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Sample records for ascending retrocecal appendicitis

  1. Is single port incisionless-intracorporeal conventional equipment-endoscopic surgery feasible in patients with retrocecal acute appendicitis?

    PubMed Central

    Karakus, Suleyman Cuneyt; Koku, Naim; Ertaskin, Idris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Since laparoscopic appendectomy was first described, various modifications, such as single port incisionless-intracorporeal conventional equipment-endoscopic surgery (SPICES), have been described for reducing pain and improving cosmetic results. In the retrocecal and retrocolic positions, attachments to the lateral peritoneum and cecum may lead to difficulties during SPICES, which is performed with only one port. Here, we present the effects of variations in the position of the vermiform appendix in treating acute appendicitis with SPICES. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 52 children who underwent SPICES for acute appendicitis between March 2010 and November 2011 in our institution. One group (group A) consisted of 30 patients (mean age, 10.5 ± 2.5 years) with retrocecal appendix, while the other group (group B) included 22 patients (mean age, 10.9 ± 2.3 years) with the appendix lying free in the peritoneal cavity. Results There were no significant differences between groups in terms of patient age, gender, success rate of SPICES, mean operating time, mean follow-up period, overall complication rates or mean postoperative hospitalization period. Conclusion These results suggest that SPICES is a safe and feasible approach even in patients with retrocecal acute appendicitis. PMID:23908965

  2. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Appendicitis KidsHealth > For Teens > Appendicitis Print A A A ... out, had appendicitis and needed surgery. What Is Appendicitis? Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix. The ...

  3. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... function. A blockage inside of the appendix causes appendicitis. The blockage leads to increased pressure, problems with ... to pass gas Low fever Not everyone with appendicitis has all these symptoms. Appendicitis is a medical ...

  4. Perinephric abscess caused by ruptured retrocecal appendix: MDCT demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar Ahmad; Farooq, Mir; Gojwari, Tariq; Kosar, Tasleem

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening yet difficult to diagnose. One such presentation is described in a 60-year-old man who was brought to the hospital due to right lumbar pain and fever for the last 15 days. Ultrasonography showed a right perinephric gas and fluid collection. Abdominal computed tomography with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) revealed gas-containing abscess in the right retroperitoneal region involving the perinephric space, extending from the lower pole of the right kidney up to the bare area of the liver. Inflamed retrocecal appendix was seen on thick multiplanar reformat images with its tip at the lower extent of the abscess. Laparotomy and retroperitoneal exploration were performed immediately and a large volume of foul smelling pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was confirmed as the cause of the abscess. PMID:20842255

  5. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    Appendicitis is swelling (inflammation) of the appendix. The appendix is a small pouch attached to the large ... Appendicitis is a very common cause of emergency surgery. The problem most often occurs when the appendix ...

  6. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed? What Is Appendicitis? Your appendix (say: uh-PEN-dix) is a small, finger-shaped pouch connected ... or swells up, it's called appendicitis (say: uh-pen-di-SYE-tis). Both kids and adults can ...

  7. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be hard to diagnose appendicitis in young children, the elderly, and women of childbearing age. The first symptom is often pain around the belly button. Pain may be minor at first, but becomes more sharp and severe. ...

  8. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... may indicate appendicitis include • Rovsing’s sign. A health care provider tests for Rovsing’s sign by applying hand pressure to ... muscle also runs near the appendix. A health care provider tests for the obturator sign by asking the patient ...

  9. UNDESCENDED TESTICLE COMPLICATING ACUTE APPENDICITIS*

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Maximilian L.

    1924-01-01

    1. Symptoms referable to compression of the spermatic cord and incarceration of right testicle, obscure the underlying pathologic changes occurring in the vermiform appendix. 2. Testicular underdevelopment and resulting subnormal cerebration. 3. Operative technique: (a) Pre-operative diagnosis: Incarceration of right testicle and possible perforative appendicitis. (b) Descent of right incarcerated testicle. Bassini closure. (c) Exploratory laparotomy: Intramuscular gridiron incision. 4. Operative findings: (a) Strangulation and incarceration of undescended right testicle and spermatic cord in inguinal canal. (b) Copious pus, free in peritoneal cavity. An adherent, sloughing, perforative, retrocecal appendix identified, left undisturbed and free drainage established. 5. Progress: (a) Eventful recovery from acute suppurative appendicitis following drainage of appendical focus. (b) Marked development following the operative descent of an incarcerated testicle in a backward boy, age twelve, who had a bilateral cryptorchism. PMID:18739377

  10. Acute appendicitis presenting as thigh abscess in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Gupta, Vipul; Sharma, S C

    2005-04-01

    A case of retrocecal appendicitis is described in a 6-year-old male child who presented with thigh abscess. The presence of a positive psoas stretch test, feculent discharge, an enteric growth on bacteriological examination, and intraabdominal fluid collection on abdominal ultrasound provided clues to the presence of an intraabdominal source of sepsis. Laparotomy revealed a perforated retrocecal appendix with surrounding collection communicating into the thigh. Appendectomy with drainage of retroperitoneal and thigh collections under adequate antibiotic coverage resulted in a satisfactory recovery. We describe our experience with the present case and discuss the pertinent literature. PMID:15756560

  11. Retrocecal hernia successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery: A case report and literature review of 15 cases in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Abe, Hideki; Nagai, Hideo; Yoshimi, Fuyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Retrocecal hernia is rare and involves strangulation ileus, and therefore, frequently requires emergency surgery following conservative therapy. Presentation of case We report an interesting case of a retrocecal hernia in a 65-year-old man, with a history of diabetes mellitus. The patient was admitted to our hospital with severe periumbilical pain and nausea. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an intestinal obstruction at a pericecal site, and dilatation of the small bowel at the oral side of the obstruction. The patient was initially treated with conservative therapy using long intestinal tube placement. On the 12th hospital day, the patient’s symptoms had not resolved, and laparoscopic surgery was performed. We diagnosed a retrocecal hernia based on laparoscopic findings and repaired it. The patient was discharged without complications on the 7th postoperative day. Discussion and conclusion Using laparoscopic exploration and suturing, we were able to perform a minimally invasive operation that may have promoted an earlier hospital discharge. PMID:26688512

  12. Computed tomography findings mimicking appendicitis as a manifestation of colorectal cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Watchorn, Richard E.; Poder, Liina; Wang, Zhen J.; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Webb, Emily M.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    The primary computed tomography (CT) signs of appendicitis can also be seen with other inflammatory or neoplastic processes. We report on two cases in which appendiceal dilatation and peri-appendiceal fluid or stranding were the dominant imaging manifestations of colorectal carcinoma in the ascending colon. This study highlights the need to closely examine the ascending colon in patients with a suspected CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis, since these findings may be secondary to an inconspicuous colorectal carcinoma. PMID:19857802

  13. Appendicitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking Your Child's Temperature What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital Belly Pain Word! Peritonitis Appendicitis Hernias What's It Like to Have Surgery? Appendicitis Digestive System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  14. Treating appendicitis with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-03-01

    A nonsurgical approach using antimicrobial agents has been advocated as the initial treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis. Several studies and meta-analyses explored this approach. Because many of these studies included individuals with resolving appendicitis, their results were biased. Antimicrobials, however, are warranted and needed for the management of surgical high-risk patients with perforated appendicitis and those with localized abscess or phlegmon. Randomized placebo-controlled trials that focus on early identification of complicated acute appendicitis patients needing surgery and that prospectively evaluate the optimal use of antibiotic treatment in patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis are warranted. PMID:26689849

  15. Appendicitis associated with intestinal malrotation: imaging diagnosis features. Case report.

    PubMed

    Badea, Radu; Al Hajjar, Nadim; Andreica, Vasile; Procopeţ, Bogdan; Caraiani, Cosmin; Tamas-Szora, Attila

    2012-06-01

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare pathological situation consisting of non-rotation or incomplete rotation of the primitive intestine. Due to the abnormal caecal position inflicted by malrotation, diagnosis of acute appendicitis is difficult. Ultrasonography (US) and Computed Tomography (CT) are relevant and complementary imaging techniques for establishing an otherwise elusive diagnosis. We present the case of 54 year old male presenting with nonspecific abdominal complaints in which US (standard and contrast enhanced) and CT scans identified acute appendicitis associated with malrotated caecum and ascending colon, located in the left hipocondrum. PMID:22675720

