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Sample records for arylamine n-acetyltransferase type

  1. Placental arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1: potential contributory source of urinary folate catabolite p-acetamidobenzoylglutamate during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Upton, A; Smelt, V; Mushtaq, A; Aplin, R; Johnson, N; Mardon, H; Sim, E

    2000-12-15

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 (NAT1), better known as a drug-metabolising enzyme, has been proposed to acetylate the folate catabolite p-aminobenzoylglutamate (p-abaglu) to N-acetamidobenzoylglutamate (ap-abaglu) which is a major urinary folate catabolite. Using mass spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate the formation of ap-abaglu by recombinant human NAT1 and human placental homogenates. Using density gradient centrifugation the placental enzymic activity which acetylates p-aba and the placental enzymic activity acetylating p-abaglu both have an S(20,w) value of 3.25 S. This is the expected value for a monomer of human NAT1 (33 kDa). The specific NAT1 inhibitor 5-iodosalicylate inhibits acetylation of both p-aba and p-abaglu catalysed by either recombinant human NAT1 or placental samples as the source of enzyme. These data demonstrate that NAT1 is the major placental enzyme involved in acetylating p-abaglu. PMID:11113560

  2. Structure of Mesorhizobium loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, Simon J.; Dairou, Julien; Sandy, James; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Noble, Martin E. M.; Sim, Edith

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of a M. loti arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes have been found in a broad range of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. The NAT enzymes catalyse the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl Co-enzyme A onto the terminal nitrogen of a range of arylamine, hydrazine and arylhydrazine compounds. Recently, several NAT structures have been reported from different prokaryotic sources including Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bioinformatics analysis of the Mesorhizobium loti genome revealed two NAT paralogues, the first example of multiple NAT isoenzymes in a eubacterial organism. The M. loti NAT 1 enzyme was recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzyme was crystallized in 0.5 M Ca(OAc){sub 2}, 16% PEG 3350, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. A data set diffracting to 2.0 Å was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic spacegroup P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.2, b = 97.3, c = 114.3 Å. The structure was refined to a final free-R factor of 24.8%. The structure reveals that despite low sequence homology, M. loti NAT1 shares the common fold as reported in previous NAT structures and exhibits the same catalytic triad of residues (Cys-His-Asp) in the active site.

  3. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. We report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis employing an exhaustive dataset of NAT-homologous sequences recovered through inspection of 2445 genomes. We describe ...

  4. Small molecule inhibition of arylamine N-acetyltransferase Type I inhibits proliferation and invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tiang, Jacky M.; Butcher, Neville J.; Minchin, Rodney F.

    2010-02-26

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 is a phase II metabolizing enzyme that has been associated with certain breast cancer subtypes. While it has been linked to breast cancer risk because of its role in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens, recent studies have suggested it may be important in cell growth and survival. To address the possible importance of NAT1 in breast cancer, we have used a novel small molecule inhibitor (Rhod-o-hp) of the enzyme to examine growth and invasion of the breast adenocarcinoma line MDA-MB-231. The inhibitor significantly reduced cell growth by increasing the percent of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Rhod-o-hp also reduced the ability of the MDA-MB-231 cells to grow in soft agar. Using an in vitro invasion assay, the inhibitor significantly reduced the invasiveness of the cells. To test whether this effect was due to inhibition of NAT1, the enzyme was knocked down using a lentivirus-based shRNA approach and invasion potential was significantly reduced. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that NAT1 activity may be important in breast cancer growth and metastasis. The study suggests that NAT1 is a novel target for breast cancer treatment.

  5. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  6. Phylogenetic and biological investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 (FDB2) gene of Fusarium verticillioides was the first NAT cloned and character...

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3].

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Xavier; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that catalyze the acetylation of arylamines. All functional NATs described to date possess a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of Bacillus cereus arylamine N-acetyltransferase 3 [(BACCR)NAT3], a putative NAT isoenzyme that possesses a unique catalytic triad containing a glutamate residue, is reported. The crystal diffracted to 2.42 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.44, b = 44.52, c = 132.98 Å, β = 103.8°. PMID:22297998

  8. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in bronchial epithelial cells and its inhibition by cellular oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Dairou, Julien; Petit, Emile; Ragunathan, Nilusha; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Marano, Francelyne; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells express xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that are involved in the biotransformation of inhaled toxic compounds. The activities of these XMEs in the lung may modulate respiratory toxicity and have been linked to several diseases of the airways. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are conjugating XMEs that play a key role in the biotransformation of aromatic amine pollutants such as the tobacco-smoke carcinogens 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and {beta}-naphthylamine ({beta}-NA). We show here that functional human NAT1 or its murine counterpart Nat2 are present in different lung epithelial cells i.e. Clara cells, type II alveolar cells and bronchial epithelial cells, thus indicating that inhaled aromatic amines may undergo NAT-dependent biotransformation in lung epithelium. Exposure of these cells to pathophysiologically relevant amounts of oxidants known to contribute to lung dysfunction, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or peroxynitrite, was found to impair the NAT1/Nat2-dependent cellular biotransformation of aromatic amines. Genetic and non genetic impairment of intracellular NAT enzyme activities has been suggested to compromise the important detoxification pathway of aromatic amine N-acetylation and subsequently to contribute to an exacerbation of untoward effects of these pollutants on health. Our study suggests that oxidative/nitroxidative stress in lung epithelial cells, due to air pollution and/or inflammation, could contribute to local and/or systemic dysfunctions through the alteration of the functions of pulmonary NAT enzymes.

  9. Identification and Functional Characterization of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases in Eubacteria: Evidence for Highly Selective Acetylation of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Deloménie, Claudine; Fouix, Sylvaine; Longuemaux, Sandrine; Brahimi, Naïma; Bizet, Chantal; Picard, Bertrand; Denamur, Erick; Dupret, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity has been described in various bacterial species. Bacterial N-acetyltransferases, including those from bacteria of the gut flora, may be involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, thereby exerting physiopathological effects. We characterized these enzymes further by steady-state kinetics, time-dependent inhibition, and DNA hybridization in 40 species, mostly from the human intestinal microflora. We report for the first time N-acetyltransferase activity in 11 species of Proteobacteriaceae from seven genera: Citrobacter amalonaticus, Citrobacter farmeri, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella ozaenae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens, Shigella flexneri, Plesiomonas shigelloides, and Vibrio cholerae. We estimated apparent kinetic parameters and found that 5-aminosalicylic acid, a compound efficient in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, was acetylated with a catalytic efficiency 27 to 645 times higher than that for its isomer, 4-aminosalicylic acid. In contrast, para-aminobenzoic acid, a folate precursor in bacteria, was poorly acetylated. Of the wild-type strains studied, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the best acetylator in terms of both substrate spectrum and catalytic efficiency. DNA hybridization with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-derived probe suggested the presence of this enzyme in eight proteobacterial and four gram-positive species. Molecular aspects together with the kinetic data suggest distinct functional features for this class of microbial enzymes. PMID:11344150

  10. Comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and functional investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated (Glenn and Bacon, 2009; Glenn et al., 2010). The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the...

  11. Structural Basis of Substrate-Binding Specificity of Human Arylamine N-acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Tempel, W.; Martin, F.; Loppnau, P.; Goodfellow, G.; Grant, D.; Plotnikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    The human arylamine N-acetyltransferases NAT1 and NAT2 play an important role in the biotransformation of a plethora of aromatic amine and hydrazine drugs. They are also able to participate in the bioactivation of several known carcinogens. Each of these enzymes is genetically variable in human populations, and polymorphisms in NAT genes have been associated with various cancers. Here we have solved the high resolution crystal structures of human NAT1 and NAT2, including NAT1 in complex with the irreversible inhibitor 2-bromoacetanilide, a NAT1 active site mutant, and NAT2 in complex with CoA, and have refined them to 1.7-, 1.8-, and 1.9- Angstroms resolution, respectively. The crystal structures reveal novel structural features unique to human NATs and provide insights into the structural basis of the substrate specificity and genetic polymorphism of these enzymes.

  12. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: from drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sim, E; Abuhammad, A; Ryan, A

    2014-06-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes, acetylating arylamine carcinogens and drugs including hydralazine and sulphonamides. The slow NAT phenotype increases susceptibility to hydralazine and isoniazid toxicity and to occupational bladder cancer. The two polymorphic human NAT loci show linkage disequilibrium. All mammalian Nat genes have an intronless open reading frame and non-coding exons. The human gene products NAT1 and NAT2 have distinct substrate specificities: NAT2 acetylates hydralazine and human NAT1 acetylates p-aminosalicylate (p-AS) and the folate catabolite para-aminobenzoylglutamate (p-abaglu). Human NAT2 is mainly in liver and gut. Human NAT1 and its murine homologue are in many adult tissues and in early embryos. Human NAT1 is strongly expressed in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and may contribute to folate and acetyl CoA homeostasis. NAT enzymes act through a catalytic triad of Cys, His and Asp with the architecture of the active site-modulating specificity. Polymorphisms may cause unfolded protein. The C-terminus helps bind acetyl CoA and differs among NATs including prokaryotic homologues. NAT in Salmonella typhimurium supports carcinogen activation and NAT in mycobacteria metabolizes isoniazid with polymorphism a minor factor in isoniazid resistance. Importantly, nat is in a gene cluster essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival inside macrophages. NAT inhibitors are a starting point for novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Human NAT1-specific inhibitors may act in biomarker detection in breast cancer and in cancer therapy. NAT inhibitors for co-administration with 5-aminosalicylate (5-AS) in inflammatory bowel disease has prompted ongoing investigations of azoreductases in gut bacteria which release 5-AS from prodrugs including balsalazide. PMID:24467436

  13. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: from drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics to drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Abuhammad, A; Ryan, A

    2014-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes, acetylating arylamine carcinogens and drugs including hydralazine and sulphonamides. The slow NAT phenotype increases susceptibility to hydralazine and isoniazid toxicity and to occupational bladder cancer. The two polymorphic human NAT loci show linkage disequilibrium. All mammalian Nat genes have an intronless open reading frame and non-coding exons. The human gene products NAT1 and NAT2 have distinct substrate specificities: NAT2 acetylates hydralazine and human NAT1 acetylates p-aminosalicylate (p-AS) and the folate catabolite para-aminobenzoylglutamate (p-abaglu). Human NAT2 is mainly in liver and gut. Human NAT1 and its murine homologue are in many adult tissues and in early embryos. Human NAT1 is strongly expressed in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and may contribute to folate and acetyl CoA homeostasis. NAT enzymes act through a catalytic triad of Cys, His and Asp with the architecture of the active site-modulating specificity. Polymorphisms may cause unfolded protein. The C-terminus helps bind acetyl CoA and differs among NATs including prokaryotic homologues. NAT in Salmonella typhimurium supports carcinogen activation and NAT in mycobacteria metabolizes isoniazid with polymorphism a minor factor in isoniazid resistance. Importantly, nat is in a gene cluster essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival inside macrophages. NAT inhibitors are a starting point for novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Human NAT1-specific inhibitors may act in biomarker detection in breast cancer and in cancer therapy. NAT inhibitors for co-administration with 5-aminosalicylate (5-AS) in inflammatory bowel disease has prompted ongoing investigations of azoreductases in gut bacteria which release 5-AS from prodrugs including balsalazide. PMID:24467436

  14. Interaction of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 with different nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhou J; Butcher, Neville J; Mortimer, Gysell M; Jia, Zhongfan; Monteiro, Michael J; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2014-03-01

    Humans are exposed to nanoparticles in the environment as well as those in nanomaterials developed for biomedical applications. However, the safety and biologic effects of many nanoparticles remain to be elucidated. Over the past decade, our understanding of the interaction of proteins with various nanomaterials has grown. The protein corona can determine not only how nanoparticles interact with cells but also their biologic effects and toxicity. In this study, we describe the effects that several different classes of nanoparticles exert on the enzymatic activity of the cytosolic protein human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1), a drug-metabolizing enzyme widely distributed in the body that is also responsible for the activation and detoxification of known carcinogens. We investigated three metal oxides (zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and silicon dioxide), two synthetic clay nanoparticles (layered double hydroxide and layered silicate nanoparticles), and a self-assembling thermo-responsive polymeric nanoparticle that differ in size and surface characteristics. We found that the different nanoparticles induced very different responses, ranging from inhibition to marked enhancement of enzyme activity. The layered silicates did not directly inactivate NAT1, but was found to enhance substrate-dependent inhibition. These differing effects demonstrate the multiplicity of nanoparticle-protein interactions and suggest that enzyme activity may be compromised in organs exposed to nanoparticles, such as the lungs or reticulo-endothelial system. PMID:24346836

  15. Over-expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqing; Vath, Gregory M; Kawamura, Akane; Bates, Caleb A; Sim, Edith; Hanna, Patrick E; Wagner, Carston R

    2005-02-01

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) has been overexpressed in E. coli as a mutant dihydrofolic acid reductase (DHFR) fusion protein with a thrombin sensitive linker. An initial DEAE anion-exchange chromatography resulted in partial purification of the fusion protein. The fusion protein was cleaved with thrombin, and human rNAT1 was purified with a second DEAE column. A total of 8 mg of human rNAT1 from 2 1 of cell culture was purified to homogeneity with this methodology. Arylamine substrate specificities were determined for human rNATI and hamster rNAT2. With both NATs, the second order rate constants (k(cat)/ Kmb) for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) were several thousand-fold higher than those for procainamide (PA), consistent with the expected substrate specificities of the enzymes. However, p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), previously reported to be a human NAT1 and hamster NAT2 selective substrate, exhibits 20-fold higher specificity for hamster rNAT2 (k(cat)/Kmb 3410 microM(-1) s(-1)) than for human rNAT1 (k(cat)/Kmb 169.4 microM(-1) s(-1)). p-aminobenzoyl-glutamic acid (pABglu) was acetylated 10-fold more efficiently by human rNAT1 than by hamster rNAT2. Inhibition studies of human rNAT1 and hamster rNAT2 revealed that folic acid and methotrexate (MTX) are competitive inhibitors of both the unacetylated and acetylated forms of the enzymes, with K(I) values in 50 - 300 micro range. Dihydrofolic acid (DHF) was a much poorer inhibitor of human rNAT1 than of hamster rNAT2. The combined results demonstrate that human rNAT1 and hamster rNAT2 have similar but distinct kinetic properties with certain substrates, and suggest that folic acid, at least in the non-polyglutamate form, may not have an effect on human NAT1 activity in vivo. PMID:16003948

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of arylamine N-acetyltransferase C (BanatC) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Pluvinage, Benjamin; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inés; Martins, Marta; Ragunathan, Nilusha; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2007-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis arylamine N-acetyltransferase C (BanatC) is an enzyme that metabolizes the drug sulfamethoxazole. Crystals of the purified enzyme that diffract at 1.95 Å are reported. The arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes that have been found in a large range of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These enzymes catalyse the acetylation of arylamine drugs and/or pollutants. Recently, a Bacillus anthracis NAT isoform (BanatC) has been cloned and shown to acetylate the sulfonamide antimicrobial sulfamethoxazole (SMX). Subsequently, it was shown that BanatC contributes to the resistance of this bacterium to SMX. Here, the crystallization and the X-ray characterization of BanatC (Y38F mutant) are reported. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.70, c = 172.40 Å, and diffract to 1.95 Å resolution on a synchrotron source.

  17. Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) Genetic Diversity and Traditional Subsistence: A Worldwide Population Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Audrey; Darlu, Pierre; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Poloni, Estella S.

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is involved in human physiological responses to a variety of xenobiotic compounds, including common therapeutic drugs and exogenous chemicals present in the diet and the environment. Many questions remain about the evolutionary mechanisms that have led to the high prevalence of slow acetylators in the human species. Evidence from recent surveys of NAT2 gene variation suggests that NAT2 slow-causing variants might have become targets of positive selection as a consequence of the shift in modes of subsistence and lifestyle in human populations in the last 10,000 years. We aimed to test more extensively the hypothesis that slow acetylation prevalence in humans is related to the subsistence strategy adopted by the past populations. To this end, published frequency data on the most relevant genetic variants of NAT2 were collected from 128 population samples (14,679 individuals) representing different subsistence modes and dietary habits, allowing a thorough analysis at both a worldwide and continent scale. A significantly higher prevalence of the slow acetylation phenotype was observed in populations practicing farming (45.4%) and herding (48.2%) as compared to populations mostly relying on hunting and gathering (22.4%) (P = 0.0007). This was closely mirrored by the frequency of the slow 590A variant that was found to occur at a three-fold higher frequency in food producers (25%) as compared to hunter-gatherers (8%). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the Neolithic transition to subsistence economies based on agricultural and pastoral resources modified the selective regime affecting the NAT2 acetylation pathway. Furthermore, the vast amount of data collected enabled us to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date description of NAT2 worldwide genetic diversity, thus building up a useful resource of frequency data for further studies interested in epidemiological or anthropological research questions involving

  18. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Treatment of Rats with Apocynin Has Considerable Inhibitory Effects on Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sheena; Laurieri, Nicola; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka; Delgoda, Rupika

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apocynin on the activity of arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) in excised liver samples was examined using eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats. Three groups of six animals each were fed a normal diet alone or a treatment of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day of apocynin via gavages for eight (8) weeks. Chronic in vivo administration of apocynin led to significant (p < 0.001) reduction of in vitro liver NAT activity up to 93% as compared with untreated rats (18.80 ± 2.10 μmols p-anisidine/min/μg liver protein). In vitro exposure of untreated liver homogenates to apocynin led to a dose-dependent inhibition of NAT activity with IC50 = 0.69 ± 0.02 mM. In silico modelling of apocynin tautomers and radical species into human NAT crystal structures supported the hypothesis that thiol functionalities in NAT enzymes may be crucial in apocynin binding. The involvement of human NAT enzymes in different pathological conditions, such as cancer, has encouraged the research for selective NAT inhibitors in both humans and animal models with possible chemopreventive properties. PMID:27242013

  20. Treatment of Rats with Apocynin Has Considerable Inhibitory Effects on Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Activity in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sheena; Laurieri, Nicola; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka; Delgoda, Rupika

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apocynin on the activity of arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) in excised liver samples was examined using eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats. Three groups of six animals each were fed a normal diet alone or a treatment of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day of apocynin via gavages for eight (8) weeks. Chronic in vivo administration of apocynin led to significant (p < 0.001) reduction of in vitro liver NAT activity up to 93% as compared with untreated rats (18.80 ± 2.10 μmols p-anisidine/min/μg liver protein). In vitro exposure of untreated liver homogenates to apocynin led to a dose-dependent inhibition of NAT activity with IC50 = 0.69 ± 0.02 mM. In silico modelling of apocynin tautomers and radical species into human NAT crystal structures supported the hypothesis that thiol functionalities in NAT enzymes may be crucial in apocynin binding. The involvement of human NAT enzymes in different pathological conditions, such as cancer, has encouraged the research for selective NAT inhibitors in both humans and animal models with possible chemopreventive properties. PMID:27242013

  1. Insights into the O-Acetylation Reaction of Hydroxylated Heterocyclic Amines by Human Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases: A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Felton, J S; Lightstone, F C

    2006-06-06

    A computational study was performed to better understand the differences between human arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 1 and 2. Homology models were constructed from available crystal structures and comparisons of the active site residues 125, 127, and 129 for these two enzymes provide insight into observed substrate differences. The NAT2 model provided a basis for understanding how some of the common mutations may affect the structure of the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations of the human NAT models and the template structure (NAT from Mycobacterium smegmatis) were performed and showed the models to be stable and reasonable. Docking studies of hydroxylated heterocyclic amines in the models of NAT1 and NAT2 probed the differences exhibited by these two proteins with mutagenic agents. The hydroxylated heterocyclic amines were only able to fit into the NAT2 active site, and an alternative binding site by the P-loop was found using our models and will be discussed. Additionally, quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the O-acetylation reaction of the hydroxylated heterocyclic amines N-OH MeIQx and N-OH PhIP. This study has given us insight into why there are substrate differences among isoenzymes and explains some of the polymorphic activity differences.

  2. Deciphering the Ancient and Complex Evolutionary History of Human Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Patin, Etienne; Barreiro, Luis B.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Luca, Francesca; Sajantila, Antti; Behar, Doron M.; Semino, Ornella; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Guiso, Nicole; Gicquel, Brigitte; McElreavey, Ken; Harding, Rosalind M.; Heyer, Evelyne; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2006-01-01

    The human N-acetyltransferase genes NAT1 and NAT2 encode two phase-II enzymes that metabolize various drugs and carcinogens. Functional variability at these genes has been associated with adverse drug reactions and cancer susceptibility. Mutations in NAT2 leading to the so-called slow-acetylation phenotype reach high frequencies worldwide, which questions the significance of altered acetylation in human adaptation. To investigate the role of population history and natural selection in shaping NATs variation, we characterized genetic diversity through the resequencing and genotyping of NAT1, NAT2, and the pseudogene NATP in a collection of 13 different populations with distinct ethnic backgrounds and demographic pasts. This combined study design allowed us to define a detailed map of linkage disequilibrium of the NATs region as well as to perform a number of sequence-based neutrality tests and the long-range haplotype (LRH) test. Our data revealed distinctive patterns of variability for the two genes: the reduced diversity observed at NAT1 is consistent with the action of purifying selection, whereas NAT2 functional variation contributes to high levels of diversity. In addition, the LRH test identified a particular NAT2 haplotype (NAT2*5B) under recent positive selection in western/central Eurasians. This haplotype harbors the mutation 341T→C and encodes the “slowest-acetylator” NAT2 enzyme, suggesting a general selective advantage for the slow-acetylator phenotype. Interestingly, the NAT2*5B haplotype, which seems to have conferred a selective advantage during the past ∼6,500 years, exhibits today the strongest association with susceptibility to bladder cancer and adverse drug reactions. On the whole, the patterns observed for NAT2 well illustrate how geographically and temporally fluctuating xenobiotic environments may have influenced not only our genome variability but also our present-day susceptibility to disease. PMID:16416399

  3. Identification and functional characterization of novel polymorphisms associated with the genes for arylamine N-acetyltransferases in mice.

    PubMed

    Boukouvala, Sotiria; Price, Naomi; Sim, Edith

    2002-07-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) polymorphism in humans has been associated with variation in susceptibility to drug toxicity and cancer. In mice, three NAT isoenzymes are encoded by Nat1, Nat2 and Nat3 genes. Only Nat2 has been shown previously to be polymorphic, a single nucleotide substitution causing the slow acetylator phenotype in the A/J strain. We sequenced the Nat genes from inbred (CBA and 129/Ola), outbred (PO and TO) and wild-derived inbred (Mus spretus and Mus musculus castaneus) mouse strains and report polymorphism in all three Nat genes of M. spretus and in Nat2 and Nat3 genes of M. m. castaneus. Enzymatic activity assays using liver homogenates demonstrated that M. m. castaneus is a 'fast' and M. spretus a 'slow' acetylator. Western blot analysis indicated that hepatic NAT2 protein is less abundant in M. spretus than M. m. castaneus. The new allozymes were expressed in a mammalian cell line and NAT enzymatic activity was measured with a series of substrates. NAT1 and NAT2 isoenzymes of M. m. castaneus exhibited a higher rate of acetylation, compared with those of M. spretus. Activity of the NAT3 allozymes was hardly detectable, although the Nat3 gene does appear to be transcribed, since mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in the spleen. Additional polymorphisms, useful for Nat-related genetic studies, have been identified between BALB/c, C57Bl/6J, A/J, 129/Ola, CBA, PO, TO, M. m. castaneus and M. spretus strains in four microsatellite repeats located close to the Nat genes. PMID:12142728

  4. Effects of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase I knockdown in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2015-01-01

    Expression of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase I (NAT1) has been associated with various cancer subtypes and inhibition of this enzyme with small molecule inhibitors or siRNA affects cell growth and survival. Here, we have investigated the role of NAT1 in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We knocked down NAT1 using a lentivirus-based shRNA approach and observed marked changes in cell morphology in the triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436, and BT-549. Most notable was a reduction in the number and size of the filopodia protrusions on the surface of the cells. The loss of filopodia could be rescued by the reintroduction of NAT1 into the knockdown cells. NAT1 expression was localized to the lamellipodia and extended into the filopodia protrusions. In vitro invasion through Geltrex was significantly inhibited in both the MDA cell lines but not in the BT-549 cells. The expression of Snail increased when NAT1 was knocked down, while other genes associated with mesenchymal to epithelial transition (vimentin, cytokeratin-18, and Twist) did not show any changes. By contrast, both N-cadherin and β-catenin were significantly reduced. When MDA-MB-231 cells expressing shRNA were injected in vivo into BALB/c nu/nu nude mice, a significant reduction in the number of colonies that formed in the lungs was observed. Taken together, the results show that NAT1 can alter the invasion and metastatic properties of some triple-negative breast cancer cells but not all. The study suggests that NAT1 may be a novel therapeutic target in a subset of breast cancers. PMID:25627111

  5. A single nucleotide polymorphism tags variation in the arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotype in populations of European background.

    PubMed

    García-Closas, Montserrat; Hein, David W; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Núria; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin; Doll, Mark A; Figueroa, Jonine D; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Kogevinas, Manolis; Johnson, Alison; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Moore, Lee E; Moeller, Timothy; Real, Francisco X; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-04-01

    The arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) slow acetylation phenotype is an established risk factor for urinary bladder cancer. We reported earlier on this risk association using NAT2 phenotypic categories inferred from NAT2 haplotypes based on seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a study in Spain. In a subsequent genome-wide scan, we have identified a single common tag SNP (rs1495741) located in the 3' end of NAT2 that is also associated with bladder cancer risk. The aim of this report is to evaluate the agreement between the common tag SNP and the 7-SNP NAT2 inferred phenotype. The agreement between the 7-SNP NAT2 inferred phenotype and the tag SNP, rs1495741, was initially assessed in 2174 individuals from the Spanish Bladder Cancer Study (SBCS), and confirmed in a subset of individuals from the Main and Vermont component the New England Bladder Cancer Study (NEBCS). We also investigated the association of rs1495741 genotypes with NAT2 catalytic activity in cryopreserved hepatocytes from 154 individuals of European background. We observed very strong agreement between rs1495741 and the 7-SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype: sensitivity and specificity for the NAT2 slow phenotype was 99 and 95%, respectively. Our findings were replicated in an independent population from the NEBCS. Estimates for the association between NAT2 slow phenotype and bladder cancer risk in the SBCS and its interaction with cigarette smoking were comparable for the 7-SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype and rs1495741. In addition, rs1495741 genotypes were strongly related to NAT2 activity measured in hepatocytes (P<0.0001). A novel NAT2 tag SNP (rs1495741) predicts with high accuracy the 7-SNP inferred NAT2 phenotype, and thus can be used as a sole marker in pharmacogenetic or epidemiological studies of populations of European background. These findings illustrate the utility of tag SNPs, often used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), to identify novel phenotypic markers. Further studies

  6. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:21347396

  7. Structural and biochemical characterization of an active arylamine N-acetyltransferase possessing a non-canonical Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Xavier; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Chaffotte, Alain F; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs), a class of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, catalyze the acetylation of aromatic amine compounds through a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Each residue is essential for catalysis in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic NATs. Indeed, in (HUMAN)NAT2 variants, mutation of the Asp residue to Asn, Gln, or Glu dramatically impairs enzyme activity. However, a putative atypical NAT harboring a catalytic triad Glu residue was recently identified in Bacillus cereus ((BACCR)NAT3) but has not yet been characterized. We report here the crystal structure and functional characterization of this atypical NAT. The overall fold of (BACCR)NAT3 and the geometry of its Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad are similar to those present in functional NATs. Importantly, the enzyme was found to be active and to acetylate prototypic arylamine NAT substrates. In contrast to (HUMAN) NAT2, the presence of a Glu or Asp in the triad of (BACCR)NAT3 did not significantly affect enzyme structure or function. Computational analysis identified differences in residue packing and steric constraints in the active site of (BACCR)NAT3 that allow it to accommodate a Cys-His-Glu triad. These findings overturn the conventional view, demonstrating that the catalytic triad of this family of acetyltransferases is plastic. Moreover, they highlight the need for further study of the evolutionary history of NATs and the functional significance of the predominant Cys-His-Asp triad in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms. PMID:23770703

  8. Eubacterial arylamine N-acetyltransferases - identification and comparison of 18 members of the protein family with conserved active site cysteine, histidine and aspartate residues.

