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Sample records for artificial small shallow

  1. Artificial neural networks for small dataset analysis.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Antonello

    2015-05-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are usually considered as tools which can help to analyze cause-effect relationships in complex systems within a big-data framework. On the other hand, health sciences undergo complexity more than any other scientific discipline, and in this field large datasets are seldom available. In this situation, I show how a particular neural network tool, which is able to handle small datasets of experimental or observational data, can help in identifying the main causal factors leading to changes in some variable which summarizes the behaviour of a complex system, for instance the onset of a disease. A detailed description of the neural network tool is given and its application to a specific case study is shown. Recommendations for a correct use of this tool are also supplied. PMID:26101654

  2. Attitude stability analyses for small artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, W. R.; Zanardi, M. C.; Formiga, J. K. S.; Cabette, R. E. S.; Stuchi, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the stability of the rotational motion of a symmetrical spacecraft, in a circular orbit. The equilibrium points and regions of stability are established when components of the gravity gradient torque acting on the spacecraft are included in the equations of rotational motion, which are described by the Andoyer's variables. The nonlinear stability of the equilibrium points of the rotational motion is analysed here by the Kovalev-Savchenko theorem. With the application of the Kovalev-Savchenko theorem, it is possible to verify if they remain stable under the influence of the terms of higher order of the normal Hamiltonian. In this paper, numerical simulations are made for a small hypothetical artificial satellite. Several stable equilibrium points were determined and regions around these points have been established by variations in the orbital inclination and in the spacecraft principal moment of inertia. The present analysis can directly contribute in the maintenance of the spacecraft's attitude.

  3. Artificial neural networks for small dataset analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are usually considered as tools which can help to analyze cause-effect relationships in complex systems within a big-data framework. On the other hand, health sciences undergo complexity more than any other scientific discipline, and in this field large datasets are seldom available. In this situation, I show how a particular neural network tool, which is able to handle small datasets of experimental or observational data, can help in identifying the main causal factors leading to changes in some variable which summarizes the behaviour of a complex system, for instance the onset of a disease. A detailed description of the neural network tool is given and its application to a specific case study is shown. Recommendations for a correct use of this tool are also supplied. PMID:26101654

  4. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-07-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results.

  5. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results. PMID:22894502

  6. Artificial sweeteners as waste water markers in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, Andrea; Muellegger, Christian; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    One key factor in groundwater quality management is the knowledge of flow paths and recharge. In coupled ground- and surface water systems the understanding of infiltration processes is therefore of paramount importance. Recent studies show that artificial sweeteners - which are used as sugar substitutes in food and beverages - are suitable tracers for domestic wastewater in the aquatic environment. As most rivers receive sewage discharges, artificial sweeteners might be used for tracking surface waters in groundwater. In this study artificial sweeteners are used in combination with conventional tracers (inert anions Cl-, SO42-, stable water isotopes δ18O, δ2H) to identify river water infiltration and the influence of waste water on a shallow unconfined aquifer used for drinking water production. The investigation area is situated in a mesoscale alpine head water catchment. The alluvial aquifer consists of quaternary gravel deposits and is characterized by high hydraulic permeability (kfmax 5 x 10-2 ms-1), high flow velocities (vmax 250 md-1) and a considerable productivity (2,5 m3s-1). A losing stream follows the aquifer in close proximity and is susceptible to infiltrate substantial volumes of water into the alluvial sediments. Water sampling campaigns in March and July 2012 confirmed the occurrence of artificial sweeteners (Acesulfam ACE, Sucralose SUC, Saccharin SAC and Cyclamat CYC) at the investigated site. The local sewage treatment plant was identified as point source of artificial sweeteners in the river water, with ACE concentrations up to 0,6 μgL-1. ACE concentrations in groundwater where approximately of one order of magnitude lower: ACE was present in 33 out of 40 sampled groundwater wells with concentrations up to 0,07 μgL-1, thus indicating considerable influence of sewage water loaded surface water throughout the aquifer. Elevated concentrations of ACE and SAC in single observation wells denote other sources of locally limited contamination

  7. Shallow Plumbing Systems for Small-Volume Basaltic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. N.; Valentine, G. A.; Krier, D. J.; Perry, F. V.

    2006-12-01

    We characterize the subvolcanic geometry of small-volume basaltic volcanoes (magmatic volatile-driven eruptions, 0.1 to 0.5 km3) based on a synthesis of field studies of 5 basaltic volcanoes with varying degrees of erosion exposing feeder dikes, conduits, and vent areas <250 m depth. Study areas include East Grants Ridge (New Mexico), Basalt Ridge, East Basalt Ridge, Paiute Ridge, and Southeast Crater Flat (Nevada). Basaltic feeder dikes ~250 to 100 m deep have typical widths of 4 - 12 m, with smooth host-rock contacts (rhyolite tuff). At depths <100 m, heterogeneities in the host rock form preferential pathways for small dike splays and sills, resulting in a 30-m effective width at 50 m depth. The development of a complex conduit above ~50-70 m depth is reflected in bifurcating dikes and brecciation and stoping of the country rock. The overall zone of effect <50 m depth is <110 m wide (220 m elongated along the feeder dike). Based on comparisons with theoretical conduit flow models, the width of the feeder dike from 250 to 500 m depth is expected to range from 1 to 10 m and is expected to decrease to about 1-2 meters below ~500 m. The flaring shape of the observed feeder systems is similar to results of theoretical modeling using lithostatic pressure- balanced flow conditions. Sizes of observed conduits differ from modeled dimensions by up to a factor of 10 in the shallow (<50 m) subsurface, but >100 m depth the difference is a factor of two to five. This difference is primarily due to the fact that observed eroded conduits record the superimposed effects of multiple eruptive events while theoretical model results define dimensions necessary for a single, steady eruption phase. The complex details of magma-host rock interactions observed at the study areas (contact welding, brecciation, bifurcating dikes and sills, and stoping) represent the mechanisms by which the lithostatic pressure-balanced geometry is attained. The similarity in the normalized shapes of

  8. Remote sensing of water depths in shallow waters via artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhun, Özçelik; Yalçın, Arısoy

    2010-09-01

    Determination of the water depths in coastal zones is a common requirement for the majority of coastal engineering and coastal science applications. However, production of high quality bathymetric maps requires expensive field survey, high technology equipment and expert personnel. Remotely sensed images can be conveniently used to reduce the cost and labor needed for bathymetric measurements and to overcome the difficulties in spatial and temporal depth provision. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methodology is introduced in this study to derive bathymetric maps in shallow waters via remote sensing images and sample depth measurements. This methodology provides fast and practical solution for depth estimation in shallow waters, coupling temporal and spatial capabilities of remote sensing imagery with modeling flexibility of ANN. Its main advantage in practice is that it enables to directly use image reflectance values in depth estimations, without refining depth-caused scatterings from other environmental factors (e.g. bottom material and vegetation). Its function-free structure allows evaluating nonlinear relationships between multi-band images and in-situ depth measurements, therefore leads more reliable depth estimations than classical regressive approaches. The west coast of the Foca, Izmir/Turkey was used as a test bed. Aster first three band images and Quickbird pan-sharpened images were used to derive ANN based bathymetric maps of this study area. In-situ depth measurements were supplied from the General Command of Mapping, Turkey (HGK). Two models were set, one for Aster and one for Quickbird image inputs. Bathymetric maps relying solely on in-situ depth measurements were used to evaluate resultant derived bathymetric maps. The efficiency of the methodology was discussed at the end of the paper. It is concluded that the proposed methodology could decrease spatial and repetitive depth measurement requirements in bathymetric mapping especially for

  9. Determination and evaluation of the phosphorus load of an artificial shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Y; Grube, S; Weilandt, M

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced eutrophication of lakes due to high nutrient loads from anthropogenic sources has become a worldwide problem. Dying ecosystems and limitation of uses are the consequences. In Bochum, Germany, Lake Umminger is an integral part of a recreation area, but also receives high nutrient loads from the local sewer system, as could be shown with the help of water and nutrient balances. Mass algae growth, the dying of fish and production of digestion gas implied a demand to rehabilitate the lake. Primarily, the urgency and sanitation potential as well as the applicability of external and internal enhancement measures had to be evaluated. The trophic classification needed was based upon the German guideline for the classification of the water quality of natural lakes according to trophic criteria, mainly using Vollenweider's eutrophication model. This paper focuses on a description and analysis of the problems that arose during the application of this model to Lake Umminger, stating that shallow, artificial lakes cannot be evaluated correctly with the existing methods. Although some suggestions for further improvement are given, the development of new evaluation criteria was not in the scope of the study presented. PMID:19039180

  10. Numerical Comparison of Artificial Recharge by Small-diameter Wells to Common Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, F.; Liu, G.; Dietrich, P.; Liedl, R.; Fank, J.; Fank, A.; Butler, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scarcity of potable water has reached to a critical level all around the world. To address the temporal inequality of demand and availability of water resources, as well as additional purposes like enhancing water quality, artificial recharge is increasingly used. For shallow infiltration, such recharge methods as surface infiltration basins and trenches are commonly applied. However, these methods have significant disadvantages, e.g., enhanced clogging, evaporation, and an increased need of land use. Therefore, a new method for artificial recharge using shallow small-diameter wells is investigated. Such wells can be installed by Direct Push (DP) and water is allowed to infiltrate into aquifers by natural gravity, so that their installation and operation costs are very low. In this work, this method is compared numerically to a surface infiltration basin and a system applying horizontal filter pipes. For this, the work is divided into two parts. First, a rigorous comparison is done between the DP well and the infiltration basin. The simulated aquifer is composed of an unsaturated zone of 12 m and a saturated zone of 8 m. The results show the dependency of both methods on different components of the hydraulic conductivity, and highlight the advantages of the DP well over the basin. A small number of 5-cm shallow wells of 12 m length can be used to recharge water at the same infiltration rate as from a 60 m2 basin. When a layer of low hydraulic conductivity is present, the infiltration capacity of surface basins is significantly reduced while the adverse impacts on the wells are less pronounced due to the horizontal flow above the low conductivity layer (larger distance of water movement away from the screen). In the second part of this work, the DP wells will be compared to an operating horizontal, vadose zone artificial recharge system in Southern Styria, Austria. The water table is 3 m deep and horizontal filter pipes are used to recharge water into the shallow

  11. Habitat values for artificial oyster ( Crassostrea ariakensis) reefs compared with natural shallow-water habitats in Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Weimin; Zheng, Lin; Li, Beijun; An, Chuanguang

    2013-09-01

    Oyster reefs have an equivalent, complex 3-dimensional structure to vegetated habitats and may provide similar functions in estuarine environments. Nevertheless, few studies have compared oyster reefs with adjacent natural shallow-water habitats. Here the resident benthic macroinvertebrate communities in an artificial oyster ( Crassostrea ariakensis) reef and in adjacent natural estuarine shallow-water habitats (salt marsh, intertidal mudflat, and subtidal soft bottom) in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary were described. The mean total densities and biomass, Margalef's species richness, Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Weaver biodiversity indices of the resident benthic macroinvertebrate communities differed significantly among the habitats. Significantly higher densities and biomass of benthic macroinvertebrates occurred in the oyster reef compared with the other three habitats. Ordination plots showed a clear separation in benthic macroinvertebrate communities among the four habitat types. The results demonstrated that the artificial oyster reef supported distinct and unique benthic communities, playing an important role in the complex estuarine habitat by supplying prey resources and contributing to biodiversity. In addition, the results suggested that the oyster reef had been restored successfully.

  12. Root reinforcement and its implications in shallow landsliding susceptibility on a small alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, M. C.; Farabegoli, E.; Onorevoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Roots shear resistance offers a considerable contribution to hill-slope stability on vegetated terrains. Through the pseudo-cohesion of shrubs, trees and turf's roots, the geomechanical properties of soils can be drastically increased, exerting a positive influence on the hillslope stability. We analysed the shallow landsliding susceptibility of a small alpine catchment (Duron valley, Central Dolomites, Italy) that we consider representative of a wide altitude belt of the Dolomites (1800 - 2400 m a.s.l). The catchment is mostly mantled by grass (Nardetum strictae s.l.), with clustered shrubs (Rhododendron hirsutum and Juniperus nana), and trees (Pinus cembra, Larix decidua and Picea abies). The soil depth, investigated with direct and indirect methods, ranges from 0 to 180 cm, with its peak at the hollow axes. Locally, the bedrock, made of Triassic volcanic rocks, is deeply incised by the Holocene drainage network. Intensive grazing of cows and horses pervades the catchment area and cattle-trails occupy ca 20% of the grass cover. We used laboratory and field tests to characterize the geotechnical properties of these alpine soils; moreover we designed and tested an experimental device that measures, in situ, the shear strengths of the grass mantle. In the study area we mapped 18 shallow landslides, mostly related to road cuts and periodically reactivated as retrogressive landslides. The triggering mechanisms of these shallow landslides were qualitatively analysed at large scale and modelled at smaller scale. We used SHALSTAB to model the shallow landsliding susceptibility of the catchment at the basin scale and SLIDE (RocScience) to compute the Safety Factor at the versant scale. Qualitative management solutions are provided, in order to reduce the shallow landsliding susceptibility risk in this alpine context.

  13. Water quality parameters response to temperature change in small shallow lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Hua; Liang, Xinqiang; Yao, Yuxin; Zhou, Li; Cui, Xinyi

    Effects of temperature (T) on water quality of three small shallow lakes in Taihu Lake region of China were investigated. The annual temperature was classified into three levels: low temperature (LT, 4 °C < T ⩽ 10 °C), middle temperature (MT, 10 °C < T ⩽ 20 °C), and high temperature (HT, 20 °C < T ⩽ 30 °C). Results showed that total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations might go to a fixed value (or range) in small shallow lakes receiving domestic sewage and farm drainage water. Nitrogen concentrations in the lakes were mainly in the form of nitrate (NO3-) at above concerned three temperature levels, and nitrogen concentrations in the forms of TN, TIN, and NO3- were increased with the increase of nutrient input. At the LT and MT levels, there was a series of good cubic curve relationships between temperatures and three N forms (TN, NO3- and NH4+). The temperatural inflexion change points in the curves were nearly at 7 °C and 14 °C, respectively. However, no significant relationship between temperature and any water quality parameter was observed at the HT level. The significant relationship of TIN to TN, NO3- to TN and NH4+ to dissolve oxygen (DO) was exist in three temperature portions, and TP to Chemical oxygen demand (COD, determined by potassium permanganate oxidation methods) in LT and MT, TP to pH or DO in HT also exist. COD were less than 6 mg L-1 at each temperature level, and pH values were the largest in HT than it in LT or MT. Thus, changes between temperature and water quality parameters (TN, NO3-, NH4+ and TP) obviously nearly in 7 °C or 14 °C in lakes show that water self-purification of natural small shallow lakes were obviously with temperature changed.

  14. 2014-2015 Tritium values in small and shallow aquifers in northern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiana, Manuela; Mussi, Mario; Ronchetti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Tritium data relating to actual rainfall in north of Italy and in particular in the northern Apennines are rare or missing. The reasons of this lack of data frequently depends on the high cost of analysis and the necessity of high amount of water to perform the analysis itself. In order to obtain these data a valid alternative can be analyze the amount of Tritium in unconfined, shallow and small aquifer not affect by human activities (such as sewage). Recent studies, applied to the hydrogeology of the Po plain or of the Apennine slopes, highlight, in rainfall water recharging shallow aquifer, tritium values ranging between 6 T.U. and 12 T.U., higher than those detected in other and different areas of Italy or of the South Europe. The aim of this paper is to highlight first results of tritium analyses performed on spring draining shallow aquifers in northern Apennines, characterized by the absence of human activities. The peculiarity of sampling point (spring are characterized by small and well defined catchment areas as well small differences between the infiltration/recharge elevation and the spring elevation) makes results representative of mean tritium value of rainfall recharge in the studied area. In detail, during 2014-2015 three springs located at different elevation in Secchia Valley have been sampled and analyzed. Tritium analyses performed on a total of 5 samples highlight the following results: the maximum value (5.0±0.7 T.U.) is detected in water collected in November whereas the minimum value ( 3.7±0.6 T.U.) is obtained in May. Therefore a mean annual value of 4.2±0.7 T.U. in the studied area have been highlighted.

  15. Application of artificial neural networks to assess pesticide contamination in shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sahoo, G.B.; Ray, C.; Mehnert, E.; Keefer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was developed and applied to predict pesticide concentrations in groundwater monitoring wells. Pesticide concentration data are challenging to analyze because they tend to be highly censored. Input data to the neural network included the categorical indices of depth to aquifer material, pesticide leaching class, aquifer sensitivity to pesticide contamination, time (month) of sample collection, well depth, depth to water from land surface, and additional travel distance in the saturated zone (i.e., distance from land surface to midpoint of well screen). The output of the neural network was the total pesticide concentration detected in the well. The model prediction results produced good agreements with observed data in terms of correlation coefficient (R = 0.87) and pesticide detection efficiency (E = 89%), as well as good match between the observed and predicted "class" groups. The relative importance of input parameters to pesticide occurrence in groundwater was examined in terms of R, E, mean error (ME), root mean square error (RMSE), and pesticide occurrence "class" groups by eliminating some key input parameters to the model. Well depth and time of sample collection were the most sensitive input parameters for predicting the pesticide contamination potential of a well. This infers that wells tapping shallow aquifers are more vulnerable to pesticide contamination than those wells tapping deeper aquifers. Pesticide occurrences during post-application months (June through October) were found to be 2.5 to 3 times higher than pesticide occurrences during other months (November through April). The BPNN was used to rank the input parameters with highest potential to contaminate groundwater, including two original and five ancillary parameters. The two original parameters are depth to aquifer material and pesticide leaching class. When these two parameters were the only input parameters for the BPNN

  16. Hydrogeophysical characterization of shallow unconsolidated sediments for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Won, Byeongho; Kim, Yongcheol

    2013-04-01

    A water curtain cultivation system is usually used to offer a stable heat source using a geothermal heat of groundwater. However, it may cause groundwater drawdown by an excessive use of groundwater such as over-pumping. Therefore, as part of an effort to develop a sustainable water curtain system, artificial groundwater recharge is projected to minimize groundwater shortage problem and recover groundwater level. Geophysical approaches are systematically applied to characterize unconsolidated sediments and riverside porous aquifers for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area. Resistivity survey is applied to map the distribution of subsurface structure, especially unconsolidated sediments. A series of test holes are drilled, and water level, temperature, and groundwater electrical conductivity are monitored to characterize hydrogeological properties of the site. The natural gamma and induction profiles enable us to estimate stratigraphic cross section and interpret inter-borehole. Borehole compensated neutron porosity is derived for a small-diameter, dual-detector neutron logs. Consequently, geophysical methods could enhance knowledge of the physical properties of unconsolidated sediments, and they are expected to evaluate injection feasibility of artificial groundwater recharge systems to the sustainable water resource management.

  17. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well-known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm-size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR –Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria–, Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters. PMID:25115943

  18. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  19. Artificial Muscle: Carbon Nanotube Yarn-Based Glucose Sensing Artificial Muscle (Small 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghan; Ko, Sachan; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lima, Márcio D; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-04-01

    On page 2085, S. J. Kim and co-workers introduce a reversibly rotatable and highly glucose-sensitive carbon multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) yarn artificial muscle. This yarn is created using a boronic acid-conjugated hyaluronic acid/cholesterol nanogel (HC-BA NG) deposited on a two-end-tethered structural actuator. By exploiting the swelling/de-swelling of HC-BA NG, the MWNT yarn actuator shows a reversible torsional actuation with short response time and high sensitivity for monitoring changes in glucose concentration with 5-100 mM range. This actuator can be utilized for an implantable glucose monitoring sensor. PMID:27076046

  20. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  1. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  2. Capillary Rise on Legs of a Small Animal and on Artificially Textured Surfaces Mimicking Them

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs. PMID:24849071

  3. Boundary layer dynamics in a small shallow valley near the Alps (ScaleX campaign)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, Matthias; Adler, Bianca; Banerjee, Tirtha; Brugger, Peter; De Roo, Frederik; Emeis, Stefan; Matthias, Mauder; Schäfer, Klaus; Wolf, Benjamin; Schmid, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mountainous terrain presents a challenge for the experimental determination of exchange processes. The Alps modulate synoptic flow and introduce circulation systems that reach into the forelands. In addition, the Prealpine landscape is heterogeneous itself, dominated by patches of forestry on the slopes and agriculture on flat areas. That combined complexity is manifest in atmospheric circulations at multiple scales. We investigated the diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer with focus on the connection between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations at the regional to local scale. The experiment is part of an ongoing, multi-disciplinary study on scale dependencies in the distribution of energy and matter (ScaleX) at the TERENO Prealpine observatory in Germany. We observed vertical profiles of wind speed and air temperature up to 1000 m above ground during June and July 2015 in a small shallow Prealpine valley in Bavaria, Germany. Wind vectors and temperature were observed using ground-based optical, acoustic and radiometric remote sensing techniques. Spatial patterns in wind speed and direction were determined using eddy covariance systems, 3D Doppler LIDAR and acoustic sounding (RASS). Three Doppler LIDAR units were configured to form a virtual tower at the beam intersect. Temperature profiles were observed using radio-acoustic sounding (RASS) and a microwave radiometer (HATPRO). The temporal and spatial resolutions of the resulting vertical profiles were between 1-15 min and between 3-100 m, respectively. The observed variability in wind vectors and stability shows evidence of the link between flow phenomena at micro- to mesoscale and local biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes. We present first results and discuss the predictability of the impact of local and regional (alpine) landscape features on flow and structures in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  4. High-resolution shallow marine seismic surveys off Busan and Pohang, Korea, using a small-scale multichannel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Park, Keun-Pil; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Yoo, Dong-Geun; Kang, Dong-Hyo; Kim, Young-Gun; Hwang, Kyu-Duk; Kim, Jong-Chon

    2004-05-01

    A small-scale multichannel high-resolution shallow marine seismic survey was designed to improve the quality of high-resolution seismic data using a multichannel array while preserving cost effectiveness and expedience of the conventional shallow single-channel seismic survey. To evaluate the potential of these modified methods, test surveys were carried out off Busan and Pohang, Korea. A 10- or 30-in 3 small air gun, 30- or 40-m-long streamer cable and PC-based recording system with A/D converter were used to acquire digital high-resolution seismic data. In the data processing, deconvolution and static corrections were very effective in improving the resolution. Resolution and signal to noise (S/N) ratio were increased by acquiring multichannel data in comparison to conducting the same survey with a single-channel array. In the data of Busan survey, thin internal reflectors with 1-2 m resolution were clearly discernable after processing and compared with 3.5-kHz subbottom profiler data. Faults with ˜0.8 m throw were detected in the data of Pohang survey. The results of this study show that small-scale multichannel seismic surveys may be an effective way to image shallow subsurface structures and can be used in various engineering and environmental applications, sedimentary research and marine resources exploration.

  5. Macroscopic Artificial Magnetic Honeycomb Lattice of Thermally Controlled Ultra-Small Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Brock; Dahal, Ashutosh; Debeer-Schitt, Lisa; Gunasekera, Jagath; Singh, Deepak

    The two-dimensional artificial magnetic honeycomb lattice system is evolving into a new research arena to explore a plethora of novel magnetism that are predicted to occur as functions of temperature and magnetic field: a long-range spin ice, spin liquid, an entropy-driven magnetic charge-ordered state involving topological vortex pairs and a spin-order due to the spin chirality. We have created macroscopic samples of artificial magnetic honeycomb lattices of Cobalt and Permalloy having connected ultra-small elements (bonds), with length scales of sub-10 nm to 30 nm, which have never before been possible. The equivalent energy of the resulting systems is 10-100 K and is thus amenable to both temperature- and field-dependent exploration of novel magnetic phenomena. We have performed detailed magnetic and small angle neutron scattering measurements (SANS) on the newly fabricated honeycomb lattice of Permalloy that show the thermal character of the system. Furthermore, the experimental data reveals the onset of magnetic ordered regimes in temperature that are consistent with the predicted novel phase diagram in artificial honeycomb lattice. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  6. CO2-induced small water solubility in olivine and implications for properties of the shallow mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Liu, Dingding; Xia, Qunke

    2014-10-01

    H2O and CO2 are important components of fluids in the mantle at ∼30-150 km depth, and may affect strongly water dissolution in nominally anhydrous olivine; however, available experimental hydrogenation of olivine has been nearly exclusively carried out in coexistence with H2O (CO2-free). In this study, the effect of CO2 on water solubility in olivine has been investigated by H-annealing natural olivine under peridotite- and fluid-saturated conditions. Experiments were conducted at 1.5-5 GPa and 1100-1300 °C, with oxygen fugacity controlled by Ni-NiO and with either H2O or H2O-CO2 as buffering fluid. The olivine shows no change in composition during the experiments. The infrared spectra of the hydrated olivine are characterized by prominent OH bands from ∼3650 to 3000 cm in all the runs, at both high frequency (>3450 cm) and low frequency (<3450 cm), and the H2O solubility is ∼120-370 ppm for the olivine in coexisting with H2O, and ∼65-180 ppm for the olivine in coexisting with H2O-CO2. When CO2 is present in the buffering fluid, the H2O solubility of olivine is reduced by a factor of ∼2, due to effect on the partitioning of water between minerals and coexisting fluid, and the measured H2O solubility shows independence on fluid composition (the molar ratio of CO2 to CO2 + H2O at ∼0.2-0.5) given pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity. Olivine equilibrated in the shallow mantle is probably dominated by OH groups in the wavenumber ∼3650-3000 cm, and the intensity of OH bands at low frequency may be higher than or comparable to those at higher frequencies. The storage capacity of water in the shallow mantle in previous estimates may have been overestimated by a factor of at least ∼4 if the observed effect of CO2 on water solubility is correct. Our results have profound influence on understanding partial melting, electrical conductivity anomalies and metasomatism in the shallow mantle.

  7. On the Rigid-Lid Approximation for Two Shallow Layers of Immiscible Fluids with Small Density Contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchêne, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    The rigid-lid approximation is a commonly used simplification in the study of density-stratified fluids in oceanography. Roughly speaking, one assumes that the displacements of the surface are negligible compared with interface displacements. In this paper, we offer a rigorous justification of this approximation in the case of two shallow layers of immiscible fluids with constant and quasi-equal mass density. More precisely, we control the difference between the solutions of the Cauchy problem predicted by the shallow-water (Saint-Venant) system in the rigid-lid and free-surface configuration. We show that in the limit of a small density contrast, the flow may be accurately described as the superposition of a baroclinic (or slow) mode, which is well predicted by the rigid-lid approximation, and a barotropic (or fast) mode, whose initial smallness persists for large time. We also describe explicitly the first-order behavior of the deformation of the surface and discuss the case of a nonsmall initial barotropic mode.

  8. The relationship between fish assemblages and the helminth communities of a prey fish, in a group of small shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Maria V; Brugni, Norma L; Viozzi, Gustavo P; Semenas, Liliana

    2010-12-01

    Galaxias maculatus (small puyen) is an abundant native fish distributed in lakes and rivers of the Patagonia, and it is the frequent prey of other fishes, fish-eating birds, and mammals. Previous studies have shown that it is parasitized by 33 metazoan species and that the richness and composition of the parasite communities vary between lakes. The aim of the present work was to analyze the relationship between the composition of fish assemblages and the helminth component community structure of G. maculatus . Ten environmentally similar, small, shallow lakes, belonging to the Nahuel Huapi Lake basin, were chosen because of the differences in the native fish assemblages. Parasite community structure in G. maculatus varied according to the fish assemblage of each lake. The presence of the piscivorous fish Percichthys trucha regularly produced variations in the composition and richness at the component and infracommunity levels, as well as the percentage of autogenic parasite species in G. maculatus . PMID:21158611

  9. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  10. Self-organizing Ising model of artificial financial markets with small-world network topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haijie; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Anghui; Su, Guifeng; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    We study a self-organizing Ising-like model of artificial financial markets with underlying small-world (SW) network topology. The asset price dynamics results from the collective decisions of interacting agents which are located on a small-world complex network (the nodes symbolize the agents of a financial market). The model incorporates the effects of imitation, the impact of external news and private information. We also investigate the influence of different network topologies, from regular lattice to random graph, on the asset price dynamics by adjusting the probability of the rewiring procedure. We find that a specific combination of model parameters reproduce main stylized facts of real-world financial markets.

  11. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  12. Distribution and significance of small, artificial water bodies across the United States landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Renwick, W.H.; Bartley, J.D.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    At least 2.6 million small, artificial water bodies dot the landscape of the conterminous United States; most are in the eastern half of the country. These features account for approximately 20% of the standing water area across the United States, and their impact on hydrology, sedimentology, geochemistry, and ecology is apparently large in proportion to their area. These features locally elevate evaporation, divert and delay downstream water flow, and modify groundwater interactions. They apparently intercept about as much eroded soil as larger, better-documented reservoirs. Estimated vertical accretion rates are much higher, hence, inferred sedimentary chemical reactions must be different in the small features than in larger ones. Finally, these features substantially alter the characteristics of aquatic habitats across the landscape. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A subaqueous eruption model for shallow-water, small volume eruptions: Evidence from two Precambrian examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Wulf U.

    Ancient, shallow-water, pyroclastic deposits are identified in the Paleoproterozoic Ketilidian Mobile belt, southeast Greenland at Kangerluluk and in the Neoproterozoic Gariep belt of Namibia in the Schakalsberg Mountains. The 1-30 m-thick tuff and lapilli tuff deposits are interpreted as eruption-fed density current deposits emanating from tephra jets that collapsed under subaqueous conditions due to water ingress. The presence of 1-10 mm diameter armoured lapilli, with a central vesicular lapillus or shard, suggests the existence of high velocity, gas, water vapour, and particle-rich tephra jets. A transition from a gas-steam supported tephra jet to a cold water-laden density current without an intermediate stage of storage and remobilization is inferred. Interpretation of a 5-15 m-thick lapilli tuff breccia further supports explosive subaqueous mechanisms. Pyroclasts in the lapilli tuff breccia are interpreted as bombs emplaced ballistically. Multiple bomb sags produced by the impact of rounded juvenile crystal-rich pyroclasts required a water-exclusion zone formed either by a continuous magma uprush or multiple jet activity occurring concurrently, rather than as isolated tephra jets. Intercalated density current deposits indicate uprush events of limited duration and their recurrence with rapid collapse after each pulse. A new subaqueous Surtseyan-type eruption model is proposed based on observations from these two Precambrian study areas.

  14. Shallow plumbing systems for small-volume basaltic volcanoes, 2: Evidence from crustal xenoliths at scoria cones and maars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.

    2012-04-01

    for conduit/dike widening in magmatic versus phreatomagmatic eruptions. Namely, ascending eruptive mixtures driven by magmatic volatiles widen their relatively shallow conduits by erosion and mechanical failure of the walls and ejection of the resulting xenoliths. Maar-forming eruptions produce wide and deep diatremes mainly by mechanical disruption of country rock during many discrete magma-water explosions at varying depths in the subsurface. Deep explosions cause debris jets that may not erupt, and the disrupted country rock and juvenile material gradually churns and mixes within the diatreme. Only a small fraction of the debris is ejected from the crater by especially strong and/or shallow explosions, to form tephra ring deposits.

  15. Small doses from artificial UV sources elucidate the photo-production of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Richard; Liley, Ben; Johnston, Paul; Scragg, Robert; Stewart, Alistair; Reeder, Anthony I; Allen, Martin W

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the relation between UV exposure and vitamin D status, 201 volunteers wore personal electronic UV dosimeters during daylight hours, to record their UV exposure over a 10 week period when ambient UV levels were significantly less than the summer maxima. Blood samples to determine serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] levels were taken at the end of week 4 and week 8. Participants were then given a single full-body exposure of approximately 2 SED from one of four artificial UV sources with different spectral outputs and a further blood sample taken at study completion, nominally week 10. The artificial UV exposure reversed the mean seasonal decline in 25(OH)D3. Increases in 25(OH)D3 from week 8 to week 10 were related to total UV exposure, including the ambient sun exposures. These exposures were weighted by the erythemal action spectrum and separately for three different action spectra for pre-vitamin D production. For the erythema weighting function, 25(OH)D3 increased 1.78 ± 0.25 nmol per litre per SED, a value consistent with other studies. Any differences due to age, BMI, gender, and skin reflectance were not statistically significant. Ethnicity differences were the only significant factor, with Asians producing the least vitamin D, and Maori the most. There was no statistically significant improvement in consistency between sources for any of the three pre-vitamin weightings compared with that for erythema. Further work is needed to verify which vitamin D action spectrum is most appropriate. Nevertheless, these small doses of UV from artificial sources were helpful in quantifying the relationship between UV exposure and vitamin D status among the New Zealand population. PMID:23807653

  16. Assessment of small-diameter shallow wells for managed aquifer recharge at a site in southern Styria, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Falk; Liu, Gaisheng; Fank, Johann; Friedl, Franz; Liedl, Rudolf; Dietrich, Peter

    2016-07-01

    An approach to establish the recharge component of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has recently been proposed that uses small-diameter shallow wells installed using relatively inexpensive drilling methods such as direct push. As part of further development of that approach, a generalized procedure is presented for a technical and economic assessment of the approach's potential in comparison to other systems. Following this procedure, the use of small-diameter wells was evaluated both experimentally and numerically for a site located in southern Styria, Austria. MAR is currently done at the site using a horizontal pipe infiltration system, and system expansion has been proposed with a target rate of 12 l/s using small-diameter wells as one possible option. A short-duration single-well field recharge experiment (recharge rate 1.3-3.5 l/s) was performed (recharge by gravity only). Numerical modeling of the injection test was used to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K). Quasi-steady-state, single-well recharge simulations for different locations, as well as a long-term transient simulation, were performed using the K value calibrated from the field injection test. Results indicate that a recharge capacity of 4.1 l/s was achievable with a maximum head rise of 0.2 m at the injection well. Finally, simulations were performed for three different well fields (4, 6 and 8 wells, respectively) designed to infiltrate a target rate of 12 l/s. The experimental and numerical assessments, supported by a cost analysis of the small-diameter wells, indicate that the small-diameter wells are a viable, cost-effective recharge approach at this and other similar sites.

  17. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  18. Small quasi-static displacements associated with shallow LP seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, J.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic long-period (LP) events are still not completely understood, in part because our source models are poorly constrained. In particular individual LP events are usually inverted using a very limited bandwidth, which might mask important aspects of the source. Following advances from earthquake seismology where sources are inverted using joint static and dynamic data we investigate the possibility of using seismometers as deformation sensors, where 'static' displacements are hypothesised to be in the micrometre range (Bean et al. 2014). We use data from high-density networks on a variety of volcanoes. The first component of this study focuses on the extraction of small static displacement steps from seismometer data. The main challenges we face include low signal-to-noise ratios and ambiguity of the extracted ground motion due to the tilt-sensitivity of the instruments. We use a combination of laboratory experiments on seismometers and numerical simulations to investigate the processing steps needed to perform the 'step' extraction task and to guide the interpretation of the resulting data. The method is applied to signals recorded near the summits of Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) and Mt Etna (Italy), which exhibit ramp-like displacement waveforms, coincidently associated by 'dynamic' LP recordings. Our interim conclusion is that these LP sources likely have a measurable static component in the source. Our next step is to use this static component to better constrain LP source inversions.

  19. Eutrophication History of Small Shallow Lakes in Estonia: Evidence from Multiproxy Analysis of Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koff, T.; Marzecova, A.; Vandel, E.; Mikomägi, A.; Avi, E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities have impacted aquatic systems through the release of contaminants and the regulation of surface and groundwater. Although environmental monitoring has been essential in detecting eutrophication, biodiversity loss or water quality deterioration, monitoring activities are limited in time and are thus not sufficient in their scope to identify causality and thresholds. Paleolimnological studies increasingly show that the response of lakes to climatic and human influences is complex, multidimensional, and often indirectly mediated through watershed processes. In this study we examine the history of eutrophication processes in small lakes in Estonia using the multi-proxy analysis of sediment. Study sites represent lakes with different anthropogenic stressors: urbanisation and recreational use, run-off from an oil shale mine, and fish-kills and liming measures. We have used diverse analytical methods, such as elemental analysis, stable isotopes, fossil pigments, diatoms and Cladocera remains. The information derived from sedimentary indicators broadly agrees with the historical evidence of eutrophication and pollution. Moreover, the sediment records are indispensable for identifying additional issues such as: 1) earlier onset of cultural eutrophication; 2) the significant impact of catchment erosion on the deterioration of lake quality, particularly cyanobacterial blooms; and 3) changes in sedimentation processes with significance for internal biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. Importantly, the integration of several methods has significantly improved interpretation of sedimentary data and elucidated the different strengths of various indicator types. The project findings prove to be highly relevant for both the prediction of the ecological responses of lakes to different anthropogenic impacts and the establishment of reasonable reference target conditions in restoration schemes, as well as for methodological improvements of the sediment analysis.

  20. Artificial Avidin-Based Receptors for a Panel of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Tullila, Antti; Agrawal, Nitin; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Kähkönen, Niklas; Koskinen, Masi; Nevanen, Tarja K; Johnson, Mark S; Airenne, Tomi T; Kulomaa, Markku S; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2016-01-15

    Proteins with high specificity, affinity, and stability are needed for biomolecular recognition in a plethora of applications. Antibodies are powerful affinity tools, but they may also suffer from limitations such as low stability and high production costs. Avidin and streptavidin provide a promising scaffold for protein engineering, and due to their ultratight binding to D-biotin they are widely used in various biotechnological and biomedical applications. In this study, we demonstrate that the avidin scaffold is suitable for use as a novel receptor for several biologically active small molecules: Artificial, chicken avidin-based proteins, antidins, were generated using a directed evolution method for progesterone, hydrocortisone, testosterone, cholic acid, ketoprofen, and folic acid, all with micromolar to nanomolar affinity and significantly reduced biotin-binding affinity. We also describe the crystal structure of an antidin, sbAvd-2(I117Y), a steroid-binding avidin, which proves that the avidin scaffold can tolerate significant modifications without losing its characteristic tetrameric beta-barrel structure, helping us to further design avidin-based small molecule receptors. PMID:26550684

  1. Potent and specific inhibition of glycosidases by small artificial binding proteins (affitins).

    PubMed

    Correa, Agustín; Pacheco, Sabino; Mechaly, Ariel E; Obal, Gonzalo; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Oppezzo, Pablo; Alzari, Pedro M; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Glycosidases are associated with various human diseases. The development of efficient and specific inhibitors may provide powerful tools to modulate their activity. However, achieving high selectivity is a major challenge given that glycosidases with different functions can have similar enzymatic mechanisms and active-site architectures. As an alternative approach to small-chemical compounds, proteinaceous inhibitors might provide a better specificity by involving a larger surface area of interaction. We report here the design and characterization of proteinaceous inhibitors that specifically target endoglycosidases representative of the two major mechanistic classes; retaining and inverting glycosidases. These inhibitors consist of artificial affinity proteins, Affitins, selected against the thermophilic CelD from Clostridium thermocellum and lysozyme from hen egg. They were obtained from libraries of Sac7d variants, which involve either the randomization of a surface or the randomization of a surface and an artificially-extended loop. Glycosidase binders exhibited affinities in the nanomolar range with no cross-recognition, with efficient inhibition of lysozyme (Ki = 45 nM) and CelD (Ki = 95 and 111 nM), high expression yields in Escherichia coli, solubility, and thermal stabilities up to 81.1°C. The crystal structures of glycosidase-Affitin complexes validate our library designs. We observed that Affitins prevented substrate access by two modes of binding; covering or penetrating the catalytic site via the extended loop. In addition, Affitins formed salt-bridges with residues essential for enzymatic activity. These results lead us to propose the use of Affitins as versatile selective glycosidase inhibitors and, potentially, as enzymatic inhibitors in general. PMID:24823716

  2. Potent and Specific Inhibition of Glycosidases by Small Artificial Binding Proteins (Affitins)

    PubMed Central

    Mechaly, Ariel E.; Obal, Gonzalo; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Oppezzo, Pablo; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Glycosidases are associated with various human diseases. The development of efficient and specific inhibitors may provide powerful tools to modulate their activity. However, achieving high selectivity is a major challenge given that glycosidases with different functions can have similar enzymatic mechanisms and active-site architectures. As an alternative approach to small-chemical compounds, proteinaceous inhibitors might provide a better specificity by involving a larger surface area of interaction. We report here the design and characterization of proteinaceous inhibitors that specifically target endoglycosidases representative of the two major mechanistic classes; retaining and inverting glycosidases. These inhibitors consist of artificial affinity proteins, Affitins, selected against the thermophilic CelD from Clostridium thermocellum and lysozyme from hen egg. They were obtained from libraries of Sac7d variants, which involve either the randomization of a surface or the randomization of a surface and an artificially-extended loop. Glycosidase binders exhibited affinities in the nanomolar range with no cross-recognition, with efficient inhibition of lysozyme (Ki = 45 nM) and CelD (Ki = 95 and 111 nM), high expression yields in Escherichia coli, solubility, and thermal stabilities up to 81.1°C. The crystal structures of glycosidase-Affitin complexes validate our library designs. We observed that Affitins prevented substrate access by two modes of binding; covering or penetrating the catalytic site via the extended loop. In addition, Affitins formed salt-bridges with residues essential for enzymatic activity. These results lead us to propose the use of Affitins as versatile selective glycosidase inhibitors and, potentially, as enzymatic inhibitors in general. PMID:24823716

  3. Temperature and rainfall are related to fertility rate after spring artificial insemination in small ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abecia, J. A.; Arrébola, F.; Macías, A.; Laviña, A.; González-Casquet, O.; Benítez, F.; Palacios, C.

    2016-03-01

    A total number of 1092 artificial inseminations (AIs) performed from March to May were documented over four consecutive years on 10 Payoya goat farms (36° N) and 19,392 AIs on 102 Rasa Aragonesa sheep farms (41° N) over 10 years. Mean, maximum, and minimum ambient temperatures, mean relative humidity, mean solar radiation, and total rainfall on each insemination day were recorded. Overall, fertility rates were 58 % in goats and 45 % in sheep. The fertility rates of the highest and lowest deciles of each of the meteorological variables indicated that temperature and rainfall had a significant effect on fertility in goats. Specifically, inseminations that were performed when mean (68 %), maximum (68 %), and minimum (66 %) temperatures were in the highest decile, and rainfall was in the lowest decile (59 %), had a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher proportion of does that became pregnant than did the ewes in the lowest decile (56, 54, 58, and 49 %, respectively). In sheep, the fertility rates of the highest decile of mean (62 %), maximum (62 %), and minimum (52 %) temperature, RH (52 %), THI (53 %), and rainfall (45 %) were significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than were the fertility rates among ewes in the lowest decile (46, 45, 45, 45, 46, and 43 %, respectively). In conclusion, weather was related to fertility in small ruminants after AI in spring. It remains to be determined whether scheduling the dates of insemination based on forecasted temperatures can improve the success of AI in goats and sheep.

  4. Condition classification of small reciprocating compressor for refrigerators using artificial neural networks and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo-Suk; Hwang, Won-Woo; Kim, Dong-Jo; Chit Tan, Andy

    2005-03-01

    The need to increase machine reliability and decrease production loss due to faulty products in highly automated line requires accurate and reliable fault classification technique. Wavelet transform and statistical method are used to extract salient features from raw noise and vibration signals. The wavelet transform decomposes the raw time-waveform signals into two respective parts in the time space and frequency domain. With wavelet transform prominent features can be obtained easily than from time-waveform analysis. This paper focuses on the development of an advanced signal classifier for small reciprocating refrigerator compressors using noise and vibration signals. Three classifiers, self-organising feature map, learning vector quantisation and support vector machine (SVM) are applied in training and testing for feature extraction and the classification accuracies of the techniques are compared to determine the optimum fault classifier. The classification technique selected for detecting faulty reciprocating refrigerator compressors involves artificial neural networks and SVMs. The results confirm that the classification technique can differentiate faulty compressors from healthy ones and with high flexibility and reliability.

  5. Small scale seismic measurement bench to assess imaging methods - application to Full Waveform Inversion of a shallow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leparoux, D.; Bretaudeau, F.; Brossier, R.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of subsurface is useful for civil engineering and landscape management topics. The usual methods use surface waves phase velocities or first arrival times of body waves. However, for complex structures, such methods can be inefficient and Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) promises relevant performances because all the signal is taken into account. FWI has been originally developed for deep explorations (Pratt et al. 1999). Heterogeneities and strong attenuation in the near surface make difficult the adaptation of the FWI to shallower media (Bretaudeau et al. 2009). For this reason, we have developed a physical modeling measurement bench that performs small scale seismic recording in well controlled contexts (Bretaudeau et al. 2011). In this paper we assess the capacity of the FWI method (Brossier 2010) for imaging a subsurface structure including a low velocity layer and a lateral variation of interfaces. The analog model is a 180mm long and 50mm thick layered epoxy resin block (fig. 1). Seismic data generated with a punctual piezoelectric source emitting a 120KHz Ricker wavelet at the medium surface were collected by an heterodyne laser interferometer. The laser allows recording the absolute normal particle displacement without contact, avoiding disturbances caused by coupling. The laser interferometer and the piezoelectric source were attached to automated arms that could be moved over the model surface to a precision of 0.01mm (fig. 1). The acquisition survey includes 241 receiver and 37 source positions respectively spaced at 1 and 5 mm. Figure 2 shows 2D maps of the Vs parameter after inversion of data sequentially processed with 13 frequencies. The geometry of the sloped interface is recovered. A low velocity zone is imaged but with a thickness thinner than expected. Moreover, artifacts appear in the near surface. Experimental modeling results showed the capacity of the FWI in this case and provided key issues for further works about inversion by

  6. Artificial mouth opening fosters anoxic conditions that kill small estuarine fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alistair; Laurenson, Laurie J. B.; Bishop, Kylie

    2009-05-01

    -establishing populations within the estuary. It is clear from this research that artificial openings of estuaries should be avoided during low flow periods when oxygen concentrations are low. It also appears that many of the small estuarine resident species common in seasonally open estuaries are capable of recolonising estuaries following fish kills. The effects on larger, longer lived resident species are not known but likely to be more detrimental due to longer time required for them to reach sexual maturity.

