. Correcting wave predictions with artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarynskyy, O.; Makarynska, D.

    2003-04-01

    The predictions of wind waves with different lead times are necessary in a large scope of coastal and open ocean activities. Numerical wave models, which usually provide this information, are based on deterministic equations that do not entirely account for the complexity and uncertainty of the wave generation and dissipation processes. An attempt to improve wave parameters short-term forecasts based on artificial neural networks is reported. In recent years, artificial neural networks have been used in a number of coastal engineering applications due to their ability to approximate the nonlinear mathematical behavior without a priori knowledge of interrelations among the elements within a system. The common multilayer feed-forward networks, with a nonlinear transfer functions in the hidden layers, were developed and employed to forecast the wave characteristics over one hour intervals starting from one up to 24 hours, and to correct these predictions. Three non-overlapping data sets of wave characteristics, both from a buoy, moored roughly 60 miles west of the Aran Islands, west coast of Ireland, were used to train and validate the neural nets involved. The networks were trained with error back propagation algorithm. Time series plots and scatterplots of the wave characteristics as well as tables with statistics show an improvement of the results achieved due to the correction procedure employed.

  15. Length scales and self-organization in dense suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düring, Gustavo; Lerner, Edan; Wyart, Matthieu

    2014-02-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its connection to the observed correlation length, we develop an analogy between suspension flows and the rigidity transition occurring when floppy networks are pulled, a transition believed to be associated with the stress stiffening of certain gels. After deriving the critical properties near the rigidity transition, we show numerically that suspension flows lie close to it. We find that this proximity causes a decoupling between viscosity and the correlation length of velocities ξ, which scales as the length lc characterizing the response to a local perturbation, previously predicted to follow lc˜1/√zc-z ˜p0.18, where p is the dimensionless particle pressure, z is the coordination of the contact network made by the particles, and zc is twice the spatial dimension. We confirm these predictions numerically and predict the existence of a larger length scale lr˜√p with mild effects on velocity correlation and of a vanishing strain scale δγ ˜1/p that characterizes decorrelation in flow.

  16. ASAP- ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is a general orbit prediction program which incorporates sufficient orbit modeling accuracy for mission design, maneuver analysis, and mission planning. ASAP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. ASAP uses Cowell's method in the numerical integration of the equations of motion. The orbital mechanics calculation contains perturbations due to non-sphericity (up to a 40 X 40 field) of the planet, lunar and solar effects, and drag and solar radiation pressure. An 8th order Runge-Kutta integration scheme with variable step size control is used for efficient propagation. The input includes the classical osculating elements, orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficient, gravitational constants, and planet radius, rotation rate, etc. The printed output contains Cartesian coordinates, velocity, equinoctial elements, and classical elements for each time step or event step. At each step, selected output is added to a plot file. The ASAP package includes a program for sorting this plot file. LOTUS 1-2-3 is used in the supplied examples to graph the results, but any graphics software package could be used to process the plot file. ASAP is not written to be mission-specific. Instead, it is intended to be used for most planetary orbiting missions. As a consequence, the user has to have some basic understanding of orbital mechanics to provide the correct input and interpret the subsequent output. ASAP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible computer operating under MS-DOS. The ASAP package requires a math coprocessor and a minimum of 256K RAM. This program was last

  17. Transformation optics with artificial Riemann sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Chen, Huanyang

    2013-11-01

    The two original versions of ‘invisibility’ cloaks (Leonhardt 2006 Science 312 1777-80 and Pendry et al 2006 Science 312 1780-2) show perfect cloaking but require unphysical singularities in material properties. A non-Euclidean version of cloaking (Leonhardt 2009 Science 323 110-12) was later presented to address these problems, using a very complicated non-Euclidean geometry. In this work, we combine the two original approaches to transformation optics into a more general concept: transformation optics with artificial Riemann sheets. Our method is straightforward and can be utilized to design new kinds of cloaks that can work not only in the realm of geometric optics but also using wave optics. The physics behind this design is similar to that of the conformal cloak for waves. The resonances in the interior region make the phase delay disappear and induce the cloaking effect. Numerical simulations confirm our theoretical results.

  18. Simulations of artificial swimmers in confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Luca; Zhu, Lailai; Gjølberg, Eerik

    2012-11-01

    Miniature swimmming robots are potentially powerful for microobject manipulation, such as flow control in lab-on-a-chip, localized drug delivery and screening for diseases. Magnetically driven artificial bacterial flagella (ABF) performing helical motion is advantegous due to high swimming speed and accurate control. Using boundary element method, we numerically investigate the propulsion of ABF in free space and near solid boundaries. Step-out at high actuation frequencies, wobbling and near-wall drifting are documented, in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. We aim to explore the effect of swimmer shape on the performance, thus benefiting design of efficient microswimmers. Propulsion of ABF confined by a solid wall with and without background shear flow is also studied, with a focus on wall-induced hydrodynamic interaction and its influence on the stability of the motion. Funding by VR (the Swedish Research Council) and Linne flow centre at KTH is acknowledged.

  19. Attitude stability analyses for small artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, W. R.; Zanardi, M. C.; Formiga, J. K. S.; Cabette, R. E. S.; Stuchi, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the stability of the rotational motion of a symmetrical spacecraft, in a circular orbit. The equilibrium points and regions of stability are established when components of the gravity gradient torque acting on the spacecraft are included in the equations of rotational motion, which are described by the Andoyer's variables. The nonlinear stability of the equilibrium points of the rotational motion is analysed here by the Kovalev-Savchenko theorem. With the application of the Kovalev-Savchenko theorem, it is possible to verify if they remain stable under the influence of the terms of higher order of the normal Hamiltonian. In this paper, numerical simulations are made for a small hypothetical artificial satellite. Several stable equilibrium points were determined and regions around these points have been established by variations in the orbital inclination and in the spacecraft principal moment of inertia. The present analysis can directly contribute in the maintenance of the spacecraft's attitude.

  20. Mesh deformation based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Domen; Kosel, Franc; Čelič, Damjan; Lipej, Andrej

    2011-09-01

    In the article a new mesh deformation algorithm based on artificial neural networks is introduced. This method is a point-to-point method, meaning that it does not use connectivity information for calculation of the mesh deformation. Two already known point-to-point methods, based on interpolation techniques, are also presented. In contrast to the two known interpolation methods, the new method does not require a summation over all boundary nodes for one displacement calculation. The consequence of this fact is a shorter computational time of mesh deformation, which is proven by different deformation tests. The quality of the deformed meshes with all three deformation methods was also compared. Finally, the generated and the deformed three-dimensional meshes were used in the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis of a Francis water turbine. A comparison of the analysis results was made to prove the applicability of the new method in every day computation.

  1. Potential application of artificial concepts to aerodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.; Andrews, A.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of artificial intelligence as it applies to computational fluid dynamics simulation is investigated. How expert systems can be adapted to speed the numerical aerodynamic simulation process is also examined. A proposed expert grid generation system is briefly described which, given flow parameters, configuration geometry, and simulation constraints, uses knowledge about the discretization process to determine grid point coordinates, computational surface information, and zonal interface parameters.

  2. Local Flow Field and Slip Length of Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schäffel, David; Koynov, Kaloian; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Schönecker, Clarissa

    2016-04-01

    While the global slippage of water past superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted wide interest, the local distribution of slip still remains unclear. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we performed detailed measurements of the local flow field and slip length for water in the Cassie state on a microstructured superhydrophobic surface. We revealed that the local slip length is finite, nonconstant, anisotropic, and sensitive to the presence of surfactants. In combination with numerical calculations of the flow, we can explain all these properties by the local hydrodynamics. PMID:27081981

  3. Local Flow Field and Slip Length of Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffel, David; Koynov, Kaloian; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Schönecker, Clarissa

    2016-04-01

    While the global slippage of water past superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted wide interest, the local distribution of slip still remains unclear. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we performed detailed measurements of the local flow field and slip length for water in the Cassie state on a microstructured superhydrophobic surface. We revealed that the local slip length is finite, nonconstant, anisotropic, and sensitive to the presence of surfactants. In combination with numerical calculations of the flow, we can explain all these properties by the local hydrodynamics.

  4. Propagation of numerical noise in particle-in-cell tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesting, Frederik; Franchetti, Giuliano

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) is the most used algorithm to perform self-consistent tracking of intense charged particle beams. It is based on depositing macroparticles on a grid, and subsequently solving on it the Poisson equation. It is well known that PIC algorithms occupy intrinsic limitations as they introduce numerical noise. Although not significant for short-term tracking, this becomes important in simulations for circular machines over millions of turns as it may induce artificial diffusion of the beam. In this work, we present a modeling of numerical noise induced by PIC algorithms, and discuss its influence on particle dynamics. The combined effect of particle tracking and noise created by PIC algorithms leads to correlated or decorrelated numerical noise. For decorrelated numerical noise we derive a scaling law for the simulation parameters, allowing an estimate of artificial emittance growth. Lastly, the effect of correlated numerical noise is discussed, and a mitigation strategy is proposed.

  5. Telomere length in Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kitay-Cohen, Y; Goldberg-Bittman, L; Hadary, R; Fejgin, M D; Amiel, A

    2008-11-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures located at the termini of chromosomes that protect the chromosomes from fusion and degradation. Hepatocyte cell-cycle turnover may be a primary mechanism of telomere shortening in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, inducing fibrosis and cellular senescence. HCV infection has been recognized as potential cause of B-cell lymphoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study sought to assess relative telomere length in leukocytes from patients with chronic HCV infection, patients after eradication of HCV infection (in remission), and healthy controls. A novel method of manual evaluation was applied. Leukocytes derived from 22 patients with chronic HCV infection and age- and sex-matched patients in remission and healthy control subjects were subjected to a fluorescence-in-situ protocol (DAKO) to determine telomere fluorescence intensity and number. The relative, manual, analysis of telomere length was validated against findings on applied spectral imaging (ASI) in a random sample of study and control subjects. Leukocytes from patients with chronic HCV infection had shorter telomeres than leukocytes from patients in remission and healthy controls. On statistical analysis, more cells with low signal intensity on telomere FISH had shorter telomeres whereas more cells with high signal intensity had longer telomeres. The findings were corroborated by the ASI telomere software. Telomere shortening in leukocytes from patients with active HCV infection is probably due to the lower overall telomere level rather than higher cell cycle turnover. Manual evaluation is an accurate and valid method of assessing relative telomere length between patients with chronic HCV infection and healthy subjects. PMID:18992639

  6. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  7. The Length of Time's Arrow

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-08-21

    An unresolved problem in physics is how the thermodynamic arrow of time arises from an underlying time reversible dynamics. We contribute to this issue by developing a measure of time-symmetry breaking, and by using the work fluctuation relations, we determine the time asymmetry of recent single molecule RNA unfolding experiments. We define time asymmetry as the Jensen-Shannon divergencebetween trajectory probability distributions of an experiment and its time-reversed conjugate. Among other interesting properties, the length of time's arrow bounds the average dissipation and determines the difficulty of accurately estimating free energy differences in nonequilibrium experiments.

  8. The artificial compression method for computation of shocks and contact discontinuities. I - Single conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of the artificial compression method for the computation of discontinuous solutions of a single conservation law by finite difference methods. The single conservation law has either a shock or a contact discontinuity. Any monotone finite difference scheme applied to the original equation smears the discontinuity, while the same scheme applied to the equation modified by an artificial compression flux produces steady progressing profiles. If L is any finite difference scheme in conservation form and C is an artificial compressor, the split flux artificial compression method CL is a corrective scheme: L smears the discontinuity while propagating it; C compresses the smeared transition toward a sharp discontinuity. Numerical implementation of artificial compression is described.

  9. Natural channel protein inserts and functions in a completely artificial, solid-supported bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Wangyang; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Reconstitution of membrane proteins in artificial membrane systems creates a platform for exploring their potential for pharmacological or biotechnological applications. Previously, we demonstrated amphiphilic block copolymers as promising building blocks for artificial membranes with long-term stability and tailorable structural parameters. However, the insertion of membrane proteins has not previously been realized in a large-area, stable, and solid-supported artificial membrane. Here, we show the first, preliminary model of a channel membrane protein that is functionally incorporated in a completely artificial polymer, tethered, solid-supported bilayer membrane (TSSBM). Unprecedented ionic transport characteristics that differ from previous results on protein insertion into planar, free-standing membranes, are identified. Our findings mark a change in understanding protein insertion and ion flow within natural channel proteins when inserted in an artificial TSSBM, thus holding great potential for numerous applications such as drug screening, trace analyzing, and biosensing. PMID:23846807

  10. Suppressing the numerical Cherenkov radiation in the Yee numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of laser facilities will routinely produce relativistic particle beams from the interaction of intense laser pulses with solids and/or gases. Their modeling with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes needs dispersion-free Maxwell solvers in order to properly describe the interaction of electromagnetic waves with relativistic particles. A particular attention is devoted to the suppression of the numerical Cherenkov instability, responsible for the noise generation. It occurs when the electromagnetic wave is artificially slowed down because of the finite mesh size, thus allowing for the high energy particles to propagate with super-luminous velocities. In the present paper, we show how a slight increase of the light velocity in the Maxwell's equations enables to suppress this instability while keeping a good overall precision of calculations.

  11. Biological Effects Of Artificial Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corth, Richard

    1980-10-01

    We are increasingly being warned of the possible effects of so called "polluted" light, that is light that differs in spectral content from that of sunlight. We should be concerned, we are told, because all animals and plants have evolved under this natural daylight and therefore any difference between that illuminant and the artificial illuminants that are on the market today, is suspect. The usual presentation of the differences between the sunlight and the artificial illuminants are as shown in Figure 1. Here we are shown the spectral power distribution of sunlight and Cool White fluorescent light. The spectral power distributions of each have been normalized to some convenient wavelength so that each can be seen and easily compared on the same figure. But this presentation is misleading for one does not experience artificial illuminants at the same intensity as one experiences sunlight. Sunlight intensities are ordinarily found to be in the 8000 to 10,000 footcandle range whereas artificial illuminants are rarely experienced at intensity levels greater than 100 footcandles. Therefore a representative difference between the two types of illumination conditions is more accurately represented as in Figure 2. Thus if evolutionary adaptations require that humans and other animals be exposed to sunlight to ensure wellbeing, it is clear that one must be exposed to sunlight intensities. It is not feasible to expect that artificially illuminated environments will be lit to the same intensity as sunlight

  12. Artificial gametes from stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn. PMID:26161331

  13. Artificial evolution: a new path for artificial intelligence?

    PubMed

    Husbands, P; Harvey, I; Cliff, D; Miller, G

    1997-06-01

    Recently there have been a number of proposals for the use of artificial evolution as a radically new approach to the development of control systems for autonomous robots. This paper explains the artificial evolution approach, using work at Sussex to illustrate it. The paper revolves around a case study on the concurrent evolution of control networks and visual sensor morphologies for a mobile robot. Wider intellectual issues surrounding the work are discussed, as is the use of more abstract evolutionary simulations as a new potentially useful tool in theoretical biology. PMID:9209759

  14. Kinetically engendered subspinodal length scales in spontaneous dewetting of thin liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotni, Tirumala Rao; Sarkar, Jayati; Khanna, Rajesh

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations reveal emergence of subspinodal length scales in spontaneous dewetting of nonslipping unstable thin liquid films on homogeneous substrates if the liquid viscosity decreases with decrease in film thickness.

  15. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  16. An Artificial Neural Networks Method for Solving Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Abir

    2010-09-01

    While there already exists many analytical and numerical techniques for solving PDEs, this paper introduces an approach using artificial neural networks. The approach consists of a technique developed by combining the standard numerical method, finite-difference, with the Hopfield neural network. The method is denoted Hopfield-finite-difference (HFD). The architecture of the nets, energy function, updating equations, and algorithms are developed for the method. The HFD method has been used successfully to approximate the solution of classical PDEs, such as the Wave, Heat, Poisson and the Diffusion equations, and on a system of PDEs. The software Matlab is used to obtain the results in both tabular and graphical form. The results are similar in terms of accuracy to those obtained by standard numerical methods. In terms of speed, the parallel nature of the Hopfield nets methods makes them easier to implement on fast parallel computers while some numerical methods need extra effort for parallelization.

  17. Telomere length and cardiovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Frej; Saijonmaa, Outi

    2012-06-01

    Telomeres are located at the end of chromosomes. They are composed of repetitive TTAGGG tandem repeats and associated proteins of crucial importance for telomere function. Telomeric DNA is shortened by each cell division until a critical length is achieved and the cell enters senescence and eventually apoptosis. Telomeres are therefore considered a 'biological clock' of the cell. Telomerase adds nucleotides to telomeric DNA thereby contributing to telomere maintenance, genomic stability, functions, and proliferative capacity of the cell. In certain rare forms of progeria, point mutations within the telomere lead to accelerated telomere attrition and premature aging. Endogenous factors causing telomere shortening are aging, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) shortening is inhibited by estrogen and endogenous antioxidants. Accelerated telomere attrition is associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as age, gender, obesity, smoking, sedentary life-style, excess alcohol intake, and even mental stress. Cardiovascular (CV) diseases and CV aging are usually but not invariably associated with shorter telomeres than in healthy subjects. LTL appears to be a biomarker of CV aging, reflecting the cumulative burden of endogenous and exogenous factors negatively affecting LTL. Whether accelerated telomere shortening is cause or consequence of CV aging and disease is not clear. PMID:22713142

  18. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles. PMID:11710194

  19. Nanobiocatalytic assemblies for artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hong; Nam, Dong Heon; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-08-01

    Natural photosynthesis, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion process, occurs through a series of photo-induced electron transfer reactions in nanoscale architectures that contain light-harvesting complexes, protein-metal clusters, and many redox biocatalysts. Artificial photosynthesis in nanobiocatalytic assemblies aims to reconstruct man-made photosensitizers, electron mediators, electron donors, and redox enzymes for solar synthesis of valuable chemicals through visible light-driven cofactor regeneration. The key requirement in the design of biocatalyzed artificial photosynthetic process is an efficient and forward electron transfer between each photosynthetic component. This review describes basic principles in combining redox biocatalysis with photocatalysis, and highlights recent research outcomes in the development of nanobiocatalytic assemblies that can mimic natural photosystems I and II, respectively. Current issues in biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis and future perspectives will be briefly discussed. PMID:24832068

  20. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  1. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Nosenko, M. A.; Drutskaya, M. S.; Moisenovich, M. M.; Nedospasov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed. PMID:27437136

  2. Artificial heart for humanoid robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnuru, Akshay; Wu, Lianjun; Tadesse, Yonas

    2014-03-01

    A soft robotic device inspired by the pumping action of a biological heart is presented in this study. Developing artificial heart to a humanoid robot enables us to make a better biomedical device for ultimate use in humans. As technology continues to become more advanced, the methods in which we implement high performance and biomimetic artificial organs is getting nearer each day. In this paper, we present the design and development of a soft artificial heart that can be used in a humanoid robot and simulate the functions of a human heart using shape memory alloy technology. The robotic heart is designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate someone blushing or when someone is angry by the use of elastomeric substrates and certain features for the transport of fluids.