    PubMed

    Payton, M; Mushtaq, A; Yu, T W; Wu, L J; Sinclair, J; Sim, E

    2001-05-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are enzymes involved in the detoxification of a range of arylamine and hydrazine-based xenobiotics. NATs have been implicated in the endogenous metabolism of p-aminobenzoyl glutamate in eukaryotes, although very little is known about the distribution and function of NAT in the prokaryotic kingdom. Using DNA library screening techniques and the analysis of data from whole-genome sequencing projects, we have identified 18 nat-like sequences from the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of NAT derived from the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (PDB accession code 1E2T) was resolved and revealed an active site catalytic triad composed of Cys(69)-His(107)-Asp(122). These residues have been shown to be conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic NAT homologues together with three highly conserved regions which are found proximal to the active site triad. The characterization of prokaryotic NATs and NAT-like enzymes is reported. It is also predicted that prokaryotic NATs, based on gene cluster composition and distribution amongst genomes, participate in the metabolism of xenobiotics derived from decomposition of organic materials. PMID:11320117

  9. Identification of cancer chemopreventive isothiocyanates as direct inhibitors of the arylamine N-acetyltransferase-dependent acetylation and bioactivation of aromatic amine carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Bui, Linh-Chi; Mathieu, Cécile; Petit, Emile; Cariou, Kevin; Dodd, Robert H.; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic amines (AAs) are chemicals of industrial, pharmacological and environmental relevance. Certain AAs, such as 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), are human carcinogens that require enzymatic metabolic activation to reactive chemicals to form genotoxic DNA adducts. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME) that play a major role in this carcinogenic bioactivation process. Isothiocyanates (ITCs), including benzyl-ITC (BITC) and phenethyl-ITC (PEITC), are phytochemicals known to have chemopreventive activity against several aromatic carcinogens. In particular, ITCs have been shown to modify the bioactivation and subsequent mutagenicity of carcinogenic AA chemicals such as 4-ABP. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which these phytochemicals may modulate AA carcinogens bioactivation and AA-DNA damage remains poorly understood. This manuscript provides evidence indicating that ITCs can decrease the metabolic activation of carcinogenic AAs via the irreversible inhibition of NAT enzymes and subsequent alteration of the acetylation of AAs. We demonstrate that BITC and PEITC react with NAT1 and inhibit readily its acetyltransferase activity (ki = 200 M−1.s−1 and 66 M−1.s−1 for BITC and PEITC, respectively). Chemical labeling, docking approaches and substrate protection assays indicated that inhibition of the acetylation of AAs by NAT1 was due to the chemical modification of the enzyme active site cysteine. Moreover, analyses of AAs acetylation and DNA adducts in cells showed that BITC was able to modulate the endogenous acetylation and bioactivation of 4-ABP. In conclusion, we show that direct inhibition of NAT enzymes may be an important mechanism by which ITCs exert their chemopreventive activity towards AA chemicals. PMID:26840026

  10. Identification of cancer chemopreventive isothiocyanates as direct inhibitors of the arylamine N-acetyltransferase-dependent acetylation and bioactivation of aromatic amine carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Bui, Linh-Chi; Mathieu, Cécile; Petit, Emile; Cariou, Kevin; Dodd, Robert H; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-02-23

    Aromatic amines (AAs) are chemicals of industrial, pharmacological and environmental relevance. Certain AAs, such as 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), are human carcinogens that require enzymatic metabolic activation to reactive chemicals to form genotoxic DNA adducts. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME) that play a major role in this carcinogenic bioactivation process. Isothiocyanates (ITCs), including benzyl-ITC (BITC) and phenethyl-ITC (PEITC), are phytochemicals known to have chemopreventive activity against several aromatic carcinogens. In particular, ITCs have been shown to modify the bioactivation and subsequent mutagenicity of carcinogenic AA chemicals such as 4-ABP. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which these phytochemicals may modulate AA carcinogens bioactivation and AA-DNA damage remains poorly understood.This manuscript provides evidence indicating that ITCs can decrease the metabolic activation of carcinogenic AAs via the irreversible inhibition of NAT enzymes and subsequent alteration of the acetylation of AAs. We demonstrate that BITC and PEITC react with NAT1 and inhibit readily its acetyltransferase activity (ki = 200 M-1.s-1 and 66 M-1.s-1 for BITC and PEITC, respectively). Chemical labeling, docking approaches and substrate protection assays indicated that inhibition of the acetylation of AAs by NAT1 was due to the chemical modification of the enzyme active site cysteine. Moreover, analyses of AAs acetylation and DNA adducts in cells showed that BITC was able to modulate the endogenous acetylation and bioactivation of 4-ABP. In conclusion, we show that direct inhibition of NAT enzymes may be an important mechanism by which ITCs exert their chemopreventive activity towards AA chemicals. PMID:26840026

  11. Cadmium Alters the Biotransformation of Carcinogenic Aromatic Amines by Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes: Molecular, Cellular, and in Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Nilusha; Dairou, Julien; Sanfins, Elodie; Busi, Florent; Noll, Christophe; Janel, Nathalie; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic heavy metal of environmental concern. Exposure to both Cd and carcinogenic organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or aromatic amines (AAs), is a common environmental problem. Human arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that play a key role in the biotransformation of AA carcinogens. Changes in NAT activity have long been associated with variations in susceptibility to different cancers in relation with exposure to certain AAs. Objective We explored the possible interactions between Cd and the NAT-dependent biotransformation of carcinogenic AAs. Methods We exposed purified enzymes, lung epithelial cells, and mouse models to Cd and subsequently analyzed NAT-dependent metabolism of AAs. Results We found that Cd, at biologically relevant concentrations, impairs the NAT-dependent acetylation of carcinogenic AAs such as 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) in lung epithelial cells. NAT activity was strongly impaired in the tissues of mice exposed to Cd. Accordingly, mice exposed to Cd and 2-AF displayed altered in vivo toxicokinetics with a significant decrease (~ 50%) in acetylated 2-AF in plasma. We found that human NAT1 was rapidly and irreversibly inhibited by Cd [median inhibitory concentration (IC50) ≈ 55 nM; rate inhibition constant (kinact) = 5 × 104 M−1 · sec−1], with results of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) protection assays indicating that Cd-mediated inhibition was due to the reaction of metal with the active-site cysteine residue of the enzyme. We found similar results for human NAT2, although this isoform was less sensitive to inactivation (IC50 ≈ 1 μM; kinact = 1 × 104 M−1 · sec−1). Conclusions Our data suggest that Cd can alter the metabolism of carcinogenic AAs through the impairment of the NAT-dependent pathway, which may have important toxicological consequences. PMID:20810355

  12. 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate and the S-adenosylmethionine cycle in C57BL/6J mouse tissues: gender differences and effects of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 deletion.

    PubMed

    Witham, Katey L; Butcher, Neville J; Sugamori, Kim S; Brenneman, Debbie; Grant, Denis M; Minchin, Rodney F

    2013-01-01

    Folate catabolism involves cleavage of the C(9)-N(10) bond to form p-aminobenzoylgluamate (PABG) and pterin. PABG is then acetylated by human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) before excretion in the urine. Mice null for the murine NAT1 homolog (Nat2) show several phenotypes consistent with altered folate homeostasis. However, the exact role of Nat2 in the folate pathway in vivo has not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of Nat2 deletion in male and female mice on the tissue levels of 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate and the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. We found significant gender differences in hepatic and renal homocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine and methionine levels consistent with a more active methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle in female tissues. In addition, methionine levels were significantly higher in female liver and kidney. PABG was higher in female liver tissue but lower in kidney compared to male tissues. In addition, qPCR of mRNA extracted from liver tissue suggested a significantly lower level of Nat2 expression in female animals. Deletion of Nat2 affected liver 5- methyl-tetrahydrofolate in female mice but had little effect on other components of the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. No N-acetyl-PABG was observed in any tissues in Nat2 null mice, consistent with the role of Nat2 in PABG acetylation. Surprisingly, tissue PABG levels were similar between wild type and Nat2 null mice. These results show that Nat2 is not required to maintain tissue PABG homeostasis in vivo under normal conditions. PMID:24205029

  13. 5-Methyl-Tetrahydrofolate and the S-Adenosylmethionine Cycle in C57BL/6J Mouse Tissues: Gender Differences and Effects of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase-1 Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Katey L.; Butcher, Neville J.; Sugamori, Kim S.; Brenneman, Debbie; Grant, Denis M.; Minchin, Rodney F.

    2013-01-01

    Folate catabolism involves cleavage of the C9-N10 bond to form p-aminobenzoylgluamate (PABG) and pterin. PABG is then acetylated by human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) before excretion in the urine. Mice null for the murine NAT1 homolog (Nat2) show several phenotypes consistent with altered folate homeostasis. However, the exact role of Nat2 in the folate pathway in vivo has not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of Nat2 deletion in male and female mice on the tissue levels of 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate and the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. We found significant gender differences in hepatic and renal homocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine and methionine levels consistent with a more active methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle in female tissues. In addition, methionine levels were significantly higher in female liver and kidney. PABG was higher in female liver tissue but lower in kidney compared to male tissues. In addition, qPCR of mRNA extracted from liver tissue suggested a significantly lower level of Nat2 expression in female animals. Deletion of Nat2 affected liver 5- methyl-tetrahydrofolate in female mice but had little effect on other components of the methionine-S-adenosylmethionine cycle. No N-acetyl-PABG was observed in any tissues in Nat2 null mice, consistent with the role of Nat2 in PABG acetylation. Surprisingly, tissue PABG levels were similar between wild type and Nat2 null mice. These results show that Nat2 is not required to maintain tissue PABG homeostasis in vivo under normal conditions. PMID:24205029

  14. Paradoxical attenuation of autoimmune hepatitis by oral isoniazid in wild-type and N-acetyltransferase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Vega, Libia; Grant, Denis M; Uetrecht, Jack

    2014-06-01

    Isoniazid (INH) treatment can cause serious liver injury and autoimmunity. There are now several lines of evidence that INH-induced liver injury is immune mediated, but this type of liver injury has not been reproduced in animals, possibly because immune tolerance is the dominant response of the liver. In this study, we immunized mice with isonicotinic acid (INA)-modified proteins and Freund's adjuvant, which led to mild experimental autoimmune hepatitis (EAH) with an increase in cells staining positive for F4/80, CD11b, CD8, CD4, CD45R, and KI67. We expected that subsequent treatment of mice with oral INH would lead to more serious immune-mediated liver injury, but paradoxically it markedly attenuated the EAH caused by immunization with INA-modified hepatic proteins. In addition, patients of the slow acetylator phenotype are at increased risk of INH-induced liver injury. Treatment of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-deficient Nat1/2(-/-) mice with INH for up to 5 weeks produced mild increases in glutamate and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities, but not severe liver injury. Female Nat1/2(-/-) mice treated with INH for 1, 3, or 7 days developed steatosis, an increase in Oil Red O staining, and abnormal mitochondrial morphology in the liver. A decrease in M1 and an increase in M2a and M2b macrophages was observed in female Nat1/2(-/-) mice treated with INH for 1, 3, or 7 days; these changes returned to baseline levels by day 35. These data indicate that INH has immunosuppressive effects, even though it is also known to induce autoantibody production and a lupus-like autoimmune syndrome in humans. PMID:24623063

  15. NATb/NAT1*4 promotes greater arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 mediated DNA adducts and mutations than NATa/NAT1*4 following exposure to 4-aminobiphenyl

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Lori M.; Doll, Mark A.; Cai, Jian; States, J. Christopher; Hein, David W.

    2011-01-01

    N -acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) is a phase II metabolic enzyme responsible for the biotransformation of aromatic and heterocyclic amine carcinogens such as 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP). NAT1 catalyzes N-acetylation of arylamines as well as the O-acetylation of N-hydroxylated arylamines. O-acetylation leads to the formation of electrophilic intermediates that result in DNA adducts and mutations. NAT1 is transcribed from a major promoter, NATb, and an alternative promoter, NATa, resulting in mRNAs with distinct 5′-untranslated regions (UTR). NATa mRNA is expressed primarily in the kidney, liver, trachea and lung while NATb mRNA has been detected in all tissues studied. To determine if differences in 5′-UTR have functional effect upon NAT1 activity and DNA adducts or mutations following exposure to ABP, pcDNA5/FRT plasmid constructs were prepared for transfection of full length human mRNAs including the 5′-UTR derived from NATa or NATb, the open reading frame, and 888 nucleotides of the 3′-UTR. Following stable transfection of NATb/NAT1*4 or NATa/NAT1*4 into nucleotide excision repair (NER) deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, N-acetyltransferase activity (in vitro and in situ), mRNA, and protein expression were higher in NATb/NAT1*4 than NATa/NAT1*4 transfected cells (p<0.05). Consistent with NAT1 expression and activity, ABP-induced DNA adducts and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutants were significantly higher (p<0.05) in NATb/NAT1*4 than in NATa/NAT1*4 transfected cells following exposure to ABP. These differences observed between NATa and NATb suggest that the 5′-UTRs are differentially regulated. PMID:21837760

  16. Homology modelling and structural analysis of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase NAT1: evidence for the conservation of a cysteine protease catalytic domain and an active-site loop.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Lima, F; Deloménie, C; Goodfellow, G H; Grant, D M; Dupret, J M

    2001-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (EC 2.3.1.5) (NATs) catalyse the biotransformation of many primary arylamines, hydrazines and their N-hydroxylated metabolites, thereby playing an important role in both the detoxification and metabolic activation of numerous xenobiotics. The recently published crystal structure of the Salmonella typhimurium NAT (StNAT) revealed the existence of a cysteine protease-like (Cys-His-Asp) catalytic triad. In the present study, a three-dimensional homology model of human NAT1, based upon the crystal structure of StNAT [Sinclair, Sandy, Delgoda, Sim and Noble (2000) Nat. Struct. Biol. 7, 560-564], is demonstrated. Alignment of StNAT and NAT1, together with secondary structure predictions, have defined a consensus region (residues 29-131) in which 37% of the residues are conserved. Homology modelling provided a good quality model of the corresponding region in human NAT1. The location of the catalytic triad was found to be identical in StNAT and NAT1. Comparison of active-site structural elements revealed that a similar length loop is conserved in both species (residues 122-131 in NAT1 model and residues 122-133 in StNAT). This observation may explain the involvement of residues 125, 127 and 129 in human NAT substrate selectivity. Our model, and the fact that cysteine protease inhibitors do not affect the activity of NAT1, suggests that human NATs may have adapted a common catalytic mechanism from cysteine proteases to accommodate it for acetyl-transfer reactions. PMID:11368758

  17. Combined effect of smoking and inherited polymorphisms in arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2, glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 on bladder cancer in a Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Marrakchi, Raja; Ben Slama, Mohamed R; Sfaxi, Mohamed; Ayed, Mohsen; Chebil, Mohamed; El Gaaied, Amel Benammar

    2009-04-15

    Cigarette smoking is the predominant risk factor for bladder cancer in males and females. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). Polymorphisms in NAT and GST genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens. We have conducted this case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, and GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. In all groups of patients, we have shown that GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotype, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk of bladder (OR=7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). Furthermore, we found that NAT2 slow acetylator individuals temporarily carrying wild-type GSTT1 or GSTM1 null genotypes have a strong increased risk of bladder cancer (OR= 26 and 22.17, respectively). This cumulative effect was estimated at 12 for smokers harboring slow or an intermediate NAT2, GSTM1 null, and wild-type GSTT1 genotypes compared to non-smokers carrying rapid NAT2, wild-type GSTM,1 and GSTT1 null genotypes (p=0.02; OR=12; CI 95% 1-323.76). PMID:19380028

  18. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib by zinc: reversal of amikacin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli by a zinc ionophore.

    PubMed

    Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Alam, Jamal Y; Herron, Steven R; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2014-07-01

    In vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by ZnCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 15 μM. Growth of Acinetobacter baumannii or Escherichia coli harboring aac(6')-Ib in cultures containing 8 μg/ml amikacin was significantly inhibited by the addition of 2 μM Zn(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione (ZnPT). PMID:24820083

  19. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-mediated amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by zinc and copper pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A; Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  20. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib-Mediated Amikacin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Zinc and Copper Pyrithione

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A.; Lin, David L.; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn2+ or Cu2+ in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  1. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified...

  2. Sanfilippo syndrome type C: mutation spectrum in the heparan sulfate acetyl-CoA: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT) gene.

    PubMed

    Feldhammer, Matthew; Durand, Stéphanie; Mrázová, Lenka; Boucher, Renée-Myriam; Laframboise, Rachel; Steinfeld, Robert; Wraith, James E; Michelakakis, Helen; van Diggelen, Otto P; Hrebícek, Martin; Kmoch, Stanislav; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2009-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIC or Sanfilippo syndrome type C is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal membrane enzyme, heparan sulfate acetyl-CoA (AcCoA): alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT; EC 2.3.1.78), which catalyzes transmembrane acetylation of the terminal glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate prior to their hydrolysis by alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Lysosomal storage of undegraded heparan sulfate in the cells of affected patients leads to neuronal death, causing neurodegeneration and severely impaired development accompanied by mild visceral and skeletal abnormalities, including mild dwarfism, coarse facies, and joint stiffness. To date, 50 HGSNAT mutations have been identified in MPS IIIC patients: 40 were previously published and 10 novel mutations are reported here. The mutations span the entire structure of the gene and include 13 splice-site mutations, 11 insertions and deletions, 8 nonsense mutations, and 18 missense mutations (http://chromium.liacs.nl/LOVD2/home.php?select_db=HGSNAT). In addition, four polymorphisms result in amino acid changes that do not affect activity of the enzyme. In this work we discuss the spectrum of MPS IIIC mutations, their clinical presentation and distribution within the patient population, and speculate how the mutations may affect the structure and function of HGSNAT. PMID:19479962

  3. Comparative genomic survey of microbial arylamine N-acetyltransferases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Microorganisms are constantly exposed to exogenous chemical influences. Our previous genomic surveys have identified putative NAT genes across a phylogenetic spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. We are currently pursuing two lines of investigation: The first looks int...

  4. Non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa due to mutations in the mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC gene, heparan-alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT)

    PubMed Central

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Newman, Hadas; Leibu, Rina; Bax, Nathalie M.; Baris, Hagit N; Rizel, Leah; Banin, Eyal; Massarweh, Amir; Roosing, Susanne; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N.; Isakov, Ofer; Shomron, Noam; Sharon, Dror; Den Hollander, Anneke I.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most common form of inherited retinal degeneration, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and can appear as syndromic or non-syndromic. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPS IIIC) is a lethal disorder, caused by mutations in the heparan-alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT) gene and characterized by progressive neurological deterioration, with retinal degeneration as a prominent feature. We identified HGSNAT mutations in six patients with non-syndromic RP. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in an Ashkenazi Jewish Israeli RP patient revealed a novel homozygous HGSNAT variant, c.370A>T, which leads to partial skipping of exon 3. Screening of 66 Ashkenazi RP index cases revealed an additional family with two siblings homozygous for c.370A>T. WES in three Dutch siblings with RP revealed a complex HGSNAT variant, c.[398G>C; 1843G>A] on one allele, and c.1843G>A on the other allele. HGSNAT activity levels in blood leukocytes of patients were reduced compared with healthy controls, but usually higher than those in MPS IIIC patients. All patients were diagnosed with non-syndromic RP and did not exhibit neurological deterioration, or any phenotypic features consistent with MPS IIIC. Furthermore, four of the patients were over 60 years old, exceeding by far the life expectancy of MPS IIIC patients. HGSNAT is highly expressed in the mouse retina, and we hypothesize that the retina requires higher HGSNAT activity to maintain proper function, compared with other tissues associated with MPS IIIC, such as the brain. This report broadens the spectrum of phenotypes associated with HGSNAT mutations and highlights the critical function of HGSNAT in the human retina. PMID:25859010

  5. Identification and validation of N-acetyltransferase 2 as an insulin sensitivity gene.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Joshua W; Xie, Weijia; Zhang, Zhongyang; Chennamsetty, Indumathi; Chennemsetty, Indumathi; Assimes, Themistocles L; Paananen, Jussi; Hansson, Ola; Pankow, James; Goodarzi, Mark O; Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Morris, Andrew P; Chen, Yii-Der I; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Ganna, Andrea; Mahajan, Anubha; Guo, Xiuqing; Abbasi, Fahim; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Lum, Pek; Molony, Cliona; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Raffel, Leslie J; Tsao, Philip S; Schadt, Eric E; Rotter, Jerome I; Sinaiko, Alan; Reaven, Gerald; Yang, Xia; Hsiung, Chao A; Groop, Leif; Cordell, Heather J; Laakso, Markku; Hao, Ke; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Timothy M; Weedon, Michael N; Walker, Mark; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Decreased insulin sensitivity, also referred to as insulin resistance (IR), is a fundamental abnormality in patients with type 2 diabetes and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While IR predisposition is heritable, the genetic basis remains largely unknown. The GENEticS of Insulin Sensitivity consortium conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for direct measures of insulin sensitivity, such as euglycemic clamp or insulin suppression test, in 2,764 European individuals, with replication in an additional 2,860 individuals. The presence of a nonsynonymous variant of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) [rs1208 (803A>G, K268R)] was strongly associated with decreased insulin sensitivity that was independent of BMI. The rs1208 "A" allele was nominally associated with IR-related traits, including increased fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C, total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and coronary artery disease. NAT2 acetylates arylamine and hydrazine drugs and carcinogens, but predicted acetylator NAT2 phenotypes were not associated with insulin sensitivity. In a murine adipocyte cell line, silencing of NAT2 ortholog Nat1 decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake, increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, and decreased adipocyte differentiation, while Nat1 overexpression produced opposite effects. Nat1-deficient mice had elevations in fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides and decreased insulin sensitivity, as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, with intermediate effects in Nat1 heterozygote mice. Our results support a role for NAT2 in insulin sensitivity. PMID:25798622

  6. Effect of arylamine acetyltransferase Nat3 gene knockout on N-acetylation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sugamori, K S; Brenneman, D; Wong, S; Gaedigk, A; Yu, V; Abramovici, H; Rozmahel, R; Grant, D M

    2007-07-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) catalyze the biotransformation of many important arylamine drugs and procarcinogens. NAT can either detoxify or activate procarcinogens, complicating the manner in which these enzymes may participate in enhancing or preventing toxic responses to particular agents. Mice possess three NAT isoenzymes: Nat1, Nat2, and Nat3. Whereas Nat1 and Nat2 can efficiently acetylate many arylamines, few substrates appear to be appreciably metabolized by Nat3. We generated a Nat3 knockout mouse strain and used it along with our double Nat1/2(-/-) knockout strain to further investigate the functional role of Nat3. Nat3(-/-) mice showed normal viability and reproductive capacity. Nat3 expression was very low in wild-type animals and completely undetectable in Nat3(-/-) mice. In contrast, greatly elevated expression of Nat3 transcript was observed in Nat1/2(-/-) mice. We used a transcribed marker polymorphism approach to establish that the increased expression of Nat3 in Nat1/2(-/-) mice is a positional artifact of insertion of the phosphoglycerate kinase-neomycin resistance cassette in place of the Nat1/Nat2 gene region and upstream of the intact Nat3 gene, rather than a biological compensatory mechanism. Despite the increase in Nat3 transcript, the N-acetylation of p-aminosalicylate, sulfamethazine, 2-aminofluorene, and 4-aminobiphenyl was undetectable either in vivo or in vitro in Nat1/2(-/-) animals. In parallel, no difference was observed in the in vivo clearance or in vitro metabolism of any of these substrates between wild-type and Nat3(-/-) mice. Thus, Nat3 is unlikely to play a significant role in the N-acetylation of arylamines either in wild-type mice or in mice lacking Nat1 and Nat2 activities. PMID:17403913

  7. Genetic polymorphism in N-Acetyltransferase (NAT): Population distribution of NAT1 and NAT2 activity.

    PubMed

    Walker, Katy; Ginsberg, Gary; Hattis, Dale; Johns, Douglas O; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2009-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferases (NAT) are key enzymes in the conjugation of certain drugs and other xenobiotics with an arylamine structure. Polymorphisms in NAT2 have long been recognized to modulate toxicity produced by the anti-tubercular drug isoniazid, with molecular epidemiologic studies suggesting a link between acetylator phenotype and increased risk for bladder cancer. Recent evidence indicates that the other major NAT isozyme, NAT1, is also polymorphic. The current analysis characterizes the main polymorphisms in both NAT2 and NAT1 in terms of their effect on enzyme activity and frequency in the population. Multiple NAT2 alleles (NAT2*5, *6, *7, and *14) have substantially decreased acetylation activity and are common in Caucasians and populations of African descent. In these groups, most individuals carry at least one copy of a slow acetylator allele, and less than 10% are homozygous for the wild type (fast acetylator) trait. Incorporation of these data into a Monte Carlo modeling framework led to a population distribution of NAT2 activity that was bimodal and associated with considerable variability in each population assessed. The ratio of the median to the first percentile of NAT2 activity ranged from 7 in Caucasians to 18 in the Chinese population. This variability indicates the need for more quantitative approaches (e.g., physiologically based pharmacokinetic [PBPK] modeling) to assess the full distribution of internal dose and adverse responses to aromatic amines and other NAT2 substrates. Polymorphisms in NAT1 are generally associated with relatively minor effects on acetylation function, with Monte Carlo analysis indicating less interindividual variability than seen in NAT2 analysis. PMID:20183529

  8. Polymorphisms of human N-acetyltransferases and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Agúndez, José A G

    2008-07-01

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferases (CoASAc; NAT, EC 2.3.1.5) NAT1 and NAT2 play a key role in the metabolism of drugs and environmental chemicals and in the metabolic activation and detoxification of procarcinogens. Phenotyping analyses have revealed an association between NAT enzyme activities and the risk of developing several forms of cancer. As genotyping procedures have become available for NAT1 and NAT2 gene variations, hundreds of association studies on NAT polymorphisms and cancer risk have been conducted. Here we review the findings obtained from these studies. Evidence for a putative association of NAT1 polymorphism and myeloma, lung and bladder cancer, as well as association of NAT2 polymorphisms with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, liver, colorectal and bladder cancer have been reported. In contrast, no consistent evidence for a relevant association of NAT polymorphisms with brain, head & neck, breast, gastric, pancreatic or prostate cancer have been described. Although preliminary data are available, further well-powered studies are required to fully elucidate the role of NAT1 in most human cancers, and that of NAT2 in astrocytoma, meningioma, esophageal, renal, cervical and testicular cancers, as well as in leukaemia and myeloma. This review discusses controversial findings on cancer risk and putative causes of heterogeneity in the proposed associations, and it identifies topics that require further investigation, particularly mechanisms underlying association of NAT polymorphisms and risk for subsets of cancer patients with specific exposures, putative epistatic contribution of polymorphism for other xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases of Cytochrome P450 enzymes, and genetic plus environmental interaction. PMID:18680472

  9. N-acetyltransferase 2 (Nat2) polymorphism in the sand rat Psammomys obesus.

    PubMed

    Khelil, Malika; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Tayebi, Bouchentouf

    2010-10-01

    Human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) and its homologue in rodents (Nat2) are polymorphic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and also seem to play a role in endogenous metabolism. NAT1 and Nat2 polymorphism was associated to cancers under xenobiotic procarcinogens metabolism as well as under endogenous substrate metabolism. This study investigated the p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) -Nat2 catalytic activity and its polymorphism in liver homogenates of adult sand rats Psammomys obesus Cretzschmar, 1828. These Saharian sand rats develop high incidence of spontaneous cancers under standard laboratory diet. The average value of PABA-Nat2 specific activity tested in nine sand rats was significant (2.96 ± 2.16 nmoles/min/mg). The N-acetylation exhibited a bimodal distribution. There was a significant difference (p<0.01) between PABA-Nat2 activity in the fast acetylators group (4.10 ± 1.67 nmol/min/mg) and slow acetylators group (0.7 ± 0.27 nmol/min/mg). The percentage of the fast acetylator group was 66.66%. These results support the presence of Nat2 polymorphism in the liver of the strain sand rats Psammomys obesus. This strain is useful for investigating the role of Nat2 polymorphisms in susceptibility to cancers related to arylamine carcinogen exposures as well as to endogenous substrate metabolism. PMID:20550432

  10. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases in mycotoxigenic and related fungi of agricultural significance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycotoxigenic fungi are of worldwide concern, as they contaminate crops and compromise food safety. Many of these fungi are also aggressive plant pathogens with devastating effects on maize, and wheat. The host plants possess a variety of defensive mechanisms against those fungi, including the produ...

  11. Structures and functions of insect arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (iaaNAT); a key enzyme for physiological and behavioral switch in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Mohamed, Ahmed A. M.; Takeda, Makio

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of N-acetyltransfeases (NATs) seems complex. Vertebrate arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT) has been extensively studied since it leads to the synthesis of melatonin, a multifunctional neurohormone prevalent in photoreceptor cells, and is known as a chemical token of the night. Melatonin also serves as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species. This is also true with invertebrates. NAT therefore has distinct functional implications in circadian function, as timezymes (aaNAT), and also xenobiotic reactions (arylamine NAT or simply NAT). NATs belong to a broader enzyme group, the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Due to low sequence homology and a seemingly fast rate of structural differentiation, the nomenclature for NATs can be confusing. The advent of bioinformatics, however, has helped to classify this group of enzymes; vertebrates have two distinct subgroups, the timezyme type and the xenobiotic type, which has a wider substrate range including imidazolamine, pharmacological drugs, environmental toxicants and even histone. Insect aaNAT (iaaNAT) form their own clade in the phylogeny, distinct from vertebrate aaNATs. Arthropods are unique, since the phylum has exoskeleton in which quinones derived from N-acetylated monoamines function in coupling chitin and arthropodins. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity is limited in insects, but NAT-mediated degradation prevails. However, unexpectedly iaaNAT occurs not only among arthropods but also among basal deuterostomia, and is therefore more apomorphic. Our analyses illustrate that iaaNATs has unique physiological roles but at the same time it plays a role in a timezyme function, at least in photoperiodism. Photoperiodism has been considered as a function of circadian system but the detailed molecular mechanism is not well understood. We propose a molecular hypothesis for photoperiodism in Antheraea pernyi based on the transcription regulation of NAT interlocked by the circadian system

  12. N-acetyltransferase polymorphisms are associated with risk of lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Pierluigi; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Sanna, Sonia; Satta, Giannina; Nonne, Tinucia; Angelucci, Emanuele; Gabbas, Attilio; Rais, Marco; Malpeli, Giorgio; Campagna, Marcello; Scarpa, Aldo; G Ennas, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Genes encoding for arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) have been investigated with alternate findings in relation to risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We tested functional haplotype-based NAT1 and NAT2 gene polymorphisms in relation to risk of lymphoma overall and its major B cell subtypes, diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We used allele specific primers and multiplex PCR to detect NAT1 and NAT2 haplotypes in 248 patients with incident lymphoma and 208 population controls. We inferred the NAT1 rapid and slow acetylator and the NAT2 rapid, intermediate or slow acetylator phenotype, based on published functional data on the respective genotypes. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for lymphoma, B-NHL, DLBCL, FL, CLL, and other B-NHL combined associated with the inferred rapid NAT1 acetylator and with the intermediate and slow NAT2 acetylator phenotypes were estimated with unconditional and polytomous logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, gender and education. NAT1 rapid acetylators showed a 2.8-fold excess risk (95% CI 1.5-5.2) for lymphoma (all subtypes combined). Risk was highest for CLL and FL, with significant heterogeneity detected across subtypes. Risk also increased with decreasing NAT2 acetylating capacity with no heterogeneity detected across B cell lymphoma subtypes. Risks did not vary by gender. Although poor statistical power was a major limitation in our study, larger studies and pooled analyses are warranted to test whether NAT1 and NAT2 gene polymorphisms might modulate risk of specific lymphoma subtypes through the varying metabolic activity of their products. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25689677

  13. Polymorphic acetylation of arylamines and DNA-adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Weber, W W; Levy, G N; Martell, K J

    1990-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains congenic for rapid and slow N-acetyltransferase (NAT) (A.B6, rapid and B6.A, slow) were used to separate the effect of the NAT polymorphism from the influence of other genetically polymorphic enzymes on DNA adduct formation induced by exposure to arylamine carcinogens. Adduct formation was measured by HPLC analysis of 32P-postlabeled nucleotides from DNA of the urinary bladder and liver. Acetylator phenotype was a significant determinant of DNA damage in females as slow acetylators had higher levels of bladder DNA adducts than rapids. This correlation was the reverse of that seen with liver DNA. Older mice (20-23 weeks) formed much higher bladder DNA adduct levels than young mice (7 week). The increase in bladder adduct formation with age was seen in both sexes of all mouse strains. The older male B6 mice showed a 26-fold increase in bladder adducts and the older females showed no more than a 2-fold increase. In addition, the older male B6 mice produced significant amounts of an unidentified, early eluting adduct peak. Biochemical studies of liver NAT and O-acetyltransferase (OAT) activities showed a direct correlation between the levels of liver 2-aminofluorene (AF) NAT activity and levels of liver DNA-adduct formation, but the role of OAT activity in adduct formation in the mouse remains unclear. These results indicate that the NAT phenotype, age and sex are all important determinants of arylamine-DNA adduct formation in mice. PMID:2134671

  14. New substrate analogues of human serotonin N-acetyltransferase produce in situ specific and potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Gilles; Ubeaud, Caroline; Mozo, Julien; Péan, Christophe; Hennig, Philippe; Rodriguez, Marianne; Scoul, Catherine; Bonnaud, Anne; Nosjean, Olivier; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Delagrange, Philippe; Renard, Pierre; Volland, Jean-Paul; Yous, Said; Lesieur, Daniel; Boutin, Jean A

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin is synthesized by an enzymatic pathway, in which arylalkylamine (serotonin) N-acetyltransferase catalyzes the rate-limiting step. A previous study reported the discovery of bromoacetyltryptamine (BAT), a new type of inhibitor of this enzyme. This compound is the precursor of a potent bifunctional inhibitor (analogue of the transition state), capable of interfering with both the substrate and the cosubstrate binding sites. This inhibitor is biosynthesized by the enzyme itself in the presence of free coenzyme A. In the present report, we describe the potency of new N-halogenoacetyl derivatives leading to a strong in situ inhibition of serotonin N-acetyltransferase. The new concept behind the mechanism of action of these precursors was studied by following the biosynthesis of the inhibitor from tritiated-BAT in a living cell. The fate of tritiated-phenylethylamine (PEA), a natural substrate of the enzyme, in the presence or absence of [(3)H]BAT was also followed, leading to their incorporation into the reaction product or the inhibitor (N-acetyl[(3)H]PEA and coenzyme A-S[(3)H]acetyltryptamine, respectively). The biosynthesis of this bifunctional inhibitor derived from BAT was also followed by nuclear magnetic resonance during its catalytic production by the pure enzyme. In a similar manner we studied the production of another inhibitor generated from N-[2-(7-hydroxynaphth-1-yl)ethyl]bromoacetamide. New derivatives were also screened for their capacity to inhibit a purified enzyme, in addition to enzyme overexpressed in a cellular model. Some of these compounds proved to be extremely potent, with IC(50)s of approximately 30 nM. As these compounds, by definition, closely resemble the natural substrates of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, we also show that they are potent ligands at the melatonin receptors. Nevertheless, these inhibitors form a series of pharmacological tools that could be used to understand more closely the inhibition of pineal melatonin

  15. AAC(3)-XI, a New Aminoglycoside 3-N-Acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum

    PubMed Central

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  16. AAC(3)-XI, a new aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum.