  7. Effects of shallow subvolcanic magma storage regions on magma evolution and eruptions dynamics of small mafic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Wallace, P. J.; McKay, D.; Ruscitto, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of shallow subvolcanic dike and sill complexes has long been recognized in field investigations of mafic cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Evidence that these subvolcanic storage regions develop during (rather than separate from) eruptive activity comes from detailed studies of tephra deposits and lava flows produced during cinder cone eruptions. These deposits show both the variable volatile contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions and pervasive microphenocryst crystallization, both of which indicate temporary magma storage at shallow levels prior to eruption. The consequences of such shallow magma storage for both eruption dynamics and syn-eruptive magma evolution have not previously been considered. Here we use both physical (density, crystallinity) and compositional (bulk, melt inclusion) data from the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin, Mexico to examine the impact of shallow pre-eruptive storage on both the eruption process and on the dramatic evolution in magma composition first described by Wilcox (1954). We supplement these observations with data from recent (1500-2000 ybp) mafic cinder cone eruptions in central Oregon. Our data show that shallow subvolcanic storage of magma permits pre-eruptive degassing and crystallization, which, in turn, are responsible for the (typically) wide density range of basaltic scoria observed in cinder cone activity. As pre-eruptive gas loss will diminish the volatiles available to fuel explosive activity, we further speculate that the ease of syn-eruptive dike and sill formation, which is likely to be controlled by both the rate of magma supply and the specific tectonic setting, may modulate the explosive potential of cinder cone eruptions. Additionally, all of the deposits that we have studied have a range in bulk composition, with the earliest tephra the most mafic and the latest lava the most silicic of the eruptive sequence. This observation suggests that an additional consequence of shallow magma storage

  8. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Relationship of Phytoplankton Biomass and Limnological Variables in a Small Artificial Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feipeng; Zhang, Haiping; Zhu, Yiping; Chen, Ling; Zhao, Jianfu

    2010-11-01

    Zhongxin Lake is an artificial freshwater lake located in Qianwei Village of Chongming Island, the third largest island in China. Besides its culture function and aesthetic value, it is also an ideal target, which can be regarded as an enclosed and simplified ecosystem with little external pollution. The objective of the study is to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics in the relationship between phytoplankton and main limnological variables. An intensive observation and monitoring program was performed more than one year at six sampling points along five locally connected watercourses. Nutrient levels and their seasonal variables might be the main factors which control the temporal development of phytoplankton. Chlorophyll-a (chl-a) levels peaked from late August to September and showed a significant positive correlation with water temperature, turbidity, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved total phosphorus (DTP). Wind driven flow and geographical features appears to be the limiting factors for the spatial dynamics of phytoplankton. Higher average chl-a levels caused higher turbidity in the south and middle watercourses which are separated by dams and where shallow-circulation flow can be hardly maintained. Low average chl-a levels were recorded in the north watercourse in conditions of lower water levels, direct connection with the east watercourse and west watercourse and higher prevailing wind driven flow. The findings have strongly shown the influence of nutrients and hydro-meteorological variables as important factors of spatial and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton biomass.

  9. Membrane transport of andrographolide in artificial membrane and rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Daodee, Supawadee; Wangboonskul, Jinda; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Murakami, Teruo

    2007-06-15

    In the present study, the possible drug interactions of andrographolide with co-administering drugs such as acetaminophen, amoxycillin, aspirin, chlorpheniramine and norfloxacin to treat various infectious and inflammatory diseases that may be induced during absorption process were examined using artificial lipophilic membrane and everted rat intestine. The membrane transport of andrographolide across the artificial membrane was not affected by different pH of the medium (simulated gastric and intestinal fluids), different concentrations of andrographolide and co-administered drugs examined. In everted rat intestine, above co-administered drugs examined showed no significant effect on andrographolide membrane transport. The participation of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and MRP2 in andrographolide transport was then examined, since andrographolide is a diterpene compound and some diterpene compounds are known as P-glycoprotein substrates. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein/MRP2 inhibitor, significantly suppressed the efflux transport of andrographolide in distal region of intestine, whereas probenecid, an MRP inhibitor, showed no significant effect in both proximal and distal regions of intestine. These results suggest that P-glycoprotein, but not MRP, is participated in the intestinal absorption of andrographolide and P-glycoprotein-mediated drug interactions occur depending on the co-administered drugs and its concentrations. PMID:19093450

  10. Predicting the impacts of climate change on nonpoint source pollutant loads from agricultural small watershed using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjeong; Seong, Chounghyun; Hakkwan, Kim; Park, Seungwoo; Kang, Moonseong

    2010-01-01

    This study described the development and validation of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the purpose of analyzing the effects of climate change on nonpoint source (NPS) pollutant loads from agricultural small watershed. The runoff discharge was estimated using ANN algorithm. The performance of ANN modelwas examined using observed data from s tudy watershed. The simulationresults agreed well with observed values during calibration and validation periods. NPS pollutant loads were calculated from load-discharge relationship driven by long-term monitoring data. LARS-WG (Long Ashton Research Station-Weather Generator) model was used to generate rainfall data. The calibrated ANN model and load-discharge relationship with the generated data from LARS-WGwere applied to analyze the effects of climate change on NPS pollutant loads from the agricultural small watershed. The results showed that the ANN model provided valuable approach i n estimating future runof f discharge, and the NPS pollutantloads. PMID:20923094

  11. Coarse grid shallow water simulations of rainfall-runoff in small catchments with modified friction law to account for unresolved microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgen, Ilhan; Serrano-Taslim, Miguel; Zhao, Jiaheng; Liang, Dongfang; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the fully dynamic shallow water equations have been successfully used to simulate rainfall-runoff in natural catchments. Hereby, the hydrodynamics of the surface runoff is greatly influenced by local topographical features. Thus, it is desirable to use high-resolution models which resolve the topography of the study area sufficiently. However, high-resolution simulations across catchment scales are often unfeasible due to finite computer resources. In this contribution, the shallow water equations are solved on a coarse resolution, leaving significant topographical features unresolved. The coarsened grid size leads to a smaller cell number and therefore reduces computational cost. The influence of the topography is accounted for with an artificial friction source term which is dependent on the inundation ratio, i.e. the ratio of water depth to roughness height, the slope and two additional parameters, namely a dimensionless friction coefficient and a geometric conveyance parameter. Subgrid scale information is used to determine these parameters. The friction approach is applied in two different ways: (1) a global average roughness height for the entire catchment is calculated and used as input, (2) the roughness height is calculated individually in each cell which introduces additional heterogeneity to the model. In two test cases, the individual roughness height-based approach is compared to results of the global roughness height-based approach and to igh-resolution model results. The comparison shows slight improvement in the results if the roughness height is assigned individually, however overall the improvement is negligible. Both models enable to run the simulations about three orders of magnitude faster than the high-resolution model.

  12. Novel approach to the fabrication of an artificial small bone using a combination of sponge replica and electrospinning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hee; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2011-06-01

    In this study, a novel artificial small bone consisting of ZrO2-biphasic calcium phosphate/polymethylmethacrylate-polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (ZrO2-BCP/PMMA-PCL-HAp) was fabricated using a combination of sponge replica and electrospinning methods. To mimic the cancellous bone, the ZrO2/BCP scaffold was composed of three layers, ZrO2, ZrO2/BCP and BCP, fabricated by the sponge replica method. The PMMA-PCL fibers loaded with HAp powder were wrapped around the ZrO2/BCP scaffold using the electrospinning process. To imitate the Haversian canal region of the bone, HAp-loaded PMMA-PCL fibers were wrapped around a steel wire of 0.3 mm diameter. As a result, the bundles of fiber wrapped around the wires imitated the osteon structure of the cortical bone. Finally, the ZrO2/BCP scaffold was surrounded by HAp-loaded PMMA-PCL composite bundles. After removal of the steel wires, the ZrO2/BCP scaffold and bundles of HAp-loaded PMMA-PCL formed an interconnected structure resembling the human bone. Its diameter, compressive strength and porosity were approximately 12 mm, 5 MPa and 70%, respectively, and the viability of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells was determined to be over 90% by the MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. This artificial bone shows excellent cytocompatibility and is a promising bone regeneration material.

  13. Sources, fate, and effects of PAHs in shallow water environments: a review with special reference to small watercraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are aromatic hydrocarbons with two to seven fused carbon (benzene) rings that can have substituted groups attached. Shallow coastal, estuarine, lake, and river environments receive PAHs from treated wastewater, stormwater runoff, petroleum spills and natural seeps, recreational and commercial boats, natural fires, volcanoes, and atmospheric deposition of combustion products. Abiotic degradation of PAHs is caused by photooxidation, photolysis in water, and chemical oxidation. Many aquatic microbes, plants, and animals can metabolize and excrete ingested PAHs; accumulation is associated with poor metabolic capabilities, high lipid content, and activity patterns or distributions that coincide with high concentrations of PAHs. Resistance to biological transformation increases with increasing number of carbon rings. Four- to seven-ring PAHs are the most difficult to metabolize and the most likely to accumulate in sediments. Disturbance by boating activity of sediments, shorelines, and the surface microlayer of water causes water column re-entry of recently deposited or concentrated PAHs. Residence time for PAHs in undisturbed sediment exceeds several decades. Toxicity of PAHs causes lethal and sublethal effects in plants and animals, whereas some substituted PAHs and metabolites of some PAHs cause mutations, developmental malformations, tumors, and cancer. Environmental concentrations of PAHs in water are usually several orders of magnitude below levels that are acutely toxic, but concentrations can be much higher in sediment. The best evidence for a link between environmental PAHs and induction of cancerous neoplasms is for demersal fish in areas with high concentrations of PAHs in the sediment.

  14. The Influence of Topographic and Dynamic Cyclic Variables on the Distribution of Small Cetaceans in a Shallow Coastal System

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Marijke N.; Simmonds, Mark P.; Reijnders, Peter J. H.; Aarts, Geert

    2014-01-01

    The influence of topographic and temporal variables on cetacean distribution at a fine-scale is still poorly understood. To study the spatial and temporal distribution of harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena and the poorly known Risso’s dolphin Grampus griseus we carried out land-based observations from Bardsey Island (Wales, UK) in summer (2001–2007). Using Kernel analysis and Generalized Additive Models it was shown that porpoises and Risso’s appeared to be linked to topographic and dynamic cyclic variables with both species using different core areas (dolphins to the West and porpoises to the East off Bardsey). Depth, slope and aspect and a low variation in current speed (for Risso’s) were important in explaining the patchy distributions for both species. The prime temporal conditions in these shallow coastal systems were related to the tidal cycle (Low Water Slack and the flood phase), lunar cycle (a few days following the neap tidal phase), diel cycle (afternoons) and seasonal cycle (peaking in August) but differed between species on a temporary but predictable basis. The measure of tidal stratification was shown to be important. Coastal waters generally show a stronger stratification particularly during neap tides upon which the phytoplankton biomass at the surface rises reaching its maximum about 2–3 days after neap tide. It appeared that porpoises occurred in those areas where stratification is maximised and Risso’s preferred more mixed waters. This fine-scale study provided a temporal insight into spatial distribution of two species that single studies conducted over broader scales (tens or hundreds of kilometers) do not achieve. Understanding which topographic and cyclic variables drive the patchy distribution of porpoises and Risso’s in a Headland/Island system may form the initial basis for identifying potentially critical habitats for these species. PMID:24466031

  15. Characterization of a Subtropical Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmocheyles imbricata) Assemblage Utilizing Shallow Water Natural and Artificial Habitats in the Florida Keys

    PubMed Central

    Gorham, Jonathan C.; Clark, David R.; Bresette, Michael J.; Bagley, Dean A.; Keske, Carrie L.; Traxler, Steve L.; Witherington, Blair E.; Shamblin, Brian M.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information to better inform management decisions and direct further research, vessel-based visual transects, snorkel transects, and in-water capture techniques were used to characterize hawksbill sea turtles in the shallow marine habitats of a Marine Protected Area (MPA), the Key West National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys. Hawksbills were found in hardbottom and seagrass dominated habitats throughout the Refuge, and on man-made rubble structures in the Northwest Channel near Cottrell Key. Hawksbills captured (N = 82) were exclusively juveniles and subadults with a straight standard carapace length (SSCL) ranging from 21.4 to 69.0cm with a mean of 44.1 cm (SD = 10.8). Somatic growth rates were calculated from 15 recaptured turtles with periods at large ranging from 51 to 1188 days. Mean SSCL growth rate was 7.7 cm/year (SD = 4.6). Juvenile hawksbills (<50 cm SSCL) showed a significantly higher growth rate (9.2 cm/year, SD = 4.5, N = 11) than subadult hawksbills (50–70 cm SSCL, 3.6 cm/year, SD = 0.9, N = 4). Analysis of 740 base pair mitochondrial control region sequences from 50 sampled turtles yielded 12 haplotypes. Haplotype frequencies were significantly different compared to four other Caribbean juvenile foraging aggregations, including one off the Atlantic coast of Florida. Many-to-one mixed stock analysis indicated Mexico as the primary source of juveniles in the region and also suggested that the Refuge may serve as important developmental habitat for the Cuban nesting aggregation. Serum testosterone radioimmunoassay results from 33 individuals indicated a female biased sex ratio of 3.3 females: 1 male for hawksbills in the Refuge. This assemblage of hawksbills is near the northern limit of the species range, and is one of only two such assemblages described in the waters of the continental United States. Since this assemblage resides in an MPA with intensive human use, basic information on the

  16. Characterization of a subtropical hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmocheyles imbricata) assemblage utilizing shallow water natural and artificial habitats in the Florida Keys.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Jonathan C; Clark, David R; Bresette, Michael J; Bagley, Dean A; Keske, Carrie L; Traxler, Steve L; Witherington, Blair E; Shamblin, Brian M; Nairn, Campbell J

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information to better inform management decisions and direct further research, vessel-based visual transects, snorkel transects, and in-water capture techniques were used to characterize hawksbill sea turtles in the shallow marine habitats of a Marine Protected Area (MPA), the Key West National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys. Hawksbills were found in hardbottom and seagrass dominated habitats throughout the Refuge, and on man-made rubble structures in the Northwest Channel near Cottrell Key. Hawksbills captured (N = 82) were exclusively juveniles and subadults with a straight standard carapace length (SSCL) ranging from 21.4 to 69.0cm with a mean of 44.1 cm (SD = 10.8). Somatic growth rates were calculated from 15 recaptured turtles with periods at large ranging from 51 to 1188 days. Mean SSCL growth rate was 7.7 cm/year (SD = 4.6). Juvenile hawksbills (<50 cm SSCL) showed a significantly higher growth rate (9.2 cm/year, SD = 4.5, N = 11) than subadult hawksbills (50-70 cm SSCL, 3.6 cm/year, SD = 0.9, N = 4). Analysis of 740 base pair mitochondrial control region sequences from 50 sampled turtles yielded 12 haplotypes. Haplotype frequencies were significantly different compared to four other Caribbean juvenile foraging aggregations, including one off the Atlantic coast of Florida. Many-to-one mixed stock analysis indicated Mexico as the primary source of juveniles in the region and also suggested that the Refuge may serve as important developmental habitat for the Cuban nesting aggregation. Serum testosterone radioimmunoassay results from 33 individuals indicated a female biased sex ratio of 3.3 females: 1 male for hawksbills in the Refuge. This assemblage of hawksbills is near the northern limit of the species range, and is one of only two such assemblages described in the waters of the continental United States. Since this assemblage resides in an MPA with intensive human use, basic information on the

  17. Effect of swirling flow on platelet concentration distribution in small-caliber artificial grafts and end-to-end anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Fan; Fan, Yu-Bo; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet concentration near the blood vessel wall is one of the major factors in the adhesion of platelets to the wall. In our previous studies, it was found that swirling flows could suppress platelet adhesion in small-caliber artificial grafts and end-to-end anastomoses. In order to better understand the beneficial effect of the swirling flow, we numerically analyzed the near-wall concentration distribution of platelets in a straight tube and a sudden tubular expansion tube under both swirling flow and normal flow conditions. The numerical models were created based on our previous experimental studies. The simulation results revealed that when compared with the normal flow, the swirling flow could significantly reduce the near-wall concentration of platelets in both the straight tube and the expansion tube. The present numerical study therefore indicates that the reduction in platelet adhesion under swirling flow conditions in small-caliber arterial grafts, or in end-to-end anastomoses as observed in our previous experimental study, was possibly through a mechanism of platelet transport, in which the swirling flow reduced the near-wall concentration of platelets.

  18. Quantitative measurement by artificial vision of small bubbles in flowing mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquit, Vincent C.; Wendel, Mark W.; Felde, David K.; Riemer, Bernie W.

    2011-03-01

    At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), an accelerator-based neutron source located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee, USA), the production of neutrons is obtained by accelerating protons against a mercury target. This self-cooling target, however, suffers rapid heat deposition by the beam pulse leading to large pressure changes and thus to cavitations that may be damaging to the container. In order to locally compensate for pressure increases, a small-bubble population is added to the mercury flow using gas bubblers. The geometry of the bubblers being unknown, we are testing several bubblers' configurations and are using machine vision techniques to characterize their efficiency by quantitative measurement of the created bubble population. In this paper we thoroughly detail the experimental setup and the image processing techniques used to quantitatively assess the bubble population. To support this approach we are comparing our preliminary results for different bubblers and operating modes, and discuss potential improvements.

  19. Quantitative measurement by artificial vision of small bubbles in flowing mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), an accelerator-based neutron source located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee, USA), the production of neutrons is obtained by accelerating protons against a mercury target. This self-cooling target, however, suffers rapid heat deposition by the beam pulse leading to large pressure changes and thus to cavitations that may be damaging to the container. In order to locally compensate for pressure increases, a small-bubble population is added to the mercury flow using gas bubblers. The geometry of the bubblers being unknown, we are testing several bubblers configurations and are using machine vision techniques to characterize their efficiency by quantitative measurement of the created bubble population. In this paper we thoroughly detail the experimental setup and the image processing techniques used to quantitatively assess the bubble population. To support this approach we are comparing our preliminary results for different bubblers and operating modes, and discuss potential improvements.

  20. Shallow submarine volcano group in the early stage of island arc development: Geology and petrology of small islands south off Hahajima main island, the Ogasawara Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Kyoko; Umino, Susumu; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Small Islands south off Hahajima, the southernmost of the Ogasawara Archipelago, consist of primitive basalts (<12 wt.% MgO) to dacite erupted during the transitional stage immediately following boninite volcanism on the incipient arc to sustained typical oceanic arc. Strombolian to Hawaiian fissure eruptions occurring on independent volcanic centers for the individual islands under a shallow sea produced magnesian basalt to dacite fall-out tephras, hyaloclastite and a small volume of pillow lava, which were intruded by NE-trending dikes. These volcanic strata are correlated to the upper part (<40 Ma) of the Hahajima main island. Volcanic rock samples have slightly lower FeO*/MgO ratios than the present volcanic front lavas, and are divided into three types with high, medium and low La/Yb ratios. Basalt to dacite of high- and medium-La/Yb types show both tholeiitic (TH) and calc-alkaline (CA) differentiation trends. Low-La/Yb type belongs only to TH basalt. The multiple magma types are coexistence on the each island. TH basalts have phenocrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, while CA basalts are free from plagioclase phenocrysts.

  1. Seismic source functions from free-field ground motions recorded on SPE: Implications for source models of small, shallow explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Esteban; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Reduced displacement potentials (RDPs) for chemical explosions of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) in granite at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site are estimated from free-field ground motion recordings. Far-field P wave source functions are proportional to the time derivative of RDPs. Frequency domain comparisons between measured source functions and model predictions show that high-frequency amplitudes roll off as ω- 2, but models fail to predict the observed seismic moment, corner frequency, and spectral overshoot. All three features are fit satisfactorily for the SPE-2 test after cavity radius Rc is reduced by 12%, elastic radius is reduced by 58%, and peak-to-static pressure ratio on the elastic radius is increased by 100%, all with respect to the Mueller-Murphy model modified with the Denny-Johnson Rc scaling law. A large discrepancy is found between the cavity volume inferred from RDPs and the volume estimated from laser scans of the emplacement hole. The measurements imply a scaled Rc of ~5 m/kt1/3, more than a factor of 2 smaller than nuclear explosions. Less than 25% of the seismic moment can be attributed to cavity formation. A breakdown of the incompressibility assumption due to shear dilatancy of the source medium around the cavity is the likely explanation. New formulas are developed for volume changes due to medium bulking (or compaction). A 0.04% decrease of average density inside the elastic radius accounts for the missing volumetric moment. Assuming incompressibility, established Rc scaling laws predicted the moment reasonable well, but it was only fortuitous because dilation of the source medium compensated for the small cavity volume.

  2. Reactivation of MASPIN in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells by artificial transcription factors (ATFs)

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Adriana S

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes have antiproliferative and antimetastatic functions and thus, they negatively affect tumor progression. Reactivating specific tumor suppressor genes would offer an important therapeutic strategy to block tumor progression. Mammary serine protease inhibitor (MASPIN) is a tumor suppressor gene that is not mutated or rearranged in tumor cells, but is silenced during metastatic progression by transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. In this work, we have investigated the ability of artificial transcription factors (ATFs) to reactivate MASPIN expression and to reduce tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines carrying a hypermethylated MASPIN promoter. We found that the ATFs linked to transactivator domains were able to demethylate the MASPIN promoter. Consistently, we observed that co-treatment of ATF-transduced cells with methyltransferase inhibitors enhanced MASPIN expression as well as induction of tumor cell apoptosis. In addition to tumor suppressive functions, restoration of endogenous MASPIN expression was accompanied by inhibition of metastatic dissemination in nude mice. ATF-mediated reactivation of MASPIN lead to changes in cell motility and to induction of E-CADHERIN. These data suggest that ATFs are able to reprogram aggressive lung tumor cells towards a more epithelial, differentiated phenotype and represent novel therapeutic agents for metastatic lung cancers. PMID:20948306

  3. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  4. E. coli Resuspension During an Artificial High-flow Event in a Small First-order Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A. K.; Shelton, D. R.; Hill, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    Stream, pond, and lake sediments can serve as environmental reservoirs for E. coli, including pathogenic strains. Substantial increases in E. coli concentrations observed in stream water during rainfall events are often attributed exclusively to runoff from agricultural fields, pastures, and riparian areas. However, this increase can, to various extents, be caused by the resuspension of E. coli from sediment. The separation of runoff vs. sediment E. coli sources is not possible based exclusively on creek water sampling during natural rainfalls. The objectives of this work were (a) to create and monitor an artificial high-flow event that would cause E. coli concentration changes solely due to resuspension and settling, (b) to develop a model of E. coli transport in creek water as affected by resuspension and settling. The study site, at the USDA-Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, is in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of Maryland. The site contains a small first-order stream that is instrumented with four stations for monitoring stream flow and bacteria concentrations. The creek runs within a riparian corridor of variable width from about 65 m at its narrowest point, to more than 100 m. The creek bed is from 100 to 150 cm wide. Prior to the high-flow experiment, the creek sediment was grab-sampled weekly for 2 months for E. coli concentrations at three locations downstream from stations 1, 2 and 4. Time and sample position across the creek were not significant factors affecting E. coli concentrations in sediment; location along the creek was a significant factor. Initial E. coli concentrations in top 1 cm (just prior to flow) averaged 4500, 2500, and 500 cell per g of sediment at locations 1 and 2 and 4, respectively. The E. coli concentrations in sediments decreased exponentially with depth by about one order of magnitude per 2 cm. The artificial flow event was created by releasing 80 tons of tap water on a tarp-covered stream bank at 11 m above the station 1

  5. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  6. Drift Velocity of Small-Scale Artificial Ionospheric Irregularities According to Multifrequency HF Doppler Radar. I. Method of Calculation and Its Hardware Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, G. G.; Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradov, V. G.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Kubatko, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The method of calculating the total drift velocity vector of small-scale artificial ionospheric irregularities as measured by the effective Doppler frequency shift of aspect-scattered signals from several diagnostic illumination transmitters operated at different frequencies is discussed. The technique of adaptive simulation of decameter radio waves propagating in an inhomogeneous magnetized ionosphere with allowance for the aspect scattering effects due to small-scale field-aligned irregularities is developed. A multifrequency HF Doppler radar for simultaneous measurement of the Doppler spectra of radio signals at a set of frequencies is described.

  7. Seismic imaging of small horizontal scale structures of the shallow thermocline on the western Brittany continental shelf (North-East Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piete, H.; Marié, L.; Marsset, B.; Gutscher, M.

    2012-12-01

    The recent development of the seismic oceanography technique has made possible the imaging of a variety of deep oceanographic structures (Holbrook et al., 2003); however, until now this method has remained ill suited for the study of shallow (<200m) thermohaline structures. This difficulty is partly due to the fact that both important seismic trace lengths and large offsets that characterize the acoustic receiver device (seismic streamer) cause significant signal attenuations through an induced antenna filter effect. Further difficulties are related to limitations of currently employed seismic sources, which do not conciliate 1- high power (essential to the imaging of weakly reflective structures in a noisy environment) and 2- spectral contents offering high vertical resolutions (relevant to the mapping of small vertical wavelength structures). In this study we defined and tested a new experimental seismic acquisition system capable of imaging the ~10 m thick seasonal thermocline on the western Brittany continental shelf. To accomplish this task, we pursued two complementary approaches: 1. Analysis of legacy seismic data (multi-channel seismic reflection profiles acquired on the East-Corsican margin, Bahamas Plateau and Gulf of Cadiz in various oceanographic environments) featuring reflectors at depths between 25 and 150 m, in order to identify and quantify the influence of acquisition parameters (seismic trace length, offsets, emission level and frequency content). 2. Incorporation of new oceanographic data acquired during the FROMVAR cruise (July 28th to August 10th 2010) on the western Brittany shelf in thermally stratified waters for use in the simulation of the seismic acquisition, in order to further define the optimal parameters for the system. Finally a 3D seismic system has emerged and was tested during the ASPEX scientific cruise led from June 17th to 19th 2012 across the western Brittany shelf. The device featured: i- four seismic streamers, each

  8. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  9. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of diff erent dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics (Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  10. Effect of the Artificial Sweetener, Acesulfame Potassium, a Sweet Taste Receptor Agonist, on Glucose Uptake in Small Intestinal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ye; Sarr, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Sweet taste receptors may enhance glucose absorption. AIM To explore the cell biology of sweet taste receptors on glucose uptake. HYPOTHESIS Artificial sweeteners increase glucose uptake via activating sweet taste receptors in the enterocyte to translocate GLUT2 to the apical membrane through the PLC βII pathway. METHODS Caco-2, RIE-1, and IEC-6 cells, starved from glucose for 1 h were pre-incubated with 10 mM acesulfame potassium (AceK). Glucose uptake was measured by incubating cells for 1 to 10 min with 0.5–50 mM glucose with or without U-73122, chelerythrine, and cytochalasin B. RESULTS In Caco-2 and RIE-1 cells, 10 mM AceK increased glucose uptake by 20~30% at glucose ≥ 25 mM, but not in lesser glucose concentrations (≤10 mM), nor at 1 min or 10 min incubations. U-73122 inhibited uptake at glucose ≥ 25 mM and for 5 min incubation; chelerythrine and cytochalasin B had similar effects. No effect occurred in IEC-6 cells. SUMMARY Activation of sweet taste receptors had no effect on glucose uptake in low (<25 mM) glucose concentrations but increased uptake at greater concentrations (≥ 25 mM). CONCLUSIONS Role of artificial sweeteners on glucose uptake appears to act in part by effects on the enterocyte itself. PMID:22948835

  11. Solute transport dynamics in small, shallow groundwater-dominated agricultural catchments: insights from a high-frequency, multisolute 10 yr-long monitoring study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, A. H.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Gruau, G.; Akkal, N.; Faucheux, M.; Fauvel, Y.; Grimaldi, C.; Hamon, Y.; Jaffrézic, A.; Lecoz-Boutnik, M.; Molénat, J.; Petitjean, P.; Ruiz, L.; Merot, P.

    2013-04-01

    High-frequency, long-term and multisolute measurements are required to assess the impact of human pressures on water quality due to (i) the high temporal and spatial variability of climate and human activity and (ii) the fact that chemical solutes combine short- and long-term dynamics. Such data series are scarce. This study, based on an original and unpublished time series from the Kervidy-Naizin headwater catchment (Brittany, France), aims to determine solute transfer processes and dynamics that characterise this strongly human-impacted catchment. The Kervidy-Naizin catchment is a temperate, intensive agricultural catchment, hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Over 10 yr, five solutes (nitrate, sulphate, chloride, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon) were monitored daily at the catchment outlet and roughly every four months in the shallow groundwater. The concentrations of all five solutes showed seasonal variations but the patterns of the variations differed from one solute to another. Nitrate and chloride exhibit rather smooth variations. In contrast, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon is dominated by flood flushes. The observed nitrate and chloride patterns are typical of an intensive agricultural catchment hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Nitrate and chloride originating mainly from organic fertilisers accumulated over several years in the shallow groundwater. They are seasonally exported when upland groundwater connects with the stream during the wet season. Conversely, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon patterns are not specific to agricultural catchments. These solutes do not come from fertilisers and do not accumulate in soil or shallow groundwater; instead, they are biogeochemically produced in the catchment. The results allowed development of a generic classification system based on the specific temporal patterns and source locations of each solute. It also considers the stocking period

  12. Subterranean fragmentation of magma during conduit initiation and evolution in the shallow plumbing system of the small-volume Jagged Rocks volcanoes (Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Arizona, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Muirhead, James D.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-08-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes have limited magma supply and lack long-lived sustained magma plumbing systems. They erupt once, often from multiple vents and sometimes over several years, and are rarely or never re-activated. Eruptive behavior is very sensitive to physical processes (e.g., volatile exsolution, magma-water interaction) occurring in the later stages of magma ascent at shallow crustal depths (<1 km), which yield a spectrum of eruptive styles including weak to moderate explosive activity, violent phreatomagmatism, and lava effusion. Jagged Rocks Complex in the late Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic field (Arizona, USA) exposes the frozen remnants of the feeding systems for one or a few monogenetic volcanoes. It provides information on how a shallow magmatic plumbing system evolved within a stable non-marine sedimentary basin, and the processes by which magma flowing through dikes fragmented and conduits were formed. We have identified three main types of fragmental deposits, (1) buds (which emerge from dikes), (2) pyroclastic massifs, and (3) diatremes; these represent three different styles and intensities of shallow-depth magma fragmentation. They may develop successively and at different sites during the evolution of a monogenetic volcano. The deposits consist of a mixture of pyroclasts with varying degrees of welding and country-rock debris in various proportions. Pyroclasts are commonly welded together, but also reveal in places features consistent with phreatomagmatism, such as blocky shapes, dense groundmasses, and composite clasts (loaded and cored). The extent of fragmentation and the formation of subterranean open space controlled the nature of the particles and the architecture and geometry of these conduit structures and their deposits.

  13. Temperature-dependent recombination velocity analysis on artificial small angle grain boundaries using electron beam induced current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Ohshita, Yoshio; Prakash, Ronit R.; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2016-02-01

    The details of the process of carrier recombination via the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defect level, at the grain boundaries of multicrystalline silicon, were investigated. For this, the temperature-dependent recombination velocities, as determined by experiments, were analyzed by the application of an electron beam induced current method. For the model, the misorientation angles at the grain boundaries were defined using a multi-seed casting-growth method. The results of our experiments indicated different temperature behaviors at low and high temperatures. These can be explained by controlling the process anticipated by the SRH model, that is, the process whereby minority carriers (electrons) are captured at lower temperatures, followed by the reemission of the carriers before recombination with Arrhenius behavior at higher temperatures. The minority capture process appeared to conform to the power law T-α temperature behavior. Thus, there are two candidate electron capture mechanisms, namely, cascade phonon emission capture for shallow centers and excitonic-Auger capture for deep centers. The activation energy for the reemission of carriers was around 0.1 eV. These findings regarding the temperature dependence are essentially independent of the misorientation angles, suggesting a common defect level and recombination mechanism. The difference in the recombination velocities can be regarded as being derived from the difference in the density at the defect level.

  14. Heat-Wave Effects on Oxygen, Nutrients, and Phytoplankton Can Alter Global Warming Potential of Gases Emitted from a Small Shallow Lake.

    PubMed

    Bartosiewicz, Maciej; Laurion, Isabelle; Clayer, François; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-06-21

    Increasing air temperatures may result in stronger lake stratification, potentially altering nutrient and biogenic gas cycling. We assessed the impact of climate forcing by comparing the influence of stratification on oxygen, nutrients, and global-warming potential (GWP) of greenhouse gases (the sum of CH4, CO2, and N2O in CO2 equivalents) emitted from a shallow productive lake during an average versus a heat-wave year. Strong stratification during the heat wave was accompanied by an algal bloom and chemically enhanced carbon uptake. Solar energy trapped at the surface created a colder, isolated hypolimnion, resulting in lower ebullition and overall lower GWP during the hotter-than-average year. Furthermore, the dominant CH4 emission pathway shifted from ebullition to diffusion, with CH4 being produced at surprisingly high rates from sediments (1.2-4.1 mmol m(-2) d(-1)). Accumulated gases trapped in the hypolimnion during the heat wave resulted in a peak efflux to the atmosphere during fall overturn when 70% of total emissions were released, with littoral zones acting as a hot spot. The impact of climate warming on the GWP of shallow lakes is a more complex interplay of phytoplankton dynamics, emission pathways, thermal structure, and chemical conditions, as well as seasonal and spatial variability, than previously reported. PMID:27266257

  15. Radiographic detection of artificially created horizontal root fracture using different cone beam CT units with small fields of view

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, K; Önder, B; Murat, S; Avsever, H; Yüksel, S; Paksoy, CS

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare limited cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units with different field of views (FOVs) and voxel sizes in detecting artificially created horizontal root fracture (HRF) in extracted human teeth. Methods: Artificial HRF was created in the horizontal plane in 40 teeth. Another 40 intact teeth served as a control group. 80 teeth were placed in the respective maxillary anterior sockets of a human dry skull in groups. Six image sets were obtained: (1) Accuitomo 170, 40 × 40 mm FOV (0.080 mm3); (2) Accuitomo 170, 60 × 60 mm FOV (0.125 mm3); (3) Kodak 9000, 50 × 37 mm FOV (0.076 mm3); (4) Kodak 9000, 50 × 37 mm FOV (0.100 mm3); (5) Vatech Pax-Duo3D 50 × 50 mm FOV (0.080 mm3) and (6) Vatech Pax-Duo3D 85 × 85 mm FOV (0.120 mm3). Images were evaluated twice by five observers. Kappa values were calculated for observer agreement. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (Az values) were calculated, and the Az values for each image type were compared using t-tests (α = 0.05). Results: Intraobserver kappa coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.95 for the Accuitomo 170 images, from 0.80 to 0.92 for the Kodak 9000 images and from 0.76 to 0.95 for Vatech PanX-Duo3D. The Az values for different image types and observers ranged from 0.93 to 0.97 for Accuitomo 170 images, from 0.93 to 0.98 for Kodak 9000 images and from 0.93 to 0.97 for the Vatech PanX-Duo3D images. No statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the Az values. Conclusions: Limited CBCT units performed similarly in detecting simulated HRF. PMID:23420851

  16. Small and Dim Target Detection via Lateral Inhibition Filtering and Artificial Bee Colony Based Selective Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haibin; Deng, Yimin; Wang, Xiaohua; Xu, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel bionic selective visual attention mechanism to quickly select regions that contain salient objects to reduce calculations. Firstly, lateral inhibition filtering, inspired by the limulus’ ommateum, is applied to filter low-frequency noises. After the filtering operation, we use Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm based selective visual attention mechanism to obtain the interested object to carry through the following recognition operation. In order to eliminate the camera motion influence, this paper adopted ABC algorithm, a new optimization method inspired by swarm intelligence, to calculate the motion salience map to integrate with conventional visual attention. To prove the feasibility and effectiveness of our method, several experiments were conducted. First the filtering results of lateral inhibition filter were shown to illustrate its noise reducing effect, then we applied the ABC algorithm to obtain the motion features of the image sequence. The ABC algorithm is proved to be more robust and effective through the comparison between ABC algorithm and popular Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. Except for the above results, we also compared the classic visual attention mechanism and our ABC algorithm based visual attention mechanism, and the experimental results of which further verified the effectiveness of our method. PMID:23991033

  17. Small and dim target detection via lateral inhibition filtering and Artificial Bee colony based selective visual attention.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Deng, Yimin; Wang, Xiaohua; Xu, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel bionic selective visual attention mechanism to quickly select regions that contain salient objects to reduce calculations. Firstly, lateral inhibition filtering, inspired by the limulus' ommateum, is applied to filter low-frequency noises. After the filtering operation, we use Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm based selective visual attention mechanism to obtain the interested object to carry through the following recognition operation. In order to eliminate the camera motion influence, this paper adopted ABC algorithm, a new optimization method inspired by swarm intelligence, to calculate the motion salience map to integrate with conventional visual attention. To prove the feasibility and effectiveness of our method, several experiments were conducted. First the filtering results of lateral inhibition filter were shown to illustrate its noise reducing effect, then we applied the ABC algorithm to obtain the motion features of the image sequence. The ABC algorithm is proved to be more robust and effective through the comparison between ABC algorithm and popular Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. Except for the above results, we also compared the classic visual attention mechanism and our ABC algorithm based visual attention mechanism, and the experimental results of which further verified the effectiveness of our method. PMID:23991033

  18. Drift Velocity of Small-Scale Artificial Ionospheric Irregularities According to a Multifrequency HF Doppler Radar. II. Observation and Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, G. G.; Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradov, V. G.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Kubatko, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of observations of the Doppler frequency shift for the radar radio signals of broadcast and exact-time RWM stations, which are scattered by small-scale artificial ionospheric irregularities. By the method described in our previous paper [1] and using the multifrequency HF Doppler radar, estimates were made for a three-dimensional vector of the drift velocity of irregularities. It is shown that the drift velocity of irregularities can vary considerably both in magnitude and direction for short periods of time. The velocity lies in a wide range of values, 20-270 m/s, but sometimes it exceeds 500-700 m/s. The most probable drift velocity ranges from 40 to 70 m/s.

  19. Prediction of elasticity constants in small biomaterial samples such as bone. A comparison between classical optimization techniques and identification with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Lucchinetti, E; Stüssi, E

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the elasticity constants of biological materials often sets important constraints, such as the limited size or the irregular geometry of the samples. In this paper, the identification approach as applied to the specific problem of accurately retrieving the material properties of small bone samples from a measured displacement field is discussed. The identification procedure can be formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of minimizing the difference between computed and measured displacements by searching for an appropriate set of material parameters using dedicated algorithms. Alternatively, the backcalculation of the material properties from displacement maps can be implemented using artificial neural networks. In a practical situation, however, measurement errors strongly affect the identification results, calling for robust optimization approaches in order accurately to retrieve the material properties from error-polluted sample deformation maps. Using a simple model problem, the performances of both classical and neural network driven optimization are compared. When performed before the collection of experimental data, this evaluation can be very helpful in pinpointing potential problems with the envisaged experiments such as the need for a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, particularly important when working with small tissue samples such as specimens cut from rodent bones or single bone trabeculae. PMID:15648663

  20. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as ...

  1. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes kinds of results achieved by computer programs in artificial intelligence. Topics discussed include heuristic searches, artificial intelligence/psychology, planning program, backward chaining, learning (focusing on Winograd's blocks to explore learning strategies), concept learning, constraint propagation, language understanding…

  2. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  3. Effects of Temperature, Salinity and Fish in Structuring the Macroinvertebrate Community in Shallow Lakes: Implications for Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Brucet, Sandra; Boix, Dani; Nathansen, Louise W.; Quintana, Xavier D.; Jensen, Elisabeth; Balayla, David; Meerhoff, Mariana; Jeppesen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming may lead to changes in the trophic structure and diversity of shallow lakes as a combined effect of increased temperature and salinity and likely increased strength of trophic interactions. We investigated the potential effects of temperature, salinity and fish on the plant-associated macroinvertebrate community by introducing artificial plants in eight comparable shallow brackish lakes located in two climatic regions of contrasting temperature: cold-temperate and Mediterranean. In both regions, lakes covered a salinity gradient from freshwater to oligohaline waters. We undertook day and night-time sampling of macroinvertebrates associated with the artificial plants and fish and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators within artificial plants and in pelagic areas. Our results showed marked differences in the trophic structure between cold and warm shallow lakes. Plant-associated macroinvertebrates and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators were more abundant and the communities richer in species in the cold compared to the warm climate, most probably as a result of differences in fish predation pressure. Submerged plants in warm brackish lakes did not seem to counteract the effect of fish predation on macroinvertebrates to the same extent as in temperate freshwater lakes, since small fish were abundant and tended to aggregate within the macrophytes. The richness and abundance of most plant-associated macroinvertebrate taxa decreased with salinity. Despite the lower densities of plant-associated macroinvertebrates in the Mediterranean lakes, periphyton biomass was lower than in cold temperate systems, a fact that was mainly attributed to grazing and disturbance by fish. Our results suggest that, if the current process of warming entails higher chances of shallow lakes becoming warmer and more saline, climatic change may result in a decrease in macroinvertebrate species richness and abundance in shallow lakes. PMID:22393354

  4. Artificial small-scale field-aligned irregularities in the high latitude F region of the ionosphere induced by an X-mode HF heater wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Rietveld, M. T.; Ivanova, I. M.; Baddeley, L. J.

    2011-04-01

    The effects on the high-latitude F region of the ionosphere by X-mode powerful HF radio waves injected towards the magnetic zenith (MZ) are analysed. The experiments were conducted using the EISCAT/Heating facility and UHF radar at Tromsø, Norway, the CUTLASS (SuperDARN) radar and the EISCAT ionosonde (dynasonde). The results show that the X-mode HF pump wave, radiated into the magnetic zenith from the HF heater, can generate very strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the F-region of the high-latitude ionosphere. These irregularities, with spatial scales across the geomagnetic field of the order of 8-15 m, are generated when the heater frequency is above the ordinary-mode critical frequency but comparable with the extraordinary-mode critical frequency. The generation of the X-mode AFAIs was accompanied by electron temperature (Te) enhancements up to 50% above the background level and an increase in the electron density (Ne) by up to 30%.

  5. Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159246.html Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney? Small trial suggests device might be ... themselves of clunky machines, moving about with a "wearable artificial kidney" instead. That's the promise of a ...

  6. Small, low cost, artificial kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavender, A. R.; Markley, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Disposable hemodialyzer is described that can be used at home by non-medically trained personnel. Short lengths of semipermeable membrane tubes are arranged in parallel, supported by plastic mesh and encased in epoxy at ends. Tubes are connected to input and output blood manifolds which are separated by dialysate chamber. Daily dialysis requires only two hours or less.

  7. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  8. Applicability of nonresonant artificial diamagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, L.; Lapine, M.; McPhedran, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    Artificial diamagnetics are prominent for achieving extraordinarily strong diamagnetism in a wide frequency range. However, as far as the magnetic fields outside the artificial medium are concerned, bulk conductors show a very similar pattern. The question arises whether the complicated internal structure of artificial diamagnetics can, to this end, be replaced by a simpler object. We show that for an electrically small body, internal structuring is likely to make the effective diamagnetic response weaker than that of a simple conducting object.

  9. Impact of hard-bottom substrata on the small-scale distribution of fish and decapods in shallow subtidal temperate waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Stephanie; Fischer, Philipp

    2013-03-01

    The micro-scale spatial distribution patterns of a demersal fish and decapod crustacean assemblage were assessed in a hard-bottom kelp environment in the southern North Sea. Using quadrats along line transects, we assessed the in situ fish and crustacean abundance in relation to substratum types (rock, cobbles and large pebbles) and the density of algae. Six fish and four crustacean species were abundant, with Ctenolabrus rupestris clearly dominating the fish community and Galathea squamifera dominating the crustacean community. Differences in the substratum types had an even stronger effect on the micro-scale distribution than the density of the dominating algae species. Kelp had a negative effect on the fish abundances, with significantly lower average densities in kelp beds compared with adjacent open areas. Averaged over all of the substrata, the most attractive substratum for the fish was large pebbles . In contrast, crustaceans did not show a specific substratum affinity. The results clearly indicate that, similar to other complex systems, significant micro-scale species-habitat associations occur in northern hard-bottom environments. However, because of the frequently harsh environmental conditions, these habitats are mainly sampled from ships with sampling gear, and the resulting data cannot be used to resolve small-scale species-habitat associations. A detailed substratum classification and community assessment, often only possible using SCUBA diving, is therefore important to reach a better understanding of the functional relationships between species and their environment in northern temperate waters, knowledge that is very important with respect to the increasing environmental pressure caused by global climate change.

  10. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are also briefly…

  11. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A series of articles focuses on artificial intelligence research and development to enhance information systems and services. Topics discussed include knowledge base designs, expert system development tools, natural language processing, expert systems for reference services, and the role that artificial intelligence concepts should have in…

  12. Artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Firschein, O.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on artificial intelligence. Topics considered include knowledge engineering, expert systems, applications of artificial intelligence to scientific reasoning, planning and problem solving, error recovery in robots through failure reason analysis, programming languages, natural language, speech recognition, map-guided interpretation of remotely-sensed imagery, and image understanding architectures.