  3. Artificial sweeteners: safe or unsafe?

    PubMed

    Qurrat-ul-Ain; Khan, Sohaib Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Artificial sweeteners or intense sweeteners are sugar substitutes that are used as an alternative to table sugar. They are many times sweeter than natural sugar and as they contain no calories, they may be used to control weight and obesity. Extensive scientific research has demonstrated the safety of the six low-calorie sweeteners currently approved for use in foods in the U.S. and Europe (stevia, acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose), if taken in acceptable quantities daily. There is some ongoing debate over whether artificial sweetener usage poses a health threat .This review article aims to cover thehealth benefits, and risks, of consuming artificial sweeteners, and discusses natural sweeteners which can be used as alternatives. PMID:25842566

  4. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  5. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  6. Artificial Life in Quantum Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantum information protocol that models the biological behaviours of individuals living in a natural selection scenario. The artificially engineered evolution of the quantum living units shows the fundamental features of life in a common environment, such as self-replication, mutation, interaction of individuals, and death. We propose how to mimic these bio-inspired features in a quantum-mechanical formalism, which allows for an experimental implementation achievable with current quantum platforms. This study paves the way for the realization of artificial life and embodied evolution with quantum technologies. PMID:26853918

  7. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  8. Artificial Life in Quantum Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    We develop a quantum information protocol that models the biological behaviours of individuals living in a natural selection scenario. The artificially engineered evolution of the quantum living units shows the fundamental features of life in a common environment, such as self-replication, mutation, interaction of individuals, and death. We propose how to mimic these bio-inspired features in a quantum-mechanical formalism, which allows for an experimental implementation achievable with current quantum platforms. This study paves the way for the realization of artificial life and embodied evolution with quantum technologies.

  9. Artificial Cells: Prospects for Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they also have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nano-scale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  10. Artificial cells: prospects for biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David

    2002-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nanoscale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-19

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  12. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-10

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  13. Application of Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model and back-propagation artificial neural network in laser diode fast axis collimator assembly.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Rossi, Giammarco; Braglia, Andrea; Perrone, Guido

    2016-08-10

    The paper presents the development of a tool based on a back-propagation artificial neural network to assist in the accurate positioning of the lenses used to collimate the beam from semiconductor laser diodes along the so-called fast axis. After training using a Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model, the network is capable of indicating the tilt, decenter, and defocus of such lenses from the measured field distribution, so the operator can determine the errors with respect to the actual lens position and optimize the diode assembly procedure. An experimental validation using a typical configuration exploited in multi-emitter diode module assembly and fast axis collimating lenses with different focal lengths and numerical apertures is reported. PMID:27534506

  14. Nurse Fatigue and Shift Length: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Deborah Maust

    2015-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on patient quality and concerns about the impact of health care worker fatigue has stimulated efforts for leaders to address patient quality and caregiver satisfaction. Shift length has been associated with nurse fatigue and has become a growing concern in the United States with the routine shift length of 12 hours. In this project, shift lengths from 12 hours to 8 hours for a 4-week period to evaluate fatigue levels associated with 12-hour and 8-hour shifts. Lessons learned from this experience: nurses are agreeable to try a proposed change, numerous ideas should be tried to develop additional innovative solutions to the issue of nurse fatigue, and nurses may not want to work 5 days per week. PMID:26281278

  15. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications. PMID:24943491

  16. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  17. Artificial plasma formed by connected metallic wires at infrared frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the plasmonic properties of metal and the effect of metal loss in the effective-medium properties of wire media formed by an array of connected rods at infrared frequencies. Using homogenization techniques, it is demonstrated that the plasmonic properties of metals may enable the design of artificial plasmas that mimic more closely the behavior of a continuous isotropic medium with negative permittivity. It is shown that when the plasmonic properties of the metal are dominant, the electrical length of the unit cell may be a very small fraction of the operating wavelength near the plasma frequency of the wire medium and that the spatial dispersion effects may be relatively weak. In addition, we investigate the possibility operating the artificial plasma in the regime Re{ɛ}=-1 to obtain a superlensing effect at infrared frequencies analogous to that characteristic of the silver lens.

  18. Investigation on artificial blood vessels prepared from bacterial cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zang, Shanshan; Zhang, Ran; Chen, Hua; Lu, Yudong; Zhou, Jianhai; Chang, Xiao; Qiu, Guixing; Wu, Zhihong; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    BC (bacterial cellulose) exhibits quite distinctive properties than plant cellulose. The outstanding properties make BC a promising material for preparation of artificial blood vessel. By taking advantage of the high oxygen permeability of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) as a tubular template material, a series of BC tubes with a length of 100 mm, a thickness of 1mm and an outer diameter of 4 or 6mm were biosynthesized with the help of Gluconacetobacter xylinum. Through characterization by SEM (scanning electron microscope), tensile testing and thermal analysis, it is demonstrated that BC tubes are good enough for artificial blood vessel with elaborated nano-fiber architecture, qualified mechanical properties and high thermal stability. In addition, measurement of biocompatibility also shows that BC tubes are greatly adaptable to the in vivo environment. The results indicate that BC tubes have great potential for being utilized as tubular scaffold materials in the field of tissue engineering. PMID:25491966

  19. Length of human pregnancy and contributors to its natural variation

    PubMed Central

    Jukic, A.M.; Baird, D.D.; Weinberg, C.R.; McConnaughey, D.R.; Wilcox, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How variable is the length of human pregnancy, and are early hormonal events related to gestational length? SUMMARY ANSWER Among natural conceptions where the date of conception (ovulation) is known, the variation in pregnancy length spanned 37 days, even after excluding women with complications or preterm births. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Previous studies of length of gestation have either estimated gestational age by last menstrual period (LMP) or ultrasound (both imperfect measures) or included pregnancies conceived through assisted reproductive technology. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The Early Pregnancy Study was a prospective cohort study (1982–85) that followed 130 singleton pregnancies from unassisted conception to birth, with detailed hormonal measurements through the conception cycle; 125 of these pregnancies were included in this analysis. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We calculated the length of gestation beginning at conception (ovulation) in 125 naturally conceived, singleton live births. Ovulation, implantation and corpus luteum (CL) rescue pattern were identified with urinary hormone measurements. We accounted for events that artificially shorten the natural length of gestation (Cesarean delivery or labor induction, i.e. ‘censoring’) using Kaplan–Meier curves and proportional hazards models. We examined hormonal and other factors in relation to length of gestation. We did not have ultrasound information to compare with our gold standard measure. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The median time from ovulation to birth was 268 days (38 weeks, 2 days). Even after excluding six preterm births, the gestational length range was 37 days. The coefficient of variation was higher when measured by LMP (4.9%) than by ovulation (3.7%), reflecting the variability of time of ovulation. Conceptions that took longer to implant also took longer from implantation to delivery (P = 0.02). CL rescue pattern (reflecting ovarian response to

  20. Artificial Video for Video Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallis, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of video analysis software and computer-generated animations for student activities. The use of artificial video affords the opportunity for students to study phenomena for which a real video may not be easy or even possible to procure, using analysis software with which the students are already familiar. We will…

  1. Hydrogen production: Catalysing artificial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.; Shen, Shaohua

    2013-12-01

    Efficient photocatalytic splitting of water to realize carbon-free production of hydrogen from sunlight remains a challenge. New precious-metal-free molecular catalysts in semiconductor-based, visible-light-driven water-splitting systems are promising for realizing practical artificial photosynthesis.

  2. Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow.

    PubMed

    Kyba, Christopher C M; Tong, Kai Pong; Bennie, Jonathan; Birriel, Ignacio; Birriel, Jennifer J; Cool, Andrew; Danielsen, Arne; Davies, Thomas W; Outer, Peter N den; Edwards, William; Ehlert, Rainer; Falchi, Fabio; Fischer, Jürgen; Giacomelli, Andrea; Giubbilini, Francesco; Haaima, Marty; Hesse, Claudia; Heygster, Georg; Hölker, Franz; Inger, Richard; Jensen, Linsey J; Kuechly, Helga U; Kuehn, John; Langill, Phil; Lolkema, Dorien E; Nagy, Matthew; Nievas, Miguel; Ochi, Nobuaki; Popow, Emil; Posch, Thomas; Puschnig, Johannes; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schmidt, Wim; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel; Spoelstra, Henk; Tekatch, Anthony; Trueblood, Mark; Walker, Constance E; Weber, Michael; Welch, Douglas L; Zamorano, Jaime; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program. PMID:25673335

  3. Thinking, Creativity, and Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSiano, Michael; DeSiano, Salvatore

    This document provides an introduction to the relationship between the current knowledge of focused and creative thinking and artificial intelligence. A model for stages of focused and creative thinking gives: problem encounter/setting, preparation, concentration/incubation, clarification/generation and evaluation/judgment. While a computer can…

  4. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, Joseph

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with designing machine systems that can simulate human mental processes. The field draws upon theoretical constructs from a wide variety of disciplines, including mathematics, psychology, linguistics, neurophysiology, computer science, and electronic engineering. Some of the…

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence (AI) in relation to intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) and science education. Provides a brief background of AI work, examples of expert systems, examples of ICAI work, and addresses problems facing AI workers that have implications for science education. Proposes a revised model of the Karplus/Renner…

  6. Artificial neural networks in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    This Technology Brief provides an overview of artificial neural networks (ANN). A definition and explanation of an ANN is given and situations in which an ANN is used are described. ANN applications to medicine specifically are then explored and the areas in which it is currently being used are discussed. Included are medical diagnostic aides, biochemical analysis, medical image analysis and drug development.

  7. Artificial-Satellite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Johnny H.

    1989-01-01

    Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is general orbit-predicting computer program incorporating sufficient orbit-modeling accuracy for design and planning of missions and analysis of maneuvers. Suitable for study of planetary-orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Not written for specific mission and intended use for almost any planetary orbiting mission. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  8. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  9. WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY ARTIFICIAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of artificial wetlands at Santee, California demonstrated the capacity of wetlands systems for integrated secondary and advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters. When receiving a blend of primary and secondary wastewaters at a blend ratio of 1:2 (6 cm per day: 12 cm pe...

  10. Accurate Critical Stress Intensity Factor Griffith Crack Theory Measurements by Numerical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Critical stress intensity factor (KIc) has been an approximation for fracture toughness using only load-cell measurements. However, artificial man-made cracks several orders of magnitude longer and wider than natural flaws have required a correction factor term (Y) that can be up to about 3 times the recorded experimental value [1-3]. In fact, over 30 years ago a National Academy of Sciences advisory board stated that empirical KIc testing was of serious concern and further requested that an accurate bulk fracture toughness method be found [4]. Now that fracture toughness can be calculated accurately by numerical integration from the load/deflection curve as resilience, work of fracture (WOF) and strain energy release (SIc) [5, 6], KIc appears to be unnecessary. However, the large body of previous KIc experimental test results found in the literature offer the opportunity for continued meta analysis with other more practical and accurate fracture toughness results using energy methods and numerical integration. Therefore, KIc is derived from the classical Griffith Crack Theory [6] to include SIc as a more accurate term for strain energy release rate (𝒢Ic), along with crack surface energy (γ), crack length (a), modulus (E), applied stress (σ), Y, crack-tip plastic zone defect region (rp) and yield strength (σys) that can all be determined from load and deflection data. Polymer matrix discontinuous quartz fiber-reinforced composites to accentuate toughness differences were prepared for flexural mechanical testing comprising of 3 mm fibers at different volume percentages from 0-54.0 vol% and at 28.2 vol% with different fiber lengths from 0.0-6.0 mm. Results provided a new correction factor and regression analyses between several numerical integration fracture toughness test methods to support KIc results. Further, bulk KIc accurate experimental values are compared with empirical test results found in literature. Also, several fracture toughness mechanisms

  11. Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159246.html Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney? Small trial suggests device might be ... themselves of clunky machines, moving about with a "wearable artificial kidney" instead. That's the promise of a ...

  12. Artificial Intelligence Databases: A Survey and Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David

    1990-01-01

    Identifies and describes online databases containing references to materials on artificial intelligence, robotics, and expert systems, and compares them in terms of scope and usage. Recommendations for conducting online searches on artificial intelligence and related fields are offered. (CLB)

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. PMID:27034483

  14. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric “molecules”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-01

    Dual band metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption bands are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual band metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual band metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric “molecules” with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric “molecule” consists of four “atoms” of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption bands with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-band metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence.

  15. Artificial insemination for breeding non-domestic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Temple, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Captive breeding of non-domestic birds has increased dramatically in this century, and production of young often exceeds that of the same number of birds in their native habitat. However, when infertility is a problem, artificial insemination can be a useful method to improve production. Artificial insemination programs with non-domestic birds are relatively recent, but several notable successes have been documented, especially with cranes and raptors. Three methods of artificial insemination are described--cooperative, massage, and electroejaculation. Cooperative artificial insemination requires training of birds imprinted on man and is used extensively in some raptor programs. The massage technique generally is used when there are larger numbers of birds to inseminate since it requires less training of the birds than with the cooperative method, and a larger number of attempted semen collections are successful. Although the best samples are obtained from birds conditioned to capture and handling procedures associated with the massage method, samples can be obtained from wild birds. Semen collection and insemination for the crane serves to illustrate some of the modifications necessary to compensate for anatomical variations. Collection of semen by electrical stimulation is not commonly used in birds. Unlike the other two methods which require behavioral cooperation by the bird, electroejaculation is possible in reproductively active birds without prior conditioning when properly restrained. Fertility from artificial insemination in captive non-domestic-birds has been good. Although some spermatozoal morphology has been reported, most aspects of morphology are not useful in predicting fertility. However, spermatozoal head length in the crane may have a positive correlation with fertility. Nevertheless, insemination with the largest number of live spermatozoa is still the best guarantee of fertile egg production.

  16. Introduction to Concepts in Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebur, Dagmar

    1995-01-01

    This introduction to artificial neural networks summarizes some basic concepts of computational neuroscience and the resulting models of artificial neurons. The terminology of biological and artificial neurons, biological and machine learning and neural processing is introduced. The concepts of supervised and unsupervised learning are explained with examples from the power system area. Finally, a taxonomy of different types of neurons and different classes of artificial neural networks is presented.

  17. Numerical simulation of tip clearance effects in turbomachinery

    SciTech Connect

    Basson, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1995-07-01

    The numerical formulation developed here includes an efficient grid generation scheme, particularly suited to computational grids for the analysis of turbulent turbomachinery flows and tip clearance flows, and a semi-implicit, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics scheme that directly includes artificial dissipation,a nd is applicable to both viscous and inviscid flows. The value of this artificial dissipation is optimized to achieve accuracy and convergency in the solution. The numerical model is used to investigate the structure of tip clearance flows in a turbine nozzle. The structure of leakage flow is captured accurately, including blade-to-blade variation of all three velocity components, pitch and yaw angles, losses and blade static pressures in the tip clearance region. The simulation also includes evaluation of such quantities the spanwise extent affected by the leakage flow. It is demonstrated, through optimization of grid size and artificial dissipation, that the tip clearance flow field can be captured accurately.

  18. Design and fabrication of long focal length microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsin-Ta; Lin, Vinna; Hsieh, Jo-Lan; Su, Guo-Dung John

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we present microlens arrays (MLA) with long focal length (in millimeter range) based on thermal reflow process. The focal length of microlens is usually in the same order of lens diameter or several hundred microns. To extend focal length, we made a photoresist (SU-8) MLA covered by a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film on a glass substrate. Because the refractive index difference between PDMS and photoresist interface is lower than that of air and MLA interface, light is less bended when passing through MLA and is focused at longer distance. Microlenses of diameters from 50 μm to 240 μm were successfully fabricated. The longest focal length was 2.1 mm from the microlens of 240 μm diameter. The numerical aperture (NA) was reduced 0.06, which is much lower than the smallest NA (~ 0.15) by regular thermal reflow processes. Cured PDMS has high transmittance and becomes parts of MLA without too much optical power loss. Besides, other focal lengths can be realized by modifying the refractive index different between two adjacent materials as described in this paper.

  19. Numerical simulation of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Bergman, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Opening Switches have been examined numerically with the aid of the ANTHEM plasma simulation model. A generic bi-cylindrical switch is studied. The switching of generator pulses ranging from 50 ns to 1 ..mu..sec is reviewed, for a variety of plasma fill lengths and densities, and for a range of resistive loads. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Minimal length uncertainty and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, A.; Mortazavi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, minimal length uncertainty is used as a constraint to solve the Friedman equation. It is shown that, based on the minimal length uncertainty principle, the Hubble scale is decreasing which corresponds to an accelerating universe.

  1. Solar fuels via artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2009-12-21

    Because sunlight is diffuse and intermittent, substantial use of solar energy to meet humanity's needs will probably require energy storage in dense, transportable media via chemical bonds. Practical, cost effective technologies for conversion of sunlight directly into useful fuels do not currently exist, and will require new basic science. Photosynthesis provides a blueprint for solar energy storage in fuels. Indeed, all of the fossil-fuel-based energy consumed today derives from sunlight harvested by photosynthetic organisms. Artificial photosynthesis research applies the fundamental scientific principles of the natural process to the design of solar energy conversion systems. These constructs use different materials, and researchers tune them to produce energy efficiently and in forms useful to humans. Fuel production via natural or artificial photosynthesis requires three main components. First, antenna/reaction center complexes absorb sunlight and convert the excitation energy to electrochemical energy (redox equivalents). Then, a water oxidation complex uses this redox potential to catalyze conversion of water to hydrogen ions, electrons stored as reducing equivalents, and oxygen. A second catalytic system uses the reducing equivalents to make fuels such as carbohydrates, lipids, or hydrogen gas. In this Account, we review a few general approaches to artificial photosynthetic fuel production that may be useful for eventually overcoming the energy problem. A variety of research groups have prepared artificial reaction center molecules. These systems contain a chromophore, such as a porphyrin, covalently linked to one or more electron acceptors, such as fullerenes or quinones, and secondary electron donors. Following the excitation of the chromophore, photoinduced electron transfer generates a primary charge-separated state. Electron transfer chains spatially separate the redox equivalents and reduce electronic coupling, slowing recombination of the charge

  2. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  4. Artificial Intelligence and Its Importance in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilmann, Martha J.

    Artificial intelligence, or the study of ideas that enable computers to be intelligent, is discussed in terms of what it is, what it has done, what it can do, and how it may affect the teaching of tomorrow. An extensive overview of artificial intelligence examines its goals and applications and types of artificial intelligence including (1) expert…

  5. Video data compression using artificial neural network differential vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ashok K.; Bibyk, Steven B.; Ahalt, Stanley C.

    1991-01-01

    An artificial neural network vector quantizer is developed for use in data compression applications such as Digital Video. Differential Vector Quantization is used to preserve edge features, and a new adaptive algorithm, known as Frequency-Sensitive Competitive Learning, is used to develop the vector quantizer codebook. To develop real time performance, a custom Very Large Scale Integration Application Specific Integrated Circuit (VLSI ASIC) is being developed to realize the associative memory functions needed in the vector quantization algorithm. By using vector quantization, the need for Huffman coding can be eliminated, resulting in superior performance against channel bit errors than methods that use variable length codes.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Sail Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Usui, Hideyuki; Funaki, Ikkoh; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2008-12-31

    To capture the kinetic energy of the solar wind by creating a large magnetosphere around the spacecraft, magneto-plasma sail injects a plasma jet into a strong magnetic field produced by an electromagnet onboard the spacecraft. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) on the magnetosphere of magneto-plasma sail. First, using an axi-symmetric two-dimensional MHD code, we numerically confirm the magnetic field inflation, and the formation of a magnetosphere by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field. The expansion of an artificial magnetosphere by the plasma injection is then simulated, and we show that the magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field expanded by the plasma jet from the spacecraft. This simulation indicates the size of the artificial magnetosphere becomes smaller when applying the IMF.

  7. On the accuracy of triple phase boundary lengths calculated from tomographic image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Peter S.; Yakal-Kremski, Kyle; Wilson, James; Bowen, Jacob R.; Barnett, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The triple phase boundary (TPB) length is one of the most important quantities obtainable from three dimensional reconstructions of solid oxide fuel cells that utilize porous composite electrodes. However, the choice of TPB calculation method and the voxelation of the microstructures can lead to systematic errors in TPB estimates. Here, two approaches for calculating the TPB density are compared to investigate how different TPB aspects such as curvature, orientation, and phase contact angles affect the results. The first approach applies a correction factor to the TPB length calculated by simply summing voxel (volume element) edge lengths that are shared between voxels of three different phases. The second approach applies a smoothening technique to the TPB curves. The two methods are compared by calculations on different kinds of artificially generated microstructures and on a real SOFC electrode microstructure obtained by focused ion beam tomography. Results are presented showing how specific aspects of different microstructures affect the TPB length calculation error.