    PubMed

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Mobashery, Shahriar; Courvalin, Patrice

    2015-09-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  17. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Eleni P.; Kontomina, Evanthia; Davis, Britton; Kotseli, Barbara; Tsirka, Theodora; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Sim, Edith; Glenn, Anthony E.; Boukouvala, Sotiria

    2015-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified in Fusarium infecting cereal plants as responsible for detoxification of host defence compound 2-benzoxazolinone. Here we investigate functional diversification of NAT enzymes in crop-compromising species of Fusarium and Aspergillus, identifying three groups of homologues: Isoenzymes of the first group are found in all species and catalyse reactions with acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA. The second group is restricted to the plant pathogens and is active with malonyl-CoA in Fusarium species infecting cereals. The third group generates minimal activity with acyl-CoA compounds that bind non-selectively to the proteins. We propose that fungal NAT isoenzymes may have evolved to perform diverse functions, potentially relevant to pathogen fitness, acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA intracellular balance and secondary metabolism. PMID:26245863

  18. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Eleni P; Kontomina, Evanthia; Davis, Britton; Kotseli, Barbara; Tsirka, Theodora; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Sim, Edith; Glenn, Anthony E; Boukouvala, Sotiria

    2015-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified in Fusarium infecting cereal plants as responsible for detoxification of host defence compound 2-benzoxazolinone. Here we investigate functional diversification of NAT enzymes in crop-compromising species of Fusarium and Aspergillus, identifying three groups of homologues: Isoenzymes of the first group are found in all species and catalyse reactions with acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA. The second group is restricted to the plant pathogens and is active with malonyl-CoA in Fusarium species infecting cereals. The third group generates minimal activity with acyl-CoA compounds that bind non-selectively to the proteins. We propose that fungal NAT isoenzymes may have evolved to perform diverse functions, potentially relevant to pathogen fitness, acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA intracellular balance and secondary metabolism. PMID:26245863

  19. [The biological role of prokaryotic and eukaryotic N-acetyltransferase].

    PubMed

    Zabost, Anna; Zwolska, Zofia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    The N-acetyltransferases (NAT; E.C.2.3.1.5) are involved in the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins. They catalyse the acetyl transfer from acetyl coenzyme A to an aromatic amine, heterocyclic amine, or hydrazine compound. NAT homologues are present in numerous species from bacteria to human. Sequence variations in the human NAT1 and NAT2 result in the production of NAT proteins with variable enzyme activity or stability, leading to slow or rapid acetylation. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms in NAT1 and NAT2 influence drug metabolism and drug-related toxicity. Epidemiological studies suggest that the NAT1 and NAT2 acetylation polymorphisms modify the risk of developing cancers of the urinary bladder, colorectal, breast, head and neck, and lung. PMID:23420430

  20. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%). PMID:17879084

  1. N-acetyltransferase 2 activity and folate levels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wen; Strnatka, Diana; McQueen, Charlene A.; Hunter, Robert J.; Erickson, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To determine whether increased N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity might have a toxic effect during development and an influence on folate levels since previous work has shown that only low levels of exogenous NAT can be achieved in constitutionally transgenic mice (Cao, et al, 2005) Main Methods A human NAT1 tet-inducible construct was used that would not be expressed until the inducer was delivered. Human NAT1 cDNA was cloned into pTRE2 and injected into mouse oocytes. Two transgenic lines were crossed to mouse line TgN(rtTahCMV)4Uh containing the CMV promoted “teton.”Measurements of red blood cell folate levels in inbred strains of mice were performed. Key findings Only low levels of human NAT1 could be achieved in kidney (highly responsive in other studies) whether the inducer, doxycycline, was given by gavage or in drinking water.An inverse correlation of folate levels with Nat2 enzyme activity was found. Significance Since increasing NAT1 activity decrease folate in at least one tissue, the detrimental effect of expression of human NAT1 in combination with endogenous mouse Nat2 may be a consequence of increased catabolism of folate. PMID:19932120

  2. Structural Studies on a Glucosamine/Glucosaminide N-Acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Dopkins, Brandon J; Tipton, Peter A; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2016-08-16

    Glucosamine/glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase or GlmA catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl CoA to the primary amino group of glucosamine. The enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum is thought to be involved in cell wall rescue. In addition to glucosamine, GlmA has been shown to function on di- and trisaccharides of glucosamine as well. Here we present a structural and kinetic analysis of the enzyme. For this investigation, eight structures were determined to resolutions of 2.0 Å or better. The overall three-dimensional fold of GlmA places it into the tandem GNAT superfamily. Each subunit of the dimer folds into two distinct domains which exhibit high three-dimensional structural similarity. Whereas both domains bind acetyl CoA, it is the C-terminal domain that is catalytically competent. On the basis of the various structures determined in this investigation, two amino acid residues were targeted for further study: Asp 287 and Tyr 297. Although their positions in the active site suggested that they may play key roles in catalysis by functioning as active site bases and acids, respectively, this was not borne out by characterization of the D287N and Y297F variants. The kinetic properties revealed that both residues were important for substrate binding but had no critical roles as acid/base catalysts. Kinetic analyses also indicated that GlmA follows an ordered mechanism with acetyl CoA binding first followed by glucosamine. The product N-acetylglucosamine is then released prior to CoA. The investigation described herein provides significantly new information on enzymes belonging to the tandem GNAT superfamily. PMID:27348258

  3. Characterization and transcriptional regulation of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Orosz, E; Shaw, K J; Hare, R; Miller, G

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned the chromosomally encoded 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene [aac(2')-Ia] from Providencia stuartii. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned insert identified a single open reading frame, which is capable of encoding a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20,073 Da. The deduced AAC(2')-Ia protein showed no significant homology to other proteins, including all of the AAC(3) and AAC(6') proteins. Primer extension analysis was used to identify the aac(2')-Ia promoter, which contained an unusual sequence (CTTTTT) at the -35 region. Expression of the aac(2')-Ia gene occurs at low levels in wild-type P. stuartii strains; therefore, they are aminoglycoside susceptible. We have isolated mutants with high-level AAC(2')-Ia expression at a frequency of 4.8 x 10(-6). Detailed analysis of one mutant demonstrated a 12.2-fold increase in the accumulation of aac(2')-Ia mRNA. In addition, the levels of beta-galactosidase expression from a plasmid-encoded aac(2')-lacZ transcriptional fusion were increased 11.5-fold in this mutant relative to those in an isogenic wild-type strain. These results suggested that a trans-acting factor, designated aar (for aminoglycoside acetyltransferase regulator), controls AAC(2')-Ia expression in P. stuartii. Images PMID:8407825

  4. Genetic Variation at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) Genes in Global Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functional variability at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) genes is associated with adverse drug reactions and cancer susceptibility in humans. Previous studies of small sets of ethnic groups have indicated that the NAT genes have high levels of amino acid variation that differ in f...

  5. Entrainment of the circadian rhythm in the rat pineal N-acetyltransferase activity by prolonged periods of light.

    PubMed

    Illnerová, H; Vanĕcek, J

    1987-08-01

    Entertainment of the circadian rhythm in the pineal N-acetyltranferase activity by prolonged periods of light was studied in rats synchronized with a light:dark regime of 12:12 h by observing phase-shifts in rhythm after delays in switching off the light in the evening or after bringing forward of the morning onset of light. When rats were subjected to delays in switching off the light of up to 10 h and then were released into darkness, phase-delays of the evening N-acetyltransferase rise during the same night corresponded roughly to delays in the light switch off. However, phase-delays of the morning decline were much smaller. After a delay in the evening switch off of 11 h, no N-acetyltransferase rhythm was found in the subsequent darkness. The evening N-acetyltransferase rise was phase-delayed by 6.2 h at most 1 day after delays. Phase-delays of the morning N-acetyltransferase decline were shorter than phase-delays of the N-acetyltransferase rise by only 0.7 h to 0.9 h at most. Hence, 1 day after delays in the evening switch off, the period of the high night N-acetyltransferase activity may be shortened only slightly. The N-acetyltransferase rhythm was abolished only after a 12 h delay in switching off the light. Rats were subjected to a bringing forward of the morning light onset and then were released into darkness 4 h before the usual switch off of light. In the following night, the morning N-acetyltransferase decline, but not the evening rise, was phase advanced considerably. Moreover, when the onset of light was brought forward to before midnight, the N-acetyltransferase rise was even phase-delayed. Hence, 1 day after bringing forward the morning onset of light, the period of the high night N-acetyltransferase activity may be drastically reduced. When rats were subjected to a 4 h light pulse around midnight and then released into darkness, the N-acetyltransferase rhythm in the next night was abolished. The data are discussed in terms of a two

  6. Acetyl transfer in arylamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. N-Hydroxyacetamidoaryl compounds (hydroxamic acids) are metabolites of arylamides, and an enzyme that transfers the acetyl group from these derivatives to arylamines has been found in rat tissues. The reaction products were identified by thin-layer chromatography and a spectrophotometric method, with 4-amino-azobenzene as acetyl acceptor, was used to measure enzyme activity. 2. The acetyltransferase was in the soluble fraction of rat liver, required a thiol for maximum activity and had a pH optimum between 6·0 and 7·5. 3. The soluble fractions of various rat tissues showed decreasing activity in the following order: liver, adrenal, kidney, lung, spleen, testis, heart; brain was inactive. 4. With the exception of aniline and aniline derivatives all the arylamines tested were effective as acetyl acceptors but aromatic compounds with side-chain amino groups were inactive. 5. The N-hydroxyacetamido derivatives of 2-naphthylamine, 4-amino-biphenyl and 2-aminofluorene were active acetyl donors but N-hydroxyacetanilide showed only slight activity. Acetyl-CoA was not a donor. 6. Some properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other acetyltransferases. PMID:5969287

  7. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  8. Mechanism of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:..cap alpha..-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase is a lysosomal membrane enzyme, deficient in the genetic disease Sanfilippo C syndrome. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA to terminal ..cap alpha..-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate within the organelle. The reaction mechanism was examined using high purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver and human fibroblasts. The N-acetyltransferase reaction is optimal above pH 5.5 and a 2-3 fold stimulation of activity is observed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. The binding of acetyl-CoA to the enzyme is measured by exchange label from (/sup 3/H)CoA to acetyl-CoA, and is optimal at pH's above 7.0. The acetyl-enzyme intermediate is formed by incubating membranes with (/sup 3/H)acetyl-CoA. The acetyl group can be transferred to glucosamine, forming (/sup 3/H)N-acetylglucosamine; the transfer is optimal between pH 4 and 5. Lysosomal membranes from Sanfilippo C fibroblasts confirm that these half reactions carried out by the N-acetyltransferase. The enzyme is inactivated by N-bromosuccinimide and diethylpyrocarbonate, indicating that a histidine is involved in the reaction. These results suggest that the histidine residue is at the active site of the enzyme. The properties of the N-acetyltransferase in the membrane, the characterization of the enzyme kinetics, the chemistry of a histidine mediated acetylation and the pH difference across the lysosomal membrane all support a transmembrane acetylation mechanism.

  9. Urinary acetylated metabolites and N-acetyltransferase-2 genotype in human subjects treated with a para-phenylenediamine-containing oxidative hair dye.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Skare, Julie A; Meuling, Wim J A; Hein, David W; De Bie, Albert Th H J; Toutain, Herve

    2004-11-01

    In the organism of mammals, important detoxification pathways of arylamines are catalysed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). A recent case-control epidemiology study suggested that human NAT2 slow acetylators exposed to oxidative hair dyes may be at greater risk to develop bladder cancer. We therefore profiled urinary [(14)C]-metabolites and NAT2 genotype in eight human subjects following treatment with a dark-shade oxidative hair dye containing [(14)C]-para-phenylenediamine (PPD). Genotyping identified three subjects as slow, and five subjects as intermediate NAT2 acetylators. Within 24 h after treatment, the study subjects excreted a mean total of 0.43+/-0.24% of the applied [(14)C] in the urine, where five different metabolites were found. The major urinary metabolites were concluded to be N-mono-acetylated and N,N'-diacetylated PPD. They were present in all urine samples and amounted to 80-95% of the total urinary [(14)C]. Another metabolite, possibly a glucuronic acid conjugate, was found in 6/8 urine samples at 5-13% of the total urinary [(14)C]. All metabolites appeared to be related to PPD, no evidence of the presence of high-molecular weight dye-intermediates or corresponding metabolites was found. The metabolite profile in the study subjects showed no significant differences between the NAT2 intermediate and NAT2 slow acetylator subgroups. Urine of NAT2 slow acetylators contained N-mono-acetylated-PPD at 42.2+/-10.2% and N,N'-di-acetylated-PPD at 54.1+/-7.6% of total urinary radioactivity, while the corresponding values of intermediate acetylators were 46.0+/-8.9% and 45.7+/-9.9%, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that the human acetylation rate of PPD after topical application is independent of the NAT2 genotype status, most likely due to metabolism by epidermal NAT1 prior to systemic absorption. PMID:15350687

  10. Carcinogenicity, allergenicity, and lupus-inducibility of arylamines.

    PubMed

    Chung, King-Thom

    2016-01-01

    Arylamines are widely used in food, drugs, and cosmetics as well as other industries. These chemicals are present ubiquitously in cigarette smoke, smoke emitted from cooking fume hoods as well as are generated by diverse industries. Arylamines can be generated by cleavage of azo dyes by intestinal and skin microbiota. Some arylamines are used as drugs while others are constituents of human metabolism. Many of the arylamines are mutagenic and carcinogenic. They are generally recognized as the major cause of human bladder cancer, but arylamines can induce cancers of other organs in humans and animals. Some arylamines are allergenic, causing lupus like syndrome, or other maladies. In view of their unbiquitious nature and the diseases they cause, arylamines are probably the most important chemicals causing health problems. PMID:26709643

  11. Structure-based molecular design for thermostabilization of N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 involved in a novel pathway of L-arginine synthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nasuno, Ryo; Hirase, Saeka; Norifune, Saki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Previously, N-Acetyltransferase Mpr1 was suggested to be involved in a novel pathway of L-arginine biosynthesis in yeast. Our recent crystallographic analysis demonstrated that the overall structure of Mpr1 is a typical folding among proteins in the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, and also provided clues to the design of mutations for improvement of the enzymatic functions. Here, we constructed new stable variants, Asn203Lys- and Asn203Arg-Mpr1, which exhibited 2.4-fold and 2.2-fold longer activity half-lives than wild-type Mpr1, respectively, by structure-based molecular design. The replacement of Asn203 with a basic amino acid was suggested to stabilize α-helix 2, which is important for the Mpr1 structure, probably by neutralizing its dipole. In addition, the combination of two amino acid substitutions at positions 65 and 203 in Mpr1, Phe65Leu, which was previously isolated by the screening from PCR random mutagenesis library of MPR1, and Asn203Lys or Asn203Arg, led to further stabilization of Mpr1. Our growth assay suggests that overexpression of the stable Mpr1 variants increase L-arginine synthesis in yeast cells. Our finding is the first report on the rational engineering of Mpr1 for thermostabilization and could be useful in the construction of new yeast strains with higher L-arginine synthetic activity and also improved fermentation ability. PMID:26454877

  12. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in melatonin-rich transgenic rice expressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Young Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2013-11-01

    Transgenic rice plants overexpressing a sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase led to an enhanced production of melatonin with various physiological effects, including seminal root elongation and resistance against cold and oxidative stress, which raises the possibility that melatonin may alter gene expression profiles in the transgenic rice. Therefore, we performed a microarray analysis to investigate the regulatory role of melatonin using the melatonin-rich transgenic rice. We identified 260 and 204 genes that were up- or downregulated in the melatonin-rich transgenic rice when compared with the wild type. Of these, 20 upregulated genes were identified in the seedlings of melatonin-rich rice at more than twice the levels in the wild type (P < 0.05), while 23 downregulated genes were also detected. The representative upregulated genes included caleosin, a Ca(2+) -binding oil-body surface protein involved in the degradation of lipids stored in oil bodies and various signaling proteins such as a cyclin F-box protein and leucine-rich repeat protein. In contrast, jasmonate-induced protein, senescence-associated protein, and polygalacturonase were included in the downregulated gene group. These results suggest that melatonin has an important role in modulating a wide range of gene expression, reflecting its pleiotropic physiological roles in plant growth and development. PMID:23889160

  13. Purification and characterization of glutamate N-acetyltransferase involved in citrulline accumulation in wild watermelon.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Kentaro; Akashi, Kinya; Yokota, Akiho

    2005-10-01

    Citrulline is an efficient hydroxyl radical scavenger that can accumulate at concentrations of up to 30 mm in the leaves of wild watermelon during drought in the presence of strong light; however, the mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In this study, we characterized wild watermelon glutamate N-acetyltransferase (CLGAT) that catalyses the transacetylation reaction between acetylornithine and glutamate to form acetylglutamate and ornithine, thereby functioning in the first and fifth steps in citrulline biosynthesis. CLGAT enzyme purified 7000-fold from leaves was composed of two subunits with different N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the corresponding cDNA revealed that these two subunits have molecular masses of 21.3 and 23.5 kDa and are derived from a single precursor polypeptide, suggesting that the CLGAT precursor is cleaved autocatalytically at the conserved ATML motif, as in other glutamate N-acetyltransferases of microorganisms. A green fluorescence protein assay revealed that the first 26-amino acid sequence at the N-terminus of the precursor functions as a chloroplast transit peptide. The CLGAT exhibited thermostability up to 70 degrees C, suggesting an increase in enzyme activity under high leaf temperature conditions during drought/strong-light stresses. Moreover, CLGAT was not inhibited by citrulline or arginine at physiologically relevant high concentrations. These findings suggest that CLGAT can effectively participate in the biosynthesis of citrulline in wild watermelon leaves during drought/strong-light stress. PMID:16218965

  14. Crystal structure of bacillus subtilis YdaF protein : a putative ribosomal N-acetyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunzelle, J. S.; Wu, R.; Korolev, S. V.; Collart, F. R.; Joachimiak, A.; Anderson, W. F.; Biosciences Division; Northwestern Univ.; Saint Louis Univ. School of Medicine

    2004-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis suggests that the ydaF gene encodes a protein (YdaF) that functions as an N-acetyltransferase, more specifically, a ribosomal N-acetyltransferase. Sequence analysis using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) suggests that YdaF belongs to a large family of proteins (199 proteins found in 88 unique species of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes). YdaF also belongs to the COG1670, which includes the Escherichia coli RimL protein that is known to acetylate ribosomal protein L12. N-acetylation (NAT) has been found in all kingdoms. NAT enzymes catalyze the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) to a primary amino group. For example, NATs can acetylate the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group, the {epsilon}-amino group of lysine residues, aminoglycoside antibiotics, spermine/speridine, or arylalkylamines such as serotonin. The crystal structure of the alleged ribosomal NAT protein, YdaF, from Bacillus subtilis presented here was determined as a part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics. The structure maintains the conserved tertiary structure of other known NATs and a high sequence similarity in the presumed AcCoA binding pocket in spite of a very low overall level of sequence identity to other NATs of known structure.

  15. FDB2 encodes a member of the arylamine N-acetyltransferase family and is necessary for biotransformation of benzoxazolinones by Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize produces the benzoxazinones DIMBOA and DIBOA, which naturally transform into the more stable benzoxazolinones MBOA and BOA, respectively. These compounds are implicated in allelopathic weed suppression, insect feeding deterrence, and microbial disease resistance. The mycotoxigenic fungus Fus...

  16. Purification and characterization of aspartate N-acetyltransferase: A critical enzyme in brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Mojun; Parungao, Gwenn G; Viola, Ronald E

    2016-03-01

    Canavan disease (CD) is a neurological disorder caused by an interruption in the metabolism of N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Numerous mutations have been found in the enzyme that hydrolyzes NAA, and the catalytic activity of aspartoacylase is significantly impaired in CD patients. Recent studies have also supported an important role in CD for the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of NAA in the brain. However, previous attempts to study this enzyme had not succeeded in obtaining a soluble, stable and active form of this membrane-associated protein. We have now utilized fusion constructs with solubilizing protein partners to obtain an active and soluble form of aspartate N-acetyltransferase. Characterization of the properties of this enzyme has set the stage for the development of selective inhibitors that can lower the elevated levels of NAA that are observed in CD patients and potentially serve as a new treatment therapy. PMID:26550943

  17. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  18. A new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase in silkworm (Bombyx mori) affects integument pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Long, Yaohang; Li, Jiaorong; Zhao, Tianfu; Li, Guannan; Zhu, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Dopamine is a precursor for melanin synthesis. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is involved in the melatonin formation in insects because it could catalyze the transformation from dopamine to dopamine-N-acetyldopamine. In this study, we identified a new AANAT gene in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) and assessed its role in the silkworm. The cDNA of this gene encodes 233 amino acids that shares 57 % amino acid identity with the Bm-iAANAT protein. We thus refer to this gene as Bm-iAANAT2. To investigate the role of Bm-iAANAT2, we constructed a transgenic interference system using a 3xp3 promoter to suppress the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 in the silkworm. We observed that melanin deposition occurs in the head and integument in transgenic lines. To verify the melanism pattern, dopamine content and the enzyme activity of AANAT were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We found that an increase in dopamine levels affects melanism patterns on the heads of transgenic B. mori. A reduction in the enzyme activity of AANAT leads to changes in dopamine levels. We analyzed the expression of the Bm-iAANAT2 genes by qPCR and found that the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 gene is significantly lower in transgenic lines. Our results lead us to conclude that Bm-iAANAT2 is a new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene in the silkworm and is involved in the metabolism of the dopamine to avoid the generation of melanin. PMID:25712907

  19. Association of N-acetyltransferase-2 polymorphism with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sun, J D; Yuan, H; Hu, H Q; Yu, H M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possible correlations between N-acetyltransferase-2 (NAT2) gene polymorphisms and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD patients (113) and healthy controls (118) were enrolled from the First People's Hospital of Yuhang between January 2013 and June 2014. The patients were divided into mild CHD (N = 72) and severe CHD (N = 41) subgroups. DNA samples were extracted and the distributions of NAT2 polymorphisms were examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Clinical characteristic indexes of severe CHD patients were also examined for relevant statistical analysis. WT, M1, M2, and M3 alleles were observed in both case and control groups. PCR-RFLP identified a wild-type homozygote, WT/WT; a mutant heterozygote, WT/Mx; and a mutant homozygote, Mx/Mx (x = 1, 2, and 3) variant of the NAT2 genotype. Mx/Mx differed significantly between case and control groups (P < 0.05); the frequencies of all four alleles did not differ significantly between case and control groups (P > 0.05). Slow acetylator genotype frequencies were notably higher in the case group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Individuals with the slow acetylator genotype were at 1.97-times higher risk of CHD and also displayed higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than those with the rapid acetylator genotype (P < 0.05). Therefore, the NAT2 polymorphism was believed to be associated with increased risk of CHD, with the NAT2 slow acetylator genotype serving as a risk factor for severe CHD in a Chinese population. PMID:26985933

  20. Modulation of the biliary expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase alters the autocrine proliferative responses of cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; DeMorrow, Sharon; Onori, Paolo; Carpino, Guido; Mancinelli, Romina; Meng, Fanyin; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Franchitto, Antonio; Francis, Heather; Han, Yuyan; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Dusio, Giuseppina; Jensen, Kendal J; Greene, John J; Glaser, Shannon; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Secretin stimulates ductal secretion by interacting with secretin receptor (SR) activating cAMP⇒CFTR⇒Cl−/HCO3− AE2 signaling that is elevated by biliary hyperplasia. Cholangiocytes secrete several neuroendocrine factors regulating biliary functions by autocrine mechanisms. Melatonin inhibits biliary growth and secretin-stimulated choleresis in cholestatic bile duct ligated (BDL) rats by interaction with melatonin type 1 (MT1) receptor via downregulation of cAMP-dependent signaling. No data exists regarding the role of melatonin synthesized locally by cholangiocytes in the autocrine regulation of biliary growth and function. Methods In this study, we evaluated: (i) the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT, the rate-limiting enzyme for melatonin synthesis from serotonin) in cholangiocytes; and (ii) the effect of local modulation of biliary AANAT expression on the autocrine proliferative/secretory responses of cholangiocytes. Results In the liver, cholangiocytes (and to lower extent BDL hepatocytes) expressed AANAT. AANAT expression and melatonin secretion: (i) increased in BDL compared to normal rats and BDL rats treated with melatonin; and (ii) decreased in normal and BDL rats treated with AANAT Vivo-Morpholino compared to controls. The decrease in AANAT expression and subsequent lower melatonin secretion by cholangiocytes was associated with increased biliary proliferation and increased SR, CFTR, and Cl−/HCO3− AE2 expression. Overexpression of AANAT in cholangiocyte cell lines decreased the basal proliferative rate and expression of SR, CFTR, and Cl−/HCO3− AE2 and ablated secretin-stimulated biliary secretion in these cells. Conclusion Local modulation of melatonin synthesis may be important for the management of the balance between biliary proliferation/damage that is typical of cholangiopathies. PMID:23080076

  1. Catalytic mechanism of bleomycin N-acetyltransferase proposed on the basis of its crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Oda, Kosuke; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Noda, Masafumi; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin (Bm) N-acetyltransferase, BAT, is a self-resistance determinant in Bm-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003. In our present study, we crystallized BAT under both a terrestrial and a microgravity environment in the International Space Station. In addition to substrate-free BAT, the crystal structures of BAT in a binary complex with CoA and in a ternary complex with Bm and CoA were determined. BAT forms a dimer structure via interaction of its C-terminal domains in the monomers. However, each N-terminal domain in the dimer is positioned without mutual interaction. The tunnel observed in the N-terminal domain of BAT has two entrances: one that adopts a wide funnel-like structure necessary to accommodate the metal-binding domain of Bm, and another narrow entrance that accommodates acetyl-CoA (AcCoA). A groove formed on the dimer interface of two BAT C-terminal domains accommodates the DNA-binding domain of Bm. In a ternary complex of BAT, BmA(2), and CoA, a thiol group of CoA is positioned near the primary amine of Bm at the midpoint of the tunnel. This proximity ensures efficient transfer of an acetyl group from AcCoA to the primary amine of Bm. Based on the BAT crystal structure and the enzymatic kinetic study, we propose that the catalytic mode of BAT takes an ordered-like mechanism. PMID:19889644

  2. Mechanistic and Structural Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of melatonin and other N-acetylarylalkylamides from the corresponding arylalkylamine and acetyl-CoA. The N-acetylation of arylalkylamines is a critical step in Drosophila melanogaster for the inactivation of the bioactive amines and the sclerotization of the cuticle. Two AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) have been identified in D. melanogaster, in which AANATA differs from AANATB by the truncation of 35 amino acids from the N-terminus. We have expressed and purified both D. melanogaster AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) in Escherichia coli and used the purified enzymes to demonstrate that this N-terminal truncation does not affect the activity of the enzyme. Subsequent characterization of the kinetic and chemical mechanism of AANATA identified an ordered sequential mechanism, with acetyl-CoA binding first, followed by tyramine. We used a combination of pH–activity profiling and site-directed mutagenesis to study prospective residues believed to function in AANATA catalysis. These data led to an assignment of Glu-47 as the general base in catalysis with an apparent pKa of 7.0. Using the data generated for the kinetic mechanism, structure–function relationships, pH–rate profiles, and site-directed mutagenesis, we propose a chemical mechanism for AANATA. PMID:25406072

  3. Structure and Functional Diversity of GCN5-Related N-Acetyltransferases (GNAT).

    PubMed

    Salah Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md; Tikhomirova, Alexandra; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    General control non-repressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferases (GNAT) catalyze the transfer of an acyl moiety from acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to a diverse group of substrates and are widely distributed in all domains of life. This review of the currently available data acquired on GNAT enzymes by a combination of structural, mutagenesis and kinetic methods summarizes the key similarities and differences between several distinctly different families within the GNAT superfamily, with an emphasis on the mechanistic insights obtained from the analysis of the complexes with substrates or inhibitors. It discusses the structural basis for the common acetyltransferase mechanism, outlines the factors important for the substrate recognition, and describes the mechanism of action of inhibitors of these enzymes. It is anticipated that understanding of the structural basis behind the reaction and substrate specificity of the enzymes from this superfamily can be exploited in the development of novel therapeutics to treat human diseases and combat emerging multidrug-resistant microbial infections. PMID:27367672

  4. Acceptor substrate binding revealed by crystal structure of human glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Liang, Yu-He; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2008-09-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) N-acetyltransferase 1 (GNA1) is a key enzyme in the pathway toward biosynthesis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, an important donor substrate for N-linked glycosylation. GNA1 catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P) from acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and the acceptor substrate GlcN6P. Here, we report crystal structures of human GNA1, including apo GNA1, the GNA1-GlcN6P complex and an E156A mutant. Our work showed that GlcN6P binds to GNA1 without the help of AcCoA binding. Structural analyses and mutagenesis studies have shed lights on the charge distribution in the GlcN6P binding pocket, and an important role for Glu156 in the substrate binding. Hence, these findings have broadened our knowledge of structural features required for the substrate affinity of GNA1. PMID:18675810

  5. Mechanistic and structural analysis of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Jeffries, Kristen A; Bond, Jason D; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Rodriguez-Ospina, Santiago; Breydo, Leonid; Caswell, K Kenneth; Merkler, David J