  16. Chronic appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David; Butterworth, Sonia A.; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question While the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is relatively straightforward, chronic appendicitis is an entity that can be controversial and is often misdiagnosed. How and when should clinicians be investigating chronic appendicitis as a cause of chronic and recurrent abdominal pain in the pediatric population? Answer Chronic appendicitis is a long-standing inflammation or fibrosis of the appendix that presents clinically as prolonged or intermittent abdominal pain. It is often a challenging diagnosis and might result in complications such as intra-abdominal infections or bowel obstruction or perforation. Clinical presentation, along with imaging studies, can help the clinician rule out other conditions, and among those who are diagnosed, for many children, appendectomy results in partial or complete resolution of pain symptoms. PMID:27303020

  17. Fiber Intake and Childhood Appendicitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Jean D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Parents of 135 children with appendicitis and of 212 comparison children were interviewed about their children's diet. Results suggest that a liberal intake of whole-grain breads and cereals may decrease the risk of appendicitis during childhood. (KH)

  18. Operative management of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    St Peter, Shawn D; Snyder, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Appendectomy has been the standard of care for appendicitis since the late 1800s, and remains one of the most common operations performed in children. The advent of data-driven medicine has led to questions about every aspect of the operation-whether appendectomy is even necessary, when it should be performed (timing), how the procedure is done (laparoscopic variants versus open and irrigation versus no irrigation), length of hospital stay, and antibiotic duration. The goal of this analysis is to review the current status of, and available data regarding, the surgical management of appendicitis in children. PMID:27521710

  19. Stump Appendicitis: A Clinical Enigma.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, F; Abdurrahman, I; Tatar, Z

    2015-01-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most frequently performed operations. Stump appendicitis, as a postoperative complication of appendectomy, is inflammation of the remnant residue when an incomplete excision occurs. We present a patient with stump appendicitis who had been operated on, laparoscopically, for acute appendicitis 6 months before. The patient was diagnosed with acute appendicitis, underwent surgery, and was discharged on postoperative day 3 without complications. Stump appendicitis is a rare cause of acute abdominal disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Ultrasonography is helpful in the diagnosis. PMID:26713833

  20. Acute recurrent appendicitis with appendicolith.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Bernstein, M A; Kottamasu, S R; Sirr, S A

    1988-11-01

    Appendiceal disease can be acute, acute recurrent, or chronic. Acute appendicitis is the most common form. Acute recurrent appendicitis is more common than chronic appendicitis. In children the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are variable. Patients who have an appendicolith usually develop appendicitis, often with perforation. A case is presented of 3-year follow-up of a patient with an appendicolith and acute recurrent appendicitis. The literature about appendicoliths is reviewed. In the appropriate clinical setting, a history of prior episodes of similar right lower quadrant pain does not preclude the diagnosis of appendiceal disease. Awareness of the less common forms of appendicitis is important so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:3052484

  1. Gangrenous Appendicitis in a Boy with Mobile Caecum.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Zeynep; Gunduz, Metin; Sekmenli, Taner; Kivrak, Hatice Yazar

    2015-04-01

    A mobile caecum and ascending colon is an uncommon congenital disorder, and it is even rarer as the cause of an acute abdomen during childhood. This report presents the case of a 6-year-old boy with acute gangrenous appendicitis with a mobile caecum and ascending colon. Data from the surgical course, as well as laboratory and imaging studies, were acquired and carefully examined. Emergency ultrasound (US) was performed and revealed no signs of appendicitis in the right lower quadrant. Serial imaging study, including non-enhanced computed tomography (CT), was performed. An imaging study identified epigastric appendicitis with mobile caecum. Surgery was executed under general anesthesia with a median incision extending from the epigastrium to the suprapubic region. The caecum was mobile and placed in the right epigastric area, next to the left lobe of the liver and gallbladder. The gangrenous appendix was discovered posterior to the caecum and transverse colon, enlarging to the left upper quadrant. Appendectomy was executed, the gangrenous appendix was confirmed pathologically, and the patient was released 4 days later. In the US, if there are unusual clinical findings or no findings in patients with abdominal pain, CT is beneficial in determining the location of the caecum and appendix and preventing misdiagnosis in children. PMID:26060548

  2. Subacute ascending numbness.

    PubMed

    Arshi, B; Shaw, S

    2014-01-01

    A 21-year-old male presented with two weeks of ascending numbness involving all 4 limbs, and imbalance when walking. Examination revealed diminished vibration and proprioception at the fingers, toes, and ankles, a high steppage gait and a positive Romberg sign. He had no weakness in any muscle groups. Laboratory data included vitamin B12 218 pg/mL (normal range: 200-800 pg/mL), homocysteine 87 μmol/L (normal range: 2.2-13.2 μmol/L), and non-reactive RPR. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed abnormal T2-weighted hyperintensity along the posterior columns extending from C2 to C7. PMID:25200456

  3. Appendicitis in mature patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R P; Cochran, J L; Russell, W L; Bard, R M

    1985-01-01

    All patients greater than 50 years of age (N = 96) admitted with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis from 1971 to 1980 were reviewed. A comparative series of 91 patients aged 25 to 50 years was similarly reviewed. Noninflammatory diseases of the appendix and incidental appendectomies were excluded. Detailed study of symptoms, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, radiographic evaluation, concomitant diseases, hospital course, surgical findings, complications, and mortality were completed. Comparison of patients aged 25 to 50 to patients older than 50 years revealed a statistically significant increased incidence of perforation in the older group (p less than 0.0001). Sixty-five per cent of the older group showed greater incidence of perforation. Further analysis of this series yields the hypothesis that the increased incidence of perforation is related to a significant decrease in the frequency of classic presentation in the greater-than-50 age group, a significant decrease in frequency of correct admission diagnosis and a significant delay between admission and surgical procedure in the older group. A more rapid pathophysiologic progression of appendicitis with increasing age was noted. A much higher percentage of older patients was undiagnosed until the surgical procedure. In this group, there was a longer duration of symptoms, less frequent classic presentation, and decreased frequency of right lower quadrant guarding and tenderness as compared to patients with correct diagnosis prior to surgery. Complications were much more frequent in older patients and higher still in those with perforation. Analysis of findings by decade of life revealed an anticipated high incidence of perforated appendicitis in patients greater than 50, but also showed a continuation of the high incidence of perforation into the decade 40 to 50. There were three deaths in the entire study group (1.6%) all occurring in the older age group with postoperative

  4. Laparoscopic treatment of perforated appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lai, I-Rue

    2014-01-01

    The use of laparoscopy has been established in improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes for patients with simple appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendectomy is associated with less wound pain, less wound infection, a shorter hospital stay, and faster overall recovery when compared to the open appendectomy for uncomplicated cases. In the past two decades, the use of laparoscopy for the treatment of perforated appendicitis to take the advantages of minimally invasiveness has increased. This article reviewed the prevalence, approaches, safety disclaimers, perioperative and postoperative outcomes of the laparoscopic appendectomy in the treatment of patients with perforated appendicitis. Special issues including the conversion, interval appendectomy, laparoscopic approach for elderly or obese patient are also discussed to define the role of laparoscopic treatment for patients with perforated appendicitis. PMID:25339821

  5. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  6. Wound management in perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Lemieur, T P; Rodriguez, J L; Jacobs, D M; Bennett, M E; West, M A

    1999-05-01

    Open wound management after perforated appendicitis was common practice but, recently, primary closure has been advocated to reduce costs and morbidity. Hospital records from 319 adults who underwent appendectomy from 1993 to 1996 were reviewed to identify surgical wound infections (SWIs) and examine risk factors. Information about age, length of stay (LOS), operative time, white blood cell count, and antibiotic administration were obtained. Perforation was either noted at operation or identified microscopically by the pathologist. If primary wound closure was performed, patients with acute appendicitis and perforation had a 4-fold higher readmission rate, a 5-fold increase in SWI, and twice the LOS compared with patients with acute appendicitis without perforation. Patients with grossly perforated acute appendicitis had no difference in LOS if the wound was treated open or closed primarily. No patient with microscopic perforation and primary wound closure developed SWI. Primary wound closure after acute appendicitis was safe in the absence of clinical perforation. In the presence of clinical appendiceal perforation the wound should be left open. PMID:10231213