  8. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  9. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  10. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  11. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  12. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  13. Monitoring Artificial Tracer Stones at the Danube East of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedermann, Marcel; Gerstl, Margit; Trithart, Michael; Habersack, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    The Integrated River Engineering Project on the Danube to the East of Vienna aims to implement innovative measures to stop riverbed incision on one of the last free flowing sections of the Austrian Danube River. In order to reduce erosion processes, it is planned to add larger gravel sizes within the natural grain size spectrum (granulometric bed improvement). It is planned to superimpose a layer of 25 cm thickness to reduce sediment discharge to a minimum of 10 to 15% of the current amount, but not to stop it entirely. Additionally seven huge sidearm systems will be reconnected, about 30% of the bank protection will be removed and low flow regulation structures will be improved in order to enhance the ecological situation. Within the scope of this Project a comprehensive sediment monitoring program is implemented. Besides bedload transport measurements using a basket sampler and sediment transport modelling applying a newly designed numerical model, artificial stones were added and monitored in order to observe transport velocities and initiation of motion. For the monitoring performed at the three kilometer long test reach near Hainburg, 40 artificial stones of three different sizes (intermediate b-axis: 23 mm, 40 mm, 70 mm) were produced and a coded radio acoustic transmitter was attached to each gravel. The stones were lowered to the river bed at six different locations at the beginning of the test reach, at a gravel bar and in a groyne field within the stretch. The positions of the stones have been observed about once a week, depending on hydrology, over a whole year including a HQ15 flood event. The positions of the stones have been determined by radio tracking from a boat. Hence transport paths and velocities as well as the initiation of bedload transport could be monitored. The paper gives an overview on the methodology and presents results of the monitoring program. The observed stones showed a size selective behaviour in transport. At all discharges

  14. Characteristics from a hydrodynamic model of a trapezoidal artificial reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoyang; Liang, Zhenlin; Huang, Liuyi; Liu, Yang; Tang, Yanli

    2014-11-01

    Flume experiments and numerical simulation were conducted to characterize the hydrodynamics of a trapezoid artificial reef. Measurements in particle image velocimetry were conducted to observe the formation of upwelling and vortices; and forces for the reef model were measured by load cell. The results of flume experiments agree well with the numerical data. In addition, the flow structure around a reef combining trapezoidal and cubic blocks was simulated numerically under two deployment schemes, showing a more complicated flow structure than that of a stand-alone reef. Relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number suggest that the degree of turbulence can be assessed from the value of drag coefficient downstream from the reef. The role of the reef in water flow is to reduce flow velocity and generate turbulence.

  15. Characterization of a planar artificial magnetic metamaterial surface.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Schurig, D; Mock, J J

    2006-09-01

    We explore the electromagnetic characterization of a planar artificial magnetic metamaterial. Because the composite structure is two- rather than three-dimensional, it does not form a medium with assignable bulk properties, such as the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability. However, we find that it is possible to characterize the expected bulk response of a structure composed of repeated layers of metamaterial planes, from a reflectance measurement of a single metamaterial surface made at an oblique angle. We present an analytical theory that relates the reflectance of a single plane to the expected bulk permeability and permeability of the composite, as well as supporting experiments and numerical simulations. Our results show that the recent use of reflectance measurements to characterize planar split ring resonator samples can reveal the presence of circulating currents in a sample--the precursor to artificial magnetism--but are insufficient to provide quantitative results unless the symmetry of the underlying metamaterial elements is carefully specified. PMID:17025761

  16. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E; Crabtree, George W; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-20

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials. PMID:27199423

  17. Fuel-powered artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Ebron, Von Howard; Yang, Zhiwei; Seyer, Daniel J; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Oh, Jiyoung; Xie, Hui; Razal, Joselito; Hall, Lee J; Ferraris, John P; Macdiarmid, Alan G; Baughman, Ray H

    2006-03-17

    Artificial muscles and electric motors found in autonomous robots and prosthetic limbs are typically battery-powered, which severely restricts the duration of their performance and can necessitate long inactivity during battery recharge. To help solve these problems, we demonstrated two types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high-energy-density fuels to mechanical energy. The first type stores electrical charge and uses changes in stored charge for mechanical actuation. In contrast with electrically powered electrochemical muscles, only half of the actuator cycle is electrochemical. The second type of fuel-powered muscle provides a demonstrated actuator stroke and power density comparable to those of natural skeletal muscle and generated stresses that are over a hundred times higher. PMID:16543453

  18. Economic reasoning and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Parkes, David C; Wellman, Michael P

    2015-07-17

    The field of artificial intelligence (AI) strives to build rational agents capable of perceiving the world around them and taking actions to advance specified goals. Put another way, AI researchers aim to construct a synthetic homo economicus, the mythical perfectly rational agent of neoclassical economics. We review progress toward creating this new species of machine, machina economicus, and discuss some challenges in designing AIs that can reason effectively in economic contexts. Supposing that AI succeeds in this quest, or at least comes close enough that it is useful to think about AIs in rationalistic terms, we ask how to design the rules of interaction in multi-agent systems that come to represent an economy of AIs. Theories of normative design from economics may prove more relevant for artificial agents than human agents, with AIs that better respect idealized assumptions of rationality than people, interacting through novel rules and incentive systems quite distinct from those tailored for people. PMID:26185245

  19. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  20. Prospecting droughts with stochastic artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Rivera, Juan Camilo

    2008-04-01

    SummaryA non-linear multivariate model based on an artificial neural network multilayer perceptron is presented, that includes a random component. The developed model is applied to generate monthly streamflows, which are used to obtain synthetic annual droughts. The calibration of the model was undertaken using monthly streamflow records of several geographical sites of a basin. The model calibration consisted of training the neural network with the error back-propagation learning algorithm, and adding a normally distributed random noise. The model was validated by comparing relevant statistics of synthetic streamflow series to those of historical records. Annual droughts were calculated from the generated streamflow series, and then the expected values of length, intensity and magnitude of the droughts were assessed. An exercise on identical basis was made applying a second order auto-regressive multivariate model, AR(2), to compare its results with those of the developed model. The proposed model outperforms the AR(2) model in reproducing the future drought scenarios.

  1. Reconstitution of Heme Enzymes with Artificial Metalloporphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Oohora, K; Hayashi, T

    2016-01-01

    An important strategy used in engineering of hemoproteins to generate artificial enzymes involves replacement of heme with an artificial cofactor after removal of the native heme cofactor under acidic conditions. Replacement of heme in an enzyme with a nonnatural metalloporphyrinoid can significantly alter the reactivity of the enzyme. This chapter describes the design and synthesis of three types of artificial metalloporphyrinoid cofactors consisting of mono-, di-, and tri-anionic ligands (tetradehydrocorrin, porphycene, and corrole, respectively). In addition, practical procedures for the preparation of apo-hemoproteins, incorporation of artificial cofactors, and characterization techniques are presented. Furthermore, the representative catalytic activities of artificial enzymes generated by reconstitution of hemoproteins are summarized. PMID:27586344

  2. Level-by-level artificial viscosity and visualization for MHD simulation with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Tomoharu; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Miura, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical method to determine the artificial viscosity in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method, where the artificial viscosity is adaptively changed due to the resolution level of the AMR hierarchy. Although the suitable value of the artificial viscosity depends on the governing equations and the model of target problem, it can be determined by von Neumann stability analysis. By means of the new method, "level-by-level artificial viscosity method," MHD simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are carried out with the AMR method. The validity of the level-by-level artificial viscosity method is confirmed by the comparison of the linear growth rates of RTI between the AMR simulations and the simple simulations with uniform grid and uniform artificial viscosity whose resolution is the same as that in the highest level of the AMR simulation. Moreover, in the nonlinear phase of RTI, the secondary instability is clearly observed where the hierarchical data structure of AMR calculation is visualized as high resolution region floats up like terraced fields. In the applications of the method to general fluid simulations, the growth of small structures can be sufficiently reproduced, while the divergence of numerical solutions can be suppressed.

  3. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  4. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, Francois; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazarides, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  5. Three-Body Recombination of {sup 6}Li Atoms with Large Negative Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas; Hammer, H.-W.

    2009-08-14

    The three-body recombination rate at threshold for distinguishable atoms with large negative pair scattering lengths is calculated in the zero-range approximation. The only parameters in this limit are the 3 scattering lengths and the Efimov parameter, which can be complex-valued. We provide semianalytic expressions for the cases of 2 or 3 equal scattering lengths, and we obtain numerical results for the general case of 3 different scattering lengths. Our general result is applied to the three lowest hyperfine states of {sup 6}Li atoms. Comparisons with recent experiments provide indications of loss features associated with Efimov trimers near the 3-atom threshold.

  6. A tensor artificial viscosity using a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tz. V.; Rieben, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    We derive a tensor artificial viscosity suitable for use in a 2D or 3D unstructured arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code. This work is similar in nature to that of Campbell and Shashkov [1]; however, our approach is based on a finite element discretization that is fundamentally different from the mimetic finite difference framework. The finite element point of view leads to novel insights as well as improved numerical results. We begin with a generalized tensor version of the Von Neumann-Richtmyer artificial viscosity, then convert it to a variational formulation and apply a Galerkin discretization process using high order Gaussian quadrature to obtain a generalized nodal force term and corresponding zonal heating (or shock entropy) term. This technique is modular and is therefore suitable for coupling to a traditional staggered grid discretization of the momentum and energy conservation laws; however, we motivate the use of such finite element approaches for discretizing each term in the Euler equations. We review the key properties that any artificial viscosity must possess and use these to formulate specific constraints on the total artificial viscosity force term as well as the artificial viscosity coefficient. We also show, that under certain simplifying assumptions, the two-dimensional scheme from [1] can be viewed as an under-integrated version of our finite element method. This equivalence holds on general distorted quadrilateral grids. Finally, we present computational results on some standard shock hydro test problems, as well as some more challenging problems, indicating the advantages of the new approach with respect to symmetry preservation for shock wave propagation over general grids.

  7. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  8. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  9. Bioinspired artificial single ion pump.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Zeng, Lu; Yang, Fu; Li, Lin; Yan, Dadong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-10-30

    Bioinspired artificial functional nanochannels for intelligent molecular and ionic transport control at the nanoscale have wide potential applications in nanofluidics, energy conversion, and biosensors. Although various smart passive ion transport properties of ion channels have been artificially realized, it is still hugely challenging to achieve high level intelligent ion transport features in biological ion pumps. Here we show a unique bioinspired single ion pump based on a cooperative pH response double-gate nanochannel, whose gates could be opened and closed alternately/simultaneously under symmetric/asymmetric pH environments. With the stimulation of the double-gate nanochannel by continuous switching of the symmetric/asymmetric pH stimuli, the bioinspired system systematically realized three key ionic transport features of biological ion pumps, including an alternating gates ion pumping process under symmetric pH stimuli, transformation of the ion pump into an ion channel under asymmetric pH stimuli, and a fail-safe ion pumping feature under both symmetric and asymmetric pH stimuli. The ion pumping processes could well be reproduced under a concentration gradient. With the advantages of the extraordinary ionic transport functions of biological ion pumps, the bioinspired ion pump should find widespread applicability in active transportation-controlling smart nanofluidic devices, efficient energy conversions, and seawater desalinization, and open the way to design and develop novel bioinspired intelligent artificial nanochannel materials. PMID:23773031

  10. Periplasmic Screening for Artificial Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Jeschek, M; Panke, S; Ward, T R

    2016-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes represent an attractive means of combining state-of-the-art transition metal catalysis with the benefits of natural enzymes. Despite the tremendous recent progress in this field, current efforts toward the directed evolution of these hybrid biocatalysts mainly rely on the laborious, individual purification of protein variants rendering the throughput, and hence the outcome of these campaigns feeble. We have recently developed a screening platform for the directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes based on the streptavidin-biotin technology in the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. This periplasmic compartmentalization strategy comprises a number of compelling advantages, in particular with respect to artificial metalloenzymes, which lead to a drastic increase in the throughput of screening campaigns and additionally are of unique value for future in vivo applications. Therefore, we highlight here the benefits of this strategy and intend to propose a generalized guideline for the development of novel transition metal-based biocatalysts by directed evolution in order to extend the natural enzymatic repertoire. PMID:27586348

  11. Artificial life: The coming evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D. Santa Fe Inst., NM ); Belin, A.d'A. )

    1990-01-01

    Within fifty to a hundred years a new class of organisms is likely to emerge. These organisms will be artificial in the sense that they will originally be designed by humans. However, they will reproduce, and will evolve into something other than their initial form; they will be alive'' under any reasonable definition of the word. These organisms will evolve in a fundamentally different manner than contemporary biological organisms, since their reproduction will be under at least partial conscious control, giving it a Lamarckian component. The pace of evolutionary change consequently will be extremely rapid. The advent of artificial life will be the most significant historical event since the emergence of human beings. The impact on humanity and the biosphere could be enormous, larger than the industrial revolution, nuclear weapons, or environmental pollution. We must take steps now to shape the emergence of artificial organisms; they have potential to be either the ugliest terrestrial disaster, or the most beautiful creation of humanity. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Artificial multilayers and nanomagnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    SHINJO, Teruya

    2013-01-01

    The author has been actively engaged in research on nanomagnetic materials for about 50 years. Nanomagnetic materials are comprised of ferromagnetic systems for which the size and shape are controlled on a nanometer scale. Typical examples are ultrafine particles, ultrathin films, multilayered films and nano-patterned films. In this article, the following four areas of the author’s studies are described. (1) Mössbauer spectroscopic studies of nanomagnetic materials and interface magnetism. (2) Preparation and characterization of metallic multilayers with artificial superstructures. (3) Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in magnetic multilayers. (4) Novel properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic thin films (dots and wires). A subject of particular interest in the author’s research was the artificially prepared multilayers consisting of metallic elements. The motivation to initiate the multilayer investigation is described and the physical properties observed in the artificial multilayers are introduced. The author’s research was initially in the field of pure physical science and gradually extended into applied science. His achievements are highly regarded not only from the fundamental point of view but also from the technological viewpoint. PMID:23391605

  13. Beller Lecture: Artificial Ferroic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyderman, Laura

    In artificial ferroic systems, novel functionality is engineered through the combination of structured ferroic materials and the control of the interactions between the different components. I will present two classes of these systems, beginning with hybrid mesoscopic structures incorporating two different ferromagnetic layers whose static and dynamic behaviour result from the mutual imprint of the magnetic domain configurations. Here we have demonstrated a new vortex core reversal mechanism, which occurs when it is displaced across domain boundaries with a magnetic field. I will then describe our progress on artificial spin ice, consisting of arrays of dipolar-coupled nanomagnets arranged in frustrated geometries. We have employed photoemission electron microscopy to observe the behaviour of emergent magnetic monopoles in an array of nanomagnets placed on the kagome lattice. We have also created artificial spin ice with fluctuating magnetic moments and observed the evolution of magnetic configurations with time. This has provided a means to study relaxation processes with a controlled route to the lowest-energy state. Recently, we have demonstrated with muon spin relaxation that these magnetic metamaterials can support thermodynamic phase transitions, and future directions include the incorporation of novel magnetic materials such as ultrathin magnetic films, the investigation of 3D structures, as well as the implementation of x-ray resonant magnetic scattering to study magnetic correlations in smaller nanomagnets and at faster timescales

  14. Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size.

    PubMed

    Booksmythe, Isobel; Head, Megan L; Keogh, J Scott; Jennions, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Male genitalia often show remarkable differences among related species in size, shape and complexity. Across poeciliid fishes, the elongated fin (gonopodium) that males use to inseminate females ranges from 18 to 53% of body length. Relative genital size therefore varies greatly among species. In contrast, there is often tight within-species allometric scaling, which suggests strong selection against genital-body size combinations that deviate from a species' natural line of allometry. We tested this constraint by artificially selecting on the allometric intercept, creating lines of males with relatively longer or shorter gonopodia than occur naturally for a given body size in mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We show that relative genital length is heritable and diverged 7.6-8.9% between our up-selected and down-selected lines, with correlated changes in body shape. However, deviation from the natural line of allometry does not affect male success in assays of attractiveness, swimming performance and, crucially, reproductive success (paternity). PMID:27188478

  15. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today’s common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  16. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones.

    PubMed

    Ombelet, W; Van Robays, J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  17. Cross correlation and length scales in turbulent flows near surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.; Moin, P.; Lee, M.; Moser, R. D.; Spalart, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Kaimal, J. C.; Gaynor, E.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of length scales are used in turbulent flows; 'functional length scales' such as mixing length, dissipation length L(sub epsilon), etc., and 'flow-field length scales' derived from cross correlations of velocity, pressure, etc. in the flow. Some connection between these scales are derived here. We first consider the cross correlation R(sub vv)(y,y(sub 1)) of the normal components u at two heights y, y(sub 1) above a rigid surface, normalized by the velocity y(sub 1) (greater than y). For shear-free boundary layers it is found theoretically, and in field and numerical experiments that R(sub vv) approximately equals y/y(sub 1). For shear layers it is also found that R(sub vv) approximately equals f(y/y(sub 1)) less than or equal to y,y(sub 1). This function f differs slightly between low Reynolds number numerical simulations and field experiments. The lateral structure defined by R(sub vv)(y,r(sub 3); y(sub 1),0) is also self similar and shows that the eddies centered at about y(sub 1) appear to have constant lateral width a(sub 3) above and below y(sub 1), where a(sub 3, sup +) approximately equals 7+1/(1.4dU(sup +)/dy(sup +)), when normalized on u(sub *) and v, where U is the mean velocity. Results for L(sub epsilon, sup -1) from direct numerical simulation are found to compare well with the formula L(sub epsilon, sup -1) = A(sub B)/y + A(sub S)dU/dy/v, for unidirectional and reversing turbulent boundary layers and channel flow, except near where dU/dy approximately equals 0. The conclusion is that the large-scale eddy structure and length scales in these flows are determined by a combination of shear and blocking, and that the vertical component of turbulence has a self-similar structure in both kinds of boundary layer.

  18. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  19. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  20. Microbial colonization on natural and artificial macrophytes in a phosphorus-limited, hardwater lake. [Potamogeton illinoensis

    SciTech Connect

    Burkholder, J.M.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    Epiphyte communities in a phosphorus-limited hardwater lake were compared over a 14-week period from Potamogeton illinoensis and structurally similar artificial plants of different leaf ages. Artificial plants were serially incubated in the lake to simulate the age of natural leaves. The physiognomy of loosely attached epiphytes appeared similar on the two substrata. Algal cell number and biovolume were 15-fold and 17-fold higher, respectively, on artificial leaves early in the growing season, but total algal density gradually became similar on natural and artificial plants. In contrast, the taxonomic composition of loosely attached algae became increasingly distinct, and mean cell biovolume on natural leaves was twice that on artificial leaves. Adnate epiphytes on both substrata developed from sparse populations of bacteria on new leaves to a community of diatoms, blue-green algae and numerous bacteria on mature and senescent leaves. Adnate community succession on natural leaves in late senescence/death differed from that on artificial leaves colonized for comparable periods in having (1) a marked increase in filamentous blue-green algae, (2) a subsequent decrease in all algae, and (3) a final fungi-dominated stage. The trends in colonization indicate that macrophytes in this oligotrophic lake provided a distinct habitat from that of artificial substrate for epiphytes throughout the growing season.