  13. On the dissolution/reaction of small-grain Bioglass ® 45S5 and F-modified bioactive glasses in artificial saliva (AS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aina, Valentina; Bertinetti, Luca; Cerrato, Giuseppina; Cerruti, Marta; Lusvardi, Gigliola; Malavasi, Gianluca; Morterra, Claudio; Tacconi, Linda; Menabue, Ledi

    2011-02-01

    The reaction of small-grain Bioglass® 45S5 in artificial saliva (AS), to produce a layer of hydroxy-apatite (HA) and/or hydroxy-carbonate apatite (HCA), has been studied and compared to the results obtained in a simple buffered solution (TRIS). Some potentially bioactive glasses based on the composition of Bioglass® and containing CaF2 (HCaCaF2 5% and HNaCaF2 5%) have also been studied, in order to analyze the effects/changes produced when a F-containing glass surface is contacted with AS. The insertion of fluorine has been proposed to improve bioactive glass bone-bonding ability, and to parallel fluorine-containing glass-ceramics currently used in dentistry. ICP-OES analysis of the solution, and FTIR spectroscopy of the solid samples provided compositional information on the stages of reaction. These data were integrated with XRD and the textural and morphological data, obtained by specific surface areas determination and TEM-EDS measurements. In the case of Bioglass® 45S5, a comparison at corresponding reaction times indicates that the precipitation of an amorphous Ca-phosphate phase is faster in AS, but the crystallization of HA/HCA is delayed in AS with respect to the TRIS solution. For fluoride-containing glasses, the sample HCaCaF2 5%, in which CaF2 replaces part of CaO, possesses the fastest rate for HA/HCA crystallization (1 week) in AS. Some lines of interpretation for these results are proposed.

  14. Artificial urushi.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Uyama, H; Ikeda, R

    2001-11-19

    A new concept for the design and laccase-catalyzed preparation of "artificial urushi" from new urushiol analogues is described. The curing proceeded under mild reaction conditions to produce the very hard cross-linked film (artificial urushi) with a high gloss surface. A new cross-linkable polyphenol was synthesized by oxidative polymerization of cardanol, a phenol derivative from cashew-nut-shell liquid, by enzyme-related catalysts. The polyphenol was readily cured to produce the film (also artificial urushi) showing excellent dynamic viscoelasticity. PMID:11763444

  15. Imaging shallow objects with scattered guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Gerard C.; Milligan, Paul A.; Huggins, Robert J.; Rector, James W.

    1999-10-01

    Current surface seismic reflection techniques based on the common-midpoint (CMP) reflection stacking method cannot be readily used to image small objects in the first few meters of a weathered layer. We discuss a seismic imaging method to detect such objects; it uses the first-arrival (guided) wave, scattered by shallow heterogeneities and converted into scattered Rayleigh waves. These guided waves and Rayleigh waves are dominant in the shallow weathered layer and therefore might be suitable for shallow object imaging. We applied this method to a field data set and found that we could certainly image meter-size objects up to about 3 m off to the side of a survey line consisting of vertical geophones. There are indications that cross-line horizontal geophone data could be used to identify shallow objects up to 10 m offline in the same region.

  16. Shallow moonquakes - How they compare with earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Of three types of moonquakes strong enough to be detectable at large distances - deep moonquakes, meteoroid impacts and shallow moonquakes - only shallow moonquakes are similar in nature to earthquakes. A comparison of various characteristics of moonquakes with those of earthquakes indeed shows a remarkable similarity between shallow moonquakes and intraplate earthquakes: (1) their occurrences are not controlled by tides; (2) they appear to occur in locations where there is evidence of structural weaknesses; (3) the relative abundances of small and large quakes (b-values) are similar, suggesting similar mechanisms; and (4) even the levels of activity may be close. The shallow moonquakes may be quite comparable in nature to intraplate earthquakes, and they may be of similar origin.

  17. Noise From Shallow Underwater Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloway, Alexander G.

    Naval activities such as ordnance disposal, demolition and requisite training, can involve detonation of small explosive charges in shallow water that have the potential to harm nearby marine life. Measurements of the underwater sound generated by sub-surface explosions were collected as part of a naval training exercise. In this thesis the noise levels from these explosions will be investigated using peak pressure, sound exposure level and energy spectral density. Measurements of very-low frequency Scholte interface waves will also be presented and used to investigate elastic parameters in the sediment.

  18. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  19. An artificial molecular pump.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R; Schneebeli, Severin T; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration. PMID:25984834

  20. An artificial molecular pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R.; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration.

  1. Artificial noses.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, Shannon E; Aernecke, Matthew J; Walt, David R

    2011-08-15

    The mammalian olfactory system is able to detect many more odorants than the number of receptors it has by utilizing cross-reactive odorant receptors that generate unique response patterns for each odorant. Mimicking the mammalian system, artificial noses combine cross-reactive sensor arrays with pattern recognition algorithms to create robust odor-discrimination systems. The first artificial nose reported in 1982 utilized a tin-oxide sensor array. Since then, however, a wide range of sensor technologies have been developed and commercialized. This review highlights the most commonly employed sensor types in artificial noses: electrical, gravimetric, and optical sensors. The applications of nose systems are also reviewed, covering areas such as food and beverage quality control, chemical warfare agent detection, and medical diagnostics. A brief discussion of future trends for the technology is also provided. PMID:21417721

  2. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  3. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  4. Data analysis and hydrological modelling of frozen ground, shallow groundwater formation and river flow co-evolution at small watersheds of Russia in continuous, discontinuous permafrost and the zone of seasonal ground freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Luidmila; Semenova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Frozen ground distribution and its properties control the presence of aquifuge and aquifers. Correct representation of interactions between infiltrating water, ground ice, permafrost or seasonal freezing table and river flow is challenging for hydrological modelling in cold regions. Observational data of ground water levels, thawing depths in different landscapes or topographical units and meteorological information with high temporal and spatial resolution are required to analyze seasonal and interannual evolution of groundwater in active layer and its linkage to river flow. Such data are extremely rare in vast and remote regions of Russia. There are few historical datasets inherited from former USSR containing unique collection of long-term daily observations of water fluxes, frozen ground characteristics and groundwater levels. The data from three water balance stations were employed in our study with overall goal to analyze co-evolution of thawing layer, shallow groundwater and river flow by data processing and process-based modelling. Three instrumented small watersheds are situated in continuous, discontinuous permafrost zones and at the territory with seasonally frozen ground. They present different climates, landscapes and geology. The Kolyma water-balance station is located in mountainous region of continuous permafrost in North-Eastern Russia. The watershed area of 22 km2 is covered by bare rocks, mountain tundra, sparse larch forest and wet larch forest depending on slope aspect and inclination. The Bomnak water-balance station (22 km2) is situated in discontinuous permafrost zone in upper part of the Amur River basin and characterized by unmerged permafrost. Dominant landscapes are birch forest and bogs. The Pribaltiyskaya water-balance station (40 km2) located in Latvia is characterized by seasonally frozen ground and is covered by mixed forest and arable land. Process-based Hydrograph model was employed in the study. The model was developed

  5. Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve. PMID:26957450

  6. An artificial gravity demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, C.; Lemke, L.; Penzo, P.

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gravity experiment which is tethered to a Delta second stage and which uses the Small Expendable Deployer System is proposed. Following tether deployment, the Delta vehicle performs the required spin-up maneuver and can then be passivated. A surplus reentry vehicle houses the artificial gravity life science experiments. When the experiments are completed, the reentry phase of the experiment is initiated by synchronizing the spin of the configuration with the required deorbit impulse.

  7. Artificial halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmke, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Judged by their frequency and beauty, ice halos easily rival rainbows as a prominent atmospheric optics phenomenon. This article presents experimental halo demonstrations of varying complexity. Using a single commercially available hexagonal glass prism, a variety of artificial halos can be simulated. The experiments include laser beam path analysis, a modified classic spinning prism experiment, and a novel Monte-Carlo machine for three-dimensional rotations. Each of these experiments emulates different conditions of certain halo displays, and in combination, they allow a thorough understanding of these striking phenomena.

  8. Principal Component Analysis Coupled with Artificial Neural Networks—A Combined Technique Classifying Small Molecular Structures Using a Concatenated Spectral Database

    PubMed Central

    Gosav, Steluţa; Praisler, Mirela; Birsa, Mihail Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present several expert systems that predict the class identity of the modeled compounds, based on a preprocessed spectral database. The expert systems were built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and are designed to predict if an unknown compound has the toxicological activity of amphetamines (stimulant and hallucinogen), or whether it is a nonamphetamine. In attempts to circumvent the laws controlling drugs of abuse, new chemical structures are very frequently introduced on the black market. They are obtained by slightly modifying the controlled molecular structures by adding or changing substituents at various positions on the banned molecules. As a result, no substance similar to those forming a prohibited class may be used nowadays, even if it has not been specifically listed. Therefore, reliable, fast and accessible systems capable of modeling and then identifying similarities at molecular level, are highly needed for epidemiological, clinical, and forensic purposes. In order to obtain the expert systems, we have preprocessed a concatenated spectral database, representing the GC-FTIR (gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry) and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) spectra of 103 forensic compounds. The database was used as input for a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The scores of the forensic compounds on the main principal components (PCs) were then used as inputs for the ANN systems. We have built eight PC-ANN systems (principal component analysis coupled with artificial neural network) with a different number of input variables: 15 PCs, 16 PCs, 17 PCs, 18 PCs, 19 PCs, 20 PCs, 21 PCs and 22 PCs. The best expert system was found to be the ANN network built with 18 PCs, which accounts for an explained variance of 77%. This expert system has the best sensitivity (a rate of classification C = 100% and a rate of true positives TP = 100%), as well as a good selectivity (a rate of true negatives TN = 92.77%). A

  9. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731

  10. Artificial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Pine, David J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  11. Artificial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Jérémie; Sacanna, Stefano; Abramian, Anaïs; Barral, Jérémie; Hanson, Kasey; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Pine, David J; Chaikin, Paul M

    2015-05-01

    Motility is a basic feature of living microorganisms, and how it works is often determined by environmental cues. Recent efforts have focused on developing artificial systems that can mimic microorganisms, in particular their self-propulsion. We report on the design and characterization of synthetic self-propelled particles that migrate upstream, known as positive rheotaxis. This phenomenon results from a purely physical mechanism involving the interplay between the polarity of the particles and their alignment by a viscous torque. We show quantitative agreement between experimental data and a simple model of an overdamped Brownian pendulum. The model notably predicts the existence of a stagnation point in a diverging flow. We take advantage of this property to demonstrate that our active particles can sense and predictably organize in an imposed flow. Our colloidal system represents an important step toward the realization of biomimetic microsystems with the ability to sense and respond to environmental changes. PMID:26601175

  12. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  13. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  14. AUTOMATING SHALLOW SEISMIC IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2003-09-14

    The current project is a continuation of an effort to develop ultrashallow seismic imaging as a cost-effective method potentially applicable to DOE facilities. The objective of the present research is to develop and demonstrate the use of a cost-effective, automated method of conducting shallow seismic surveys, an approach that represents a significant departure from conventional seismic-survey field procedures. Initial testing of a mechanical geophone-planting device suggests that large numbers of geophones can be placed both quickly and automatically. The development of such a device could make the application of SSR considerably more efficient and less expensive. The imaging results obtained using automated seismic methods will be compared with results obtained using classical seismic techniques. Although this research falls primarily into the field of seismology, for comparison and quality-control purposes, some GPR data will be collected as well. In the final year of th e research, demonstration surveys at one or more DOE facilities will be performed. An automated geophone-planting device of the type under development would not necessarily be limited to the use of shallow seismic reflection methods; it also would be capable of collecting data for seismic-refraction and possibly for surface-wave studies. Another element of our research plan involves monitoring the cone of depression of a pumping well that is being used as a proxy site for fluid-flow at a contaminated site. Our next data set will be collected at a well site where drawdown equilibrium has been reached. Noninvasive, in-situ methods such as placing geophones automatically and using near-surface seismic methods to identify and characterize the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies for DOE and others.

  15. A time-domain synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging method for material flaw quantification with validations on small-scale artificial and natural flaws.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuefei; He, Jingjing; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub

    2015-02-01

    A direct time-domain reconstruction and sizing method of synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is developed to improve the spatial resolution and sizing accuracy for phased-array ultrasonic inspections. The basic idea of the reconstruction algorithm is to coherently superimpose multiple A-scan measurements, incorporating the phase information of the sampling points. The algorithm involves data mapping and in-phase summation according to time-of-flight (TOF). Data mapping refers to the process of placing each of the sampling points to a two-/three-dimensional grid that represents the geometry model of the object being inspected. The value for each of the cells of the grid is a summation of all sampling points mapped into the cell. A sizing method based on the concept of 6 dB-drop is proposed to characterize the flaw boundary. The extents, orientation and the shape of the flaw can then be inferred to provide more information for life assessment calculations. Lab experiments are performed using a 10 MHz phased-array ultrasonic transducer to collect data from a cylinder material block with closely spaced artificial flaws and from a material block with a natural flaw. The developed method is used to process the experimental data to characterize the flaws. Using the developed method, the improvement of spatial resolution is observed. Results indicate that four closely spaced 0.794 mm-diameter flat-bottomed holes are clearly identified, and the quantification of size and orientation of the natural flaw is very close to the actual measurement made from digital microscopy after cutting the testing piece apart. PMID:25448426

  16. Artificial Reefs--A Coastal Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindo, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the construction of artificial reefs for such uses as commercial fishing and recreational boating. Describes a class project in which students construct a small artificial reef and observe the changes over time in terms of temperature, salinity, flora and fauna. (TW)

  17. Artificial Respiration and Artificial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Joseph; Brook, Morris H.; Lopez, Jose F.

    1965-01-01

    A training program in the newer methods of treatment of acute cardiopulmonary emergencies which was developed at the University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, is reported. Artificial respiration by the chance rescuer, primary and secondary resuscitation, and post-resuscitation measures involving the use of special drugs and equipment by trained personnel are described. Figures and tables designed for wall-mounting and ready reference in an emergency situation are presented. Firstaid ventilatory adjuncts for use by trained personnel are classified and critically appraised, and the propriety of their use is emphasized. A plea is made to the medical profession and allied agencies to assume the responsibility of spreading knowledge of the new techniques more widely. Unless effective treatment is instituted early enough to prevent death or permanent anoxic damage to heart and brain, follow-through therapy will often be fruitless. PMID:14339303

  18. Volga shallow offing dynamics investigation based on space photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, E. E.

    Volga mouth region is investigated much better, than sea mouths of other river in Russia. In spite of the fact, not enough attention was devoted to Volga shallow offing. Volga shallow offing covers area about 9,3 ths. sq. km and has great significance for Caspian sea fish industry, because environmental conditions of this region and neighboring shallows of Northern Caspian Sea are determinative for passage, spawning and young fish growth of valuable sorts of fish. Insufficient investigation of Volga shallow offing is caused as by difficulty of access to this region through small depths (1 - 2 m) and intensive vegetation, so by data deficiency. Data deficiency notably intensified during recent 10 - 15 years, when significant reduction of hydro-meteorological investigations in Volga mouth area occurred. Gradual accumulation of on-site data, development of new technologies of map material analysis and space photography data processing allows to expect new scientific and application results. The purpose of our investigation concludes in determination of space-time mechanism of hydro-meteorological processes in Volga shallow offing based on space photography materials. Main results of our investigation can be summarized in following basic statements: (1) The most efficient method of Volga shallow offing investigation appears to be combined application of space photography data and on-site materials. (2) Electronic atlas of Volga shallow offing photomaps for the period of 1975 to 1997 yrs. is created. (3) Maps of above-water flora of Volga shallow offing for 1975 and 1997 yrs are created. (4) Electronic atlas of streams in Volga shallow offing for the period of 1975 to 1997 yrs. is created. On basis of it four maps of drain streams at Volga shallow offing are created. (5) Landscape zoning of Volga shallow offing is made and most active and passive regions are determined depending on drain streams and water vegetation. (6) It is shown, that development of Volga shallow

  19. Stability analysis of Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Cheng, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper stability and error analyses are discussed for some finite difference methods when applied to the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. Two finite difference formulations, which are based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, are discussed. In the first part of this paper the results of numerical analyses for an explicit Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) have shown that the method is unconditionally stable. This method, which is a generalized fixed grid method of characteristics, covers the Courant-Isaacson-Rees method as a special case. Some artificial viscosity is introduced by this scheme. However, because the method is unconditionally stable, the artificial viscosity can be brought under control either by reducing the spatial increment or by increasing the size of time step. The second part of the paper discusses a class of semi-implicit finite difference methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. This method, when the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is used for the convective terms, is also unconditionally stable and highly accurate for small space increments or large time steps. The semi-implicit methods seem to be more computationally efficient than the explicit ELM; at each time step a single tridiagonal system of linear equations is solved. The combined explicit and implicit ELM is best used in formulating a solution strategy for solving a network of interconnected channels. The explicit ELM is used at channel junctions for each time step. The semi-implicit method is then applied to the interior points in each channel segment. Following this solution strategy, the channel network problem can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional open-channel flow problems. Numerical results support properties given by the stability and error analyses. ?? 1990.

  20. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  1. Growth and mortality of Cichla spp. (Perciformes, Cichlidae) introduced in Volta Grande Reservoir (Grande River) and in a small artificial lake in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomiero, L M; Carmassi, A L; Rondineli, G R; Villares Junior, G A; Braga, F M S

    2010-11-01

    The growth and mortality parameters were estimated through the analysis of length frequency distribution for species of Cichla spp. introduced into a lake in Leme (SP), and in Volta Grande reservoir (SP-MG). In Leme, Cichla kelberi presented larger frequency in the inferior classes of lengths, larger instantaneous rate of natural mortality, and smaller number of cohorts than C. kelberi and C. piquiti in Volta Grande. The values of growth performance obtained for the species were similar, corroborating the validity of the estimated growth and mortality parameters. The increase of the growth rate in small and less diverse environments occurs due to predation. The genus Cichla adapts well in locations in which it is introduced, however this adaptation shows itself to be strongly adjusted to each particular location, determining great plasticity and establishment capacity. PMID:21180920

  2. Close binaries in near and shallow contact stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; Zejda, M.; Mikulášek, Z.

    2013-02-01

    After a detailed investigation of new observations obtained by small telescopes, we found a group of near and shallow contact binaries with decreasing period including BS Vul, MR Com, EP Cep, ES Cep and V369 Cep. BS Vul and V369 Cep are primary-filling near-contact binaries, while MR Com, EP Cep and ES Cep are shallow contact binaries. With their decrease in period, BS Vul and V369 Cep will evolve to the shallow-contact systems with higher mass ratios, just like ES Cep. The period decease of shallow contact binaries could be caused by the combined effect of the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) and variable angular momentum loss (AML). This produces contact binaries in oscillating circles that evolve towards the lower mass ratio direction. That means systems resemble ES Cep will evolve to those systems with lower mass ratio, such as MR Com and EP Cep.

  3. Mississippi oxbow lake sediment quality during an artificial flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sediment quality was assessed during a 35-day artificial flood in a shallow (<1.5 m) oxbow lake along the Coldwater River, Mississippi, using Hyalella azteca 28-day bioassays. Seventeen pesticides were monitored in sediments before, during and after flooding, with increases in atrazine and ...

  4. Shallow flow vortex formation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Haojun

    Vortical structures in shallow flow past a vertical cylinder are addressed in this investigation. A cinema technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) provided quantitative representations of the wholefield flow patterns in both instantaneous and averaged forms. Techniques for passive and active control of these vortices, and their influence on the loading of the bed, were explored. In a fully-developed, laminar shallow flow, the unstable structure in the near-wake of the cylinder correlates with the horseshoe (necklace) vortex system about the upstream surface of the cylinder. A coherent varicose mode of vortex formation is observed in the near-wake, even though the classical large-scale vortex shedding is suppressed due to bed friction effects. It is also demonstrated that when the near-wake is stable at a sufficiently low value of Reynolds number, applications of external perturbations lead to destabilization of the wake. Classes of small-scale three-dimensional structures arise in a fully-turbulent shallow flow past a surface-piercing cylinder. A prevalent feature is an upward moving jet-like flow from the bed surface, through the center of the developing quasi-two-dimensional primary vortex, at a location in the very near-wake of the cylinder. Passive control via base-bleed through a narrow streamwise slot leads to substantially delay/attenuation of vortex formation in the near-wake. The large-scale near-wake structure is recoverable through combined positive-active control, in the form of rotational perturbations in the presence of small magnitude base bleed. These alterations of the near-wake structure occur in conjunction with modifications of the streamline topology and Reynolds stress at the bed, as well as the shallow approach flow. Active control via rotational perturbations of the cylinder at the most unstable shear-layer frequency promotes well-defined vortical structures in the separating shearlayer, which contribute to the earlier

  5. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... works well. When you need to urinate, the cuff of the artificial sphincter can be relaxed so ... pain. An artificial sphincter has three parts: A cuff, which fits around your urethra, the tube that ...

  6. SHALLOW GROUNDWATER USE BY ALFALFA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One proposal for drainage water disposal is to reuse drainage water for irrigation of salt tolerant crops until the volume has been reduced sufficiently to enable final disposal by evaporation. Part of this concept of serial biological concentration requires in-situ crop water reuse from shallow gr...

  7. Non-classical shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Carina M.; Howison, S. D.; Ockendon, H.; Ockendon, J. R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with violent discontinuities in shallow water flows with large Froude number F. On a horizontal base, the paradigm problem is that of the impact of two fluid layers in situations where the flow can be modelled as two smooth regions joined by a singularity in the flow field. Within the framework of shallow water theory, we show that, over a certain time-scale, this discontinuity may be described by a delta shock, which is a weak solution of the underlying conservation laws in which the depth and mass and momentum fluxes have both delta function and step function components. We also make some conjectures about how this model evolves from the traditional model for jet impacts in which a spout is emitted. For flows on a sloping base, we show that for flow with an aspect ratio of O(F-2) on a base with an O(1) or larger slope, the governing equations admit a new type of discontinuous solution that is also modelled as a delta shock. The physical manifestation of this discontinuity is a small tube' of fluid bounding the flow. The delta-shock conditions for this flow are derived and solved for a point source on an inclined plane. This latter delta-shock framework also sheds light on the evolution of the layer impact on a horizontal base

  8. Artificial Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Balzani; Credi; Raymo; Stoddart

    2000-10-01

    The miniaturization of components used in the construction of working devices is being pursued currently by the large-downward (top-down) fabrication. This approach, however, which obliges solid-state physicists and electronic engineers to manipulate progressively smaller and smaller pieces of matter, has its intrinsic limitations. An alternative approach is a small-upward (bottom-up) one, starting from the smallest compositions of matter that have distinct shapes and unique properties-namely molecules. In the context of this particular challenge, chemists have been extending the concept of a macroscopic machine to the molecular level. A molecular-level machine can be defined as an assembly of a distinct number of molecular components that are designed to perform machinelike movements (output) as a result of an appropriate external stimulation (input). In common with their macroscopic counterparts, a molecular machine is characterized by 1) the kind of energy input supplied to make it work, 2) the nature of the movements of its component parts, 3) the way in which its operation can be monitored and controlled, 4) the ability to make it repeat its operation in a cyclic fashion, 5) the timescale needed to complete a full cycle of movements, and 6) the purpose of its operation. Undoubtedly, the best energy inputs to make molecular machines work are photons or electrons. Indeed, with appropriately chosen photochemically and electrochemically driven reactions, it is possible to design and synthesize molecular machines that do work. Moreover, the dramatic increase in our fundamental understanding of self-assembly and self-organizational processes in chemical synthesis has aided and abetted the construction of artificial molecular machines through the development of new methods of noncovalent synthesis and the emergence of supramolecular assistance to covalent synthesis as a uniquely powerful synthetic tool. The aim of this review is to present a unified view of the field

  9. A Dynamic Eddy Viscosity Model for the Shallow Water Equations Solved by Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, Simone; Suckale, Jenny; Giraldo, Francis X.; Constantinescu, Emil

    2016-04-01

    We present the solution of the viscous shallow water equations where viscosity is built as a residual-based subgrid scale model originally designed for large eddy simulation of compressible [1] and stratified flows [2]. The necessity of viscosity for a shallow water model not only finds motivation from mathematical analysis [3], but is supported by physical reasoning as can be seen by an analysis of the energetics of the solution. We simulated the flow of an idealized wave as it hits a set of obstacles. The kinetic energy spectrum of this flow shows that, although the inviscid Galerkin solutions -by spectral elements and discontinuous Galerkin [4]- preserve numerical stability in spite of the spurious oscillations in the proximity of the wave fronts, the slope of the energy cascade deviates from the theoretically expected values. We show that only a sufficiently small amount of dynamically adaptive viscosity removes the unwanted high-frequency modes while preserving the overall sharpness of the solution. In addition, it yields a physically plausible energy decay. This work is motivated by a larger interest in the application of a shallow water model to the solution of tsunami triggered coastal flows. In particular, coastal flows in regions around the world where coastal parks made of mitigation hills of different sizes and configurations are considered as a means to deviate the power of the incoming wave. References [1] M. Nazarov and J. Hoffman (2013) "Residual-based artificial viscosity for simulation of turbulent compressible flow using adaptive finite element methods" Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 71:339-357 [2] S. Marras, M. Nazarov, F. X. Giraldo (2015) "Stabilized high-order Galerkin methods based on a parameter-free dynamic SGS model for LES" J. Comput. Phys. 301:77-101 [3] J. F. Gerbeau and B. Perthame (2001) "Derivation of the viscous Saint-Venant system for laminar shallow water; numerical validation" Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. Ser. B, 1:89?102 [4] F

  10. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  11. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  12. Shallow-water conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    The derivation of basic conservation laws in the shallow-water theory from the multidimensional integral laws of conservation of mass and total momentum describing the plane-parallel flow of an ideal incompressible fluid above a horizontal bottom is proposed. The restrictions on flow parameters arising in this case have the integral form and are much weaker in comparison with the requirement of flow potentiality and the condition of long-wavelength approximation. The last fact substantiates the use of the shallow-water model for the mathematical modeling of a much wider class of wave flows, the parameters of which are not related directly to the restrictions of the long-wavelength approximation.

  13. Total artificial hearts: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Cohn, William E; Timms, Daniel L; Frazier, O H

    2015-10-01

    A practical artificial heart has been sought for >50 years. An increasing number of people succumb to heart disease each year, but the number of hearts available for transplantation remains small. Early total artificial hearts mimicked the pumping action of the native heart. These positive-displacement pumps could provide adequate haemodynamic support and maintain the human circulation for short periods, but large size and limited durability adversely affected recipients' quality of life. Subsequent research into left ventricular assist devices led to the use of continuous-flow blood pumps with rotating impellers. Researchers have attempted to integrate this technology into modern total artificial hearts with moderate clinical success. The importance of pulsatile circulation remains unclear. Future research is, therefore, needed into positive-displacement and rotary total artificial hearts. PMID:26031698

  14. Shallow cells in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The existing theory on two-dimensional transitions (appropriate to thin parallel-plate geometries) is presented in such a way that it is possible to identify easily conditions for the onset of shallow cells. Conditions are given under which succinonitrile-acetone mixtures should undergo supercritical bifurcation in experimentally accessible ranges. These results suggest a means for the quantitative test of the Mullins and Sekerka (1964) model and its weakly nonlinear extensions.

  15. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish

  16. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. 1982 THERMAL SHALLOW RESERVOIR TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Mogen, P.; Pittinger, L.; Magers, M.

    1985-01-22

    An extensive study of the Thermal Shallow Reservoir at The Geysers was performed in 1982 to improve our understanding of the source and flow patterns of steam in the shallow anomaly and how they relate to the Thermal 4 blowout. This project included gathering and analyzing pressure transient, enthalpy, tracer and chemical data and developing a reservoir model that was consistent with this data. Following the pressure transient testing and analysis, a convection-plume with lateral-flow model was proposed. Subsequent analysis of enthalpy, tracer and chemical data corroborated this model. The high flowrate wells--Thermal 4, Thermal 10, Thermal 11 and Magma 1--produce from the high-pressure, high-permeability upflow zone. The source of this upflow is a limited fracture system connecting the shallow anomaly with the underlying main reservoir. The outlying low-pressure, low-permeability wells are supplied by lateral flow of steam from the central area. The pressure gradient from the core to the periphery is caused by condensation in the flanks.

  18. Alternative attractors of shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, M

    2001-07-17

    Ponds and shallow lakes can be very clear with abundant submerged plants, or very turbid due to a high concentration of phytoplankton and suspended sediment particles. These strongly contrasting ecosystem states have been found to represent alternative attractors with distinct stabilizing feedback mechanisms. In the turbid state, the development of submerged vegetation is prevented by low underwater light levels. The unprotected sediment frequently is resuspended by wave action and by fish searching for food causing a further decrease of transparency. Since there are no plants that could serve as refuges, zooplankton is grazed down by fish to densities insufficient to control algal blooms. In contrast, the clear state in eutrophic shallow lakes is dominated by aquatic macrophytes. The submerged macrophytes prevent sediment resuspension, take up nutrients from the water, and provide a refuge for zooplankton against fish predation. These processes buffer the impacts of increased nutrient loads until they become too high. Consequently, the response of shallow lakes to eutrophication tends to be catastrophic rather than smooth, and various lakes switch back and forth abruptly between a clear and a turbid state repeatedly without obvious external forcing. Importantly, a switch from a turbid to a stable clear state often can be invoked by means of biomanipulation in the form of a temporary reduction of the fish stock. PMID:12806081

  19. Simple explanations for shallow landslides!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank; Rickli, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In order to find easily recordable and practicable parameters for estimating the resistance of steep slopes against superficial soil failure, 218 comprehensively documented shallow landslides triggered in forested area have been analysed. The parameters investigated are divided into three principal subject areas: soil mechanics, vegetation, and topography. From the soil mechanical perspective, the shear parameters angle of internal friction Φ' and cohesion c' were pivotal. Information on them derived from field classification, laboratory analyses of grain size distribution (USCS) as well as from direct shear and triaxial compression tests with corresponding soil material. In respect of vegetation, forest aspects were of particular interest e.g. tree species composition, degree of coverage, layering, development stage, health, and gap size. Topographically, the focus was on terrain morphology, inclination, exposition, and altitude. It turned out that applying a three-step filter based on the aforementioned parameter categories yielded a retrospectively explanation power of 97% (n=212). The respective main criteria that were serially applied are: soil mechanics: slope inclination α is less than 5° steeper than the angle of internal friction Φ' of the corresponding soil material vegetation: forests are in a multi-layered or well structured pole or tree wood stage with a tree coverage degree of > 40% topography: the line of slope - transverse profile of the area of shallow landslide is NOT concave-flat, flat-concave, or convex-concave The application of the first step, the "5° -criterion", revealed that about 50% (n=107) of the slopes with the superficial soil failures were more than 5° steeper than the angle of internal friction Φ' of the soil material. In the second step, the vegetation-criteria explained another 40% (n=90) insofar that the corresponding requirements were not met. The topography step, finally, showed that additional 15 shallow landslides (7

  20. The Study on the Migration of Radionuclides in the Shallow Land

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Wang, Z.; Li, Z.; Zhao Y.; Guo, Z.; Guo, L.; Shi, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Maeda, T.; Matsumoto, J.; Mukai, M.; Tanaka, T.

    2002-02-25

    >From 1995 through 2001 a cooperative study project on the migration of radionuclides in shallow land was carried out by CIRP and JAERI, which covers field test, laboratory simulation test, other laboratory studies and related model development. The radionuclides studied involve 90Sr, 237Np, 238Pu. For comparison the nonradioactive elements Sr, Nd and Ce were also studied. The field test was performed both in aerated zone and aquifer zone of loess. In the aerated zone the nuclide migration in engineering materials were also studied. The study in the aerated zone was carried out in 9 pits with the size of 2m x 2m under natural conditions or artificial sprinkling conditions. The study in the aquifer was carried out in a new built Underground Research Facility with the area of 142m2. The test results show that the order of adsorption activity of the nuclide on the loess is 238Pu > 237Np > 90Sr and Nd, Ce > Sr. During the 3 years period of test the migration of 238Pu and Nd, Ce was not observable in both aerated zone and aquifer zone, the nuclide of 237Np migrated a small distance, and the nuclide of 90Sr had a relative large migration. The migration of the nuclides in engineering materials was not detected, which include cement, degraded cement, cement mortar, Chinese bentonite and Japanese bentonite.

  1. Artificial insemination in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial insemination is a relative simple yet powerful tool geneticists can employ for the propagation of economically important traits in livestock and poultry. In this chapter, we address the fundamental methods of the artificial insemination of poultry, including semen collection, semen evalu...

  2. Equine artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Merkt, H

    1976-07-24

    The use and techniques of artificial insemination for horses in Germany over the last 30 years is described. Artificial insemination appears to produce pregnancy percentages equal to those from normal breeding methods and its continued availability under veterinary supervision is recommended in conditions where disease, disability or distance debar normal service. PMID:960520

  3. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  4. The influence of grid resolution on the prediction of natural and road-related shallow landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, D.; Borga, M.; Aronica, G. T.; Brigandì, G.; Tarolli, P.

    2014-06-01

    This work evaluates the predictive power of the quasi-dynamic shallow landslide model QD-SLaM to simulate shallow landslide locations in a small-scale Mediterranean landscape, namely, the lower portion (2.6 km2) of the Giampilieri catchment, located in Sicily (Italy). The catchment was impacted by a sequence of high-intensity storms over the years 2007-2009, resulting in widespread landsliding, with a total landslide initiation area amounting to 2.6% of the basin area. The effect of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) on the quality of model predictions is tested by considering four DTM resolutions: 2, 4, 10 and 20 m. Moreover, the impact of the dense forest road network on the model performance is evaluated by separately considering road-related landslides and natural landslides. The landslide model does not incorporate the description of road-related failures and is applied without calibration of the model parameters. The model predictive power is shown to be DTM-resolution dependent. Use of coarser resolution has a smoothing effect on terrain attributes, with local slope angles decreasing and contributing areas becoming larger. The percentage of watershed area represented by the model as unconditionally unstable (i.e. failing even without the addition of water from precipitation) ranges between 6.3% at 20 m DTM and 13.8% at 2 m DTM, showing an overestimation of the mapped landslide area. We consider this prediction as an indication for likely failing sites in future storms rather than areas proved stable during previous storms. When assessed over the sample of mapped non-road-related landslides, better model performances are reported for 4 and 10 m DTM resolution, thus highlighting the fact that higher DTM resolution does not necessarily mean better model performances. Model performances over road-related failures are lower than for the natural cases, and slightly increase with decreasing DTM resolution. These findings indicate that to realize the full

  5. Artificial reef observations from a manned submersible off southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Wicklund, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of 16 artificial reef structures in depths ranging from 30-120m indicated that the highest numbers of fish are found around reefs in water shallower than 46m. Fewer fish, especially those with tropical coral reef affinities, <46m was probably caused by a thermocline. Algae and reef community encrusters, abundant on shallower structures, were absent below 46m. Structures that penetrated above the thermocline, such as upright oil rigs and a hopper barge, were also effective reefs. The open structure and high profile of the rigs enhance their use as artificial reefs by providing a range of well-aerated habitats. Greatest diversity and numbers of fish were observed at the Miami sewer outfall. -from Authors

  6. Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.F. Jr.; Schrider, L.A.; McCallister, J.V.; Mazza, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Belden & Blake and the US DOE will cofund a horizontal well to be drilled in the Clinton Sandstone as part of the DOE`s multi well program titled ``Horizontal Drilling in Shallow Geologic Complex Reservoirs.`` This well will be located in Mahoning County, Ohio in an area which has demonstrated above average Clinton gas production. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first horizontal well drilled to the Clinton Sand formation in Ohio. Since many of the remaining Clinton Sand drilling sites are of poorer reservoir quality, they may not be developed unless technology such as horizontal drilling can be successfully demonstrated.

  7. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  8. Artificial ecosystem selection.

    PubMed

    Swenson, W; Wilson, D S; Elias, R

    2000-08-01

    Artificial selection has been practiced for centuries to shape the properties of individual organisms, providing Darwin with a powerful argument for his theory of natural selection. We show that the properties of whole ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially are composed of thousands of species and millions of individuals. Artificial ecosystem selection can be used for practical purposes, illustrates an important role for complex interactions in evolution, and challenges a widespread belief that selection is most effective at lower levels of the biological hierarchy. PMID:10890915

  9. A cellular control architecture for compliant artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Odhner, Lael U; Ueda, Jun; Asada, H Harry

    2006-01-01

    Dividing an artificial muscle material into a network of small cells could provide performance benefits and eliminate unwanted behaviors such as hysteresis. This paper presents a scheme for the position control or compliance control of an artificial muscle having this kind of cellular structure. Each cell contracts or relaxes probabilistically in response to a global feedback control loop, which measures only the aggregate force and displacement of the muscle. The stochastic nature of the cells produces smooth, reliable global behavior in the artificial muscle. By choosing a control law such that the expected response of the artificial muscle is equal to the desired response, good tracking control is achieved. PMID:17946978

  10. Shallow (0-10) seismic investigation of a distressed earthen levee, New Orleans, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Hicks, J.; Vera, E. E.

    2009-12-01

    earthen levee, shear modulus minima in a constructed profile, correlate with zones of estimated high saturation porosity (80%) high organic content and undercomapcted clay-rich sediments. We interpret that despite nominal full soil saturation, small in-situ intergaranular, free gas maintains Vp values low (~140 m/s). However, Vp/Vs ratios increase to values > 14 within gas-free sands of the underlying St. Bernard delta lobe complex (2000 -4000 yr) at shallow depths (~ 5m).

  11. Natural hazards in the Alps triggered by ski slope engineering and artificial snow production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the Alps there is increasing concern of man-made triggering of natural hazards in association with ski slope engineering and pressures from climate change. However literature on the topic is rare. Ski run development has been intensified in the past decade to accommodate a higher density of skiers. In order to absorb the increased flux of skiers promoted by continually increasing lift capacity, ski runs are subject to more and more enlargement, straightening and leveling. This has required large-scale re-leveling of slopes with the removal of soil and protective vegetation using heavy machinery during the summer season. Slope-ward incision on steep slopes, creation of artificial embankments by leeward deposition and development of straight ski runs perpendicular to steep slopes have resulted in both shallow and deep erosion, gullying, triggering of small landslides and even bedload transport in marginal channels. Other natural hazards have been triggered directly or indirectly due to intensification of artificial snow production. This has increased exponentially in the last decade in order to secure the skiing season under increasingly warm temperatures and erratic snowfall and decreasing snow depth and snow duration in association with climate change. The consequences are multiple. Firstly, in order to economize both costs and quantity of artificial snow production, ski runs are leveled as far as possible in order to avoid topographical irregularities, protruding vegetation or rocks. The combination of topsoil removal and prolonged duration of artificial snow cover results in a decreased vegetation cover and period as well as species alteration. Together with greatly decreased permeability of the underground, snowmelt and intensive summer precipitation trigger surface runoff, erosion and even small landslides. After more than a decade of intensive cover by artificial snow, most such steep ski runs at altitudes above 1400 m are reduced into highly erosive

  12. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1987-09-01

    The author discusses the development of artificial intelligence (AI). He explains the basic elements of AI: Heuristic search, knowledge representation, AI languages and tools, Natural Language Processing, computer vision, expert systems and problem solving and planning.

  13. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally referred to behavior-environment relations and not to inferred internal structures and processes. It is concluded that if workers in artificial intelligence are to succeed in their general goal, then they must design machines that are adaptive, that is, that can learn. Thus, artificial intelligence researchers must discard their essentialist model of natural intelligence and adopt a selectionist model instead. Such a strategic change should lead them to the science of behavior analysis. PMID:22477051

  14. Artificial Sweeteners and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... artificial sweeteners and cancer? Saccharin Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the ... cause cancer in laboratory animals .” Subsequent studies in rats showed an increased incidence of urinary bladder cancer ...

  15. Monitoring of a slope affected by shallow landslides: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisina, Claudia; Zizioli, Davide; Bordoni, Massimiliano; Valentino, Roberto; Bittelli, Marco; Chersich, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Shallow landslides can be defined as slope movements, due to extreme rainfall events, affecting superficial deposits of small thickness; their failure surface is, generally, located within the soil-bedrock interface. Although they involve small volumes of soil, due to their close proximity to urbanized areas, they cause significant damage to structures and infrastructures and, sometimes, human losses. Therefore, identifying at slope scale the soil hydrological and mechanical processes which control the shallow landslide triggering mechanisms is becoming of crucial interest in order to assess the shallow landslide susceptibility using physically based models and to develop early-warning system. For doing this an experimental monitoring station was installed in an area of the North-Eastern Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines, Italy), where several shallow landslide events occurred in the last years. The objectives of the research are: (a) to monitor the saturated and unsaturated zone response to seasonal and extreme rainfall events in order to identify the processes that determine the formation of shallow landslides; (b) to determine how antecedent precipitation could affect pore pressure development. The test site slope is representative of other sites in Northern Apennines subjected to shallow landslides: it is characterized by medium-high gradient (more than 15°), the land use is constituted by trees and shrubs developed on abandoned vineyards, the bedrock is made up of gravel, sand and poorly cemented conglomerates. The geotechnical characterization of superficial deposits was based on soils analysis conducted according to the ASTM standard, including assessment of the physical parameters of materials (grain size distribution, bulk and dry densities and Atterberg Limits), the shear strength parameters (direct shear and triaxial tests). A pedological and mineralogical characterization of the site were also carried out. The experimental station consists in a

  16. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  17. Artificial light sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T F

    1986-04-01

    A wide variety of artificial light sources exists for use in the diagnosis and treatment of photosensitivity disorders. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of these light sources (including gas discharge arcs, fluorescent lamps, and other apparatus) illustrates the importance of matching the emission spectrum of the light source, the spectral response of the radiometer, and the photobiologic action spectrum. Environmental and occupational exposure to artificial light sources may contribute to photosensitivity disorders. PMID:3955892

  18. Acoustic MIMO communications in a very shallow water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuehai; Cao, Xiuling; Tong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Underwater acoustic channels pose significant difficulty for the development of high speed communication due to highly limited band-width as well as hostile multipath interference. Enlightened by rapid progress of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technologies in wireless communication scenarios, MIMO systems offer a potential solution by enabling multiple spatially parallel communication channels to improve communication performance as well as capacity. For MIMO acoustic communications, deep sea channels offer substantial spatial diversity among multiple channels that can be exploited to address simultaneous multipath and co-channel interference. At the same time, there are increasing requirements for high speed underwater communication in very shallow water area (for example, a depth less than 10 m). In this paper, a space-time multichannel adaptive receiver consisting of multiple decision feedback equalizers (DFE) is adopted as the receiver for a very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication system. The performance of multichannel DFE receivers with relatively small number of receiving elements are analyzed and compared with that of the multichannel time reversal receiver to evaluate the impact of limited spatial diversity on multi-channel equalization and time reversal processing. The results of sea trials in a very shallow water channel are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication.

  19. Heidegger and artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, G.

    1987-01-01

    The discipline of Artificial Intelligence, in its quest for machine intelligence, showed great promise as long as its areas of application were limited to problems of a scientific and situation neutral nature. The attempts to move beyond these problems to a full simulation of man's intelligence has faltered and slowed it progress, largely because of the inability of Artificial Intelligence to deal with human characteristic, such as feelings, goals, and desires. This dissertation takes the position that an impasse has resulted because Artificial Intelligence has never been properly defined as a science: its objects and methods have never been identified. The following study undertakes to provide such a definition, i.e., the required ground for Artificial Intelligence. The procedure and methods employed in this study are based on Heidegger's philosophy and techniques of analysis as developed in Being and Time. Results of this study show that both the discipline of Artificial Intelligence and the concerns of Heidegger in Being and Time have the same object; fundamental ontology. The application of Heidegger's conclusions concerning fundamental ontology unites the various aspects of Artificial Intelligence and provides the articulation which shows the parts of this discipline and how they are related.

  20. Effects of light pollution on the emergent fauna of shallow marine ecosystems: Amphipods as a case study.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Hughes, Lauren Elizabeth

    2015-05-15

    Light pollution from coastal urban development is a widespread and increasing threat to biodiversity. Many amphipod species migrate between the benthos and the pelagic environment and light seems is a main ecological factor which regulates migration. We explore the effect of artificial lighting on amphipod assemblages using two kind of lights, LED and halogen, and control traps in shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef. Both types of artificial light traps showed a significantly higher abundance of individuals for all species in comparison to control traps. LED lights showed a stronger effect over the amphipod assemblages, with these traps collecting a higher number of individuals and differing species composition, with some species showing a specific attraction to LED light. As emergent amphipods are a key ecological group in the shallow water environment, the impact of artificial light can affect the broader functioning of the ecosystem. PMID:25817311

  1. Shallow land burial technology: Humid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. C.; Yeh, G. T.

    Trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste. Two finite-element hydrologic models were developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining, results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. Trench-cover subsidence measured over two of the three lined trenches did not occur over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. Results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at shallow land burial (SLB) sites with water-related problems.