    2014-12-16

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of melatonin and other N-acetylarylalkylamides from the corresponding arylalkylamine and acetyl-CoA. The N-acetylation of arylalkylamines is a critical step in Drosophila melanogaster for the inactivation of the bioactive amines and the sclerotization of the cuticle. Two AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) have been identified in D. melanogaster, in which AANATA differs from AANATB by the truncation of 35 amino acids from the N-terminus. We have expressed and purified both D. melanogaster AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) in Escherichia coli and used the purified enzymes to demonstrate that this N-terminal truncation does not affect the activity of the enzyme. Subsequent characterization of the kinetic and chemical mechanism of AANATA identified an ordered sequential mechanism, with acetyl-CoA binding first, followed by tyramine. We used a combination of pH-activity profiling and site-directed mutagenesis to study prospective residues believed to function in AANATA catalysis. These data led to an assignment of Glu-47 as the general base in catalysis with an apparent pKa of 7.0. Using the data generated for the kinetic mechanism, structure-function relationships, pH-rate profiles, and site-directed mutagenesis, we propose a chemical mechanism for AANATA. PMID:25406072

  6. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2. PMID:26729109

  7. N-Acetyltransferase 2 genotype, exfoliated urothelial cells and benzidine exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing-wen; Lin, Guo-fang; Chen, Ji-gang; Guo, Wei-Chao; Qin, Yi-qiu; Golka, Klaus; Shen, Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    Most studies report an association of the slow N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) status with elevated bladder cancer risk. In this study, NAT2 genotypes and the decades-long records of Papanicolaou's grading of exfoliated urothelial cells in a former benzidine-exposed cohort of the Shanghai dyestuff industry (29 bladder cancer patients; 307 non-cancer cohort members, some of them presenting different grades of pre-malignant alterations of exfoliated urothelial cells) were investigated. The cohort members had been enrolled in regular medical surveillance since mid-1980s. No overall increase of slow NAT2 genotypes in the former benzidine-exposed bladder cancer patients was found, compared with non-diseased members of the same cohort. A lower presentation of the homozygous wild genotype NAT2 4/4 was observed in bladder cancer patients, compared with non-diseased members with averaged Papanicolaou's grading (APG)3 II (OR=0.31, 95 percent CI 0.10-0.96, p=0.034) or with APG less than II (OR=0.36,95 percent CI 0.12-1.10, p=0.063). Nevertheless, neither a protective influence of rapid NAT2 genotypes on bladder cancer risk nor on pre-malignant cytological alterations could be confirmed by the present data. PMID:22202012

  8. Catalytic Mechanism of Bleomycin N-Acetyltransferase Proposed on the Basis of Its Crystal Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Kosuke; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Noda, Masafumi; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin (Bm) N-acetyltransferase, BAT, is a self-resistance determinant in Bm-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003. In our present study, we crystallized BAT under both a terrestrial and a microgravity environment in the International Space Station. In addition to substrate-free BAT, the crystal structures of BAT in a binary complex with CoA and in a ternary complex with Bm and CoA were determined. BAT forms a dimer structure via interaction of its C-terminal domains in the monomers. However, each N-terminal domain in the dimer is positioned without mutual interaction. The tunnel observed in the N-terminal domain of BAT has two entrances: one that adopts a wide funnel-like structure necessary to accommodate the metal-binding domain of Bm, and another narrow entrance that accommodates acetyl-CoA (AcCoA). A groove formed on the dimer interface of two BAT C-terminal domains accommodates the DNA-binding domain of Bm. In a ternary complex of BAT, BmA2, and CoA, a thiol group of CoA is positioned near the primary amine of Bm at the midpoint of the tunnel. This proximity ensures efficient transfer of an acetyl group from AcCoA to the primary amine of Bm. Based on the BAT crystal structure and the enzymatic kinetic study, we propose that the catalytic mode of BAT takes an ordered-like mechanism. PMID:19889644

  9. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L.; Shi, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2. PMID:26729109

  10. Cloning and characterization of a serotonin N-acetyltransferase from a gymnosperm, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Ahn, Taeho; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. SNAT catalyzes serotonin into N-acetylserotonin, an immediate precursor for melatonin biosynthesis by N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT). We cloned the SNAT gene from a gymnosperm loblolly pine (Pinus teada). The loblolly pine SNAT (PtSNAT) gene encodes 255 amino acids harboring a transit sequence with 67 amino acids and shows 67% amino acid identity with rice SNAT when comparing the mature polypeptide regions. Purified recombinant PtSNAT showed peak activity at 55°C with the K(m) (428 μM) and Vmax (3.9 nmol/min/mg protein) values. As predicted, PtSNAT localized to chloroplasts. The SNAT mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues, including leaf, bud, flower, and pinecone, whereas the corresponding protein was detected only in leaf. In accordance with the exclusive SNAT protein expression in leaf, melatonin was detected only in leaf at 0.45 ng per gram fresh weight. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gymnosperm PtSNAT had high homology with SNATs from all plant phyla (even with cyanobacteria), and formed a clade separated from the angiosperm SNATs, suggestive of direct gene transfer from cyanobacteria via endosymbiosis. PMID:25208036

  11. Structure and Functional Diversity of GCN5-Related N-Acetyltransferases (GNAT)

    PubMed Central

    Salah Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md; Tikhomirova, Alexandra; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    General control non-repressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferases (GNAT) catalyze the transfer of an acyl moiety from acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to a diverse group of substrates and are widely distributed in all domains of life. This review of the currently available data acquired on GNAT enzymes by a combination of structural, mutagenesis and kinetic methods summarizes the key similarities and differences between several distinctly different families within the GNAT superfamily, with an emphasis on the mechanistic insights obtained from the analysis of the complexes with substrates or inhibitors. It discusses the structural basis for the common acetyltransferase mechanism, outlines the factors important for the substrate recognition, and describes the mechanism of action of inhibitors of these enzymes. It is anticipated that understanding of the structural basis behind the reaction and substrate specificity of the enzymes from this superfamily can be exploited in the development of novel therapeutics to treat human diseases and combat emerging multidrug-resistant microbial infections. PMID:27367672

  12. Effect of maternal deprivation on N-acetyltransferase activity rhythm in blinded rat pups.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Yamazaki, K; Takahashi, K

    1998-02-15

    It has been reported that the rhythms of infant rats synchronize with the mother's rhythm until the light-dark cycle comes and has strong effects on their endogenous clocks. We found that periodic maternal deprivation (PMD) was able to cause a phase shift of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) in neonatal blinded rat pups. PMD in which contact with the mother was allowed for only 4 h caused a phase shift of NAT rhythm, irrespective of the timing of contact with the mother in a day. Acute single mother deprivation caused an excess of NAT activity for more hours than usual and contact with the mother prevented such an excessive response. Mother deprivation may act as a cold stress, since artificial warming of pups gave the same results as contact with the mother. When the pups were artificially warmed by a heater during a 1-week deprivation period, a flat 24-h pattern of NAT was observed. The mechanism causing a phase shift of NAT activity rhythm of rat pups may be complicated. PMID:9523895

  13. Retinal, pineal and diencephalic expression of frog arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase-1.

    PubMed

    Isorna, Esther; Besseau, Laurence; Boeuf, Gilles; Desdevises, Yves; Vuilleumier, Robin; Alonso-Gómez, Angel L; Delgado, María J; Falcón, Jack

    2006-06-27

    The arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is a key enzyme in the rhythmic production of melatonin. Two Aanats are expressed in Teleost fish (Aanat1 in the retina and Aanat2 in the pineal organ) but only Aanat1 is found in tetrapods. This study reports the cloning of Aanat1 from R. perezi. Transcripts were mainly expressed in the retina, diencephalon, intestine and testis. In the retina and pineal organ, Aanat1 expression was in the photoreceptor cells. Expression was also seen in ependymal cells of the 3rd ventricle and discrete cells of the suprachiasmatic area. The expression of Aanat1 in both the retina and pineal organ, and the absence of Aanat2 suggests that green frog resembles more to birds and mammals than to Teleost fish, as far as Aanat is concerned. The significance of Aanat1 in extra-pineal and extra-retinal tissues remains to be elucidated; in the diencephalon, it might be associated to the so-called deep brain photoreceptor cells. PMID:16687207

  14. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. PMID:26245695

  15. Testicular dysfunction in experimental chronic renal insufficiency: a deficiency of nocturnal pineal N-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, E. W.; Hojvat, S. A.; Kahn, S. E.; Bermes, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Biochemical correlates of neuroendocrine/gonadal function and nocturnal levels of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were determined in partially nephrectomized (PNx), male, Long Evans rats following a 5-week period of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). PNx animals demonstrated two to four-fold elevations in urea nitrogen and three to four-fold reductions (P less than 0.02) in plasma total testosterone concentrations as compared to sham-operated controls. The pituitary LH contents of PNx rats were decreased to approximately 60% of the control value (P less than 0.05). There were no differences in plasma prolactin levels between the control and PNx groups either at mid-day or in the middle of the night. Nocturnal pineal NAT activity in PNx rats was markedly reduced to approximately 20% of the control value (P less than 0.001). Similar evidence of gonadal dysfunction (reduced plasma total testosterone and testes testosterone content) and a significant decrease in night-time levels of pineal NAT activity were also observed after 13 weeks of CRI in PNx rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain that were housed under a different photoperiod. These results suggest that pineal gland dysfunction is a feature of CRI in the PNx model. Such an abnormality might contribute to the pathogenesis of gonadal dysfunction in CRI. PMID:2765391

  16. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  17. New N-acetyltransferase fold in the structure and mechanism of the phosphonate biosynthetic enzyme FrbF.

    PubMed

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E; DeSieno, Matthew A; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K

    2011-10-14

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098. PMID:21865168

  18. Association between N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphisms and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, J X; Gao, W; Liang, Y; Zhou, X M

    2015-01-01

    N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is an essential phase II enzyme in the metabolism of aromatic and heterocyclic amines and of hydrazines. NAT2 activity can be divided into three phenotypes: rapid, intermediate, and slow. Studies identifying an association between NAT2 polymorphism and the risk of pancreatic cancer have shown conflicting results. In order to assess this relationship comprehensively, we performed a meta-analysis that involved 1607 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1682 controls from six studies, which were selected from a group of ten, identified by a search of PubMed and Embase databases up to July 2014. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the relationships. In the overall analysis, no significant associations between NAT2 rapid acetylation genotypes and pancreatic cancer risk (RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.73-1.19) were found; however, the results showed significant heterogeneity (I2 = 55.0%). The results from subgroup analysis suggested that the rapid genotypes might decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer (RR = 0.56, 95%CI = 0.38-0.84) in Turkey, although the association was not significant in the United States population (RR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.71-1.34) or in the multi-center studies (RR = 1.10, 95%CI = 0.90-1.34). Analysis of the slow acetylation genotypes demonstrated the converse outcomes. In conclusion, the results of our study suggested that the NAT2 slow acetylation genotypes might increase the susceptibility to pancreatic cancer in Europe but that these have no significant effects in the United States and multi-center populations. PMID:26681215

  19. Risks on N-acetyltransferase 2 and bladder cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zongheng; Zhang, Jinshan; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Xianjue; Li, Youkong; Xu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Background It is known that bladder cancer disease is closely related to aromatic amine compounds, which could cause cancer by regulating of N-acetylation and N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2). The NAT2 slowed acetylation and would increase the risk of bladder cancer, with tobacco smoke being regarded as a risk factor for this increased risk. However, the relationship between NAT2 slow acetylation and bladder cancer is still debatable at present. This study aims to explore preliminarily correlation of NAT2 slow acetylation and the risk of bladder cancer. Methods The articles were searched from PubMed, Cochran, McGrane English databases, CBM, CNKI, and other databases. The extraction of bladder cancer patients and a control group related with the NAT2 gene were detected by the state, and the referenced articles and publications were also used for data retrieval. Using a random effects model, the model assumes that the studies included in the analysis cases belong to the overall population in the study of random sampling, and considering the variables within and between studies. Data were analyzed using STATA Version 6.0 software, using the META module. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the literature study, 20 independent studies are included in this meta-analysis. Results The results showed that the individual differences of bladder cancer susceptibility might be part of the metabolism of carcinogens. Slow acetylation status of bladder cancer associated with the pooled odds ratio was 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.11–1.55). Conclusion The status of NAT2 slow N-acetylation is associated with bladder cancer risks, and may increase the risk of bladder cancer. PMID:26715854

  20. Degradation of Serotonin N-Acetyltransferase, a Circadian Regulator, by the N-end Rule Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wadas, Brandon; Borjigin, Jimo; Huang, Zheping; Oh, Jang-Hyun; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2016-08-12

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) converts serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS), a distinct biological regulator and the immediate precursor of melatonin, a circulating hormone that influences circadian processes, including sleep. N-terminal sequences of AANAT enzymes vary among vertebrates. Mechanisms that regulate the levels of AANAT are incompletely understood. Previous findings were consistent with the possibility that AANAT may be controlled through its degradation by the N-end rule pathway. By expressing the rat and human AANATs and their mutants not only in mammalian cells but also in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and by taking advantage of yeast genetics, we show here that two "complementary" forms of rat AANAT are targeted for degradation by two "complementary" branches of the N-end rule pathway. Specifically, the N(α)-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) Ac-AANAT is destroyed through the recognition of its Nt-acetylated N-terminal Met residue by the Ac/N-end rule pathway, whereas the non-Nt-acetylated AANAT is targeted by the Arg/N-end rule pathway, which recognizes the unacetylated N-terminal Met-Leu sequence of rat AANAT. We also show, by constructing lysine-to-arginine mutants of rat AANAT, that its degradation is mediated by polyubiquitylation of its Lys residue(s). Human AANAT, whose N-terminal sequence differs from that of rodent AANATs, is longer-lived than its rat counterpart and appears to be refractory to degradation by the N-end rule pathway. Together, these and related results indicate both a major involvement of the N-end rule pathway in the control of rodent AANATs and substantial differences in the regulation of rodent and human AANATs that stem from differences in their N-terminal sequences. PMID:27339900

  1. N-acetyltransferase 2, exposure to aromatic and heterocyclic amines, and receptor-defined breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rabstein, Sylvia; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Haas, Susanne; Weiss, Tobias; Spickenheuer, Anne; Pierl, Christiane; Justenhoven, Christina; Illig, Thomas; Vollmert, Caren; Baisch, Christian; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Pesch, Beate

    2010-03-01

    The role of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) polymorphism in breast cancer is still unclear. We explored the associations between potential sources of exposure to aromatic and heterocyclic amines (AHA), acetylation status and receptor-defined breast cancer in 1020 incident cases and 1047 population controls of the German GENICA study. Acetylation status was assessed as slow or fast. Therefore, NAT2 haplotypes were estimated using genotype information from six NAT2 polymorphisms. Most probable haplotypes served as alleles for the deduction of NAT2 acetylation status. The risks of developing estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive or negative tumors were estimated for tobacco smoking, consumption of red meat, grilled food, coffee, and tea, as well as expert-rated occupational exposure to AHA with logistic regression conditional on age and adjusted for potential confounders. Joint effects of these factors and NAT2 acetylation status were investigated. Frequent consumption of grilled food and coffee showed higher risks in slow acetylators for receptor-negative tumors [grilled food: ER-: odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-6.14 for regular vs. rare; coffee: ER-: OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.22-5.33 for >or=4 vs. 0 cups/day]. We observed slightly higher risks for never smokers that are fast acetylators for receptor-positive tumors compared with slow acetylators (ER-: OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.00-1.73). Our results support differing risk patterns for receptor-defined breast cancer. However, the modifying role of NAT2 for receptor-defined breast cancer is difficult to interpret in the light of complex mixtures of exposure to AHA. PMID:19996973

  2. A rice chloroplast transit peptide sequence does not alter the cytoplasmic localization of sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase expressed in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Lee, Kyungjin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-09-01

    Ectopic overexpression of melatonin biosynthetic genes of animal origin has been used to generate melatonin-rich transgenic plants to examine the functional roles of melatonin in plants. However, the subcellular localization of these proteins expressed in the transgenic plants remains unknown. We studied the localization of sheep (Ovis aries) serotonin N-acetyltransferase (OaSNAT) and a translational fusion of a rice SNAT transit peptide to OaSNAT (TS:OaSNAT) in plants. Laser confocal microscopy analysis revealed that both OaSNAT and TS:OaSNAT proteins were localized to the cytoplasm even with the addition of the transit sequence to OaSNAT. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing the TS:OaSNAT fusion transgene exhibited high SNAT enzyme activity relative to untransformed wild-type plants, but lower activity than transgenic rice plants expressing the wild-type OaSNAT gene. Melatonin levels in both types of transgenic rice plant corresponded well with SNAT enzyme activity levels. The TS:OaSNAT transgenic lines exhibited increased seminal root growth relative to wild-type plants, but less than in the OaSNAT transgenic lines, confirming that melatonin promotes root growth. Seed-specific OaSNAT expression under the control of a rice prolamin promoter did not confer high levels of melatonin production in transgenic rice seeds compared with seeds from transgenic plants expressing OaSNAT under the control of the constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter. PMID:24920304

  3. Arabidopsis serotonin N-acetyltransferase knockout mutant plants exhibit decreased melatonin and salicylic acid levels resulting in susceptibility to an avirulent pathogen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in the melatonin biosynthesis pathway in plants. We examined the effects of SNAT gene inactivation in two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lines. After inoculation with the avirulent pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato DC3000 harboring the elicitor avrRpt2 (Pst-avrRpt2), melatonin levels in the snat knockout mutant lines were 50% less than in wild-type Arabidopsis Col-0 plants. The snat knockout mutant lines exhibited susceptibility to pathogen infection that coincided with decreased induction of defense genes including PR1, ICS1, and PDF1.2. Because melatonin acts upstream of salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, the reduced melatonin levels in the snat mutant lines led to decreased SA levels compared to wild-type, suggesting that the increased pathogen susceptibility of the snat mutant lines could be attributed to decreased SA levels and subsequent attenuation of defense gene induction. Exogenous melatonin treatment failed to induce defense gene expression in nahG Arabidopsis plants, but restored the induction of defense gene expression in the snat mutant lines. In addition, melatonin caused translocation of NPR1 (nonexpressor of PR1) protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus indicating that melatonin-elicited pathogen resistance in response to avirulent pathogen attack is SA-dependent in Arabidopsis. PMID:25652756

  4. The human serotonin N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.87) gene (AANAT): Structure, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.L.; Bernard, M.; Roseboom, P.H.

    1996-05-15

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, AA-NAT, HGMW-approved symbol AANAT;EC 2.3.1.87) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis and controls the night/day rhythm in melatonin production in the vertebrate pineal gland. We have found that the human AA-NAT gene spans {approx}2.5 kb, contains four exons, and is located at chromosome 17q25. The open reading frame encodes a 23.2-kDa protein that is {approx}80% identical to sheep and rat AA-NAT. The AA-NAT transcript ({approx}1 kb) is highly abundant in the pineal gland and is expressed at lower levels in the retina and in the Y79 retinoblastoma cell line. AA-NAT mRNA is also detectable at low levels in several brain regions and the pituitary gland, but not in several peripheral tissues examined. Brain and pituitary AA-NAT could modulate serotonin-dependent aspects of human behavior and pituitary function. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juan; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Lan-Fen; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2006-11-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.6 Å resolution. Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase from human liver, which catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to the primary amine of d-glucosamine 6-phosphate to form N-acetyl-d-glucosamine 6-phosphate, was expressed in a soluble form from Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified to homogeneity using Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 50.08, c = 142.88 Å.

  6. Chloroplast-encoded serotonin N-acetyltransferase in the red alga Pyropia yezoensis: gene transition to the nucleus from chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Yool Lee, Hyoung; Choi, Dong-Woog; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-02-01

    Melatonin biosynthesis involves the N-acetylation of arylalkylamines such as serotonin, which is catalysed by serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), the penultimate enzyme of melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. Here, we report the functional characterization of a putative N-acetyltransferase gene in the chloroplast genome of the alga laver (Pyropia yezoensis, formerly known as Porphyra yezoensis) with homology to the rice SNAT gene. To confirm that the putative Pyropia yezoensis SNAT (PySNAT) gene encodes an SNAT, we cloned the full-length chloroplastidic PySNAT gene by PCR and purified the recombinant PySNAT protein from Escherichia coli. PySNAT was 174 aa and had 50% amino acid identity with cyanobacteria SNAT. Purified recombinant PySNAT showed a peak activity at 55 °C with a K m of 467 µM and V max of 28 nmol min-1 mg(-1) of protein. Unlike other plant SNATs, PySNAT localized to the cytoplasm due to a lack of N-terminal chloroplast transit peptides. Melatonin was present at 0.16ng g(-1) of fresh mass but increased during heat stress. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence suggested that PySNAT has evolved from the cyanobacteria SNAT gene via endosymbiotic gene transfer. Additionally, the chloroplast transit peptides of plant SNATs were acquired 1500 million years ago, concurrent with the appearance of green algae. PMID:25183745

  7. Chloroplast-encoded serotonin N-acetyltransferase in the red alga Pyropia yezoensis: gene transition to the nucleus from chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Yeong; Yool Lee, Hyoung; Choi, Dong-Woog; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin biosynthesis involves the N-acetylation of arylalkylamines such as serotonin, which is catalysed by serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), the penultimate enzyme of melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. Here, we report the functional characterization of a putative N-acetyltransferase gene in the chloroplast genome of the alga laver (Pyropia yezoensis, formerly known as Porphyra yezoensis) with homology to the rice SNAT gene. To confirm that the putative Pyropia yezoensis SNAT (PySNAT) gene encodes an SNAT, we cloned the full-length chloroplastidic PySNAT gene by PCR and purified the recombinant PySNAT protein from Escherichia coli. PySNAT was 174 aa and had 50% amino acid identity with cyanobacteria SNAT. Purified recombinant PySNAT showed a peak activity at 55 °C with a K m of 467 µM and V max of 28 nmol min–1 mg–1 of protein. Unlike other plant SNATs, PySNAT localized to the cytoplasm due to a lack of N-terminal chloroplast transit peptides. Melatonin was present at 0.16ng g–1 of fresh mass but increased during heat stress. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence suggested that PySNAT has evolved from the cyanobacteria SNAT gene via endosymbiotic gene transfer. Additionally, the chloroplast transit peptides of plant SNATs were acquired 1500 million years ago, concurrent with the appearance of green algae. PMID:25183745

  8. An antioxidative mechanism mediated by the yeast N-acetyltransferase Mpr1: oxidative stress-induced arginine synthesis and its physiological role.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akira; Kotani, Tetsuya; Sasano, Yu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiaeSigma1278b has the MPR1 gene encoding the N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 that acetylates the proline metabolism intermediate Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C)/glutamate-gamma-semialdehyde (GSA) in vitro. In addition, Mpr1 protects cells from various oxidative stresses by regulating the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the relationship between P5C/GSA acetylation and antioxidative mechanism involving Mpr1 remains unclear. Here, we report the synthesis of oxidative stress-induced arginine via P5C/GSA acetylation catalyzed by Mpr1. Gene disruption analysis revealed that Mpr1 converts P5C/GSA into N-acetyl-GSA for arginine synthesis in the mitochondria, indicating that Mpr1 mediates the proline and arginine metabolic pathways. More importantly, Mpr1 regulate ROS generation by acetylating toxic P5C/GSA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the transcription of PUT1 encoding the proline oxidase Put1 and MPR1 was strongly induced, and consequently, the arginine content was significantly increased. We also found that two deletion mutants (Deltampr1/2 and Deltaput1) were more sensitive to high-temperature stress than the wild-type strain, but that direct treatment with arginine restored the cell viability of these mutants. These results suggest that Mpr1-dependent arginine synthesis confers stress tolerance. We propose an antioxidative mechanism that is involved in stress-induced arginine synthesis requiring Mpr1 and Put1. PMID:20550582

  9. Human acetyl-CoA:glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1 has a relaxed donor specificity and transfers acyl groups up to four carbons in length.

    PubMed

    Brockhausen, Inka; Nair, Dileep G; Chen, Min; Yang, Xiaojing; Allingham, John S; Szarek, Walter A; Anastassiades, Tassos

    2016-04-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase1 (GNA1) catalyses the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) to glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) to form N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P), which is an essential intermediate in UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis. An analog of GlcNAc, N-butyrylglucosamine (GlcNBu) has shown healing properties for bone and articular cartilage in animal models of arthritis. The goal of this work was to examine whether GNA1 has the ability to transfer a butyryl group from butyryl-CoA to GlcN6P to form GlcNBu6P, which can then be converted to GlcNBu. We developed fluorescent and radioactive assays and examined the donor specificity of human GNA1. Acetyl, propionyl, n-butyryl, and isobutyryl groups were all transferred to GlcN6P, but isovaleryl-CoA and decanoyl-CoA did not serve as donor substrates. Site-specific mutants were produced to examine the role of amino acids potentially affecting the size and properties of the AcCoA binding pocket. All of the wild type and mutant enzymes showed activities of both acetyl and butyryl transfer and can therefore be used for the enzymatic synthesis of GlcNBu for biomedical applications. PMID:26935656

  10. A unique GCN5-related glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region exist in the fungal multi-domain glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Xiao, Yibei; Yang, Xinbin; Mesters, Jeroen R.; Yang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidases widely exist in the filamentous fungi, which may play a key role in chitin metabolism of fungi. A multi-domain GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmNag), exhibiting a potential N-acetyltransferase region, has been recently reported to show great potential in industrial applications. In this study, the crystal structure of RmNag was determined at 2.80 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structure of RmNag showed four distinctive domains, which belong to two distinguishable functional regions — a GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase region (N-terminal) and a N-acetyltransferase region (C-terminal). From structural and functional analysis, the C-terminal region of RmNag was identified as a unique tandem array linking general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT), which displayed glucosamine N-acetyltransferase activity. Structural analysis of this glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region revealed that a unique glucosamine binding pocket is located in the pantetheine arm binding terminal region of the conserved CoA binding pocket, which is different from all known GNAT members. This is the first structural report of a glucosamine N-acetyltransferase, which provides novel structural information about substrate specificity of GNATs. The structural and functional features of this multi-domain β-N-acetylglucosaminidase could be useful in studying the catalytic mechanism of GH family 3 proteins. PMID:26669854

  11. A unique GCN5-related glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region exist in the fungal multi-domain glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Xiao, Yibei; Yang, Xinbin; Mesters, Jeroen R; Yang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidases widely exist in the filamentous fungi, which may play a key role in chitin metabolism of fungi. A multi-domain GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmNag), exhibiting a potential N-acetyltransferase region, has been recently reported to show great potential in industrial applications. In this study, the crystal structure of RmNag was determined at 2.80 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structure of RmNag showed four distinctive domains, which belong to two distinguishable functional regions--a GH family 3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase region (N-terminal) and a N-acetyltransferase region (C-terminal). From structural and functional analysis, the C-terminal region of RmNag was identified as a unique tandem array linking general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT), which displayed glucosamine N-acetyltransferase activity. Structural analysis of this glucosamine N-acetyltransferase region revealed that a unique glucosamine binding pocket is located in the pantetheine arm binding terminal region of the conserved CoA binding pocket, which is different from all known GNAT members. This is the first structural report of a glucosamine N-acetyltransferase, which provides novel structural information about substrate specificity of GNATs. The structural and functional features of this multi-domain β-N-acetylglucosaminidase could be useful in studying the catalytic mechanism of GH family 3 proteins. PMID:26669854

  12. Computational study of the three-dimensional structure of N-acetyltransferase 2-acetyl coenzyme a complex.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Kana; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is one of the most important polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plays a significant role in individual differences of drug efficacies and/or side effects. Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor in the experimentally determined crystal structure of NAT2, although the acetyl source of acetylation reactions catalyzed by NAT is not CoA, but rather acetyl CoA. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of NAT2, including acetyl CoA, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. By substituting acetyl CoA for CoA the amino acid residue Gly286, which is known to transform into a glutamate residue by NAT2*7A and NAT2*7B, comes close to the cofactor binding site. In addition, the binding pocket around the sulfur atom of acetyl CoA expanded in the NAT2-acetyl CoA complex. PMID:20930369

  13. Structural and functional analysis of the yeast N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 involved in oxidative stress tolerance via proline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nasuno, Ryo; Hirano, Yoshinori; Itoh, Takafumi; Hakoshima, Toshio; Hibi, Takao; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-07-16

    Mpr1 (sigma1278b gene for proline-analog resistance 1), which was originally isolated as N-acetyltransferase detoxifying the proline analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylate, protects yeast cells from various oxidative stresses. Mpr1 mediates the L-proline and L-arginine metabolism by acetylating L-Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, leading to the L-arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide, which confers oxidative stress tolerance. Mpr1 belongs to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, but exhibits poor sequence homology with the GNAT enzymes and unique substrate specificity. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of Mpr1 and its complex with the substrate cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline at 1.9 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Mpr1 is folded into α/β-structure with eight-stranded mixed β-sheets and six α-helices. The substrate binds to Asn135 and the backbone amide of Asn172 and Leu173, and the predicted acetyl-CoA-binding site is located near the backbone amide of Phe138 and the side chain of Asn178. Alanine substitution of Asn178, which can interact with the sulfur of acetyl-CoA, caused a large reduction in the apparent kcat value. The replacement of Asn135 led to a remarkable increase in the apparent Km value. These results indicate that Asn178 and Asn135 play an important role in catalysis and substrate recognition, respectively. Such a catalytic mechanism has not been reported in the GNAT proteins. Importantly, the amino acid substitutions in these residues increased the L-Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate level in yeast cells exposed to heat stress, indicating that these residues are also crucial for its physiological functions. These studies provide some benefits of Mpr1 applications, such as the breeding of industrial yeasts and the development of antifungal drugs. PMID:23818613

  14. aarC, an essential gene involved in density-dependent regulation of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Solinsky, K A; Paradise, M R; Parojcic, M M

    1997-01-01

    The 2'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(2')-Ia] in Providencia stuartii has a dual function where it is involved in the acetylation of peptidoglycan and certain aminoglycosides. A search for negative regulators of the aac(2')-Ia gene has resulted in the identification of aarC. A missense allele (aarC1) resulted in an 8.9-fold increase in beta-galactosidase accumulation from an aac(2')-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Northern blot analysis demonstrated an increase in aac(2')-Ia mRNA accumulation that was specific to cells at high density. In addition, the aarC1 allele also resulted in a substantial increase in the expression of aarP, a transcriptional activator of the aac(2')-Ia gene. The wild-type aarC gene was isolated by complementation and encodes a predicted protein of 365 amino acids with a molecular mass of 39,815 Da. The predicted AarC protein exhibited 88% amino acid homology to the previously identified GcpE protein of Escherichia coli and 86% homology to a gene product from Haemophilus influenzae. The E. coli gcpE gene was able to functionally complement the aarC1 allele in P. stuartii. The aarC1 allele was identified as a T to G transversion that resulted in a valine to glycine substitution at position 136 in the AarC protein. The aarC gene appears to be essential for cell viability as construction of a disrupted copy (aarC::lacZ) was possible only in cells that carried an episomal copy of aarC or gcpE. PMID:9079912

  15. Differences between human slow N-acetyltransferase 2 alleles in levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-induced DNA adducts and mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bendaly, Jean; Doll, Mark A.; Millner, Lori M.; Metry, Kristin J.; Smith, Ned B.; Pierce, William M.; Hein, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic amines such as 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) require biotransformation to exert their carcinogenic effects. Genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes such as N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) may modify cancer risk following exposure. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator), NAT2*5B (common Caucasian slow acetylator), or NAT2*7B (common Asian slow acetylator) alleles (haplotypes) were treated with ABP to test the effect of NAT2 polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis. ABP N-acetyltransferase catalytic activities were detectable only in cell lines transfected with NAT2 and were highest in cells transfected with NAT2*4, lower in cells transfected with NAT2*7B, and lowest in cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Following ABP treatment, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP) was the primary adduct formed. Cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed the highest concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutants, and dG-C8-ABP adducts. Cells transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*7B showed lower levels of cytotoxicity, hprt mutagenesis, and dG-C8-ABP adducts. Cells transfected with CYP1A1 only or cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B did not induce cytotoxicity, hprt mutagenesis or dG-C8-ABP adducts. ABP DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r > 0.96) with ABP-induced hprt mutant levels following each treatment. The results of the present study suggest that investigations of NAT2 genotype or phenotype associations with disease or toxicity could be more precise and reproducible if heterogeneity within the “slow” NAT2 acetylator phenotype is considered and incorporated into the study design. PMID:19682468

  16. The polyamine N-acetyltransferase-like enzyme PmvE plays a role in the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Martini, Cecilia; Michaux, Charlotte; Bugli, Francesca; Arcovito, Alessandro; Iavarone, Federica; Cacaci, Margherita; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Hartke, Axel; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that the mutant strain of Enterococcus faecalis lacking the transcriptional regulator SlyA is more virulent than the parental strain. We hypothesized that this phenotype was due to overexpression of the second gene of the slyA operon, ef_3001, renamed pmvE (for polyamine metabolism and virulence of E. faecalis). PmvE shares strong homologies with N(1)-spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines. In this study, we used an E. faecalis strain carrying the recombinant plasmid pMSP3535-pmvE (V19/p3535-pmvE), which allows the induction of pmvE by addition of nisin. Thereby, we showed that the overexpression of PmvE increased the virulence of E. faecalis in the Galleria mellonella infection model, as well as the persistence within peritoneal macrophages. We were also able to show a direct interaction between the His-tagged recombinant PmvE (rPmvE) protein and putrescine by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique on a Biacore instrument. Moreover, biochemical assays showed that PmvE possesses an N-acetyltransferase activity toward polyamine substrates. Our results suggest that PmvE contributes to the virulence of E. faecalis, likely through its involvement in the polyamine metabolism. PMID:25385793

  17. N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphisms, tobacco smoking, and breast cancer risk in the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Dostal, Lucie; Hunter, David J; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hoover, Robert; Ziegler, Regina G; Thun, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Common polymorphisms in the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) modify the association between cigarette smoking and bladder cancer and have been hypothesized to determine whether active cigarette smoking increases breast cancer risk. The authors sought to replicate the latter hypothesis in a prospective analysis of 6,900 breast cancer cases and 9,903 matched controls drawn from 6 cohorts (1989-2006) in the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. Standardized methods were used to genotype the 3 most common polymorphisms that define NAT2 acetylation phenotype (rs1799930, rs1799931, and rs1801280). In unconditional logistic regression analyses, breast cancer risk was higher in women with more than 20 pack-years of active cigarette smoking than in never smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17, 1.39), after controlling for established risk factors other than alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. However, associations were similar for the slow (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.39) and rapid/intermediate (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.42) acetylation phenotypes, with no evidence of interaction (P = 0.87). These results provide some support for the hypothesis that long-term cigarette smoking may be causally associated with breast cancer risk but underscore the need for caution when interpreting sparse data on gene-environment interactions. PMID:22074863

  18. Substrate-Induced Allosteric Change in the Quaternary Structure of the Spermidine N-Acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Weigand, Steven; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-11-01

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Two hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. Our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites. PMID:26410587

  19. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Ibrahim A; Kobeissi, Loulou; Jabbour, Michel E; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002-2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1(∗)14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1(∗)14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR = 7.86, 95% CI: 1.53-40.39). A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1(∗)14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1(∗)14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1(∗)14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association. PMID:22956951

  20. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Ibrahim A.; Kobeissi, Loulou; Jabbour, Michel E.; Dhaini, Hassan R.