  1. A hybrid mock circulation loop for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Frank; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Timms, Daniel L; Frazier, O Howard; Cohn, William E

    2014-09-01

    Rotary blood pumps are emerging as a viable technology for total artificial hearts, and the development of physiological control algorithms is accelerated with new evaluation environments. In this article, we present a novel hybrid mock circulation loop (HMCL) designed specifically for evaluation of rotary total artificial hearts (rTAH). The rTAH is operated in the physical domain while all vasculature elements are embedded in the numerical domain, thus combining the strengths of both approaches: fast and easy exchange of the vasculature model together with improved controllability of the pump. Parameters, such as vascular resistance, compliance, and blood volume, can be varied dynamically in silico during operation. A hydraulic-numeric interface creates a real-time feedback loop between the physical and numerical domains. The HMCL uses computer-controlled resistance valves as actuators, thereby reducing the size and number of hydraulic elements. Experimental results demonstrate a stable interaction over a wide operational range and a high degree of flexibility. Therefore, we demonstrate that the newly created design environment can play an integral part in the hydraulic design, control development, and durability testing of rTAHs. PMID:25234760

  2. Reactive underwater object inspection based on artificial electric sense.

    PubMed

    Lebastard, Vincent; Boyer, Frédéric; Lanneau, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Weakly electric fish can perform complex cognitive tasks based on extracting information from blurry electric images projected from their immediate environment onto their electro-sensitive skin. In particular they can be trained to recognize the intrinsic properties of objects such as their shape, size and electric nature. They do this by means of novel perceptual strategies that exploit the relations between the physics of a self-generated electric field, their body morphology and the ability to perform specific movement termed probing motor acts (PMAs). In this article we artificially reproduce and combine these PMAs to build an autonomous control strategy that allows an artificial electric sensor to find electrically contrasted objects, and to orbit around them based on a minimum set of measurements and simple reactive feedback control laws of the probe's motion. The approach does not require any simulation models and could be implemented on an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with artificial electric sense. The AUV has only to satisfy certain simple geometric properties, such as bi-laterally (left/right) symmetrical electrodes and possess a reasonably high aspect (length/width) ratio. PMID:27458187

  3. Numerical Analysis of the Symmetric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji-Hong; Zhang, A.-Li

    1995-03-01

    Aimed at the initial value problem of the particular second-order ordinary differential equations,y ″=f(x, y), the symmetric methods (Quinlan and Tremaine, 1990) and our methods (Xu and Zhang, 1994) have been compared in detail by integrating the artificial earth satellite orbits in this paper. In the end, we point out clearly that the integral accuracy of numerical integration of the satellite orbits by applying our methods is obviously higher than that by applying the same order formula of the symmetric methods when the integration time-interval is not greater than 12000 periods.

  4. Holographic screening length in a hot plasma of two sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaja, A. Nata; Kassim, H. Abu; Yusof, N.

    2015-11-01

    We study the screening length L_{max} of a moving quark-antiquark pair in a hot plasma, which lives in a two sphere, S^2, using the AdS/CFT correspondence in which the corresponding background metric is the four-dimensional Schwarzschild-AdS black hole. The geodesic of both ends of the string at the boundary, interpreted as the quark-antiquark pair, is given by a stationary motion in the equatorial plane by which the separation length L of both ends of the string is parallel to the angular velocity ω . The screening length and total energy H of the quark-antiquark pair are computed numerically and show that the plots are bounded from below by some functions related to the momentum transfer P_c of the drag force configuration. We compare the result by computing the screening length in the reference frame of the moving quark-antiquark pair, in which the background metrics are "Boost-AdS" and Kerr-AdS black holes. Comparing both black holes, we argue that the mass parameters M_{Sch} of the Schwarzschild-AdS black hole and M_{Kerr} of the Kerr-AdS black hole are related at high temperature by M_{Kerr}=M_{Sch}(1-a^2l^2)^{3/2}, where a is the angular momentum parameter and l is the AdS curvature.

  5. Controlling Reflections from Mesh Refinement Interfaces in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A leading approach to improving the accuracy on numerical relativity simulations of black hole systems is through fixed or adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We describe a generic numerical error which manifests as slowly converging, artificial reflections from refinement boundaries in a broad class of mesh-refinement implementations, potentially limiting the effectiveness of mesh- refinement techniques for some numerical relativity applications. We elucidate this numerical effect by presenting a model problem which exhibits the phenomenon, but which is simple enough that its numerical error can be understood analytically. Our analysis shows that the effect is caused by variations in finite differencing error generated across low and high resolution regions, and that its slow convergence is caused by the presence of dramatic speed differences among propagation modes typical of 3+1 relativity. Lastly, we resolve the problem, presenting a class of finite-differencing stencil modifications which eliminate this pathology in both our model problem and in numerical relativity examples.

  6. Object oriented studies into artificial space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, J. M.; Marshall, G.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype simulation is being developed under contract to the Royal Aerospace Establishment (RAE), Farnborough, England, to assist in the discrimination of artificial space objects/debris. The methodology undertaken has been to link Object Oriented programming, intelligent knowledge based system (IKBS) techniques and advanced computer technology with numeric analysis to provide a graphical, symbolic simulation. The objective is to provide an additional layer of understanding on top of conventional classification methods. Use is being made of object and rule based knowledge representation, multiple reasoning, truth maintenance and uncertainty. Software tools being used include Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEE) and SymTactics for knowledge representation. Hooks are being developed within the SymTactics framework to incorporate mathematical models describing orbital motion and fragmentation. Penetration and structural analysis can also be incorporated. SymTactics is an Object Oriented discrete event simulation tool built as a domain specific extension to the KEE environment. The tool provides facilities for building, debugging and monitoring dynamic (military) simulations.

  7. Disordered artificial spin ices: Avalanches and criticality (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Cynthia J. Olson Chern, Gia-Wei; Reichhardt, Charles; Libál, Andras

    2015-05-07

    We show that square and kagome artificial spin ices with disconnected islands exhibit disorder-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions. The critical point of the transition is characterized by a diverging length scale and the effective spin reconfiguration avalanche sizes are power-law distributed. For weak disorder, the magnetization reversal is dominated by system-spanning avalanche events characteristic of a supercritical regime, while at strong disorder, the avalanche distributions have subcritical behavior and are cut off above a length scale that decreases with increasing disorder. The different type of geometrical frustration in the two lattices produces distinct forms of critical avalanche behavior. Avalanches in the square ice consist of the propagation of locally stable domain walls separating the two polarized ground states, and we find a scaling collapse consistent with an interface depinning mechanism. In the fully frustrated kagome ice, however, the avalanches branch strongly in a manner reminiscent of directed percolation. We also observe an interesting crossover in the power-law scaling of the kagome ice avalanches at low disorder. Our results show that artificial spin ices are ideal systems in which to study a variety of nonequilibrium critical point phenomena as the microscopic degrees of freedom can be accessed directly in experiments.

  8. Disordered artificial spin ices: Avalanches and criticality (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Cynthia J. Olson; Chern, Gia-Wei; Libál, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    2015-05-01

    We show that square and kagome artificial spin ices with disconnected islands exhibit disorder-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions. The critical point of the transition is characterized by a diverging length scale and the effective spin reconfiguration avalanche sizes are power-law distributed. For weak disorder, the magnetization reversal is dominated by system-spanning avalanche events characteristic of a supercritical regime, while at strong disorder, the avalanche distributions have subcritical behavior and are cut off above a length scale that decreases with increasing disorder. The different type of geometrical frustration in the two lattices produces distinct forms of critical avalanche behavior. Avalanches in the square ice consist of the propagation of locally stable domain walls separating the two polarized ground states, and we find a scaling collapse consistent with an interface depinning mechanism. In the fully frustrated kagome ice, however, the avalanches branch strongly in a manner reminiscent of directed percolation. We also observe an interesting crossover in the power-law scaling of the kagome ice avalanches at low disorder. Our results show that artificial spin ices are ideal systems in which to study a variety of nonequilibrium critical point phenomena as the microscopic degrees of freedom can be accessed directly in experiments.

  9. The collaggrecan: Synthesis and visualization of an artificial proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, Mario; Caravà, Elena; Sgambato, Antonella; Natalello, Antonino; Russo, Laura; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-05-01

    An artificial aggrecan-like proteoglycan has been designed and synthesized in vitro. At variance with natural proteoglycans, whose glycosaminoglycan chains are always O-linked via a tetrasaccharide bridge to the serine residues of a specific protein core, the present structure consists of chondroitin-6-sulfate chains directly bound to the lysine and hydroxylysine residues of a collagen molecule backbone. The resulting macromolecule has been characterized by histochemistry, atomic force microscopy and FTIR. The number of variables involved (e.g., length and type of the collagen backbone, glycosaminoglycan species, sulfation type and pattern, molecular weight, number and length of side chains, etc.) makes possible to conceive an almost endless variety of artificial proteoglycans, each precisely tailored to a specific functional role. In addition to their use as biomaterials, glycated collagens interact with cells in complex ways and a previous study has already shown the ability of a glycated collagen to redirect fibroblastoma cells from proliferation to differentiation. The research is still underway. PMID:26797224

  10. Artificial bee colony algorithm for constrained possibilistic portfolio optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the portfolio optimization problem with real-world constraints under the assumption that the returns of risky assets are fuzzy numbers. A new possibilistic mean-semiabsolute deviation model is proposed, in which transaction costs, cardinality and quantity constraints are considered. Due to such constraints the proposed model becomes a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem and traditional optimization methods fail to find the optimal solution efficiently. Thus, a modified artificial bee colony (MABC) algorithm is developed to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model and the corresponding algorithm.

  11. Metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "atoms".

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Bi, Ke; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we numerically designed and then experimentally verified a metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "atoms". This metamaterial absorber is composed of dielectric ceramic material (SrTiO3) "atoms" embedded in a background matrix on a metal plate. The dielectric "atoms" couple strongly to the incident electric and magnetic fields at the Mie resonance mode, leading to the narrow perfect absorption band with simulated and experimental absorptivities of 99% and 98.5% at 8.96 GHz, respectively. The designed metamaterial perfect absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide angle incidence. PMID:27607650

  12. Characterization of crosslinked artificial protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowatzki, Paul

    Genetically engineered artificial proteins are promising candidates for new biomaterials because their amino acid sequences can be precisely controlled. This work describes the characterization of crosslinked films of biomimetic artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins with hybrid functions designed to meet materials needs in applications such as small diameter vascular grafts and corneal tissue implants. Elastin-derived polypeptides give the proteins flexibility, while RGD and CS5 peptide domains from fibronectin serve to adhere cells. Techniques were sought to crosslink aECM proteins in ways that resulted in tunable mechanical properties. Hexamethylene diisocyanate was used to crosslink aECM proteins into uniform, transparent, highly-extensible hydrogel films with low water contents characteristic of native elastin. Their elastic moduli, 0.1--1.1 MPa, depended on crosslinker concentration and aECM protein length, and spanned the observed range of elastin fibers. The suitability of biomaterials implants depends strongly on their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation in vivo. It was shown that small sequence changes in the elastin-like portion of aECM proteins were sufficient to decrease their rate of degradation by elastase sevenfold, illustrating a simple method to tune the protease sensitivity of designed proteins. The effects were seen in both soluble proteins and crosslinked films analyzed by measuring their decrease in elastic modulus during degradation. An aECM protein was examined for its effectiveness as a corneal onlay, i.e., a permanent contact lens. The protein was crosslinked into transparent, elastic, water-rich lenses and was implanted into rabbit corneas. The onlays were stable and well-tolerated, and full re-epithelialization occurred within 4-7 days. Histological examination revealed normal regenerating epithelial cell morphology on the anterior surface, good interfaces between the onlay and surrounding tissue, and only minimal

  13. Evaluation of screening length corrections for interaction potentials in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2013-10-01

    Since in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) data analysis the interaction potential represented by the screening length as the screening effect is not satisfactorily established up to the present, we introduce commonly the correction factor in the screening length. Previously, Yamamura, Takeuchi and Kawamura (YTK) have suggested the theory taking the shell effect of electron distributions into account for the correction factor to Firsov screening length in the Moliere potential. The application of YTK theory to the evaluation of screening length corrections for the interaction potentials in ICISS manifested that the screening length corrections calculated by the YTK theory agree almost with those determined by simulations or numerical calculations in ICISS and its variants data analyses, being superior to the evaluation of screening length corrections with the O'Connor and Biersack (OB) formula.

  14. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  15. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  16. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  17. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Marty; Eloranta, Ed

    2016-06-01

    A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  18. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  19. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  20. Required length of guardrails before hazards.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, E; Sinz, W; Hoschopf, H; Gobald, M; Steffan, H; Nadler, B; Nadler, F; Strnad, B; Schneider, F

    2011-11-01

    One way to protect against impacts during run-off-road accidents with infrastructure is the use of guardrails. However, real-world accidents indicate that vehicles can leave the road and end up behind the guardrail. These vehicles have no possibility of returning to the lane. Vehicles often end up behind the guardrail because the length of the guardrails installed before hazards is too short; this can lead to a collision with a shielded hazard. To identify the basic speed for determining the necessary length of guardrails, we analyzed the speed at which vehicles leave the roadway from the ZEDATU (Zentrale Datenbank Tödlicher Unfälle) real-world accidents database. The required length of guardrail was considered the length that reduces vehicle speed at a maximum theoretically possible deceleration of 0.3g behind the barrier based on real-world road departure speed. To determine the desired length of a guardrail ahead of a hazard, we developed a relationship between guardrail length and the speed at which vehicles depart the roadway. If the initial elements are flared away from the carriageway, the required length will be reduced by up to an additional 30% The ZEDATU database analysis showed that extending the current length of guardrails to the evaluated required length would reduce the number of fatalities among occupants of vehicles striking bridge abutments by approximately eight percent. PMID:21819841

  1. Invariant length of a cosmic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Malcolm R.

    1990-06-01

    The world sheet of a cosmic string is characterized by a function l, invariant under both coordinate and gauge transformations, which can be interpreted as the ``invariant length'' of the string. In flat space, l reduces to the invariant length of Vachaspati and Vilenkin, and gives an upper bound for the actual length of the string, and a lower bound for its energy, as measured by any inertial observer. In curved spacetime, time variations in the invariant length divide naturally into two parts: one due to the tidal tensor at points exterior to the world sheet and one due to the tidal tensor at points on the world sheet itself.

  2. Attitude measurement by artificial vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchetet, F.; Aubreton, O.; Gorria, P.; Laligant, O.

    2006-01-01

    The recent development of light and low-cost airborne platforms (microlight, drones, kites, balloons,...) has led to the need for simple and low-cost devices allowing attitude measurement with respect to a reference horizon of the platform itself or of an embedded setting. A theoretical study of the conditions for measuring attitude angles from artificial vision is proposed and an original practical algorithm allowing these measurements to be performed in real time is described. An implementation in a CMOS retina circuit is also presented. These points are illustrated by experiments confirming the feasibility of the device.

  3. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  4. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  5. Epistasis analysis using artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Hill, Doug P

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce artificial intelligence (AI) methodology for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. The ultimate goal of our AI strategy is to analyze genome-wide genetics data as a human would using sources of expert knowledge as a guide. The methodology presented here is based on computational evolution, which is a type of genetic programming. The ability to generate interesting solutions while at the same time learning how to solve the problem at hand distinguishes computational evolution from other genetic programming approaches. We provide a general overview of this approach and then present a few examples of its application to real data. PMID:25403541

  6. A Light Driven Artificial Goldfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, J.; Finkelmann, H.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Shelley, M.; Toth-Katona, T.

    2005-03-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) undergo large and rapid shape changes when illuminated by light. We have immersed an azo-dye doped LCE in a fluid and alternately illuminate either side of the LCE with light to create an artificial goldfish of sorts. These light induced deformations allow the LCE to interact with a fluid environment in novel ways. We use a fluid flow visualization technique to attempt to understand the dynamics of these interactions. We describe our experimental setup, the LCE drive scheme used, and our observations of induced motion in both the LCE sample and the surrounding fluid.

  7. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  8. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  9. Research and applications: Artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphael, B.; Duda, R. O.; Fikes, R. E.; Hart, P. E.; Nilsson, N. J.; Thorndyke, P. W.; Wilber, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Research in the field of artificial intelligence is discussed. The focus of recent work has been the design, implementation, and integration of a completely new system for the control of a robot that plans, learns, and carries out tasks autonomously in a real laboratory environment. The computer implementation of low-level and intermediate-level actions; routines for automated vision; and the planning, generalization, and execution mechanisms are reported. A scenario that demonstrates the approximate capabilities of the current version of the entire robot system is presented.

  10. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  11. Numerical simulation of particle fluxes formation generated as a result of space objects breakups in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, A. G.; Galushina, T. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the software package developed for the numerical simulation of the breakups of natural and artificial objects and algorithms on which it is based. A new software "Numerical model of breakups" includes models of collapse of the spacecraft (SC) as a result of the explosion and collision as well as two models of the explosion of an asteroid.

  12. Magnetically actuated artificial cilia for optimum mixing performance in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Ya-Ting

    2013-07-21

    Contemporary lab-chip devices require efficient, high-performance mixing capability. A series of artificial cilia with embedded magnetic particles was fabricated to achieve precise flow manipulation through magnetically driven control. These fabricated structures were actuated in a homogeneous magnetic field generated by a built-in magnetic coil system for various beating cycles inside a microchannel. Three representative trajectories, namely, circular motion, back-and-forth oscillation, and a figure-of-eight pattern, of artificial cilia were designed and generated to mimic the motion of actual cilia. Homogeneous mixing of two highly viscous (>25 centipoise) dyed solutions by using the figure-of-eight trajectory achieved a mixing efficiency of approximately 86%. The underlying relationship between ciliated structures and the induced flow fields was further elucidated by performing a hydrodynamic analysis with micro-particle image velocimetry. In addition, a numerical modeling method which used a fluid structure interaction module was applied to provide quantitative 3D illustrations of induced flow patterns, including vortical structures and vortex core locations. The results reveal that both the magnitude and distribution of induced vortices primarily affect the mixing performance of two viscous flow streams. By using magnetically controlled artificial cilia along with the presented analytical paradigms, a new active flow mixing strategy was suggested to efficiently transport/agitate flows for microfluidics and biomedical applications. PMID:23685964

  13. Artificial olfactory system with fault-tolerant sensor array.

    PubMed

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Abdolzadeh, Vida; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar

    2016-07-01

    Numerous applications of artificial olfaction resulting from research in many branches of sciences have caused considerable interest in the enhancement of these systems. In this paper, we offer an architecture which is suitable for critical applications, such as medical diagnosis, where reliability and precision are deemed important. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array. In this study, the discriminating ability of the proposed architecture in detecting complex odors, as well as the performance of the proposed architecture in encountering sensor failure, were investigated and compared with the generic architecture. The results demonstrated that by applying the proposed architecture in the artificial olfactory system, the performance of system in the healthy mode was identical to the classic structure. However, in the faulty situation, the proposed architecture implied high identification ability of odor samples, while the generic architecture showed very poor performance in the same situation. Based on the results, it was possible to achieve high odor identification through the developed artificial olfactory system using the proposed architecture. PMID:27038885

  14. Artificial neural networks in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Hasan Reza; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) effectively analyze non-linear data sets. The aimed was A review of the relevant published articles that focused on the application of ANNs as a tool for assisting clinical decision-making in neurosurgery. A literature review of all full publications in English biomedical journals (1993-2013) was undertaken. The strategy included a combination of key words 'artificial neural networks', 'prognostic', 'brain', 'tumor tracking', 'head', 'tumor', 'spine', 'classification' and 'back pain' in the title and abstract of the manuscripts using the PubMed search engine. The major findings are summarized, with a focus on the application of ANNs for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Finally, the future of ANNs in neurosurgery is explored. A total of 1093 citations were identified and screened. In all, 57 citations were found to be relevant. Of these, 50 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The synthesis of the data showed several applications of ANN in neurosurgery, including: (1) diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in low back pain, brain tumours and primary epilepsy; (2) enhancing clinically relevant information extraction from radiographic images, intracranial pressure processing, low back pain and real-time tumour tracking; (3) outcome prediction in epilepsy, brain metastases, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbar disc herniation, childhood hydrocephalus, trauma mortality, and the occurrence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage; (4) the use in the biomechanical assessments of spinal disease. ANNs can be effectively employed for diagnosis, prognosis and outcome prediction in neurosurgery. PMID:24987050

  15. Artificial Organisms with Human Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Domenico

    If artificial organisms are constructed with the goal to better understand the behaviour of real organisms, artificial organisms that resemble human beings should possess a communication system with the same properties of human language. This chapter tries to identify nine such properties and for each of them to describe what has been done and what has to be done. Human language: (1) is made up of signals which are arbitrarily connected to their meanings, (2) has syntax and, more generally, its signals are made up of smaller signals, (3) is culturally transmitted and culturally evolved, (4) is used to communicate with oneself and not only with others, (5) is particularly sophisticated for communicating information about the external environment, (6) uses displaced signals, (7) is intentional and requires recognition of intentions in others, (8) is the product of a complex nervous system, (9) influences human cognition. Communication presupposes a shared worldview which depends on the brain, body, and adaptive pattern of the organisms that want to communicate, and this represents a critical challenge also for communication between robots and us.