  2. Sentence Processing in an Artificial Language: Learning and Using Combinatorial Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Michael S.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    A study combining artificial grammar and sentence comprehension methods investigated the learning and online use of probabilistic, nonadjacent combinatorial constraints. Participants learned a small artificial language describing cartoon monsters acting on objects. Self-paced reading of sentences in the artificial language revealed comprehenders'…

  3. Shallow-water models for gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Patrick James

    Gravity currents, produced by the instantaneous release of a finite volume of dense fluid beneath a layer of lighter fluid and overlying a spatially-varying rigid bottom boundary, are modelled as discontinuous solutions to the systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws arising from a shallow-water model. Equations of motion for two stably-stratified fluids of constant density are derived for the incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations for small aspect ratio flow in an Eulerian fluid, and the equations are nondimensionalized using a gravity current scaling so that they may be stated as a first order system of partial differential equations. The model equations neglect the effects of turbulence, entrainment, density stratification, and viscosity, but include the Coriolis force, variable topography, and bottom friction. Special cases are stated for one-layer three-dimensional axisymmetric flow, and in the two-dimensional case for flow with a free surface, rigid lid, thin upper or lower layer, or small density differences. These equations are then stated as a nonlinear system of conservation laws. The model equations are classified as hyperbolic, with defined regions of hyperbolicity stated where possible. When in conservation form, discontinuous solutions are considered, and the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions derived for solutions which are trivial on one side of the shock. The initial release problem is shown to be well-posed by the method of localization. By approximating a gravity current front as a vertical discontinuity, the initial release problem is solved numerically by use of a relaxation method designed for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws and adapted to include boundary conditions and forcing terms. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by several diagrams which show the effects of bottom slope and friction in the two-dimensional case, and of bottom slope and rotation in the three-dimensional one. Since the relaxation method is

  4. Microfluidic manipulation with artificial/bioinspired cilia.

    PubMed

    den Toonder, Jaap M J; Onck, Patrick R

    2013-02-01

    A recent development, inspired by nature, is the use of 'artificial cilia' to create pumping and/or mixing in microfluidic devices. Cilia are small hairs that can be found in biology and are used for (fluid) actuation and sensing. Microscopic actuators resembling cilia, actuated to move under the influence of various stimuli such as electrostatic field, magnetic field, and even light, have been developed by a number of groups and shown to be capable of generating flow and mixing in microfluidic environments. The research on artificial cilia started about a decade ago and is rapidly expanding. In addition to being relevant for potential application in lab-on-a-chip devices, the work on artificial cilia forms a beautiful example of how a biological system can form the successful basis for both scientific research and technological applications. In this review, we will give an overview of the most important approaches in this exciting field. PMID:23245658

  5. Artificial consciousness, artificial emotions, and autonomous robots.

    PubMed

    Cardon, Alain

    2006-12-01

    Nowadays for robots, the notion of behavior is reduced to a simple factual concept at the level of the movements. On another hand, consciousness is a very cultural concept, founding the main property of human beings, according to themselves. We propose to develop a computable transposition of the consciousness concepts into artificial brains, able to express emotions and consciousness facts. The production of such artificial brains allows the intentional and really adaptive behavior for the autonomous robots. Such a system managing the robot's behavior will be made of two parts: the first one computes and generates, in a constructivist manner, a representation for the robot moving in its environment, and using symbols and concepts. The other part achieves the representation of the previous one using morphologies in a dynamic geometrical way. The robot's body will be seen for itself as the morphologic apprehension of its material substrata. The model goes strictly by the notion of massive multi-agent's organizations with a morphologic control. PMID:17016730

  6. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  7. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  8. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  9. Artificial intelligence in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, G. M.; Varona, P.

    2013-11-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing use of artificial intelligence tools in nanotechnology research. In this paper we review some of these efforts in the context of interpreting scanning probe microscopy, the study of biological nanosystems, the classification of material properties at the nanoscale, theoretical approaches and simulations in nanoscience, and generally in the design of nanodevices. Current trends and future perspectives in the development of nanocomputing hardware that can boost artificial-intelligence-based applications are also discussed. Convergence between artificial intelligence and nanotechnology can shape the path for many technological developments in the field of information sciences that will rely on new computer architectures and data representations, hybrid technologies that use biological entities and nanotechnological devices, bioengineering, neuroscience and a large variety of related disciplines.

  10. Influence functions of a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L

    1997-04-01

    Thin shallow spherical shell theory is used to derive the general influence function, owing to uniform and/or discrete (actuators) loads, for a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror of uniform thickness with a central hole and supported at discrete points. Small elastic deformations are considered. No symmetry on the load distribution constrains the model. Explicit analytical expressions of the set of equations are given for calculating the influence functions. Results agree with the finite element analysis (FEA) to within 1%. When the FEA requires megabytes of RAM memory, the analytical method needs only kilobytes and typically runs 30 times faster. This is a crucial advantage for the iterative optimization of mirror supports such as large passive or active meniscus-shaped primary mirror supports or Cassegrain/Gregorian adaptive secondary actuator configurations. References are given on estimating the shear effects (thick mirror), the thickness variation effect, and the influence of the size of the support pads. PMID:18253168

  11. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Vanessa Moura; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013–2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future. PMID:27119151

  12. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Vanessa Moura Dos; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013-2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future. PMID:27119151

  13. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  14. Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

    2013-09-30

    The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

  15. Atmospheric Vortices in Shallow Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, G. D.; Spillane, K. T.; Lourensz, R. S.

    1988-03-01

    Observations of funnel clouds over Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia, indicate that they occur during outbreaks of cool air from the Southern Ocean advecting over the relatively warm bay waters. These clouds act as tracers for shallow convection vortices with dynamics similar to large dust devils. The related phenomena of waterspouts and tornadoes differ from these vortices by requiring deep convection and downdraft and updraft interactions associated with rain processes.Deardorff (1978a) suggests that a necessary condition for the formation of dust devils is /L of the order of 100 or more, where h is the convective boundary layer height and L the Obukhov length. Calculations of /L over the bay and over land for the days of observation are consistent with this suggestion. They indicate that significant rotation may occur at /L as low as 50. This information, if confirmed, may make it possible to use boundary layer numerical models to forecast likely conditions of dust devil occurrence over mesoscale regions, which would be of benefit to pilots of light aircraft and helicopters.

  16. Broadband performance of time-reversing arrays in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim Ghazi

    Active acoustic time reversal is the process of recording the signal from a remote source with a transducer array, and then replaying the signal in a time-reversed fashion to retro-direct the replayed sound back to the remote source to form a retrofocus, in an unknown environment. Time-Reversing Arrays (TRAs) perform well in the absence of acoustic absorption losses and temporal changes in the environment when there is sufficient array aperture and high signal-to-noise ratio. Future active sonar and underwater communication systems for use in unknown shallow ocean waters may be developed from the automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of TRAs. The performance of TRAs can be determined by four criteria: the size, the longevity and the field amplitude of the array's retrofocus, as well as the correlation of the retrofocus signal with a time-reversed version of the original signal. Four issues related to TRAs performance are investigated in this thesis: (i) the impact of noise, (ii) the influence of array and source motion, (iii) the effects of oceanic currents, and (iv) the effectiveness of blind deconvolution of the original signal via artificial time-reversal. Noise influences TRA performance twice because the array both listens and transmits. Degradation of TRA's performance caused by noise in the acoustic environment is investigated through an analytical formulation that can be reduced to an algebraic relationship for a simple noise model. Numerical experiments that illustrate this effort are also shown. Another limitation of TRA performance is the Doppler effect induced by the dynamic source-array configuration or the moving medium. Normal modes and parabolic equation simulations illustrate these influences for various oceanic waveguides and array geometry. Finally a novel blind deconvolution technique, artificial time-reversal (ATR), is developed for providing an estimate of an unknown source signal propagating in an unknown shallow oceanic

  17. Geomorphological mapping of shallow landslides using UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Giordan, Daniele; Dutto, Furio; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-04-01

    The mapping of event shallow landslides is a critical activity, due to the large number of phenomena, mostly with small dimension, affecting extensive areas. This is commonly done through aerial photo-interpretation or through field surveys. Nowadays, landslide maps can be realized exploiting other methods/technologies: (i) airborne LiDARs, (ii) stereoscopic satellite images, and (iii) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition to the landslide maps, these methods/technologies allow the generation of updated Digital Terrain Models (DTM). In December 2013, in the Collazzone area (Umbria, Central Italy), an intense rainfall event triggered a large number of shallow landslides. To map the landslides occurred in the area, we exploited data and images obtained through (A) an airborne LiDAR survey, (B) a remote controlled optocopter (equipped with a Canon EOS M) survey, and (C) a stereoscopic satellite WorldView II MS. To evaluate the mapping accuracy of these methods, we select two landslides and we mapped them using a GPS RTK instrumentation. We consider the GPS survey as the benchmark being the most accurate system. The results of the comparison allow to highlight pros and cons of the methods/technologies used. LiDAR can be considered the most accurate system and in addition it allows the extraction and the classification of the digital surface models from the surveyed point cloud. Conversely, LiDAR requires additional time for the flight planning, and specific data analysis user capabilities. The analysis of the satellite WorldView II MS images facilitates the landslide mapping over large areas, but at the expenses of a minor resolution to detect the smaller landslides and their boundaries. UAVs can be considered the cheapest and fastest solution for the acquisition of high resolution ortho-photographs on limited areas, and the best solution for a multi-temporal analysis of specific landslide phenomena. Limitations are due to (i) the needs of optimal climatic

  18. Artificial Intelligence and CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, John H.

    The potential application of artificial intelligence (AI) to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is explored. Two areas of AI that hold particular interest to those who deal with language meaning--knowledge representation and expert systems, and natural-language processing--are described and examples of each are presented. AI contribution…

  19. Applications of artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on expert systems and artificial intelligence. Topics considered at the conference included the location of multiple faults by diagnostic expert systems, knowledge-based systems, natural language, image processing, computer vision, and identification systems.

  20. The Artificial Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, D. R.

    An interim milestone for interstellar space travel is proposed: the artificial planet. Interstellar travel will require breakthroughs in the areas of propulsion systems, energy systems, construction of large space structures, protection from space & radiation effects, space agriculture, closed environmental & life support systems, and many other areas. Many difficult problems can be attacked independently of the propulsion and energy challenges through a project to establish an artificial planet in our solar system. Goals of the project would include construction of a large space structure, development of space agriculture, demonstration of closed environmental & life support systems over long time periods, selection of gravity level for long-term spacecraft, demonstration of a self-sufficient colony, and optimization of space colony habitat. The artificial planet would use solar energy as a power source. The orbital location will be selected to minimize effects of the Earth, yet be close enough for construction, supply, and rescue operations. The artificial planet would start out as a construction station and evolve over time to address progressive goals culminating in a self-sufficient space colony.

  1. Micromachined Artificial Haircell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor); Chen, Nannan (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A micromachined artificial sensor comprises a support coupled to and movable with respect to a substrate. A polymer, high-aspect ratio cilia-like structure is disposed on and extends out-of-plane from the support. A strain detector is disposed with respect to the support to detect movement of the support.

  2. Artificial intelligence and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, I.C.; Braddock, J.V.; Brown, W.; Langendorf, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report examines the state-of-the-art in artificial intelligence and robotics technologies and their potential in terms of Army needs. Assessment includes battlefield technology, research and technology insertions, management considerations and recommendations related to research and development personnel, and recommendations regarding the Army's involvement in the automated plant.

  3. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  4. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  5. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  6. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  7. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  8. Artificial intelligence. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of the field of artificial intelligence. It contains material covering the latest advances in control, representation, language, vision, and problem solving. Problem solving in design and analysis systems is addressed. Mitcell's version-space learning procedure, Morevec's reduced-images stereo procedure, and the Strips problem solver are covered.

  9. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  10. Artificial intelligence within AFSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information on artificial intelligence research in the Air Force Systems Command is given in viewgraph form. Specific research that is being conducted at the Rome Air Development Center, the Space Technology Center, the Human Resources Laboratory, the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, the Armamant Laboratory, and the Wright Research and Development Center is noted.

  11. Comparison between different approaches of modeling shallow landslide susceptibility: a case history in the area of Oltrepo Pavese, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizioli, D.; Meisina, C.; Valentino, R.; Montrasio, L.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow landslides are triggered by intense rainfalls of short duration. Even though they involve only small portions of hilly and mountainous terrains, they are the cause of heavy damages to people and infrastructures. The identification of shallow landslide prone-areas is, therefore, a necessity to plan mitigation measures. On the 27th and 28th of April 2009, the area of Oltrepo Pavese, northern Italy, was affected by a very intense rainfall event, which caused a great number of shallow landslides. These instability phenomena meanly occurred on slopes taken up by vineyards and caused damages to many roads and one human loss. On the basis of aerial photographs taken immediately after the event and field surveys, it was possible to detect more than 1,600 landslides. After acquiring all the information dealing with topography, geotechnical properties of the involved soils and land use, a susceptibility analysis on territorial scale has been carried out. The paper deals with the application and the comparison, on the study area, of different methods for the susceptibility assessment: a) the physically-based stability models TRIGRS (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Model, Baum et al., 2008), which is designed for modelling the potential occurrences of shallow landslides by incorporating the transient pressure response to rainfall and downward infiltration processes and SLIP (Shallow Landslides Instability Prediction; Montrasio, 2000; Montrasio and Valentino, 2008), which allows to dynamically take into account the connection between the stability condition of a slope, the characteristics of the soil, and the rainfall amounts, including also previous rainfalls; b) the logistic regression and the Neural Artificial Network (ANN) that take into account some important predisposing factors in the study area (slope angle, landform classification, the potential solar radiation, soil thickness, permeability, topographic ruggedness index

  12. Unconventional shallow biogenic gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shurr, G.W.; Ridgley, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Unconventional shallow biogenic gas falls into two distinct systems that have different attributes. Early-generation systems have blanketlike geometries, and gas generation begins soon after deposition of reservoir and source rocks. Late-generation systems have ringlike geometries, and long time intervals separate deposition of reservoir and source rocks from gas generation. For both types of systems, the gas is dominantly methane and is associated with source rocks that are not thermally mature. Early-generation biogenic gas systems are typified by production from low-permeability Cretaceous rocks in the northern Great Plains of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana. The main area of production is on the southeastern margin of the Alberta basin and the northwestern margin of the Williston basin. The huge volume of Cretaceous rocks has a generalized regional pattern of thick, non-marine, coarse clastics to the west and thinner, finer grained marine lithologies to the east. Reservoir rocks in the lower part tend to be finer grained and have lower porosity and permeability than those in the upper part. Similarly, source beds in the units have higher values of total organic carbon. Patterns of erosion, deposition, deformation, and production in both the upper and lower units are related to the geometry of lineament-bounded basement blocks. Geochemical studies show that gas and coproduced water are in equilibrium and that the fluids are relatively old, namely, as much as 66 Ma. Other examples of early-generation systems include Cretaceous clastic reservoirs on the southwestern margin of Williston basin and chalks on the eastern margin of the Denver basin. Late-generation biogenic gas systems have as an archetype the Devonian Antrim Shale on the northern margin of the Michigan basin. Reservoir rocks are fractured, organic-rich black shales that also serve as source rocks. Although fractures are important for production, the relationships to specific geologic structures are

  13. Shallow cumulus rooted in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.; Horn, G.; Sikma, M.; Jacobs, C. M.; Baldocchi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between plant evapotranspiration, controlled by photosynthesis (for a low vegetation cover by C3 and C4 grasses), and the moist thermals that are responsible for the formation and development of shallow cumulus clouds (SCu). We perform systematic numerical experiments at fine spatial scales using large-eddy simulations explicitly coupled to a plant-physiology model. To break down the complexity of the vegetation-atmospheric system at the diurnal scales, we design the following experiments with increasing complexity: (a) clouds that are transparent to radiation, (b) clouds that shade the surface from the incoming shortwave radiation and (c) plant stomata whose apertures react with an adjustment in time to cloud perturbations. The shading by SCu leads to a strong spatial variability in photosynthesis and the surface energy balance. As a result, experiment (b) simulates SCu that are characterized by less extreme and less skewed values of the liquid water path and cloud-base height. These findings are corroborated by the calculation of characteristics lengths scales of the thermals and clouds using autocorrelation and spectral analysis methods. We find that experiments (a) and (b) are characterized by similar cloud cover evolution, but different cloud population characteristics. Experiment (b), including cloud shading, is characterized by smaller clouds, but closer to each other. By performing a sensitivity analysis on the exchange of water vapor and carbon dioxide at the canopy level, we show that the larger water-use efficiency of C4 grass leads to two opposing effects that directly influence boundary-layer clouds: the thermals below the clouds are more vigorous and deeper driven by a larger buoyancy surface flux (positive effect), but are characterized by less moisture content (negative effect). We conclude that under the investigated mid-latitude atmospheric and well-watered soil conditions, SCu over C4 grass fields is characterized

  14. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for the development of artificial gravity environments on spacecraft are outlined. The physiological effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular skeletal, and vestibular systems are enumerated. Design options for creating artificial gravity environments are shown.

  15. Nanocontroller update: building a better artificial neuron.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Recent progress in microprocessor design has produced sophisticated 8-bit single-chip microcontrollers in small packages. These user-programmable "nanocontrollers", some with as few as eight pins, now include a variety of linear on-chip components. Miniscule complex mixed digital and analog systems are now possible. This paper outlines some of these advances, then describes how using these new microcontroller features to create a better artificial neuron have improved the author's ten-year-old neural network design. PMID:12085647

  16. Rearing insects on artificial diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects are reared in the laboratory for various purposes. They may be reared either on their natural food or artificial diets. Developing artificial diets may be difficult and time consuming but once optimized, artificial diets usually are simple to prepare and easy to use. Because they are process...

  17. Artificial Intelligence and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorescu, Ioana

    1987-01-01

    Compares artificial intelligence and information retrieval paradigms for natural language understanding, reviews progress to date, and outlines the applicability of artificial intelligence to question answering systems. A list of principal artificial intelligence software for database front end systems is appended. (CLB)

  18. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Weightlessness produces significant physiological changes. Whether these changes will stabilize or achieve medical significance is not clear. Artificial gravity is the physiological countermeasure, and the tether system represents an attractive approach to artificial gravity. The need for artificial gravity is examined.

  19. Shallow-deep transitions of impurities in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, V.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2003-03-01

    We study the hydrogenic impurity in a quantum dot (QD). We employ the effective mass theory with realistic barrier and variable effective mass. The model is simple, but it predicts features not previously observed. We observe that the shallow hydrogenic impurity becomes deeper as the dot size (R) is reduced and with further reduction of the dot size it becomes shallow and at times resonant with the conduction band. Such a shallow-deep (SHADE) transition is investigated and a critical size in terms of the impurity Bohr radius (aI*) is identified. A relevant aspect of a QD is reduction in the dielectric constant, epsilon, as its size decreases. Employing a size dependent epsilon(R), we demonstrate that the impurity level gets exceptionally deep in systems for which aI* is small. Thus, carrier "freeze out" is a distinct possibility in a wide class of materials such as ZnS, CdS, etc. The behavior of the impurity level with dot size is understood on the basis of simple scaling arguments. Calculations are presented for III-V (AlGaAs) and II-VI (ZnS, CdS) QDs. We speculate that the deepening of the impurity level is related to the high luminescence efficiency of QDs. It is suggested that quantum dots offer an opportunity for defect engineering.

  20. Shallow-deep transitions of impurities in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, V.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2001-06-01

    We study the hydrogenic impurity in a quantum dot (QD). We employ the effective mass theory with realistic barrier and variable effective mass. The model is simple, but it predicts features not previously observed. We observe that the shallow hydrogenic impurity becomes deeper as the dot size (R) is reduced and with further reduction of the dot size it becomes shallow and at times resonant with the conduction band. Such a shallow-deep (SHADE) transition is investigated and a critical size in terms of the impurity Bohr radius (aI*) is identified. A relevant aspect of a QD is reduction in the dielectric constant, ɛ, as its size decreases. Employing a size dependent ɛ(R), we demonstrate that the impurity level gets exceptionally deep in systems for which aI* is small. Thus, carrier "freeze out" is a distinct possibility in a wide class of materials such as ZnS, CdS, etc. The behavior of the impurity level with dot size is understood on the basis of simple scaling arguments. Calculations are presented for III-V (AlGaAs) and II-VI (ZnS, CdS) QDs. We speculate that the deepening of the impurity level is related to the high luminescence efficiency of QDs. It is suggested that quantum dots offer an opportunity for defect engineering.

  1. Sediment dynamics in shallow tidal basins: In situ observations, satellite retrievals, and numerical modeling in the Venice Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, L.; Silvestri, S.; Marani, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Volpe, V.; Defina, A.

    2014-04-01

    The morphological evolution of shallow tidal systems strongly depends on gradients in transport that control sediment erosion and deposition. A spatially refined quantitative description of suspended sediment patterns and dynamics is therefore a key requirement to address issues connected with dynamical trends, responses, and conservation of these systems. Here we use a combination of numerical models of sediment transport dynamics, high temporal resolution point observations, and high spatial resolution remote sensing data to overcome the intrinsic limitations of traditional monitoring approaches and to establish the robustness of numerical models in reproducing space-time suspended sediment concentration (SSC) patterns. The comparison of SSC distributions in the Venice Lagoon (Italy) computed with a numerical model with SSC retrievals from remote sensing data allows us to define the ability of the model to properly describe spatial patterns and gradients in the SSC fields. The use of point observations similarly allows us to constrain the model temporally, thus leading to a complete space-time evaluation of model abilities. Our results highlight the fundamental control exerted on sediment transport intensity and patterns by the sheltering effect associated with artificial and natural intertidal landforms. Furthermore, we show how the stabilizing effect of benthic vegetation is a main control of sediment dynamics at the system scale, confirming a notion previously established in the laboratory or at small field scales.

  2. On the Calculation of Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambartsumyan, S. A.

    1956-01-01

    This paper considers a sufficiently thin shallow shell of nonzero Gaussian curvature. It also presents a system of symmetrically constructed differential equations, constructed by the mixed method through the stress function and the displpacement function.

  3. Growth Characteristics Downstream of a Shallow Bump: Computation and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity field created by a shallow bump on a wall revealed that an energy peak in the spanwise spectrum associated with the driver decays and an initially small-amplitude secondary mode rapidly grows with distance downstream of the bump. Linear theories could not provide an explanation for this growing mode. The present Navier-Stokes simulation replicates and confirms the experimental results. Insight into the structure of the flow was obtained from a study of the results of the calculations and is presented.

  4. Mixing and shocks in geophysical shallow water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Tivon

    In the first section, a reduced two-layer shallow water model for fluid mixing is described. The model is a nonlinear hyperbolic quasilinear system of partial differential equations, derived by taking the limit as the upper layer becomes infinitely deep. It resembles the shallow water equations, but with an active buoyancy. Fluid entrainment is supposed to occur from the upper layer to the lower. Several physically motivated closures are proposed, including a robust closure based on maximizing a mixing entropy (also defined and derived) at shocks. The structure of shock solutions is examined. The Riemann problem is solved by setting the shock speed to maximize the production of mixing entropy. Shock-resolving finite-volume numerical models are presented with and without topographic forcing. Explicit shock tracking is required for strong shocks. The constraint that turbulent energy production be positive is considered. The model has geophysical applications in studying the dynamics of dense sill overflows in the ocean. The second section discusses stationary shocks of the shallow water equations in a reentrant rotating channel with wind stress and topography. Asymptotic predictions for the shock location, strength, and associated energy dissipation are developed by taking the topographic perturbation to be small. The scaling arguments for the asymptotics are developed by demanding integrated energy and momentum balance, with the result that the free surface perturbation is of the order of the square root of the topographic perturbation. Shock formation requires that linear waves be nondispersive, which sets a solvability condition on the mean flow and which leads to a class of generalized Kelvin waves. Two-dimensional shock-resolving numerical simulations validate the asymptotic expressions and demonstrate the presence of stationary separated flow shocks in some cases. Geophysical applications are considered. Overview sections on shock-resolving numerical methods

  5. Stably Stratified Flow in a Shallow Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    2016-07-01

    Stratified nocturnal flow above and within a small valley of approximately 12-m depth and a few hundred metres width is examined as a case study, based on a network of 20 sonic anemometers and a central 20-m tower with eight levels of sonic anemometers. Several regimes of stratified flow over gentle topography are conceptually defined for organizing the data analysis and comparing with the existing literature. In our case study, a marginal cold pool forms within the shallow valley in the early evening but yields to larger ambient wind speeds after a few hours, corresponding to stratified terrain-following flow where the flow outside the valley descends to the valley floor. The terrain-following flow lasts about 10 h and then undergoes transition to an intermittent marginal cold pool towards the end of the night when the larger-scale flow collapses. During this 10-h period, the stratified terrain-following flow is characterized by a three-layer structure, consisting of a thin surface boundary layer of a few metres depth on the valley floor, a deeper boundary layer corresponding to the larger-scale flow, and an intermediate transition layer with significant wind-directional shear and possible advection of lee turbulence that is generated even for the gentle topography of our study. The flow in the valley is often modulated by oscillations with a typical period of 10 min. Cold events with smaller turbulent intensity and duration of tens of minutes move through the observational domain throughout the terrain-following period. One of these events is examined in detail.

  6. Artificial neural superposition eye.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-09-17

    We propose an ultra-thin imaging system which is based on the neural superposition compound eye of insects. Multiple light sensitive pixels in the footprint of each lenslet of this multi-channel configuration enable the parallel imaging of the individual object points. Together with the digital superposition of related signals this multiple sampling enables advanced functionalities for artificial compound eyes. Using this technique, color imaging and a circumvention for the trade-off between resolution and sensitivity of ultra-compact camera devices have been demonstrated in this article. The optical design and layout of such a system is discussed in detail. Experimental results are shown which indicate the attractiveness of microoptical artificial compound eyes for applications in the field of machine vision, surveillance or automotive imaging. PMID:19547555

  7. Developing better artificial bones.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Edward D

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space at the Colorado School of Mines are preparing the Space-DRUMS (Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix Systems) materials processing facility for transport to the International Space Station. The Space-DRUMS uses acoustic pressure beams to maintain the position of a suspended liquid or solid. Space-DRUMS will be used to extend experiments with tricalcium phosphate in the development of artificial bone material. PMID:12524712

  8. Artificial gravity Mars spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1989-01-01

    Experience gained in the study of artificial gravity for a manned trip to Mars is reviewed, and a snowflake-configured interplanetary vehicle cluster of habitat modules, descent vehicles, and propulsion systems is presented. An evolutionary design is described which permits sequential upgrading from five to nine crew members, an increase of landers from one to as many a three per mission, and an orderly, phased incorporation of advanced technologies as they become available.

  9. Applications Of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Mohan M.; Gilmore, John F.

    1986-03-01

    Intelligence evolves out of matter, so said the Sankhya philosophers of ancient India. The discipline of artificial intelligence (Al), which was established some 30 years ago, has confirmed the validity of the above assertion. Recently, a number of AI applications have been successfully demonstrated, generating a great deal of excitement and interest in scientific and technical circles. In this special issue of Optical Engineering a representative set of applications that incorporate Al principles is presented.

  10. Whither Artificial Reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Percival-Smith, Robin

    1985-01-01

    Artificial reproduction now offers sub fertile couples a number of options which raise scientific and ethical questions. This article discusses the Canadian and British experiences in formulating regulations and legislation in this important field. Current work on mammalian embryo research foretells the direction which human research will take. This article stresses the need for family physicians' participation in the ethical decisions that accompany these new developments. PMID:21274181

  11. Polish artificial heart program.

    PubMed

    El Fray, Miroslawa; Czugala, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the development of artificial heart substitutes, anthrombogenic materials and surfaces remain to be the main challenge for implants, which can prevent thrombosis that leads to rejection. The goal of material engineering is essentially to design polymeric materials of high durability and optimal thrombogenicity in mechanical heart prosthesis, being developed recently in a frame of the polish artificial heart program. For these reasons, various surface modifications are being continuously developed for a 'gold standard' material, which is a polyurethane (PU) thermoplastic elastomer and they will be shortly reviewed. However, new polymeric materials can meet medical word's attention if they are able to provide similar or better characteristics in term of bulk and surface properties. Specifically, if they will show appropriate surface topography, which is the most influential in determining the response of live tissues toward biomaterials. Nanostructured polyester thermoplastic elastomers of high biodurability as an alternative to PU materials for artificial heart are challenging new materials, and they will be discussed briefly. PMID:22110047

  12. [Liver and artificial liver].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A

    1998-06-01

    Despite good results of orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure the need still exists for an effective and safe artificial liver, able to temporarily take over the complex liver function so as to bridge the gap with transplantation or regeneration. Attempts to develop non-biological artificial livers have failed, mostly when controlled clinical trials were performed. In the last decade several different types of bioartificial livers have been devised, in which the biocomponent consists of freshly isolated porcine hepatocytes or a human hepatoblastoma cell line. The majority use semipermeable hollow fibers known from artificial kidney devices. The liver cells may lie either inside or outside the lumen of these fibers. In vitro analysis of liver function and animal experimental work showing that the bioartificial liver increases survival justify clinical application. Bioartificial livers are connected to patients extracorporeally by means of plasmapheresis circuit for periods of about 6 hours. In different trials about 40 patients with severe liver failure have been treated. No important adverse effects have not been reported in these phase I trials. Results of controlled studies are urgently needed. As long as no satisfactory immortalised human liver cell line with good function is available, porcine hepatocytes will remain the first choice, provided transmission of porcine pathogens to man is prevented. PMID:9752034

  13. Carbon dioxide fixation by artificial photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ibusuki, Takashi; Koike, Kazuhide; Ishitani, Osamu

    1993-12-31

    Green plants can absorb atmospheric CO{sub 2} and transform it to sugars, carbohydrates through their photosynthetic systems, but they become the source of CO{sub 2} when they are dead. This is the reason why artificial leaves which can be alive forever should be developed to meet with global warming due to the increase of CO{sub 2} concentration. The goal of artificial photosynthesis is not to construct the same system as the photosynthetic one, but to mimic the ability of green plants to utilize solar energy to make high energy chemicals. Needless to say, the artificial photosynthetic system is desired to be as simple as possible and to be as efficient as possible. From the knowledge on photosynthesis and the results of previous investigations, the critical components of artificial photosynthetic system are understood as follows: (1) light harvesting chromophore, (2) a center for electron transfer and charge separation, (3) catalytic sites for converting small molecules like water and CO{sub 2} (mutilelectron reactions) which are schematically described.

  14. Biologically inspired robots as artificial inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2002-06-01

    Imagine an inspector conducting an NDE on an aircraft where you notice something is different about him - he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your first reaction would probably be to say 'it's unbelievable but he looks real' just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. This science fiction scenario could become a reality at the trend in the development of biologically inspired technologies, and terms like artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. For many years, the trend has been to automate processes in order to increase the efficiency of performing redundant tasks where various systems have been developed to deal with specific production line requirements. Realizing that some parts are too complex or delicate to handle in small quantities with a simple automatic system, robotic mechanisms were developed. Aircraft inspection has benefitted from this evolving technology where manipulators and crawlers are developed for rapid and reliable inspection. Advancement in robotics towards making them autonomous and possibly look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures that are beyond the capability of today's technology with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of these robots may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Making such robots is becoming increasingly feasible and in this paper the state of the art will be reviewed.

  15. Geophysical characterization of shallow karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Jordi, Claudio; Sollberger, David; Doetsch, Joseph; Kaufmann, Manuela; Robertsson, Johan; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2015-04-01

    -wave velocity tomograms and resistivity images exhibit significant parameter variations in both the horizontal and vertical directions; the P-wave tomograms, for example, indicate velocity changes from a few hundred to a few thousand m/s over short distances for carbonate rocks close to the surface. These variations in physical parameters are likely caused by changes in the lithology and in the degree of karstification, with the latter seeming to be the dominating factor. With respect to the karst impact on seismic wave propagation, we observe pronounced lateral changes in the characteristics of the densely sampled wavefield. For example, distinct changes in the surface-wavetrain characteristics can be related to strong lateral seismic-velocity changes observed in the tomograms. ERT-derived resistivity models show sub-horizontal layering at the 10-meter scale with an orientation (dip, strike) that agrees with the geological model of the area. The complementary EM soundings largely concur with the shallow ERT models, but ERT and EM results show only moderate correlation with the P-wave tomograms indicating that seismic and electric/electromagnetic properties of the karstified carbonates are only weakly linked. The GPR images show shallowly dipping reflectors with dips that are in overall agreement with observed dips of the surface-exposed bedding.

  16. A method for measuring vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of soft, shallow-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Marin, P.E.; Black, B.K.; Lynch, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution measures of vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of shallow-water sediments are fundamental to understanding the processes that control elevation change and the mechanisms of progradation (e.g., development of mudflats and intertidal wetlands) in coastal systems. Yet, measurements of elevation by traditional survey methods often are of low accuracy because of the compressible nature of the substrates. Nor do they provide measures of vertical accretion or sediment compaction. This paper evaluates the use in shallow-water systems of an approach designed to measure these variables in vegetated wetlands. The approach employs simultaneous measures of elevation from temporary benchmarks using a sedimentation-erosion table (SET) and vertical accretion from marker horizons with sediment cores collected with a cryogenic coring apparatus. The measures are made with a level of resolution sufficient to distinguish between the influence of surface and subsurface processes on elevation, thus providing quantitative estimates of shallow subsidence. The SET-marker horizon approach was evaluated on a developing splay created by an artificial crevasse of a distributary in the Mississippi River delta. The approach provided high-resolution measures of vertical accretion (48.3 ' 2.0 cm.) and elevation (36.7 ' 1.6 cm) over a 4-year period, with the difference between the two indicating the amount of shallow subsidence. In addition, by laying new marker horizons in later years, the approach provided rates not only of shallow subsidence (3.9 ' 0.5 cm y-1) but also compaction of newly deposited seiments (2.1 ' 0.6 cm y-1) and compaction of underlying sediments (1.8 ' 2.0 cm y-1 ) over a two-year period. Hence, the SET-marker horizon approach has widespread applicability in both emergent wetland and shallow water environments for providing high resolution measures of the processes controlling elevation change.

  17. Contrasting Fish Behavior in Artificial Seascapes with Implications for Resources Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Koeck, Barbara; Alós, Josep; Caro, Anthony; Neveu, Reda; Crec'hriou, Romain; Saragoni, Gilles; Lenfant, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Artificial reefs are used by many fisheries managers as a tool to mitigate the impact of fisheries on coastal fish communities by providing new habitat for many exploited fish species. However, the comparison between the behavior of wild fish inhabiting either natural or artificial habitats has received less attention. Thus the spatio-temporal patterns of fish that establish their home range in one habitat or the other and their consequences of intra-population differentiation on life-history remain largely unexplored. We hypothesize that individuals with a preferred habitat (i.e. natural vs. artificial) can behave differently in terms of habitat use, with important consequences on population dynamics (e.g. life-history, mortality, and reproductive success). Therefore, using biotelemetry, 98 white seabream (Diplodus sargus) inhabiting either artificial or natural habitats were tagged and their behavior was monitored for up to eight months. Most white seabreams were highly resident either on natural or artificial reefs, with a preference for the shallow artificial reef subsets. Connectivity between artificial and natural reefs was limited for resident individuals due to great inter-habitat distances. The temporal behavioral patterns of white seabreams differed between artificial and natural reefs. Artificial-reef resident fish had a predominantly nocturnal diel pattern, whereas natural-reef resident fish showed a diurnal diel pattern. Differences in diel behavioral patterns of white seabream inhabiting artificial and natural reefs could be the expression of realized individual specialization resulting from differences in habitat configuration and resource availability between these two habitats. Artificial reefs have the potential to modify not only seascape connectivity but also the individual behavioral patterns of fishes. Future management plans of coastal areas and fisheries resources, including artificial reef implementation, should therefore consider the

  18. Hydrologic control of dissolved organic matter concentration and quality in a semiarid artificially drained agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellmore, Rebecca A.; Harrison, John A.; Needoba, Joseph A.; Brooks, Erin S.; Kent Keller, C.

    2015-10-01

    Agricultural practices have altered watershed-scale dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics, including in-stream concentration, biodegradability, and total catchment export. However, mechanisms responsible for these changes are not clear, and field-scale processes are rarely directly linked to the magnitude and quality of DOM that is transported to surface water. In a small (12 ha) agricultural catchment in eastern Washington State, we tested the hypothesis that hydrologic connectivity in a catchment is the dominant control over the concentration and quality of DOM exported to surface water via artificial subsurface drainage. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humic-like components of DOM decreased while the Fluorescence Index and Freshness Index increased with depth through the soil profile. In drain discharge, these characteristics were significantly correlated with drain flow across seasons and years, with drain DOM resembling deep sources during low-flow and shallow sources during high flow, suggesting that DOM from shallow sources bypasses removal processes when hydrologic connectivity in the catchment is greatest. Assuming changes in streamflow projected for the Palouse River (which contains the study catchment) under the A1B climate scenario (rapid growth, dependence on fossil fuel, and renewable energy sources) apply to the study catchment, we project greater interannual variability in annual DOC export in the future, with significant increases in the driest years. This study highlights the variability in DOM inputs from agricultural soil to surface water on daily to interannual time scales, pointing to the need for a more nuanced understanding of agricultural impacts on DOM dynamics in surface water.

  19. Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical estuaries are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), a small and shallow estuary located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the estuary. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the estuary are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the estuary. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire estuary. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern. PMID:23122270

  20. Polar Vortices in Shallow Water Simulations of Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Morgan E.; Emanuel, Kerry

    2014-11-01

    Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune each exhibit unique polar atmospheric behavior. Assuming these flows are due to shallow dynamics, we explore the parameter space potentially responsible for the difference between each planet's polar features. The best observations have come from the Cassini misson to Saturn. Among many discoveries, a massive, warm and cyclonic vortex has been observed on each pole. The South Polar Vortex (SPV), specifically, has the highest measured temperatures on Saturn, a double eyewall, deep eye and a rapid cyclonic jet with the second highest windspeeds observed on the planet. Numerous small, vortical, and potentially convective systems are embedded within the large-scale flow of the SPV. Given these observations, we explore one potential mechanism of polar vortex maintenance: up-scale, poleward vorticity flux due to vortical hot towers (VHTs). Large GCMs cannot yet resolve local deep convection in the weather layer. Using a reduced gravity shallow water model on a polar beta plane, we represent convective towers with mass-flux driven vortex pairs and allow them to move freely. We show that there exist multiple regimes of polar flow, and that small and/or quickly rotating planets with sufficient total energy favor a polar cyclone in our simulations.

  1. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems. PMID:16203606

  2. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  3. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  4. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  5. Artificial Vision: Vision of a Newcomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikado, Takashi; Sawai, Hajime; Tano, Yasuo

    The Japanese Consortium for an Artificial Retina has developed a new stimulating method named Suprachoroidal-Transretinal Stimulation (STS). Using STS, electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) were effectively elicited in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats and in rabbits and cats with normal vision, using relatively small stimulus currents, such that the spatial resolution appeared to be adequate for a visual prosthesis. The histological analysis showed no damage to the rabbit retina when electrical currents sufficient to elicit distinct EEPs were applied. It was also shown that transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) to the retina prevented the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). STS, which is less invasive than other retinal prostheses, could be one choice to achieve artificial vision, and the optimal parameters of electrical stimulation may also be effective for the neuroprotection of residual RGCs.

  6. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by indigenous aquifer microorganisms under natural and artificial oxic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.; Herlong, H.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial communities indigenous to a shallow groundwater system near Beaufort, SC, degraded milligram per liter concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under natural and artificial oxic conditions. Significant MTBE biodegradation was observed where anoxic, MTBE-contaminated groundwater discharged to a concrete-lined ditch. In the anoxic groundwater adjacent to the ditch, concentrations of MTBE were > 1 mg/L. Where groundwater discharge occurs, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations beneath the ditch exceeded 1.0 mg/L to a depth of 1.5 m, and MTBE concentrations decreased to <1 ??g/L prior to discharge. MTBE mass flux calculations indicate that 96% of MTBE mass loss occurs in the relatively small oxic zone prior to discharge. Samples of a natural microbial biofilm present in the oxic zone beneath the ditch completely degraded [U-14C]MTBE to [14C]CO2 in laboratory liquid culture studies, with no accumulation of intermediate compounds. Upgradient of the ditch in the anoxic, MTBE and BTEX-contaminated aquifer, addition of a soluble oxygen release compound resulted in oxic conditions and rapid MTBE biodegradation by indigenous microorganisms. In an observation well located closest to the oxygen addition area, DO concentrations increased from 0.4 to 12 mg/L in <60 days and MTBE concentrations decreased from 20 to 3 mg/L. In the same time period at a downgradient observation well, DO increased from <0.2 to 2 mg/L and MTBE concentrations decreased from 30 to <5 mg/L. These results indicate that microorganisms indigenous to the groundwater system at this site can degrade milligram per liter concentrations of MTBE under natural and artificial oxic conditions.

  7. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by indigenous aquifer microorganisms under natural and artificial oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Landmeyer, J E; Chapelle, F H; Herlong, H H; Bradley, P M

    2001-03-15

    Microbial communities indigenous to a shallow groundwater system near Beaufort, SC, degraded milligram per liter concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under natural and artificial oxic conditions. Significant MTBE biodegradation was observed where anoxic, MTBE-contaminated groundwater discharged to a concrete-lined ditch. In the anoxic groundwater adjacent to the ditch, concentrations of MTBE were > 1 mg/L. Where groundwater discharge occurs, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations beneath the ditch exceeded 1.0 mg/Lto a depth of 1.5 m, and MTBE concentrations decreased to <1 microg/L prior to discharge. MTBE mass flux calculations indicate that 96% of MTBE mass loss occurs in the relatively small oxic zone prior to discharge. Samples of a natural microbial biofilm present in the oxic zone beneath the ditch completely degraded [U-14C]MTBE to [14C]CO2 in laboratory liquid culture studies, with no accumulation of intermediate compounds. Upgradient of the ditch in the anoxic, MTBE- and BTEX-contaminated aquifer, addition of a soluble oxygen release compound resulted in oxic conditions and rapid MTBE biodegradation by indigenous microorganisms. In an observation well located closest to the oxygen addition area, DO concentrations increased from 0.4 to 12 mg/L in <60 days and MTBE concentrations decreased from 20 to 3 mg/L. In the same time period at a downgradient observation well, DO increased from <0.2 to 2 mg/L and MTBE concentrations decreased from 30 to <5 mg/L. These results indicate that microorganisms indigenous to the groundwater system at this site can degrade milligram per liter concentrations of MTBE under natural and artificial oxic conditions. PMID:11347923

  8. A Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Mecedonio, G.

    2009-04-01

    Geophysical flows such as lahars or lava flows severely threat the communities located on or near the volcano flanks. Risks and damages caused by the propagation of this kind of flows require a quantitative description of this phenomenon and reliable tools for forecasting their emplacement. Computational models are a valuable tool for planning risk mitigation countermeasures, such as human intervention to force flow diversion, artificial barriers, and allow for significant economical and social benefits. A FORTRAN 90 code based on a Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flows (SLAG) for describing transport and emplacement of diluted lahars, water and lava was developed in both serial and parallel version. Three rheological models, such as those describing i) a viscous, ii) a turbulent, and iii) a dilatant flow respectively, were implemented in order to describe transport of lavas, water and diluted lahars. The code was made user-friendly by creating some interfaces that allow the user to easily define the problem, extract and interpolate the topography of the simulation domain. Moreover SLAG outputs can be written in both GRD format (e.g., Surfer), NetCDF format, or visualized directly in GoogleEarth. In SLAG the governing equations were treated using a Godunov splitting method following George (2008) algorithm based on a Riemann solver for the shallow water equations that decomposes an augmented state variable the depth, momentum, momentum flux, and bathymetry into four propagating discontinuities or waves. For our application, the algorithm was generalized for solving the energy equation. For validating the code in simulating real geophysical flows, we performed few simulations the lava flow event of the the 3rd and 4th January 1992 Etna eruption, the July 2001 Etna lava flows, January 2002 Nyragongo lava flows and few test cases for simulating transport of diluted lahars. Ref: George, D.L. (2008), Augmented Riemann Solvers for the Shallow Water Equations over Variable

  9. Unravelling the nocturnal appearance of bogue Boops boops shoals in the anthropogenically modified shallow littoral.

    PubMed

    Mavraki, N; Georgiadis, M; Koutsikopoulos, C; Tzanatos, E

    2016-05-01

    In the present study the role of the nocturnal migration of bogue Boops boops shoals to anthropogenically modified shallow littoral locations was examined, evaluating four alternative hypotheses: (1) feeding, (2) reproduction, (3) attraction of B. boops to artificial light and (4) concealment in the darkness related to predation avoidance. All hypotheses apart from predation avoidance were rejected, as B. boops tended to concentrate in shaded locations of wider illuminated areas, a finding not only important concerning fish behaviour, but also with significant management implications. PMID:27094613

  10. Shallow waters: The ``other'' Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Perdue, J.M.

    2000-04-01

    The US Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported 3.21 billion bbl of petroleum and 30.8 Tcf of natural gas remained at the end of 1997 as proved reserves on the shelf. That is a 14.6% increase in oil reserves and a 4.5% increase in gas reserves compared to the previous year's estimates. An additional 1.03 billion bbl of oil and 3.9 Tcf of gas are estimated to be unproved reserves in 51 unproved active fields, with 16 other unproved fields not yet studied. The small fields that remain on the continental shelf account for 22% of US oil production (800,000 b/d) and 27% of the country's natural gas production (13 Bcf). Of the nearly 8,200 active leases on the shelf, a mere 200 account for the lion's share of this oil and gas. But that doesn't mean there aren't any new fields left to find.

  11. Development of artificial empathy.

    PubMed

    Asada, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been advocating cognitive developmental robotics to obtain new insight into the development of human cognitive functions by utilizing synthetic and constructive approaches. Among the different emotional functions, empathy is difficult to model, but essential for robots to be social agents in our society. In my previous review on artificial empathy (Asada, 2014b), I proposed a conceptual model for empathy development beginning with emotional contagion to envy/schadenfreude along with self/other differentiation. In this article, the focus is on two aspects of this developmental process, emotional contagion in relation to motor mimicry, and cognitive/affective aspects of the empathy. It begins with a summary of the previous review (Asada, 2014b) and an introduction to affective developmental robotics as a part of cognitive developmental robotics focusing on the affective aspects. This is followed by a review and discussion on several approaches for two focused aspects of affective developmental robotics. Finally, future issues involved in the development of a more authentic form of artificial empathy are discussed. PMID:25498950

  12. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  13. SHALLOW HABITATS IN TWO RHODE ISLAND SYSTEMS: II. PATTERNS OF SIZE, STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are examining habitats in small estuarine coves that may be important for the development of ecological indicators of integrity. We sampled nekton in Coggeshall Cove (shallow estuarine cove) in summer 1999 and 2000 and Ninigret Pond (coastal lagoon) in summer 2000. Coggeshall ...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF THE THERMAL SHALLOW RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, G.D.