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1∗14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1∗14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR = 7.86, 95% CI: 1.53–40.39). A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1∗14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1∗14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1∗14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association. PMID:22956951

  1. Substrate-induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Weigand, Steven J.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-09-26

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Twomore » hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. As a result, our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites.« less

  2. Implication of an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene and a Phosphinothricin N-Acetyltransferase Gene in the Diversity of Pseudomonas cichorii Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Wali, Ullah Md; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas cichorii harbors the hrp genes. hrp-mutants lose their virulence on eggplant but not on lettuce. A phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase gene (pat) is located between hrpL and an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (aldH) in the genome of P. cichorii. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and composition of the genes among pseudomonads suggests a common ancestor of hrp and pat between P. cichorii strains and P. viridiflava strains harboring the single hrp pathogenicity island. In contrast, phylogenetic diversification of aldH corresponded to species diversification amongst pseudomonads. In this study, the involvement of aldH and pat in P. cichorii virulence was analyzed. An aldH-deleted mutant (ΔaldH) and a pat-deleted mutant (Δpat) lost their virulence on eggplant but not on lettuce. P. cichorii expressed both genes in eggplant leaves, independent of HrpL, the transcriptional activator for the hrp. Inoculation into Asteraceae species susceptible to P. cichorii showed that the involvement of hrp, pat and aldH in P. cichorii virulence is independent of each other and has no relationship with the phylogeny of Asteraceae species based on the nucleotide sequences of ndhF and rbcL. It is thus thought that not only the hrp genes but also pat and aldH are implicated in the diversity of P. cichorii virulence on susceptible host plant species. PMID:24704843

  3. Substrate-induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Weigand, Steven J.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-09-26

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Two hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. As a result, our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites.

  4. Melatonin production in Escherichia coli by dual expression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule produced in animals and plants and a well-studied natural compound. Two enzymatic steps are required for the biosynthesis of melatonin from serotonin. First, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) catalyzes serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS) followed by the action of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT), resulting in the synthesis of O-methylated NAS, also known as melatonin. Attempts to document melatonin production in Escherichia coli have been unsuccessful to date due to either low enzyme activity or inactive ASMT expression. Here, we employed caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) instead of ASMT, as COMT is a multifunctional enzyme that has ASMT activity as well. Among several combinations of dual expression cassettes, recombinant E. coli that expressed sheep SNAT with rice COMT produced a high quantity of melatonin, which was measured in a culture medium (1.46 mg/L in response to 1 mM serotonin). This level was several orders of magnitude higher than that produced in transgenic rice and tomato overexpressing sheep SNAT and ASMT, respectively. This heterologous expression system can be widely employed to screen various putative SNAT or ASMT genes from animals and plants as well as to overproduce melatonin in various useful microorganisms. PMID:27005412

  5. Genotyping of the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) and loss of heterozygosity in bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schnakenberg, E; Ehlers, C; Feyerabend, W; Werdin, R; Hübotter, R; Dreikorn, K; Schloot, W

    1998-05-01

    Acetylation is one of the major routes in metabolism and detoxification of a large number of drugs, chemicals and carcinogens. Slow acetylators are said to be more susceptible to developing bladder cancer and because of investigations about tumor risk based on phenotyping procedures, it was our aim to study the distribution of allelic constellations of the N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) by genotyping patients with bladder cancer. We analysed NAT2 gene of blood and tumor DNA from 60 patients with primary bladder cancer and DNA of blood samples from 154 healthy individuals. Using ASO-PCR/RFLP techniques we identified 70% of patients with bladder cancer (n = 42) to be slow acetylators while genotyping of controls resulted in 61% with slow acetylators (n = 94). In addition, dividing bladder cancer patients in males and females the genotype NAT2*5B/NAT2*6A occured with much higher frequencies in males (OR = 4, 95%); CI = 1.8-8.9). Furthermore, investigating bladder cancer tissues we could detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in slow and rapid acetylator genotypes. In eleven out of 60 tumor samples (18.3%) we observed allelic loss at the NAT2 locus while in control DNA of blood from the same patients both alleles were still detectable. PMID:9660060

  6. Risk from exposure to arylamines from consumer products and hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Platzek, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Arylamines are widely used for the manufacturing of elastomers, colorants and consumer products. Furthermore they are part of many colorants either as contaminant or as cleavage product. Also many hair dyes are arylamines. Thus consumers are exposed from various sources and products, especially high exposure is contributed by tobacco smoke. Many of the arylamines and colorants derived from them are mutagenic and/or carcinogenic. In contrast, a considerable number of arylamines has been proven to be non hazardous. In other cases exposure was negligible. Insofar the risk due to exposure to arylamines from consumer products has to be assessed case by case considering the toxicological profile and the exposure for each individual substance and product. PMID:20515789

  7. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  8. NAT8L (N-Acetyltransferase 8-Like) Accelerates Lipid Turnover and Increases Energy Expenditure in Brown Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Pessentheiner, Ariane R.; Pelzmann, Helmut J.; Walenta, Evelyn; Schweiger, Martina; Groschner, Lukas N.; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kolb, Dagmar; Uno, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Toh; Nitta, Atsumi; Rieder, Dietmar; Prokesch, Andreas; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.

    2013-01-01

    NAT8L (N-acetyltransferase 8-like) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) from acetyl-CoA and aspartate. In the brain, NAA delivers the acetate moiety for synthesis of acetyl-CoA that is further used for fatty acid generation. However, its function in other tissues remained elusive. Here, we show for the first time that Nat8l is highly expressed in adipose tissues and murine and human adipogenic cell lines and is localized in the mitochondria of brown adipocytes. Stable overexpression of Nat8l in immortalized brown adipogenic cells strongly increases glucose incorporation into neutral lipids, accompanied by increased lipolysis, indicating an accelerated lipid turnover. Additionally, mitochondrial mass and number as well as oxygen consumption are elevated upon Nat8l overexpression. Concordantly, expression levels of brown marker genes, such as Prdm16, Cidea, Pgc1α, Pparα, and particularly UCP1, are markedly elevated in these cells. Treatment with a PPARα antagonist indicates that the increase in UCP1 expression and oxygen consumption is PPARα-dependent. Nat8l knockdown in brown adipocytes has no impact on cellular triglyceride content, lipogenesis, or oxygen consumption, but lipolysis and brown marker gene expression are increased; the latter is also observed in BAT of Nat8l-KO mice. Interestingly, the expression of ATP-citrate lyase is increased in Nat8l-silenced adipocytes and BAT of Nat8l-KO mice, indicating a compensatory mechanism to sustain the acetyl-CoA pool once Nat8l levels are reduced. Taken together, our data show that Nat8l impacts on the brown adipogenic phenotype and suggests the existence of the NAT8L-driven NAA metabolism as a novel pathway to provide cytosolic acetyl-CoA for lipid synthesis in adipocytes. PMID:24155240

  9. Modification of N-acetyltransferases and glutathione S-transferases by coffee components: possible relevance for cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Huber, Wolfgang W; Parzefall, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism are involved in the activation and detoxification of carcinogens and can play a pivotal role in the susceptibility of individuals toward chemically induced cancer. Differences in such susceptibility are often related to genetically predetermined enzyme polymorphisms but may also be caused by enzyme induction or inhibition through environmental factors or in the frame of chemopreventive intervention. In this context, coffee consumption, as an important lifestyle factor, has been under thorough investigation. Whereas the data on a potential procarcinogenic effect in some organs remained inconclusive, epidemiology has clearly revealed coffee drinkers to be at a lower risk of developing cancers of the colon and the liver and possibly of several other organs. The underlying mechanisms of such chemoprotection, modifications of xenobiotic metabolism in particular, were further investigated in rodent and in vitro models, as a result of which several individual chemoprotectants out of the >1000 constituents of coffee were identified as well as some strongly metabolized individual carcinogens against which they specifically protected. This chapter discusses the chemoprotective effects of several coffee components and whole coffee in association with modifications of the usually protective glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and the more ambivalent N-acetyltransferase (NAT). A key role is played by kahweol and cafestol (K/C), two diterpenic constituents of the unfiltered beverage that were found to reduce mutagenesis/tumorigenesis by strongly metabolized compounds, such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo-[4,5-b]pyridine, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and aflatoxin B(1), and to cause various modifications of xenobiotic metabolism that were overwhelmingly beneficial, including induction of GST and inhibition of NAT. Other coffee components such as polyphenols and K/C-free coffee are also capable of increasing GST and partially of inhibiting NAT

  10. Subfunctionalization of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferases in the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax: two-ones for one two.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Charles-Hubert; Cazaméa-Catalan, Damien; Zilberman-Peled, Bina; Herrera-Perez, Patricia; Sauzet, Sandrine; Magnanou, Elodie; Fuentès, Michael; Gothilf, Yoav; Muñoz-Cueto, Jose Antonio; Falcón, Jack; Besseau, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is an important component of the vertebrates circadian system, synthetized from serotonin by the successive action of the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat: serotonin→N-acetylserotonin) and acetylserotonin-O-methyltransferase (Asmt: N-acetylserotonin→melatonin). Aanat is responsible for the daily rhythm in melatonin production. Teleost fish are unique because they express two Aanat genes, aanat1 and aanat2, mainly expressed in the retina and pineal gland, respectively. In silico analysis indicated that the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication generated Aanat1 duplicates (aanat1a and aanat1b); some fish express both of them, while others express either one of the isoforms. Here, we bring the first information on the structure, function, and distribution of Aanat1a and Aanat1b in a teleost, the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Aanat1a and Aanat1b displayed a wide and distinct distribution in the nervous system and peripheral tissues, while Aanat2 appeared as a pineal enzyme. Co-expression of Aanats with asmt was found in the pineal gland and the three retinal nuclear layers. Enzyme kinetics indicated subtle differences in the affinity and catalytic efficiency of Aanat1a and Aanat1b for indolethylamines and phenylethylamines, respectively. Our data are consistent with the idea that Aanat2 is a pineal enzyme involved in melatonin production, while Aanat1 enzymes have a broader range of functions including melatonin synthesis in the retina, and catabolism of serotonin and dopamine in the retina and other tissues. The data are discussed in light of the recently uncovered roles of N-acetylserotonin and N-acetyldopamine as antioxidants, neuroprotectants, and modulators of cell proliferation and enzyme activities. PMID:26267754

  11. Elevated arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) gene expression in medial habenular and suprachiasmatic nuclei of hibernating ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Erik Z; Hallenbeck, John M; Cai, Decheng; McCarron, Richard M

    2002-06-15

    Hibernation, an adaptive response for energy conservation in mammals, involves a variety of physiological changes. Melatonin is linked with the regulation of core body temperature and intervenes in generating circadian cycles; its role in seasonal (circannual) rhythms of hibernation is explored here. Melatonin is primarily produced in the pineal gland. Since arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for synthesizing melatonin, AA-NAT gene expression was investigated to assess the possible role of melatonin in hibernation. The findings presented here utilized combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry methodologies to evaluate the AA-NAT mRNA expression in brains of both hibernating and non-hibernating ground squirrels. Brains were examined for the expression of AA-NAT mRNA using a oligonucleotide AA-NAT probe; antibody against neurofilament-70 (NF-70) was used as a neuronal marker. All hibernating animals expressed significantly (P<0.01) elevated levels of AA-NAT mRNA in both the epithalamic medial habenular nuclei (MHb) area and the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), which is also known as the master biologic clock. These findings represent the first demonstration of the expression of mRNA encoding for AA-NAT in the extra-pineal (i.e. SCN and MHb) sites of thirteen-lined ground squirrels and indicate that the habenular nucleus may be an important supplementary location for melatonin biosynthesis. The data presented here indicate that AA-NAT gene is one of the few specific genes up-regulated during hibernation and suggest that elevation of its expression in SCN and MHb may play an essential role in the generation and maintenance of hibernation. PMID:12191489

  12. Absence of Association between N-Acetyltransferase 2 Acetylator Status and Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility: Based on Evidence from 40 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Liang, Guo dong; Li, Jing ying; Zhu, Yi dan; Su, Yun tao

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives N-Acetyltransferase (NAT) 2 is an important enzyme involved in the metabolism of different xenobiotics, including potential carcinogens, whose phenotypes were reported to be related to individual susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the results remain conflicting. To assess the relationship between NAT2 phenotypes and CRC risk, we performed this meta-analysis. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all case-control or cohort studies of NAT2 acetylator status on the susceptibility of CRC by searching of PubMed and EMBASE, up to May 20, 2011. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association. Results A total of over 40,000 subjects from 40 published literatures were identified by searching the databases. No significantly elevated CRC risk in individuals with NAT2 slow acetylators compared with fast acetylators was found when all studies pooled (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.87–1.04, I2 = 52.6%). While three studies contributed to the source of heterogeneity were removed, there was still null result observed (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90–1.03, P = 0.17 for heterogeneity, I2 = 17.8%). In addition, we failed to detect any associations in the stratified analyses by race, sex, source of controls, smoking status, genotyping methods or tumor localization. No publication bias was observed in this study. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the NAT2 phenotypes may not be associated with colorectal cancer development. PMID:22403658

  13. Cloning and characterization of the serotonin N-acetyltransferase-2 gene (SNAT2) in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-09-01

    The penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis is serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), which exists as a single copy in mammals and plants. Our recent studies of the Arabidopsis snat-knockout mutant and SNAT RNAi rice (Oryza sativa) plants predicted the presence of at least one other SNAT isogene in plants; that is, the snat-knockout mutant of Arabidopsis and the SNAT RNAi rice plants still produced melatonin, even in the absence or the suppression of SNAT expression. Here, we report a molecular cloning of an SNAT isogene (OsSNAT2) from rice. The mature amino acid sequences of SNAT proteins indicated that OsSNAT2 and OsSNAT1 proteins had 39% identity values and 60% similarity. The Km and Vmax values of the purified recombinant OsSNAT2 were 371 μm and 4700 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively; the enzyme's optimal activity temperature was 45°C. Confocal microscopy showed that the OsSNAT2 protein was localized to both the cytoplasm and chloroplasts. The in vitro enzyme activity of OsSNAT2 was severely inhibited by melatonin, but the activities of sheep SNAT (OaSNAT) and rice OsSNAT1 proteins were not. The enzyme activity of OsSNAT2 was threefold higher than that of OsSNAT1, but 232-fold lower than that of OaSNAT. The OsSNAT1 and OsSNAT2 transcripts were similarly suppressed in rice leaves during the melatonin induction after cadmium treatment. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OsSNAT1 and OsSNAT2 are distantly related, suggesting that they evolved independently from Cyanobacteria prior to the endosymbiosis event. PMID:27121038

  14. Influence of polymorphic N-acetyltransferases on non-malignant spontaneous disorders and on response to drugs.

    PubMed

    Ladero, J M

    2008-07-01

    Polymorphic N-acetyl transferases (NAT) 1 and 2 are involved in detoxification of xenobiotic arylamines and hydralazines. These common environmental chemicals may be related to the pathogenesis of many spontaneous disorders, mainly malignancies, but also disimmune or degenerative diseases, for which a polygenic predisposition has been suggested. Hence, polymorphic NAT genes (NAT2 has been the most studied one) may be low-penetrance risk genes for some of these disorders. Although a relation of risk may be definitely discarded for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory bowel disease and endometriosis, more research is needed for rheumatoid arthritis, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Behçet's and periodontal diseases , as current results are inconclusive but suggest a possible relation with NAT2 polymorphism. In diabetes mellitus the possible relation with the rapid phenotype may be due to acquired metabolic changes and more genotyping studies are needed. NAT2 slow metabolizers are more prone to the side effects of polymorphically acetylated drugs, as is the SLE-like syndrome induced by hydralazine and procainamide, the side effects due to sulphasalazine and the skin rash secondary to many sulphonamides. Future research should be based on well-designed studies, with adequate sample sizes and homogeneous recruitment criteria, to obviate the proliferation of small studies that are time- and resource-consuming without offering definite answers. PMID:18680473

  15. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  16. Crystal structure of CmlI, the arylamine oxygenase from the chloramphenicol biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Knoot, Cory J; Kovaleva, Elena G; Lipscomb, John D

    2016-09-01

    The diiron cluster-containing oxygenase CmlI catalyzes the conversion of the aromatic amine precursor of chloramphenicol to the nitroaromatic moiety of the active antibiotic. The X-ray crystal structures of the fully active, N-terminally truncated CmlIΔ33 in the chemically reduced Fe(2+)/Fe(2+) state and a cis μ-1,2(η (1):η (1))-peroxo complex are presented. These structures allow comparison with the homologous arylamine oxygenase AurF as well as other types of diiron cluster-containing oxygenases. The structural model of CmlIΔ33 crystallized at pH 6.8 lacks the oxo-bridge apparent from the enzyme optical spectrum in solution at higher pH. In its place, residue E236 forms a μ-1,3(η (1):η (2)) bridge between the irons in both models. This orientation of E236 stabilizes a helical region near the cluster which closes the active site to substrate binding in contrast to the open site found for AurF. A very similar closed structure was observed for the inactive dimanganese form of AurF. The observation of this same structure in different arylamine oxygenases may indicate that there are two structural states that are involved in regulation of the catalytic cycle. Both the structural studies and single crystal optical spectra indicate that the observed cis μ-1,2(η (1):η (1))-peroxo complex differs from the μ-η (1):η (2)-peroxo proposed from spectroscopic studies of a reactive intermediate formed in solution by addition of O2 to diferrous CmlI. It is proposed that the structural changes required to open the active site also drive conversion of the µ-1,2-peroxo species to the reactive form. PMID:27229511

  17. Genetic variation in N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) and 2 (NAT2) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Schenk, Maryjean; Hein, David W.; Davis, Scott; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Cozen, Wendy; Cerhan, James R.; Hartge, Patricia; Welch, Robert; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Wang, Sophia S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Animal studies suggest that lymphomagenesis can be induced by exposure to carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines found in diet, cigarette smoke, and the environment, but human epidemiologic investigations of these exogenous exposures have yielded conflicting results. As part of our evaluation of the role of aromatic and heterocyclic amines, which are metabolized by N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes, in the etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we examined NHL risk in relation to genetic variation in NAT1 and NAT2 and exposure to cigarette smoke and dietary heterocyclic amines and mutagens. Methods We genotyped ten common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NAT1 and NAT2 among 1136 cases and 922 controls from a population-based case–control study in four geographic areas of the US. Relative risk of NHL for NAT1 and NAT2 genotypes, NAT2 acetylation phenotype, and exposure to cigarette smoke and dietary heterocyclic amines and mutagens was estimated using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from unconditional logistic regression models. Results We observed increased risk of NHL among individuals with the NAT1*10/*10 genotype compared with individuals with other NAT1 genotypes (OR=1.60, 95% CI 1.04–2.46, p=0.03). We also observed increased NHL risk in a dose-dependent model among NAT2 intermediate- and rapid-acetylators in comparison with slow-acetylators, although only the trend was statistically significant (intermediate: OR=1.18, 95% CI 0.97–1.44, p=0.1; rapid: OR=1.43, 95% CI 0.97–2.14, p=0.07; p for linear trend=0.03). Compared with nonsmokers, NHL risk estimates for current cigarette smoking were increased only among NAT2 intermediate/rapid-acetylators (OR=2.44, 95% CI 1.15–5.20, p=0.02). Conclusions Our data provide evidence that NAT1 and NAT2 genotypes are associated with NHL risk and support a contributory role for carcinogenic aromatic and/or heterocyclic amines in the multi-factorial etiology of

  18. Structural analysis of PseH, the Campylobacter jejuni N-acetyltransferase involved in bacterial O-linked glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wan Seok; Nam, Mi Sun; Namgung, Byeol; Yoon, Sung-il

    2015-03-20

    Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterium that uses flagella for motility and causes worldwide acute gastroenteritis in humans. The C. jejuni N-acetyltransferase PseH (cjPseH) is responsible for the third step in flagellin O-linked glycosylation and plays a key role in flagellar formation and motility. cjPseH transfers an acetyl group from an acetyl donor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to the amino group of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-N-acetyl-β-L-altrosamine to produce UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of cjPseH, crystal structures of cjPseH alone and in complex with AcCoA were determined at 1.95 Å resolution. cjPseH folds into a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by four α-helices with two continuously connected grooves. A deep groove (groove-A) accommodates the AcCoA molecule. Interestingly, the acetyl end of AcCoA points toward an open space in a neighboring shallow groove (groove-S), which is occupied by extra electron density that potentially serves as a pseudosubstrate, suggesting that the groove-S may provide a substrate-binding site. Structure-based comparative analysis suggests that cjPseH utilizes a unique catalytic mechanism of acetylation that has not been observed in other glycosylation-associated acetyltransferases. Thus, our studies on cjPseH will provide valuable information for the design of new antibiotics to treat C. jejuni-induced gastroenteritis. - Highlights: • cjPseH adopts a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by α-helices. • cjPseH features two continuously connected grooves on the protein surface. • Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) binds into a deep groove of cjPseH in an ‘L’ shape. • The acetyl end of AcCoA points to a wide groove, a potential substrate-binding site.

  19. Highly regioselective para-methylthiolation/bridging methylenation of arylamines promoted by NH4I.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinfeng; Cong, Tiantian; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2015-10-14

    Aryl methyl thioethers and methylene-bridged arylamines were synthesized via highly regioselective para-methylthiolation/bridging methylenation of arylamines using DMSO as the methylthio or methylene source in the presence of NH4I under metal-free conditions. For the substrates with both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents, the reaction proceeded smoothly and gave moderate to good yields. PMID:26337143

  20. Low melatonin production by suppression of either serotonin N-acetyltransferase or N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase in rice causes seedling growth retardation with yield penalty, abiotic stress susceptibility, and enhanced coleoptile growth under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) and N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) are the last two key enzymes for melatonin biosynthesis in living organisms. In this study, we demonstrated that transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants, in which expression of either endogenous SNAT or ASMT was suppressed, had reduced melatonin synthesis, confirming that both SNAT and ASMT are functionally involved in melatonin synthesis. The melatonin-deficient SNAT rice had retarded seedling growth, which was partially restored by exogenous melatonin application, suggesting melatonin's role in seedling growth. In addition, the plants were more sensitive to various abiotic stresses, including salt and cold, compared with the wild type. Melatonin-deficient SNAT rice had increased coleoptile growth under anoxic conditions, indicating that melatonin also inversely regulates plant growth under anaerobic conditions with the concomitant high expression of alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Similarly, the melatonin-deficient ASMT rice exhibited accelerated senescence in detached flag leaves, as well as significantly reduced yield. These loss-of-function studies on the melatonin biosynthetic genes confirmed most previous pharmacological reports that melatonin not only promotes plant growth but also mitigates various abiotic stresses. PMID:26919041

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and use as a molecular probe of a gene encoding an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase of broad substrate profile.