  16. Analysis of pull-in instability of geometrically nonlinear microbeam using radial basis artificial neural network based on couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Heidari, Ali; Homaei, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The static pull-in instability of beam-type microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is theoretically investigated. Two engineering cases including cantilever and double cantilever microbeam are considered. Considering the midplane stretching as the source of the nonlinearity in the beam behavior, a nonlinear size-dependent Euler-Bernoulli beam model is used based on a modified couple stress theory, capable of capturing the size effect. By selecting a range of geometric parameters such as beam lengths, width, thickness, gaps, and size effect, we identify the static pull-in instability voltage. A MAPLE package is employed to solve the nonlinear differential governing equations to obtain the static pull-in instability voltage of microbeams. Radial basis function artificial neural network with two functions has been used for modeling the static pull-in instability of microcantilever beam. The network has four inputs of length, width, gap, and the ratio of height to scale parameter of beam as the independent process variables, and the output is static pull-in voltage of microbeam. Numerical data, employed for training the network, and capabilities of the model have been verified in predicting the pull-in instability behavior. The output obtained from neural network model is compared with numerical results, and the amount of relative error has been calculated. Based on this verification error, it is shown that the radial basis function of neural network has the average error of 4.55% in predicting pull-in voltage of cantilever microbeam. Further analysis of pull-in instability of beam under different input conditions has been investigated and comparison results of modeling with numerical considerations shows a good agreement, which also proves the feasibility and effectiveness of the adopted approach. The results reveal significant influences of size effect and geometric parameters on the static pull-in instability voltage of MEMS. PMID:24860602

  17. Analysis of Pull-In Instability of Geometrically Nonlinear Microbeam Using Radial Basis Artificial Neural Network Based on Couple Stress Theory

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Heidari, Ali; Homaei, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The static pull-in instability of beam-type microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is theoretically investigated. Two engineering cases including cantilever and double cantilever microbeam are considered. Considering the midplane stretching as the source of the nonlinearity in the beam behavior, a nonlinear size-dependent Euler-Bernoulli beam model is used based on a modified couple stress theory, capable of capturing the size effect. By selecting a range of geometric parameters such as beam lengths, width, thickness, gaps, and size effect, we identify the static pull-in instability voltage. A MAPLE package is employed to solve the nonlinear differential governing equations to obtain the static pull-in instability voltage of microbeams. Radial basis function artificial neural network with two functions has been used for modeling the static pull-in instability of microcantilever beam. The network has four inputs of length, width, gap, and the ratio of height to scale parameter of beam as the independent process variables, and the output is static pull-in voltage of microbeam. Numerical data, employed for training the network, and capabilities of the model have been verified in predicting the pull-in instability behavior. The output obtained from neural network model is compared with numerical results, and the amount of relative error has been calculated. Based on this verification error, it is shown that the radial basis function of neural network has the average error of 4.55% in predicting pull-in voltage of cantilever microbeam. Further analysis of pull-in instability of beam under different input conditions has been investigated and comparison results of modeling with numerical considerations shows a good agreement, which also proves the feasibility and effectiveness of the adopted approach. The results reveal significant influences of size effect and geometric parameters on the static pull-in instability voltage of MEMS. PMID:24860602

  18. Numerical and Experimental Study of Levee Breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalfy, E. Y.; LaRocque, L.; Riahi-Nezhad, C. K.; Chaudhry, H.

    2014-12-01

    Levees are constructed along rivers and channels for flood protection. Failure of these levees can cause loss of life and property damage. A better understanding of the flow field from a levee breach allows the decision maker to assess risks and to prepare emergency plans. For this purpose, a two-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the levee breach. The model solves the shallow-water equations using the MacCormack explicit, finite- difference two-step, predictor-corrector scheme. The scheme is second-order accurate in time and space. The artificial viscosity technique is used to smooth the high-frequency oscillations in the computed results. The numerical results compare satisfactorily with the experimental results. A parametric study is carried-out to investigate the effect of main channel width, breach width on the computed flow field.

  19. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  20. LENGTH SCALE OF TURBULENCE ABOVE ROUGH SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of analyses of data for two urban sites and a rural site suggest that the mixing length can be represented by the integral length scale of the turbulence derived from vertical velocity spectra. The result is apparently universal and permits the shear production of turbule...

  1. The chain-length dependence test.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Trends obtained from systematic studies based on chain-length variation have provided valuable insight and understanding into the behavior of m-phenylene ethynylene foldamers. The generalization of this experimental approach, the chain-length dependence test, is useful for studying solution conformation, packing in the solid state, specific intrachain interactions, and the contributions of end groups to a particular property. PMID:16411735

  2. Telomere length in early life predicts lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Heidinger, Britt J.; Blount, Jonathan D.; Boner, Winnie; Griffiths, Kate; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Monaghan, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of telomeres, the ends of eukaryote chromosomes, is thought to play an important role in cell deterioration with advancing age. The observed variation in telomere length among individuals of the same age is therefore thought to be related to variation in potential longevity. Studies of this relationship are hampered by the time scale over which individuals need to be followed, particularly in long-lived species where lifespan variation is greatest. So far, data are based either on simple comparisons of telomere length among different age classes or on individuals whose telomere length is measured at most twice and whose subsequent survival is monitored for only a short proportion of the typical lifespan. Both approaches are subject to bias. Key studies, in which telomere length is tracked from early in life, and actual lifespan recorded, have been lacking. We measured telomere length in zebra finches (n = 99) from the nestling stage and at various points thereafter, and recorded their natural lifespan (which varied from less than 1 to almost 9 y). We found telomere length at 25 d to be a very strong predictor of realized lifespan (P < 0.001); those individuals living longest had relatively long telomeres at all points at which they were measured. Reproduction increased adult telomere loss, but this effect appeared transient and did not influence survival. Our results provide the strongest evidence available of the relationship between telomere length and lifespan and emphasize the importance of understanding factors that determine early life telomere length. PMID:22232671

  3. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  4. Dimensions of religious involvement and leukocyte telomere length.

    PubMed

    Hill, Terrence D; Ellison, Christopher G; Burdette, Amy M; Taylor, John; Friedman, Katherine L

    2016-08-01

    Although numerous studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with a wide range of favorable health outcomes, it is unclear whether this general pattern extends to cellular aging. In this paper, we tested whether leukocyte telomere length varies according to several dimensions of religious involvement. We used cross-sectional data from the Nashville Stress and Health Study (2011-2014), a large probability sample of 1252 black and white adults aged 22 to 69 living in Davidson County, TN, USA. Leukocyte telomere length was measured using the monochrome multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction method with albumin as the single-copy reference sequence. Dimensions of religious involvement included religiosity, religious support, and religious coping. Our multivariate analyses showed that religiosity (an index of religious attendance, prayer frequency, and religious identity) was positively associated with leukocyte telomere length, even with adjustments for religious support, religious coping, age, gender, race, education, employment status, income, financial strain, stressful life events, marital status, family support, friend support, depressive symptoms, smoking, heavy drinking, and allostatic load. Unlike religiosity, religious support and religious coping were unrelated to leukocyte telomere length across models. Depressive symptoms, smoking, heavy drinking, and allostatic load failed to explain any of the association between religiosity and telomere length. To our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to link religious involvement and cellular aging. Although our data suggest that adults who frequently attend religious services, pray with regularity, and consider themselves to be religious tend to exhibit longer telomeres than those who attend and pray less frequently and do not consider themselves to be religious, additional research is needed to establish the mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:27174242

  5. The Biological Relevance of Artificial Life: Lessons from Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano

    2000-01-01

    There is no fundamental reason why A-life couldn't simply be a branch of computer science that deals with algorithms that are inspired by, or emulate biological phenomena. However, if these are the limits we place on this field, we miss the opportunity to help advance Theoretical Biology and to contribute to a deeper understanding of the nature of life. The history of Artificial Intelligence provides a good example, in that early interest in the nature of cognition quickly was lost to the process of building tools, such as "expert systems" that, were certainly useful, but provided little insight in the nature of cognition. Based on this lesson, I will discuss criteria for increasing the biological relevance of A-life and the probability that this field may provide a theoretical foundation for Biology.

  6. Small, low cost, artificial kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavender, A. R.; Markley, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Disposable hemodialyzer is described that can be used at home by non-medically trained personnel. Short lengths of semipermeable membrane tubes are arranged in parallel, supported by plastic mesh and encased in epoxy at ends. Tubes are connected to input and output blood manifolds which are separated by dialysate chamber. Daily dialysis requires only two hours or less.

  7. Numerical studies of supersonic/hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, W.S.; Chung, T.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of direct numerical simulations of turbulence interacting with shock waves and chemical reactions using unstructured adaptive finite element h-p methods. Reliable methods for resolving the complicated time and length scales involved in turbulence interacting with shock waves and chemical reactions are not yet available. Direct numerical simulations are here developed via Taylor-Galerkin finite element implicit scheme, with mesh refinements and spectral orders optimized such that errors are reduced where gradients of variables are large. 31 refs.

  8. A multiuser detector based on artificial bee colony algorithm for DS-UWB systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity. PMID:23983638

  9. The Impact of Course Length on Online Numeric-Based Course Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensch, Scott

    2013-01-01

    When offering online classes, it is necessary to ensure that all course material and objectives will be covered and learners will be successful in the course. This becomes especially important when the same class material and objectives are offered in a three-, five-, and fourteen-week format. This paper outlines the difficulty of delivering…

  10. [Heritability of body weight and fork length for Oncorhynchus masou masou].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Yong; Jia, Zhi-Ying; Bai, Qing-Li; Chen, Shu-Qiang; Shi, Lian-Yu; Wang, Bing-Qian

    2013-02-01

    Body weight and body length have been considered as the most important production traits for the fish genetic improvement. For cold-water fish, body length was usually substituted by fork length. In order to estimate the heritability of body weight and fork length of the sixth generation Oncorhynchus masou masou, which was introduced into China, the method of unbalanced nest design and an artificial insemination technigue were used. Twenty-nine full-sib families and fourteen half-sib families were obtained. Body weight and fork length of O. masou masou were measured in 12 and 24 months after fertilization. Based on full-sib and half-sib families data, the causal components of phenotypic variance were calculated. The results showed that, (1) during the whole growth phase of O. masou masou, the coefficient variation (CV) of fork length was higher than body weight, and CV of 12-month old was higher than that of 24-month old; (2) body weight and fork length of O. masou masou among sires and dams among sires were significant difference (P<0.01) both at 12 months and at 24 months; (3) the maternal component estimates were significantly larger than those of paternal ones for body weight and fork length traits both at 12 months and at 24 months; (4) for 12 months of O. masou masou the heritabilities of body weight and fork length were 0.41~0.51 and 0.46~0.54, respectively. For 24 months the values were 0.55~0.60 and 0.53~0.59, respectively; and (5) it was concluded that the heritability of growth traits in O. masou masou was relatively high and this highlights the potential to improve its growth through selective breeding. This study shows important data supporting for further genetic improvement of O. masou masou. PMID:23448933

  11. A review of pipe and bamboo artificial refugia as sampling tools in anuran studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glorioso, Brad M.; Waddle, J. Hardin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial pipe-like refugia have been used for more than 40 years in anuran studies, and have captured 28 species, primarily (82%) hylid treefrogs. Early pipe-like refugia were made using cut pieces of bamboo in the tropical forests of Puerto Rico, but most recent studies have used synthetic pipes and have occurred primarily in the southeastern United States. Characteristics of artificial refugia (e.g., color, length, and diameter), and their placement in the environment have varied greatly among studies, making comparisons difficult. Here, we summarize and evaluate different pipe designs and placement, address potential concerns when using artificial pipe-like refugia, and suggest studies necessary to better interpret the data gained from this technique in anuran studies.

  12. Artificial intelligence in medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Szolovits, P; Patil, R S; Schwartz, W B

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to overcome limitations inherent in conventional computer-aided diagnosis, investigators have created programs that simulate expert human reasoning. Hopes that such a strategy would lead to clinically useful programs have not been fulfilled, but many of the problems impeding creation of effective artificial intelligence programs have been solved. Strategies have been developed to limit the number of hypotheses that a program must consider and to incorporate pathophysiologic reasoning. The latter innovation permits a program to analyze cases in which one disorder influences the presentation of another. Prototypes embodying such reasoning can explain their conclusions in medical terms that can be reviewed by the user. Despite these advances, further major research and developmental efforts will be necessary before expert performance by the computer becomes a reality. PMID:3276267

  13. Toward a Minimal Artificial Axon.

    PubMed

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The electrophysiology of action potentials is usually studied in neurons, through relatively demanding experiments which are difficult to scale up to a defined network. Here we pursue instead the minimal artificial system based on the essential biological components-ion channels and lipid bilayers-where action potentials can be generated, propagated, and eventually networked. The fundamental unit is the classic supported bilayer: a planar bilayer patch with embedded ion channels in a fluidic environment where an ionic gradient is imposed across the bilayer. Two such units electrically connected form the basic building block for a network. The system is minimal in that we demonstrate that one kind of ion channel and correspondingly a gradient of only one ionic species is sufficient to generate an excitable system which shows amplification and threshold behavior. PMID:27049652

  14. Collective beating of artificial microcilia.

    PubMed

    Coq, Naïs; Bricard, Antoine; Delapierre, Francois-Damien; Malaquin, Laurent; du Roure, Olivia; Fermigier, Marc; Bartolo, Denis

    2011-07-01

    We combine technical, experimental, and theoretical efforts to investigate the collective dynamics of artificial microcilia in a viscous fluid. We take advantage of soft lithography and colloidal self-assembly to devise microcarpets made of hundreds of slender magnetic rods. This novel experimental setup is used to investigate the dynamics of extended cilia arrays driven by a precessing magnetic field. Whereas the dynamics of an isolated cilium is a rigid body rotation, collective beating results in a symmetry breaking of the precession patterns. The trajectories of the cilia are anisotropic and experience a significant structural evolution as the actuation frequency increases. We present a minimal model to account for our experimental findings and demonstrate how the global geometry of the array imposes the shape of the trajectories via long-range hydrodynamic interactions. PMID:21797546

  15. [An assistant artificial hip joint].

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-man; Chen, Jian-chang; Shi, Jiang; Chen, Wenhong; Zhang, Chunhao

    2002-01-01

    The assistant artificial hip joint (AAHJ) is a new impermanent hip support implanted in the body. It is used for treatment of ischemic necrosis of the femoral head at the early stage. It reserves the natural femoral head, increases its containment and decreases its load, thus makes the recovery of the necrosed femoral head. The AAHJ's moving axis center is the same as that of the femoral head. Therefore, the moving range of the hip joint is very close to the normal postoperatively. The patient can walk with loading in 3 weeks after the surgical operation, and can regain his (or her) daily work and life in 2 to 3 months of the operation. The AAHJ's structure is simple and the price is cheap. PMID:16104164

  16. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  17. Innovative applications of artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, H.; Rappaport, A.

    1989-01-01

    Papers concerning applications of artificial intelligence are presented, covering applications in aerospace technology, banking and finance, biotechnology, emergency services, law, media planning, music, the military, operations management, personnel management, retail packaging, and manufacturing assembly and design. Specific topics include Space Shuttle telemetry monitoring, an intelligent training system for Space Shuttle flight controllers, an expert system for the diagnostics of manufacturing equipment, a logistics management system, a cooling systems design assistant, and a knowledge-based integrated circuit design critic. Additional topics include a hydraulic circuit design assistant, the use of a connector assembly specification expert system to harness detailed assembly process knowledge, a mixed initiative approach to airlift planning, naval battle management decision aids, an inventory simulation tool, a peptide synthesis expert system, and a system for planning the discharging and loading of container ships.

  18. Quality Control by Artificial Vision

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Edmond Y.; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Niel, Kurt S.

    2010-01-01

    Computational technology has fundamentally changed many aspects of our lives. One clear evidence is the development of artificial-vision systems, which have effectively automated many manual tasks ranging from quality inspection to quantitative assessment. In many cases, these machine-vision systems are even preferred over manual ones due to their repeatability and high precision. Such advantages come from significant research efforts in advancing sensor technology, illumination, computational hardware, and image-processing algorithms. Similar to the Special Section on Quality Control by Artificial Vision published two years ago in Volume 17, Issue 3 of the Journal of Electronic Imaging, the present one invited papers relevant to fundamental technology improvements to foster quality control by artificial vision, and fine-tuned the technology for specific applications. We aim to balance both theoretical and applied work pertinent to this special section theme. Consequently, we have seven high-quality papers resulting from the stringent peer-reviewing process in place at the Journal of Electronic Imaging. Some of the papers contain extended treatment of the authors work presented at the SPIE Image Processing: Machine Vision Applications conference and the International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision. On the broad application side, Liu et al. propose an unsupervised texture image segmentation scheme. Using a multilayer data condensation spectral clustering algorithm together with wavelet transform, they demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach on both texture and synthetic aperture radar images. A problem related to image segmentation is image extraction. For this, O'Leary et al. investigate the theory of polynomial moments and show how these moments can be compared to classical filters. They also show how to use the discrete polynomial-basis functions for the extraction of 3-D embossed digits, demonstrating superiority over Fourier

  19. Overview of artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinming; Han, Yi; So, Sung-Sau

    2008-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN), or simply neural network, is a machine learning method evolved from the idea of simulating the human brain. The data explosion in modem drug discovery research requires sophisticated analysis methods to uncover the hidden causal relationships between single or multiple responses and a large set of properties. The ANN is one of many versatile tools to meet the demand in drug discovery modeling. Compared to a traditional regression approach, the ANN is capable of modeling complex nonlinear relationships. The ANN also has excellent fault tolerance and is fast and highly scalable with parallel processing. This chapter introduces the background of ANN development and outlines the basic concepts crucially important for understanding more sophisticated ANN. Several commonly used learning methods and network setups are discussed briefly at the end of the chapter. PMID:19065803

  20. Artificial defocusing lens in ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, G. N.; Vaskov, V. V.; Golyan, S. F.; Gurevich, A. V.; Dimant, Y. S.; Zyuzkin, V. A.; Kim, V. Y.; Komrakov, G. P.; Lobacheviskiy, L. A.; Migulin, V. V.

    1984-10-01

    Strong defocusing of perturbing radio waves is detected, indicating the creation of an effective defocusing lens in the ionosphere. Modess in which there is not anomalous absorption are employed in order to isolate the defocusing effects unambiguously. The experimental setup incorporates a 300 MW SURG heating system with a narrow radiation pattern. The concentration perturbations are diagnosed in the vertical sounding mode at 8 frequencies by means of a Doppler system. The experimental results were obtained during May and July 1983 under daytime conditions. The amplitude and Doppler frequency shift behavior of the probe wave is analyzed, and the defocusing coefficient is computed as a function of the frequency of the probe wave and power of the heating wave. The artificial lens detected results in significant attenuation of radio waves passing through it.