    1985-01-22

    The Geysers was discovered in 1847, and its therapeutic mineral baths were widely recognized by 1880. It was not until 1921, however, that the first steam well at The Geysers was drilled. Between 1922 and 1925, eight additional wells were drilled and tested as reported by Allen and Day. Development activity ceased until 1955 when Magma Power Company drilled the first ''commercial'' well. This success led to additional drilling in the Thermal Shallow Reservoir and the commissioning of a 12 MW power plant in September 1960, followed by a 14 MW power plant in February, 1963. This completed the commercial development of the Thermal shallow Reservoir.

  15. On the role of artificial viscosity in Navier-Stokes solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine directly the amount of artificial viscosity needed for stability using an eigenvalue analysis for a finite difference representation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The stability and growth of small perturbations about a steady flow over the airfoils are analyzed for various amounts of artificial viscosity. The eigenvalues were determined for a small perturbation about a steady inviscid flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil at a Mach number of 0.8 and angle of attack of 0 degrees. The movement of the eigenvalue constellation with respect to the amount of artificial viscosity is studied. The stability boundries as a function of the amount of artificial viscosity from both the eigenvalue analysis and the time marching scheme are also presented. This procedure not only allows for determining the effect of varying amounts of artificial viscosity, but also for the effects of different forms of terms for artificial viscosity.

  16. Artificial meteor test towards: On-demand meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Okajima, L.; Sahara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Nishizono, T.

    2016-01-01

    An arc-heated wind tunnel is widely used for ground-based experiments to simulate environments of the planetary atmospheric entry under hypersonic and high-temperature conditions. In order to understand details of a meteor ablation such as temperature, composition ratio and fragmentation processes, the artificial meteor test was carried out using a JAXA/ISAS arc-heated wind tunnel. High-heating rate around 30 MW/m2 and High-enthalpy conditions, 10000 K arc-heated flow at velocity around 6 km/s were provided. Newly developed artificial metallic meteoroids and real meteorites such as Chelyabinsk were used for the ablation test. The data obtained by near-ultraviolet and visible spectrograph (200 and 1100nm) and high-speed camera (50 μs) have been examined to develop more efficient artificial meteor materials. We will test artificial meteors from a small satellite in 2018.

  17. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected. PMID:18957747

  18. Exploration of Artificial Frustrated Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-02-17

    This program encompasses experimental and theoretical studies of arrays of nanometer-scale magnets known as “artificial frustrated magnets”. These magnets are small and closely spaced, so that their behavior as a collective group is complex and reveals insights into how such collections of interacting objects behave as a group. In particular, the placement of the magnets is such that the interactions between them are “frustrated”, in that they compete with each other. These systems are analogs to a class of magnetic materials in which the lattice geometry frustrates interactions between individual atomic moments, and in which a wide range of novel physical phenomena have been recently observed. The advantage to studying the arrays is that they are both designable and resolvable: i.e., the experiments can control all aspects of the array geometry, and can also observe how individual elements of the arrays behave. This research program demonstrated a number of phenomena including the role of multiple collective interactions, the feasibility of using systems with their magnetism aligned perpendicular to the plane of the array, the importance of disorder in the arrays, and the possibility of using high temperatures to adjust the magnet orientations. All of these phenomena, and others explored in this program, add to the body of knowledge around collective magnetic behavior and magnetism in general. Aside from building scientific knowledge in an important technological area, with relevance to computing and memory, the program also gave critical support to the education of students working on the experiments.

  19. Artificial organs: recent progress in artificial hearing and vision.

    PubMed

    Ifukube, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    Artificial sensory organs are a prosthetic means of sending visual or auditory information to the brain by electrical stimulation of the optic or auditory nerves to assist visually impaired or hearing-impaired people. However, clinical application of artificial sensory organs, except for cochlear implants, is still a trial-and-error process. This is because how and where the information transmitted to the brain is processed is still unknown, and also because changes in brain function (plasticity) remain unknown, even though brain plasticity plays an important role in meaningful interpretation of new sensory stimuli. This article discusses some basic unresolved issues and potential solutions in the development of artificial sensory organs such as cochlear implants, brainstem implants, artificial vision, and artificial retinas. PMID:19330498

  20. "Still Planners Run Deep": Shallow Reasoning For Fast Replanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromarty, Andrew S.; Shapiro, Daniel G.; Fehling, Michael R.

    1984-06-01

    Artificial intelligence planning systems attempting to achieve human-like performance typically bring to bear a wealth of real-world knowledge in order to select actions consistent with the system's goals and its assessment of the state of its environment. Unfortunately, as machine reasoning systems become larger and more general, they frequently become correspondingly slower and hence less effective at their intended task. Meanwhile, most human actors can deal competently with quite complex environments without compelling evidence that they plan by relying principally upon (or even understanding) formal reasoning and planning techniques such as resolution theorem proving, dynamic programming, and backward chaining. We suggest that humans can plan and replan so quickly because of two important principles: (a) their internal represention of the world is well suited to the planning problems they solve, and (b) their plans have much less depth than most powerful machine reasoning systems. A good substitute for deep planning may be a "broad but shallow" planning strategy that generates plans terminated in parameterized action sequences ("behaviors") which are chunked at a relatively high level of abstraction, combined with a context-dependent salience measure that differentially cues plan fragments or "behaviors" to propose themselves as candidates during time-critical planning operations.

  1. On the Theory of Thin Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, A. A.

    1956-01-01

    This report is concerned with the theory of thin shallow shells. It does not employ the lines of curvature as the coordinate system, but employs "almost cartesian coordinates" or the coordinates obtained by cutting the surface into two mutually orthogonal systems of parallel planes.

  2. 40 CFR 230.43 - Vegetated shallows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vegetated shallows. 230.43 Section 230.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.43...

  3. WHIDBEY ISLAND INTERTIDAL AND SHALLOW SUBTIDAL BENTHOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to quantitatively characterize the benthos of the intertidal and shallow subtidal areas of three habitats on the west coast of Whidbey Island. The study area was between +6.0' above mean low water to -10.0 m below mean low water. Stratified rando...

  4. California earthquakes: why only shallow focus?

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Byerlee, J D

    1970-06-26

    Frictional sliding on sawcuts and faults in laboratory samples of granite and gabbro is markedly temperature-dependent. At pressures from 1 to 5 kilobars, stick-slip gave way to stable sliding as temperature was increased from 200 to 500 degrees Celsius. Increased temperature with depth could thus cause the abrupt disappearance of earthquakes noted at shallow depths in California. PMID:17759338

  5. 40 CFR 230.43 - Vegetated shallows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vegetated shallows. 230.43 Section 230.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.43...

  6. Grain transport mechanics in shallow flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flows. The two-phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a dispe...

  7. Grain transport mechanics in shallow overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flow. The two phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a disper...

  8. 40 CFR 230.43 - Vegetated shallows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vegetated shallows. 230.43 Section 230.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... water circulation patterns; (2) releasing nutrients that increase undesirable algal populations;...

  9. 40 CFR 230.43 - Vegetated shallows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Vegetated shallows. 230.43 Section 230.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts...

  10. 40 CFR 230.43 - Vegetated shallows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vegetated shallows. 230.43 Section 230.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.43...

  11. Shallow Geophysical Exploration of the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. M.; Kelsay, T.; Sheehan, A. F.; Leopold, M.

    2009-12-01

    We use minimally invasive shallow geophysical techniques to image the structure of the critical zone from surface to bedrock (0-20 m) throughout three catchments within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BcCZO). Shallow seismic refraction (SSR), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) provide three complementary methods for determining the physical characteristics of the shallow subsurface. A total of 10 km of SSR surveys were collected in Summer 2009 using a hammer source and 24-channel seismograph. The SSR data were modeled using both the time-term method and travel-time tomography. Results of the SSR surveys provide a pseudo-3D network of critical zone compressional wave velocity (Vp) structure within each catchment. Select SSR lines follow each of the ERT and GPR lines investigated providing an essential supplement for interpretation and view of layering within the critical zone. The evolution of each catchment within the BcCZO contain signals of both erosion and weathering dependent upon the large-scale geomorphic processes down to the microbial weathering of mineral grains. The geophysical approach describes the arena for the small-scale processes while also providing a quantitative description of the critical zone structure at an instant in time. We use these tools to establish a three-dimensional model of critical zone architecture within three catchments with significantly different recent and continuing geomorphic forcings: fluvial rejuvenation, long-term quiescent erosion and glaciation. We find bedrock Vp greater than 2500 m/s, regolith Vp generally less than 450 m/s and various gradients of weathered bedrock ranging from Vp of 700-2000 m/s if present. Significant topography and irregular bedrock surfaces contribute additional complexity to the critical zone architecture in each location. Once developed this model will guide investigations of critical zone processes from landscape to hydrologic modeling and

  12. Molecular artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Serena; Drouet, Samuel; Francàs, Laia; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Guttentag, Miguel; Richmond, Craig; Stoll, Thibaut; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-11-21

    The replacement of fossil fuels by a clean and renewable energy source is one of the most urgent and challenging issues our society is facing today, which is why intense research has been devoted to this topic recently. Nature has been using sunlight as the primary energy input to oxidise water and generate carbohydrates (solar fuel) for over a billion years. Inspired, but not constrained, by nature, artificial systems can be designed to capture light and oxidise water and reduce protons or other organic compounds to generate useful chemical fuels. This tutorial review covers the primary topics that need to be understood and mastered in order to come up with practical solutions for the generation of solar fuels. These topics are: the fundamentals of light capturing and conversion, water oxidation catalysis, proton and CO2 reduction catalysis and the combination of all of these for the construction of complete cells for the generation of solar fuels. PMID:24473472

  13. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities. PMID:24741154

  14. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  15. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  16. A Primer on Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Ralph A.

    A survey of literature on recent advances in the field of artificial intelligence provides a comprehensive introduction to this field for the non-technical reader. Important areas covered are: (1) definitions, (2) the brain and thinking, (3) heuristic search, and (4) programing languages used in the research of artificial intelligence. Some…

  17. In Pursuit of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watstein, Sarah; Kesselman, Martin

    1986-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence and reviews current research in natural language processing, expert systems, and robotics and sensory systems. Discussion covers current commercial applications of artificial intelligence and projections of uses and limitations in library technical and public services, e.g., in cataloging and online information and…

  18. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  19. Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

    The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

  20. Instructional Applications of Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halff, Henry M.

    1986-01-01

    Surveys artificial intelligence and the development of computer-based tutors and speculates on the future of artificial intelligence in education. Includes discussion of the definitions of knowledge, expert systems (computer systems that solve tough technical problems), intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), and specific ITSs such as GUIDON, MYCIN,…

  1. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  2. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  3. Conservative smoothing versus artificial viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report was stimulated by some recent investigations of S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method). Solid dynamics computations with S.P.H. show symptoms of instabilities which are not eliminated by artificial viscosities. Both analysis and experiment indicate that conservative smoothing eliminates the instabilities in S.P.H. computations which artificial viscosities cannot. Questions were raised as to whether conservative smoothing might smear solutions more than artificial viscosity. Conservative smoothing, properly used, can produce more accurate solutions than the von Neumann-Richtmyer-Landshoff artificial viscosity which has been the standard for many years. The authors illustrate this using the vNR scheme on a test problem with known exact solution involving a shock collision in an ideal gas. They show that the norms of the errors with conservative smoothing are significantly smaller than the norms of the errors with artificial viscosity.

  4. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  5. Dynamic Structure in Artificial Protein Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Scott B.; Hong, Mei; de Azevedo, Eduardo; Tirrell, David A.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2000-03-01

    Artificial proteins that form reversible hydrogels have been designed and synthesized using recombinant DNA methodologies. Proteins are designed such that two helical, leucine zipper domains flank a central, water soluble domain. Under proper conditions of concentration, pH, and temperature the helical domains aggregate as coiled coils and act as physical crosslinks. Small angle x-ray and neutron scattering have been used to elucidate the gel structure, and NMR and fluorescence exchange experiments have been used to probe the dynamics of the gel system.

  6. Compressed sensing for wideband wavenumber tracking in dispersive shallow water.

    PubMed

    Le Courtois, Florent; Bonnel, Julien

    2015-08-01

    In shallow water zones and at low frequency, seabed and water column properties can be estimated from the acoustic wavenumbers using inversion algorithms. When considering horizontal line arrays (HLA) and narrowband sources, the wavenumbers can be evaluated with classic spectral analysis methods. In this paper, a compressed sensing (CS) method for sparse recovery of the wavenumbers is proposed. This takes advantage of the few propagating modes and allows for spectral estimation when short HLA are used. The CS representation improves the wavenumber estimation, compared to the Fourier transform. However, for small arrays and several propagating modes, the CS generates interferences and does not allow proper wavenumber estimation. When considering broadband sources, it is possible to combine the wavenumbers estimated at several frequencies in order to build a frequency-wavenumber (f - k) representation. In this case, a post-processing tracking operation which improves the f - k resolution is presented. This relies on a general approach of waveguide physics and uses a particle filtering (PF) algorithm to track the wavenumbers. The consecutive use of CS and PF leads to a better wavenumber estimation. This methodology can be used for sources that are not at an end-fire position. It is illustrated by simulations and successfully applied on the Shallow Water 2006 data using the 32 sensor SHARK array. PMID:26328676

  7. SMART-1 end of life shallow regolith impact simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Ramkissoon, N. K.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Foing, B.

    2015-08-01

    The SMART-1 end-of-life impact with the lunar surface was simulated with impacts in a two stage light-gas gun onto inclined basalt targets with a shallow surface layer of sand. This simulated the probable impact site, where a loose regolith will have overlaid a well consolidated basaltic layer of rock. The impact angles used were at 5° and 10° from the horizontal. The impact speed was ~2 km s-1 and the projectiles were 2.03 mm diameter aluminum spheres. The sand depth was between approximately 0.8 and 1.8 times the projectile diameter, implying a loose lunar surface regolith of similar dimensions to the SMART-1 spacecraft. A crater in the basement rock itself was only observed in the impact at 10° incidence, and where the depth of loose surface material was less than the projectile diameter, in which case the basement rock also contained a small pit-like crater. In all cases, the projectile ricocheted away from the impact site at a shallow angle. This implies that at the SMART-1 impact site the crater will have a complicated structure, with exposed basement rock and some excavated rock displaced nearby, and the main spacecraft body itself will not be present at the main crater.

  8. Solitary wave dynamics in shallow water over periodic topography.

    PubMed

    Nakoulima, Ousseynou; Zahibo, Narcisse; Pelinovsky, Efim; Talipova, Tatiana; Kurkin, Andrey

    2005-09-01

    The problem of long-wave scattering by piecewise-constant periodic topography is studied both for a linear solitary-like wave pulse, and for a weakly nonlinear solitary wave [Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) soliton]. If the characteristic length of the topographic irregularities is larger than the pulse length, the solution of the scattering problem is obtained analytically for a leading wave in the framework of linear shallow-water theory. The wave decrement in the case of the small height of the topographic irregularities is proportional to delta2, where delta is the relative height of the topographic obstacles. An analytical approximate solution is also obtained for the weakly nonlinear problem when the length of the irregularities is larger than the characteristic nonlinear length scale. In this case, the Korteweg-de Vries equation is solved for each piece of constant depth by using the inverse scattering technique; the solutions are matched at each step by using linear shallow-water theory. The weakly nonlinear solitary wave decays more significantly than the linear solitary pulse. Solitary wave dynamics above a random seabed is also discussed, and the results obtained for random topography (including experimental data) are in reasonable agreement with the calculations for piecewise topography. PMID:16253002

  9. Shallow water imaging sonar system for environmental surveying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The scope of this research is to develop a shallow water sonar system designed to detect and map the location of objects such as hazardous wastes or discarded ordnance in coastal waters. The system will use high frequency wide-bandwidth imaging sonar, mounted on a moving platform towed behind a boat, to detect and identify objects on the sea bottom. Resolved images can be obtained even if the targets are buried in an overlayer of silt. The specific technical objective of this research was to develop and test a prototype system that is capable of (1) scan at high speeds (up to 10m/s), even in shallow water (depth to ten meters), without motion blurring or loss of resolution; (2) produce images of the bottom structure that are detailed enough for unambiguous detection of objects as small as 15cm, even if they are buried up to 30cm deep in silt or sand. The critical technology involved uses an linear FM (LFM) or similar complex waveform, which has a high bandwidth for good range resolution, with a long pulse length for similar Dopper resolution. The lone duration signal deposits more energy on target than a narrower pulse, which increases the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-clutter ratio. This in turn allows the use of cheap, lightweight, low power, piezoelectric transducers at the 30--500 kHz range.

  10. A reduced grid model for shallow flows on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, J.M.; Margolin, L.G.; Smolarkiewicz, P.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors describe a numerical model for simulating shallow water flows on a rotating sphere. The model is augmented by a reduced grid capability that increases the allowable time step based on stability requirements, and leads to significant improvements in computational efficiency. The model is based on finite difference techniques, and in particular on the nonoscillatory forward-in-time advection scheme MPDATA. They have implemented the model on the massively parallel CM-5, and have used it to simulate shallow water flows representative of global atmospheric motions. Here they present simulations of two flows, the Rossby-Haurwitz wave of period four, a nearly steady pattern with a complex balance of large and small scale motions, and also a zonal flow perturbed by an obstacle. They compare the accuracy and efficiency of using the reduced grid option with that of the original model. The authors also present simulations at several levels of resolution to show how the efficiency of the model scales with problem size.

  11. Surface Towed CSEM Systems for Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J.; Constable, S.; Kannberg, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a low-power, surface towed electric dipole-dipole system suitable for mapping seafloor geology in shallow water and deployable from small boats. The transmitter is capable of up to 50 amps output using 12 VDC from a 110/240 VAC power supply, and can generate an arbitrary GPS stabilized ternary waveform. Transmitter antennas are typically 50 to 100 m long. Receivers are built around the standard Scripps seafloor electrode, amplifier, and logging systems but housed in floating PVC cases and equipped with GPS timing and positioning, pitch/roll/heading sensors, and accelerometers. Receiver dipoles are 1.5 m long rigid booms held 1 m below the surface. As with the Scripps deep-towed Vulcan system, rigid antennas are used to avoid noise associated with flexible antennas moving across Earth's magnetic field. The tow cable is a simple floating rope up to 1000 m long. Water depth and conductivity are sampled continuously in order to provide constraints for apparent resistivity calculations and inversion, and moored seafloor recorders can be used to extend transmitter/receiver offsets. The entire system can be air freighted and transported in one utility vehicle. We will present results from a study to map permafrost in shallow water off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

  12. Shallow gas in Cenozoic sediments of the Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampe, Anna F.; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Thöle, Hauke; Arfai, Jashar

    2013-04-01

    Shallow petroleum systems in the southern North Sea are known for several decades but they were not actively explored for a long time. In recent years these unconventional shallow petroleum systems are studied in greater detail and one shallow gas field (A-12) is in production in the Netherlands. Additionally, oil was encountered in Miocene sandstones in the southern Danish North Sea (Lille John well) just north of the Danish-German border. Seismic amplitude anomalies are an indication for hydrocarbons in sediments. Therefore we have mapped the occurrence of seismic amplitude anomalies in the German North Sea based on more than 25.000 km of 2D seismic data and around 4.000 km2 of 3D seismic data. Amplitude anomalies are ubiquitous phenomena in the study area. These anomalies are not only caused by hydrocarbons but also by changing lithologies e.g. peat or fluid migration. Therefore several classes of seismic anomalies, e.g. bright spots, chimneys, blanking areas and velocity pull-down were mapped. Examples for these classes were studied with AVO (amplitude variation with offset) analyses to verify the existence or non-existence of gas in the sediments. Shallow gas can be produced and transported through the dense pipeline grid of the southern and central North Sea or it could be burned offshore close to wind parks in small power plants and the electric energy then transported through the existing power connections of the wind parks. Thus enabling a continuous energy supply during calm wind periods. This study is carried out within the framework of the project "Geoscientific Potential of the German North Sea (GPDN)" in which the Cenozoic sedimentary system was mapped in great detail. A detailed model of delta evolution (Baltic river system) was developed which serves as a structural framework. The studied interval is time equivalent to the Utsira formation which is used offshore Norway for sequestration of CO2. These different possibilities of using or exploiting

  13. The artificial leaf.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  14. Amplification of large artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D R; Smyth, A P; Moir, D T

    1990-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome cloning is an attractive technology for genomic mapping studies because very large DNA segments can be readily propagated. However, detailed analyses often require the extensive application of blotting-hybridization techniques because artificial chromosomes are normally present at only one copy per haploid genome. We have developed a cloning vector and host strain that alleviate this problem by permitting copy number amplification of artificial chromosomes. The vector includes a conditional centromere that can be turned on or off by changing the carbon source. Strong selective pressure for extra copies of the artificial chromosome can be applied by selecting for the expression of a heterologous thymidine kinase gene. When this system was used, artificial chromosomes ranging from about 100 to 600 kilobases in size were readily amplified 10- to 20-fold. The selective conditions did not induce obvious rearrangements in any of the clones tested. Reactivation of the centromere in amplified artificial chromosome clones resulted in stable maintenance of an elevated copy number for 20 generations. Applications of copy number control to various aspects of artificial chromosome analysis are addressed. Images PMID:2236036

  15. MAPPING BATHYMETRY AND BOTTOM TYPE IN A SHALLOW ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bathymetry and bottom type are important in characterizing estuaries and their ecology but hard to map, especially in shallow estuaries. Acoustic backscattering was used to remotely sense these properties in the shallow Slocums River Estuary of Massachusetts. Acoustic pulses were...

  16. Shallow magma targets in the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1984-10-01

    Within the next few years a hole will be drilled into a shallow magma body in the western US for the purpose of evaluating the engineering feasibility of magma energy. This paper examines potential drilling sites for these engineering feasibility experiments. Target sites high on the list are ones that currently exhibit good geophysical and geological data for shallow magma and also have reasonable operational requirements. Top ranked sites for the first magma energy well are Long Valley, CA, and Coso/Indian Wells, CA. Kilauea, HI, also in the top group, is an attractive site for some limited field experiments. A number of additional sites offer promise as eventual magma energy sites, but sparsity of geophysical data presently prevents these sites from being considered for the first magma energy well.

  17. Multigrid shallow water equations on an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen; Duben, Peter; Palmer, Tim

    2015-04-01

    A novel computing technology for multigrid shallow water equations is investigated. As power consumption begins to constrain traditional supercomputing advances, weather and climate simulators are exploring alternative technologies that achieve efficiency gains through massively parallel and low power architectures. In recent years FPGA implementations of reduced complexity atmospheric models have shown accelerated speeds and reduced power consumption compared to multi-core CPU integrations. We continue this line of research by designing an FPGA dataflow engine for a mulitgrid version of the 2D shallow water equations. The multigrid algorithm couples grids of variable resolution to improve accuracy. We show that a significant reduction of precision in the floating point representation of the fine grid variables allows greater parallelism and thus improved overall peformance while maintaining accurate integrations. Preliminary designs have been constructed by software emulation. Results of the hardware implementation will be presented at the conference.

  18. Artificial frustrated spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Y.; Chioar, I. A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Montaigne, F.; Canals, B.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-09-01

    Complex architectures of nanostructures are routinely elaborated using bottom-up or nanofabrication processes. This technological capability allows scientists to engineer materials with properties that do not exist in nature, but also to manufacture model systems to explore fundamental issues in condensed matter physics. Two-dimensional frustrated arrays of magnetic nanostructures are one class of systems for which theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally. These systems have been the subject of intense research in the last few years and allowed the investigation of a rich physics and fascinating phenomena, such as the exploration of the extensively degenerate ground-state manifolds of spin ice systems, the evidence of new magnetic phases in purely two-dimensional lattices, and the observation of pseudoexcitations involving classical analogues of magnetic monopoles. We show here, experimentally and theoretically, that simple magnetic geometries can lead to unconventional, non-collinear spin textures. For example, kagome arrays of inplane magnetized nano-islands do not show magnetic order. Instead, these systems are characterized by spin textures with intriguing properties, such as chirality, coexistence of magnetic order and disorder, and charge crystallization. Magnetic frustration effects in lithographically patterned kagome arrays of nanomagnets with out-of-plane magnetization also lead to an unusal, and still unknown, magnetic ground state manifold. Besides the influence of the lattice geometry, the micromagnetic nature of the elements constituting the arrays introduce the concept of chiral magnetic monopoles, bringing additional complexity into the physics of artificial frustrated spin systems.

  19. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for grasping and manipulating objects. The hand includes left and right thumbs that are operatively connected to an engagement assembly which causes movement of the left and right thumbs. The left thumb has a left thumb base and is movable about three separate first left thumb axes which run through the left thumb base. Correspondingly, the right thumb has a right thumb base and is movable about three separate first right thumb axes which run through the right thumb base. The engagement assembly has a gear assembly which is operatively connected to a motor assembly. Upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly causes movement of the left and right thumbs about the first left thumb axes and first right thumb axes respectively. The hand can also have a center finger which is operatively connected to the engagement assembly and which is interposed between the left and right thumbs. The finger has a finger base and is movable about two separate first finger axes running through the finger base. Therefore, upon actuation by the motor assembly, the gear assembly will also cause movement of the finger about the first finger axes.

  20. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  1. Nanostructured artificial nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyong; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Magonov, Sergei; Ozturk, Birol

    2003-06-01

    Finding a synthetic pathway to artificial analogs of nacre and bones represents a fundamental milestone in the development of composite materials. The ordered brick-and-mortar arrangement of organic and inorganic layers is believed to be the most essential strength- and toughness-determining structural feature of nacre. It has also been found that the ionic crosslinking of tightly folded macromolecules is equally important. Here, we demonstrate that both structural features can be reproduced by sequential deposition of polyelectrolytes and clays. This simple process results in a nanoscale version of nacre with alternating organic and inorganic layers. The macromolecular folding effect reveals itself in the unique saw-tooth pattern of differential stretching curves attributed to the gradual breakage of ionic crosslinks in polyelectrolyte chains. The tensile strength of the prepared multilayers approached that of nacre, whereas their ultimate Young modulus was similar to that of lamellar bones. Structural and functional resemblance makes clay- polyelectrolyte multilayers a close replica of natural biocomposites. Their nanoscale nature enables elucidation of molecular processes occurring under stress.

  2. Artificial dexterous hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial dexterous hand is provided for conformally engaging and manipulating objects. The hand includes an articulated digit which is connected to an engagement sub-assembly and has a first shape adaption mechanism associated with it. The digit has a digit base and first and second phalanges. The digit base is operatively interconnected to the first phalange by a base joint having a base pulley. The phalanges are operatively interconnected by a separate first phalange joint having a first phalange pulley. The engagement sub-assembly includes a tendon, which is received by the base pulley and by the first phalange pulley, and an actuation device for selectively tensioning the tendon. The first shape adaption mechanism is responsive to and receives the tendon. It is also situated between the base joint and the first phalange joint and is connected to the first phalange. Upon actuation by the actuation device, the phalanges are caused to pivot relative to the base joint and the second phalange is caused to pivot relative to the first phalange. At the same time, the first shape adaption mechanism controls the sequence of the aforementioned pivoting of the phalanges through application of braking force to the tendon.

  3. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: Risk assessment and proposed management strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hannak, Judith S.; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors’ socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers – the target group for further education and skill training – were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive ‘ecotourism zone’ while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  4. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: risk assessment and proposed management strategy.

    PubMed

    Hannak, Judith S; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors' socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers--the target group for further education and skill training--were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive 'ecotourism zone' while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  5. Balancing the source terms in a SPH model for solving the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xilin; Liang, Qiuhua; Pastor, Manuel; Zou, Weilie; Zhuang, Yan-Feng

    2013-09-01

    A shallow flow generally features complex hydrodynamics induced by complicated domain topography and geometry. A numerical scheme with well-balanced flux and source term gradients is therefore essential before a shallow flow model can be applied to simulate real-world problems. The issue of source term balancing has been exhaustively investigated in grid-based numerical approaches, e.g. discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods and finite volume Godunov-type methods. In recent years, a relatively new computational method, smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), has started to gain popularity in solving the shallow water equations (SWEs). However, the well-balanced problem has not been fully investigated and resolved in the context of SPH. This work aims to discuss the well-balanced problem caused by a standard SPH discretization to the SWEs with slope source terms and derive a corrected SPH algorithm that is able to preserve the solution of lake at rest. In order to enhance the shock capturing capability of the resulting SPH model, the Monotone Upwind-centered Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) is also explored and applied to enable Riemann solver based artificial viscosity. The new SPH model is validated against several idealized benchmark tests and a real-world dam-break case and promising results are obtained.

  6. Wave turbulence in shallow water models.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2014-06-01

    We study wave turbulence in shallow water flows in numerical simulations using two different approximations: the shallow water model and the Boussinesq model with weak dispersion. The equations for both models were solved using periodic grids with up to 2048{2} points. In all simulations, the Froude number varies between 0.015 and 0.05, while the Reynolds number and level of dispersion are varied in a broader range to span different regimes. In all cases, most of the energy in the system remains in the waves, even after integrating the system for very long times. For shallow flows, nonlinear waves are nondispersive and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with ∼k{-2} scaling. For deeper (Boussinesq) flows, the nonlinear dispersion relation as directly measured from the wave and frequency spectrum (calculated independently) shows signatures of dispersion, and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with predictions of weak turbulence theory, ∼k{-4/3}. In this latter case, the nonlinear dispersion relation differs from the linear one and has two branches, which we explain with a simple qualitative argument. Finally, we study probability density functions of the surface height and find that in all cases the distributions are asymmetric. The probability density function can be approximated by a skewed normal distribution as well as by a Tayfun distribution. PMID:25019897

  7. International Legislation of Shallow Geothermal Energy Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hähnlein, S.; Bayer, P.; Blum, P.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change, energy savings and energy autonomy are frequently discussed topics. Hence, renewable energy resources are currently promoted worldwide. One of these is geothermal energy. Worldwide the number of shallow geothermal installations (< 400 m depth) is continuously rising. One consequence is widespread man-made temperature anomalies in natural aquifer systems. These have to be controlled to guarantee long-term usability of the geothermal reservoirs and to avoid adverse effects on groundwater ecosystems. However, nationally as well as internationally, regulations to achieve these controls are very heterogeneous, sometimes contradictory and scientifically questionable. For example, what is the optimal distance between adjacent, potentially competing ground source heat pump (GSHP) or groundwater heat pump (GWHP) systems? Answers to derive a good code of practice have to balance technical, economic and ecological criteria. The objective of our study is to review the current international legal status of thermal use of groundwater. We present the results of an international survey, which offers comprehensive insight in the worldwide legal situation of closed and open systems of shallow geothermal installations. The focus is on minimum distances of these systems and limits for groundwater temperature changes. We can conclude that there are only few regulations and recommendations for minimum distances of these installations and groundwater temperature changes. Some countries have no regulations and in addition if recommendations are given, these are not legally binding. However, to promote shallow geothermal energy as an economically attractive and sustainable energy source, an international homogeneous legislation is necessary.

  8. New and expected developments in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Artificial lift is a broad subject. This paper discusses some of the new developments in the major areas of artificial lift. These are (1) beam lift, (2) electrical submersible pumping, (3) gas lift, (4) hydraulic pumping and (5) miscellaneous topics. The beam lift discussion concerns a new rod material, downhole measurements for rod loading, unit design and some miscellaneous topics. The ESP (Electrical Submersible Pump) section includes a discussion on solids handling, downhole sensor technology, new motor temperature limitations, motor efficiency, and other topics. The gas lift discussion includes mention of coiled tubing with gas lift valves internal, a surface controlled gas lift valve concept, and gas lift valve testing and modeling. Hydraulic pumping is used in many locations with deep pay and fairly small production rates. New hydraulic developments include a wider availability of power fluid pumps other than positive displacement pumps, and small jet pumps specifically designed for de-watering gas wells. Some miscellaneous developments include an insertable PC (progressing cavity) pump and improved plunger lift algorithms and equipment.

  9. Artificial intelligence: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdami, M.

    1985-01-01

    The book covers the principles of AI, the main areas of application, as well as considering some of the social implications. The applications chapters have a common format structured as follows: definition of the topic; approach with conventional computing techniques; why 'intelligence' would provide a better approach; and how AI techniques would be used and the limitations. The contents discussed are: Principles of artificial intelligence; AI programming environments; LISP, list processing and pattern-making; AI programming with POP-11; Computer processing of natural language; Speech synthesis and recognition; Computer vision; Artificial intelligence and robotics; The anatomy of expert systems - Forsyth; Machine learning; Memory models of man and machine; Artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology; Breaking out of the chinese room; Social implications of artificial intelligence; and Index.

  10. Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-01

    This contribution was presented as the closing lecture at the Faraday Discussion 155 on artificial photosynthesis, held in Edinburgh Scotland, September 5-7 2011. The world needs new, environmentally friendly and renewable fuels to exchange for fossil fuels. The fuel must be made from cheap and "endless" resources that are available everywhere. The new research area of solar fuels aims to meet this demand. This paper discusses why we need a solar fuel and why electricity is not enough; it proposes solar energy as the major renewable energy source to feed from. The scientific field concerning artificial photosynthesis expands rapidly and most of the different scientific visions for solar fuels are briefly overviewed. Research strategies and the development of artificial photosynthesis research to produce solar fuels are overviewed. Some conceptual aspects of research for artificial photosynthesis are discussed in closer detail. PMID:22470985

  11. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  12. Inflatable artificial sphincter - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An artificial sphincter consists of three parts: a cuff that fits around the bladder neck a pressure regulating balloon a pump that inflates the cuff. To treat urinary incontinence, the cuff is placed ...

  13. Darwin, artificial selection, and poverty.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Luis

    2010-03-01

    This paper argues that the processes of evolutionary selection are becoming increasingly artificial, a trend that goes against the belief in a purely natural selection process claimed by Darwin's natural selection theory. Artificial selection is mentioned by Darwin, but it was ignored by Social Darwinists, and it is all but absent in neo-Darwinian thinking. This omission results in an underestimation of probable impacts of artificial selection upon assumed evolutionary processes, and has implications for the ideological uses of Darwin's language, particularly in relation to poverty and other social inequalities. The influence of artificial selection on genotypic and phenotypic adaptations arguably represents a substantial shift in the presumed path of evolution, a shift laden with both biological and political implications. PMID:20812798

  14. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  15. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  16. Design and optimization of multi-class series-parallel linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ji, Zhenyu; Shi, Xuetao; You, Fusheng; Fu, Feng; Liu, Ruigang; Xia, Junying; Wang, Nan; Bai, Jing; Wang, Zhanxi; Qin, Xiansheng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibiting complex and excellent precision has evolved for millions of years. Skeletal muscle has better performance and simpler structure compared with existing driving modes. Artificial muscle may be designed by analyzing and imitating properties and structure of skeletal muscle based on bionics, which has been focused on by bionic researchers, and a structure mode of linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle has been designed in this paper. Half sarcomere is the minimum unit of artificial muscle and electromagnetic model has been built. The structural parameters of artificial half sarcomere actuator were optimized to achieve better movement performance. Experimental results show that artificial half sarcomere actuator possesses great motion performance such as high response speed, great acceleration, small weight and size, robustness, etc., which presents a promising application prospect of artificial half sarcomere actuator. PMID:24211938

  17. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  18. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Slaughter, M

    2011-09-01

    In the 1960s, cardiac surgeons and biomedical engineers pioneered the development of total artificial hearts (TAH) for the treatment of left and right heart failure. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the first implantation of the AbioCor device, the use of TAH has been limited, having failed to reach its envisioned potential and promise as an alternative therapy to heart transplantation. The Syncardia/CardioWest device, originally developed 30 years ago as the Jarvik TAH and later renamed the CardioWest TAH, continues to be used clinically in over 50 centers within the US and Europe having supported over 900 patients worldwide. Syncardia continues to develop TAH technology as evidenced by their recent introduction of a new portable pneumatic driver that enables patients to be discharged from the hospital. In contrast to TAH devices, continuous flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have made tremendous technological strides and are rapidly gaining widespread clinical acceptance. The VAD technology has demonstrated extraordinary safety and reliability records through evolving technologies, advanced biocompatible materials, and improved patient management. Subsequently, the number of TAH implantations remains low compared to the growth in LVAD implants. Nonetheless, the Syncardia/CardioWest TAH remains an important and viable option for patients with severe biventricular failure and end organ dysfunction. Overall, a 79% survival rate has been achieved in patients supported with a Syncardia/CardioWest TAH as bridge-to-transplantation. In this review article, a brief history on the evolution of TAH devices, their current use and emerging use of evolving continuous flow VAD technology as chronic biventricular and TAH device systems are presented. PMID:21775941

  19. Regolith structure analysis — A contribution to understanding the local occurrence of shallow landslides (Austrian Tyrol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Christoph; Kringer, Korbinian; Geitner, Clemens; Rutzinger, Martin

    2013-02-01

    This study focuses on shallow landslides on Alpine slopes, usually triggered by extreme rainfall events or rapid snowmelt. Shallow landslides cause soil loss of agricultural land and can even induce larger mass movements. To estimate shallow landslide susceptibility, it is crucial to understand the interactions of the conditioning factors. The structure of the shallow subsurface (regolith) represents the least well known variable. Hydrological characteristics of the slope and its resulting stability depend very much on the structure and thickness of the regolith. However, conditions of the shallow subsurface have hitherto not been investigated in detail, due to difficulties in area-wide data collection. By adapting a common method from engineering sciences, our research provides new insights into the small-scale structure of a regolith body on an Alpine slope in the inner Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). We carried out field measurements by applying densely spaced lightweight dynamic cone penetrometer tests (DCPT) on a test site of 30 m by 30 m. To cope with the three-dimensional (3D) characteristics of the regolith body, we suggest the application of a 3D volumetric lattice (voxel) model. For the analysis of patterns and variations in the penetration resistance, we propose a spatial interpolation by the regularized spline with tension (RST) method. We approximated three different geotechnical parameters: (i) the thickness of the local regolith, (ii) the penetration resistance within the regolith and (iii) the surface of the solid bedrock. An exploratory analysis allowed us to describe surface and bedrock morphology and to detect discontinuities in the regolith in the immediate vicinity of the landslide. In addition, we were able to establish a distinct spatial relation of the derived geotechnical parameters and slope failure. The proposed method was developed, tested and verified in an individual case study, but the results indicate a great potential for future

  20. Evaluation of an artificial estuarine habitat-initial stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poonai, P.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the influence of an artificial habitat of discarded automobile tires upon the biomass in and around it, three sites were selected in the Banana River of which two will contain small groups of tires and one will not. Over a given period, the populations in and around the tires will be compared with those which existed initially or prevail on the natural site. Preliminary observations indicate that adequate numbers may be present in the lower trophic levels but that there are perhaps inadequate populations of upper level carnivores which it appears can be increased by an artificial habitat.

  1. Combined effects of climate change and bank stabilization on shallow water habitats of chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Jeffrey C; McClure, Michelle M; Sheer, Mindi B; Munn, Nancy L

    2013-12-01

    Significant challenges remain in the ability to estimate habitat change under the combined effects of natural variability, climate change, and human activity. We examined anticipated effects on shallow water over low-sloped beaches to these combined effects in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, an area highly altered by development. A proposal to stabilize some shoreline with large rocks (riprap) would alter shallow water areas, an important habitat for threatened Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and would be subject to U.S. Endangered Species Act-mandated oversight. In the mainstem, subyearling Chinook salmon appear to preferentially occupy these areas, which fluctuate with river stages. We estimated effects with a geospatial model and projections of future river flows. Recent (1999-2009) median river stages during peak subyearling occupancy (April-June) maximized beach shallow water area in the lower mainstem. Upstream shallow water area was maximized at lower river stages than have occurred recently. Higher river stages in April-June, resulting from increased flows predicted for the 2080s, decreased beach shallow water area 17-32%. On the basis of projected 2080s flows, more than 15% of beach shallow water area was displaced by the riprap. Beach shallow water area lost to riprap represented up to 1.6% of the total from the mouth to 12.9 km upstream. Reductions in shallow water area could restrict salmon feeding, resting, and refuge from predators and potentially reduce opportunities for the expression of the full range of life-history strategies. Although climate change analyses provided useful information, detailed analyses are prohibitive at the project scale for the multitude of small projects reviewed annually. The benefits of our approach to resource managers include a wider geographic context for reviewing similar small projects in concert with climate change, an approach to analyze cumulative effects of similar actions, and estimation of the

  2. Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics and Energy Partition for the Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, A.; Venaille, A.; Bouchet, F.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to use large deviation theory in order to compute the entropy of macrostates for the microcanonical measure of the shallow water system. The main prediction of this full statistical mechanics computation is the energy partition between a large scale vortical flow and small scale fluctuations related to inertia-gravity waves. We introduce for that purpose a semi-Lagrangian discrete model of the continuous shallow water system, and compute the corresponding statistical equilibria. We argue that microcanonical equilibrium states of the discrete model in the continuous limit are equilibrium states of the actual shallow water system. We show that the presence of small scale fluctuations selects a subclass of equilibria among the states that were previously computed by phenomenological approaches that were neglecting such fluctuations. In the limit of weak height fluctuations, the equilibrium state can be interpreted as two subsystems in thermal contact: one subsystem corresponds to the large scale vortical flow, the other subsystem corresponds to small scale height and velocity fluctuations. It is shown that either a non-zero circulation or rotation and bottom topography are required to sustain a non-zero large scale flow at equilibrium. Explicit computation of the equilibria and their energy partition is presented in the quasi-geostrophic limit for the energy-enstrophy ensemble. The possible role of small scale dissipation and shocks is discussed. A geophysical application to the Zapiola anticyclone is presented.

  3. The impact of 85 years of coastal development on shallow seagrass beds (Posidonia oceanica L. (Delile)) in South Eastern France: A slow but steady loss without recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holon, F.; Boissery, P.; Guilbert, A.; Freschet, E.; Deter, J.

    2015-11-01

    Shallow Posidonia oceanica beds (0 to -15 m), the most common seagrass in the Mediterranean, were mapped from aerial photographs dating from the 1920's and from 2012 along 800 km of coastline in South-Eastern France (Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur region). Changes in P. oceanica bed spatial distribution (limits and extent) during these 85 years were analyzed in terms of concordance (remaining areas), positive discordance (expanding areas) or negative discordance (lost areas). Lost areas were linked with direct or indirect impacts of coastal development (artificialized coastlines (namely harbours, ports of refuge, landfills, artificial beaches, groynes and pontoons, submarine pipelines and aquatic farms) visible on the photographs. The comparison showed that 73% of the shallow limits have declined. Considering spatial extent, remaining seagrass meadows areas accounted for the major part (85%), while lost areas accounted for 13% and expanding areas for 1.1%. Lost areas were mainly linked with artificial coastlines but 44% remained with undetermined causes (invisible pressures and/or mixed effects). The analysis of 96 coastal facilities creating the artificial (namely man-made) coastlines showed that the highest impact over the longest distance (5 km) was caused by harbours. Only artificial beaches had such a distant impact. Pontoons were the least surrounded by lost seagrass meadows areas. These quantitative data offer important information for marine conservation.

  4. Shallow Subsurface Structures of Volcanic Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Nash, J.; Mitchell, K. L.; Parness, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic fissure vents are a difficult geologic feature to quantify. They are often too thin to document in detail with seismology or remote geophysical methods. Additionally, lava flows, lava drain back, or collapsed rampart blocks typically conceal a fissure's surface expression. For exposed fissures, quantifying the surface (let along sub0surface) geometric expression can become an overwhelming and time-consuming task given the non-uniform distribution of wall irregularities, drain back textures, and the larger scale sinuosity of the whole fissure system. We developed (and previously presented) VolcanoBot to acquire robust characteristic data of fissure geometries by going inside accessible fissures after an eruption ends and the fissure cools off to <50 C. Data from VolcanoBot documents the fissure conduit geometry with a near-IR structured light sensor, and reproduces the 3d structures to cm-scale accuracy. Here we present a comparison of shallow subsurface structures (<30 m depth) within the Mauna Ulu fissure system and their counterpart features at the vent-to-ground-surface interface. While we have not mapped enough length of the fissure to document sinuosity at depth, we see a self-similar pattern of irregularities on the fissure walls throughout the entire shallow subsurface, implying a fracture mechanical origin similar to faults. These irregularities are, on average, 1 m across and protrude 30 cm into the drained fissure. This is significantly larger than the 10% wall roughness addressed in the engineering literature on fluid dynamics, and implies that magma fluid dynamics during fissure eruptions are probably not as passive nor as simple as previously thought. In some locations, it is possible to match piercing points across the fissure walls, where the dike broke the wall rock in order to propagate upwards, yet in other locations there are erosional cavities, again, implying complex fluid dynamics in the shallow sub-surface during fissure eruptions.

  5. Shallow Aquifer Methane Gas Source Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Murgulet, D.; Rose, P. S.; Hay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas can contribute significantly to the world's energy demand. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on horizontal drill lines developed over the last 15 years makes formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons economically available. From 2000 to 2035 shale gas is predicted to rise from 1% to 46% of the total natural gas for the US. A vast energy resource is available in the United States. While there is a strong financial advantage to the application of fracking there is emerging concern about environmental impacts to groundwater and air quality from improper shale fracking operations. Elevated methane (CH4) concentrations have been observed in drinking water throughout the United States where there is active horizontal drilling. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic-fracturing can increase CH4 transport to aquifers, soil and the vadose zone. Seepage can also result from casing failure in older wells. However, there is strong evidence that elevated CH4 concentrations can be associated with topographic and hydrogeologic features, rather than shale-gas extraction processes. Carbon isotope geochemistry can be applied to study CH4source(s) in shallow vadose zone and groundwater systems. A preliminary TAMU-CC isotope data set from samples taken at different locations in southern Texas shows a wide range of CH4 signatures suggesting multiple sources of methane and carbon dioxide. These data are interpreted to distinguish regions with methane contributions from deep-sourced horizontal drilling versus shallow system microbial production. Development of a thorough environmental assessment using light isotope analysis can provide understanding of shallow anthropogenic versus natural CH4sources and assist in identifying regions that require remedial actions.