    PubMed Central

    Terán, F J; Suárez, J E; Mendoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase that was able to modify amikacin was cloned from a plasmid isolated from a clinical strain of Enterobacter cloacae. Sequencing of a 955-bp segment which mediates the modifying activity revealed a single open reading frame of 432 nucleotides that predicted a polypeptide of 144 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 16,021. Putative ribosomal binding sites and -10 and -35 sequences were located at the 5' end of the gene. The size of the polypeptide was confirmed through minicell analysis of the expression products of plasmids containing the sequence. The use of the gene as a molecular probe revealed its specificity toward strains harboring genes coding for related enzymes. This probe is therefore useful for epidemiological studies. Images PMID:2069376

  2. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphism as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication in tuberculous meningitis or tuberculoma patients having seizures - A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adole, Prashant S.; Kharbanda, Parampreet S.; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Simultaneous administration of phenytoin and isoniazid (INH) in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) or tuberculoma patients with seizures results in higher plasma phenytoin level and thus phenytoin intoxication. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) enzyme catalyses two acetylation reactions in INH metabolism and NAT2 gene polymorphism leads to slow and rapid acetylators. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of allelic variants of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene as a predisposing factor for phenytoin toxicity in patients with TBM or tuberculoma having seizures, and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously. Methods: Sixty patients with TBM or tuberculoma with seizures and taking INH and phenytoin simultaneously for a minimum period of seven days were included in study. Plasma phenytoin was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. NAT2 gene polymorphism was studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele specific PCR. Results: The patients were grouped into those having phenytoin intoxication and those with normal phenytoin level, and also classified as rapid or slow acetylators by NAT2 genotyping. Genotypic analysis showed that of the seven SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) of NAT2 gene studied, six mutations were found to be associated with phenytoin intoxication. For rs1041983 (C282T), rs1799929 (C481T), rs1799931 (G857A), rs1799930 (G590A), rs1208 (A803G) and rs1801280 (T341C) allelic variants, the proportion of homozygous mutant was higher in phenytoin intoxicated group than in phenytoin non-intoxicated group. Interpretation & conclusions: Homozygous mutant allele of NAT2 gene at 481site may act as a predisposing factor for phenytoin intoxication among TBM or tuberculoma patients having seizures. PMID:27488001

  3. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l, an N-acetyltransferase, in the nucleus accumbens attenuates the response to methamphetamine via activation of group II mGluRs in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yudai; Iegaki, Noriyuki; Sumi, Kazuyuki; Fu, Kequan; Sato, Keiji; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Uno, Kyosuke; Nitta, Atsumi

    2014-08-01

    A novel N-acetyltransferase, Shati/Nat8l, was identified in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice with methamphetamine (METH) treatment. Previously we reported that suppression of Shati/Nat8l enhanced METH-induced behavioral alterations via dopaminergic neuronal regulation. However, the physiological mechanisms of Shati/Nat8l on the dopaminergic system in the brain are unclear. In this study, we injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing Shati/Nat8l into the NAc or dorsal striatum (dS) of mice, to increase Shati/Nat8l expression. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, attenuated METH-induced hyperlocomotion, locomotor sensitization, and conditioned place preference in mice. Moreover, the Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc attenuated the elevation of extracellular dopamine levels induced by METH in in vivo microdialysis experiments. These behavioral and neurochemical alterations due to Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc were inhibited by treatment with selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 and 3 (mGluR2/3) antagonist LY341495. In the AAV vector-injected NAc, the tissue contents of both N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), endogenous mGluR3 agonist, were elevated. The injection of peptidase inhibitor of NAAG or the perfusion of NAAG itself reduced the basal levels of extracellular dopamine in the NAc of naive mice. These results indicate that Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, plays an important suppressive role in the behavioral responses to METH by controlling the dopaminergic system via activation of group II mGluRs. PMID:24559655

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of QdtC: an N-Acetyltransferase Required for the Biosynthesis of dTDP-3-Acetamido-3,6-Dideoxy-α-d-Glucose¶

    PubMed Central

    Thoden, James B.; Cook, Paul D.; Schäffer, Christina; Messner, Paul; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-01

    3-acetamido-3,6-didexoy-α-d-glucose or Quip3NAc is an unusual dideoxy sugar found in the O-antigens of various Gram-negative bacteria and in the S-layer glycoprotein glycans of some Gram-positive bacteria. It is produced in these organisms as a dTDP-linked sugar, with five enzymes ultimately required for its biosynthesis. The focus of this investigation is on the enzyme QdtC, a CoA-dependent N-acetyltransferase that catalyzes the last step in the Quip3NAc biosynthetic pathway. For this analysis, three crystal structures were determined: the wild-type enzyme in the presence of acetyl-CoA, and two ternary complexes of the enzyme with CoA and either dTDP-d-Quip3N or dTDP-3-amino-3,6-didexoy-α-d-galactose (dTDP-d-Fucp3N). Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme is dominated by a left-handed β-helix motif with 11 turns. The three active sites are located at the subunit:subunit interfaces, and the two dTDP-sugar ligands employed in this study bind to the protein in nearly identical manners. Those residues responsible for anchoring the hexose moieties of the dTDP-sugars to the protein include Glu 141, Asn 159, Asp 160 from one subunit and His 134 from another subunit. To probe the roles of various amino acid residues in the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, ten site-directed mutant proteins were constructed and their kinetic parameters measured. On the basis of these data, a catalytic mechanism is proposed for QdtC whereby the acetylation of the sugar amino group does not require a catalytic base provided by the protein. Rather, the sulfur of CoA functions as the ultimate proton acceptor. PMID:19191736

  5. Molecular mechanism of the enterococcal aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase': role of GNAT-conserved residues in the chemistry of antibiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Draker, Kari-ann; Wright, Gerard D

    2004-01-20

    The Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecium is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics due to the presence of a chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(6')-Ii]. This enzyme is a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily and is therefore structurally homologous to proteins that catalyze acetyl transfer to diverse acyl-accepting substrates. This study reports the investigation of several potential catalytic residues that are present in the AAC(6')-Ii active site and also conserved in many GNAT enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of Glu72, His74, Leu76, and Tyr147 with characterization of the purified site mutants gave valuable information about the roles of these amino acids in acetyl transfer chemistry. More specifically, steady-state kinetic analysis of protein activity, solvent viscosity effects, pH studies, and antibiotic resistance profiles were all used to assess the roles of Glu72 and His74 as potential active site bases, Tyr147 as a general acid, and the importance of the amide NH group of Leu76 in transition-state stabilization. Taken together, our results indicate that Glu72 is not involved in general base catalysis, but is instead critical for the proper positioning and orientation of aminoglycoside substrates in the active site. Similarly, His74 is also not acting as the active site base, with pH studies revealing that this residue must be protonated for optimal AAC(6')-Ii activity. Mutation of Tyr147 was found not to affect the chemical step of catalysis, and our results were not consistent with this residue acting as a general acid. Last, the amide NH group of Leu76 is implicated in important interactions with acetyl-CoA and transition-state stabilization. In summary, the work described here provides important information regarding the molecular mechanism of AAC(6')-Ii catalysis that allows us to contrast our findings with those of other GNAT proteins and to demonstrate that these enzymes

  6. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article “Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG” published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  7. Cloning of Arabidopsis serotonin N-acetyltransferase and its role with caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in the biosynthesis of melatonin in vitro despite their different subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Kyungjin; Lee, Hye-Jung; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-11-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis. We cloned SNAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSNAT) and functionally characterized this enzyme for the first time from dicotyledonous plants. Similar to rice SNAT, AtSNAT was found to localize to chloroplasts with peak enzyme activity at 45 °C (Km , 309 μm; Vmax , 1400 pmol/min/mg protein). AtSNAT also catalyzed 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) into melatonin with high catalytic activity (Km , 51 μm; Vmax , 5300 pmol/min/mg protein). In contrast, Arabidopsis caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (AtCOMT) localized to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, AtCOMT can methylate serotonin into 5-MT with low catalytic activity (Km , 3.396 mm; Vmax , 528 pmol/min/mg protein). These data suggest that serotonin can be converted into either N-acetylserotonin by SNAT or into 5-MT by COMT, after which it is metabolized into melatonin by COMT or SNAT, respectively. To support this hypothesis, serotonin was incubated in the presence of both AtSNAT and AtCOMT enzymes. In addition to melatonin production, the production of major intermediates depended on incubation temperatures; N-acetylserotonin was predominantly produced at high temperatures (45 °C), while low temperatures (37 °C) favored the production of 5-MT. Our results provide biochemical evidence for the presence of a serotonin O-methylation pathway in plant melatonin biosynthesis. PMID:25250906

  8. Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R regulates arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase synthesis via internal ribosomal entry site-mediated translation in a circadian manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Rim; Kim, Tae-Don; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Youngseob; Lee, Dohyun; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-11-01

    Rhythmic arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) synthesis is a prominent circadian-controlled response that occurs in most mammals. AANAT is the core enzyme in melatonin production; because melatonin participates in many physiological processes, the regulation of AANAT is an important research topic. In this study, we focused on the role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) in the translation of AANAT. A novel RNA-binding protein hnRNP R widely interacted with the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of AANAT mRNA and contributed to translation through an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Fine-tuning of AANAT protein synthesis occurred in response to knockdown and overexpression of hnRNP R. Nocturnal elevation of AANAT protein was dependent on the rhythmic changes of hnRNP R, whose levels are elevated in the pineal gland during nighttime. Increases in hnRNP R additionally improved AANAT production in rat pinealocytes under norepinephrine (NE) treatment. These results suggest that cap-independent translation of AANAT mRNA plays a role in the rhythmic synthesis of melatonin through the recruitment of translational machinery to hnRNP R-bound AANAT mRNA. PMID:26444903

  9. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article "Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG" published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  10. Characterization, Localization, Essentiality, and High-Resolution Crystal Structure of Glucosamine 6-Phosphate N-Acetyltransferase from Trypanosoma brucei ▿ ‡ §

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Karina; Güther, M. Lucia Sampaio; Wernimont, Amy K.; Qiu, Wei; Hui, Raymond; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2011-01-01

    A gene predicted to encode Trypanosoma brucei glucosamine 6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase (TbGNA1; EC 2.3.1.4) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was enzymatically active, and its high-resolution crystal structure was obtained at 1.86 Å. Endogenous TbGNA1 protein was localized to the peroxisome-like microbody, the glycosome. A bloodstream-form T. brucei GNA1 conditional null mutant was constructed and shown to be unable to sustain growth in vitro under nonpermissive conditions, demonstrating that there are no metabolic or nutritional routes to UDP-GlcNAc other than via GlcNAc-6-phosphate. Analysis of the protein glycosylation phenotype of the TbGNA1 mutant under nonpermissive conditions revealed that poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures were greatly reduced in the parasite and that the glycosylation profile of the principal parasite surface coat component, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), was modified. The significance of results and the potential of TbGNA1 as a novel drug target for African sleeping sickness are discussed. PMID:21531872

  11. rs1495741 as a tag single nucleotide polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype associates bladder cancer risk and interacts with smoking

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chong; Gu, Liyan; Yang, Mingyuan; Zhang, Zhensheng; Zeng, Shuxiong; Song, Ruixiang; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rs1495741 has been identified to infer N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) acetylator phenotype, and to decrease the risk of bladder cancer. However, a number of studies conducted in various regions showed controversial results. To quantify the association between rs1495741 and the risk of bladder cancer and to estimate the interaction effect of this genetic variant with smoking, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis involving 14,815 cases and 58,282 controls from 29 studies. Our results indicates rs1495741 significantly associated with bladder cancer risk (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.82–0.89, test for heterogeneity P = 0.36, I2 = 7.0%). And we verified this association in populations from Europe, America, and Asia. Further, our stratified meta-analysis showed rs1495741's role is typically evident only in ever smokers, which suggests its interaction with smoking. This study may provide new insight into gene-environment study on bladder cancer. PMID:27495060

  12. Unique arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase-2 polymorphism in salmonids and profound variations in thermal stability and catalytic efficiency conferred by two residues.

    PubMed

    Cazaméa-Catalan, D; Magnanou, E; Helland, R; Besseau, L; Boeuf, G; Falcón, J; Jørgensen, E H

    2013-05-15

    Melatonin contributes to synchronizing major biological and behavioral functions with cyclic changes in the environment. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is responsible for a daily rhythm in melatonin secretion. Teleost possess two enzyme forms, AANAT1 and AANAT2, preferentially expressed in the retina and the pineal gland, respectively. The concomitant action of light and temperature shapes the daily and seasonal changes in melatonin secretion: the former controls duration while the latter modulates amplitude. Investigating the respective roles of light and temperature is particularly relevant in the context of global warming, which is likely to affect the way fish decode and anticipate seasonal changes, with dramatic consequences on their physiology and behavior. Here we investigated the impact of temperature on pineal melatonin secretion of a migratory species, the Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), the northernmost living and cold-adapted salmonid. We show that temperature directly impacts melatonin production in cultured pineal glands. We also show that one organ expresses two AANAT2 transcripts displaying high similarity between them and with trout Oncorhynchus mykiss AANAT2, differing by only two amino acid sites. We compared the kinetics and 3D models of these enzymes as well as of a chimeric construct, particularly with regard to their response to temperature. Our study brings interesting and new information on the evolutionary diversity of AANAT enzymes in teleosts and the role played by specific residues in the catalytic properties of the enzymes. PMID:23393284

  13. A test method for the measurement of arylamines in stationary source emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.R.; Pate, B.A.; Wright, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 lists eighteen arylamines as hazardous air pollutants to be regulated. The eighteen arylamines range from semivolatile to almost nonvolatile, from almost water-insoluble to hygroscopic, from thermally quite stable to unstable, and from fairly toxic to confirmed human carcinogens. This paper presents a report on progress in the development of a method to measure this quite disparate group of compounds in stationary source emissions. The proposed method involves collection in an acidic aqueous solution, sorption of collected arylamines on a cation exchange resin, desorption of arylamines from the resin with a small volume of a basic solution, and separation and measurement by high pressure liquid chromatography with photodiode array (HPLC-PDA) detection. Evaluation of cation exchange resins and resin elution solvents and the analytical portions of the method are being conducted using a subset of eight arylamines: aniline, chloramben, 2,4-diaminotoluene, N,N-dimethylaniline, 3,3`-dimethylbenzidine, quinoline, o-toluidine, and trifluralin. Sorption on a solid-phase extraction resin (LC-SCX, Supelco) followed by elution off the resin with a 2.2 normal solution of ammonia in a 50:35:15 mixture of 1-butanol, 1-propanol, and water gave the best recoveries of the test compounds (except chloramben, which contains a carboxylic acid group and does not elute) from the acidified collection solution. The compounds were separated on an Alltech Alltima C18 5{mu}m, 150 {times} 4.6 mm HPLC column using solvent programming with acetonitrile and either water or an acetate/acetic acid pH 7 buffer. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Identification of N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) Transcription Start Sites and Quantitation of NAT2-specific mRNA in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Anwar; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Doll, Mark A.; States, J. Christopher; Barker, David F.; Hein, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genetic polymorphism is associated with drug toxicity and/or carcinogenesis in various tissues. Knowledge of NAT2 gene structure and expression are critical for understanding these associations. Previous findings suggest that human NAT2 expression is highest in liver and gut, but expressed at functional levels in other tissues. A sensitive and specific TaqMan reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay with intron-spanning primers was developed and used, together with a second TaqMan RT-PCR assay based on amplification of a NAT2 open reading frame (ORF) exon segment, to measure NAT2 mRNA in 29 different human tissues. Cap-dependent amplification of mRNA 5′ termini and review of public database information was done to more precisely define the NAT2 promoter(s) and to validate the quantitative RT-PCR assay design. The great majority (40/41) of NAT2 liver cDNAs had 5′ termini between 8682 and 8752 nucleotides upstream of the NAT2 ORF exon, and 34/40 5′-termini were at the -8711 and -8716 adenines. All of 59 NAT2 cDNAs with 5′ termini in this vicinity, including 40 of the liver isolates and 19 cDNAs in public databases from liver and other sources, showed direct splicing to the ORF exon, with no other non-coding exon detected. NAT2 mRNA was highest in liver, small intestine and colon and readily detected in most other tissues albeit at much lower levels. NAT2 expression in diverse human tissues provides further mechanistic support underlying associations between NAT2 genetic polymorphism, drug toxicity and/or chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:17287389

  15. Association Between N-acetyltransferase 2 Polymorphism and Bladder Cancer Risk: Results From Studies of the Past Decade and a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoran; Wang, Xugang; Zhang, Liang; Mo, Naixin; Lv, Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have identified that the slow acetylation status of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is associated with an elevated bladder cancer risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of NAT2 acetylation status in patients with bladder cancer. Electronic databases were searched to retrieve related studies published in the past decade. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to calculate the strength of this relationship. Overall, a total of 18 studies were selected for the analysis, which included 4473 bladder cancer cases and 7204 matched controls. Our result showed that the NAT2 slow acetylation phenotypes were significantly associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer compared with the rapid phenotypes (OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.33-1.82; P < .00001) in a random-effect model. This significant association was also found in a subgroup analysis of ethnicity (P < .05). Furthermore, the NAT2 slow phenotypes also significantly increased the risk of bladder cancer in smokers (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.62-0.90; P = .002). However, no correlation was found between the combined effect of NAT2 slow phenotypes and gender with bladder cancer risk (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.28-2.78; P = .84). In conclusion, our results suggest that the NAT2 slow acetylator, in particular, the NAT2 slow acetylator combined with smoking, are associated with an increased bladder cancer risk. Future well-designed studies with large populations and more ethnicities are needed to clarify this association further. PMID:26585839

  16. AB105. Rs1495741 as a tag single nucleotide polymorphism of N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype associates bladder cancer risk and interacts with smoking

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rs1495741 has been identified to infer N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) acetylator phenotype, and to decrease the risk of bladder cancer. However, a number of studies conducted in various regions showed controversial results. To quantify the association between rs1495741 and the risk of bladder cancer, and to estimate the interaction effect of this genetic variant with smoking, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis involving 14815 cases and 58282 controls from 29 studies. Methods A comprehensive online search was conducted on Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, WanFang Data. The association strength of rs1495741 and bladder cancer risk was measured by odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI. The association between bladder cancer and smoking status of the included populations were first estimated by pooled OR. Then the interaction of rs1495741 and smoking was investigated by stratified analysis by smoking habits (ever and never smoking groups). Results Our results indicates rs1495741 significantly associated with bladder cancer risk (OR =0.85, 95% CI =0.82–0.89, test for heterogeneity P=0.36, I2 =7.0%). And we verified this association in populations from Europe, America and Asian. Further, our stratified meta-analysis showed rs1495741’s role is typically evident only in ever smokers, which suggesting its interaction with smoking. Conclusions Our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates the association of SNP rs1495741, smoking and bladder cancer risk in populations from Europe, America and Asia. And we confirmed this association in ever smoker population only, which suggests the underlying mechanism of this association could be rs1495741’s role as a tag SNP of NAT2 acetylation phenotype. Our results may provide new insights in gene-environmental study on bladder cancer.

  17. Refinement of the prediction of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotypes with respect to enzyme activity and urinary bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ickstadt, Katja; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) are well known to modify urinary bladder cancer risk as well as efficacy and toxicity of pharmaceuticals via reduction in the enzyme's acetylation capacity. Nevertheless, the discussion about optimal NAT2 phenotype prediction, particularly differentiation between different degrees of slow acetylation, is still controversial. Therefore, we investigated the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms and their haplotypes on slow acetylation in vivo and on bladder cancer risk. For this purpose, we used a study cohort of 1,712 bladder cancer cases and 2,020 controls genotyped for NAT2 by RFLP-PCR and for the tagSNP rs1495741 by TaqMan(®) assay. A subgroup of 344 individuals was phenotyped by the caffeine test in vivo. We identified an 'ultra-slow' acetylator phenotype based on combined *6A/*6A, *6A/*7B and *7B/*7B genotypes containing the homozygous minor alleles of C282T (rs1041983, *6A, *7B) and G590A (rs1799930, *6A). 'Ultra-slow' acetylators have significantly about 32 and 46 % lower activities of caffeine metabolism compared with other slow acetylators and with the *5B/*5B genotypes, respectively (P < 0.01, both). The 'ultra-slow' genotype showed an association with bladder cancer risk in the univariate analysis (OR = 1.31, P = 0.012) and a trend adjusted for age, gender and smoking habits (OR = 1.22, P = 0.082). In contrast, slow acetylators in general were not associated with bladder cancer risk, neither in the univariate (OR = 1.02, P = 0.78) nor in the adjusted (OR = 0.98, P = 0.77) analysis. In conclusion, this study suggests that NAT2 phenotype prediction should be refined by consideration of an 'ultra-slow' acetylation genotype. PMID:24221535

  18. Molecular Structure of WlbB, a Bacterial N-Acetyltransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2010-09-08

    The pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis contain in their outer membranes the rare sugar 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid. Five enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of this sugar starting from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. One of these, referred to as WlbB, is an N-acetyltransferase that converts UDP-2-acetamido-3-amino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NA) to UDP-2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NAcA). Here we report the three-dimensional structure of WlbB from Bordetella petrii. For this analysis, two ternary structures were determined to 1.43 {angstrom} resolution: one in which the protein was complexed with acetyl-CoA and UDP and the second in which the protein contained bound CoA and UDP-GlcNAc3NA. WlbB adopts a trimeric quaternary structure and belongs to the L{beta}H superfamily of N-acyltransferases. Each subunit contains 27 {beta}-strands, 23 of which form the canonical left-handed {beta}-helix. There are only two hydrogen bonds that occur between the protein and the GlcNAc3NA moiety, one between O{sup {delta}1} of Asn 84 and the sugar C-3{prime} amino group and the second between the backbone amide group of Arg 94 and the sugar C-5{prime} carboxylate. The sugar C-3{prime} amino group is ideally positioned in the active site to attack the si face of acetyl-CoA. Given that there are no protein side chains that can function as general bases within the GlcNAc3NA binding pocket, a reaction mechanism is proposed for WlbB whereby the sulfur of CoA ultimately functions as the proton acceptor required for catalysis.

  19. N-acetyltransferase genotypes and the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of para-aminosalicylic acid in patients with drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sy, Sherwin K B; de Kock, Lizanne; Diacon, Andreas H; Werely, Cedric J; Xia, Huiming; Rosenkranz, Bernd; van der Merwe, Lize; Donald, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between N-acetyltransferase genotypes, pharmacokinetics, and tolerability of granular slow-release para-aminosalicylic acid (GSR-PAS) in tuberculosis patients. The study was a randomized, two-period, open-label, crossover design wherein each patient received 4 g GSR-PAS twice daily or 8 g once daily alternately. The PAS concentration-time profiles were modeled by a one-compartment disposition model with three transit compartments in series to describe its absorption. Patients' NAT1 and NAT2 genotypes were determined by sequencing and restriction enzyme analysis, respectively. The number of daily vomits was modeled by a Poisson probability mass function. Comparisons of other tolerability measures by regimens, gender, and genotypes were evaluated by a linear mixed-effects model. The covariate effects associated with efavirenz, gender, and NAT1*3, NAT1*14, and NAT2*5 alleles corresponded to 25, 37, -17, -48, and -27% changes, respectively, in oral clearance of PAS. The NAT1*10 allele did not influence drug clearance. The time above the MIC of 1 mg/liter was significantly different between the two regimens but not influenced by the NAT1 or NAT2 genotypes. The occurrence and intensity of intolerance differed little between regimens. Four grams of GSR-PAS twice daily but not 8 g once daily ensured concentrations exceeding the MIC (1 mg/liter) throughout the dosing interval; PAS intolerance was not related to maximum PAS concentrations over the doses studied and was not more frequent after once-daily dosing. We confirm that the slow phenotype conferred by the NAT1*14 and NAT1*3 alleles resulted in higher PAS exposure but found no evidence of increased activity of the NAT1*10 allele. PMID:25963985

  20. N-Acetyltransferase Genotypes and the Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of para-Aminosalicylic Acid in Patients with Drug-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    de Kock, Lizanne; Diacon, Andreas H.; Werely, Cedric J.; Xia, Huiming; Rosenkranz, Bernd; van der Merwe, Lize; Donald, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between N-acetyltransferase genotypes, pharmacokinetics, and tolerability of granular slow-release para-aminosalicylic acid (GSR-PAS) in tuberculosis patients. The study was a randomized, two-period, open-label, crossover design wherein each patient received 4 g GSR-PAS twice daily or 8 g once daily alternately. The PAS concentration-time profiles were modeled by a one-compartment disposition model with three transit compartments in series to describe its absorption. Patients' NAT1 and NAT2 genotypes were determined by sequencing and restriction enzyme analysis, respectively. The number of daily vomits was modeled by a Poisson probability mass function. Comparisons of other tolerability measures by regimens, gender, and genotypes were evaluated by a linear mixed-effects model. The covariate effects associated with efavirenz, gender, and NAT1*3, NAT1*14, and NAT2*5 alleles corresponded to 25, 37, −17, −48, and −27% changes, respectively, in oral clearance of PAS. The NAT1*10 allele did not influence drug clearance. The time above the MIC of 1 mg/liter was significantly different between the two regimens but not influenced by the NAT1 or NAT2 genotypes. The occurrence and intensity of intolerance differed little between regimens. Four grams of GSR-PAS twice daily but not 8 g once daily ensured concentrations exceeding the MIC (1 mg/liter) throughout the dosing interval; PAS intolerance was not related to maximum PAS concentrations over the doses studied and was not more frequent after once-daily dosing. We confirm that the slow phenotype conferred by the NAT1*14 and NAT1*3 alleles resulted in higher PAS exposure but found no evidence of increased activity of the NAT1*10 allele. PMID:25963985

  1. Chemical and electrochemical oxidation of C8-arylamine adducts of 2′-deoxyguanosine

    PubMed Central

    Stover, James S.; Ciobanu, Madalina; Cliffel, David E.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical and chemical oxidation of a series of C8-arylamine adducts of 2′-deoxyguanosine has been examined. The oxidations were found to be reversible by cyclic and square-wave voltammetry in both aqueous buffer and aprotic organic solvent. The mechanism of the oxidation in protic media was either one- or two-electron depending on the aryl group. The chemical oxidation resulted in guanidinohydantoin and spiroiminodihydantoin rearrangement products similar to those observed for 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine. PMID:17256856

  2. Role of chemical reactions of arylamine hole transport materials in operational degradation of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondakov, Denis Y.

    2008-10-15

    We report that the representative arylamine hole transport materials undergo chemical transformations in operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. Although the underlying chemical mechanisms are too complex to be completely elucidated, structures of several identified degradation products point at dissociations of relatively weak carbon-nitrogen and carbon-carbon bonds in arylamine molecules as the initiating step. Considering the photochemical reactivities, the bond dissociation reactions of arylamines occur by the homolysis of the lowest singlet excited states formed by recombining charge carriers in the operating OLED device. The subsequent chemical reactions are likely to yield long-lived, stabilized free radicals capable of acting as deep traps--nonradiative recombination centers and fluorescence quenchers. Their presence in the hole transport layer results in irreversible hole trapping and manifests as a positive fixed charge. The extent and localization of chemical transformations in several exemplary devices suggest that the free radical reactions of hole transporting materials, arylamines, can be sufficient to account for the observed luminance efficiency loss and voltage rise in operating OLEDs. The relative bond strengths and excited state energies of OLED materials appear to have a determining effect on the operational stability of OLED devices.

  3. Urinary mutagenicity and N-acetylation phenotype in textile industry workers exposed to arylamines

    SciTech Connect

    Sinues, B.; Perez, J.; Bernal, M.L.; Saenz, M.A.; Lanuza, J.; Bartolome, M. )

    1992-09-15

    Primary aromatic amines have been identified epidemiologically as human carcinogens. It has been suggested that the target organ affected by aromatic amines is dependent on the rate of metabolic activation. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between low acetyl transferase activity and bladder cancer risk. On this basis, our working hypothesis was that the slow acetylators could follow in a higher extent the metabolic pathway independent of N-acetylation, leading to the excretion of conjugates of electrophyles with glucuronic acid. The instability of these glucuronides could be responsible for the association between arylamine-induced bladder cancer and slow acetylator phenotype. A total of 153 individuals were included in this study: 70 exposed to arylamines (working in textile industry) and 83 nonexposed. The following parameters were determined in urine: mutagenic index in the absence of metabolic activation, S9; mutagenic index in the presence of S9; and the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase. All individuals were phenotyped according to their capacity of N-acetylation by using isoniazid as drug test. The results show that the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase is statistically higher in exposed subjects when compared with nonexposed individuals (P less than 0.001), this parameter being statistically higher among exposed subjects who were slow acetylators than among rapid metabolizers, independent of the fact that they were smokers or nonsmokers. There were no significant differences between groups for the mutagenicity in urine not incubated with beta-glucuronidase.

  4. Structures of the N-acetyltransferase domain of Xylella fastidiosa N-acetyl-l-glutamate synthase/kinase with and without a His tag bound to N-acetyl-l-glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2015-01-01

    Structures of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain of the bifunctional N-acetyl-l-glutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Xylella fastidiosa bound to N-acetyl-l-glutamate (NAG) with and without an N-terminal His tag have been solved and refined at 1.7 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. The NAT domain with an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 51.72, c = 242.31 Å. Two subunits form a molecular dimer in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼41% solvent. The NAT domain without an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.48, b = 122.34, c = 75.88 Å, β = 107.6°. Eight subunits, which form four molecular dimers, were identified in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼38% solvent. The structures with and without the N-terminal His tag provide an opportunity to evaluate how the His tag affects structure and function. Furthermore, multiple subunits in different packing environments allow an assessment of the plasticity of the NAG binding site, which might be relevant to substrate binding and product release. The dimeric structure of the X. fastidiosa N-acetytransferase (xfNAT) domain is very similar to that of human N-acetyltransferase (hNAT), reinforcing the notion that mammalian NAGS is evolutionally derived from bifunctional bacterial NAGS/K. PMID:25615976

  5. Structures of the N-acetyltransferase domain of Xylella fastidiosa N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase with and without a His tag bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2015-01-01

    Structures of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain of the bifunctional N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Xylella fastidiosa bound to N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) with and without an N-terminal His tag have been solved and refined at 1.7 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. The NAT domain with an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a=b=51.72, c=242.31 Å. Two subunits form a molecular dimer in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼41% solvent. The NAT domain without an N-terminal His tag crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a=63.48, b=122.34, c=75.88 Å, β=107.6°. Eight subunits, which form four molecular dimers, were identified in the asymmetric unit, which contains ∼38% solvent. The structures with and without the N-terminal His tag provide an opportunity to evaluate how the His tag affects structure and function. Furthermore, multiple subunits in different packing environments allow an assessment of the plasticity of the NAG binding site, which might be relevant to substrate binding and product release. The dimeric structure of the X. fastidiosa N-acetytransferase (xfNAT) domain is very similar to that of human N-acetyltransferase (hNAT), reinforcing the notion that mammalian NAGS is evolutionally derived from bifunctional bacterial NAGS/K. PMID:25615976

  6. Interface energetics of polyfluorene and fluorene-arylamine copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jaehyung; Kahn, Antoine

    2006-08-01

    The energy level alignment at interfaces between poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene) (F8), poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-diphenylamine) (TFB) and poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) and substrates with work function ranging from 4.3 eV to 5.1 eV is investigated via ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy. Vacuum level alignment with flat bands away from the interface is found when the interface hole barrier is 0.6 eV or larger. Band bending that moves the filled states away from the Fermi level occurs when the hole barrier is smaller than 0.4 eV. This is presumably due to the accumulation of excess interface charges on the polymer side when the interfacial barrier is small. The resulting field shifts the polymer levels in a way that limits charge penetration in the bulk of the film. We also study metal-on-polymer interfaces. Different metals exhibit different growth modes. While Pt shows complete layer-by-layer type of growth, Al shows island type of growth. Current-voltage measurement shows the presence of hole traps in the Au-on top-contact device, suggesting diffusion of small Au clusters into the polymer film. Furthermore, metal-on-polymer interfaces frequently present different interface energetics than their polymer-on-metal counterpart. e.g. a 0.3 - 0.4 eV higher hole injection barrier for Pt-on-TFB than TFB on Pt.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of arylamine derivatives of rauwolscine as molecular probes for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, S.M.; Graham, R.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Repaske, M.G.; Nunnari, J.M.; Limbird, L.E.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist rauwolscine was structurally modified to yield a series of arylamine carboxamide derivatives, which were investigated as potential molecular probes for the localization and structural characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. The arylamine carboxamides differ in the number of carbon atoms separating the reactive phenyl moiety from the fused ring structure of the parent compound, rauwolscine carboxylate. Competitive inhibition studies with (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine in rat kidney membranes indicate that the affinity for the carboxamide derivatives is inversely related to the length of the carbon spacer arm with rauwolscine 4-aminophenyl carboxamide exhibiting the highest affinity (Kd = 2.3 +/- 0.2 nM). Radioiodination of rau-AMPC yields a ligand, /sup 125/I-rau-AMPC, which binds to rat kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptors with high affinity, as determined by both kinetic analysis (Kd = k2/k1 = 0.016 min-1/2.1 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 0.76 nM) and equilibrium binding studies (Kd = 0.78 +/- 0.16 nM). /sup 125/I-rau-AMPC was quantitatively converted to the photolabile arylazide derivative 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-azido-3-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl) carboxamide (/sup 125/I-rau-AZPC). In a partially purified receptor preparation from porcine brain, this compound photolabels a major (Mr = 62,000) peptide. The labeling of this peptide is inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with a rank order of potency consistent with an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor binding site. Both /sup 125/I-rau-AMPC and the photolabile arylazide derivative, /sup 125/I-rau-AZPC, should prove useful as molecular probes for the structural and biochemical characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors.

  8. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  9. Arylamine-DNA adducts in vitro and in vivo: their role in bacterial mutagenesis and urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beland, Frederick A.; Beranek, David T.; Dooley, Kenneth L.; Heflich, Robert H.; Kadlubar, Fred F.