  1. Research and applications: Artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphael, B.; Fikes, R. E.; Chaitin, L. J.; Hart, P. E.; Duda, R. O.; Nilsson, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    A program of research in the field of artificial intelligence is presented. The research areas discussed include automatic theorem proving, representations of real-world environments, problem-solving methods, the design of a programming system for problem-solving research, techniques for general scene analysis based upon television data, and the problems of assembling an integrated robot system. Major accomplishments include the development of a new problem-solving system that uses both formal logical inference and informal heuristic methods, the development of a method of automatic learning by generalization, and the design of the overall structure of a new complete robot system. Eight appendices to the report contain extensive technical details of the work described.

  2. Introduction to artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Enzo; Buscema, Massimo

    2007-12-01

    The coupling of computer science and theoretical bases such as nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory allows the creation of 'intelligent' agents, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), able to adapt themselves dynamically to problems of high complexity. ANNs are able to reproduce the dynamic interaction of multiple factors simultaneously, allowing the study of complexity; they can also draw conclusions on individual basis and not as average trends. These tools can offer specific advantages with respect to classical statistical techniques. This article is designed to acquaint gastroenterologists with concepts and paradigms related to ANNs. The family of ANNs, when appropriately selected and used, permits the maximization of what can be derived from available data and from complex, dynamic, and multidimensional phenomena, which are often poorly predictable in the traditional 'cause and effect' philosophy. PMID:17998827

  3. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  4. Innovative applications of artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Rappaport, Alain

    Papers concerning applications of artificial intelligence are presented, covering applications in aerospace technology, banking and finance, biotechnology, emergency services, law, media planning, music, the military, operations management, personnel management, retail packaging, and manufacturing assembly and design. Specific topics include Space Shuttle telemetry monitoring, an intelligent training system for Space Shuttle flight controllers, an expert system for the diagnostics of manufacturing equipment, a logistics management system, a cooling systems design assistant, and a knowledge-based integrated circuit design critic. Additional topics include a hydraulic circuit design assistant, the use of a connector assembly specification expert system to harness detailed assembly process knowledge, a mixed initiative approach to airlift planning, naval battle management decision aids, an inventory simulation tool, a peptide synthesis expert system, and a system for planning the discharging and loading of container ships.

  5. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  6. Spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, Guido; Eberhard, Veit; Hunkel, Dirk; Zeitnitz, B.

    1995-02-01

    A double spectrometer allows the precise measurement of the spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers. Exciting the fibers with a N 2-laser at different points and measuring the wavelength dependent light intensity on both ends of the fiber simultaneously, enables a measurement of the attenuation length which is practically independent of systematic uncertainties. The experimental setup can additionally be used for the measurement of the relative light output. Six types of scintillating fibers from four manufactures (Bicron, Kuraray, Pol.Hi.Tech, and Plastifo) were tested. For different fibers the wavelength dependent attenuation lengths were measured from 0.3 m up to 20 m with an accuracy as good as 1%.

  7. Regulation of Flagellar Length in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Iyer, Janaki Kannan; Buchheim, Julie A.; Meek, William

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two apically localized flagella that are maintained at an equal and appropriate length. Assembly and maintenance of flagella requires a microtubule-based transport system known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). During IFT, proteins destined for incorporation into or removal from a flagellum are carried along doublet microtubules via IFT particles. Regulation of IFT activity therefore is pivotal in determining the length of a flagellum. Reviewed is our current understanding of the role of IFT and signal transduction pathways in the regulation of flagellar length. PMID:18692148

  8. A Note on Solar Cycle Length Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, J. M.; García, J. A.; Gallego, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Recently, new estimates of the solar cycle length (SCL) have been calculated using the Zurich Sunspot Number (R Z) and the Regression-Fourier-Calculus (RFC)-method, a mathematically rigorous method involving multiple regression, Fourier approximation, and analytical expressions for the first derivative. In this short contribution, we show estimates of the solar cycle length using the RFC-method and the Group Sunspot Number (R G) instead the R Z. Several authors have showed the advantages of R G for the analysis of sunspot activity before 1850. The use of R G solves some doubtful solar cycle length estimates obtained around 1800 using R Z.

  9. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  10. Artificial intelligence and the future.

    PubMed

    Clocksin, William F

    2003-08-15

    We consider some of the ideas influencing current artificial-intelligence research and outline an alternative conceptual framework that gives priority to social relationships as a key component and constructor of intelligent behaviour. The framework starts from Weizenbaum's observation that intelligence manifests itself only relative to specific social and cultural contexts. This is in contrast to a prevailing view, which sees intelligence as an abstract capability of the individual mind based on a mechanism for rational thought. The new approach is not based on the conventional idea that the mind is a rational processor of symbolic information, nor does it require the idea that thought is a kind of abstract problem solving with a semantics that is independent of its embodiment. Instead, priority is given to affective and social responses that serve to engage the whole agent in the life of the communities in which it participates. Intelligence is seen not as the deployment of capabilities for problem solving, but as constructed by the continual, ever-changing and unfinished engagement with the social group within the environment. The construction of the identity of the intelligent agent involves the appropriation or 'taking up' of positions within the conversations and narratives in which it participates. Thus, the new approach argues that the intelligent agent is shaped by the meaning ascribed to experience, by its situation in the social matrix, and by practices of self and of relationship into which intelligent life is recruited. This has implications for the technology of the future, as, for example, classic artificial intelligence models such as goal-directed problem solving are seen as special cases of narrative practices instead of as ontological foundations. PMID:12952683

  11. Artificial Intelligence--Applications in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirot, James L.; Norris, Cathleen A.

    1987-01-01

    This first in a projected series of five articles discusses artificial intelligence and its impact on education. Highlights include the history of artificial intelligence and the impact of microcomputers; learning processes; human factors and interfaces; computer assisted instruction and intelligent tutoring systems; logic programing; and expert…

  12. INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL GROUND-WATER RECHARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Artificial ground-water recharge has been practiced for scores of years throughout the world. The purpose of artificial recharge is to increase the rate at which water infiltrates the land surface in order to supplement the quantity of ground water in storage. A variety of rechar...

  13. Generation of artificial helioseismic time-series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schou, J.; Brown, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present an outline of an algorithm to generate artificial helioseismic time-series, taking into account as much as possible of the knowledge we have on solar oscillations. The hope is that it will be possible to find the causes of some of the systematic errors in analysis algorithms by testing them with such artificial time-series.

  14. Artificial Neural Networks and Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Patricia A.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN), part of artificial intelligence, are discussed. Such networks are fed sample cases (training sets), learn how to recognize patterns in the sample data, and use this experience in handling new cases. Two cognitive roles for ANNs (intelligent filters and spreading, associative memories) are examined. Prototypes…

  15. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  16. Artificial Reefs--A Coastal Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindo, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the construction of artificial reefs for such uses as commercial fishing and recreational boating. Describes a class project in which students construct a small artificial reef and observe the changes over time in terms of temperature, salinity, flora and fauna. (TW)

  17. Creativity in design and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Neocleous, C.C.; Esat, I.I.; Schizas, C.N.

    1996-12-31

    The creativity phase is identified as an integral part of the design phase. The characteristics of creative persons which are relevant to designing artificial neural networks manifesting aspects of creativity, are identified. Based on these identifications, a general framework of artificial neural network characteristics to implement such a goal are proposed.

  18. Artificial Astrocytes Improve Neural Network Performance

    PubMed Central

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B.; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  19. Ecological consequences of artificial night lighting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This edited volume is the best source for the increasingly recognized impact of artificial night lighting on the living world. Fifteen chapters cover effects of artificial lighting on mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, invertebrates (mostly insects), and plants. The book was an outgrowt...

  20. 49 CFR 176.148 - Artificial lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Artificial lighting. 176.148 Section 176.148 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... lighting. Electric lights, except arc lights, are the only form of artificial lighting permitted...

  1. 49 CFR 176.148 - Artificial lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Artificial lighting. 176.148 Section 176.148 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... lighting. Electric lights, except arc lights, are the only form of artificial lighting permitted...

  2. 49 CFR 176.148 - Artificial lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Artificial lighting. 176.148 Section 176.148 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... lighting. Electric lights, except arc lights, are the only form of artificial lighting permitted...

  3. 49 CFR 176.148 - Artificial lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Artificial lighting. 176.148 Section 176.148 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... lighting. Electric lights, except arc lights, are the only form of artificial lighting permitted...

  4. 49 CFR 176.148 - Artificial lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Artificial lighting. 176.148 Section 176.148 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... lighting. Electric lights, except arc lights, are the only form of artificial lighting permitted...

  5. The history of the artificial eye.

    PubMed

    Martin, O; Clodius, L

    1979-08-01

    The history of the artificial eye, from antiquity to the present, is described. Around the beginning of the nineteenth century, glass eyes replaced the earlier metal ones--not always well tolerated. In 1835, cryolite glass was used instead of lead glass; to this day it remains the lightest and most desirable substance for making artificial eyes. PMID:396850

  6. 50 CFR 27.73 - Artificial lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Artificial lights. 27.73 Section 27.73... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: Light and Sound Equipment § 27.73 Artificial lights. No unauthorized person shall use or direct the rays of a spotlight or other...

  7. Artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance.

    PubMed

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  8. 50 CFR 27.73 - Artificial lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Artificial lights. 27.73 Section 27.73... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: Light and Sound Equipment § 27.73 Artificial lights. No unauthorized person shall use or direct the rays of a spotlight or other...

  9. 50 CFR 27.73 - Artificial lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Artificial lights. 27.73 Section 27.73... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: Filming, Photography, and Light and Sound Equipment § 27.73 Artificial lights. No unauthorized person shall use or direct the rays of...

  10. Web Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, Vladan

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys important aspects of Web Intelligence (WI) in the context of Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) research. WI explores the fundamental roles as well as practical impacts of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced Information Technology (IT) on the next generation of Web-related products, systems, services, and…

  11. Program for Development of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary; Culbert, Chris; Lopez, Frank

    1987-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) computer program is shell for developing expert systems. Designed to enable research, development, and delivery of artificial intelligence on conventional computers. Primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. Meets or out-performs most microcomputer- and minicomputer-based artificial-intelligence tools. Written in C.

  12. Artificial Intelligence in Education: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    Gives a brief outline of the development of Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) which includes psychology, education, cognitive science, computer science, and artificial intelligence. Highlights include learning environments; learner modeling; a situated approach to learning; and current examples of AIED research. (LRW)

  13. 50 CFR 27.73 - Artificial lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Artificial lights. 27.73 Section 27.73... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Disturbing Violations: Light and Sound Equipment § 27.73 Artificial lights. No unauthorized person shall use or direct the rays of a spotlight or other...

  14. Thermal dispersivity based calibration of a numerical borehole heat exchanger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Valentin; Bayer, Peter; Bisch, Gerhard; Klaas, Norbert; Braun, Jürgen; Blum, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Shallow geothermal energy is used worldwide as a heat and/or cooling source for buildings. The most often used technique to exploit energy from the subsurface is ground source heat pump systems in combination with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE). The BHE consists either of one U-pipe, two U-pipes or a coaxial pipe, which are inserted in a borehole. The remaining void space is filled with a grouting material to improve the thermal connection between the pipes and the subsurface and to protect the subsurface if there is a leakage in the pipes. In the pipes, a heat carrier fluid is circulated to establish a thermal gradient around the BHE and thus promote conductive heat transfer. This causes a temperature anomaly in the subsurface. Extension and magnitude of such temperature anomalies do not only depend on the amount of exchanged energy, but also on the characteristics of the ground and the installed ground source heat pump system itself. In this study, we developed a high-resolution finite element BHE model to simulate the heat propagation from a BHE to the subsurface or vice versa. First, the resulting heat propagation predicted by the numerical model is compared to the analogous analytical solutions. Then the numerical model is calibrated based on a large-scale geothermal tank experiment. The tank has a size of 9m × 6m × 4.5m (length × width × depth), and it hosts a layered artificial aquifer with four BHEs, which are surrounded by a dense temperature sensor network (> 150 PT-100 temperature sensors). In the tank, a hydraulic gradient can be established and thus groundwater flow can be imitated. By calibrating the numerical model, the sensitivity of longitudinal and transversal dispersivity values is evaluated. Our analysis cannot prove that the commonly assumed ratio of 1:10 between transversal and longitudinal dispersivity is correct. Rather, it is shown that there exists a wide range of possible parameter value combinations.

  15. Research on the Evolutionary Strategy Based on AIS and Its Application on Numerical Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, Li

    Based on the features of artificial immune system, a new evolutionary strategy is proposed in order to calculate the numerical integration of functions. This evolutionary strategy includes the mechanisms of swarm searching and constructing the fitness function. Finally, numerical examples are given for verifying the effectiveness of evolutionary strategy. The results show that the performance of evolutionary strategy is satisfactory and more accurate than traditional methods of numerical integration, such as trapezoid formula and Simpson formula.

  16. Stable Artificial Dissipation Operators for Finite Volume Schemes on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svard, Magnus; Gong, Jing; Nordstrom, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Our objective is to derive stable first-, second- and fourth-order artificial dissipation operators for node based finite volume schemes. Of particular interest are general unstructured grids where the strength of the finite volume method is fully utilized. A commonly used finite volume approximation of the Laplacian will be the basis in the construction of the artificial dissipation. Both a homogeneous dissipation acting in all directions with equal strength and a modification that allows different amount of dissipation in different directions are derived. Stability and accuracy of the new operators are proved and the theoretical results are supported by numerical computations.

  17. Contribution to the mechanics of worm-like motion systems and artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Steigenberger, J

    2003-08-01

    In this paper the author presents a mathematical model of a device that can be seen as a segment of an artificial worm (following the paradigm "earthworm") and as an artificial muscle as well. Confining considerations to statics, the model shows up as an ordinary parameter-dependent boundary value problem. It is tackled numerically in various particular forms by means of Maple and thus gives a good view of the segment's behavior during inflation and under longitudinal load. Segments of maximal volume present a useful preliminary stage of the investigations. PMID:14586816

  18. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  19. Relative Motion around Artificial Lagrange Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng; Baoyin, Hexi

    This work investigates relative motion around the artificial Lagrange points. Two control strategies are used to analyze the stability of relative motion around artificial Lagrange points. The relative motion is strictly unstable and further investigation shows that it diverges very slowly in the vicinity of some artificial Lagrange points. A parameter is defined to quantify instability of the relative motion. Then, the pseudo-stable regions of artificial Lagrange points are given when different values of the parameter are treated as the critical value of pseudo-stability. A large pseudo-stable region exists for one of two control strategies—the passive control strategy. This paper discusses the passive stability design of a sail, and both the attitude and orbital dynamics are considered simultaneously. An artificial Lagrange point in the pseudo-stable region is used to validate the design method. The results show that both the attitude and relative motion are pseudo-stable.

  20. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Karakose, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. PMID:23935424

  1. Principles of Early Development of Karst Conduits Under Natural and Man-Made Conditions Revealed by Mathematical Analysis of Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    1996-04-01

    Numerical models of the enlargement of primary fissures in limestone by calcite aggressive water show a complex behavior. If the lengths of the fractures are large and hydraulic heads are low, as is the case in nature, dissolution rates at the exit of the channel determine its development by causing a slow increase of water flow, which after a long gestation time by positive feedback accelerates dramatically within a short time span. Mathematical analysis of simplified approximations yields an analytical expression for the breakthrough time, when this happens, in excellent agreement with the results of a numerical model. This expression quantifies the geometrical, hydraulic, and chemical parameters determining such karst processes. If the lengths of the enlarging channels are small, but hydraulic heads are high, as is the case for artificial hydraulic structures such as dams, it is the widening at the entrance of the flow path which determines the enlargement of the conduit. Within the lifetime of the dam this can cause serious water losses. This can also be explained by mathematical analysis of simplified approximations which yield an analytical threshold condition from which the safety of a dam can be judged. Thus in both cases the dynamic processes of karstification are revealed to gain a deeper understanding of the early development of karst systems. As a further important result, one finds that minimum conditions, below which karstification cannot develop, do not exist.

  2. Security analysis of the decoy method with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol for finite key lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Nakayama, Ryota

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides a formula for the sacrifice bit-length for privacy amplification with the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol for finite key lengths, when we employ the decoy method. Using the formula, we can guarantee the security parameter for a realizable quantum key distribution system. The key generation rates with finite key lengths are numerically evaluated. The proposed method improves the existing key generation rate even in the asymptotic setting.

  3. Characteristic length of the knotting probability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    We present a self-avoiding polygon (SAP) model for circular DNA in which the radius of impermeable cylindrical segments corresponds to the screening length of double-stranded DNA surrounded by counter ions. For the model we evaluate the probability for a generated SAP with N segments having a given knot K through simulation. We call it the knotting probability of a knot K with N segments for the SAP model. We show that when N is large the most significant factor in the knotting probability is given by the exponentially decaying part exp(-N/NK), where the estimates of parameter NK are consistent with the same value for all the different knots we investigated. We thus call it the characteristic length of the knotting probability. We give formulae expressing the characteristic length as a function of the cylindrical radius rex, i.e. the screening length of double-stranded DNA.

  4. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  5. Phase coherence length in silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisu; Ma, Yangjin; Guan, Hang; Liu, Yang; Danziger, Steven; Ocheltree, Stewart; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-06-29

    We report for the first time two typical phase coherence lengths in highly confined silicon waveguides fabricated in a standard CMOS foundry's multi-project-wafer shuttle run in the 220nm silicon-on-insulator wafer with 248nm lithography. By measuring the random phase fluctuations of 800 on-chip silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometers across the wafer, we extracted, with statistical significance, the coherence lengths to be 4.17 ± 0.42 mm and 1.61 ± 0.12 mm for single mode strip waveguide and rib waveguide, respectively. We present a new experimental method to quantify the phase coherence length. The theory model is verified by both our and others' experiments. Coherence length is expected to become one key parameter of the fabrication non-uniformity to guide the design of silicon photonics. PMID:26191700

  6. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  7. Artificial evolution by viability rather than competition.

    PubMed

    Maesani, Andrea; Fernando, Pradeep Ruben; Floreano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms are widespread heuristic methods inspired by natural evolution to solve difficult problems for which analytical approaches are not suitable. In many domains experimenters are not only interested in discovering optimal solutions, but also in finding the largest number of different solutions satisfying minimal requirements. However, the formulation of an effective performance measure describing these requirements, also known as fitness function, represents a major challenge. The difficulty of combining and weighting multiple problem objectives and constraints of possibly varying nature and scale into a single fitness function often leads to unsatisfactory solutions. Furthermore, selective reproduction of the fittest solutions, which is inspired by competition-based selection in nature, leads to loss of diversity within the evolving population and premature convergence of the algorithm, hindering the discovery of many different solutions. Here we present an alternative abstraction of artificial evolution, which does not require the formulation of a composite fitness function. Inspired from viability theory in dynamical systems, natural evolution and ethology, the proposed method puts emphasis on the elimination of individuals that do not meet a set of changing criteria, which are defined on the problem objectives and constraints. Experimental results show that the proposed method maintains higher diversity in the evolving population and generates more unique solutions when compared to classical competition-based evolutionary algorithms. Our findings suggest that incorporating viability principles into evolutionary algorithms can significantly improve the applicability and effectiveness of evolutionary methods to numerous complex problems of science and engineering, ranging from protein structure prediction to aircraft wing design. PMID:24489790

  8. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  9. Hydrodynamic analysis, performance assessment, and actuator design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philen, Michael; Neu, Wayne

    2011-09-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop analysis tools for determining actuator requirements and assessing viable actuator technology for design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator. A simple hydrodynamic model that includes both reactive and resistive forces along the tail is proposed and the calculated mean thrust agrees well with conventional estimates of drag. Using the hydrodynamic model forces as an input, studies are performed for an alligator ranging in size from 1 cm to 2 m at swimming speeds of 0.3-1.8 body lengths per second containing five antagonistic pairs of actuators distributed along the length of the tail. Several smart materials are considered for the actuation system, and preliminary analysis results indicate that the acrylic electroactive polymer and the flexible matrix composite actuators are potential artificial muscle technologies for the system.