  7. ASCENDS: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B., III

    2014-12-01

    ASCENDS: Past,Present and Future by Berrien Moore III (University of Oklahoma) and Ken Jucks (NASA) with The ASCENDS Science Working Group The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights,Days,and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission was recommended by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey,and it is considered the scientific and technological next step following Japan's Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO).Space agencies are commitment to CO2 observations:GOSAT-2:Japan is proceeding with its development;OCO-2:NASA has launched it into the A-Train;TanSat:China's CO2 mission is in development,and CarbonSat is being considered by ESA.Using a laser,ASCENDS will make uninterrupted CO2 observations in high-latitudes,nighttime observations,and measurements in partly cloud conditions.ASCENDS expands the sampling of the atmosphere and may avoid some of the potential biases of passive systems.An issue for any mission is the linkage of observations to information regarding the subject of interest—in this case,surface fluxes of CO2.ASCENDS and the other low-Earth orbiting CO2 missions are difference from most missions in which the subject of interest is directly observed.In the case of these missions,the purpose of the atmospheric measurement is to determine surface fluxes that are distant from where the atmosphere is observed.This distinction between the subject observed and the subject of interest places added importance on the mission's observational requirements that governs the specifications of the mission and instrument.We discuss the challenge of establishing these mission requirements and present quantitative information on mapping observations with their uncertainties to information regarding terrestrial and oceanic surface fluxes of CO2.Results from the ASCENDS Science Working Group that the link measurement requirements to flux determination (or flux uncertainty reductions) are highlighted.We discuss modeling

  8. Appendicitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Appendicitis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/appendicitis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  9. Appendicitis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Appendicitis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/appendicitis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  10. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis: Report of a case and review of Japanese literature

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Hata, Shojirou; Seiichiro, Shimizu; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Teruya, Masanori; Kaminishi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Outside of these high-risk regions, acute amebic appendicitis is considerably rarer and the mortality rate is much higher than with non-amebic appendicitis. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31-year-old woman presented with fever and right lower abdominal pain with no history of traveling abroad or sexual infection. Computed tomography revealed a dilated appendix and thickened cecal and ascending colon walls. She underwent an appendectomy for appendicitis. Owing to a lack of symptom resolution, we performed a pathologic examination of the appendix again that revealed multiple Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites; the serum amebic antibody was positive. She was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis and discharged on postoperative day 12. DISCUSSION The mortality rate and frequency of severe postoperative intraabdominal complications were higher in the Japanese literature (1995–2013) (25% and 33%, respectively) than in other developed countries (3.3% and 19.4%, respectively). Japan is a low-risk area for amebiasis; many physicians fail to consider amebiasis in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. It is important to conduct further examinations, including those for amebiasis, when appendectomy does not resolve acute appendicitis. CONCLUSION We report a case of acute amebic appendicitis in a 31-year-old woman and review the ages at presentation, causative factors, treatments, and outcomes of 11 cases reported in Japan between 1995 and 2013. PMID:25460473

  11. Appendicitis in Dar es Salaam, histological pattern.

    PubMed

    Mbembati, N A; Lema, L E; Mwakyoma, H A; Ussiri, E V

    1996-03-01

    Histology of 378 appendicectomy specimens submitted to the Histopathology Department of Muhimbili Medical Centre from its surgical wards over a 10 year period (1985 to 1994) were reviewed. There were 185 cases (48.9 pc) of acute appendicitis, 101 cases (26.7 pc) of chronic appendicitis, 74 (19.6 pc) normal appendices and 13 cases (3.5 pc) schistosomal appendicitis. There were two cases of tuberculous appendicitis and two cases of mucocele of the appendix. Apart from the high frequency of chronic appendicitis the histological findings in this study compare well with findings reported from other studies. PMID:8653771

  12. [A man with atypical appendicitis].

    PubMed

    du Pré, Bastiaan C; Akkersdijk, Willem L

    2012-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute left-sided middle and lower abdominal pain. He was diagnosed with 'left-sided acute appendicitis with non-rotation of the colon'. This is a rare and usually asymptomatic congenital anomaly. PMID:22551755

  13. Perforated double appendicitis: Horseshoe type.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Serap Pamak; Cabıoğlu, Neslihan; Akıncı, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Appendix vermiformis duplex is an infrequent malformation. However if it is missed out, there might be some complications and medicolegal troubles. A surgeon must be aware of any other appendix during appendectomy. Therefore, the possible locations and shapes described in the Cave-Wallbridge classification should be considered by the surgeon. In this case report, we present a patient with a horseshoe-type dupplication of appendix in a perforated appendicitis diagnosed during an emergency laparotomy. PMID:27436939

  14. Perforated double appendicitis: Horseshoe type

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Serap Pamak; Cabıoğlu, Neslihan; Akıncı, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Appendix vermiformis duplex is an infrequent malformation. However if it is missed out, there might be some complications and medicolegal troubles. A surgeon must be aware of any other appendix during appendectomy. Therefore, the possible locations and shapes described in the Cave-Wallbridge classification should be considered by the surgeon. In this case report, we present a patient with a horseshoe-type dupplication of appendix in a perforated appendicitis diagnosed during an emergency laparotomy. PMID:27436939

  15. Paradigm Shifts in the Treatment of Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Grace Zee; Loeff, Deborah S

    2016-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of emergent surgery in children. Historically, surgical dogma dictated emergent appendectomy due to concern for impending perforation. Recently, however, there has been a paradigm shift in both the understanding of its pathophysiology as well as its treatment to more nonoperative management. No longer is it considered a spectrum from uncomplicated appendicitis inevitably progressing to complicated appendicitis over time. Rather, uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis are now considered two distinct pathophysiologic entities. This change requires not only educating the patients and their families but also the general practitioners who will be managing treatment expectations and caring for patients long term. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of appendicitis, including the differentiation between uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis, as well as the new treatment paradigms. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e235-e240.]. PMID:27403670

  16. Historical aspects of appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Hamill, James K; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    Evidence of appendicitis exists from ancient Egyptian mummies but the appendix was not discovered as an anatomical entity until the renaissance in Western European literature. Much confusion reigned over the cause of right iliac fossa inflammatory disease until the late 19th century, when the appendix was recognized as the cause of the great majority of cases. Coining the term 'appendicitis' and making the case for early surgery, Fitz in 1886 set the scene for recovery from appendicitis through operative intervention. PMID:24165165

  17. Radiation appendicitis: demonstration with graded compression US

    SciTech Connect

    Puylaert, J.B.; Hoekstra, F.; de Vries, B.C.; Rutgers, P.H.; Lalisang, R.I.; Ooms, E.C.

    1987-08-01

    In a patient who had received presurgical radiation therapy for extensive rectal carcinoma, ultrasonography with graded compression disclosed an inflamed appendix. The patient had no clinical signs of acute appendicitis. At laparotomy for resection of the rectal carcinoma, the appendix appeared grossly abnormal and was removed. Pathologic examination showed severe radiation enteritis of the appendix. The sonographic appearance of radiation appendicitis closely resembled that of acute appendicitis.

  18. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm.