    1983-01-01

    Hepatic N-oxidation, followed by N-glucuronidation, has been proposed as a route of metabolic activation for arylamine bladder carcinogens. It is postulated that the N-glucuronides are transported to the bladder lumen where they are hydrolyzed under slightly acidic conditions to release direct-acting carcinogenic and mutagenic N-hydroxyarylamines. In this study, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 1-naphthylamine (1-NA), 2-naphthylamine (2-NA), 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 4-nitrobiphenyl (NBP), benzidine (BZ), and N-acetylbenzidine (ABZ) were administered to male beagle dogs (60 μmole/kg), and the bladder epithelium DNA adducts were quantified at various times after treatment. At 24-48 hr after administration, the order of binding to bladder epithelium DNA was: ABP >> AAF > NBP ≅ 2-NA≅BZ ≅ ABZ >> 1-NA. The level of DNA modification by ABP remained constant for 7 days, whereas 2-NA and AAF residues decreased by 35% and 80%, respectively. The extent and relative persistence of total DNA binding correlated with the compounds' ability to induce bladder tumors in dogs. ABP, AAF, NBP, 2-NA and ABZ administration resulted in DNA binding sufficient for adduct analysis. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA and examination of the adducts by high pressure liquid chromatography indicated that arylamine substitution at C8 of deoxyguanosine was the dominant product. Additional adducts were detected in animals treated with ABP, NBP, and 2-NA. Furthermore, the profiles of adducts obtained in vivo were remarkably similar to the profiles obtained when the N-hydroxy arylamine metabolites of these carcinogens were reacted with DNA in vitro at pH 5.0. To evaluate the mutagenic potential of these arylamine-DNA adducts, Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 1535 and TA 1538 were incubated with N-hydroxy-2-NA, N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene (AF), N-hydroxy-ABP, and N-hydroxy-ABZ and the resulting DNA adducts and reversions were quantified. Arylamine-C8-deoxyguanosine substitution was correlated with

  10. NF-κB Drives the Synthesis of Melatonin in RAW 264.7 Macrophages by Inducing the Transcription of the Arylalkylamine-N-Acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Pires-Lapa, Marco Antonio; Monteiro, Alex Willian Arantes; Cecon, Erika; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Markus, Regina P.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that during inflammatory responses the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) induces the synthesis of melatonin by macrophages and that macrophage-synthesized melatonin modulates the function of these professional phagocytes in an autocrine manner. Expression of a DsRed2 fluorescent reporter driven by regions of the aa-nat promoter, that encodes the key enzyme involved in melatonin synthesis (arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase), containing one or two upstream κB binding sites in RAW 264.7 macrophage cell lines was repressed when NF-κB activity was inhibited by blocking its nuclear translocation or its DNA binding activity or by silencing the transcription of the RelA or c-Rel NF-κB subunits. Therefore, transcription of aa-nat driven by NF-κB dimers containing RelA or c-Rel subunits mediates pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced melatonin synthesis in macrophages. Furthermore, melatonin acts in an autocrine manner to potentiate macrophage phagocytic activity, whereas luzindole, a competitive antagonist of melatonin receptors, decreases macrophage phagocytic activity. The opposing functions of NF-κB in the modulation of AA-NAT expression in pinealocytes and macrophages may represent the key mechanism for the switch in the source of melatonin from the pineal gland to immune-competent cells during the development of an inflammatory response. PMID:23284853

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-Acetyltransferase Domain of Human N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Synthase in Complex with N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Provides Insights into Its Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  12. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  13. Capturing Labile Sulfenamide and Sulfinamide Serum Albumin Adducts of Carcinogenic Arylamines by Chemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lijuan; Turesky, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are a class of structurally related carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high temperature cooking of meats. These procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-oxidation of the exocyclic amine group to produce N-hydroxylated metabolites, which are critical intermediates implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. The arylhydroxylamines and their oxidized arylnitroso derivatives can also react with cysteine (Cys) residues of glutathione or proteins to form, respectively, sulfenamide and sulfinamide adducts. However, sulfur-nitrogen linked adducted proteins are often difficult to detect because they are unstable and undergo hydrolysis during proteolytic digestion. Synthetic N-oxidized intermediates of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a carcinogenic HAA produced in cooked meats, and 4-aminobiphenyl, a carcinogenic aromatic amine present in tobacco smoke were reacted with human serum albumin (SA) and formed labile sulfenamide or sulfinamide adducts at the Cys34 residue. Oxidation of the carcinogen-modified SA with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (m-CPBA) produced the arylsulfonamide adducts, which were stable to heat and the chemical reduction conditions employed to denature SA. The sulfonamide adducts of PhIP and 4-ABP were identified, by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, in proteolytic digests of denatured SA. Thus, selective oxidation of arylamine-modified SA produces stable arylsulfonamide-SA adducts, which may serve as biomarkers of these tobacco and dietary carcinogens. PMID:23240913

  14. Understanding the Highly Varying pKa of Arylamines. A Perspective from the Average Local Ionization Condensed-to-Atom Framework.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eduardo; Duque-Noreña, Mario

    2015-07-23

    The highly varying experimental pKa values for 36 arylamines spanning 7 orders of magnitude is carefully examined. Within this framework, a valence condensed-to-atom model for the average ionization energy is introduced and tested. The theoretical approach is connected to orbital Fukui functions directly mapped into semilocal or regional site-specific responses. It is revealed that the average local ionization energies associated with the amino nitrogen atom is linearly correlated to the basicity of the substituted arylamines, properly reproducing the experimental ordering of basicity. The condensed-to-atom descriptor exhibits a high predictive power, providing a new direct reactivity evaluation of significant value. PMID:26107310

  15. Synthesis of tertiary arylamines: Lewis acid-catalyzed direct reductive N-alkylation of secondary amines with ketones through an alternative pathway.

    PubMed

    Nayal, Onkar S; Thakur, Maheshwar S; Bhatt, Vinod; Kumar, Manoranjan; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Sharma, Upendra

    2016-08-11

    We report herein a highly efficient, tin(ii)/PMHS catalyzed reductive N-alkylation of arylamines with ketones affording tertiary arylamines. A very wide substrate scope was observed for the current catalytic method as all six permutations of ketones/aldehydes/heterocyclic carbonyls and primary/secondary/heterocyclic amines were well tolerated, enabling access to secondary, tertiary and heterocyclic amines. The method is also convenient for the synthesis of N-substituted isoindolinones and phthalazinones via a tandem amination-amidation sequence. Mechanistic investigations revealed a carbocationic pathway instead of an ordinary direct reductive amination pathway. PMID:27363507

  16. Synthesis of spiro[dihydropyridine-oxindoles] via three-component reaction of arylamine, isatin and cyclopentane-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Sun, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Summary A fast and convenient protocol for the synthesis of novel spiro[dihydropyridine-oxindole] derivatives in satisfactory yields was developed by the three-component reactions of arylamine, isatin and cyclopentane-1,3-dione in acetic acid at room temperature. On the other hand the condensation of isatin with two equivalents of cyclopentane-1,3-dione gave 3,3-bis(2-hydroxy-5-oxo-cyclopent-1-enyl)oxindole in high yields. The reaction mechanism and substrate scope of this novel reaction is briefly discussed. PMID:23399791

  17. Regulation of serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity in the chick pineal gland by UV-A and white light: role of MK-801- and SCH 23390-sensitive retinal signals.

    PubMed

    Zawilska, Jolanta B; Lorenc, Anna; Berezińska, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    The rhythmic melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland is one of the most extensively studied circadian rhythms in vertebrates. Light is the dominant environmental factor controlling this process. Light at night acutely suppresses pineal melatonin content and activity of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT; the key and penultimate enzyme in the hormone biosynthetic pathway). In addition, pulses of light appropriately timed reset the circadian oscillator generating the melatonin rhythm. Although the avian pineal gland is a directly photosensitive organ, it has recently been demonstrated that light perceived by the eyes only regulates its activity. The present study shows that ocular exposure of chicks to UV-A radiation or white light during the second half of the subjective night markedly decreased AANAT activity in the pineal gland, and produced a significant phase advance of the circadian rhythm of the enzyme activity. Both the suppressive and phase-shifting effects of UV-A light were antagonized by intraocular pretreatment of birds with MK 801 (a selective blocker of NMDA glutamate receptors), but were not modified by SCH 23390 (a selective antagonist of D1-dopamine receptors). On the other hand, the suppressive and phase-shifting effects of retinally perceived white light were antagonized by intraocular injection of SCH 23390, and not affected by MK 801. Our results demonstrate that retinal illumination with UV-A radiation and white light provide powerful signals that shift phase of the circadian oscillator generating melatonin rhythm in the chick pineal gland. It is suggested that control of pineal melatonin synthesis by retinally perceived UV-A and white light might involve input from different photoreceptors. PMID:17901569

  18. Effect of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cytochrome P450 Isoenzyme and N-Acetyltransferase 2 Genes on the Metabolism of Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapies in Malaria Patients from Cambodia and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Staehli Hodel, Eva Maria; Csajka, Chantal; Ariey, Frédéric; Guidi, Monia; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor Mulokozi; Duong, Socheat; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Olliaro, Piero; Genton, Blaise

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacogenetics of antimalarial agents are poorly known, although the application of pharmacogenetics might be critical in optimizing treatment. This population pharmacokinetic-pharmacogenetic study aimed at assessing the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytochrome P450 isoenzyme genes (CYP, namely, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5) and the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) on the pharmacokinetics of artemisinin-based combination therapies in 150 Tanzanian patients treated with artemether-lumefantrine, 64 Cambodian patients treated with artesunate-mefloquine, and 61 Cambodian patients treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The frequency of SNPs varied with the enzyme and the population. Higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Cambodians than Tanzanians for CYP2C9*3, CYP2D6*10 (100C→T), CYP3A5*3, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7. In contrast, higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Tanzanians for CYP2D6*17 (1023C→T and 2850C→T), CYP3A4*1B, NAT2*5, and NAT2*14. For 8 SNPs, no significant differences in frequencies were observed. In the genetic-based population pharmacokinetic analyses, none of the SNPs improved model fit. This suggests that pharmacogenetic data need not be included in appropriate first-line treatments with the current artemisinin derivatives and quinolines for uncomplicated malaria in specific populations. However, it cannot be ruled out that our results represent isolated findings, and therefore more studies in different populations, ideally with the same artemisinin-based combination therapies, are needed to evaluate the influence of pharmacogenetic factors on the clearance of antimalarials. PMID:23229480

  19. Sequence Verification of Oligonucleotides Containing Multiple Arylamine Modifications by Enzymatic Digestion and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lan; Zhang, Li; Cho, Bongsup P.; Chiarelli, M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An analytical method for the structure differentiation of arylamine modified oligonucleotides (ODNs) using on-line LC/MS analysis of raw exonuclease digests is described. Six different dodeca ODNs derived from the reaction of N-acetoxy-N-(trifluoroacetyl)-2-aminofluorene with the dodeca oligonucleotide 5′-CTCGGCGCCATC-3′ are isolated and sequenced with this LC/MS method using 3′- and 5′-exonucleases. When the three products modified by a single aminofluorene (AF) are subjected to 3′-exonuclease digestion, the exonuclease will cleave a modified nucleotide but when di-AF modified ODNs are analyzed the 3′-exonuclease ceases to cleave nucleotides when the first modification is exposed at the 3′-terminus. Small abundances of ODN fragments formed by the cleavage of an AF-modified nucleotide were observed when two of the three di-AF modified ODNs were subjected to 5′-exonuclease digestion. The results of the 5′-exonuclease studies of the three di-AF modified ODNs suggest that as the number of unmodified bases between two modifications in an ODN sequence increases, the easier it becomes to sequence beyond the modification closest to the 5′-terminus. The results of this study indicate that the LC/MS method described here would be useful in sequencing ODNs modified by multiple arylamines to be used as templates for site-specific mutagenesis studies. PMID:18524623

  20. Lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate causes mitochondrial defects, altered autophagy, and neuronal death in the mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C.

    PubMed

    Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2016-06-01

    The genetic metabolic disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C (MPS IIIC, Sanfilippo disease type C) causes progressive neurodegeneration in infants and children, leading to dementia and death before adulthood. MPS IIIC stands out among lysosomal diseases because it is the only one caused by a deficiency not of a hydrolase but of HGSNAT (heparan--glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase), which catalyzes acetylation of glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS) prior to its hydrolysis. PMID:25998837

  1. Metabolic activation of N-hydroxy arylamines, N-hydroxy heterocyclic amines and ring-hydroxymethyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by human sulfotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, H.C.

    1993-01-01

    Arylamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are two major classes of chemical carcinogens. N-Hydroxylation of arylamines is regarded to be a necessary process for their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, while alkyl-hydroxylation is the major metabolic pathway for alkyl-substituted PAHs. Evidence has been presented that sulfation of several N-hydroxy arylamines and hydroxymethyl PAHs is an important pathway leading to the formation of ultimate carcinogens in experiment animals. Sulfation of these chemicals forms putative sulfuric acid ester intermediates that can rearrange to electrophilic nitrenium or carbenium ions capable of forming covalent adducts with important cellular macromolecules. In order to study the metabolic activation by sulfotransferase(s) in various human tissue preparations an in vitro enzymatic assay was established. A metabolic phenotyping method was also developed for thermostable phenolsulfotransferase (TS-PST) in platelet homogenates (correlated with TS-PST activity in other tissues) based on a simple colorimetric assay using 2-naphthol as substrate. By using a PAPS-regenerating system to supply the activated sulfate and calf thymus DNA to trap the reactive metabolites, we found that N-hydroxy derivatives of the carcinogens, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), 4,4[prime]-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2-aminofluorene (2-AF), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), and 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido [1,2-1:3[prime],2[prime]-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1) were metabolically activated by human TS-PST. On the other hand, three methyl-hydroxylated derivatives (7-OH, 12-OH, and 7,12-diOH) of 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) were metabolically activated by human steroid sulfotransferase. Human sulfotransferase(s)-mediated activation of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) or 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) was not observed.

  2. Synthesis of Novel Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-amines from Arylamines and Nitriles via Sequential Addition and I2 /KI-Mediated Oxidative Cyclization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xianhai; Song, Lina; Wang, Manman; Lv, Zhigang; Wu, Jie; Yu, Wenquan; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-05-23

    A novel and practical strategy for the construction of imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-amine frameworks has been developed. The present sequential approach involves addition of arylamines to nitriles and I2 /KI-mediated oxidative C-N bond formation without purification of the intermediate amidines. This operationally simple synthetic process provides a facile access to a variety of new 2-amino substituted imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and related heterocyclic compounds in an efficient and scalable fashion. PMID:27112949

  3. Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H amidation with N-hydroxycarbamates: a new entry to N-carbamate-protected arylamines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Du, Juanjuan; Yang, Yaxi; Feng, Huijin; Li, Yuanchao

    2014-01-17

    An unprecedented Rh(III)-catalyzed direct intermolecular C-H amidation with N-hydroxycarbamates has been developed. Different directing groups, such as pyridine, pyrimidine, pyrazole, and N-OMe oxime, can be employed in this C-H amidation process, providing valuable N-carbamate-protected arylamines (e.g., Cbz, Moz, Ac, Boc, and Fmoc). More importantly, this process may afford a new avenue for intermolecular C-H amidation where readily available N-hydroxycarbamates can be used as the nitrogen source. PMID:24369964

  4. Mutagenesis by site-specific arylamine adducts in plasmid DNA: Enhancing replication of the adducted strand alters mutation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.M.; Lee, Meisie; King, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    Site specifically modified plasmids were used to determine the mutagenic effects of single arylamine adducts in bacterial cells. A synthetic heptadecamer bearing a single N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (AF) or N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (AAF) adduct was used to introduce the adducts into a specific site in plasmid DNA that contained a 17-base single-stranded region complementary to the modified oligonucleotide. Following transformation of bacterial cells with the adduct-bearing DNA, putative mutants were detected by colony hybridization techniques that allowed unbiased detection of all mutations at or near the site of the adduct. The site-specific AF or AAF adducts were also placed into plasmid DNA that contained uracil residues on the strand opposite that bearing the lesions. The presence of uracil in one strand of the DNA decreases the ability of the bacterial replication system to use the uracil-containing strand, thereby favoring the use of the strand bearing the adducts. In a comparison of the results obtained with site specifically modified DNA, either with or without uracil, the presence of the uracil increased the mutation frequencies of the AF adduct by >7-fold to 2.9% and of the AAF adduct by >12-fold to 0.75%. The AF adduct produced primarily single-base deletions in the absence of uracil but only base substitutions in the uracil-containing constructs. The AAF adduct produced mutations only in the uracil-containing DNA, which included both frame shifts and base substitutions. Mutations produced by both adducts were SOS dependent.

  5. A High-Throughput Assay for Arylamine Halogenation Based on a Peroxidase-Mediated Quinone–Amine Coupling with Applications in the Screening of Enzymatic Halogenations

    PubMed Central

    Hosford, Joseph; Shepherd, Sarah A; Micklefield, Jason; Wong, Lu Shin

    2014-01-01

    Arylhalides are important building blocks in many fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, and there has been increasing interest in the development of more “green” halogenation methods based on enzyme catalysis. However, the screening and development of new enzymes for biohalogenation has been hampered by a lack of high-throughput screening methods. Described herein is the development of a colorimetric assay for detecting both chemical and enzymatic arylamine halogenation reactions in an aqueous environment. The assay is based on the unique UV/Vis spectrum created by the formation of an ortho-benzoquinone-amine adduct, which is produced by the peroxidase-catalysed benzoquinone generation, followed by Michael addition of either a halogenated or non-halogenated arylamine. This assay is sensitive, rapid and amenable to high-throughput screening platforms. We have also shown this assay to be easily coupled to a flavin-dependent halogenase, which currently lacks any convenient colorimetric assay, in a “one-pot” workflow. PMID:25319801

  6. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human cytochrome P4501A1 and rapid or slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R; Metry, Kristin J; Doll, Mark A; States, J Christopher; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2007-07-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). In humans, NAT2*4 allele is associated with rapid acetylator phenotype, whereas NAT2*5B allele is associated with slow acetylator phenotype. We hypothesized that rapid acetylator phenotype predisposes humans to DNA damage and mutagenesis from MeIQx. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had 20-fold significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0001) and 6-fold higher levels of N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. Deoxyguanosine-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose dependent in each cell line and in the following order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism

  7. Neuroinflammation, mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carla; Hůlková, Helena; Dridi, Larbi; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; Grigoryeva, Lubov; Choi, Yoo; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; DiCristo, Graziella; Hamel, Edith; Ausseil, Jerôme; Cheillan, David; Moreau, Alain; Svobodová, Eva; Hájková, Zuzana; Tesařová, Markéta; Hansíková, Hana; Bigger, Brian W; Hrebícek, Martin; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2015-02-01

    Severe progressive neurological paediatric disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C is caused by mutations in the HGSNAT gene leading to deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase involved in the lysosomal catabolism of heparan sulphate. To understand the pathophysiology of the disease we generated a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C by germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene. At 6-8 months mice showed hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety. Cognitive memory decline was detected at 10 months and at 12-13 months mice showed signs of unbalanced hesitant walk and urinary retention. Lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate was observed in hepatocytes, splenic sinus endothelium, cerebral microglia, liver Kupffer cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. Starting from 5 months, brain neurons showed enlarged, structurally abnormal mitochondria, impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism, and storage of densely packed autofluorescent material, gangliosides, lysozyme, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid-β. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase causes lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release. They also show mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons and neuronal loss explaining why mucopolysaccharidosis III type C manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25567323

  8. Neuroinflammation, mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carla; Hůlková, Helena; Dridi, Larbi; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; Grigoryeva, Lubov; Choi, Yoo; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; DiCristo, Graziella; Hamel, Edith; Ausseil, Jerôme; Cheillan, David; Moreau, Alain; Svobodová, Eva; Hájková, Zuzana; Tesařová, Markéta; Hansíková, Hana; Bigger, Brian W.; Hrebícek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Severe progressive neurological paediatric disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C is caused by mutations in the HGSNAT gene leading to deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase involved in the lysosomal catabolism of heparan sulphate. To understand the pathophysiology of the disease we generated a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C by germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene. At 6–8 months mice showed hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety. Cognitive memory decline was detected at 10 months and at 12–13 months mice showed signs of unbalanced hesitant walk and urinary retention. Lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate was observed in hepatocytes, splenic sinus endothelium, cerebral microglia, liver Kupffer cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. Starting from 5 months, brain neurons showed enlarged, structurally abnormal mitochondria, impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism, and storage of densely packed autofluorescent material, gangliosides, lysozyme, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid-β. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that deficiency of acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase causes lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulphate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release. They also show mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons and neuronal loss explaining why mucopolysaccharidosis III type C manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25567323

  9. A regulatory cascade involving AarG, a putative sensor kinase, controls the expression of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase and an intrinsic multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) response in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Paradise, M R; Parojcic, M M; Patel, S

    1998-06-01

    A recessive mutation, aarG1, has been identified that resulted in an 18-fold increase in the expression of beta-galactosidase from an aac(2')-lacZ fusion. Transcriptional fusions and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the aarG1 allele also resulted in a large increase in the expression of aarP, a gene encoding a transcriptional activator of aac(2')-Ia. The effects of aarG1 on aac(2')-Ia expression were mediated by aarP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The aarG1 allele also resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, which included increased chloramphenicol, tetracycline and fluoroquinolone resistance. This Mar phenotype also resulted from aarP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Sequence analysis of the aarG locus revealed the presence of two open reading frames, designated aarR and aarG, organized in tandem. The putative AarR protein displayed 75% amino acid identity to the response regulator PhoP, and the AarG protein displayed 57% amino acid identity to the sensor kinase PhoQ. The aarG1 mutation, a C to T substitution, resulted in a threonine to isoleucine substitution at position 279 (T279I) in the putative sensor kinase. The AarG product was functionally similar to PhoQ, as it was able to restore wild-type levels of maganin resistance to a Salmonella typhimurium phoQ mutant. However, expression of the aarP and aac(2')-Ia genes was not significantly affected by the levels of Mg2+ or Ca2+, suggesting that aarG senses a signal other than divalent cations. PMID:9680222

  10. Human cytochrome P-450PA (P-450IA2), the phenacetin O-deethylase, is primarily responsible for the hepatic 3-demethylation of caffeine and N-oxidation of carcinogenic arylamines.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, M A; Iwasaki, M; Guengerich, F P; Kadlubar, F F

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic amines are well known as occupational carcinogens and are found in cooked foods, tobacco smoke, synthetic fuels, and agricultural chemicals. For the primary arylamines, metabolic N-oxidation by hepatic cytochromes P-450 is generally regarded as an initial activation step leading to carcinogenesis. The metabolic activation of 4-aminobiphenyl, 2-naphthylamine, and several heterocyclic amines has been shown recently to be catalyzed by rat cytochrome P-450ISF-G and by its human ortholog, cytochrome P-450PA. We now report that human hepatic microsomal caffeine 3-demethylation, the initial major step in caffeine biotransformation in humans, is selectively catalyzed by cytochrome P-450PA. Caffeine 3-demethylation was highly correlated with 4-aminobiphenyl N-oxidation (r = 0.99; P less than 0.0005) in hepatic microsomal preparations obtained from 22 human organ donors, and both activities were similarly decreased by the selective inhibitor, 7,8-benzoflavone. The rates of microsomal caffeine 3-demethylation, 4-aminobiphenyl N-oxidation, and phenacetin O-deethylation were also significantly correlated with each other and with the levels of immunoreactive human cytochrome P-450PA. Moreover, a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised to human cytochrome P-450PA was shown to inhibit strongly all three of these activities and to inhibit the N-oxidation of the carcinogen 2-naphthylamine and the heterocyclic amines, 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido-[1,2-a:3',2'-d]imidazole and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinoline. Human liver cytochrome P-450PA was also shown to catalyze caffeine 3-demethylation, 4-aminobiphenyl N-oxidation, and phenacetin O-deethylation. Thus, estimation of caffeine 3-demethylation activity in humans may be useful in the characterization of arylamine N-oxidation phenotypes and in the assessment of whether or not the hepatic levels of cytochrome P-450PA, as affected by environmental or genetic factors, contribute to interindividual differences in susceptibility to

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo disease type C using a simple fluorometric enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    He, W; Voznyi YaV; Huijmans, J G; Geilen, G C; Karpova, E A; Dudukina, T V; Zaremba, J; Van Diggelen, O P; Kleijer, W J

    1994-01-01

    A new fluorogenic substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucosaminide, was used for the assay of acetyl CoA:glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase in chorionic villi, cultured villus cells, and amniocytes. Optimal conditions for the assay and the ranges of enzyme activity were established for the various types of fetal cells. This simple fluorometric assay provides a reliable method for early prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo disease type C which is more convenient than current methods using radiolabelled substrates. The method was applied to amniotic fluid cells and fetal fibroblasts from an at-risk pregnancy in which an affected fetus was diagnosed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of glycosaminoglycans in the amniotic fluid. PMID:8183833

  12. Insight into inhibition of the human amyloid beta protein precursor (APP: PDB ID ) using (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)arylamine (LR) models: structure elucidation of a family of ZnX2-LR complexes.

    PubMed

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Kundu, Sajal; Singh, Palwinder; Shaveta; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C

    2015-02-01

    The amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and its neurotoxic cleavage product amyloid beta (Aβ) are a cause of Alzheimer's disease and appear essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis. Proteolytic processing of APP is influenced by metal ions and protein ligands, however the structural and functional mechanism of APP regulation is not known so far. In this context, molecular modeling studies were performed to understand the molecular behavior of (E)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)arylamines (LR) with an E2 domain of the APP in its complex with zinc (APP; PDB ID: ). Docking results indeed confirmed that the LR interacts with Zn in the binding site of the protein between two α-helical chains. In view of these findings, LR was further investigated for complexation reactions with Zn(2+) in order to establish the structural models in solution and in the solid state. Five new Zn(2+) complexes of compositions viz. [Zn(Br)2(L2-Me)] (), [Zn(Br)2(L2-OMe)] (), [Zn(i)2(L2-OMe)] (), [Zn(NO3)2(L2-OMe)(H2O)] () and [Zn(L4-Me)2(H2O)2](NO3)2 () were synthesized and their structures were ascertained by microanalysis, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The zinc atom in complex exhibits a distorted tetrahedral geometry while the crystal structures of complexes and show distorted square pyramidal geometries. The zinc cation in and has an octahedral coordination environment, but in the zinc coordination geometry is less distorted. The Zn(ii) cations take part in one ( and ) or two () 5-membered metallacycles imposed by the NN or NNO chelation modes of LR. The significant intermolecular ππ interactions are also discussed. PMID:25534782

  13. New Locus for Skin Intrinsic Fluorescence in Type 1 Diabetes Also Associated With Blood and Skin Glycated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; van der Klauw, Melanie M; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Atzmon, Gil; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Crandall, Jill P; Barzilai, Nir; Bull, Shelley B; Canty, Angelo J; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Hiraki, Linda T; Maynard, John; Sell, David R; Monnier, Vincent M; Cleary, Patricia A; Braffett, Barbara H; Paterson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Skin fluorescence (SF) noninvasively measures advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin and is a risk indicator for diabetes complications. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is the only known locus influencing SF. We aimed to identify additional genetic loci influencing SF in type 1 diabetes (T1D) through a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (N = 1,359) including Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) and Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR). A locus on chromosome 1, rs7533564 (P = 1.9 × 10(-9)), was associated with skin intrinsic fluorescence measured by SCOUT DS (excitation 375 nm, emission 435-655 nm), which remained significant after adjustment for time-weighted HbA1c (P = 1.7 × 10(-8)). rs7533564 was associated with mean HbA1c in meta-analysis (P = 0.0225), mean glycated albumin (P = 0.0029), and glyoxal hydroimidazolones (P = 0.049), an AGE measured in skin biopsy collagen, in DCCT. rs7533564 was not associated with diabetes complications in DCCT/EDIC or with SF in subjects without diabetes (nondiabetic [ND]) (N = 8,721). In conclusion, we identified a new locus associated with SF in T1D subjects that did not show similar effect in ND subjects, suggesting a diabetes-specific effect. This association needs to be investigated in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27207532

  14. In vitro studies on the deacetylation-reacetylation of arylamides and the transacetylation of arylamines by human and rat whole blood.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R M; Fox, W R; Baty, J D; Willis, R G

    1991-06-01

    Human and rat whole blood were shown to metabolize the aromatic amides acetanilide and phenacetin by deacetylation followed by reacetylation in vitro. Derivatives of the parent compounds labelled with deuterium in the N-acetyl group produced non-labelled material after incubation. The reaction was monitored by capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. There was no significant difference in the acetyl group exchange of these substrates using blood samples donated by non-diabetic volunteers or Type 2 diabetic patients (respective mean +/- SEM values = 4.0 +/- 0.2% and 4.2 +/- 0.3% for trideuteroacetanilide, 6.2 +/- 0.6% and 6.1 +/- 0.3% for trideuterophenacetin). Increasing the glucose concentration in the incubation medium by 50 mmol/L significantly (P less than 0.01) increased deacetylation-reacetylation of trideuteroacetanilide in each group (4.6 +/- 0.2% and 4.7 +/- 0.2% for non-diabetic and diabetic subjects, respectively). In rat blood the amount of deacetylation-reacetylation was much higher: 7.2 +/- 0.6% and 8.3 +/- 0.7% for trideuteroacetanilide and trideuterophenacetin, respectively. Induction of experimental diabetes using streptozotocin did not significantly change the extent of deacetylation-reacetylation of either deuterated substrate (10.1 +/- 2.1% and 9.5 +/- 1.1%). Elevation of the incubation glucose concentration by 50 mmol/L produced an increase in acetyl group exchange (for trideuteroacetanilide) in diabetic (14.3 +/- 2.2%) and non-diabetic (10.6 +/- 1.0%) rats. The donation of acetyl groups (transacetylation) was observed after incubation of blood samples from both diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects and rats with trideuterophenacetin and a molar excess of aniline. This reaction significantly (P less than 0.001) decreased the acetyl group exchange of trideuterophenacetin (these values were 4.5 +/- 0.4% and 3.4 +/- 0.6% using samples from non-diabetic human subjects and rats, respectively) and demonstrated the ability

  15. Crosstalk between 2 organelles: Lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate causes mitochondrial defects and neuronal death in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C

    PubMed Central

    Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of all lysosomal diseases are mucopolysaccharidoses, disorders affecting the enzymes needed for the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPS IIIC) is a severe neurologic disease caused by genetic deficiency of heparan sulfate acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT). Through our studies, we have cloned the gene, identified molecular defects in MPS IIIC patients and most recently completed phenotypic characterization of the first animal model of the disease, a mouse with a germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene.1 The obtained data have led us to propose that Hgsnat deficiency and lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulfate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release result in mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons causing their death which explains why MPS IIIC manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease. The goal of this addendum is to summarize data yielding new insights into the mechanism of MPS IIIC and promising novel therapeutic solutions for this and similar disorders. PMID:26459666

  16. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D.; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Spork, Anatol P.; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S.; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5′-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C–C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5′-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. PMID:25855790

  17. Potent mutagenicity in the Ames test of 2-cyano-4-nitroaniline and 2,6-dicyano-4-nitroaniline, components of disperse dyes.