  10. Cold bose gases with large scattering lengths.

    PubMed

    Cowell, S; Heiselberg, H; Mazets, I E; Morales, J; Pandharipande, V R; Pethick, C J

    2002-05-27

    We calculate the energy and condensate fraction for a dense system of bosons interacting through an attractive short range interaction with positive s-wave scattering length a. At high densities n>a(-3), the energy per particle, chemical potential, and square of the sound speed are independent of the scattering length and proportional to n(2/3), as in Fermi systems. The condensate is quenched at densities na(3) approximately 1. PMID:12059466

  11. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  12. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes. PMID:26208520

  13. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  14. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  15. Cosmesis: The Art of Making Artificial Limbs Look Lifelike

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Cosmesis: The Art of Making Artificial Limbs Look Lifelike Translated into ... Original article by Rick Bowers Cosmesis is the art of making artificial limbs look lifelike. Artificial hands ...

  16. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek’s disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpe...

  17. Tracheoesophageal fistula length decreases over time.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nancy; Kearney, Ann; Damrose, Edward J

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis changes over time and to determine whether the prosthesis length over time increased, decreased, or showed no predictable change in size. A retrospective chart review was performed at a tertiary care referral center. Patients who underwent either primary or secondary tracheoesophageal puncture between January 2006 and August 2014 were evaluated. Patients were excluded if the tracheoesophageal prosthesis size was not consistently recorded or if they required re-puncturing for an extruded prosthesis. Data analyzed included patient demographics and the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis at each change. A total of 37 patients were identified. The mean age was 64 years. Seventy-six percent were male. 24 % underwent primary tracheoesophageal puncture and 76 % underwent secondary tracheoesophageal puncture. The length of the prosthesis decreased over time (median Kendall correlation coefficient = -0.60; mean = -0.44) and this correlation between length and time was significant (p = 0.00085). Therefore, in conclusion, tracheoesophageal prosthesis length is not constant over time. The tracheoesophageal wall thins, necessitating placement of shorter prostheses over time. Patients with a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis will require long-term follow-up and repeat sizing of their prosthesis. Successful tracheoesophageal voicing will require periodic reevaluation of these devices, and insurers must, therefore, understand that long-term professional care will be required to manage these patients and their prostheses. PMID:26951219

  18. Dynamical Length-Regulation of Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbinger, Anna; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are vital constituents of the cytoskeleton. These stiff filaments are not only needed for mechanical support. They also fulfill highly dynamic tasks. For instance MTs build the mitotic spindle, which pulls the doubled set of chromosomes apart during mitosis. Hence, a well-regulated and adjustable MT length is essential for cell division. Extending a recently introduced model [1], we here study length-regulation of MTs. Thereby we account for both spontaneous polymerization and depolymerization triggered by motor proteins. In contrast to the polymerization rate, the effective depolymerization rate depends on the presence of molecular motors at the tip and thereby on crowding effects which in turn depend on the MT length. We show that these antagonistic effects result in a well-defined MT length. Stochastic simulations and analytic calculations reveal the exact regimes where regulation is feasible. Furthermore, the adjusted MT length and the ensuing strength of fluctuations are analyzed. Taken together, we make quantitative predictions which can be tested experimentally. These results should help to obtain deeper insights in the microscopic mechanisms underlying length-regulation. [4pt] [1] L.Reese, A.Melbinger, E.Frey, Biophys. J., 101, 9, 2190 (2011)

  19. The future of artificial satellite theories Hybrid ephemeris compression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoots, Felix R.; France, Richard G.

    1996-03-01

    Since the time of Newton, astrodynamics has focused on the analytical solution of orbital problems. This was driven by the desire to obtain a theoretical understanding of the motion and the practical desire to be able to produce a computational result, Only with the advent of the computer did numerical integration become a practical consideration for solving dynamical problems. Although computer technology is not yet to the point of being able to provide numerical integration support for all satellite orbits, we are in a transition period which is being driven by the unprecedented increase in computational power, This transition will affect the future of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical artificial satellite theories in a dramatic way, In fact, the role for semi-analytical theories may disappear. During the time of transition, a central site may have the capacity to maintain the orbits using numerical integration, but the user may not have such a capacity or may need results in a more timely manner, One way to provide for this transition need is through the use of some type of satellite ephemeris compression. Through the combined use of a power series and a Fourier series, good quality ephemeris compression has been achieved for 7 day periods, The ephemeris compression requires less than 40 terms and is valid for all eccentricities and inclinations.

  20. Kinematics of constant arc length folding for different fold shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Mohammad R.; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Ghassemi, Ali R.

    2010-06-01

    Basic mathematical functions are applied for the two-dimensional geometrical and kinematical analysis of different fold shapes. Relationships between different fold parameters are established and related to the bulk shortening taking place during folding under upper crustal conditions. The bulk shortening taking place during constant arc length folding is mathematically related to the bulk shortening during homogenous pure shear using a particular aspect ratio, which is for folding the ratio of amplitude to half wavelength and for pure shear the ratio of vertical to horizontal length of the deformed, initially square body. The evolution of the fold aspect ratio with bulk shortening is similar for a wide range of fold shapes and indicates that the fold aspect ratio allows a good estimate of the bulk shortening. The change of the geometry of individual layers across a multilayer sequence in disharmonic folding indicates a specific kinematics of multilayer folding, referred to here as "wrap folding", which does not require significant flexural slip nor flexural flow. The kinematic analysis indicates that there is a critical value for constant arc length folding between shortening values of 30-40% (depending on the fold geometry). For shortening values smaller than the critical value limb rotation and fold amplitude growth are dominating. For shortening larger than this value, faulting, boudinage and foliation development are likely the dominating deformation process during continued shortening. The kinematical analysis of constant arc length folding can be used for estimating the bulk shortening taking place during multilayer folding which is an important component of the deformation of crustal rocks during the early history of shortening. The bulk shortening is estimated for a natural, multilayer detachment fold and the shortening estimates based on the kinematic analysis are compared and supported by numerical finite element simulations of multilayer detachment

  1. Limited-path-length entanglement percolation in quantum complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuquet, Martí; Calsamiglia, John

    2011-03-01

    We study entanglement distribution in quantum complex networks where nodes are connected by bipartite entangled states. These networks are characterized by a complex structure, which dramatically affects how information is transmitted through them. For pure quantum state links, quantum networks exhibit a remarkable feature absent in classical networks: it is possible to effectively rewire the network by performing local operations on the nodes. We propose a family of such quantum operations that decrease the entanglement percolation threshold of the network and increase the size of the giant connected component. We provide analytic results for complex networks with an arbitrary (uncorrelated) degree distribution. These results are in good agreement with numerical simulations, which also show enhancement in correlated and real-world networks. The proposed quantum preprocessing strategies are not robust in the presence of noise. However, even when the links consist of (noisy) mixed-state links, one can send quantum information through a connecting path with a fidelity that decreases with the path length. In this noisy scenario, complex networks offer a clear advantage over regular lattices, namely, the fact that two arbitrary nodes can be connected through a relatively small number of steps, known as the small-world effect. We calculate the probability that two arbitrary nodes in the network can successfully communicate with a fidelity above a given threshold. This amounts to working out the classical problem of percolation with a limited path length. We find that this probability can be significant even for paths limited to few connections and that the results for standard (unlimited) percolation are soon recovered if the path length exceeds by a finite amount the average path length, which in complex networks generally scales logarithmically with the size of the network.

  2. Modeling for Convective Heat Transport Based on Mixing Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Convection is the most important mechanism for the Earth's internal dynamics, and plays a substantial role on its evolution. On investigating the thermal history of the Earth, convective heat transport should be taken into account. However, it is difficult to treat full convective flow throughout the Earth's entire history. Therefore, the parameterized convection has been developed and widely used. Convection occurring in the Earth's interior has some complicated aspects. It has large variation of viscosity, internal heating, phase boundaries, etc. Especially, the viscosity contrast has significant effect on the efficiency of the heat transport of the convection. The parameterized convection treats viscosity variation artificially, so it has many limitations. We developed an alternative method based on the concept of "mixing length theory". We can relate local thermal gradient with local convective velocity of fluid parcel. Convective heat transport is identified with effective thermal diffusivity, and we can calculate horizontally averaged temperature profile and heat flux by solving a thermal conduction problem. On estimating the parcel's velocity, we can include such as the effect of variable viscosity. In this study, we confirm that the temperature profile can be calculated correctly by this method, on comparing the experimental and 2D calculation results. We further show the effect of the viscosity contrast on the thermal structure of the convective fluid, and calculate the relationship between Nusselt number and modified Rayleigh number.

  3. From natural to artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barber, James; Tran, Phong D

    2013-04-01

    Demand for energy is projected to increase at least twofold by mid-century relative to the present global consumption because of predicted population and economic growth. This demand could be met, in principle, from fossil energy resources, particularly coal. However, the cumulative nature of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions demands that stabilizing the atmospheric CO(2) levels to just twice their pre-anthropogenic values by mid-century will be extremely challenging, requiring invention, development and deployment of schemes for carbon-neutral energy production on a scale commensurate with, or larger than, the entire present-day energy supply from all sources combined. Among renewable and exploitable energy resources, nuclear fusion energy or solar energy are by far the largest. However, in both cases, technological breakthroughs are required with nuclear fusion being very difficult, if not impossible on the scale required. On the other hand, 1 h of sunlight falling on our planet is equivalent to all the energy consumed by humans in an entire year. If solar energy is to be a major primary energy source, then it must be stored and despatched on demand to the end user. An especially attractive approach is to store solar energy in the form of chemical bonds as occurs in natural photosynthesis. However, a technology is needed which has a year-round average conversion efficiency significantly higher than currently available by natural photosynthesis so as to reduce land-area requirements and to be independent of food production. Therefore, the scientific challenge is to construct an 'artificial leaf' able to efficiently capture and convert solar energy and then store it in the form of chemical bonds of a high-energy density fuel such as hydrogen while at the same time producing oxygen from water. Realistically, the efficiency target for such a technology must be 10 per cent or better. Here, we review the molecular details of the energy capturing reactions of natural

  4. From natural to artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, James; Tran, Phong D.

    2013-01-01

    Demand for energy is projected to increase at least twofold by mid-century relative to the present global consumption because of predicted population and economic growth. This demand could be met, in principle, from fossil energy resources, particularly coal. However, the cumulative nature of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions demands that stabilizing the atmospheric CO2 levels to just twice their pre-anthropogenic values by mid-century will be extremely challenging, requiring invention, development and deployment of schemes for carbon-neutral energy production on a scale commensurate with, or larger than, the entire present-day energy supply from all sources combined. Among renewable and exploitable energy resources, nuclear fusion energy or solar energy are by far the largest. However, in both cases, technological breakthroughs are required with nuclear fusion being very difficult, if not impossible on the scale required. On the other hand, 1 h of sunlight falling on our planet is equivalent to all the energy consumed by humans in an entire year. If solar energy is to be a major primary energy source, then it must be stored and despatched on demand to the end user. An especially attractive approach is to store solar energy in the form of chemical bonds as occurs in natural photosynthesis. However, a technology is needed which has a year-round average conversion efficiency significantly higher than currently available by natural photosynthesis so as to reduce land-area requirements and to be independent of food production. Therefore, the scientific challenge is to construct an ‘artificial leaf’ able to efficiently capture and convert solar energy and then store it in the form of chemical bonds of a high-energy density fuel such as hydrogen while at the same time producing oxygen from water. Realistically, the efficiency target for such a technology must be 10 per cent or better. Here, we review the molecular details of the energy capturing reactions of natural

  5. Survival and growth of American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) hatchlings after artificial incubation and repatriation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Temsiripong, Y.; Woodward, A.R.; Ross, J.P.; Kubilis, P.S.; Percival, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Hatchling American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) produced from artificially incubated wild eggs were returned to their natal areas (repatriated). We compared artificially incubated and repatriated hatchlings released within and outside the maternal alligator's home range with naturally incubated hatchlings captured and released within the maternal alligator's home range on Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Orange Lake in Florida. We used probability of recapture and total length at approximately nine months after hatching as indices of survival and growth rates. Artificially incubated hatchlings released outside of the maternal alligator's home range had lower recapture probabilities than either naturally incubated hatchlings or artificially incubated hatchlings released near the original nest site. Recapture probabilities of other treatments did not differ significantly. Artificially incubated hatchlings were approximately 6% shorter than naturally incubated hatchlings at approximately nine months after hatching. We concluded that repatriation of hatchlings probably would not have long-term effects on populations because of the resiliency of alligator populations to alterations of early age-class survival and growth rates of the magnitude that we observed. Repatriation of hatchlings may be an economical alternative to repatriation of older juveniles for population restoration. However, the location of release may affect subsequent survival and growth. Copyright 2006 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  6. Capillary Rise on Legs of a Small Animal and on Artificially Textured Surfaces Mimicking Them

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs. PMID:24849071

  7. Gross anatomical study of spleenic length.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ashraful Islam; Khalil, Mansur; Begum, Jahan Ara; Rahman, M Habibur; Mannan, Sabina; Sultana, Seheli Zannat; Rahman, M Mahbubur; Ahamed, M Sshibbir; Sultana, Zinat Rezina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the standard length of the normal spleen in Bangladeshi people. One hundred and twenty human cadavers of which eighty-seven male and thirty-three female were dissected to remove spleen with associated structures in the morgue of Forensic Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College. Collected specimens were tagged with specific identification number, divided into five groups according to age and height of the individual. Gross and fine dissections were carried out after fixing the specimen in 10% formol saline solution. Length of the spleen was measured by measuring tape and expressed in cm and findings of the present study were compared with the findings of national and international studies. This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out in the Department of Anatomy of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. The mean length of spleen was maximum as 11.20 cm in male in group C (31-45 years), and as 11.80 cm in female in group B(16-30 years) and mean length of spleen was minimum as 10.06 cm in male and 9.53 cm in female in group A (upto 15 years). Difference between group A and B, A and C, A and D were statistically significant. There were no significant differences in between other groups. According to height of individual the mean length of spleen was maximum 11.42 cm in 165.01 to 180 cm height group and minimum 10.30 cm in 0-120 cm height group which indicate that length of the spleen increases with height of the individual. This was observed that length of the spleen depends on the age, sex and body height of the individual. PMID:19377429

  8. Insomnia and Telomere Length in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Esquivel, Stephanie; Goldberg, Alyssa; Seeman, Teresa E.; Effros, Rita B.; Dock, Jeffrey; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia, particularly in later life, may raise the risk for chronic diseases of aging and mortality through its effect on cellular aging. The current study examines the effects of insomnia on telomere length, a measure of cellular aging, and tests whether insomnia interacts with chronological age to increase cellular aging. Methods: A total of 126 males and females (60–88 y) were assessed for insomnia using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criterion for primary insomnia and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition for general insomnia (45 insomnia cases; 81 controls). Telomere length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methodology. Results: In the analysis of covariance model adjusting for body mass index and sex, age (60–69 y versus 70–88 y) and insomnia diagnosis interacted to predict shorter PBMC telomere length (P = 0.04). In the oldest age group (70–88 y), PBMC telomere length was significantly shorter in those with insomnia, mean (standard deviation) M(SD) = 0.59(0.2) compared to controls with no insomnia M(SD) = 0.78(0.4), P = 0.04. In the adults aged 60–69 y, PBMC telomere length was not different between insomnia cases and controls, P = 0.44. Conclusions: Insomnia is associated with shorter PBMC telomere length in adults aged 70–88 y, but not in those younger than 70 y, suggesting that clinically severe sleep disturbances may increase cellular aging, especially in the later years of life. These findings highlight insomnia as a vulnerability factor in later life, with implications for risk for diseases of aging. Citation: Carroll JE, Esquivel S, Goldberg A, Seeman TE, Effros RB, Dock J, Olmstead R, Breen EC, Irwin MR. Insomnia and telomere length in older adults. SLEEP 2016;39(3):559–564. PMID:26715231

  9. Prediction of Yarn Strength Utilization in Cotton Woven Fabrics using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Swapna

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an endeavor to predict the percentage yarn strength utilization (% SU) in cotton woven fabrics using artificial neural network approach. Fabrics in plain, 2/2 twill, 3/1 twill and 4-end broken twill weaves having three pick densities and three weft counts in each weave have been considered. Different artificial neural network models, with different set of input parameters, have been explored. It has been found that % SU can be predicted fairly accurately by only five fabric parameters, namely the number of load bearing and transverse yarns per unit length, the yarn crimp % in the load bearing and transverse directions and the float length of the weave. Trend analysis of the artificial neural network model has also been carried out to see how the various parameters affect the % SU. The results indicate that while an increase in the number of load bearing or transverse yarns increases the % SU, an increase in the float length and the crimp % in the yarns have a detrimental effect.

  10. Steady and Unsteady Numerical Solution of Generalized Newtonian Fluids Flow by Runge-Kutta method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keslerová, R.; Kozel, K.; Prokop, V.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper the laminar viscous incompressible flow for generalized Newtonian (Newtonian and non-Newtonian) fluids is considered. The governing system of equations is the system of Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation. The steady and unsteady numerical solution for this system is computed by finite volume method combined with an artificial compressibility method. For time discretization the explicit multistage Runge-Kutta numerical scheme is considered. Steady state solution is achieved for t→∞ using steady boundary conditions and followed by steady residual behavior. The dual time-stepping method is considered for unsteady computation. The high artificial compressibility coefficient is used in the artificial compressibility method applied in the dual time τ. The steady and unsteady numerical results of Newtonian and non-Newtonian (shear thickening and shear thinning) fluids flow in the branching channel are presented.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Time-Dependent Wave Propagation Using Nonreflective Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, D.; Muehlhaus, H.

    2003-12-01

    Solving numerically the wave equation for modelling wave propagation on an unbounded domain with complex geometry requires a truncation of the domain, to fit the infinite region on a finite computer. Minimizing the amount of spurious reflections requires in many cases the introduction of an artificial boundary and of associated nonreflecting boundary conditions. Here, a question arises, namely which boundary condition guarantees that the solution of the time dependent problem inside the artificial boundary coincides with the solution of the original problem in the infinite region. Recent investigations have shown that the accuracy and performance of numerical algorithms and the interpretation of the results critically depend on the proper treatment of external boundaries. Despite the computational speed of finite difference schemes and the robustness of finite elements in handling complex geometries the resulting numerical error consists of two independent contributions: the discretization error of the numerical method used and the spurious reflection generated at the artificial boundary. This spurious contribution travels back and substantially degrades the accuracy of the solution everywhere in the computational domain. Unless both error components are reduced systematically, the numerical solution does not converge to the solution of the original problem in the infinite region. In the present study we present and discuss absorbing boundary condition techniques for the time-dependent scalar wave equation in three spatial dimensions. In particular, exact conditions that annihilate wave harmonics on a spherical artificial boundary up to a given order are obtained and subsequently applied in numerical simulations by employing a finite differences implementation.

  12. [Artificial nutrition and preoperative fasting].