    PubMed

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Ben Hamida, Emira; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  19. Acute neonatal appendicitis in a preterm

    PubMed Central

    Mammou, Sihem; Ayadi, Imen; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal appendicitis is very rare in the neonatal period. It is usually associated with comorbidity including prematurity. Symptoms are non-specific. The prognosis is marked by high risk of mortality and morbidity. Here, we report a case of preterm new born who presented with sepsis, apnoea, and digestive signs. The laparotomy revealed perforated appendicitis complicated with peritonitis. PMID:26712299

  20. Appendicitis

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  1. Appendicitis

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  3. A curious cause of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Parker, Emma Patricia; Atta, Mustafa; Doddi, Sudeendra

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with central abdominal pain, loose stool and vomiting. He was diagnosed with gastroenteritis, but was well enough to be discharged. The next day he reattended with ongoing diarrhoea and vomiting, with the pain now localised to the right iliac fossa (RIF). Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he was taken for laparoscopic appendicectomy. At surgery, a gangrenous appendix was found, with pus extending from the pelvis up to the liver. The appendix was excised and thorough peritoneal washout performed. Postoperatively, he received 48 hours of intravenous antibiotics and was discharged home. Unfortunately the boy presented again 11 days later with right lower quadrant pain and fever. Ultrasound revealed a collection in the RIF, and he returned to theatre for washout. His recovery was slow until the peritoneal pus sent for bacterial culture grew Salmonella enteritidis, identification of which facilitated appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:27489071

  4. A curious cause of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Parker, Emma Patricia; Atta, Mustafa; Doddi, Sudeendra

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with central abdominal pain, loose stool and vomiting. He was diagnosed with gastroenteritis, but was well enough to be discharged. The next day he reattended with ongoing diarrhoea and vomiting, with the pain now localised to the right iliac fossa (RIF). Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he was taken for laparoscopic appendicectomy. At surgery, a gangrenous appendix was found, with pus extending from the pelvis up to the liver. The appendix was excised and thorough peritoneal washout performed. Postoperatively, he received 48 hours of intravenous antibiotics and was discharged home. Unfortunately the boy presented again 11 days later with right lower quadrant pain and fever. Ultrasound revealed a collection in the RIF, and he returned to theatre for washout. His recovery was slow until the peritoneal pus sent for bacterial culture grew Salmonella enteritidis, identification of which facilitated appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:27489071

  5. Left Sided Appendicitis: Once Burned Twice Shy

    PubMed Central

    Spyridakis, Ioannis; Patoulias, Dimitrios; Tsioulas, Paschalis; Patoulias, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical conditions that are diagnosed in children presenting with acute abdominal pain in the emergency department. An atypical presentation of symptoms is encountered in 30% of cases. Atypical localization of the appendix as in left sided appendicitis, although rare, has an increased risk of missed or delayed diagnosis. We present two consecutive cases of left sided appendicitis in order to describe how increased awareness in the second case helped us to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. Increased cautiousness and awareness of left sided appendicitis can assist emergency physicians to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. PMID:27042523

  6. AIR SCORE ASSESSMENT FOR ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    PubMed Central

    VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli; BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; KRUEL, Nicolau; LUPSELO, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. Approximately 7% of the population will be affected by this condition during full life. The development of AIR score may contribute to diagnosis associating easy clinical criteria and two simple laboratory tests. Aim: To evaluate the score AIR (Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score) as a tool for the diagnosis and prediction of severity of acute appendicitis. Method: Were evaluated all patients undergoing surgical appendectomy. From 273 patients, 126 were excluded due to exclusion criteria. All patients were submitted o AIR score. Results: The value of the C-reactive protein and the percentage of leukocytes segmented blood count showed a direct relationship with the phase of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: As for the laboratory criteria, serum C-reactive protein and assessment of the percentage of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes count were important to diagnosis and disease stratification. PMID:26537139

  7. Left Sided Appendicitis: Once Burned Twice Shy.

    PubMed

    Kaselas, Christos; Spyridakis, Ioannis; Patoulias, Dimitrios; Tsioulas, Paschalis; Patoulias, Ioannis

    2016-02-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical conditions that are diagnosed in children presenting with acute abdominal pain in the emergency department. An atypical presentation of symptoms is encountered in 30% of cases. Atypical localization of the appendix as in left sided appendicitis, although rare, has an increased risk of missed or delayed diagnosis. We present two consecutive cases of left sided appendicitis in order to describe how increased awareness in the second case helped us to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. Increased cautiousness and awareness of left sided appendicitis can assist emergency physicians to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. PMID:27042523

  8. [History of surgical treatment of appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Meljnikov, Igor; Radojcić, Branka; Grebeldinger, Slobodan; Radojcić, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Most of the history of appendicitis and appendectomy has been made during the past two centuries. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi gave the first description of this structure in 1522. Gabriele Fallopio, in 1561, appears to have been the first writer to compare the appendix to a worm. In1579 Caspar Bauhin proposed the ingenious theory that the appendix served in intrauterine life as a receptacle for the faexes. Many of anatomists added more or less insignificant ideas concerning the structure of the appendix and entered upon useless controversy concerning the name, function, position of the appendix vermiformis. The first successful appendectomy was performed in 1735 by Claudius Amyand. Geillaume Dupuytren considered that acute inflammation of the right side of the abdomen arose from disease of the caecum and not the appendix. As surgeons were wary of opening the abdomen for examination, early stages of appendicitis remained unknown. John Parkinson was able to give a good description of fatal appendicitis in 1812. Surgeons began draining localised abscesses which had already formed. In 1880 Robert Lawson Tait made the first diagnosis of appendicitis and surgically removed the appendix. In 1886 Reginald Heber Fitz published a study on appendicitis and named the procedure an appendectomy. In 1889, Tait split open and drained an inflamed appendix without removing it. Charles McBurney proposed his original muscle splitting operation in 1893 and this was modified by Robert Fulton Weir in 1900. Today we have a multiplicity of signs and symptoms, helping to diagnose appendicitis, and there are a lot of techniques for operation with little essential difference throughout. Kurt Semm performed the first laparoscopic appendectomy in 1981 which became a new gold standard in surgical treatment of acute and chronic appendicitis. PMID:20391748

  9. Mild Appendicitis Complication Rates Similar for Surgery, Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Mild Appendicitis Complication Rates Similar for Surgery, Antibiotics Decision not to operate might be matter of ... 25, 2016 FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics can be used to treat mild appendicitis, but ...

  10. Appendicitis in Children: Evaluation of the Pediatric Appendicitis Score in Younger and Older Children

    PubMed Central

    Salö, Martin; Friman, Gustav; Stenström, Pernilla; Ohlsson, Bodil; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to evaluate Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS), diagnostic delay, and factors responsible for possible late diagnosis in children <4 years compared with older children who were operated on for suspected appendicitis. Method. 122 children, between 1 and 14 years, operated on with appendectomy for suspected appendicitis, were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into two age groups: ≥4 years (n = 102) and <4 years (n = 20). Results. The mean PAS was lower among the younger compared with the older patients (5.3 and 6.6, resp.; P = 0.005), despite the fact that younger children had more severe appendicitis (75.0% and 33.3%, resp.; P = 0.001). PAS had low sensitivity in both groups, with a significantly lower sensitivity among the younger patients. Parent and doctor delay were confirmed in children <4 years of age with appendicitis. PAS did not aid in patients with doctor delay. Parameters in patient history, symptoms, and abdominal examination were more diffuse in younger children. Conclusion. PAS should be used with caution when examining children younger than 4 years of age. Diffuse symptoms in younger children with acute appendicitis lead to delay and to later diagnosis and more complicated appendicitis. PMID:25574500

  11. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of appendicitis. Value and limitations].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Q K; Nguyen, V D; Nguyen, V T; Huynh, T T; Tran, V K

    1994-10-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency which can be diagnosed by clinical and laboratory criteria. But there are some atypical cases that ultrasound can help to diagnose. From April the 9th 1992 to April the 11th 1993, we have examined by ultrasound 465 patients entered in our hospital for right lower quadrant pain. 190 patients have been diagnosed as appendicitis and operated (true positive = 124 cases, false negative = 54 cases and false positive = 12 cases). 275 patients have been diagnosed as negative and they are not operated (true = 273 cases, false positive = 2 cases). So in our study, the sensitivity is 70%, the specificity is 95% and the accuracy is 85%. Our scientific report has the objective to show the usefulness and the limits of ultrasound in the diagnosis of appendicitis. PMID:7799276