    PubMed

    Josephy, P David; Zahid, Muhammad; Dhanoa, Joban; de Souza, Giovanna Brondino Duarte; Groom, Hilary; Lambie, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxicity data on commercial azo dyes and their components remain sparse, despite their widespread use. We have tested the mutagenicity of 2-cyano-4-nitroaniline (CNNA) and 2,6-dicyano-4-nitroaniline (CNCNNA), components of azo dyes such as Disperse Blue 165 and Disperse Red 73, in Ames test strains. Both compounds are extraordinarily potent frameshift mutagens, with much greater activity than structurally similar dihalonitroanilines and halodinitroanilines. Analysis of the responses of strains over-expressing or deficient in bioactivation enzymes shows that bacterial nitroreductase and acetyl CoA: arylamine N-acetyltransferase are important mediators of the mutagenicity of CNNA and CNCNNA. PMID:26394367

  18. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Helicobacter pylori pseudaminic acid biosynthesis N-acetyltransferase PseH.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu C; Ud-Din, Abu I; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the common cause of gastritis and duodenal and stomach ulcers, which have been linked to a higher risk of the development of gastric cancer. The motility that facilitates persistent infection requires functional flagella that are heavily glycosylated with 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (pseudaminic acid). Pseudaminic acid biosynthesis protein H (PseH) catalyzes the third step in its biosynthetic pathway, producing UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. Crystals of H. pylori PseH have been grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using diammonium tartrate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.8, b = 145.4, c = 166.3 Å. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 2.5 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. PMID:25195909

  19. N-acetyltransferase (nat) Is a Critical Conjunct of Photoperiodism between the Circadian System and Endocrine Axis in Antheraea pernyi

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jadwiga; Hiragaki, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takeda, Makio

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1923, the biology of photoperiodism remains a mystery in many ways. We sought the link connecting the circadian system to an endocrine switch, using Antheraea pernyi. PER-, CLK- and CYC-ir were co-expressed in two pairs of dorsolateral neurons of the protocerebrum, suggesting that these are the circadian neurons that also express melatonin-, NAT- and HIOMT-ir. The results suggest that a melatonin pathway is present in the circadian neurons. Melatonin receptor (MT2 or MEL-1B-R)-ir in PTTH-ir neurons juxtaposing clock neurons suggests that melatonin gates PTTH release. RIA showed a melatonin rhythm with a peak four hours after lights off in adult brain both under LD16∶8 (LD) and LD12∶12 (SD), and both the peak and the baseline levels were higher under LD than SD, suggesting a photoperiodic influence. When pupae in diapause were exposed to 10 cycles of LD, or stored at 4°C for 4 months under constant darkness, an increase of NAT activity was observed when PTTH released ecdysone. DNA sequence upstream of nat contained E-boxes to which CYC/CLK could bind, and nat transcription was turned off by clk or cyc dsRNA. dsRNANAT caused dysfunction of photoperiodism. dsRNAPER upregulated nat transcription as anticipated, based on findings in the Drosophila melanogaster circadian system. Transcription of nat, cyc and clk peaked at ZT12. RIA showed that dsRNANAT decreased melatonin while dsRNAPER increased melatonin. Thus nat, a clock controlled gene, is the critical link between the circadian clock and endocrine switch. MT-binding may release PTTH, resulting in termination of diapause. This study thus examined all of the basic functional units from the clock: a photoperiodic counter as an accumulator of mRNANAT, to endocrine switch for photoperiodism in A. pernyi showing this system is self-complete without additional device especially for photoperiodism. PMID:24667367

  20. Application of a novel phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase (RePAT) gene in developing glufosinate-resistant rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Liu, Ziduo; Li, Yue; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Currently, only few glufosinate-resistant genes are available for commercial application. Thus, developing novel glufosinate-resistant genes with commercial feasibility is extremely important and urgent for agricultural production. In this study, we transferred a newly isolated RePAT gene into a japonica rice variety Zhonghua11, resulting in a large number of independent T0 transgenic plants, most of which grew normally under high-concentration glufosinate treatment. Four transgenic plants with one intact RePAT expression cassette integrated into the intergenic region were selected. Agronomic performances of their T2 progenies were investigated, and the results suggested that the expression of RePAT had no adverse effect on the agronomic performance. Definite glufosinate resistance of the selected transgenic plants was further confirmed to be related to the expression of RePAT by assay on the medium and qRT-PCR. The inheritance and expression of RePAT in two transgenic plants were confirmed to be stable. Finally, the two-year field assay of glufosinate resistance suggested that the agronomic performance of the transgenic plant (PAT11) was not affected by high dosage of glufosinate (5000 g/ha). Collectively, our study proves the high resistance of a novel gene RePAT to glufosinate and provides a glufosiante-resistant rice variety with agricultural application potential. PMID:26879398

  1. Application of a novel phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase (RePAT) gene in developing glufosinate-resistant rice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ying; Liu, Ziduo; Li, Yue; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Currently, only few glufosinate-resistant genes are available for commercial application. Thus, developing novel glufosinate-resistant genes with commercial feasibility is extremely important and urgent for agricultural production. In this study, we transferred a newly isolated RePAT gene into a japonica rice variety Zhonghua11, resulting in a large number of independent T0 transgenic plants, most of which grew normally under high-concentration glufosinate treatment. Four transgenic plants with one intact RePAT expression cassette integrated into the intergenic region were selected. Agronomic performances of their T2 progenies were investigated, and the results suggested that the expression of RePAT had no adverse effect on the agronomic performance. Definite glufosinate resistance of the selected transgenic plants was further confirmed to be related to the expression of RePAT by assay on the medium and qRT-PCR. The inheritance and expression of RePAT in two transgenic plants were confirmed to be stable. Finally, the two-year field assay of glufosinate resistance suggested that the agronomic performance of the transgenic plant (PAT11) was not affected by high dosage of glufosinate (5000 g/ha). Collectively, our study proves the high resistance of a novel gene RePAT to glufosinate and provides a glufosiante-resistant rice variety with agricultural application potential. PMID:26879398

  2. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Helicobacter pylori pseudaminic acid biosynthesis N-acetyltransferase PseH

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu C.; Ud-Din, Abu I.; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the common cause of gastritis and duodenal and stomach ulcers, which have been linked to a higher risk of the development of gastric cancer. The motility that facilitates persistent infection requires functional flagella that are heavily glycosylated with 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid (pseudaminic acid). Pseudaminic acid biosynthesis protein H (PseH) catalyzes the third step in its biosynthetic pathway, producing UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-l-altropyranose. Crystals of H. pylori PseH have been grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using diammonium tartrate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.8, b = 145.4, c = 166.3 Å. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 2.5 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. PMID:25195909

  3. 2-Aminofluorene metabolism and DNA adduct formation by mononuclear leukocytes from rapid and slow acetylator mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Levy, G N; Chung, J G; Weber, W W

    1994-02-01

    Following exposure of mice to the arylamine carcinogen 2-aminofluorene, DNA-carcinogen adducts can be found in the target tissues liver and bladder, and also in circulating leukocytes. Evidence is presented here that mouse mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) are capable of metabolizing 2-aminofluorene to DNA-binding metabolites which give rise to the adducts found in the MNL. Both lymphocytes and monocytes were able to acetylate arylamines during 18 h of culture. The degree of acetylation was determined by the N-acetyltransferase genotype of the mice as shown through use of acetylator congenic strains which differ only in the Nat-2 gene. Cultured MNL from rapid acetylator mice (C57BL/6J and A.B6-Natr) produced about twice as much N-acetylaminofluorene from 2-aminofluorene and 6- to 8-fold as much N-acetyl-p-aminobenzoic acid from p-aminobenzoic acid as cells from slow acetylator mice (B6.A-Nat(s) and A/J). Other differences in arylamine metabolism by MNL in culture were observed and shown to be due to genetic factors, currently unidentified, other than N-acetyltransferase. DNA adduct formation following incubation of MNL with the arylamine carcinogen 2-aminofluorene was related to both acetylation capacity and to other genetic metabolic factors in the mouse genome. MNL from rapid acetylator mice with the C57BL/6J background (B6) had 3-fold the DNA adduct levels of cells from the corresponding slow acetylator congenic (B6.A-Nat(s)). Similarly, MNL from rapid acetylator mice with the A/J background (A.B6-Natr) had twice the DNA adduct levels of those from their corresponding slow congenic (A). Adduct levels in MNL from C57BL/6J were nearly the same as those of MNL from A/J, again indicating the involvement of loci other than acetylation in DNA adduct formation. The finding of genetically dependent arylamine carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation in cultured MNL suggests the possibility of using cultured MNL for assessing individual susceptibility to arylamine

  4. Caffeine Consumption Contributes to Skin Intrinsic Fluorescence in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eny, Karen M.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Miller, Rachel Grace; Maynard, John; Grant, Denis M.; Costacou, Tina; Cleary, Patricia A.; Braffett, Barbara H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: A variant (rs1495741) in the gene for the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) protein is associated with skin intrinsic fluorescence (SIF), a noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products and other fluorophores in the skin. Because NAT2 is involved in caffeine metabolism, we aimed to determine whether caffeine consumption is associated with SIF and whether rs1495741 is associated with SIF independently of caffeine. Materials and Methods: SIF was measured in 1,181 participants with type 1 diabetes from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study. Two measures of SIF were used: SIF1, using a 375-nm excitation light-emitting diode (LED), and SIF14 (456-nm LED). Food frequency questionnaires were used to estimate mean caffeine intake. To establish replication, we examined a second type 1 diabetes cohort. Results: Higher caffeine intake was significantly associated with higher SIF1LED 375 nm[0.6, 0.2] (P=2×10−32) and SIF14LED 456 nm[0.4, 0.8] (P=7×10−31) and accounted for 4% of the variance in each after adjusting for covariates. When analyzed together, caffeine intake and rs1495741 both remained highly significantly associated with SIF1LED 375 nm[0.6, 0.2] and SIF14LED 456 nm[0.4, 0.8]. Mean caffeinated coffee intake was also positively associated with SIF1LED 375 nm[0.6, 0.2] (P=9×10−12) and SIF14LED 456 nm[0.4, 0.8] (P=4×10−12), but no association was observed for decaffeinated coffee intake. Finally, caffeine was also positively associated with SIF1LED 375 nm[0.6, 0.2] and SIF14LED 456 nm[0.4, 0.8] (P<0.0001) in the replication cohort. Conclusions: Caffeine contributes to SIF. The effect of rs1495741 on SIF appears to be partially independent of caffeine consumption. Because SIF and coffee intake are each associated with cardiovascular disease, our findings suggest that accounting for coffee and/or caffeine intake may improve risk prediction models for SIF and cardiovascular

  5. The Effect of Donor Group Rigidification on the Electronic and Optical Properties of Arylamine-Based Metal-Free Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Liezel L; Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee

    2016-07-28

    One of the most significant aspects in the development of dye-sensitized solar cells is the exploration and design of high-efficiency and low-cost dyes. This paper reports the theoretical design of various triphenylamine analogues, wherein the central nitrogen moiety establishes an sp(2)-hybridization, which endows a significant participation in the charge-transfer properties. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT methodologies were utilized to investigate the geometry, electronic structure, photochemical properties, and electrochemical properties of these dyes. Different exchange-correlation functionals were initially evaluated to establish a proper methodology for calculating the excited-state energy of the reference dye, known as DIA3. Consequently, TD-LC-ωPBE with a damping parameter of 0.175 Bohr(-1) best correlates with the experimental value. Four new dyes, namely, Dhk1, Dhk2, Dhk3, and Dhk4, were designed by modifying the rigidity of the donor moiety. According to the results, altering the type and position of binding in the donor group leads to distinct planarity of the dyes, which significantly affects their properties. The designed Dhk4 dye showed more red-shifted and broadened absorption spectra owing to the enhanced coplanarity between its donor and π-bridge moiety, which brings an advantage for its potential use as sensitizer for photovoltaic applications. PMID:27388927

  6. Blood typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... typing. The liquid part of your blood without cells (serum) is mixed with blood that is known to be type ... ABO typing: If your blood cells stick together when mixed with: Anti-A serum, you have type A blood Anti-B serum, you have type B blood Both anti-A and ...

  7. 4-Aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts and p53 mutations in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Martone, T; Airoldi, L; Magagnotti, C; Coda, R; Randone, D; Malaveille, C; Avanzi, G; Merletti, F; Hautefeuille, A; Vineis, P

    1998-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested that smokers of air-cured tobacco (rich in arylamines) are at higher risk of bladder cancer than smokers of flue-cured tobacco. The risk has been shown to be modulated by the N-acetyltransferase genotype. We analyzed the biopsies of 45 patients with bladder cancer. p53 mutations were sought by direct sequencing, and 4-aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts were measured by negative ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 4-Aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts were higher in smokers of air-cured tobacco and in current smokers, but no relationship with the number of cigarettes smoked was found. Adducts were higher in more advanced histologic grades of tumors. No pattern was evident for p53 mutations. Seven of 9 mutations occurred in grade 3 tumors. No association was found between 4-ABP adducts and GSTM1 or NAT2 genetic polymorphisms. PMID:9466649

  8. Blood Typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: Blood Group; Rh Factor Formal name: ABO Group and Rh Type Related ... mother's and baby's ABO blood groups, not the Rh factor. However, ABO grouping cannot be used to predict ...

  9. Blood typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether or not there are certain proteins, called antigens, on your red blood cells. Blood is often ... There are many antigens besides the major ones (A, B, and Rh). Many minor ones are not routinely detected during blood typing. If ...

  10. On the significance of an alternate pathway of melatonin synthesis via 5-methoxytryptamine: comparisons across species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Back, Kyoungwhan; Manchester, Lucien C; Alatorre-Jimenez, Moises A; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a phylogenetically ancient molecule. It is ubiquitously present in almost all organisms from primitive photosynthetic bacteria to humans. Its original primary function is presumable to be that of an antioxidant with other functions of this molecule having been acquired during evolution. The synthetic pathway of melatonin in vertebrates has been extensively studied. It is common knowledge that serotonin is acetylated to form N-acetylserotonin by arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) or arylamine N-acetyltransferase (SNAT or NAT) and N-acetylserotonin is, subsequently, methylated to melatonin by N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; also known as hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase, HIOMT). This is referred to as a classic melatonin synthetic pathway. Based on new evidence, we feel that this classic melatonin pathway is not generally the prevailing route of melatonin production. An alternate pathway is known to exist, in which serotonin is first O-methylated to 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) and, thereafter, 5-MT is N-acetylated to melatonin. Here, we hypothesize that the alternate melatonin synthetic pathway may be more important in certain organisms and under certain conditions. Evidence strongly supports that this alternate pathway prevails in some plants, bacteria, and, perhaps, yeast and may also occur in animals. PMID:27112772

  11. Diurnal cycles in serotonin acetyltransferase activity and cyclic GMP content of cultured chick pineal glands.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, S D

    1980-06-12

    Levels of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT: acetul CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.5.) activity in the chick pineal gland exhibit a marked diurnal variation in birds kept under a diurnal cycle of ilumination. Activity begins to rise rapidly at the start of the dark phase of the cycle and reaches maximum levels at mid-dark phase about 25-fold greater than the minimum basal level at mid-light phase. Thereafter, the level of activity declines to the basal level about the start of the light phase. This diurnal cycle in chick pineal NAT activity found in vivo has recently been reproduced in vitro with intact glands incubated in organ culture. The mechanism of the 'biological clock' which regulates these variations in level of chick pineal NAT activity is unknown. However, I now report that chick pineal glands cultured under a diurnal cycle of illumination exhibit a diurnal cycle in content of cyclic GMP which roughly parallels the cycles in NAT activity. In contrast, there was no correlation between variations in pineal content of cyclic AMP and in level of NAT activity. PMID:6250035

  12. Structure and Active Stie Residues of Pg1D, an N-Acetyltransferase from the Bacillosamine Synthetic Pathway Required for N-Glycan Synthesis in Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Ruane, K.; Sulea, T.; Watson, D.; Proteau, A.; Leclerc, S.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is highly unusual among bacteria in forming N-linked glycoproteins. The heptasaccharide produced by its pgl system is attached to protein Asn through its terminal 2, 4-diacetamido-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc (QuiNAc4NAc or N, N'-diacetylbacillosamine) moiety. The crucial, last part of this sugar's synthesis is the acetylation of UDP-2-acetamido-4-amino-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc by the enzyme PglD, with acetyl-CoA as a cosubstrate. We have determined the crystal structures of PglD in CoA-bound and unbound forms, refined to 1.8 and 1.75 Angstroms resolution, respectively. PglD is a trimer of subunits each comprised of two domains, an N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}-domain and a C-terminal left-handed {beta}-helix. Few structural differences accompany CoA binding, except in the C-terminal region following the {beta}-helix (residues 189-195), which adopts an extended structure in the unbound form and folds to extend the {beta}-helix upon binding CoA. Computational molecular docking suggests a different mode of nucleotide-sugar binding with respect to the acetyl-CoA donor, with the molecules arranged in an 'L-shape', compared with the 'in-line' orientation in related enzymes. Modeling indicates that the oxyanion intermediate would be stabilized by the NH group of Gly143', with His125' the most likely residue to function as a general base, removing H+ from the amino group prior to nucleophilic attack at the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-CoA. Site-specific mutations of active site residues confirmed the importance of His125', Glu124', and Asn118. We conclude that Asn118 exerts its function by stabilizing the intricate hydrogen bonding network within the active site and that Glu124' may function to increase the pKa of the putative general base, His125'.

  13. Active cigarette smoking and the risk of breast cancer at the level of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kasajova, Petra; Holubekova, Veronika; Mendelova, Andrea; Lasabova, Zora; Zubor, Pavol; Kudela, Erik; Biskupska-Bodova, Kristina; Danko, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between the tobacco exposure and NAT2 gene (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, rs1799930 G/A) polymorphisms in association with breast cancer development. We wanted to determine the prognostic clinical importance of these polymorphisms in association with smoking and breast cancer. For the detection of possible association between smoking, NAT2 gene polymorphisms, and the risk of breast cancer, we designed a case-controlled study with 198 patients enrolled, 98 breast cancer patients and 100 healthy controls. Ten milliliters of peripheral blood from the cubital vein was withdrawn from every patient. The HRM (high resolution melting) analysis was used for the detection of three abovementioned NAT2 gene polymorphisms. When comparing a group of women smoking more than 5 cigarettes a day with the patients smoking fewer than 5 cigarettes a day, we found out that if women were the carriers of aberrant AA genotype for rs1799930, the first group of women had higher risk of breast carcinoma than the second group. If patients were the carriers of aberrant TT genotype for rs1041983, for rs1801280CC genotype, and rs1799930AA genotype and they smoked more than 5 cigarettes a day, they had higher risk of malignant breast disease than never-smoking women. Our results confirm the hypothesis that NAT2 gene polymorphisms (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, and rs1799930 G/A) in association with long-period active smoking could be the possible individual risk-predicting factors for breast cancer development in the population of Slovak women. PMID:26700672

  14. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  15. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, ... in children, teenagers or young adults. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin ...

  16. Petrov type of linearly perturbed type-D spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araneda, Bernardo; Dotti, Gustavo

    2015-10-01

    We show that a spacetime satisfying the linearized vacuum Einstein equations around a type-D background is generically of type I, and that the splittings of the principal null directions (PNDs) and of the degenerate eigenvalue of the Weyl tensor are non-analytic functions of the perturbation parameter of the metric. This provides a gauge-invariant characterization of the effect of the perturbation on the underlying geometry, without appealing to differential curvature invariants. This is of particular interest for the Schwarzschild solution, for which there are no signatures of the even perturbations on the algebraic curvature invariants. We also show that, unlike the general case, the unstable even modes of the Schwarzschild naked singularity deform the Weyl tensor into a type-II one.

  17. Custodial Teacher Social Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Joseph W.

    Two types of teacher behavior were elicited from student responses to the Pupil Control Behavior Form (PCB). Two custodial teacher types emerged from the data: the "screamer" type, described as a teacher who controlled pupil behavior with verbal methods that expressed anger or frustration; and the "cold fish" type, depicted as a teacher who…

  18. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... without insulin injections). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the ... Diabetes / Types of Diabetes / Preventing Diabetes / Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Fall 2006 Issue: Volume 1 Number 1 Page ...

  19. A pharmacogenetic study of docetaxel and thalidomide in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer using the DMET genotyping platform.

    PubMed

    Deeken, J F; Cormier, T; Price, D K; Sissung, T M; Steinberg, S M; Tran, K; Liewehr, D J; Dahut, W L; Miao, X; Figg, W D

    2010-06-01

    The anticancer agent docetaxel shows significant inter-individual variation in its pharmacokinetic and toxicity profile. Thalidomide is an active anticancer agent and also shows wide pharmacological variation. Past pharmacogenetic research has not explained this variation. Patients with prostate cancer enrolled in a randomized phase II trial using docetaxel and thalidomide versus docetaxel alone were genotyped using the Affymetrix DMET 1.0 platform, which tests for 1256 genetic variations in 170 drug disposition genes. Genetic polymorphisms were analyzed for associations with clinical response and toxicity. In all, 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three genes were potentially associated with response to therapy: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta), sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1C, member 2 (SULT1C2) and carbohydrate (chondroitin 6) sulfotransferase 3 (CHST3). In addition, 11 SNPs in eight genes were associated with toxicities to treatment: spastic paraplegia 7 (pure and complicated autosomal recessive) (SPG7), CHST3, cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6), N-acetyltransferase 2 (arylamine N-acetyltransferase) (NAT2), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C (CFTR/MRP), member 6 (ABCC6), ATPase, Cu++ transporting, alpha polypeptide (ATP7A), cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP4B1) and solute carrier family 10 (sodium/bile acid cotransporter family), member 2 (SLC10A2). Genotyping results between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMET) and direct sequencing showed >96% of concordance. These findings highlight the role that non-CYP450 metabolizing enzymes and transporters may have in the pharmacology of docetaxel and thalidomide. PMID:20038957

  20. Pyrosequencing for microbial typing.

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2002-12-25

    Pyrosequencing is a real-time DNA sequencing technique generating short reads rapidly and inexpensively. This technology has the potential advantage of accuracy, ease-of-use, high flexibility and is now emerging as a popular platform for microbial typing. Here, we review the methodology and the use of this technique for viral typing, bacterial typing, and fungal typing. In addition, we describe how to use multiplexing for accurate and rapid typing. PMID:12457996

  1. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  2. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin ... eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young ...

  3. [Types of biofeedback].

    PubMed

    Kubik, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The author presented 9 types of biofeedback witch are usefull in medical practice. He explained neurophysiological circuits involved in this process. He presented technical basis of the different types of biofeedback and pathological fields of its supplementation. PMID:27349053

  4. Blood Type Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  5. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy is the use of medicine to treat cancer. Chemotherapy kills cancer cells. It may be used to ... people are treated with a single type of chemotherapy. But often, people get more than one type ...

  6. Unlocking Personality Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieger, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    This article examines some of the intricacies of personality types and their effect on career choices. Proposes that knowing students' Myers-Briggs personality types can help school counselors guide them down the right career path. (GCP)

  7. Diabetes Type 2

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  8. Types of Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Tate; Nicholas, Amy; Ruggiero, Tony; Blandford, William; Thayer, Sara; Bull, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    There are several types of data systems that support data from Part C/619 programs. Although the system types have similarities, each has its own unique characteristics and purposes. The attributes that make one type of data system a particularly good fit for one data-related need or function can be less desirable for another need or function. In…

  9. Type T Marital Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Frank; Carlson, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Briefly reviews Farley's Type T theory of personality and then considers a range of issues in marital therapy from the perspective of Type T. Suggests that Type T theory may be relevant in dealing with infidelity, sexual problems, love, marital abuse, child rearing, drug and alcohol use, money, division of household labor, recreation, and…

  10. Hole injection in tri-arylamine containing polyfluorene co-polymer devices with molybdenum oxide contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Alastair; Pickup, David; Yates, Chris; Zhao, Yi; Lidzey, David

    2011-04-01

    We report spectroscopic and electrical measurements to explore hole injection and conduction in devices comprising a molybdenum sub-oxide (MoOx) hole injection layers and poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2, 7-diyl)-co-(4,4'(N-(4-sec-butylphenyl))) diphenylamine](TFB) hole transporting polymer. We report improvements in device conductivity over benchmark structures incorporating an ITO electrode and polyethylenedioxythiophene polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) hole injection layers and furthermore achieve injection from MoOx to TFB that is efficient even with an underlying low workfunction Al electrode. XPS spectroscopy has been used to investigate the electronic structure of the interfaces and we find discrete energy alignment regimes consistent with recent surface science studies by Tengstedt et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 053502 (2006)], corresponding to Fermi level pinning for MoOx/TFB and vacuum level pinning in the case of Al/TFB. While the energetic alignment regime is measured to be independent of MoOx thickness, the device conductivity continuously varies with MoOx thickness; an observation that can be qualitatively explained by considering two independent charge injection mechanisms from molybdenum oxide sites having different stoicheometry.

  11. Fun with Type Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Oleg; Jones, Simon Peyton; Shan, Chung-Chieh

    Tony Hoare has always been a leader in writing down and proving properties of programs. To prove properties of programs automatically, the most widely used technology today is the ubiquitous type checker. Alas, static type systems inevitably exclude some good programs and allow some bad ones. Thus motivated, we describe some fun we have been having with Haskell, by making the type system more expressive without losing the benefits of automatic proof and compact expression. Specifically, we offer a programmer's tour of so-calledtype families, a recent extension to Haskell that allows functions on types to be expressed as straightforwardly as functions on values. This facility makes it easier for programmers to effectively extend the compiler by writing functional programs that execute during type checking. Source code for all the examples is available at http://research.microsoft.com/simonpj/papers/assoc-types/fun-with-type-funs.zip.

  12. Typing Manuscripts and Reports. Typing 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nederland Independent School District, TX.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 13. SUBJECT MATTER: Typing manuscripts and reports. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory material contains general instructions on spacing, margins, and paging. The main text contains 32 manuscripts which are varied according to arrangement and length. The guide is lithographed and spiral bound with a soft…

  13. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  14. Type 2 and type 3 burst theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The present state of the theory of type 3 bursts is reviewed by dividing the problem into the exciting agency, radiation source, and propagation of radiation between the source and the observer. In-situ measurements indicate that the excitors are electron streams of energy about 40 keV which are continuously relaxing. An investigation of neutralization of an electron stream indicates that n sub s is much less than 100,000 n sub e, where n sub s is the stream density and n sub e the coronal electron density. In situ observations are consistent with this result. An analysis of propagation of electrons in the current sheets of coronal streamers shows that such propagation at heights greater than 1 solar radius is impossible. The mechanisms for radiation are reviewed; it is shown that fundamental radiation at high frequencies (approximately 100 MHz) is highly beamed in the radial direction and that near the earth second harmonic radiation must be dominant. Because of beaming of the fundamental at high frequencies, it can often be quite weak near the limb so that the second harmonic is dominant. In considering propagation to the observer, the results of scattering of radiation are discussed. The present state of the theory of type 2 bursts is reviewed in the same manner as type 3 bursts.

  15. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  16. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Capecitabine (Xeoloda) Gemcitabine (Gemzar) Caution: None ANTI-TUMOR ANTIBIOTICS Used to treat: Many types of cancer. Examples: Actinomycin-D (Cosmegen) Bleomycin Daunorubicin (Cerubidine, Rubidomycin) ...

  17. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes; Diabetes - type 2; Adult-onset diabetes Images Diabetes and exercise Diabetic emergency supplies Starchy foods Low blood sugar symptoms ...

  18. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  19. Giftedness and Psychological Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of the psychological types, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), of 966 students at a public residential magnet high school for academically talented students with other gifted and traditional high school students found both magnet school students and gifted students showed a particular MBTI distribution. (DB)

  20. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  1. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like many parents, you may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  2. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  3. Personality types of entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter F; Gappisch, Cathrin

    2005-06-01

    85 German entrepreneurs were psychometrically assessed on 12 primary trait characteristics. The sample consisted of 49 men and 36 women whose mean age was 45.6 yr. (SD= 10.3). Occupational domains were production (40%) and services (60%). The mean duration of entrepreneurship within these domains was 13.1 yr. (SD=9.3). By factor analysis five personality types of entrepreneurs could be identified: Creative Acquisitor, Controlled Perseverator, Distant Achiever, Rational Manager, and Egocentric Agitator. These types correspond with types found in research by Miner and with the Myer-Briggs Indicator. In addition, correlations between general type potential and both job and life satisfaction of entrepreneurs were found. The results are discussed with regard to intercultural stability of personality types and implications for research and application. PMID:16050632

  4. Blood-type distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beom Jun; Myeong Lee, Dong; Hun Lee, Sung; Gim, Wan-Suk

    2007-01-01

    We statistically verify the Hardy-Weinberg principle in genetics by investigating the independence of ABO-blood types of married couples. The allelic frequencies derived from the phenotypic frequencies in ethnic groups via the Hardy-Weinberg principle are used to define a genetic distance (called the blood distance in this work) between two groups. The blood distances are compared with the geographic distances, and then used to construct a network of ethnic groups. We also investigate the relationship between the ABO blood types and the human personalities, gauged by the Myers-Briggs-type indicator (MBTI) psychological test. The statistical χ2-test reveals the independence between the blood types and MBTI results with an exception of type B males. A psychological implication is discussed.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferases, glutathione S-transferase M1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in relation to malignant and benign pancreatic disease risk. The International Pancreatic Disease Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C; Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Hautefeuille, A; Boyle, P

    1998-06-01

    Carcinogens present in cigarette smoke and diet have been associated with pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that heterocyclic and aromatic amines implicated in these exposures could be involved as causative agents and that therefore genetic variation in enzymes metabolizing these carcinogens could modify the risk of developing malignant and benign pancreatic disease. The effect of the genetic polymorphism of acetyltransferases (NAT1) and NAT2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) on the risk of pancreatic diseases (cancer, pancreatitis) was examined in a case-control study. PCR-based assays were used for genotype analysis of genomic DNA from whole blood cells. Samples collected from Caucasian patients with diagnosed pancreatic cancer (n = 81), with non-alcoholic (n = 41) and alcoholic pancreatitis (n = 73) and from asymptomatic control subjects (n = 78) were analysed. The prevalence of GSTM1 null genotype and of NAT2 fast and slow acetylator genotypes and the distribution of frequencies for NQO1 genotypes did not differ in subjects with pancreatic diseases vs controls. For NAT1 slow acetylators a non-significant excess (P = 0.18) was found among pancreatic cancer cases vs controls. There was a significant over-representation of the GSTM1 AB or B genotype in all pancreatic disease cases combined (OR = 2.6; P < 0.05). When concurrent controls were pooled with literature controls (n = 1427), OR was 1.4 (P = 0.08). The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that the polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT1 enzymes may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to pancreatic diseases. PMID:9696930

  6. P-type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, Michael G; Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    P-type ATPases form a large superfamily of cation and lipid pumps. They are remarkably simple with only a single catalytic subunit and carry out large domain motions during transport. The atomic structure of P-type ATPases in different conformations, together with ample mutagenesis evidence, has provided detailed insights into the pumping mechanism by these biological nanomachines. Phylogenetically, P-type ATPases are divided into five subfamilies, P1-P5. These subfamilies differ with respect to transported ligands and the way they are regulated. PMID:21351879

  7. Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language URL Español Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Page Content Learn about Diabetes ... Both women and men can develop diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, which used to be ...

  8. Types of Hypotension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children often outgrow NMH. Severe Hypotension Linked to Shock Shock is a life-threatening condition in which blood ... work well. Blood pressure drops much lower in shock than in other types of hypotension. Many factors ...

  9. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  10. Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identified. However, despite broad organisational, intellectual, and fiscal investments, no means for preventing or curing type 1 diabetes exists, and, globally, the quality of diabetes management remains uneven. This Seminar discusses current progress in epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes, and prospects for an improved future for individuals with this disease. PMID:23890997