  6. Is ultra shallow analysis possible using SIMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D. P.; Dowsett, M. G.; Ormsby, T. J.; Cooke, G. A.

    1998-11-24

    The use of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyse ultra shallow dopant profiles is now becoming routine. However, interpretation of the data is not straight forward, and the conventional method of effectively multiplying intensity and ion dose (time) axes by calibration constants to 'quantify' the data is certain to produce serious inaccuracies. We demonstrate that for oxygen primary beams, analysis of silicon at normal incidence without oxygen flooding is currently the only analytical condition which leads to quantifiable, accurate profiles, and show that depth resolution better than 1 nm can be obtained from within 0.5 nm of the surface using sub-keV primary beams.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Clark, D. K.

    2000-12-05

    An experimental and theoretical study of the dynamics of an air-fluidized thin granular layer is presented. Near the threshold of instability, the system exhibits critical behavior with remarkably long transient dynamics. Above the threshold of fluidization the system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation as the layer starts to oscillate at a certain frequency due to a feedback between the layer dilation and the airflow rate. Based on our experimental data, we formulate a the simple dynamical model which describes the transition in a shallow fluidized bed.

  8. Macrophyte growth in shallow streams: biomass model

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Mc Donnell, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    An assessment was made of the water quality and the magnitude of growth of rooted aquatic macrophytes in a nutrient-enriched, shallow stream system in order to provide a basis for evaluating the recovery of the ecosystem following the implementation of a program of phosphorus removal. Field investigations defined the temporal and spatial changes of plant biomass in selected study sections. A model to predict changes in macrophyte biomass as a function of varying environmental factors including nutrient flux was developed, calibrated and validated. The potential of the biomass model as a management tool to assess the impact of nutrient reductions on stream oxygen budgets was demonstrated.

  9. Silt and gas accumulation beneath an artificial recharge spreading basin, Southwestern Utah, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, D.K.; Ortiz, G.

    2009-01-01

    Sand Hollow Reservoir in southwestern Utah, USA, is operated for both surface-water storage and artificial recharge to the underlying Navajo Sandstone. The total volume of estimated artificial recharge between 2002 and 2007 is 85 million cubic meters (69,000 acre-feet). Since 2002, artificial recharge rates have generally been declining and are inversely correlated with the increasing surface area of the reservoir. Permeability testing of core samples retrieved from beneath the reservoir indicates that this decline may not be due to silt accumulation. Artificial recharge rates also show much seasonal variability. Calculations of apparent intrinsic permeability show that these variations can only partly be explained by variation in water viscosity associated with seasonal changes in water temperature. Sporadic seasonal trends in recharge rates and intrinsic permeability during 2002-2004 could be associated with the large fluctuations in reservoir elevation and wetted area. From 2005 through 2007, the reservoir was mostly full and there has been a more consistent seasonal pattern of minimum recharge rates during the summer and maximum rates during the autumn. Total dissolved-gas pressure measurements indicate the presence of biogenic gas bubbles in the shallow sediments beneath the shallower parts of Sand Hollow Reservoir when the water is warmer. Permeability reduction associated with this gas clogging may contribute to the decrease in artificial recharge rates during the spring and summer, with a subsequently increasing recharge rates in the autumn associated with a decline in volume of gas bubbles. Other possible causes for seasonal variation in artificial recharge rates require further investigation.

  10. The artificial beetle, or a brief manifesto for engineered biomimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Michael H.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    The artificial beetle is possibly the Holy Grail for practitioners of engineered biomimicry. An artificial beetle could gather and relay data and images from compromised environments on earth and other planets to decision makers. It could also be used for surveillance of foes and friends alike, and will require ethical foresight and oversight. What would it take to develop an artificial beetle? Several biotemplating techniques can be harnessed for the replication of external structural features of beetle bodies, and thus preserve functionalities such as coloration of the exoskeleton and the hydrophobicity of wings. The body cavity must host a power supply, motors to move the wings for flight, sensors to capture ambient conditions and images, and data transmitters and receivers to communicate with a remote command center. All of these devices must be very small and reliable.

  11. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to

  12. Forest Management Intensity Affects Aquatic Communities in Artificial Tree Holes

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Jana S.; Rohland, Anja; Sichardt, Nora; Lade, Peggy; Guidetti, Brenda; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Gossner, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Forest management could potentially affect organisms in all forest habitats. However, aquatic communities in water-filled tree-holes may be especially sensitive because of small population sizes, the risk of drought and potential dispersal limitation. We set up artificial tree holes in forest stands subject to different management intensities in two regions in Germany and assessed the influence of local environmental properties (tree-hole opening type, tree diameter, water volume and water temperature) as well as regional drivers (forest management intensity, tree-hole density) on tree-hole insect communities (not considering other organisms such as nematodes or rotifers), detritus content, oxygen and nutrient concentrations. In addition, we compared data from artificial tree holes with data from natural tree holes in the same area to evaluate the methodological approach of using tree-hole analogues. We found that forest management had strong effects on communities in artificial tree holes in both regions and across the season. Abundance and species richness declined, community composition shifted and detritus content declined with increasing forest management intensity. Environmental variables, such as tree-hole density and tree diameter partly explained these changes. However, dispersal limitation, indicated by effects of tree-hole density, generally showed rather weak impacts on communities. Artificial tree holes had higher water temperatures (on average 2°C higher) and oxygen concentrations (on average 25% higher) than natural tree holes. The abundance of organisms was higher but species richness was lower in artificial tree holes. Community composition differed between artificial and natural tree holes. Negative management effects were detectable in both tree-hole systems, despite their abiotic and biotic differences. Our results indicate that forest management has substantial and pervasive effects on tree-hole communities and may alter their structure and

  13. Forest Management Intensity Affects Aquatic Communities in Artificial Tree Holes.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Jana S; Rohland, Anja; Sichardt, Nora; Lade, Peggy; Guidetti, Brenda; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gossner, Martin M

    2016-01-01

    Forest management could potentially affect organisms in all forest habitats. However, aquatic communities in water-filled tree-holes may be especially sensitive because of small population sizes, the risk of drought and potential dispersal limitation. We set up artificial tree holes in forest stands subject to different management intensities in two regions in Germany and assessed the influence of local environmental properties (tree-hole opening type, tree diameter, water volume and water temperature) as well as regional drivers (forest management intensity, tree-hole density) on tree-hole insect communities (not considering other organisms such as nematodes or rotifers), detritus content, oxygen and nutrient concentrations. In addition, we compared data from artificial tree holes with data from natural tree holes in the same area to evaluate the methodological approach of using tree-hole analogues. We found that forest management had strong effects on communities in artificial tree holes in both regions and across the season. Abundance and species richness declined, community composition shifted and detritus content declined with increasing forest management intensity. Environmental variables, such as tree-hole density and tree diameter partly explained these changes. However, dispersal limitation, indicated by effects of tree-hole density, generally showed rather weak impacts on communities. Artificial tree holes had higher water temperatures (on average 2°C higher) and oxygen concentrations (on average 25% higher) than natural tree holes. The abundance of organisms was higher but species richness was lower in artificial tree holes. Community composition differed between artificial and natural tree holes. Negative management effects were detectable in both tree-hole systems, despite their abiotic and biotic differences. Our results indicate that forest management has substantial and pervasive effects on tree-hole communities and may alter their structure and

  14. Biological Effects Of Artificial Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corth, Richard

    1980-10-01

    We are increasingly being warned of the possible effects of so called "polluted" light, that is light that differs in spectral content from that of sunlight. We should be concerned, we are told, because all animals and plants have evolved under this natural daylight and therefore any difference between that illuminant and the artificial illuminants that are on the market today, is suspect. The usual presentation of the differences between the sunlight and the artificial illuminants are as shown in Figure 1. Here we are shown the spectral power distribution of sunlight and Cool White fluorescent light. The spectral power distributions of each have been normalized to some convenient wavelength so that each can be seen and easily compared on the same figure. But this presentation is misleading for one does not experience artificial illuminants at the same intensity as one experiences sunlight. Sunlight intensities are ordinarily found to be in the 8000 to 10,000 footcandle range whereas artificial illuminants are rarely experienced at intensity levels greater than 100 footcandles. Therefore a representative difference between the two types of illumination conditions is more accurately represented as in Figure 2. Thus if evolutionary adaptations require that humans and other animals be exposed to sunlight to ensure wellbeing, it is clear that one must be exposed to sunlight intensities. It is not feasible to expect that artificially illuminated environments will be lit to the same intensity as sunlight

  15. Artificial gametes from stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn. PMID:26161331

  16. Artificial evolution: a new path for artificial intelligence?

    PubMed

    Husbands, P; Harvey, I; Cliff, D; Miller, G

    1997-06-01

    Recently there have been a number of proposals for the use of artificial evolution as a radically new approach to the development of control systems for autonomous robots. This paper explains the artificial evolution approach, using work at Sussex to illustrate it. The paper revolves around a case study on the concurrent evolution of control networks and visual sensor morphologies for a mobile robot. Wider intellectual issues surrounding the work are discussed, as is the use of more abstract evolutionary simulations as a new potentially useful tool in theoretical biology. PMID:9209759

  17. Shallow Horizontal GCHP Effectiveness in Arid Climate Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Timothy James

    Ground coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been used successfully in many environments to improve the heating and cooling efficiency of both small and large scale buildings. In arid climate regions, such as the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area, where the air condi-tioning load is dominated by cooling in the summer, GCHPs are difficult to install and operate. This is because the nature of soils in arid climate regions, in that they are both dry and hot, renders them particularly ineffective at dissipating heat. The first part of this thesis addresses applying the SVHeat finite element modeling soft-ware to create a model of a GCHP system. Using real-world data from a prototype solar-water heating system coupled with a ground-source heat exchanger installed in Menlo Park, California, a relatively accurate model was created to represent a novel GCHP panel system installed in a shallow vertical trench. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the calibrated model. The second part of the thesis involved adapting the calibrated model to represent an ap-proximation of soil conditions in arid climate regions, using a range of thermal properties for dry soils. The effectiveness of the GCHP in the arid climate region model was then evaluated by comparing the thermal flux from the panel into the subsurface profile to that of the prototype GCHP. It was shown that soils in arid climate regions are particularly inefficient at heat dissipation, but that it is highly dependent on the thermal conductivity inputted into the model. This demonstrates the importance of proper site characterization in arid climate regions. Finally, several soil improvement methods were researched to evaluate their potential for use in improving the effectiveness of shallow horizontal GCHP systems in arid climate regions.

  18. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  19. Large stratospheric sudden warming in Antarctic late winter and shallow ozone hole in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzawa, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Sadao )

    1990-01-01

    There occurred a large stratospheric sudden warming in the southern hemisphere in late winter of 1988 which competes in suddenness and size with major mid-winter warmings in the northern hemisphere. Associated with the dynamical phenomenon of the sudden warming, total ozone increased over the eastern hemispheric part of Antarctica. The sudden warming as well as other warmings which followed it made the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole shallow in depth and small in area.

  20. Polarization lidar for shallow water depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steven; Thayer, Jeffrey P; Hayman, Matthew

    2010-12-20

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nm and using a single photomultiplier tube is employed for applications of shallow water depth measurement. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system's laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than 1 order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, an Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator, and a time-to-digital converter are used to target various water depths with an ice floor to simulate a glacial meltpond. Measurement of 1 cm water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 mm are demonstrated using the technique. This novel approach enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement. PMID:21173834

  1. A modified siphon sampler for shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    A modified siphon sampler (or 'single-stage sampler') was developed to sample shallow water at closely spaced vertical intervals. The modified design uses horizontal rather than vertical sample bottles. Previous siphon samplers are limited to water about 20 centimeters (cm) or more in depth; the modified design can sample water 10 cm deep. Several mounting options were used to deploy the modified siphon sampler in shallow bedrock streams of Middle Tennessee, while minimizing alteration of the stream bed. Sampling characteristics and limitations of the modified design are similar to those of the original design. Testing showed that the modified sampler collects unbiased samples of suspended silt and clay. Similarity of the intake to the original siphon sampler suggests that the modified sampler would probably take downward-biased samples of suspended sand. Like other siphon samplers, it does not sample isokinetically, and the efficiency of sand sampling can be expected to change with flow velocity. The sampler needs to be located in the main flow of the stream, and is subject to damage from rapid flow and floating debris. Water traps were added to the air vents to detect the flow of water through the sampler, which can cause a strong upward bias in sampled suspended-sediment concentration. Water did flow through the sampler, in some cases even when the top of the air vent remained above water. Air vents need to be extended well above maximum water level to prevent flow through the sampler.

  2. Seismic reflection imaging of shallow oceanographic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PiéTé, Helen; Marié, Louis; Marsset, Bruno; Thomas, Yannick; Gutscher, Marc-André

    2013-05-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiling can provide high lateral resolution images of deep ocean thermohaline fine structure. However, the shallowest layers of the water column (z < 150 m) have remained unexplored by this technique until recently. In order to explore the feasibility of shallow seismic oceanography (SO), we reprocessed and analyzed four multichannel seismic reflection sections featuring reflectors at depths between 10 and 150 m. The influence of the acquisition parameters was quantified. Seismic data processing dedicated to SO was also investigated. Conventional seismic acquisition systems were found to be ill-suited to the imaging of shallow oceanographic structures, because of a high antenna filter effect induced by large offsets and seismic trace lengths, and sources that typically cannot provide both a high level of emission and fine vertical resolution. We considered a test case, the imagery of the seasonal thermocline on the western Brittany continental shelf. New oceanographic data acquired in this area allowed simulation of the seismic acquisition. Sea trials of a specifically designed system were performed during the ASPEX survey, conducted in early summer 2012. The seismic device featured: (i) four seismic streamers, each consisting of six traces of 1.80 m; (ii) a 1000 J SIG sparker source, providing a 400 Hz signal with a level of emission of 205 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. This survey captured the 15 m thick, 30 m deep seasonal thermocline in unprecedented detail, showing images of vertical displacements most probably induced by internal waves.

  3. Homopolar artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmar, M.

    2010-05-01

    Space exploration is linked in many ways to the generation and challenges of artificial gravity. Space stations and drag-free satellite platforms are used to provide microgravity environments for scientific experiments. On the other hand, microgravity or reduced gravity environments such as on Moon and Mars are known to put limits for long-term human presence. Large centrifuges in space may provide Earth-like gravity environments during long-term travels, however, such technology certainly has its limits to provide similar environments for human outposts on other moons and planets. One can imagine a different technology using a prediction out of Einstein's general relativity theory which is called frame-dragging. In principle, frame-dragging might be used to generate artificial gravitational fields similar to electric fields generated by time-varying or moving magnetic fields. We will show that it is also possible to generate constant artificial gravitational fields that could provide microgravity or artificial gravity environments. Although such technology is possible in principle, the field strengths calculated from Einstein's theory are too small to be useful so far. However, recently detected anomalies around low-temperature spinning matter as well as fly-by anomalies point to possible enhancement mechanisms that might make an artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging a reality in the future.

  4. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion. PMID:21331419

  5. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms.

  6. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms. PMID:27122353

  7. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms. PMID:27122353

  8. Nanobiocatalytic assemblies for artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hong; Nam, Dong Heon; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-08-01

    Natural photosynthesis, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion process, occurs through a series of photo-induced electron transfer reactions in nanoscale architectures that contain light-harvesting complexes, protein-metal clusters, and many redox biocatalysts. Artificial photosynthesis in nanobiocatalytic assemblies aims to reconstruct man-made photosensitizers, electron mediators, electron donors, and redox enzymes for solar synthesis of valuable chemicals through visible light-driven cofactor regeneration. The key requirement in the design of biocatalyzed artificial photosynthetic process is an efficient and forward electron transfer between each photosynthetic component. This review describes basic principles in combining redox biocatalysis with photocatalysis, and highlights recent research outcomes in the development of nanobiocatalytic assemblies that can mimic natural photosystems I and II, respectively. Current issues in biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis and future perspectives will be briefly discussed. PMID:24832068

  9. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  10. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Nosenko, M. A.; Drutskaya, M. S.; Moisenovich, M. M.; Nedospasov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed. PMID:27437136

  11. Artificial heart for humanoid robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnuru, Akshay; Wu, Lianjun; Tadesse, Yonas

    2014-03-01

    A soft robotic device inspired by the pumping action of a biological heart is presented in this study. Developing artificial heart to a humanoid robot enables us to make a better biomedical device for ultimate use in humans. As technology continues to become more advanced, the methods in which we implement high performance and biomimetic artificial organs is getting nearer each day. In this paper, we present the design and development of a soft artificial heart that can be used in a humanoid robot and simulate the functions of a human heart using shape memory alloy technology. The robotic heart is designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate someone blushing or when someone is angry by the use of elastomeric substrates and certain features for the transport of fluids.

  12. Artificial sweeteners: safe or unsafe?

    PubMed

    Qurrat-ul-Ain; Khan, Sohaib Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Artificial sweeteners or intense sweeteners are sugar substitutes that are used as an alternative to table sugar. They are many times sweeter than natural sugar and as they contain no calories, they may be used to control weight and obesity. Extensive scientific research has demonstrated the safety of the six low-calorie sweeteners currently approved for use in foods in the U.S. and Europe (stevia, acesulfame-K, aspartame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose), if taken in acceptable quantities daily. There is some ongoing debate over whether artificial sweetener usage poses a health threat .This review article aims to cover thehealth benefits, and risks, of consuming artificial sweeteners, and discusses natural sweeteners which can be used as alternatives. PMID:25842566

  13. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  14. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  15. Hydro-geochemical modeling of subalpine urbanized area: geochemical characterization of the shallow and deep aquifers of the urban district of Como (first results).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Silvia; Brunamonte, Fabio; Frascoli, Francesca; Ferrario, Maria Francesca; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Pozzi, Andrea; Gambillara, Roberto; Binda, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    One of the greatest environmental and social-economics threats is climate change. This topic, in the next few years, will have a significant impact on the availability of water resources of many regions. This is compounded by the strong anthropization of water systems that shows an intensification of conflicts for water resource exploitation. Therefore, it is necessary a sustainable manage of natural resources thorough knowledge of the hosting territories. The development of investigation and data processing methods are essential to reduce costs for the suitable use and protection of resources. Identify a sample area for testing the best approach is crucial. This research aims to find a valid methodology for the characterization, modeling and management of subalpine urban aquifers, and the urban district of Como appears perfect. The city of Como is located at the southern end of the western sector of Lake Como (N Italy). It is a coastal town, placed on a small alluvial plain, therefore in close communication with the lake. The plain is drained by two streams, which are presently artificially buried, and have an underground flow path in the urban section till the mouth. This city area, so, is suitable for this project as it is intensely urbanized, its dimensions is not too extensive and it is characterized by two aquifers very important and little known. These are a shallow aquifer and a deep aquifer, which are important not only for any water supply, but also for the stability of the ground subsidence in the city. This research is also the opportunity to work in a particular well-known area with high scientific significance; however, there is complete absence of information regarding the deep aquifer. Great importance has also the chosen and used of the more powerful open source software for this type of area, such as PHREEQC, EnvironInsite, PHREEQE etc., used for geological and geochemical data processing. The main goal of this preliminary work is the

  16. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80 m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats. PMID:26132902

  17. Treatment performance of artificial floating reed beds in an experimental mesocosm to improve the water quality of river Kshipra.

    PubMed

    Billore, S K; Prashant; Sharma, J K

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of untreated wastewater in River Kshipra had brought annual average of BOD, TKN and TS levels up to 39 mg/l, 38 mg/l and 781 mg/l respectively in the study area. Treatment performance by Artificial Floating Reed Beds (AFRB) was evaluated for removal efficiency of TS, NH4-N, NO3-N, TKN and BOD from river water, initially, under a pilot scale by an AFRB of size 200 m2 planted with local reed grass, Phragmites karka, in the part of River Kshipra at the confluence with meeting point of a wastewater stream. The system performance was recorded as 43% reduction in TS, 38% reduction in TKN and 39% BOD reduction. The experimental AFRBs were buoyant structure planted with reed grass, each unit had a rectangular size and covered an effective surface area of 2 m2. The experiment with the mesocosms with treatment of River water resulted that AFRB was reducing pollution load by 55-60% of TS, 45-55% of NH4-N, 33-45% of NO3-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. AFRB may be recommended as an in-situ, eco-friendly river water treatment structures for small shallow, slow flowing (or slightly stagnant) water bodies. PMID:19934506

  18. A multidisciplinary methodological approach for slope stability assessment of an area prone to shallow landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoni, Massimiliano; Meisina, Claudia; Valentino, Roberto; Bittelli, Marco; Battista Bischetti, Gian; Vercesi, Alberto; Chersich, Silvia; Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow landslides are widespread slope instabilities phenomena in several hilly and mountainous contexts all over the world. Due to their high density of diffusion also in small areas, they can provoke important damages to terrains, infrastructures, buildings, and, sometimes, loss of human lives. Shallow landslides affect superficial soils of limited thickness (generally lower than 2 m), located above weathered or not bedrock levels. Their triggering mechanism is strictly linked to the hydrological response of the soils to rainfall events. Thus, it becomes fundamental a comprehensive analysis of the soil properties which can influence the susceptibility of a slope to shallow landslides. In this study, a multidisciplinary approach was followed for the characterization of the soils and the individuation of the triggering conditions in an area particularly prone to shallow failures, for slope stability assessment. This area corresponded to the hilly sector of North-Eastern Oltrepò Pavese (Lombardy Region, Northern Italy), where the density of shallow landslides is really high, reaching more than 36 landslides per km2. The soils of the study area were analyzed through a multidisciplinary characterization, which took into account for the main geotechnical, mechanical and mineralogical parameters and also for the main pedological features of the materials. This approach allowed for identifying the main features and the horizons which could influence the soil behavior in relation to the conditions that are preparatory to shallow landslides development. In a test-site slope, representative of the main geomorphological, geological and landslides distribution characteristics typical of the study area, a continuous in time monitoring of meteorological (rainfall amount, air temperature, air humidity, atmospheric pressure, net solar radiation, wind speed and direction) and hydrological (soil water content, pore water pressure) parameters was implemented. In

  19. Artificial Life in Quantum Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantum information protocol that models the biological behaviours of individuals living in a natural selection scenario. The artificially engineered evolution of the quantum living units shows the fundamental features of life in a common environment, such as self-replication, mutation, interaction of individuals, and death. We propose how to mimic these bio-inspired features in a quantum-mechanical formalism, which allows for an experimental implementation achievable with current quantum platforms. This study paves the way for the realization of artificial life and embodied evolution with quantum technologies. PMID:26853918

  20. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  1. Artificial Life in Quantum Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    We develop a quantum information protocol that models the biological behaviours of individuals living in a natural selection scenario. The artificially engineered evolution of the quantum living units shows the fundamental features of life in a common environment, such as self-replication, mutation, interaction of individuals, and death. We propose how to mimic these bio-inspired features in a quantum-mechanical formalism, which allows for an experimental implementation achievable with current quantum platforms. This study paves the way for the realization of artificial life and embodied evolution with quantum technologies.

  2. Artificial Cells: Prospects for Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they also have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nano-scale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Artificial cells: prospects for biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Deamer, David

    2002-01-01

    A variety of techniques can now be used to alter the genome of a cell. Although these techniques are very powerful, they have limitations related to cost and efficiency of scale. Artificial cells designed for specific applications combine properties of biological systems such as nanoscale efficiency, self-organization and adaptability at relatively low cost. Individual components needed for such structures have already been developed, and now the main challenge is to integrate them in functional microscopic compartments. It will then become possible to design and construct communities of artificial cells that can perform different tasks related to therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  4. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-19

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  5. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-10

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  6. Mississippi oxbow lake sediment quality during an artificial flood.

    PubMed

    Knight, S S; Lizotte, R E; Moore, M T; Smith, S; Shields, F D

    2009-04-01

    Surface sediment quality was assessed during a 35-day artificial flood in a shallow (<1.5 m) oxbow lake along the Coldwater River, Mississippi, using Hyalella azteca 28-day bioassays. Seventeen pesticides were monitored in sediments before, during and after flooding, with increases in atrazine and metolachlor concentrations coinciding with two unexpected storm events, 51 and 56 mm, during and after flooding, respectively. Mean 28-day H. azteca survival was >85% throughout this study. However, growth was affected at three sites during flooding with limited growth recovery after flooding. Patterns in observed growth impairment were associated with changes in atrazine (R(2)=0.524) and fipronil sulfone (R(2)=0.584) concentrations. PMID:19183821

  7. Internal evaporation and condensation characteristics in the shallow soil layer of an oasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Yinhuan; Han, Bo; Lu, Shihua; Li, Zhaoguo

    2016-07-01

    The surface energy balance was analyzed using observations from the Jinta oasis experiment in the summer of 2005. A negative imbalance energy flux was found during daytime that could not be attributed to the soil heat storage process. Rather, the imbalance was related to the evaporation within the soil. The soil heat storage rate and the soil moisture variability always showed similar variations at a depth of 0.05 m between 0800 and 1000 (local standard time), while the observed imbalanced energy flux was very small, which implied that water vapor condensation occurred within the soil. Therefore, the distillation in shallow soil can be derived using reliable surface energy flux observations. In order to show that the importance of internal evaporation and condensation in the shallow soil layer, the soil temperatures at the depths of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 m were reproduced using a one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation, with the observed soil temperature at the surface and at 0.40 m as the boundary conditions. It was found that the simulated soil temperature improves substantially in the shallow layer when the water distillation is added as a sink/source term, even after the soil effective thermal conductivity has been optimized. This result demonstrates that the process of water distillation may be a dominant cause of both the temperature and moisture variability in the shallow soil layer.

  8. Wastewater compounds in urban shallow groundwater wells correspond to exfiltration probabilities of nearby sewers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Gyun; Roehrdanz, Patrick R; Feraud, Marina; Ervin, Jared; Anumol, Tarun; Jia, Ai; Park, Minkyu; Tamez, Carlos; Morelius, Erving W; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L; Izbicki, John; Means, Jay C; Snyder, Shane A; Holden, Patricia A

    2015-11-15

    Wastewater compounds are frequently detected in urban shallow groundwater. Sources include sewage or reclaimed wastewater, but origins are often unknown. In a prior study, wastewater compounds were quantified in waters sampled from shallow groundwater wells in a small coastal California city. Here, we resampled those wells and expanded sample analyses to include sewage- or reclaimed water-specific indicators, i.e. pharmaceutical and personal care product chemicals or disinfection byproducts. Also, we developed a geographic information system (GIS)-based model of sanitary sewer exfiltration probability--combining a published pipe failure model accounting for sewer pipe size, age, materials of construction, with interpolated depths to groundwater--to determine if sewer system attributes relate to wastewater compounds in urban shallow groundwater. Across the wells, groundwater samples contained varying wastewater compounds, including acesulfame, sucralose, bisphenol A, 4-tert-octylphenol, estrone and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS). Fecal indicator bacterial concentrations and toxicological bioactivities were less than known benchmarks. However, the reclaimed water in this study was positive for all bioactivity tested. Excluding one well intruded by seawater, the similarity of groundwater to sewage, based on multiple indicators, increased with increasing sanitary sewer exfiltration probability (modeled from infrastructure within ca. 300 m of each well). In the absence of direct exfiltration or defect measurements, sewer exfiltration probabilities modeled from the collection system's physical data can indicate potential locations where urban shallow groundwater is contaminated by sewage. PMID:26379202

  9. Shallow axial magma chamber at the slow-spreading Erta Ale Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, Carolina; Wright, Tim J.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho; Cann, Johnson R.; Barnie, Talfan; Ayele, Atalay

    2012-04-01

    The existence of elongated, shallow magma chambers beneath the axes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges is well established. Yet, at slow-spreading ridges such shallow and elongated magma chambers are much less evident. Simple thermal models therefore predict that spreading velocity and magma supply may provide the main controls on magma-chamber depth and morphology. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar data to investigate the dynamics of the magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Erta Ale segment of the Ethiopian Rift. We show that an eruption from Alu-Dalafilla in November 2008 was sourced from a shallow, 1km deep, elongated magma chamber that is divided into two segments. The eruption was probably triggered by a small influx of magma into the northern segment. Both segments of the magma chamber fed the main eruption through a connecting dyke and both segments have been refilling rapidly since the eruption ended. Our results support the presence of independent sources of magma supply to segmented chambers located along the axes of spreading centres. However, the existence of a shallow, elongated axial chamber at Erta Ale indicates that spreading rate and magma supply may not be the only controls on magma-chamber characteristics.

  10. Internal evaporation and condensation characteristics in the shallow soil layer of an oasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Yinhuan; Han, Bo; Lu, Shihua; Li, Zhaoguo

    2015-05-01

    The surface energy balance was analyzed using observations from the Jinta oasis experiment in the summer of 2005. A negative imbalance energy flux was found during daytime that could not be attributed to the soil heat storage process. Rather, the imbalance was related to the evaporation within the soil. The soil heat storage rate and the soil moisture variability always showed similar variations at a depth of 0.05 m between 0800 and 1000 (local standard time), while the observed imbalanced energy flux was very small, which implied that water vapor condensation occurred within the soil. Therefore, the distillation in shallow soil can be derived using reliable surface energy flux observations. In order to show that the importance of internal evaporation and condensation in the shallow soil layer, the soil temperatures at the depths of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 m were reproduced using a one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation, with the observed soil temperature at the surface and at 0.40 m as the boundary conditions. It was found that the simulated soil temperature improves substantially in the shallow layer when the water distillation is added as a sink/source term, even after the soil effective thermal conductivity has been optimized. This result demonstrates that the process of water distillation may be a dominant cause of both the temperature and moisture variability in the shallow soil layer.

  11. A lattice Boltzmann-finite element model for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems involving shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical method for the modeling of shallow waters interacting with slender elastic structures is presented. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method, while the solid domain is idealized by corotational beam finite elements undergoing large displacements. Structure dynamics is predicted by using the time discontinuous Galerkin method and the fluid-structure interface conditions are handled by the Immersed Boundary method. An explicit coupling strategy to combine the adopted numerical methods is proposed and its effectiveness is tested by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced at the fluid-solid interface.

  12. Comparison of Shallow Survey 2012 Multibeam Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the Shallow Survey common dataset is a comparison of the different technologies utilized for data acquisition in the shallow survey marine environment. The common dataset consists of a series of surveys conducted over a common area of seabed using a variety of systems. It provides equipment manufacturers the opportunity to showcase their latest systems while giving hydrographic researchers and scientists a chance to test their latest algorithms on the dataset so that rigorous comparisons can be made. Five companies collected data for the Common Dataset in the Wellington Harbor area in New Zealand between May 2010 and May 2011; including Kongsberg, Reson, R2Sonic, GeoAcoustics, and Applied Acoustics. The Wellington harbor and surrounding coastal area was selected since it has a number of well-defined features, including the HMNZS South Seas and HMNZS Wellington wrecks, an armored seawall constructed of Tetrapods and Akmons, aquifers, wharves and marinas. The seabed inside the harbor basin is largely fine-grained sediment, with gravel and reefs around the coast. The area outside the harbor on the southern coast is an active environment, with moving sand and exposed reefs. A marine reserve is also in this area. For consistency between datasets, the coastal research vessel R/V Ikatere and crew were used for all surveys conducted for the common dataset. Using Triton's Perspective processing software multibeam datasets collected for the Shallow Survey were processed for detail analysis. Datasets from each sonar manufacturer were processed using the CUBE algorithm developed by the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM/JHC). Each dataset was gridded at 0.5 and 1.0 meter resolutions for cross comparison and compliance with International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) requirements. Detailed comparisons were made of equipment specifications (transmit frequency, number of beams, beam width), data density, total uncertainty, and

  13. Magnetic polymer composite artificial bacterial flagella.

    PubMed

    Peyer, K E; Siringil, E; Zhang, L; Nelson, B J

    2014-01-01

    Artificial bacterial flagella (ABFs) are magnetically actuated swimming microrobots inspired by Escherichia coli bacteria, which use a helical tail for propulsion. The ABFs presented are fabricated from a magnetic polymer composite (MPC) containing iron-oxide nanoparticles embedded in an SU-8 polymer that is shaped into a helix by direct laser writing. The paper discusses the swim performance of MPC ABFs fabricated with varying helicity angles. The locomotion model presented contains the fluidic drag of the microrobot, which is calculated based on the resistive force theory. The robot's magnetization is approximated by an analytical model for a soft-magnetic ellipsoid. The helicity angle influences the fluidic and magnetic properties of the robot, and it is shown that weakly magnetized robots prefer a small helicity angle to achieve corkscrew-type motion. PMID:25405833

  14. An electric artificial heart for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Pierce, W S; Rosenberg, G; Snyder, A J; Pae, W E; Donachy, J H; Waldhausen, J A

    1990-09-01

    Advances in microelectronics, high-strength magnets, and control system design now make replacement of the heart using an implantable, electrically powered pump feasible. The device described herein is a compact, dual pusher plate unit with valved polyurethane sac-type ventricles positioned at either end. The power unit consists of a small, brushless direct current motor and a motion translator. A microprocessor control system is used to regulate heart beat rate and provide left-right output balance. Bench studies lasting for as long as 1 year have been performed. Heart replacement with the electric heart has been performed in 18 calves since 1984. The longest survivor lived for more than 7 months. Among the causes of termination were component failure, thromboembolic complications, and bleeding. No major problem has been identified that precludes prolonged use of the electric heart. In the future the patient with end-stage heart disease will have an electric artificial heart as one therapeutic option. PMID:2396885

  15. Flow separation of currents in shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Flow separation of currents in shallow coastal areas is investigated using a boundary layer model for two-dimensional (depth-averaged) tidal flow past an elliptic headland. If the shoaling region near the coast is narrow compared to the scale of the headland, bottom friction causes the flow to separate just downstream of the point where the pressure gradient switches from favoring to adverse. As long as the shoaling region at the coast is well resolved, the inclusion of eddy viscosity and a no-slip boundary condition have no effect on this result. An approximate analytic solution for the pressure gradient along the boundary is obtained by assuming the flow away from the immediate vicinity of the boundary is irrotational. On the basis of the pressure gradient obtained from the irrotational flow solution, flow separation is a strong function of the headland aspect ratio, an equivalent Reynolds number, and a Keulegan-Carpenter number.

  16. Shallow flows over surfaces of patterned wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivel, Morgane; Jeon, David; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Our previous work showed that surfaces with spatially patterned wetting properties induce passive displacements of shallow flows. Polycarbonate plates were patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes, and a thin, rectangular water jet impinged on the patterned surface. We reported development of intriguing roller structures at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces. In our present work, we study the effect of varying the stripes' width, spacing, and orientation on the dynamics of these roller structures. Specifically, we are interested in the vortex generation and air entrainment by the rollers. We report quantitative results to this effect. We will also discuss potential uses of this technique for modifying contact line dynamics and bow waves near ships. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research (Grant # ONR-N00014-11-1-0031) and by NSF-GRFP.

  17. GiBUU and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    In this talk we shortly describe the physics contents of the GiBUU transport code, used to describe lepton scattering off nuclei. Particular attention will be given to validation of the GiBUU in pion-, electron- and photon-induced reactions, which serve as a benchmark for neutrino-induced ones. We mainly concentrate on those properties of benchmark reactions, which are relevant to the region of Shallow Inelastic Scattering (SIS). Our results in this region are presented for integrated and differential cross sections. Comparison with recent MINOS inclusive data, as well as predictions for the differential cross sections measurable in Minerνa and NoνA experiments are made.

  18. Deep shadows in a shallow box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiang; Mohan, Ankit; Tumblin, Jack

    2008-02-01

    We present a fast, low-cost technique to gather high-contrast 'relightable' photographs of desktop-sized objects. Instead of an elaborate light stage, we follow Mohan et al.; we place the object and a digitally steered spotlight inside a white cardboard box, aim the spotlight at the box interior, and move the spot to light the object from N repeatable lighting directions. However, strong ambient lighting from box interreflections causes 'shallow' shadows and reduces contrasts in all basis images. We show how to remove this ambient lighting computationally from the N images, by measuring an N ×N matrix of coupling factors between lighting directions using a mirrorsphere light probe. This linear method, suitable for any light stage, creates physically accurate 'deep shadow' basis images, yet imposes only a modest noise penalty, and does not require external light metering or illumination angle measurements. Results from our demonstration system support these claims.

  19. Fast neutron background measurements at shallow depths

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Novikov, V.; Dougherty, B.

    1993-10-01

    We report on measurements of the neutron backgrounds for neutrino experiments at shallow depth (such as the proposed San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment). A detector capable of pulse-shape discrimination measured the flux of fast neutrons at 20 mwe depth in the Stanford Underground Facility to be (1.07 {+-} 0.30) X 10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. An experiment, situated in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor. studied spallation neutrons from muons traversing Pb and Cu. An underground experiment in the SUF, employing a detector filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, is measuring the neutron production rate and multiplicity for muon spallation in low-A material (hydrocarbon-based liquid scintillator).

  20. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  1. Shallow groundwater subsidies to terrestrial ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.; Jayawickreme, D.; Nosetto, M.; Jobbagy, E. G.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout the world, shallow groundwater systems subsidize much higher net primary productivity (NPP) than would be expected based solely on local rainfall. Such subsidies are far more prevalent and less recognized in upland systems than in more commonly studied riparian ones. We present a quantitative framework for examining and quantifying groundwater subsidies globally, illustrating subsidies to NPP across rainfall gradients in Argentina and the southern United States, including Texas and California. In the Argentine Pampas, we determined that the presence of relatively shallow ground water increased the transpiration of forest plantations by 300 to 400 mm. Farther west, the presence of well developed Prosopis flexuosa woodlands in the Monte desert region east of the Andes has puzzled scientists for decades. We explored the vulnerability and importance of phreatic ground water for the productivity of the region, comparing the contributions of local rainfall to that of remote mountain recharge that is increasingly being diverted for irrigated agriculture before it reaches the desert. The isotopic composition of phreatic ground waters (δ2H; -137±5 ‰) closely matched the signature of water brought to the region by the Mendoza River (-137±6 ‰), suggesting that mountain river infiltration rather than in-situ rainfall deep drainage (-39±19 ‰) was the dominant mechanism of recharge. Vegetation in woodland ecosystems there relied on regionally derived ground water from Andean snowmelt located from 6.5 to 9.5 m underground. Understanding the ecohydrological coupling of surface and ground waters is vital for estimating net primary productivity and for balancing the demands of managed ecosystems with the conservation of unique natural systems.

  2. Artificial Video for Video Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallis, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of video analysis software and computer-generated animations for student activities. The use of artificial video affords the opportunity for students to study phenomena for which a real video may not be easy or even possible to procure, using analysis software with which the students are already familiar. We will…

  3. Hydrogen production: Catalysing artificial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.; Shen, Shaohua

    2013-12-01

    Efficient photocatalytic splitting of water to realize carbon-free production of hydrogen from sunlight remains a challenge. New precious-metal-free molecular catalysts in semiconductor-based, visible-light-driven water-splitting systems are promising for realizing practical artificial photosynthesis.

  4. Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow.

    PubMed

    Kyba, Christopher C M; Tong, Kai Pong; Bennie, Jonathan; Birriel, Ignacio; Birriel, Jennifer J; Cool, Andrew; Danielsen, Arne; Davies, Thomas W; Outer, Peter N den; Edwards, William; Ehlert, Rainer; Falchi, Fabio; Fischer, Jürgen; Giacomelli, Andrea; Giubbilini, Francesco; Haaima, Marty; Hesse, Claudia; Heygster, Georg; Hölker, Franz; Inger, Richard; Jensen, Linsey J; Kuechly, Helga U; Kuehn, John; Langill, Phil; Lolkema, Dorien E; Nagy, Matthew; Nievas, Miguel; Ochi, Nobuaki; Popow, Emil; Posch, Thomas; Puschnig, Johannes; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schmidt, Wim; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel; Spoelstra, Henk; Tekatch, Anthony; Trueblood, Mark; Walker, Constance E; Weber, Michael; Welch, Douglas L; Zamorano, Jaime; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program. PMID:25673335

  5. Thinking, Creativity, and Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSiano, Michael; DeSiano, Salvatore

    This document provides an introduction to the relationship between the current knowledge of focused and creative thinking and artificial intelligence. A model for stages of focused and creative thinking gives: problem encounter/setting, preparation, concentration/incubation, clarification/generation and evaluation/judgment. While a computer can…

  6. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, Joseph

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with designing machine systems that can simulate human mental processes. The field draws upon theoretical constructs from a wide variety of disciplines, including mathematics, psychology, linguistics, neurophysiology, computer science, and electronic engineering. Some of the…

  7. Artificial Intelligence and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Defines artificial intelligence (AI) in relation to intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) and science education. Provides a brief background of AI work, examples of expert systems, examples of ICAI work, and addresses problems facing AI workers that have implications for science education. Proposes a revised model of the Karplus/Renner…

  8. Artificial neural networks in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    This Technology Brief provides an overview of artificial neural networks (ANN). A definition and explanation of an ANN is given and situations in which an ANN is used are described. ANN applications to medicine specifically are then explored and the areas in which it is currently being used are discussed. Included are medical diagnostic aides, biochemical analysis, medical image analysis and drug development.

  9. Artificial-Satellite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Johnny H.

    1989-01-01

    Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is general orbit-predicting computer program incorporating sufficient orbit-modeling accuracy for design and planning of missions and analysis of maneuvers. Suitable for study of planetary-orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Not written for specific mission and intended use for almost any planetary orbiting mission. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  11. WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY ARTIFICIAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of artificial wetlands at Santee, California demonstrated the capacity of wetlands systems for integrated secondary and advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters. When receiving a blend of primary and secondary wastewaters at a blend ratio of 1:2 (6 cm per day: 12 cm pe...

  12. Assumed Probability Density Functions for Shallow and Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Krueger, Steven K.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2010-04-01

    The assumed joint probability density function (PDF) between vertical velocity and conserved temperature and total water scalars has been suggested to be a relatively computationally inexpensive and unified subgrid-scale (SGS) parameterization for boundary layer clouds and turbulent moments. This paper analyzes the performance of five families of PDFs using large-eddy simulations of deep convection, shallow convection, and a transition from stratocumulus to trade wind cumulus. Three of the PDF families are based on the double Gaussian form and the remaining two are the single Gaussian and a Double Delta Function (analogous to a mass flux model). The assumed PDF method is tested for grid sizes as small as 0.4 km to as large as 204.8 km. In addition, studies are performed for PDF sensitivity to errors in the input moments and for how well the PDFs diagnose some higher-order moments. In general, the double Gaussian PDFs more accurately represent SGS cloud structure and turbulence moments in the boundary layer compared to the single Gaussian and Double Delta Function PDFs for the range of grid sizes tested. This is especially true for small SGS cloud fractions. While the most complex PDF, Lewellen-Yoh, better represents shallow convective cloud properties (cloud fraction and liquid water mixing ratio) compared to the less complex Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF, there appears to be no advantage in implementing Lewellen-Yoh for deep convection. However, the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF better represents the liquid water flux, is less sensitive to errors in the input moments, and diagnoses higher order moments more accurately. Between the Lewellen-Yoh and Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDFs, it appears that neither family is distinctly better at representing cloudy layers. However, due to the reduced computational cost and fairly robust results, it appears that the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF could be an ideal family for SGS cloud and turbulence representation in coarse

  13. Improved Teleseismic Locations of Shallow Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, S. T.; Deshon, H. R.; Engdahl, E. R.; Bilek, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Improved precision teleseismic earthquake locations in subduction zones are being used to better understand shallow megathrust frictional conditions and determine the global distribution of tsunami earthquakes. Most global teleseismic catalogs fail to accurately locate shallow subduction zone earthquakes, especially mid-magnitude events, leading to increased error in determining source time functions useful for identifying tsunami earthquakes. The Engdahl, van der Hilst and Buland (EHB) method had addressed this problem in part by including the teleseismic depth phases pP, pwP and sP in the relocation algorithm. The EHB catalog relies on phase times reported to the ISC and NEIC, but additional high quality depth phase onsets can be incorporated in the relocation procedure to enhance the robustness of individual locations. We present improvements to an automated frequency-based picker that identifies depth phases not reported in the standard catalogs. The revised autopicker uses abrupt amplitude changes of the power spectral density (PSD) function calculated at optimized frequencies for each waveform. It is being used to pick onsets for P and depth phases pP, pwP or sP for inclusion in the EHB phase catalog. In the case of events with an emergent P-wave onset or with a complex waveform consisting of sub-events, the autopicker may either overlook a relatively small change in frequency of the first arrival or misidentify the onset arrival time of associated later arrivals, leading to erroneous results. We track those waveforms by comparing the difference of the P-wave arrival time from ISC/NEIC and the autopicker. The phase arrivals can then be adjusted manually as they usually make up a few percent of the whole data. Epicentral changes following relocation using additional depth phases are generally small (<5 km). Changes in depth may be on the order of 10s of km for some events, though the standard deviation of depth changes within each subduction zone is ~5 km. We

  14. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  15. Dynamic random noise shrinks the twinkling aftereffect induced by artificial scotomas.

    PubMed

    Reich, L N; Levi, D M; Frishman, L J

    2000-01-01

    Physiological alterations in cortical neurons are induced during adaptation to an artificial scotoma, a small homogeneous patch within a dynamic random noise or patterned background. When the dynamic noise is replaced by an equiluminant gray background, a twinkling aftereffect can be seen in the location of the artificial scotoma. Following binocular adaptation, we discovered that the perceived size of the twinkling aftereffect was dramatically smaller than the inducing artificial scotoma. Dichoptic adaptation induced shrinkage in the twinkling aftereffect that was similar to that found after binocular adaptation, suggesting that the twinkling aftereffect and its shrinkage both have cortical origins. We speculate that this perceptual shrinkage may reflect the interaction between two cortical mechanisms: a twinkling aftereffect mechanism that spreads throughout the artificial scotoma, and a filling-in mechanism that has a greater influence at the edges of the artificial scotoma and spreads inwards. PMID:10683457

  16. Artificial Intelligence Databases: A Survey and Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David

    1990-01-01

    Identifies and describes online databases containing references to materials on artificial intelligence, robotics, and expert systems, and compares them in terms of scope and usage. Recommendations for conducting online searches on artificial intelligence and related fields are offered. (CLB)

  17. Introduction to Concepts in Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebur, Dagmar

    1995-01-01

    This introduction to artificial neural networks summarizes some basic concepts of computational neuroscience and the resulting models of artificial neurons. The terminology of biological and artificial neurons, biological and machine learning and neural processing is introduced. The concepts of supervised and unsupervised learning are explained with examples from the power system area. Finally, a taxonomy of different types of neurons and different classes of artificial neural networks is presented.