  12. Infectious ileocecitis--appendicitis mimicking syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zganjer, M; Roic, G; Cizmic, A; Pajic, A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to emphasize the central role of ultrasound (US) in finding the cause of abdominal pain in children. Ultrasound of the lower abdomen quadrant should be considered in all cases in which the clinical signs and symptoms are not diagnostic of appendicitis. There is a wide range of clinical syndromes and diseases which can easily be diagnosed using a high resolution ultrasound with adjunct of color and power Doppler. The spectrum of abnormalities includes appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, infectious ileocecitis, Crohn's disease, intussusception, ovarian cysts, and encysted cerebrospinal fluid. One of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain in children is acute terminal ileitis (infectious ileocecitis) with mesenteric lymphadenitis. Ultrasound is the best tool to rapidly differentiate this disease from acute appendicitis, and prevent unnecessary laparotomy (Ref. 12). PMID:16201735

  13. An uncommon late complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Lapus, Robert M; Baker, Mark D

    2010-10-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 2.5-week history of right leg pain and limp. A right flank mass was noted by a parent on the day of presentation. The child's past medical history was remarkable for perforated appendicitis treated with an interval laparoscopic appendectomy 2 years before this presentation. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography revealed a retroperitoneal mass with calcifications, suggestive of a retained appendicolith with abscess formation. This case illustrates the importance of considering very late complications of appendicitis in patients presenting with fever and abdominal or flank pain or masses. PMID:20930600

  14. Gastrointestinal Zygomycosis Masquerading as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Tak; Chang, Tammy T.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Zygomycosis is a rare invasive opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in the setting of hematologic malignancies, chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, and immunosuppressive therapies. We report the first case of disseminated appendiceal zygomycosis due to Absidia spp. in a neutropenic patient who initially presented as acute appendicitis. A 63-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia presented as acute appendicitis while receiving induction chemotherapy and ultimately succumbed to overwhelming disseminated zygomycosis. Initial symptoms included loose stools and right lower abdominal pain unresponsive to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Clinical examination and cross-sectional imaging suggested acute appendicitis. The final diagnosis was established by histological evaluations of the ileocecectomy specimen, which showed angioinvasive fungal organisms within the necrotic appendiceal wall with characteristics typical of zygomycetes. Fungal cultures demonstrated Absidia spp. The patient was treated with amphotericin B but expired in the setting of fungal sepsis. A diagnosis of a fungal infection, including zygomycosis, should be considered in all chemotherapy-induced neutropenic patients who present with symptoms of acute appendicitis. A high index of clinical suspicion with prompt histologic and culture diagnosis of zygomycosis may reduce the high mortality and morbidity associated with zygomycosis of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27403107

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature. PMID:2957793

  16. Uncommon Caecum Diverticulitis Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Özkan; Kiziltan, Remzi; Bayrak, Vedat; Çelik, Sebahattin; Çalli, Iskan

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulum of the cecum is a rarely seen reason of acute abdomen and it is difficult to be distinguished from appendicitis. The diagnosis is generally made during operation. We have presented this case in order to remember that it is a disease which should be kept in mind in cases of right lower quadrant pain. PMID:27006852

  17. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  18. Cytomegalovirus appendicitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph E; McCormack, Michael; Gurung, Ananta; Passarelli, James; Landry, Marie L; Golden, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common viral pathogen. Asymptomatic infection or a mononucleosis syndrome are the most common manifestations in otherwise healthy individuals. End-organ disease is rare in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we describe a case of CMV appendicitis in a patient without an immune-compromising condition. PMID:26942831

  19. Device occlusion of pseudoaneurysm of ascending aorta

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mridul; Ray, Mili; Pallavi, M; Sen, Supratim; Ganguly, Debosree; Joshi, Pankaj; Tanti, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Amitabh; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit

    2011-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of ascending aorta is an infrequent but well-recognized and potentially fatal complication after cardiac surgeries. The complication can develop early, delayed or late, and the presentation is also varied. We are presenting here two cases of pseudoaneurysm of ascending aorta following cardiac surgery that were successfully managed by the transcatheter method. The first one occurred following coronary artery bypass surgery and the second one occurred following double-valve replacement surgery. The aortic openings of these aneurysms were occluded with 12 mm and 10 mm atrial septal occluders, respectively, with a good outcome. An immediate postprocedure angiogram showed no residual flow into the sac. Six months of follow-up of both cases also showed excellent results. PMID:21976887

  20. Syphilitic aneurysm of the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Nelson; Cascarejo, José; Vouga, Luís

    2012-02-01

    Syphilitic aortic aneurysm is a rare occurrence in the antibiotic era, making the diagnose assumption even more infrequent. Nonetheless, this pathology can appear and should be suspected in patients with aortic aneurysm. We report a case of a 57-year old patient who presents with neurosyphilis and, in the following study, a large ascending aorta aneurysm is identified. The authors discuss the diagnostic challenge, the epidemiologic concerns, surgical indication and treatment and subsequent follow-up. PMID:22159251

  1. Ascending placentitis in the mare: A review.

    PubMed

    Cummins, C; Carrington, S; Fitzpatrick, E; Duggan, V

    2008-01-01

    Ascending placentitis is a condition that occurs late in pregnancy when bacteria enter the sterile uterus from the lower reproductive tract. It leads to abortion or the birth of premature and weakened foals. Early detection and treatment of this condition is vital for ensuring the production of a viable foal.Mares with ascending placentitis often present in late term pregnancy with signs of premature udder development and premature lactation. There may be a vulvar discharge. Early detection of placental problems is possible using trans-abdominal or trans-rectal ultrasonography. Hormones such as progesterone and relaxin may be measured as indicators of foetal stress and placental failure. Postpartum foetal membranes may be thickened and contain a fibronecrotic exudate. The region most affected is the cervical star. Definitive diagnosis of ascending placentitis is by histopathological examination of the chorioallantoic membrane.Ideal treatment strategies are aimed at curing the infection and prolonging the pregnancy to as close to term as possible and consist of anti-microbials, anti-inflammatories and hormonal support.Swabs are taken from affected mares to determine antibiotic sensitivity and to aid in treatment of foals born from these mares which are at risk of becoming septic. If detected early enough, the chances of producing a viable foal are greatly increased. PMID:21851713

  2. Acute appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Heung; Lee, Dae Sup; Kim, Kwang Min

    2015-09-01

    Foreign bodies usually do not cause complications and pass through the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously. Usually endoscopic intervention is recommended within 24 hours. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by foreign bodies are very rare. In our case, we experienced successful endoscopic and surgical treatment of a patient with ingestion of razor blade and some unrecognizable foreign bodies. A 22-year-old soldier was admitted with a small quantity of hematemesis and epigastric pain. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed several foreign bodies. After 17 days, we performed appendectomy to remove the remaining foreign body and to relieve the symptoms. There is no doubt that endoscopic intervention is definitely useful method to remove foreign bodies. If there is no spontaneous drainage of the foreign body from the appendix, an appendectomy must be considered to remove the foreign body and prevent surgical complications such as appendicitis, periappendiceal abscess, and perforation. PMID:26366386

  3. Perforated appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong Kyu; Bae, Ok Suk; Hwang, Ilseon

    2012-04-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies pass through the gastrointestinal tract without any incident. However, foreign bodies lodged in the appendix can cause an inflammatory reaction with or without perforation. Here, we present a case of a 54-year-old woman with perforated appendicitis who consumed wild game containing a shot pellet. Five months before admission, she had eaten the meat of a pheasant that had been shot with a shotgun. Abdominal computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis with abscess due to a foreign body. Subsequently, a laparoscopic appendectomy was performed. Follow-up radiographs obtained after the surgery did not identify the foreign body. Histolopathologic examination confirmed appendiceal perforation with focal inflammation secondary to a foreign body. PMID:22487649

  4. Torsion of epiploic appendage mimic acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Pogorelić, Zenon; Stipić, Radoslav; Druzijanić, Nikica; Perko, Zdravko; Grandić, Leo; Vilović, Katarina; Mrklić, Ivana; Jurić, Ivo; Boschi, Vladimir; Bekavac, Josip