    PubMed

    Francq, B; Sohawon, S; Perlot, I; Sekkat, H; Noordally, S O

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative fasting is a currently adopted measure since Mendelson's report pertaining to aspiration pneumonia as a cause of death following general anesthesia. From a metabolic point of view fasting is detrimental because surgery in itself causes a state of hypercatabolism and hyperglycemia as a result of insulinresistance. Preoperative fasting has become almost obsolete in certain elective surgical procedures. In these cases the use of clear liquids is now well established and this paper focuses on the safe use of clear fluids, postoperative insulinresistance, patient comfort and postoperative outcome as well as its effect on the length of stay. PMID:22812052

  13. Correlation between the forearm plus little finger length and the femoral length.

    PubMed

    Naik, Monappa A; Sujir, Premjit; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Rao, Sharath K

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To assess the correlation between the forearm plus little finger length and the femoral length in 100 volunteers. METHODS. The forearm plus little finger length and the ipsilateral femoral length of 68 male and 32 female volunteers aged 19 to 55 (mean, 35.8) years were measured using a measuring tape. The forearm plus litter finger length was measured from the tip of the olecranon to the tip of the little finger, whereas the femoral length was measured from the tip of the greater trochanter to the level of proximal pole of the patella over the outer aspect of thigh. Two observers made the measurements on 2 separate occasions. Intra- and inter-observer variations were calculated. A value of 0.75 or greater indicated excellent agreement. RESULTS. The mean forearm plus little finger length and femoral length were 39.87 (SD, 2.73) and 39.85 (SD, 2.44) cm, respectively. The mean difference between these 2 measurements was 0.028 (95% CI, -0.109 to 0.165) cm. The correlation between these 2 measurements was 0.861 (p<0.001). Patient age, sex, and body mass index did not affect this correlation. The intra- and inter-observer reliability was excellent. CONCLUSION. The forearm plus little finger length correlated with the femoral length. This method is simple, radiation-free, and can be applied in day-today practice. PMID:24014776

  14. Bio-inspired artificial cilia with magnetic dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Leilei; Zheng, Yongmei

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the structure and properties of natural cilia, we focused on a facile template-free approach to prepare magnetic artificial cilia grown on the substrate (glass, PDMS, or others). In an applied magnetic field, the cilia formed spontaneously and immediately from magnetic nanoparticles and elastomeric polymer in a liquid solvent by bottom-up self-assembly. The length of prepared cilia could be in the scale of millimeter and reach a high aspect ratio of even over 100. We studied the effect of the magnetic strength applied and the size of nanoparticles to get tunable scale of cilia. The cilia show reversibly bending in an external magnetic field and this bending actuation gave some important functions: to transport macroscopic nonmagnetic materials on the cilia and to mix liquids.

  15. Summary presentation to the Artificial Gravity Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, G.

    1985-01-01

    General requirements for artificial gravity under a wide range of circumstances are considered. Appropriate or feasible ways of filling these requirements are explored with the focus on using tethers. The orbiter itself does not appear to be a good platform for tether research and development. Therefore, tethers that would be attached to space stations are emphasized. However, orbiter demonstrations and external tank demonstrations might be useful in exploring and developing tether operations prior to the space station. The general recommendations include requirements of artificial gravity in medicine and physiology, technology, microgravity sciences, habitability, operations in space, and what artificial gravity would mean to operations in space.

  16. Artificial lift: Many new developments are emerging

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.

    1984-03-01

    Methods of artificially lifting oil production are almost countless, testifying to the ingenuity of inventors, engineers, technicians, etc., that have worked in this area. And, artificial lift improvements continue to be important, especially now that product prices are nearly constant and production costs are under closer scruitiny. Some methods of artificial lift thought to be new to industry are mentioned in this article, including: Aluminum sucker rods, Graphite composite lift system, Unique pumping unit geometry, Chain drive pumping unit, Two types of pump-off control, Downhole gas pump, Hydraulic-centrifugal pump, Improvements in submersible pumps, and Submersible pump gas separators.

  17. Designing Artificial Enzymes by Intuition and Computation

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vikas; Koder, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    The rational design of artificial enzymes either by applying physio-chemical intuition of protein structure and function or with the aid of computation methods is a promising area of research with the potential to tremendously impact medicine, industrial chemistry and energy production. Designed proteins also provide a powerful platform for dissecting enzyme mechanisms of natural systems. Artificial enzymes have come a long way, from simple α-helical peptide catalysts to proteins that facilitate multi-step chemical reactions designed by state-of-the-art computational methods. Looking forward, we examine strategies employed by natural enzymes which could be used to improve the speed and selectivity of artificial catalysts. PMID:21124375

  18. Pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia array for biomimetic fluid propulsion.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Benjamin; de Volder, Michaël; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-11-21

    Arrays of beating cilia emerged in nature as one of the most efficient propulsion mechanisms at a small scale, and are omnipresent in microorganisms. Previous attempts at mimicking these systems have foundered against the complexity of fabricating small-scale cilia exhibiting complex beating motions. In this paper, we propose for the first time arrays of pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia that are able to address some of these issues. These artificial cilia arrays consist of six highly flexible silicone rubber actuators with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 8 mm that can be actuated independently from each other. In an experimental setup, the effects of the driving frequency, phase difference and duty cycle on the net flow in a closed-loop channel have been studied. Net fluid speeds of up to 19 mm s(-1) have been measured. Further, it is possible to invert the flow direction by simply changing the driving frequency or by changing the duty cycle of the driving block pulse pressure wave without changing the bending direction of the cilia. Using PIV measurements, we corroborate for the first time existing mathematical models of cilia arrays to measurements on prototypes. PMID:26439855

  19. An Assessment of Artificial Compressibility and Pressure Projection Methods for Incompressible Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, C.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Performance of the two commonly used numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are compared. These formulations are selected primarily because they are designed for three-dimensional applications. The computational procedures are compared by obtaining steady state solutions of a wake vortex and unsteady solutions of a curved duct flow. For steady computations, artificial compressibility was very efficient in terms of computing time and robustness. For an unsteady flow which requires small physical time step, pressure projection method was found to be computationally more efficient than an artificial compressibility method. This comparison is intended to give some basis for selecting a method or a flow solution code for large three-dimensional applications where computing resources become a critical issue.

  20. Cryogenic microwave anisotropic artificial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Frank

    This thesis addresses analysis and design of a cryogenic microwave anisotropic wave guiding structure that isolates an antenna from external incident fields from specific directions. The focus of this research is to design and optimize the radome's constituent material parameters for maximizing the isolation between an interior receiver antenna and an exterior transmitter without significantly disturbing the transmitter antenna far field characteristics. The design, characterization, and optimization of high-temperature superconducting metamaterials constitutive parameters are developed in this work at X-band frequencies. A calibrated characterization method for testing arrays of split-ring resonators at cryogenic temperature inside a TE10 waveguide was developed and used to back-out anisotropic equivalent material parameters. The artificial material elements (YBCO split-ring resonators on MgO substrate) are optimized to improve the narrowband performance of the metamaterial radome with respect to maximizing isolation and minimizing shadowing, defined as a reduction of the transmitted power external to the radome. The optimized radome is fabricated and characterized in a parallel plate waveguide in a cryogenic environment to demonstrate the degree of isolation and shadowing resulting from its presence. At 11.12 GHz, measurements show that the HTS metamaterial radome achieved an isolation of 10.5 dB and the external power at 100 mm behind the radome is reduced by 1.9 dB. This work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating a structure that provides good isolation between two antennas and low disturbance of the transmitter's fields.

  1. The Discovery of Artificial Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2012-03-01

    We reconstruct Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie's discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 based in part on documents preserved in the Joliot-Curie Archives in Paris, France. We argue that their discovery followed from the convergence of two parallel lines of research, on the neutron and on the positron, that were focused on a well-defined experimental problem, the nuclear transmutation of aluminum and other light elements. We suggest that a key role was played by a suggestion that Francis Perrin made at the seventh Solvay Conference at the end of October 1933, that the alpha-particle bombardment of aluminum produces an intermediate unstable isotope of phosphorus, which then decays by positron emission. We also suggest that a further idea that Perrin published in December 1933, and the pioneering theory of beta decay that Enrico Fermi also first published in December 1933, established a new theoretical framework that stimulated Joliot to resume the researches that he and Curie had interrupted after the Solvay Conference, now for the first time using a Geiger-Müller counter to detect the positrons emitted when he bombarded aluminum with polonium alpha particles.

  2. Cobaloxime-based artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Marine; Berggren, Gustav; Niklas, Jens; Veinberg, Elias; Mara, Michael W; Shelby, Megan L; Poluektov, Oleg G; Chen, Lin X; Tiede, David M; Cavazza, Christine; Field, Martin J; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Cobaloximes are popular H2 evolution molecular catalysts but have so far mainly been studied in nonaqueous conditions. We show here that they are also valuable for the design of artificial hydrogenases for application in neutral aqueous solutions and report on the preparation of two well-defined biohybrid species via the binding of two cobaloxime moieties, {Co(dmgH)2} and {Co(dmgBF2)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime), to apo Sperm-whale myoglobin (SwMb). All spectroscopic data confirm that the cobaloxime moieties are inserted within the binding pocket of the SwMb protein and are coordinated to a histidine residue in the axial position of the cobalt complex, resulting in thermodynamically stable complexes. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations indicated a coordination preference for His93 over the other histidine residue (His64) present in the vicinity. Interestingly, the redox activity of the cobalt centers is retained in both biohybrids, which provides them with the catalytic activity for H2 evolution in near-neutral aqueous conditions. PMID:25029381

  3. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  4. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  5. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected. PMID:18957747

  6. Artificial insemination in pigs today.

    PubMed

    Knox, R V

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial insemination (AI) for breeding pigs has been instrumental for facilitating global improvements in fertility, genetics, labor, and herd health. The establishment of AI centers for management of boars and production of semen has allowed for selection of boars for fertility and sperm production using in vitro and in vivo measures. Today, boars can be managed for production of 20 to 40 traditional AI doses containing 2.5 to 3.0 billion motile sperm in 75 to 100 mL of extender or 40 to 60 doses with 1.5 to 2.0 billion sperm in similar or reduced volumes for use in cervical or intrauterine AI. Regardless of the sperm dose, in liquid form, extenders are designed to sustain sperm fertility for 3 to 7 days. On farm, AI is the predominant form for commercial sow breeding and relies on manual detection of estrus with sows receiving two cervical or two intrauterine inseminations of the traditional or low sperm doses on each day detected in standing estrus. New approaches for increasing rates of genetic improvement through use of AI are aimed at methods to continue to lower the number of sperm in an AI dose and reducing the number of inseminations through use of a single, fixed-time AI after ovulation induction. Both approaches allow greater selection pressure for economically important swine traits in the sires and help extend the genetic advantages through AI on to more production farms. PMID:26253434

  7. Exploration of Artificial Frustrated Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-02-17

    This program encompasses experimental and theoretical studies of arrays of nanometer-scale magnets known as “artificial frustrated magnets”. These magnets are small and closely spaced, so that their behavior as a collective group is complex and reveals insights into how such collections of interacting objects behave as a group. In particular, the placement of the magnets is such that the interactions between them are “frustrated”, in that they compete with each other. These systems are analogs to a class of magnetic materials in which the lattice geometry frustrates interactions between individual atomic moments, and in which a wide range of novel physical phenomena have been recently observed. The advantage to studying the arrays is that they are both designable and resolvable: i.e., the experiments can control all aspects of the array geometry, and can also observe how individual elements of the arrays behave. This research program demonstrated a number of phenomena including the role of multiple collective interactions, the feasibility of using systems with their magnetism aligned perpendicular to the plane of the array, the importance of disorder in the arrays, and the possibility of using high temperatures to adjust the magnet orientations. All of these phenomena, and others explored in this program, add to the body of knowledge around collective magnetic behavior and magnetism in general. Aside from building scientific knowledge in an important technological area, with relevance to computing and memory, the program also gave critical support to the education of students working on the experiments.

  8. Artificial tanning and suntan salons.

    PubMed

    Watson, A B

    1982-05-15

    Many individuals will seek artificial skin-tanning methods despite recognition of their hazards. The long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) sources provide a deeper tan and are potentially safer than the short-wave (UVB) sources for most people, hence the use of UVB should be confined to therapeutic purposes. However, there should be adequate warning that UVA is not harmless and, like UVB, will not tan some people's skin effectively. At this moment, there are insufficient data to predict what will be the long-term effect of selective use of UVA both on skin and on eyes. The dosage for a given exposure time will vary from one UVA apparatus to the next and cannot be assessed on the basis of redness, as is with UVB. This is a particularly serious potential hazard for people who purchase UVA units for private use. Adequate eye protection should be mandatory, until proved otherwise. Rigid safety standards are needed for the operation of UVA solaria. PMID:7099071

  9. Artificial sequences and complexity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we exploit concepts of information theory to address the fundamental problem of identifying and defining the most suitable tools for extracting, in a automatic and agnostic way, information from a generic string of characters. We introduce in particular a class of methods which use in a crucial way data compression techniques in order to define a measure of remoteness and distance between pairs of sequences of characters (e.g. texts) based on their relative information content. We also discuss in detail how specific features of data compression techniques could be used to introduce the notion of dictionary of a given sequence and of artificial text and we show how these new tools can be used for information extraction purposes. We point out the versatility and generality of our method that applies to any kind of corpora of character strings independently of the type of coding behind them. We consider as a case study linguistic motivated problems and we present results for automatic language recognition, authorship attribution and self-consistent classification.

  10. Oxygen toxicity during artificial ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Brewis, R. A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Repeated pulmonary collapse and changes suggestive of a severe alveolar-capillary diffusion defect were observed over a period of 20 days in a patient who was receiving artificial ventilation because of status epilepticus. Profound cyanosis followed attempts to discontinue assisted ventilation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator employed was found to be delivering approximately 90% oxygen on the air-mix setting and pulmonary oxygen toxicity was suspected. Radiological improvement and progressive resolution of the alveolar-capillary block followed gradual reduction of the inspired concentration over nine days. The management and prevention of this complication are discussed. The inspired oxygen concentration should be routinely monitored in patients receiving intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and the concentration should not be higher than that required to maintain adequate oxygenation. The Bird Mark 8 respirator has an inherent tendency to develop high oxygen concentrations on the air-mix setting, and the machine should therefore be driven from a compressed air source unless high concentrations of oxygen are essential. Images PMID:4900444

  11. Artificial Intelligence and Information Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Teruo

    After reviewing the recent popularization of the information transmission and processing technologies, which are supported by the progress of electronics, the authors describe that by the introduction of the opto-electronics into the information technology, the possibility of applying the artificial intelligence (AI) technique to the mechanization of the information management has emerged. It is pointed out that althuogh AI deals with problems in the mental world, its basic methodology relies upon the verification by evidence, so the experiment on computers become indispensable for the study of AI. The authors also describe that as computers operate by the program, the basic intelligence which is concerned in AI is that expressed by languages. This results in the fact that the main tool of AI is the logical proof and it involves an intrinsic limitation. To answer a question “Why do you employ AI in your problem solving”, one must have ill-structured problems and intend to conduct deep studies on the thinking and the inference, and the memory and the knowledge-representation. Finally the authors discuss the application of AI technique to the information management. The possibility of the expert-system, processing of the query, and the necessity of document knowledge-base are stated.

  12. Delayed Feedback Model of Axonal Length Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. PMID:25954897

  13. Chromosome-length polymorphism in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Zolan, M E

    1995-01-01

    The examination of fungal chromosomes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed that length polymorphism is widespread in both sexual and asexual species. This review summarizes characteristics of fungal chromosome-length polymorphism and possible mitotic and meiotic mechanisms of chromosome length change. Most fungal chromosome-length polymorphisms are currently uncharacterized with respect to content and origin. However, it is clear that long tandem repeats, such as tracts of rRNA genes, are frequently variable in length and that other chromosomal rearrangements are suppressed during normal mitotic growth. Dispensable chromosomes and dispensable chromosome regions, which have been well documented for some fungi, also contribute to the variability of the fungal karyotype. For sexual species, meiotic recombination increases the overall karyotypic variability in a population while suppressing genetic translocations. The range of karyotypes observed in fungi indicates that many karyotypic changes may be genetically neutral, at least under some conditions. In addition, new linkage combinations of genes may also be advantageous in allowing adaptation of fungi to new environments. PMID:8531892

  14. Tactile length contraction as Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jonathan; Ngo, Vy; Goldreich, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    To perceive, the brain must interpret stimulus-evoked neural activity. This is challenging: The stochastic nature of the neural response renders its interpretation inherently uncertain. Perception would be optimized if the brain used Bayesian inference to interpret inputs in light of expectations derived from experience. Bayesian inference would improve perception on average but cause illusions when stimuli violate expectation. Intriguingly, tactile, auditory, and visual perception are all prone to length contraction illusions, characterized by the dramatic underestimation of the distance between punctate stimuli delivered in rapid succession; the origin of these illusions has been mysterious. We previously proposed that length contraction illusions occur because the brain interprets punctate stimulus sequences using Bayesian inference with a low-velocity expectation. A novel prediction of our Bayesian observer model is that length contraction should intensify if stimuli are made more difficult to localize. Here we report a tactile psychophysical study that tested this prediction. Twenty humans compared two distances on the forearm: a fixed reference distance defined by two taps with 1-s temporal separation and an adjustable comparison distance defined by two taps with temporal separation t ≤ 1 s. We observed significant length contraction: As t was decreased, participants perceived the two distances as equal only when the comparison distance was made progressively greater than the reference distance. Furthermore, the use of weaker taps significantly enhanced participants' length contraction. These findings confirm the model's predictions, supporting the view that the spatiotemporal percept is a best estimate resulting from a Bayesian inference process. PMID:27121574

  15. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, P U; Hof, A L; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G

    1999-02-01

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women and 32 men (mean age 27.2 years, s.d. 7.5 years, range 13-56 years) were recruited from the patients of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of University Hospital, Groningen. Mouth opening, mobility of TMJs and mandibular length were measured. The mobility of TMJs was measured as the angular displacement of the mandible relative to the cranium, the angle of mouth opening (AMO). Mouth opening (MO) correlated significantly with mandibular length (ML) (r = 0.36) and AMO (r = 0.66). The regression equation MO = C1 x ML x AMO + C2, in which C = 0.53 and C2 = 25.2 mm, correlated well (r = 0.79) with mouth opening. It is concluded that mouth opening reflects both mobility of the TMJs and mandibular length. PMID:10080308

  16. The evolution mechanism of intron length.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Xue, Hui; Zheng, Yan; Meng, Hu; Jia, Yun; Bo, Su-Ling

    2016-08-01

    Within two years of their discovery in 1977, introns were found to have a positive effect on gene expression. Our result shows that introns can achieve gene expression and regulation through interaction with corresponding mRNA sequences. On the base of Smith-Waterman method, local comparing helps us get the optimal matched segments between intron sequences and mRNA sequences. Studying the distribution regulation of the optimal matching region on intron sequences of ribosomal protein genes about 27 species, we find that the intron length evolution processes beginning from 5' end to 3' end and increasing one by one structural unit, which comes up with a possible mechanism for the intron length evolution. The intron of structure units is conservative with about 60bp length, but the length of linker sequence between structure units changes a lot. Interestingly, distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of miRNA and siRNA. These results indicate that the interaction between intron sequences and mRNA sequences is a kind of functional RNA-RNA interaction. Meanwhile, the two kinds of sequences above are co-evolved and interactive to play their functions. PMID:27449197

  17. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  18. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  19. Numbers and Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Eugene; Ginsburg, Jekuthiel

    Counting, naming numbers, numerals, computation, and fractions are the topics covered in this pamphlet. Number lore and interesting number properties are noted; the derivation of some arithmetic terms is briefly discussed. (DT)

  20. In vitro translation of the full-length RNA transcript of figwort mosaic virus (Caulimovirus).

    PubMed

    Ranu, R S; Gowda, S; Scholthof, H; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1996-01-01

    The circular DNA genome of FMV consists of seven tandemly arranged genes placed successively on a full-length RNA transcript that spans the entire circular viral genome. This transcript is a tentative mRNA for at least five of the six major conserved genes of this virus (genes I-V) that are positioned on this transcript. The sixth major gene (gene VI) is expressed as a separate monocistronic transcript. A long 5'-nontranslated leader (598 nucleotides), a small nonconserved gene (VII), and a short intergenic region (57 nucleotides) precede the five major conserved genes (I through V) on the full-length transcript. A reporter gene (CAT), as a separate cistron or fused in-frame, to viral cistrons in various downstream positions in cloned versions of the viral genome was used in a transcription vector to generate artificial full-length transcripts of FMV. When these mRNAs were translated in vitro (rabbit reticulocyte lysate system), the reporter gene was translated efficiently in all positions. Translation of internal native viral gene positioned on the full-length transcript of FMV was also determined (the gene VI product). These observations suggest that the full-length FMV transcript functions as a polycistronic mRNA in plants. Results are best explained on the basis of translational coupling/relay race model. PMID:8882638