  18. California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project--shallow aquifer assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    The California State Water Resources Control Board’s (SWRCB) GAMA Program is a comprehensive assessment of statewide groundwater quality in California. From 2004 to 2012, the GAMA Program’s Priority Basin Project focused on assessing groundwater resources used for public drinking-water supplies. More than 2,000 public-supply wells were sampled by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for this effort. Starting in 2012, the GAMA Priority Basin Project began an assessment of water resources in shallow aquifers in California. These shallow aquifers provide water for domestic and small community-supply wells, which are often drilled to shallower depths in the groundwater system than public-supply wells. Shallow aquifers are of interest because shallow groundwater may respond more quickly and be more susceptible to contamination from human activities at the land surface, than the deeper aquifers. The SWRCB’s GAMA Program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 (Water Code sections 10780-10782.3): a public mandate to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supplies, and to increase the availability of information about groundwater quality to the public. The U.S. Geological Survey is the technical lead of the Priority Basin Project. Stewardship of California’s groundwater resources is a responsibility shared between well owners, communities, and the State. Participants and collaborators in the GAMA Program include Regional Water Quality Control Boards, Department of Water Resources, Department of Public Health, local and regional groundwater management entities, county and local water agencies, community groups, and private citizens. Well-owner participation in the GAMA Program is entirely voluntary.

  19. WIDESPREAD PRESENCE OF SHALLOW CUSPS IN THE SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS PROFILE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Vesperini, Enrico; Trenti, Michele E-mail: trenti@colorado.ed

    2010-09-10

    Surface-brightness profiles of globular clusters with shallow central cusps ({Sigma} {approx} R {sup {nu}} with -0.3 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.05) have been associated by several recent studies with the presence of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). Such shallow slopes are observed in several globular clusters thanks to the high angular resolution of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. In this Letter, we evaluate whether shallow cusps are a unique signature of a central IMBH by analyzing a sample of direct N-body simulations of star clusters with and without a central IMBH. We 'observe' the simulations as if they were HST images. Shallow cusps are common in our simulation sample: star clusters without an IMBH have {nu} {approx_gt} -0.3 in the pre-core-collapse and core-collapse phases. Post-core-collapse clusters without an IMBH transition to steeper cusps, -0.7 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.4, only if the primordial binary fraction is very small, f {sub bin} < 3%, and if there are few stellar-mass BHs remaining. Otherwise {nu} values overlap the range usually ascribed to the presence of an IMBH throughout the entire duration of the simulations. In addition, measuring {nu} is intrinsically prone to significant uncertainty, therefore typical measurement errors may lead to {nu} {>=} -0.3 even when ({nu}) {approx_lt} -0.4. Overall our analysis shows that a shallow cusp is not an unequivocal signature of a central IMBH and casts serious doubts on the usefulness of measuring {nu} in the context of the hunt for IMBHs in globular clusters.

  20. Evaporite deposition in a shallow perennial lake, Qaidam basin, western China

    SciTech Connect

    Schubel, K.A.; Lowenstein, T.K. ); Spencer, R.J. ); Pengxi, Z. )

    1991-03-01

    Evaporites accumulate in ephemeral saline-pans, shallow perennial lakes or lagoons, and deep perennial systems. Continuous brine trench exposures of Holocene evaporites from the Qaidam basin provide criteria for the recognition of shallow perennial lake sediments. Based on Landsat photographs, lateral extent of beds (at least 7 km), and sequence thicknesses (maximum 2.5 m), the paleolake is interpreted to have been less than 2.5 m deep and at least 120 km{sup 2} in area. Sediments consist of laminated siliciclastic mud overlain by mud-halite couplets (mm- to cm-scale layers), which represent one vertical shallowing- and concentrating-upwards sequence. The basal laminite marks the onset of deposition in this shallow perennial paleolake. Syndepositional halite textures and fabrics in the overlying mud-halite couplets include cumulates, rafts, and chevrons, draped by mud laminae, and halite layers truncated by horizontal dissolution surfaces (increasing in frequency upwards). Paleolake brines, determined from fluid inclusion melting temperatures, are Na-Mg-Cl-rich and evolve from 0.84 m Mg{sup 2} to 1.52 m Mg{sup 2+} (near the surface). Combinations of the following criteria may be used for the recognition of shallow, nonstratified, perennial lake sediments: lateral continuity of layers; muds undisrupted by subaerial exposure; vertical bottom-growth of halite; halite layers conformably overlain by mud; halite layers truncated by nonuniformly spaced horizontal dissolution surfaces; erosional scours and channels filled with cross-laminated gypsum, halite, and siliciclastic sand and mud; and salinity fluctuations over small stratigraphic intervals within an overall concentrating-upwards sequence.

  1. Groundwater penetrating radar and high resolution seismic for locating shallow faults in unconsolidated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E. |; Waddell, M.G.; Sexton, B.G.

    1993-12-31

    Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediments, particularly in coastal plain settings, are very difficult to discern during subsurface exploration yet have critical impact to groundwater flow, contaminant transport and geotechnical evaluations. This paper presents a case study using cross-over geophysical technologies in an area where shallow faulting is probable and known contamination exists. A comparison is made between Wenner and dipole-dipole resistivity data, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic data. Data from these methods were verified with a cone penetrometer investigation for subsurface lithology and compared to existing monitoring well data. Interpretations from these techniques are compared with actual and theoretical shallow faulting found in the literature. The results of this study suggests that (1) the CPT study, combined with the monitoring well data may suggest that discontinuities in correlatable zones may indicate that faulting is present (2) the addition of the Wenner and dipole-dipole data may further suggest that offset zones exist in the shallow subsurface but not allow specific fault planes or fault stranding to be mapped (3) the high resolution seismic data will image faults to within a few feet of the surface but does not have the resolution to identify the faulting on the scale of our models, however it will suggest locations for upward continuation of faulted zones (4) offset 100 MHz and 200 MHz CMP GPR will image zones and features that may be fault planes and strands similar to our models (5) 300 MHz GPR will image higher resolution features that may suggest the presence of deeper faults and strands, and (6) the combination of all of the tools in this study, particularly the GPR and seismic may allow for the mapping of small scale, shallow faulting in unconsolidated sediments.

  2. Solar fuels via artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2009-12-21

    Because sunlight is diffuse and intermittent, substantial use of solar energy to meet humanity's needs will probably require energy storage in dense, transportable media via chemical bonds. Practical, cost effective technologies for conversion of sunlight directly into useful fuels do not currently exist, and will require new basic science. Photosynthesis provides a blueprint for solar energy storage in fuels. Indeed, all of the fossil-fuel-based energy consumed today derives from sunlight harvested by photosynthetic organisms. Artificial photosynthesis research applies the fundamental scientific principles of the natural process to the design of solar energy conversion systems. These constructs use different materials, and researchers tune them to produce energy efficiently and in forms useful to humans. Fuel production via natural or artificial photosynthesis requires three main components. First, antenna/reaction center complexes absorb sunlight and convert the excitation energy to electrochemical energy (redox equivalents). Then, a water oxidation complex uses this redox potential to catalyze conversion of water to hydrogen ions, electrons stored as reducing equivalents, and oxygen. A second catalytic system uses the reducing equivalents to make fuels such as carbohydrates, lipids, or hydrogen gas. In this Account, we review a few general approaches to artificial photosynthetic fuel production that may be useful for eventually overcoming the energy problem. A variety of research groups have prepared artificial reaction center molecules. These systems contain a chromophore, such as a porphyrin, covalently linked to one or more electron acceptors, such as fullerenes or quinones, and secondary electron donors. Following the excitation of the chromophore, photoinduced electron transfer generates a primary charge-separated state. Electron transfer chains spatially separate the redox equivalents and reduce electronic coupling, slowing recombination of the charge

  3. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 886.3200 - Artificial eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Artificial eye. 886.3200 Section 886.3200 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3200 Artificial eye. (a) Identification. An artificial eye is a device resembling the anterior portion of the eye, usually made of glass or plastic, intended to...

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Its Importance in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilmann, Martha J.

    Artificial intelligence, or the study of ideas that enable computers to be intelligent, is discussed in terms of what it is, what it has done, what it can do, and how it may affect the teaching of tomorrow. An extensive overview of artificial intelligence examines its goals and applications and types of artificial intelligence including (1) expert…

  6. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  7. The wave equation with viscoelastic attenuation and its application in problems of shallow-sea acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. S.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Trofimov, M. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    A suitable tool for the simulation of low frequency acoustic pulse signals propagating in a shallow sea is the numerical integration of the nonstationary wave equation. The main feature of such simulation problems is that in this case the sound waves propagate in the geoacoustic waveguide formed by the upper layers of the bottom and the water column. By this reason, the correct dependence of the attenuation of sound waves in the bottom on their frequency must be taken into account. In this paper we obtain an integro-differential equation for the sound waves in the viscoelastic fluid, which allows to simulate the arbitrary dependence of acoustic wave attenuation on frequency in the time domain computations. The procedure of numerical solution of this equation based on its approximation by a system of differential equations is then considered and the methods of artificial limitation of computational domain are described. We also construct a simple finite-difference scheme for the proposed equation suitable for the numerical solution of nonstationary problems arising in the shallow-sea acoustics.

  8. Analysis of spurious oscillation modes for the shallow water and Navier-Stokes equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Carey, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The origin and nature of spurious oscillation modes that appear in mixed finite element methods are examined. In particular, the shallow water equations are considered and a modal analysis for the one-dimensional problem is developed. From the resulting dispersion relations we find that the spurious modes in elevation are associated with zero frequency and large wave number (wavelengths of the order of the nodal spacing) and consequently are zero-velocity modes. The spurious modal behavior is the result of the finite spatial discretization. By means of an artificial compressibility and limiting argument we are able to resolve the similar problem for the Navier-Stokes equations. The relationship of this simpler analysis to alternative consistency arguments is explained. This modal approach provides an explanation of the phenomenon in question and permits us to deduce the cause of the very complex behavior of spurious modes observed in numerical experiments with the shallow water equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, this analysis is not limited to finite element formulations, but is also applicable to finite difference formulations. ?? 1983.

  9. Semblance-based imaging of shallow scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toteva, T. D.; Long, L. T.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate some of the limitations of a semblance-based technique for imaging of shallow scatterers. We targeted the upper 100m of the subsurface. The study was conducted at two different sites. The first site was an exposed granite outcrop, within the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW), located 25 km SE of Atlanta, GA. The second site was granite under a few meters thick layer of soil and weathered rock near the city of Lawrenceville, GA. Both sites are within the Georgia Piedmont and are underlain at shallow depths by fractured and unweathered crystalline rock. In the Georgia Piedmont, water resources are limited to surface reservoirs and shallow wells. There is a need for developing non-invasive techniques to detect and characterize fracture systems with water-supply production potential. The analysis consisted of two main steps. The first step was to calculate the semblance coefficient as a function of apparent velocity and azimuth. Semblance is a measure of similarity between multiple channels. It varies between 0 for no coherence and 1 for perfect coherence. For an array with diameter of 15m and frequencies from 100 to 1000 Hz, the precision in azimuth was +/- 10 deg. and about 10 percent in apparent velocity. Semblance coefficient for direct surface waves had maximums at back-azimuths in excellent correlation with the back-azimuths of the source locations (accuracy of 5deg.). The second step was an imaging algorithm. Seismic waves arriving at a given time in the coda are scattered from a point on an ellipse of revolution with its foci determined by the shot location and receiving array, and its size defined by the travel time and velocity of the waves. At both sites we used a set of 16 geophones with 100Hz corner frequency. The source was designed as a simple weight-drop source. At the PMRW the geophones were placed in a near circular array with aperture of 15m. The source was moved around the array at distances of

  10. Extremely Shallow Extensional Faulting Near Geothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Wei, S.; Donnellan, A.; Fielding, E. J.; Graves, R. W.; Helmberger, D. V.; Liu, Z.; Parker, J. W.; Treiman, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Surface faulting has been discovered in association with a shallow extensional M 4.9 earthquake, the source properties of which have also been studied by modeling of broadband seismic data and geodetic imagery. This M 4.9 and also a M 4.6 shallow normal event occurred late in the Brawley Swarm of August 2012, a dominantly strike-slip sequence with events up to M 5.5 (Hauksson et al., SRL 2013 and Wei et al., GRL 2013). The point source waveform inversions reveal normal mechanisms and centroid depths of ~2.5 km for both events, while the modeling of the geodetic data indicates a compatible depth of ~2.0 km. The M 4.9 event had unusually large (~40 cm) and sudden (~1.0 - 1.5 km/sec) slip, considering its extremely shallow depth. The earlier and larger strike-slip events during the Aug. 2012 swarm were on a left-lateral SW-NE oriented vertical planar cross-fault, whereas the M 4.6 and M 4.9 occurred on a SSW-NNE oriented, west-dipping plane. Airborne imagery obtained using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) revealed a surface fault rupture that was subsequently confirmed and documented in the field in May 2013. A pre-existing but previously un-mapped fault sustained west-down surface slip of up to 18 × 2 cm along breaks extending ~3.5 km along a NNE orientation, and ruptured beneath and under a railroad track and pipeline (without breaking them). UAVSAR and seismological data were used jointly to image the source properties of the M 4.9 earthquake in detail. Typically, the uppermost few kms of right-lateral faults in the Salton Trough exhibit creep, especially after larger earthquakes, as in 1979 and 1987. On this basis, general models of stable sliding within the uppermost few kms have been developed. In this case, however, the joint inversion indicates that seismic energy was radiated by slip of up to 40 cm on a fault plane extending from the surface to a depth of only ~3 km, extending ~4 km along-strike, and dipping ~45° west, with west

  11. Operation of linear and ring arrays in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukovskaya, V. G.; Petukhov, Yu. V.; Khil'ko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    With the aim of unambiguously determining the direction to a tonal emission source, comparative analysis of the directed properties of sufficiently extended linear and ring horizontal arrays in shallow water was performed. An isovelocity waveguide with a homogeneous fluid bottom was used as the shallow water model, in which a multimode regime of acoustic signal propagation was achieved.

  12. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Late...

  13. Shallow velocity structure and hidden faults of Kunming city region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geng-Xin; Lou, Hai; Wang, Chun-Yong; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Qin, Jia-Zheng; Yang, Run-Hai; Li, Hai-Ou

    2008-09-01

    In order to image the 3-D velocity structure of its shallow crust in Kunming region, China, finite-difference seismic tomography is used to invert the seismic data selected carefully from six-shot data. The result lays a foundation for the discussion of the relationship between the obtained velocity structure and the hidden faults, and for the illumination of the depth extents of main active faults surrounding Kunming city. Puduhe-Xishan fault lies on the western margin of the Kunming basin and is just situated on the west edge of the low velocity anomaly zone found at all depth levels. This indicates that this fault is a borderline fault of the Kunming basin. It can be concluded that the fault dips eastwards with a steep angle and its depth extent is large. Puji-Hanjiacun fault and Heilongtan-Guandu fault play a role in controlling the low velocity anomaly zone in middle basin. The depth extents of the two faults are comparatively small, without traversing the interface of basin floor.

  14. Monitoring nekton as a bioindicator in shallow estuarine habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raposa, K.B.; Roman, C.T.; Heltshe, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of estuarine nekton has many practical and ecological benefits but efforts are hampered by a lack of standardized sampling procedures. This study provides a rationale for monitoring nekton in shallow (< 1 m), temperate, estuarine habitats and addresses some important issues that arise when developing monitoring protocols. Sampling in seagrass and salt marsh habitats is emphasized due to the susceptibility of each habitat to anthropogenic stress and to the abundant and rich nekton assemblages that each habitat supports. Extensive sampling with quantitative enclosure traps that estimate nekton density is suggested. These gears have a high capture efficiency in most habitats and are small enough (e.g., 1 m(2)) to permit sampling in specific microhabitats. Other aspects of nekton monitoring are discussed, including spatial and temporal sampling considerations, station selection, sample size estimation, and data collection and analysis. Developing and initiating long-term nekton monitoring programs will help evaluate natural and human-induced changes in estuarine nekton over time and advance our understanding of the interactions between nekton and the dynamic estuarine environment.

  15. Warmth elevating the depths: shallower voids with warm dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin F.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Falck, Bridget; Silk, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic `sub-web' inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the ZOBOV algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the ORIGAMI algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases (i.e. particle mass decreases), void density minima grow shallower, while void edges change little. Also, the number of subvoids decreases. The density field in voids is particularly insensitive to baryonic physics, so if void density profiles and minima could be measured observationally, they would offer a valuable probe of the nature of dark matter. Furthermore, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the substructures in between have been smoothed out; this leads to a clear, mid-range peak in the density PDF.

  16. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  17. Initial Value Problem Solution of Nonlinear Shallow Water-Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kanoglu, Utku; Synolakis, Costas

    2006-10-06

    The initial value problem solution of the nonlinear shallow water-wave equations is developed under initial waveforms with and without velocity. We present a solution method based on a hodograph-type transformation to reduce the nonlinear shallow water-wave equations into a second-order linear partial differential equation and we solve its initial value problem. The proposed solution method overcomes earlier limitation of small waveheights when the initial velocity is nonzero, and the definition of the initial conditions in the physical and transform spaces is consistent. Our solution not only allows for evaluation of differences in predictions when specifying an exact initial velocity based on nonlinear theory and its linear approximation, which has been controversial in geophysical practice, but also helps clarify the differences in runup observed during the 2004 and 2005 Sumatran tsunamigenic earthquakes.

  18. A crustal section of northern Central America as inferred from wide angle reflections from shallow earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. J.

    A three-layered crustal structure for a portion of northern Central America is derived using both travel time and amplitude data from seismograms recorded at Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The sources are shallow earthquakes that occurred along the Motagua fault in Guatemala 200 to 450 km (25-50 seconds in terms of S-P time) from the station. Since ray paths are almost parallel to the axis of the Middle America trench, approximately 250 km away, a homogeneous, horizontally layered crust may be reasonably assumed. At this distance range, which is far beyond critical distance for reflections from within the crust, shallow sources always generate a small first arrival followed by several large later arrivals. The first arrival is interpreted as Pn (the head wave from the Mohorovicic discontinuity) and the later arrivals are interpreted as wide angle (over-critical) reflections from layer boundaries. Three wide angle reflections (PmP, PiP, and PgP) are identified.

  19. A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-11-08

    Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  20. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  1. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  2. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  3. Vibrations of moderately thick shallow spherical shells at large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, M.

    1994-04-01

    A shallow shell theory is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of moderately thick isotropic spherical shells. Effects of transverse shear deformation and rotatory inertia are included in the governing equations of motion by means of tracing constants. When these effects are ignored, the governing equations readily reduce to those applicable for thin shallow spherical shells. Solutions to the system of thick shell equations are obtained by means of Galerkin's method and the numerical Runge-Kutta procedure. Numerical results are presented for certain cases of shallow spherical shells considering different geometric shell parameters. Transverse shear and rotatory inertia effects are found to be important in linear as well as nonlinear responses of shallow spherical shells. The nonlinear frequency-amplitude behavior is of the softening type for shallow spherical shells and of the hardening type for circular plates. Frequency ratios are lower at any given amplitude when the effects of transverse shear and rotatory inertia are included in the analysis.

  4. Predator driven diel variation in abundance and behaviour of fish in deep and shallow habitats of an estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alistair; Suthers, Iain M.

    2014-05-01

    Our traditional understanding of the behaviour of large predatory fish and their smaller prey in estuarine ecosystems is often restricted by different gear types and visibility. In this study we determined the diel distribution and inferred movements of fish in an estuary in shallow and deep habitats (<1 m and 4 m deep respectively), using an unbaited acoustic camera (DIDSON). Baitfish (<100 mm TL) formed small and large shoals during the day in both shallow and deep habitats, compared to loose aggregations during the night or when they were inactive and not observed. Three larger size classes of fish (small, 100-300 mm Total Length (TL); medium, 301-500 mm TL and large >500 mm TL) were also more abundant during the day, likely due to general higher activity. This coincided with predatory activity with attacks by larger fish (301-500 mm and >500 mm) witnessed during the day but not at night. This heightened activity is the likely cause for changes in the schooling behaviour of the baitfish. The proportion of medium and large fish in the shallow habitat at night increased by over 50% as they moved from deeper areas of the estuary, showing the abundance of large predators in shallow water can be related to diel period. This highlights the pervasive top down influence even small numbers of predators can exert on the behaviour and distribution of estuarine fish assemblages.

  5. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E; Crabtree, George W; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-20

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials. PMID:27199423

  6. Fuel-powered artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Ebron, Von Howard; Yang, Zhiwei; Seyer, Daniel J; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Oh, Jiyoung; Xie, Hui; Razal, Joselito; Hall, Lee J; Ferraris, John P; Macdiarmid, Alan G; Baughman, Ray H

    2006-03-17

    Artificial muscles and electric motors found in autonomous robots and prosthetic limbs are typically battery-powered, which severely restricts the duration of their performance and can necessitate long inactivity during battery recharge. To help solve these problems, we demonstrated two types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high-energy-density fuels to mechanical energy. The first type stores electrical charge and uses changes in stored charge for mechanical actuation. In contrast with electrically powered electrochemical muscles, only half of the actuator cycle is electrochemical. The second type of fuel-powered muscle provides a demonstrated actuator stroke and power density comparable to those of natural skeletal muscle and generated stresses that are over a hundred times higher. PMID:16543453

  7. Artificial graphene with tunable interactions.

    PubMed

    Uehlinger, Thomas; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Greif, Daniel; Hofstetter, Walter; Bissbort, Ulf; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-11-01

    We create an artificial graphene system with tunable interactions and study the crossover from metallic to Mott insulating regimes, both in isolated and coupled two-dimensional honeycomb layers. The artificial graphene consists of a two-component spin mixture of an ultracold atomic Fermi gas loaded into a hexagonal optical lattice. For strong repulsive interactions, we observe a suppression of double occupancy and measure a gapped excitation spectrum. We present a quantitative comparison between our measurements and theory, making use of a novel numerical method to obtain Wannier functions for complex lattice structures. Extending our studies to time-resolved measurements, we investigate the equilibration of the double occupancy as a function of lattice loading time. PMID:24237536

  8. Economic reasoning and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Parkes, David C; Wellman, Michael P

    2015-07-17

    The field of artificial intelligence (AI) strives to build rational agents capable of perceiving the world around them and taking actions to advance specified goals. Put another way, AI researchers aim to construct a synthetic homo economicus, the mythical perfectly rational agent of neoclassical economics. We review progress toward creating this new species of machine, machina economicus, and discuss some challenges in designing AIs that can reason effectively in economic contexts. Supposing that AI succeeds in this quest, or at least comes close enough that it is useful to think about AIs in rationalistic terms, we ask how to design the rules of interaction in multi-agent systems that come to represent an economy of AIs. Theories of normative design from economics may prove more relevant for artificial agents than human agents, with AIs that better respect idealized assumptions of rationality than people, interacting through novel rules and incentive systems quite distinct from those tailored for people. PMID:26185245

  9. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  10. Reconstitution of Heme Enzymes with Artificial Metalloporphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Oohora, K; Hayashi, T

    2016-01-01

    An important strategy used in engineering of hemoproteins to generate artificial enzymes involves replacement of heme with an artificial cofactor after removal of the native heme cofactor under acidic conditions. Replacement of heme in an enzyme with a nonnatural metalloporphyrinoid can significantly alter the reactivity of the enzyme. This chapter describes the design and synthesis of three types of artificial metalloporphyrinoid cofactors consisting of mono-, di-, and tri-anionic ligands (tetradehydrocorrin, porphycene, and corrole, respectively). In addition, practical procedures for the preparation of apo-hemoproteins, incorporation of artificial cofactors, and characterization techniques are presented. Furthermore, the representative catalytic activities of artificial enzymes generated by reconstitution of hemoproteins are summarized. PMID:27586344

  11. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared in this work. Each method is described in detail along with appropriate physical and numerical boundary conditions. Analysis of well-posedness and numerical solutions to test problems for each method are provided. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, stability and robustness is used to establish the relative positive and negative characteristics of each method.

  12. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  13. Artificial anisotropy and polarizing filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, Francois; Escoubas, Ludovic; Lazarides, Basile

    2002-06-01

    The calculated spectral transmittance of a multilayer laser mirror is used to determine the effective index of the single layer equivalent to the multilayer stack. We measure the artificial anisotropy of photoresist thin films whose structure is a one-dimensional, subwavelength grating obtained from interference fringes. The limitation of the theory of the first-order effective index homogenization is discussed. We designed normal-incidence, polarizing coating and a polarization rotator by embedding anisotropic films in simple multilayer structures.

  14. Detector analysis for shallow water active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Thomas J.; Phillips, Michael E.

    2002-11-01

    SPAWAR Systems Center-San Diego, in concert with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has designed and built a proof-of-concept broadband biomimetic sonar. This proof-of-concept sonar emulates a dolphin biosonar system; emitted broadband signals approximate the frequency and time domain characteristics of signals produced by echolocating dolphins, the receive system is spatially modeled after the binaural geometry of the dolphin, and signal processing algorithms incorporate sequential integration of aspect varying returns. As with any sonar, object detection in shallow water while maintaining an acceptable false alarm rate is an important problem. A comprehensive parametric analysis of detection algorithms is presented, focusing primarily on two detector strategies: a matched filter and a spectral detector. The spectral detector compares the ratio of in-band to out-of-band power, and thus functions something like a phase-incoherent matched filter. This computationally efficient detector is shown to perform well with high proportional bandwidth signals. The detector (either matched filter or spectral) is coupled with an alpha-beta tracker which maintains a running noise estimate and calculates signal excess above the estimated noise level which is compared to a fixed threshold.

  15. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  16. Nature versus nurture in shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romps, D. M.; Kuang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We use tracers in a large-eddy simulation of shallow convection to show that stochastic entrainment, not cloud-base properties, determine the fate of convecting parcels. The tracers are used to diagnose the correlations between a parcel's state above the cloud base and both the parcel's state at the cloud base and its entrainment history. We find that the correlation with the cloud-base state goes to zero a few hundred meters above the cloud base. On the other hand, correlations between a parcel's state and its net entrainment are large. Evidence is found that the entrainment events may be described as a stochastic Poisson process. We construct a parcel model with stochastic entrainment that is able to replicate flux profiles and, more importantly, the observed variability. Turning off cloud-base variability has little effect on the results, which suggests that stochastic mass-flux models may be initialized with a single set of properties. The success of the stochastic parcel model suggests that it holds promise as the framework for a convective parameterization.

  17. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  18. Velocity model of the shallow lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangi, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The travel times of the seismic waves obtained for the Apollo-14 and -16 active seismic experiments and the Apollo-16 grenade launches are shown to be consistent with a powder-layer model of the shallow lunar crust. The velocity variation with depth determined from these data is: V(z) = approximately 110 z to the 1/6 power m/sec for z less than 10 meters and V(z) is nearly = to 250 m/sec for z greater than 10 meters. The velocity values found for the 10 meter depth are similar to those found by Kovach, et al. (1972). The z to the 1/6 power depth dependence for the velocity of the topmost layer is that predicted on the basis of a powder layer (Gangi, 1972). The Amplitude variation of the direct waves as a function of source-to-receiver separation, x, is A(x) = A(o)x to the -n power exp(-ax) where 1.5 n 2.2 and a is nearly = to 0.047 neper/m. Velocity-spectra analyses of the direct, surface-reflected, bottom-reflected and refracted waves give results that are consistent with the velocity model inferred from the traveltime data.

  19. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  20. Continuum equations for dense shallow granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Simplified equations are derived for a granular flow in the `dense' limit where the volume fraction is close to that for dynamical arrest, and the `shallow' limit where the stream-wise length for flow development (L) is large compared to the cross-stream height (h). In the dense limit, the equations are simplified by taking advantage of the power-law divergence of the pair distribution function χ proportional to (ϕad - ϕ) - α, where ϕ is the volume fraction, and ϕad is the volume fraction for arrested dynamics. When the height h is much larger than the conduction length, the energy equation reduces to an algebraic balance between the rates of production and dissipation of energy, and the stress is proportional to the square of the strain rate (Bagnold law). The analysis reveals important differences between granular flows and the flows of Newtonian fluids. One important difference is that the Reynolds number (ratio of inertial and viscous terms) turns out to depend only on the layer height and Bagnold coefficients, and is independent of the flow velocity, because both the inertial terms in the conservation equations and the divergence of the stress depend on the square of the velocity/velocity gradients.

  1. Polarization of light in shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ibrahim, Amir; Stepinski, Jan; Ahmed, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulationsrevealing the depolarizing nature of the seafloor. Significant correlations between simulations and measurements are attained when the appropriate unpolarized, Lambertian bottoms are included in the radiative transfer model. The bottoms used in this study produce realistic upwelling radiance distributions as well as ranges of the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) that peak between 10 and 30%. This study specifically finds that polarization in upwelling radiance is best preserved at long wavelengths in clear waters and also at short wavelengths in phytoplankton- and CDOM-rich waters. These results can thus facilitate the detection of benthic materials as well as future studies of camouflage by benthic biota.The DoLPwas found to be highly sensitive to benthic reflectance, but the angle of polarization (AoLP), which quantifies the orientation of polarization, is independent of it. The AoLP could therefore be used to communicate and sense direction underwater.

  2. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  3. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  4. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  5. Bioinspired artificial single ion pump.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Zeng, Lu; Yang, Fu; Li, Lin; Yan, Dadong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-10-30

    Bioinspired artificial functional nanochannels for intelligent molecular and ionic transport control at the nanoscale have wide potential applications in nanofluidics, energy conversion, and biosensors. Although various smart passive ion transport properties of ion channels have been artificially realized, it is still hugely challenging to achieve high level intelligent ion transport features in biological ion pumps. Here we show a unique bioinspired single ion pump based on a cooperative pH response double-gate nanochannel, whose gates could be opened and closed alternately/simultaneously under symmetric/asymmetric pH environments. With the stimulation of the double-gate nanochannel by continuous switching of the symmetric/asymmetric pH stimuli, the bioinspired system systematically realized three key ionic transport features of biological ion pumps, including an alternating gates ion pumping process under symmetric pH stimuli, transformation of the ion pump into an ion channel under asymmetric pH stimuli, and a fail-safe ion pumping feature under both symmetric and asymmetric pH stimuli. The ion pumping processes could well be reproduced under a concentration gradient. With the advantages of the extraordinary ionic transport functions of biological ion pumps, the bioinspired ion pump should find widespread applicability in active transportation-controlling smart nanofluidic devices, efficient energy conversions, and seawater desalinization, and open the way to design and develop novel bioinspired intelligent artificial nanochannel materials. PMID:23773031

  6. Periplasmic Screening for Artificial Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Jeschek, M; Panke, S; Ward, T R

    2016-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes represent an attractive means of combining state-of-the-art transition metal catalysis with the benefits of natural enzymes. Despite the tremendous recent progress in this field, current efforts toward the directed evolution of these hybrid biocatalysts mainly rely on the laborious, individual purification of protein variants rendering the throughput, and hence the outcome of these campaigns feeble. We have recently developed a screening platform for the directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes based on the streptavidin-biotin technology in the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. This periplasmic compartmentalization strategy comprises a number of compelling advantages, in particular with respect to artificial metalloenzymes, which lead to a drastic increase in the throughput of screening campaigns and additionally are of unique value for future in vivo applications. Therefore, we highlight here the benefits of this strategy and intend to propose a generalized guideline for the development of novel transition metal-based biocatalysts by directed evolution in order to extend the natural enzymatic repertoire. PMID:27586348

  7. Artificial life: The coming evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D. Santa Fe Inst., NM ); Belin, A.d'A. )

    1990-01-01

    Within fifty to a hundred years a new class of organisms is likely to emerge. These organisms will be artificial in the sense that they will originally be designed by humans. However, they will reproduce, and will evolve into something other than their initial form; they will be alive'' under any reasonable definition of the word. These organisms will evolve in a fundamentally different manner than contemporary biological organisms, since their reproduction will be under at least partial conscious control, giving it a Lamarckian component. The pace of evolutionary change consequently will be extremely rapid. The advent of artificial life will be the most significant historical event since the emergence of human beings. The impact on humanity and the biosphere could be enormous, larger than the industrial revolution, nuclear weapons, or environmental pollution. We must take steps now to shape the emergence of artificial organisms; they have potential to be either the ugliest terrestrial disaster, or the most beautiful creation of humanity. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Artificial multilayers and nanomagnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    SHINJO, Teruya

    2013-01-01

    The author has been actively engaged in research on nanomagnetic materials for about 50 years. Nanomagnetic materials are comprised of ferromagnetic systems for which the size and shape are controlled on a nanometer scale. Typical examples are ultrafine particles, ultrathin films, multilayered films and nano-patterned films. In this article, the following four areas of the author’s studies are described. (1) Mössbauer spectroscopic studies of nanomagnetic materials and interface magnetism. (2) Preparation and characterization of metallic multilayers with artificial superstructures. (3) Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in magnetic multilayers. (4) Novel properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic thin films (dots and wires). A subject of particular interest in the author’s research was the artificially prepared multilayers consisting of metallic elements. The motivation to initiate the multilayer investigation is described and the physical properties observed in the artificial multilayers are introduced. The author’s research was initially in the field of pure physical science and gradually extended into applied science. His achievements are highly regarded not only from the fundamental point of view but also from the technological viewpoint. PMID:23391605

  9. Beller Lecture: Artificial Ferroic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyderman, Laura

    In artificial ferroic systems, novel functionality is engineered through the combination of structured ferroic materials and the control of the interactions between the different components. I will present two classes of these systems, beginning with hybrid mesoscopic structures incorporating two different ferromagnetic layers whose static and dynamic behaviour result from the mutual imprint of the magnetic domain configurations. Here we have demonstrated a new vortex core reversal mechanism, which occurs when it is displaced across domain boundaries with a magnetic field. I will then describe our progress on artificial spin ice, consisting of arrays of dipolar-coupled nanomagnets arranged in frustrated geometries. We have employed photoemission electron microscopy to observe the behaviour of emergent magnetic monopoles in an array of nanomagnets placed on the kagome lattice. We have also created artificial spin ice with fluctuating magnetic moments and observed the evolution of magnetic configurations with time. This has provided a means to study relaxation processes with a controlled route to the lowest-energy state. Recently, we have demonstrated with muon spin relaxation that these magnetic metamaterials can support thermodynamic phase transitions, and future directions include the incorporation of novel magnetic materials such as ultrathin magnetic films, the investigation of 3D structures, as well as the implementation of x-ray resonant magnetic scattering to study magnetic correlations in smaller nanomagnets and at faster timescales

  10. Climbing robot actuated by meso-hydraulic artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Jason; Miller, Samuel; Saltzman, Jonah; Kim, Sangkyu; Lin, Yong; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the design, construction, experimental characterization, and system testing of a legged, wall-climbing robot actuated by meso-scale hydraulic artificial muscles. While small wall-climbing robots have seen increased research attention in recent years, most authors have primarily focused on designs for the gripping and adhesion of the robot to the wall, while using only standard DC servo-motors for actuation. This project seeks to explore and demonstrate a different actuation mechanism that utilizes hydraulic artificial muscles. A four-limb climbing robot platform that includes a full closed-loop hydraulic power and control system, custom hydraulic artificial muscles for actuation, an on-board microcontroller and RF receiver for control, and compliant claws with integrated sensing for gripping a variety of wall surfaces has been constructed and is currently being tested to investigate this actuation method. On-board power consumption data-logging during climbing operation, analysis of the robot kinematics and climbing behavior, and artificial muscle force-displacement characterization are presented to investigate and this actuation method.

  11. Fabrication of artificial graphene in a GaAs heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarabelli, Diego; Wang, Sheng; Kuznetsova, Yuliya; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gardner, Geoff; Manfra, Michael; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Pinczuk, Aron; Wind, Shalom

    Engineered honeycomb lattices, known as artificial graphene, constitute a platform for the exploration of graphene-like phenomena in a highly controllable and tunable manner, offering insight into a broader parameter range inaccessible to natural graphene. The electronic states of a 2D electron gas whose density is modulated by a potential with honeycomb topology have been predicted to generate massless Dirac fermions (MDFs) with tunable Fermi velocity. In this work we present the fabrication of artificial graphene in an ultrahigh quality GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well, with lattice period as small as 40nm, the smallest reported so far for this type of system. The combination of high precision electron-beam lithography, used to define an etch mask with honeycomb geometry on the surface of the sample, and precise anisotropic reactive ion etching allows to create artificial graphene with excellent uniformity and long range order. Different methodologies for preparation of the mask are compared and their limits are discussed. Thanks to the achievement of such high-resolution artificial graphene we expected to be able to observe, for the first time, MDFs in an engineered semiconductor and the possibility of access to novel topological phases. Supported by DOE-BES Award DE-SC0010695.

  12. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2012-08-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  13. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2013-02-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady- and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events, the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system, the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events, while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  14. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  15. A multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Koné, E. H.; Morales de Luna, T.; Bürger, R.

    2013-04-01

    This work considers the flow of a fluid containing one disperse substance consisting of small particles that belong to different species differing in size and density. The flow is modelled by combining a multilayer shallow water approach with a polydisperse sedimentation process. This technique allows one to keep information on the vertical distribution of the solid particles in the mixture, and thereby to model the segregation of the particle species from each other, and from the fluid, taking place in the vertical direction of the gravity body force only. This polydisperse sedimentation process is described by the well-known Masliyah-Lockett-Bassoon (MLB) velocity functions. The resulting multilayer sedimentation-flow model can be written as a hyperbolic system with nonconservative products. The definitions of the nonconservative products are related to the hydrostatic pressure and to the mass and momentum hydrodynamic transfer terms between the layers. For the numerical discretization a strategy of two steps is proposed, where the first one is also divided into two parts. In the first step, instead of approximating the complete model, we approximate a reduced model with a smaller number of unknowns. Then, taking advantage of the fact that the concentrations are passive scalars in the system, we approximate the concentrations of the different species by an upwind scheme related to the numerical flux of the total concentration. In the second step, the effect of the transference terms defined in terms of the MLB model is introduced. These transfer terms are approximated by using a numerical flux function used to discretize the 1D vertical polydisperse model, see Bürger et al. [ R. Bürger, A. García, K.H. Karlsen, J.D. Towers, A family of numerical schemes for kinematic flows with discontinuous flux, J. Eng. Math. 60 (2008) 387-425]. Finally, some numerical examples are presented. Numerical results suggest that the multilayer shallow water model could be adequate

  16. Calculations of Asteroid Impacts into Deep and Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisler, Galen; Weaver, Robert; Gittings, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Contrary to received opinion, ocean impacts of small (<500 m) asteroids do not produce tsunamis that lead to world-wide devastation. In fact the most dangerous features of ocean impacts, just as for land impacts, are the atmospheric effects. We present illustrative hydrodynamic calculations of impacts into both deep and shallow seas, and draw conclusions from a parameter study in which the size of the impactor and the depth of the sea are varied independently. For vertical impacts at 20 km/s, craters in the seafloor are produced when the water depth is less than about 5-7 times the asteroid diameter. Both the depth and the diameter of the transient crater scale with the asteroid diameter, so the volume of water excavated scales with the asteroid volume. About a third of the crater volume is vaporised, because the kinetic energy per unit mass of the asteroid is much larger than the latent heat of vaporisation of water. The vaporised water carries away a considerable fraction of the impact energy in an explosively expanding blast wave which is responsible for devastating local effects and may affect worldwide climate. Of the remaining energy, a substantial portion is used in the crown splash and the rebound jet that forms as the transient crater collapses. The collapse and rebound cycle leads to a propagating wave with a wavelength considerably shorter than classical tsunamis, being only about twice the diameter of the transient crater. Propagation of this wave is hindered somewhat because its amplitude is so large that it breaks in deep water and is strongly affected by the blast wave's perturbation of the atmosphere. Even if propagation were perfect, however, the volume of water delivered per metre of shoreline is less than was delivered by the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami for any impactor smaller than 500 m diameter in an ocean of 5 km depth or less. Near-field effects are dangerous for impactors of diameter 200 m or greater; hurricane-force winds can extend tens of

  17. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.; Van Robays, J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today’s common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  18. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones.

    PubMed

    Ombelet, W; Van Robays, J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones. PMID:26175891

  19. Source, transport, and evolution of saline groundwater in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the tidal deltaplain of southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worland, Scott C.; Hornberger, George M.; Goodbred, Steven L.

    2015-07-01

    Deltaic groundwater resources are often vulnerable to degradation from seawater intrusion or through interaction with saline paleowaters. The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna River delta, in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India, is a particularly vulnerable area with an estimated 20 million coastal inhabitants directly affected by saline drinking water. The shallow groundwater of the coastal regions is primarily brackish with pockets of fresher water. A small-scale hydrologic investigation of groundwater salinity beneath an embanked tidal channel island was undertaken to explore possible hydrogeological explanations of the distribution of water salinities in the shallow aquifer. This study employs a combination of 3H and 14C dating, electromagnetic subsurface mapping, and a 2-D solute transport model. The authors conclude that the shallow groundwater salinity can best be explained by the slow infiltration of meteoric water into paleo-brackish estuarine water that was deposited during the early-mid Holocene.

  20. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character. PMID

  1. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a “small plain, big front” character. PMID

  2. Initial Ecosystem Development in an Artificial Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettl, R.; Koegel-Knabner, I.; Zeyer, J.

    2008-12-01

    Watersheds are often used as a base for ecosystem research. However, boundaries and inner structures of natural watersheds are often insufficiently known and have to be explored indirectly e.g. by means of geophysical methods. Therefore, important parts of the system often remain 'black boxes'. In addition, natural systems are characterized by huge complexity and heterogeneity. To overcome these disadvantages artificially created watersheds may play an important role in ecosystem research. They offer the chance to investigate systems with well defined boundary conditions and inner structures. Furthermore, artificial watersheds might be an important link between lysimeter research and investigations at the landscape scale. The artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" ('Huehnerwasser') is one of the world's largest man-made catchments for scientific purposes. It was established in 2005 with an area of 6 ha (450 m x 150 m) including a small lake. The site is located in the Eastern German lignite mining district near Cottbus, about 150 km southeast of Berlin. The watershed was constructed by Vattenfall Europe Mining AG as the operator of the still active lignite open-cast mine Welzow-South. Construction work was done by means of large mining machines in co-operation with the Brandenburg University of Technology at Cottbus. The inner structure of this new landscape element is relatively simple: A clay layer was dumped as a barrier for seepage water overlaid by a 3 m sandy layer consisting of Quaternary substrate from Pleistocene sediments. The surface of the site has been flattened and the area was fenced to prevent disturbances. Neither amelioration nor any reclamation measures were carried out afterwards. The site has been left for an unrestricted natural succession. In 2007 the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR 38) as a joint project between 3 Universities (BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich) was launched and is funded by the German Research

  3. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  4. Small Business Innovations (Integrated Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Because of the diversity of NASA's information systems, it was necessary to develop DAVID as a central database management system. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Ken Wanderman and Associates, Inc. designed software tools enabling scientists to interface with DAVID and commercial database management systems, as well as artificial intelligence programs. The software has been installed at a number of data centers and is commercially available.

  5. Mechanism of spontaneous and triggered shallow creep events - Implications for shallow fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Kaneko, Y.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Slip on tectonic faults take place over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales as earthquakes, continuous aseismic creep, or transient creep events. Shallow creep events on continental strike-slip faults can occur spontaneously, or are coupled with earthquake afterslip, or are triggered by nearby earthquakes. Despite more than five decades of observations, the mechanism of shallow creep events and their implications for seismic hazard are still not fully understood. To understand the mechanism of creep events, we developed a physics-based numerical model to simulate shallow creep events on a strike-slip fault with rate-and-state frictional properties (Wei et al., 2013). We show that the widely used synoptic model (Scholz, 1998) cannot reproduce both rapid afterslip and frequent creep events as observed on the Superstition Hills fault in the Salton Trough after the 1987 Mw 6.6 earthquake. Rather, an unstable layer embedded in the shallow stable zone is required to match the geodetic observations of the creep behavior. Using the strike-slip fault model, we studied the triggering process of creep events, by either static or dynamic, or combined stress perturbations induced on the fault by nearby earthquakes. Preliminary results show that static stress perturbations in the effective normal stress on a system with spontaneous creep events can advance or delay creep events. The magnitude and timing of perturbations determines the clock change of creep events. The magnitude and interval of creep events changes permanently after static stress perturbation. Dynamic stress perturbations in effective normal stress can advance the timings of creep events when the perturbation temporally decreases the effective normal stress. A threshold exists for instantaneous triggering. The size of triggered slip increases as the dynamic perturbation increases in the direction of less normal stress. The system returns to pre-perturbation state after a long period of no slip. The length

  6. Determinants of Shallow Groundwater As Variability in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radloff, K. A.; Zheng, Y.; Stute, M.; Rahman, M.; Mihajlov, I.; Siu, H.; Huq, M.; Choudhury, I.; Ahmed, K.; van Geen, A.