    2011-12-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is a rare cause of focal abdominal pain which, depending on its localisation, can mimic a variety of abdominal diseases. We report a case of 36-year-old woman who presented with a classic signs of acute appendicitis. On examination, the obese, afebrile, and had very strong right iliac fossa tenderness and guarding. The white cell count was 12.82 x 10(9)/L, and C reactive protein count was 15.13MG/DL. She underwent emergency laparoscopic procedure after the acute appendicitis diagnosis has been established. Laparoscopic exploration of the abdominal cavity showed vermiform, no inflamed, appendix and necrotic appendix epiploica of the caecum. The treatment consisted of typical laparoscopic appendectomy and laparoscopic resection of the necrotic appendix epiploica. The patient made rapid recovery and was discharged from the hospital on second day after the operation. Histological investigation of the appendix epiploica revealed gangrenous epiploic appendage. PMID:22397276

  5. Missed appendicitis diagnosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jocelyn; Sovak, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this case report is to highlight and emphasize the need for an appropriate and thorough list of differential diagnoses when managing patients, as it is insufficient to assume cases are mechanical, until proven non-mechanical. There are over 250,000 cases of appendicitis annually in the United States. Of these cases, <50% present with classic signs and symptoms of pain in the right lower quadrant, mild fever and nausea. It is standard for patients who present with appendicitis to be managed operatively with a laparoscopic appendectomy within 24 hours, otherwise the risk of complications such as rupture, infection, and even death increases dramatically. Clinical Features: This is a retrospective case report following a 27-year-old male with missed appendicitis, who presented to a chiropractor two-weeks after self-diagnosed food poisoning. On assessment, he was tender with resisted lumbar rotation. Psoas Sign, McBurney’s Point, vascular exam, hip exam, were negative. A diagnosis of an abdominal strain was provided. Two weeks later, he returned to the chiropractor without an improvement of symptoms. Intervention & Outcome: The patient was sent to the hospital, where he was provided a diagnosis of missed appendicitis. He required a hemicolonectomy due to the associated phlegmonous mass. Summary: When a patient presents to a chiropractic clinic with symptoms of abdominal pain, having a comprehensive list of non-mechanical differential diagnoses as well as mechanical differentials is crucial. Appropriate assessment and management of abdominal cases decreases the risk to patients, as missed diagnoses often require more invasive interventions. PMID:26500364

  6. Improving diagnosis of appendicitis. Early autologous leukocyte scanning

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, A.R.; Raviola, C.A.; Weber, P.N.; McDonald, P.T.; Navarro, D.A.; Jasko, I. )

    1989-10-01

    A prospective nonrandomized study investigating the accuracy and utility of autologous leukocyte scanning in the diagnosis of appendicitis was performed. One hundred patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was uncertain underwent indium 111 oxyquinoline labelling of autologous leukocytes and underwent scanning 2 hours following reinjection. Of 32 patients with proved appendicitis, three scans revealed normal results (false-negative rate, 0.09). Of 68 patients without appendicitis, three scans had positive results (false-positive rate, 0.03; sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.97; predictive value of positive scan, 0.94; predictive value of negative scan, 0.96; and overall accuracy, 0.95). Scan results altered clinical decisions in 19 patients. In 13 cases, the scan produced images consistent with diagnoses other than appendicitis, expediting appropriate management. Early-imaging In 111 oxyquinoline autologous leukocyte scanning is a practical and highly accurate adjunct for diagnosing appendicitis.

  7. Unusual perforated appendicitis within umbilical hernia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, J; Ortiz, A; Marco de Lucas, E; Piedra, T; Jordá, J; Arnáiz, A M; Pagola, M A

    2006-01-01

    We present the first imaging report of perforated appendicitis in an umbilical hernia. Computed tomography demonstrated a gas-forming abscess within an umbilical hernia and the cecum was found inside the hernial sac, with an inner relation to the abscess. Computed tomographic findings suggested appendicitis as possible diagnosis, which was confirmed at surgery. Physicians must consider appendicitis within the differential diagnosis of an abdominal abscess located near to the cecum, even at an unexpected location. PMID:16465570

  8. Quantifying Regional Measurement Requirements for ASCENDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, M. E.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Hegarty, J. D.; Aschbrenner, R.; Henderson, J.; Zaccheo, S.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of greenhouse gas fluxes at regional and local scales is required by the Kyoto protocol and potential follow-up agreements, and their accompanying implementation mechanisms (e.g., cap-and-trade schemes and treaty verification protocols). Dedicated satellite observations, such as those provided by the Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT), the upcoming Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), and future active missions, particularly Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) and Advanced Space Carbon and Climate Observation of Planet Earth (A-SCOPE), are poised to play a central role in this endeavor. In order to prepare for the ASCENDS mission, we are applying the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model driven by meteorological fields from a customized version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to generate surface influence functions for ASCENDS observations. These "footprints" (or adjoint) express the sensitivity of observations to surface fluxes in the upwind source regions and thus enable the computation of a posteriori flux error reductions resulting from the inclusion of satellite observations (taking into account the vertical sensitivity and error characteristics of the latter). The overarching objective of this project is the specification of the measurement requirements for the ASCENDS mission, with a focus on policy-relevant regional scales. Several features make WRF-STILT an attractive tool for regional analysis of satellite observations: 1) WRF meteorology is available at higher resolution than for global models and is thus more realistic, 2) The Lagrangian approach minimizes numerical diffusion present in Eulerian models, 3) The WRF-STILT coupling has been specifically designed to achieve good mass conservation characteristics, and 4) The receptor-oriented approach offers a relatively straightforward way to compute the adjoint of the transport model. These aspects allow

  9. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  10. [BACTERIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AN ACUTE APPENDICITIS].

    PubMed

    Zhuchenko, O P

    2016-03-01

    Peculiarities of microflora in the appendix mucosa and abdominal exudate in different morphological forms of an acute appendicitis (AA) were studied up. In accordance to the bacteriological investigations data, anaerobic, and aerobic microorganisms in AA were revealed in a monoculture and in association, more frequently--obligate anaer- obes (bacteroids) with E. coli--in 82 (80.39%) observations, staphylococcus--in 52 (50.98%), fecal streptococcus--in 19 (18.63%). With progression of inflammatory process and destructive changes in the appendix wall the quantity of bacteroids and enterobacteria have had enhanced, while the quantity of lacto- and bifidumflora-- reduced. PMID:27514082

  11. [Change in pancreatic exocrine function in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu A

    1979-10-01

    In order to study changes in the functional state of the pancreas 1572 investigations of the blood and urine amylase, atoxylresistant lipase of the blood serum before operation were performed in different postoperative periods in 131 patients with acute appendicitis. The enzyme activity was established to increase, especially in destructive forms of appendicitis and in elderly patients. PMID:505800

  12. Two Cases of Omental Torsion Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Liaqat, Naeem; Dar, Sajid Hameed; Sandhu, Asif Iqbal; Nayyer, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is often simulated by other entities like mesenteric adenitis, worm infestation, Meckel’s diverticulitis, urinary tract infection and rarely omental torsion. We report two cases, a 6 year old boy and an 11 year old girl, who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis but upon exploration turned out to be omental torsion. PMID:24834389

  13. Torsion of omental fibrous pseudotumour mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Thomas E.; Ozmen, John; Fenton-Lee, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Unusual pathologies are occasionally found at laparoscopy when appendicitis is suspected. We present a case of strangulated inflammatory fibrous pseudotumour of the omentum presenting in a similar fashion to appendicitis. The infarcted omentum was excised, facilitating prompt resolution of symptoms. PMID:26811304

  14. Combined procedure of heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    de Castro, João Gonçalves; Estefanía, Rafael Hernández; Delgado, Cristian; Del Barrio, Loreto García; Rábago, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    Concomitant heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement is infrequent. In the few cases where this simultaneous procedure was performed, most patients were diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. We report the combined procedure of heart transplantation and ascending aorta replacement using the donor's ascending aorta, in a 70-year-old man who was not diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. This combined procedure can be performed successfully, providing a potentially life-saving heart transplant for patients with aortic disease of different etiologies. PMID:25737588

  15. Appendicitis after laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy-coincidence or complication.

    PubMed

    Gallmann, Dalia Mirjam; Stoessel, Kurt-Aurel; Schoeb, Othmar

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of appendicitis, particularly in young women, may be challenging. In case of abdominal pain in the postoperative period of laparoscopic surgery, one should not only think of complications such as bleeding and injury of the bowel but also such as acute appendicitis. We report a case of a 26-year-old female patient with a post-laparoscopic acute appendicitis with appendicolithiasis 3 days after a laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy during which the appendix appeared inconspicuous. Appendicitis after gynecologic laparoscopy is a rare but potentially dangerous condition. One should consider the possibility of a postoperative appendicitis in case of an acute abdomen after laparoscopic surgery. Further studies might be of value to re-evaluate incidental appendectomy especially in cases of appendicolithiasis. PMID:27103602