    2010-12-01

    Manually operated tube wells that tap into shallow aquifers remain a critical source of untreated drinking water in south Asia and an estimated 37 million people are still exposed to elevated levels of As in Bangladesh(1). This field effort sought to address two questions. What mechanisms control the partitioning of As between groundwater and sediment? How does groundwater transport affect the spatial variability of dissolved As? Understanding the source of groundwater variability is essential for understanding how [As] will change with time, especially as Bangladesh and its water demands develop. Arsenic mobility and transport within the shallow aquifer was investigated at a 0.5 km2 site where [As] increases from <5 to 600 μg/L over 300 m as the aquifer becomes increasingly reducing. Aquifer recharge occurs in the raised, sandy village, where low [As] and elevated [SO4] are found. Until a few years ago, the net groundwater flow extended from the village, beneath a thickening silty layer covered by agricultural fields, towards a small stream. The sediments, however, were a homogenous, highly reduced sand throughout the site. Arsenic adsorption along this transect was investigated by two different approaches. Despite the geochemical gradients along the transect, adsorption of As under anaerobic conditions measured by spiking freshly collected sediment was remarkably uniform: Kd = 1.5 ± 0.5 L/kg, at 14 of 15 locations. Push- pull tests were used to alter groundwater [As] surrounding a well, without disturbing the sediment. The aquifer responded to the imposed dis-equilibrium by either adsorbing or desorbing As within a few days. These results provide further evidence that groundwater [As] is controlled by As sorption reactions with the sediment that reach equilibrium rapidly compared to the time scale of groundwater flow. A simple reactive-transport model for the site based on the measured partitioning coefficient, Kd, however, supports the notion that the [As

  7. Seasonal Variation in Arsenic Speciation in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Root, R. A.; Rivera, N.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2007-12-01

    (V) deeper in the reduced zone (80%\\ orpiment, 20%\\ As(V)). In the transition zone, the As(III)/(V) ratio varied with depth, in general from 90%\\ As(III)/10%\\ As(V) at 1.30 m to 30%\\ As(III)/60%\\ As(V) at 2.00 m. In samples from between 2.50-2.70 m, As(V) was the main species, although the spectroscopic data indicated a small amount of orpiment and As(III). Iron XANES spectra indicated the formation of pyrite in some samples with arsenic sulfides. Comparisons of annual data showed that the limits of the transition zone were shifted vertically due to regional precipitation and elevation changes in the water table. During the dry season when water table elevation was at a minimum, sorbed As(III) was the dominant species in the partially saturated transition zone. In the winter, water table rise causes oxidative dissolution of sulfides in the flooded reduced zone, with persistent sulfide minerals at shallower depths that are not always saturated annually.

  8. Hydrogeological characterization and assessment of groundwater quality in shallow aquifers in vicinity of Najafgarh drain of NCT Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Sarkar, Aditya

    2013-02-01

    Najafgarh drain is the biggest drain in Delhi and contributes about 60% of the total wastewater that gets discharged from Delhi into river Yamuna. The drain traverses a length of 51 km before joining river Yamuna, and is unlined for about 31 km along its initial stretch. In recent times, efforts have been made for limited withdrawal of groundwater from shallow aquifers in close vicinity of Najafgarh drain coupled with artificial recharge of groundwater. In this perspective, assessment of groundwater quality in shallow aquifers in vicinity of the Najafgarh drain of Delhi and hydrogeological characterization of adjacent areas were done. The groundwater quality was examined in perspective of Indian as well as World Health Organization's drinking water standards. The spatial variation in groundwater quality was studied. The linkages between trace element occurrence and hydrochemical facies variation were also established. The shallow groundwater along Najafgarh drain is contaminated in stretches and the area is not suitable for large-scale groundwater development for drinking water purposes.

  9. Seismic features and automatic discrimination of deep and shallow induced-microearthquakes using neural network and logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa; Horton, Stephen, P.; Langston, Charles A.; Samei, Borhan

    2016-07-01

    We develop an automated strategy for discriminating deep microseismic events from shallow ones on the basis of the waveforms recorded on a limited number of surface receivers. Machine-learning techniques are employed to explore the relationship between event hypocenters and seismic features of the recorded signals in time, frequency, and time-frequency domains. We applied the technique to 440 microearthquakes -1.7shallow events based on the knowledge gained from existing patterns. The cross validation test showed that events with depth shallower than 250 m can be discriminated from events with hypocentral depth between 1000 to 2000 m with 88% and 90.7% accuracy using logistic regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models, respectively. Similar results were obtained using single station seismograms. The results show that the spectral features have the highest correlation to source depth. Spectral centroids and 2D cross-correlations in the time-frequency domain are two new seismic features used in this study that showed to be promising measures for seismic event classification. The used machine learning techniques have application for efficient automatic classification of low energy signals recorded at one or more seismic stations.

  10. Steady nonuniform shallow flow within emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Jie; Huai, Wen-Xin; Thompson, Sally; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-12-01

    -runoff processes on shallow slopes using SVE.

  11. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  12. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  13. Deep to shallow kaolinite relocation generates porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Laughlin, O.M.; Mc Aulay, G.E.; Haszeldine, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Eocene and Paleocene sands make up the reservoir in the West Brae Field, which is located on the Fladen Ground Spur, Quadrant 16/7a, UK North Sea. The Tertiary sandstones were derived from a mixed source area of sediments and volcanics. Early carbonate cementation and late dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspars has resulted in sandstones possessing excellent poroperm characteristics, similar to the high quality upper reservoir sandstones described in the South, Central and North Brae fields. The diagenetic feature which most adversely affects these sandstones is the presence of large amounts of authigenic, kaolinite. Quantities of up to 13% kaolinite have been reported for the West Brae reservoir, an unusually high volume considering its current depth of 7,700ft. In contrast, the South, Central and North Brae fields exhibit only 1-3% diagenetic kaolinite, even though up to 8% feldspar dissolution porosity has been recorded. This study tests the hypothesis that feldspar dissolution at 12,000 ft in the Upper Jurassic reservoirs of South, Central and North Brae, has enabled aluminum to be exported from the deep Jurassic sandstones, to form kaolinite in the shallow Tertiary sandstones of West Brae. As Jurassic derived fluids have a distinct radiogenic: strontium signature, in contrast with Paleocene fluids which have an unradiogenic Sr signature, Sr isotope studies provide a test for this hypothesis. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr analyses of the clays have been carried out to ascertain if their signature has been derived from dissolution of Jurassic minerals at depth, or if the signature is locally derived from Palaeocene sediments.

  14. Development of visual expertise for reading: rapid emergence of visual familiarity for an artificial script

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Urs; Blau, Vera C.; Yoncheva, Yuliya N.; McCandliss, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Adults produce left-lateralized N170 responses to visual words relative to control stimuli, even within tasks that do not require active reading. This specialization begins in preschoolers as a right-lateralized N170 effect. We investigated whether this developmental shift reflects an early learning phenomenon, such as attaining visual familiarity with a script, by training adults in an artificial script and measuring N170 responses before and afterward. Training enhanced the N170 response, especially over the right hemisphere. This suggests N170 sensitivity to visual familiarity with a script before reading becomes sufficiently automatic to drive left-lateralized effects in a shallow encoding task. PMID:20614357

  15. Protein-ligand docking using fitness learning-based artificial bee colony with proximity stimuli.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shota; Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2015-07-01

    Protein-ligand docking is an optimization problem, which aims to identify the binding pose of a ligand with the lowest energy in the active site of a target protein. In this study, we employed a novel optimization algorithm called fitness learning-based artificial bee colony with proximity stimuli (FlABCps) for docking. Simulation results revealed that FlABCps improved the success rate of docking, compared to four state-of-the-art algorithms. The present results also showed superior docking performance of FlABCps, in particular for dealing with highly flexible ligands and proteins with a wide and shallow binding pocket. PMID:26050878

  16. Are artificial reefs surrogates of natural habitats for corals and fish in Dubai, United Arab Emirates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, J.; Bartholomew, A.; Usseglio, P.; Bauman, A.; Sale, P. F.

    2009-09-01

    Artificial reefs are often promoted as mitigating human impacts in coastal ecosystems and enhancing fisheries; however, evidence supporting their benefits is equivocal. Such structures must be compared with natural reefs in order to assess their performance, but past comparisons typically examined artificial structures that were too small, or were immature, relative to the natural reefs. We compared coral and fish communities on two large (>400,000 m3) and mature (>25 year) artificial reefs with six natural coral patches. Coral cover was higher on artificial reefs (50%) than in natural habitats (31%), but natural coral patches contained higher species richness (29 vs. 20) and coral diversity ( H' = 2.3 vs. 1.8). Multivariate analyses indicated strong differences between coral communities in natural and artificial habitats. Fish communities were sampled seasonally for 1 year. Multivariate fish communities differed significantly among habitat types in the summer and fall, but converged in the winter and spring. Univariate analysis indicated that species richness and abundance were stable throughout the year on natural coral patches but increased significantly in the summer on artificial reefs compared with the winter and spring, explaining the multivariate changes in community structure. The increased summer abundance on artificial reefs was mainly due to adult immigration. Piscivores were much more abundant in the fall than in the winter or spring on artificial reefs, but had low and stable abundance throughout the year in natural habitats. It is likely that the decreased winter and spring abundance of fish on the artificial reefs resulted from both predation and emigration. These results indicate that large artificial reefs can support diverse and abundant coral and fish communities. However, these communities differ structurally and functionally from those in natural habitats, and they should not be considered as replacements for natural coral and fish communities.

  17. The 2010 Mw 7.8 Mentawai earthquake: Very shallow source of a rare tsunami earthquake determined from tsunami field survey and near-field GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Emma M.; Borrero, Jose C.; Huang, Zhenhua; Qiu, Qiang; Banerjee, Paramesh; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Elosegui, Pedro; Fritz, Hermann M.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Pranantyo, Ignatius Ryan; Li, Linlin; MacPherson, Kenneth A.; Skanavis, Vassilis; Synolakis, Costas E.; Sieh, Kerry

    2012-06-01

    The Mw 7.8 October 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia, earthquake was a "tsunami earthquake," a rare type of earthquake that generates a tsunami much larger than expected based on the seismic magnitude. It produced a locally devastating tsunami, with runup commonly in excess of 6 m. We examine this event using a combination of high-rate GPS data, from instruments located on the nearby islands, and a tsunami field survey. The GPS displacement time series are deficient in high-frequency energy, and show small coseismic displacements (<22 cm horizontal and <4 cm subsidence). The field survey shows that maximum tsunami runup was >16 m. Our modeling results show that the combination of the small GPS displacements and large tsunami can only be explained by high fault slip at very shallow depths, far from the islands and close to the oceanic trench. Inelastic uplift of trench sediments likely contributed to the size of the tsunami. Recent results for the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoko-Oki earthquake have also shown shallow fault slip, but the results from our study, which involves a smaller earthquake, provide much stronger constraints on how shallow the rupture can be, with the majority of slip for the Mentawai earthquake occurring at depths of <6 km. This result challenges the conventional wisdom that the shallow tips of subduction megathrusts are aseismic, and therefore raises important questions both about the mechanical properties of the shallow fault zone and the potential seismic and tsunami hazard of this shallow region.

  18. Attitude measurement by artificial vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchetet, F.; Aubreton, O.; Gorria, P.; Laligant, O.

    2006-01-01

    The recent development of light and low-cost airborne platforms (microlight, drones, kites, balloons,...) has led to the need for simple and low-cost devices allowing attitude measurement with respect to a reference horizon of the platform itself or of an embedded setting. A theoretical study of the conditions for measuring attitude angles from artificial vision is proposed and an original practical algorithm allowing these measurements to be performed in real time is described. An implementation in a CMOS retina circuit is also presented. These points are illustrated by experiments confirming the feasibility of the device.

  19. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  20. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  1. Epistasis analysis using artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Hill, Doug P

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce artificial intelligence (AI) methodology for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. The ultimate goal of our AI strategy is to analyze genome-wide genetics data as a human would using sources of expert knowledge as a guide. The methodology presented here is based on computational evolution, which is a type of genetic programming. The ability to generate interesting solutions while at the same time learning how to solve the problem at hand distinguishes computational evolution from other genetic programming approaches. We provide a general overview of this approach and then present a few examples of its application to real data. PMID:25403541

  2. A Light Driven Artificial Goldfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, J.; Finkelmann, H.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Shelley, M.; Toth-Katona, T.

    2005-03-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) undergo large and rapid shape changes when illuminated by light. We have immersed an azo-dye doped LCE in a fluid and alternately illuminate either side of the LCE with light to create an artificial goldfish of sorts. These light induced deformations allow the LCE to interact with a fluid environment in novel ways. We use a fluid flow visualization technique to attempt to understand the dynamics of these interactions. We describe our experimental setup, the LCE drive scheme used, and our observations of induced motion in both the LCE sample and the surrounding fluid.

  3. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  4. Improving designer productivity. [artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary C.

    1992-01-01

    Designer and design team productivity improves with skill, experience, and the tools available. The design process involves numerous trials and errors, analyses, refinements, and addition of details. Computerized tools have greatly speeded the analysis, and now new theories and methods, emerging under the label Artificial Intelligence (AI), are being used to automate skill and experience. These tools improve designer productivity by capturing experience, emulating recognized skillful designers, and making the essence of complex programs easier to grasp. This paper outlines the aircraft design process in today's technology and business climate, presenting some of the challenges ahead and some of the promising AI methods for meeting these challenges.

  5. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  6. Research and applications: Artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphael, B.; Duda, R. O.; Fikes, R. E.; Hart, P. E.; Nilsson, N. J.; Thorndyke, P. W.; Wilber, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Research in the field of artificial intelligence is discussed. The focus of recent work has been the design, implementation, and integration of a completely new system for the control of a robot that plans, learns, and carries out tasks autonomously in a real laboratory environment. The computer implementation of low-level and intermediate-level actions; routines for automated vision; and the planning, generalization, and execution mechanisms are reported. A scenario that demonstrates the approximate capabilities of the current version of the entire robot system is presented.

  7. Characterization of crosslinked artificial protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowatzki, Paul

    Genetically engineered artificial proteins are promising candidates for new biomaterials because their amino acid sequences can be precisely controlled. This work describes the characterization of crosslinked films of biomimetic artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins with hybrid functions designed to meet materials needs in applications such as small diameter vascular grafts and corneal tissue implants. Elastin-derived polypeptides give the proteins flexibility, while RGD and CS5 peptide domains from fibronectin serve to adhere cells. Techniques were sought to crosslink aECM proteins in ways that resulted in tunable mechanical properties. Hexamethylene diisocyanate was used to crosslink aECM proteins into uniform, transparent, highly-extensible hydrogel films with low water contents characteristic of native elastin. Their elastic moduli, 0.1--1.1 MPa, depended on crosslinker concentration and aECM protein length, and spanned the observed range of elastin fibers. The suitability of biomaterials implants depends strongly on their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation in vivo. It was shown that small sequence changes in the elastin-like portion of aECM proteins were sufficient to decrease their rate of degradation by elastase sevenfold, illustrating a simple method to tune the protease sensitivity of designed proteins. The effects were seen in both soluble proteins and crosslinked films analyzed by measuring their decrease in elastic modulus during degradation. An aECM protein was examined for its effectiveness as a corneal onlay, i.e., a permanent contact lens. The protein was crosslinked into transparent, elastic, water-rich lenses and was implanted into rabbit corneas. The onlays were stable and well-tolerated, and full re-epithelialization occurred within 4-7 days. Histological examination revealed normal regenerating epithelial cell morphology on the anterior surface, good interfaces between the onlay and surrounding tissue, and only minimal

  8. Field-scale relationships among soil properties and shallow groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Derby, Nathan E; Korom, Scott F; Casey, Francis X M

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand the link between land surface/soil properties and shallow groundwater quality. To that end, soil properties and near-water-table groundwater chemistry of a shallow, unconfined aquifer were measured on a 100-m grid on a 64-ha irrigated field in southeastern North Dakota. Soil properties and hydrochemistry were compared via multivariate analysis that included product-moment correlations and factor analysis/principal component analysis. Topographic low areas where the water table was in close proximity to the soil surface generally had higher apparent electrical conductivity (ECa ) and higher percent silt and clay than higher positions on the landscape. The majority of the groundwater was characterized by Ca- and Mg-HCO3 type water and was associated with topographic high areas with lower ECa and net groundwater recharge. Small topographic depressions were areas of higher ECa (net groundwater discharge) where salts that precipitated via evapotranspiration and evaporative discharge dissolved and leached to the groundwater during short-term depression-focused recharge events. At this site, groundwater quality and soil ECa were related to surface topography. High-resolution topography and EC(a) measurements are necessary to characterize the land surface/soil properties and surficial groundwater quality at the field-scale and to delineate areas where the shallow groundwater is most susceptible to contamination. PMID:22913586

  9. Model-based processor design for a shallow water ocean acoustic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V. ); Sullivan, E.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Model-based signal processing is a well-defined methodology enabling the inclusion of environmental (propagation) models, measurement (sensor arrays) models, and noise (shipping, measurement) models into a sophisticated processing algorithm. Depending on the class of model developed from the mathematical representation of the physical phenomenology, various processors can evolve. Here the design of a space-varying, nonstationary, model-based processor (MBP) is investigated and applied to the data from a well-controlled shallow water experiment performed at Hudson Canyon. This particular experiment is very attractive for the inaugural application of the MBP because it was performed in shallow water at low frequency requiring a small number of modes. In essence, the Hudson Canyon represents a well-known ocean environment, making it ideal for this investigation. In this shallow water application, a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model is used. The processor is designed such that it allows [ital in] [ital situ] recursive estimation of both the pressure-field and modal functions. It is shown that the MBP can be effectively utilized to validate'' the performance of the model on noisy ocean acoustic data. In fact, a set of processors is designed, one for each source range and the results are quite good---implying that the propagation model with measured parameters adequately represents the data.

  10. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  11. Anthropogenic stable cesium in water and sediment of a shallow estuary, St. Louis Bay, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Gopal; Yeager, Kevin M.; Shim, MooJoon; Shiller, Alan M.

    2015-05-01

    St. Louis Bay (SLB), Mississippi, is a small, shallow estuary with moderate local residential and industrial development. Dissolved, stable Cs (i.e., 133Cs) was significantly enriched in bay waters (up to 1570 nM) as compared to river (<1 nM) and ocean waters (2.3 nM). A TiO2 refinery, located on the north shore of the bay, is the likely source of the Cs, given that the highest Cs concentrations were found in waters and in surface sediments (up to 49 μg/g) near the refinery outfall. This setting presented a unique opportunity to study remobilization of Cs in a shallow estuarine system, where sediment resuspension is frequent. Remobilization (up to ∼3 fold increase) of dissolved Cs was observed during sediment resuspension events. A weak correlation between Cs and clay %; strong correlations among Cs, silt % and particulate organic carbon (POC); and simple numerical approaches indicate that desorption from resuspended particulate matter is the likely mechanism of Cs remobilization. Cs-enriched SLB waters can be traced to nearshore Mississippi Sound waters, but not into Mississippi Bight waters further offshore. The findings from this study also suggest that caution needs to be taken when interpreting the radio-cesium distribution in shallow estuarine and coastal systems.

  12. In Situ Natural Product Discovery via an Artificial Marine Sponge

    PubMed Central

    La Clair, James J.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Tenney, Karen; O'Neil–Johnson, Mark; Chapman, Eli; Crews, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing international interest in exploring and developing the therapeutic potential of marine–derived small molecules. Balancing the strategies for ocean based sampling of source organisms versus the potential to endanger fragile ecosystems poses a substantial challenge. In order to mitigate such environmental impacts, we have developed a deployable artificial sponge. This report provides details on its design followed by evidence that it faithfully recapitulates traditional natural product collection protocols. Retrieving this artificial sponge from a tropical ecosystem after deployment for 320 hours afforded three actin–targeting jasplakinolide depsipeptides that had been discovered two decades earlier using traditional sponge specimen collection and isolation procedures. The successful outcome achieved here could reinvigorate marine natural products research, by producing new environmentally innocuous sources of natural products and providing a means to probe the true biosynthetic origins of complex marine–derived scaffolds. PMID:25004127

  13. Artificial plasma formed by connected metallic wires at infrared frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the plasmonic properties of metal and the effect of metal loss in the effective-medium properties of wire media formed by an array of connected rods at infrared frequencies. Using homogenization techniques, it is demonstrated that the plasmonic properties of metals may enable the design of artificial plasmas that mimic more closely the behavior of a continuous isotropic medium with negative permittivity. It is shown that when the plasmonic properties of the metal are dominant, the electrical length of the unit cell may be a very small fraction of the operating wavelength near the plasma frequency of the wire medium and that the spatial dispersion effects may be relatively weak. In addition, we investigate the possibility operating the artificial plasma in the regime Re{ɛ}=-1 to obtain a superlensing effect at infrared frequencies analogous to that characteristic of the silver lens.

  14. In situ natural product discovery via an artificial marine sponge.

    PubMed

    La Clair, James J; Loveridge, Steven T; Tenney, Karen; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Chapman, Eli; Crews, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing international interest in exploring and developing the therapeutic potential of marine-derived small molecules. Balancing the strategies for ocean based sampling of source organisms versus the potential to endanger fragile ecosystems poses a substantial challenge. In order to mitigate such environmental impacts, we have developed a deployable artificial sponge. This report provides details on its design followed by evidence that it faithfully recapitulates traditional natural product collection protocols. Retrieving this artificial sponge from a tropical ecosystem after deployment for 320 hours afforded three actin-targeting jasplakinolide depsipeptides that had been discovered two decades earlier using traditional sponge specimen collection and isolation procedures. The successful outcome achieved here could reinvigorate marine natural products research, by producing new environmentally innocuous sources of natural products and providing a means to probe the true biosynthetic origins of complex marine-derived scaffolds. PMID:25004127

  15. Artificial Immune System for Multi-Area Economic Dispatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Shankha Suvra; Hazra, Abhik; Basu, Mousumi

    2013-09-01

    This article presents artificial immune system for solving multi-area economic dispatch (MAED) problem with tie line constraints considering transmission losses, multiple fuels, valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones. Artificial immune system is based on the clonal selection principle which implements adaptive cloning, hyper mutation, aging operator and tournament selection. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified on three different test systems, both small and large, involving varying degree of complexity. Compared with differential evolution, evolutionary programming and real-coded genetic algorithm, considering the quality of the solution obtained, the proposed algorithm seems to be a promising alternative approach for solving the MAED problems in practical power system.

  16. Shear wave velocity models retrieved using Rg wave dispersion data in shallow crust in some regions of southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian; Motazedian, Dariush; Corchete, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Many crucial tasks in seismology, such as locating seismic events and estimating focal mechanisms, need crustal velocity models. The velocity models of shallow structures are particularly important in the simulation of ground motions. In southern Ontario, Canada, many small shallow earthquakes occur, generating high-frequency Rayleigh ( Rg) waves that are sensitive to shallow structures. In this research, the dispersion of Rg waves was used to obtain shear-wave velocities in the top few kilometers of the crust in the Georgian Bay, Sudbury, and Thunder Bay areas of southern Ontario. Several shallow velocity models were obtained based on the dispersion of recorded Rg waves. The Rg waves generated by an m N 3.0 natural earthquake on the northern shore of Georgian Bay were used to obtain velocity models for the area of an earthquake swarm in 2007. The Rg waves generated by a mining induced event in the Sudbury area in 2005 were used to retrieve velocity models between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River. The Rg waves generated by the largest event in a natural earthquake swarm near Thunder Bay in 2008 were used to obtain a velocity model in that swarm area. The basic feature of all the investigated models is that there is a top low-velocity layer with a thickness of about 0.5 km. The seismic velocities changed mainly within the top 2 km, where small earthquakes often occur.

  17. Uncertainty on shallow landslide hazard assessment: from field data to hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefolini, Emanuele; Tolo, Silvia; Patelli, Eduardo; Broggi, Matteo; Disperati, Leonardo; Le Tuan, Hai

    2015-04-01

    Shallow landsliding that involve Hillslope Deposits (HD), the surficial soil that cover the bedrock, is an important process of erosion, transport and deposition of sediment along hillslopes. Despite Shallow landslides generally mobilize relatively small volume of material, they represent the most hazardous factor in mountain regions due to their high velocity and the common absence of warning signs. Moreover, increasing urbanization and likely climate change make shallow landslides a source of widespread risk, therefore the interest of scientific community about this process grown in the last three decades. One of the main aims of research projects involved on this topic, is to perform robust shallow landslides hazard assessment for wide areas (regional assessment), in order to support sustainable spatial planning. Currently, three main methodologies may be implemented to assess regional shallow landslides hazard: expert evaluation, probabilistic (or data mining) methods and physical models based methods. The aim of this work is evaluate the uncertainty of shallow landslides hazard assessment based on physical models taking into account spatial variables such as: geotechnical and hydrogeologic parameters as well as hillslope morphometry. To achieve this goal a wide dataset of geotechnical properties (shear strength, permeability, depth and unit weight) of HD was gathered by integrating field survey, in situ and laboratory tests. This spatial database was collected from a study area of about 350 km2 including different bedrock lithotypes and geomorphological features. The uncertainty associated to each step of the hazard assessment process (e.g. field data collection, regionalization of site specific information and numerical modelling of hillslope stability) was carefully characterized. The most appropriate probability density function (PDF) was chosen for each numerical variable and we assessed the uncertainty propagation on HD strength parameters obtained by

  18. Physically-based failure analysis of shallow layered soil deposits over large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Sabatino; Castorino, Giuseppe Claudio; Iervolino, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    materials lie on deeper soil layers with small effective cohesion. It is also shown that, due to a more realistic assessment of soil stratigraphy, the success of the model may increase when performing a back-analysis of a recent real event. References Baum, R. L., W. Z. Savage, and J. W. Godt (2002), TRIGRS-A Fortran program for transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope-stability analysis. U.S. Geological Survey, Open-file report 02-424, 35 p. Baum, R.L., Godt, J.W. (2012) Assessment of shallow landslide potential using 1-D and 3-D slope stability analysis Landslides and Engineered Slopes: Protecting Society through Improved Understanding - Eberhardt et al. (eds) 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-62123-6, 1667-1672. Cascini L., Cuomo S., Della Sala M. (2011). Spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides of flow type: A case of Sarno-Quindici, Italy. Geomorphology, 126(1-2), 148-158. Cuomo S., Della Sala M. (2013). Spatially distributed analysis of shallow landslides and soil erosion induced by rainfall. (submitted to Natural Hazards). Godt, J.W., Baum, R.L., Savage, W.Z., Salciarini, D., Schulz, W.H., Harp, E.L. (2008). Transient deterministic shallow landslide modeling: requirements for susceptibility and hazard assessments in a GIS framework. Engineering Geology 102, 214-226. Salciarini, D., Tamagnini, C., Conversini, P., Rapinesi, S. (2012). Spatially distributed rainfall thresholds for the initiation of shallow landslides. Natural Hazards 61, 229-245. Sorbino G., Sica C., Cascini L. (2010). Susceptibility analysis of shallow landslides source areas using physically based models. Natural Hazards, 53(2), 313-332.

  19. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  20. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  1. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  2. Shallow Melting and Underground Drainage in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costard, F.; Sejourne, A.; Kargel, J.; Soare, R.

    2012-03-01

    Based on the identification of sinuous and elongated pits in Utopia Planitia, we suggest that shallow melting and underground drainage are possible. We test that hypothesis using a thermal model that comprises a thick insulating dusty layer.

  3. Challenges in hardening technologies using shallow-trench isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Draper, B.L.; Flores, R.S.

    1998-02-01

    Challenges related to radiation hardening CMOS technologies with shallow-trench isolation are explored. Results show that trench hardening can be more difficult than simply replacing the trench isolation oxide with a hardened field oxide.

  4. Shallow Landslides Hazards in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellugi, D. G.; Perron, J. T.; O'Gorman, P. A.; Milledge, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall-triggered shallow landslides pose hazards to communities, infrastructure, and ecosystems. The magnitude and frequency of extreme precipitation are expected to change under climate warming, but their effects on landslide abundance, size, and spatial distribution are poorly understood. Fractional changes in extreme precipitation can be considerably greater than those in mean precipitation as storm intensity is not constrained by the atmospheric energy budget. Changes in orographic precipitation may also alter the spatial pattern of extreme precipitation. We assess relative changes in extreme precipitation for varying return periods and event durations predicted by regional climate models (RCM) in the USA over the periods 1971-2000 to 2041-2070. We delineate areas where orographic precipitation contributes to changes in extreme precipitation by analyzing topography and local winds associated with these extremes. To verify that RCMs reflect theoretical predictions, we quantify precipitation changes on the lee and windward slopes. We assess impacts of extreme precipitation change on landslide characteristics by applying a search algorithm that predicts landslide abundance, location, and size to a study site in the Oregon Coast Range (OCR) with a 10-year landslide observational record. We test a range of precipitation scenarios, forest management practices, and antecedent moisture conditions. To explore effects of orographic precipitation, we rescale observed precipitation for representative lee and windward locations and find that fractional changes in mean winter precipitation are ~3 times larger on leeward slopes. The fractional changes in intensity are much greater for extreme precipitation than mean precipitation, and they increase with return period. In the Pacific Northwest, leeward increases are ~10% for 2-year events and ~20% for 30-year events. At our study site, a 20% increase in precipitation or antecedent moisture corresponds to a 30-40% increase in

  5. Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Shallow Hazards Studies Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M.; Hobbs, B.

    2005-05-01

    ConocoPhillips (hConoco) has been involved in deepwater exploration in the Gulf of Mexico for the last 5 years using a dynamically positioned (DP) drillship. As part of the Federal (MMS) and State permitting process for deepwater exploration, ConocoPhillips (COPC) actively undertakes in securing seabed and shallow subsurface hazard surveys and analyses for every potential drillsite. COPC conducts seabed and shallow subsurface hazards surveys for at least two main reasons: To be a safe, efficient operator, seabed and shallow subsurface hazard surveys and analyses are necessary steps of the Exploration Work Flow to help ensure a safe well, and to fulfill MMS (or local government) regulatory requirements The purpose of shallow geohazards studies is to determine seafloor and sub-bottom conditions, inspect for possible chemosynthetic communities, and to provide a shallow hazards assessment in accordance with NTL 2003-G17. During the five years of deepwater exploration COPC has contracted Fugro Geoservices to perform hazards studies in over 30 offshore blocks. Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Shallow Hazards Studies Best Practices The results of the seabed and shallow geohazards are a critical part of the construction of all of our well plans and are dynamically used in all MDT's. The results of the seabed and shallow geohazards investigations have greatly improved our drilling efficiency by predicting and avoiding possible chemosynthetic communities, sea floor faults, shallow gas, and shallow water flow. CoP's outstanding safety record and environmental stewardship with regards to geohazards has helped us in accelerating certain Exploration Plans (within MMS guidelines). These types of efforts has saved money and kept the drilling schedule running smoothly. In the last two years, the MMS has given COPC approval to use existing 3D spec seismic volumes for Shallow Hazards Assessment at several locations where applicable. This type of effort has saved ConocoPhillips hundreds of

  6. Shallow plumbing and eruptive processes of a scoria cone built on steep terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A. G.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dark Peak (Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, central Nevada, USA) is an eroded Pliocene, monogenetic basaltic volcano that exposes intrusions while preserving some pyroclastic deposits and lavas, allowing reconstruction of the shallow magma feeding system and its relation to eruptive processes. Variably welded agglomerates record Strombolian and Hawaiian fountaining. Dikes fed degassed magma to a bocca on the lower cone slopes and fed a small lava field. The cone was built on the side of a steep ridge with small side drainages, had a maximum diameter of about 1 km, and was ~ 125 m high above the highest point on the paleotopography. The eruption was fed by an ~ 1 km long, narrow (1-3 m) feeder dike that locally flared in the upper tens of meters to form an ~ 30 m wide conduit around which the cone was built. The conduit shape and the transition depth from feeder dike to conduit are consistent with data from other exposed plumbing systems of small volume basaltic volcanoes that were dominated by magmatic volatile-driven eruption styles, supporting inferences that their conduits are relatively shallow features (upper ~ 150 m).

  7. An integrable shallow water equation with peaked solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.; Holm, D.D. )

    1993-09-13

    We derive a new completely integrable dispersive shallow water equation that is bi-Hamiltonian and thus possesses an infinite number of conservation laws in involution. The equation is obtained by using an asymptotic expansion directly in the Hamiltonian for Euler's equations in the shallow water regime. The soliton solution for this equation has a limiting form that has a discontinuity in the first derivative at its peak.

  8. The artificial catchment `Chicken Creek' (`Huehnerwasser') as a new research tool for hydrological and ecological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwin, W.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    The most important framework of many ecological studies are watersheds as landscape units for water and element budgets. However, internal structures of natural catchments are often not well known due to natural heterogeneity and difficult boundary conditions. Important information has to be extrapolated from point measurements or indirect exploration methods. In contrast, artificial watersheds have the advantage of better defined boundaries and internal structures. Both local boundary conditions, e.g. the accordance of the surface and the groundwater catchment or hydrologic parameters like drainage patterns, discharge points and stratification can be designed and precisely documented during site construction. A recently launched German-Swiss Collaborative Research Centre is investigating the 'Chicken Creek' watershed which can be seen as one of the largest artificially created catchments for scientific purposes worldwide. The main hypothesis of the Collaborative Research Centre is that initial structures define and shape the development of an ecosystem as well as its later stages. Against this background the artificial catchment was designed to offer manifold opportunities for hydrological oriented as well as ecological studies of an initial ecosystem. As internal structures are well known and the surface and subsurface boundaries are well defined compared to natural catchments the site offers high potentials for improving hydrological and ecological models. The catchment ‘Chicken Creek' in Lusatia (Germany; 150 km SE from Berlin) has an area of 6 ha. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. At the bottom of the catchment a small lake with a diameter of 70 m and a

  9. Estimating the effective sound speed in the bottom in shallow water areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkov, A. A.; Petnikov, V. G.; Chernousov, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Techniques are proposed for estimating the effective sound speed in sediments in shallow water areas with a soft bottom. The techniques are oriented toward determining this physical quantity for relatively small range intervals on the order of ten depths. The estimates are based on comparison of the experimental results and calculations of the characteristics of low-frequency sound fields propagating in these water areas. It is proposed to find this sound speed quantity by calculating its value for which the best agreement between experiment and calculation occurs. We present the results of testing the proposed techniques in experiments in the Klyaz'ma reservoir.

  10. Singular layers for transmission problems in thin shallow shell theory: Rigid junction case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabet, Ismail; Chacha, D. A.; Nicaise, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this Note we study two-dimensional transmission problems for the linear Koiter's model of an elastic multi-structure composed of two thin shallow shells. This work enters in the framework of singular perturbation of problems depending on a small parameter ɛ. The formal limit problem fails to give a solution satisfying all boundary and transmission conditions; it gives only the outer solution. Both in the case of regular or singular loadings, we derive a limit problem which allows us to determine the inner solution explicitly.

  11. Energy conserving and potential-enstrophy dissipating schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Hsu, Yueh-Jiuan G.

    1990-01-01

    To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease while energy is conserved (when the mass flux is nondivergent and time is continuous). Among this family of schemes, there is a member that minimizes the spurious impact of infinite potential vorticities associated with infinitesimal fluid depth. The scheme is, therefore, useful for problems in which the free surface may intersect with the lower boundary.

  12. Fracturing and flow: Investigations on the formation of shallow water sills on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Kathleen L.; Patterson, G. Wes; Lowell, Robert P.; Germanovich, Leonid

    2016-08-01

    Double ridge tectonic features appear prominently and ubiquitously across the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa. Previous studies have interpreted flanking fractures observed along some of the ridges as indicators of stress resulting from the ridge loading and flexing of the ice shell above a shallow water body. Here, we investigate a shallow water sill emplacement process at a time when the shell is cooling and thickening and explore the conditions that would make such a system feasible on timescales of ridge formation. Results show that fracture initiation and transport of ocean water to shallow depths can realistically occur, although horizontal fracturing and sill lifetimes prove challenging. Finite element models demonstrate that mechanical layering or a fractured shell do not provide enough stress change to promote horizontal fracturing, but tidal forcing does result in a small amount of turn. Assuming it is possible for a shallow sill to form, a sill would convect internally and conduct heat out quickly, resulting in a short lifetime in comparison to an estimated flexure timeframe of 100 kyr suggested required for double ridge formation. Consideration of heat transfer and residence in the overlying ice, however, extends the flexure timeframe and multiple sill intrusions or replenishment with warm ocean water could prolong the effective sill lifetime. Though challenges still remain for sill formation at Europa, these analyses constrain the potential mechanisms for emplacement and indicate sills can act as viable options for supplying the heat needed for surface flexure. Further analyses and future missions to Europa will help to increase our understanding of these enigmatic processes.

  13. An optical model for heat and salt budget estimation for shallow seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrior, Hari; Carder, Kendall

    2007-12-01

    The effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations for shallow waters are developed and applied for the region of Bahamas. Most of the general circulation models use a simplified heat budget scheme based on Jerlov water types, and do not account for optical bottom effects. By optical bottom effect, we mean the bottom absorption and reflection of the short-wave radiation, which in turn affects the thermal stratification and heat exchange with the atmosphere. In this paper, this optical bottom effect is added to a 3D turbulence model (a 1D model called GOTM is coupled to a 3D model called POM) and the evolution of the temperature structure studied. We call the coupled model 3DGOTM. This optical bottom effect is found to be important in the areas with clear water, shallow depths and small solar zenith angle. On the basis of the coastal meteorological measurements from Andros Island, we have used this three-dimensional turbulence closure model (3DGOTM) to show the influence of bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The final temperature of the developed water column depends on water depth and bottom albedo. Effects of varying the bottom albedo were studied by comparing results for coral sand and sea grass bottoms. This has an appreciable contribution to the heat budget and salt budget of the shallow waters in these coastal regions. The salinities of the shallow regions near Andros Island have been found to reach as high as 46 psu by summer. In addition to the thermohaline plumes generated by these bottom effects, this warming process has an impact on the moisture feedbacks into the atmosphere due to evaporation.

  14. Controls on subsurface methane fluxes and shallow gas formation in Baltic Sea sediment (Aarhus Bay, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, Sabine; Røy, Hans; Dale, Andrew W.; Fossing, Henrik; Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Jensen, Jørn Bo; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2016-09-01

    Shallow gas accumulates in coastal marine sediments when the burial rate of reactive organic matter beneath the sulfate zone is sufficiently high and the methanogenic zone is sufficiently deep. We investigated the controls on methane production and free methane gas accumulation along a 400 m seismo-acoustic transect across a sharp transition from gas-free into gas-bearing sediment in Aarhus Bay (Denmark). Twelve gravity cores were taken, in which the pore water was analyzed for inorganic solutes while rates of organic carbon mineralization were measured experimentally by 35SO42- radiotracer method. The thickness of organic-rich Holocene mud increased from 5 to 10 m along the transect concomitant with a shallowing of the depth of the sulfate-methane transition from >4 m to 2.5 m. In spite of drastic differences in the distribution of methane and sulfate in the sediment along the transect, there were only small differences in total mineralization, and methanogenesis was only equivalent to about 1% of sulfate reduction. Shallow gas appeared where the mud thickness exceeded 8-9 m. Rates of methanogenesis increased along the transect as did the upward diffusive flux of methane. Interestingly, the increase in the sedimentation rate and Holocene mud thickness had only a modest direct effect on methanogenesis rates in deep sediments. This increase in methane flux, however, triggered a shallowing of the sulfate-methane transition which resulted in a large increase in methanogenesis at the top of the methanogenic zone. Thus, our results demonstrate a positive feedback mechanism that causes a strong enhancement of methanogenesis and explains the apparently abrupt appearance of gas when a threshold thickness of organic-rich mud is exceeded.

  15. Artificial neural networks in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Hasan Reza; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) effectively analyze non-linear data sets. The aimed was A review of the relevant published articles that focused on the application of ANNs as a tool for assisting clinical decision-making in neurosurgery. A literature review of all full publications in English biomedical journals (1993-2013) was undertaken. The strategy included a combination of key words 'artificial neural networks', 'prognostic', 'brain', 'tumor tracking', 'head', 'tumor', 'spine', 'classification' and 'back pain' in the title and abstract of the manuscripts using the PubMed search engine. The major findings are summarized, with a focus on the application of ANNs for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Finally, the future of ANNs in neurosurgery is explored. A total of 1093 citations were identified and screened. In all, 57 citations were found to be relevant. Of these, 50 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The synthesis of the data showed several applications of ANN in neurosurgery, including: (1) diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in low back pain, brain tumours and primary epilepsy; (2) enhancing clinically relevant information extraction from radiographic images, intracranial pressure processing, low back pain and real-time tumour tracking; (3) outcome prediction in epilepsy, brain metastases, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbar disc herniation, childhood hydrocephalus, trauma mortality, and the occurrence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage; (4) the use in the biomechanical assessments of spinal disease. ANNs can be effectively employed for diagnosis, prognosis and outcome prediction in neurosurgery. PMID:24987050

  16. Artificial Compressibility with Entropic Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan; Roberts, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Artificial Compressibility (AC) methods relax the strict incompressibility constraint associated with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Instead, they rely on an artificial equation of state relating pressure and density fluctuations through a numerical Mach number. Such methods are not new: the first AC methods date back to Chorin (1967). More recent applications can be found in the lattice-Boltzmann method, which is a kinetic/mesoscopic method that converges to an AC form of the Navier-Stokes equations. With computing hardware trending towards massively parallel architectures in order to achieve high computational throughput, AC style methods have become attractive due to their local information propagation and concomitant parallelizable algorithms. In this work, we examine a damped form of AC in the context of finite-difference and finite-element methods, with a focus on achieving time-accurate simulations. Also, we comment on the scalability of the various algorithms. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Computational Hemodynamics Involving Artificial Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Feiereisen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in human, especially, in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended in the recent past to the analysis and development of mechanical devices. The blood flow in these devices is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus various incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedures can be selected depending on the choice of formulations, variables and numerical schemes. Two primitive variable formulations used are discussed as well as the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. This procedure has been applied to several artificial devices. Among these, recent progress made in developing DeBakey axial flow blood pump will be presented from computational point of view. Computational and clinical issues will be discussed in detail as well as additional work needed.

  18. Artificial Organisms with Human Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Domenico

    If artificial organisms are constructed with the goal to better understand the behaviour of real organisms, artificial organisms that resemble human beings should possess a communication system with the same properties of human language. This chapter tries to identify nine such properties and for each of them to describe what has been done and what has to be done. Human language: (1) is made up of signals which are arbitrarily connected to their meanings, (2) has syntax and, more generally, its signals are made up of smaller signals, (3) is culturally transmitted and culturally evolved, (4) is used to communicate with oneself and not only with others, (5) is particularly sophisticated for communicating information about the external environment, (6) uses displaced signals, (7) is intentional and requires recognition of intentions in others, (8) is the product of a complex nervous system, (9) influences human cognition. Communication presupposes a shared worldview which depends on the brain, body, and adaptive pattern of the organisms that want to communicate, and this represents a critical challenge also for communication between robots and us.

  19. Estimation of residence time in a shallow lacustrine embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, A. M.; Barry, D. A.; Lemmin, U.; Bakhtyar, R.

    2012-12-01

    Near-shore water quality in lacustrine bays subjected to effluent or stream discharges is affected by, amongst other things, the residence time within a given bay. Vidy Bay, located on the northern shore of Lake Geneva, Switzerland, receives discharge from a wastewater treatment plant, the Chamberonne River and a storm-water drain. The residence time of water in the bay largely depends on water exchanges with the main basin (Grand Lac) of Lake Geneva. Field investigations and modeling of the hydrodynamics of Vidy Bay have shown that currents are variable, due mainly to wind variability over the lake. However, in broad terms there are two main current patterns in the bay, (i) currents are linked to large gyres in the Grand Lac, or (ii) currents are partially independent of the Grand Lac and are controlled by small-scale gyres within the bay. Residence times in Vidy Bay were computed using the hydrodynamic model Delft3D. Since the Vidy Bay shoreline follows a shallow arc, the definition of the off-shore extent of the bay is ambiguous. Here, the largest within-bay gyre is used. Particle tracking was conducted for each of the three discharges into the bay. Model results were computed using meteorological data for 2010, and thus include the natural variability in wind patterns and seasonal stratification. An analysis of the results shows that a water parcel from the waste water outfall has a residence time ranging from hours to days. The water residence time is minimum near to the surface and maximum at the near bottom layer. The results confirmed that wind force, thermal stratification, and water depth are the main factors influencing residence time.

  20. The Energetics of Large Shallow and Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcaru, G.

    2002-05-01

    Large earthquakes occur mostly as complex processes with inhomgeneities of variable strength and size, and also in different tectonic regimes. As a result, the released strain energy (Est) can significantly vary in individual events with about the same seismic moment M0, i.e. no 1-to-1 correspondence between them. We quantify the energetic balance of earthquakes in terms of Est and its components (fracture (Eg), friction (Ef) and seismic (Es) energy) for 75 large earthquakes (Mw >= 7) with more accurate source parameters. Based on an extended Hamilton's principle, which considers nonconservative forces and any forces not accounted for in the potential energy function, and assuming complete stress drop we estimate Est using the approach of Purcaru (EOS, 1997, 78, 481). The events are from thrust-interplate, strike slip, shallow in-slab, slow/tsunami, deep and continental classes. The energetic balance is determined from: Est/M0 = (1+e(g,s))(Es/M_0), e(g,s) = Eg/E_s, and Est and Es are not in a 1-to-1 correspondence. In the Est-budget: (1) larger Es (i.e. more energetic) is radiated by deep, in-slab, strike slip and some continental events, (2) the interplate thrust events in subduction zones show a relatively balanced partition of Es and Eg and (3) small Es, and much larger Eg, is found for slow events and tsunamis. A reference class for which Es and Eg are comparable is suggested. Our results are consistent with those of other authors (Kikuchi, 1992; Choy and Boatwright, 1995; Newman and Okal, 1998). The average stress drop shows significant variability, even for events from the thrust class. The strong variation of stress drop of localized regions of the rupture area we found to play a major role in partitioning the released strain energy.