  16. Appendicitis after laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy—coincidence or complication

    PubMed Central

    Gallmann, Dalia Mirjam; Stoessel, Kurt-Aurel; Schoeb, Othmar

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of appendicitis, particularly in young women, may be challenging. In case of abdominal pain in the postoperative period of laparoscopic surgery, one should not only think of complications such as bleeding and injury of the bowel but also such as acute appendicitis. We report a case of a 26-year-old female patient with a post-laparoscopic acute appendicitis with appendicolithiasis 3 days after a laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy during which the appendix appeared inconspicuous. Appendicitis after gynecologic laparoscopy is a rare but potentially dangerous condition. One should consider the possibility of a postoperative appendicitis in case of an acute abdomen after laparoscopic surgery. Further studies might be of value to re-evaluate incidental appendectomy especially in cases of appendicolithiasis. PMID:27103602

  17. A distinctive type of ascending prominence - 'Fountain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Riddle, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Cinematographic observations of solar prominences made at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, during the past few years suggest that there is a well-defined subclass of ascending prominences characterized by closed-system transference of chromospheric material along an arch or loop (up one leg and down the other). While this occurs, the entire prominence envelope steadily rises upward and expands through the corona. These prominences are denoted as 'fountains'. Several examples are described. Fountains appear to be well contained by coronal magnetic fields. Their total kinetic energy is of the order of 10 to the 30th power erg, but dissipation is typically quite slow (over time periods of 100 min or so), so that the correlative disturbances (radio bursts, coronal transients, chromospheric brightenings) are generally not spectacular or nonexistent.

  18. K-Sign in retrocaecal appendicitis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in position of the vermiform appendix considerably changes clinical findings. Retrocaecal appendicitis presents with slightly different clinical features from those of classical appendicitis associated with a normally sited appendix. K-sign looks for the presence of tenderness on posterior abdominal wall in the retrocaecal and paracolic appendicitis. This is the first case report of this kind in the literature. The K-sign has been named, as a mark of respect, after the region of origin of this sign, Kashmir, so called as "Kashmir Sign". The sign being present in view of inflamed appendix crossing above its non palpable position above iliac crest on the posterior abdominal wall and the tenderness is by irritation of posterior peritoneum Case presentation The author is reporting a case series of four patients in whom a K-sign, a clinical sign, was elicited and found positive on the posterior abdominal wall for presence of tenderness in a specific area bound by the 12th rib superiorly, spine medially, lateral margin of posterior abdominal wall laterally and iliac crest inferiorly and was found to be present in three retrocaecal and one paracolic appendicitis. Each case had tenderness in this specific area on posterior abdominal wall. All had appendectomy and having histopathological evidence of appendicitis. Conclusion K-sign can be useful in diagnosis of retrocaecal and paracolic appendicitis. Significance of K-sign being in view of difficulty in diagnosis of retrocaecal appendicitis and its subsequent complications. PMID:19946528

  19. Right Hydronephrosis as a Complication of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Selahattin Koray; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Yıldız, İhsan; Barut, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen, but atypical appendicitis may lead to delayed diagnosis and related complications. In this report, we present a very rare case of acute appendicitis causing right hydronephrosis. Case Report. A 54-year-old male patient who had been receiving antibiotic therapy due to the diagnosis of urinary tract infection for the last one week but had no clinical improvement was admitted to the emergency service. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed right hydronephrosis and a pelvic abscess. After appendectomy and abscess drainage had been performed, hydronephrosis was completely recovered. Discussion. The use of appendicitis scoring systems, abdominal ultrasonography (USG), abdominal CT, and diagnostic laparoscopy can be useful for the diagnostic process in patients presenting with acute abdomen. In our patient, we considered that the surgical treatment was delayed since the symptoms of acute appendicitis were suppressed by the antibiotic therapy that was being administered due to the complaints including symptoms of urinary tract infections. Conclusion. Atypical appendicitis may cause a delay in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and thus may lead to serious complications such as right hydronephrosis, prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity and mortality, and increased antibiotic resistance. PMID:27069699

  20. Indium-/sup 111/ leukocyte imaging in appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.; Sawicki, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    Indium-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was applied to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-two patients observed in the hospital for possible appendicitis were prospectively studied. Scanning was done 2 hr after radiopharmaceutical injection. Thirteen scans were positive for acute appendicitis, and all but one were confirmed at laparotomy. In addition, two cases of colitis and two cases of peritonitis were detected. Of 15 negative studies, 11 had a benign course. Four patients with negative studies had laparotomy; two were found to have appendicitis and two had a normal appendix. Of 14 proven cases of appendicitis, 12 scans were positive for appendicitis with one false-positive scan, providing a sensitivity of 86%. Specificity was 93%: all negative cases except one had negative scans. Overall accuracy was 91% (29 of 32), comparing favorably with the accepted false-positive laparotomy rate of 25%. Use of In-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy serves to reduce the false-positive laparotomy rate and to shorten the clinical observation time in patients with acute appendicitis.

  1. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  2. Missed appendicitis after self-induced abortion

    PubMed Central

    Punguyire, Damien; Iserson, Victor Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Female lower abdominal pain poses diagnostic difficulties for clinicians, especially when little more than the history and physical examination are available. A girl presented with constant lower abdominal pain after taking misoprostol for pregnancy termination. She was eventually referred to a rural District Hospital, where a laparotomy demonstrated acute appendicitis. After treating herself for a self-diagnosed pregnancy with illegally provided misoprostol, this patient presented with persistent lower abdominal pain. The differential diagnosis included ectopic pregnancy and all other causes of female abdominal pain. Yet diagnosing two diseases in the same anatomical area at the same time contradicts diagnostic parsimony. System problems in resource-poor areas can limit access to healthcare services and encourage dispensing potentially dangerous medications without clinicians’ authorization. It is dangerous to rely on patients’ self-diagnoses while neglecting other diagnoses. More than one diagnosis may be needed to explain temporally and anatomically related symptoms. PMID:22187620

  3. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Skyle J; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  4. Laparoscopic Surgery for Acute Appendicitis in Children With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Julia; Stringel, Gustavo; Ozkaynak, Mehmet Fevzi; McBride, Whitney; Pandya, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Abdominal pain during cancer chemotherapy may be caused by medical or surgical conditions. A retrospective review of 5 children with cancer who had appendicitis while receiving chemotherapy was performed. Case Descriptions: Three had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 1 each had T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Two of the patients had a Pediatric Appendectomy Score of 6, and 1 each had a score of 7, 5, and 2. All had evidence of appendicitis on computed tomography. Laparoscopic appendectomy was performed without any perioperative complication. Discussion: Appendicitis is an important diagnosis in children with cancer, and laparoscopic appendectomy is safe and the procedure of choice. PMID:26390529

  5. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Skyle J.; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  6. Heat transfer of ascending cryomagma on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Marsh, Bruce D.

    2016-06-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa has a relatively young surface (60-90 Myr on average), which may be due in part to cryovolcanic processes. Current models for both effusive and explosive cryovolcanism on Europa may be expanded and enhanced by linking the potential for cryovolcanism at the surface to subsurface cryomagmatism. The success of cryomagma transport through Europa's crust depends critically on the rate of ascent relative to the rate of solidification. The final transport distance of cryomagma is thus governed by initial melt volume, ascent rate, overall ascent distance, transport mechanism (i.e., diapirism, diking, or ascent in cylindrical conduits), and melt temperature and composition. The last two factors are especially critical in determining the budget of expendable energy before complete solidification. Here we use these factors as constraints to explore conditions under which cryomagma may arrive at Europa's surface to facilitate cryovolcanism. We find that 1-5 km radius warm ice diapirs ascending from the base of a 10 km thick stagnant lid can reach the shallow subsurface in a partially molten state. Cryomagma transport may be further facilitated if diapirs travel along pre-heated ascent paths. Under certain conditions, cryolava transported from 10 km depths in tabular dikes or pipe-like conduits may reach the surface at temperatures exceeding 250 K. Ascent rates for these geometries may be high enough that isothermal transport is approached. Cryomagmas containing significant amounts of low eutectic impurities can also be delivered to Europa's surface by propagating dikes or pipe-like conduits.

  7. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV-vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  8. Sonography of acute appendicitis and its mimics in children

    PubMed Central

    Sargar, Kiran M; Siegel, Marilyn J

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute right lower quadrant pain in a pediatric population is challenging. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of an acute surgical abdomen. The common mimics of acute appendicitis are acute gastrointestinal and gynecologic diseases. This article reviews the sonographic findings of the spectrum of common acute abdominal emergencies in children with a focus on imaging clues to a specific diagnosis. This awareness can impact on diagnostic accuracy and impact patient management. PMID:25024527

  9. BODIPY atropisomer interconversion, face discrimination, and superstructure appending.

    PubMed

    Doulain, Pierre-Emmanuel; Goze, Christine; Bodio, Ewen; Richard, Philippe; Decréau, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    A strategy was developed to append sterically hindered apical pickets on both faces of the BODIPY platform to prevent stacking and aggregation. Ortho-substitution of both the meso-phenyl ring and the boron-bound catechol affords the right directionality to append pickets, achieve face discrimination, featuring two interconvertible atropisomers, and is reminiscent of the picket-fence strategy in porphyrins. PMID:26927530

  10. Risk factors for the development of complicated appendicitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Naderan, Mohammad; Babaki, Amir Eslami Shahr; Shoar, Saeed; Mahmoodzadeh, Hossein; Nasiri, Shirzad; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the patient’s history and physical examination information to find out risk factors associated with complicated appendicitis. Material and Methods: Two hundred patients who were admitted with complicated appendicitis (including abscess, phlegmon, and generalized peritonitis) were retrieved from our database. Two hundred patients with non-complicated acute appendicitis were randomly selected from the same period. These two groups were compared in terms of demographic characteristics, past medical history, and presenting symptoms. We made a multivariate analysis model using binary logistic regression and backward stepwise elimination. Results: Based on multivariate analysis, risk factors for complicated appendicitis included presenting with epigastric pain (OR=3.44), diarrhea (OR=23.4) or malaise (OR=49.7), history of RLQ pain within the past 6 months (OR=4.93), older age (OR=1.04), being married (OR=2.52), lack of anorexia (OR=4.63) and longer interval between onset of symptoms and admission (OR=1.46). Conversely, higher (academic) education was associated with decreased odds for complicated appendicitis (OR=0.26). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a surgeon’s clinical assessment is more reliable to make a judgment. “Bedside evaluation” is a useful, cheap, quick and readily available method for identifying those at risk for developing complicated acute appendicitis. PMID:26985166

  11. Ascending aortopulmonary fistula 40 years after previous cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Maki, Alexandra C; Williams, Matthew L

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of a 64-year-old female presenting with hemoptysis and an ultimate diagnosis of ascending aortopulmonary fistula 40 years after an atrial septal defect repair. A literature review of this rare complication of ascending aortic cannulation includes the pathogenesis and etiology of this rare diagnosis. Aortobronchopulmonary fistula is a rare diagnosis with grave consequences if not treated urgently. We present a case of such diagnosis that was treated with a good outcome. PMID:21299625

  12. Appendicitis in double cecal appendix: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Alves, José Roberto; Maranhão, Ícaro Godeiro de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Patrick Vanttinny Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Double cecal appendix is a rare anatomical variation. Approximately 100 cases have been reported worldwide. It is usually diagnosed incidentally during emergency appendectomies due to inflammatory processes in the cecal appendix. Case presentation: male, white, 36 years old, obese, presenting with pain in the lower abdomen for 24 h followed by nausea, vomiting and mild fever. He was subjected to additional tests, with the leukogram showing leukocytosis and abdominal ultrasonography depicting cecal appendix with thickened wall, locally associated with small quantities of liquid and intestinal loop obstruction. He underwent laparotomy, revealing acute appendicitis. Another intestinal loop obstruction was identified next to the ileum, leading to recognizing another cecal appendix after local dissection. Double appendectomy and segmental iliectomy were performed although not needed. Results of the anatomopathological examination of the surgical samples showed acute inflammation in the two cecal appendices. So, performing a routine retroperitoneal release and a complete cecum evaluation during such surgical procedures is recommended and suggested due to the possibility of not identifying a second cecal appendix. PMID:25133154

  13. Acute appendicitis: position paper, WSES, 2013.

    PubMed

    Agresta, Ferdinando; Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Verza, Luca Andrea; Prando, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most frequently performed operative procedures in general surgery departments of every size and category. Laparoscopic Appendectomy - LA - as compared to Open Appendectomy - OA - was very controversial at first but has found increasing acceptance all over the World, although the percentage of its acceptance is different in the various single National setting. Various meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews have compared LA with OA and different technical details. Furthermore, new surgical methods have recently emerged, namely, the single-port/incision laparoscopic appendectomy and NOTES technique. Their distribution among the hospitals, however, is unclear. Using laparoscopic mini-instruments with trocars of 2-3.5 mm diameter is proposed as a reliable alternative due to less postoperative pain and improved aesthetics. How to proceed in case of an inconspicuous appendix during a procedure planned as an appendectomy remains controversial despite existing study results. But the main question still is: operate or not operate an acute appendicitis, in the meaning of an attempt of a conservative antibiotic therapy. Therefore, we have done a literature survey on the performance of appendectomies and their technical details as well as the management of the intraoperative finding of an inconspicuous appendix in order to write down - under the light of the latest evidence - a position paper. PMID:24708651

  14. Solitary caecum diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hot, Semih; Eğin, Seracettin; Gökçek, Berk; Yeşiltaş, Metin; Alemdar, Ali; Akan, Arzu; Karahan, Servet Rüştü

    2015-12-01

    Solitary cecum diverticulum is a benign formation, but it can be complicated with inflammation, perforation and bleeding. Cecum diverticulitis (CD) is the most common complication of caecal diverticulum and it has the highest incidence among Asians, but it is a rare condition in the western world. The incidence of colonic diverticular disease can vary according to national origin, cultural structure and nutritional habits. CD is not common in our country, but it is an important situation because of its clinical similarity with the commonly seen acute right side abdominal diseases like acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and hence, the actual frequency is not known. The treatment of CD can vary from medical therapy to right hemi colectomy. In this study, we presented ten CD cases on whom surgical resection was performed in our surgery unit during the last 8 years. Our purpose was to increase the awareness of surgeons about this situation, and so, make them pay attention for not having their first experience in the operating room. PMID:27054646

  15. Biaxial tensile tests of the porcine ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Boufi, Mourad; Boiron, Olivier; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Alimi, Yves; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-07-01

    One of the aims of this work is to develop an original custom built biaxial set-up to assess mechanical behavior of soft tissues. Stretch controlled biaxial tensile tests are performed and stereoscopic digital image correlation (SDIC) is implemented to measure the 3D components of the generated displacements. Using this experimental device, the main goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of porcine ascending aorta in the more general context of human ascending aorta pathologies. The results highlight that (i) SDIC arrangement allows accurate assessment of displacements and so stress strain curves, (ii) porcine ascending aorta has a nearly linear and anisotropic mechanical behavior until 30% of strain, (iii) porcine ascending aorta is stiffer in the circumferential direction than in the longitudinal one, (iv) the material coefficient representing the interaction between the two loading directions is thickness dependent, (v) taking into account the variability of the samples the stress values are independent of the stretch rate in the range of values from 10(-3) to 10(-1)s(-1) and finally, (vi) unlike other segments of the aorta, 4-month-old pigs ascending aorta is definitely not a relevant model to investigate the mechanical behavior of the human ascending aorta. PMID:27211783

  16. Technology advancement for the ASCENDS mission using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Antill, C.; Browell, E. V.; Campbell, J. F.; CHEN, S.; Cleckner, C.; Dijoseph, M. S.; Harrison, F. W.; Ismail, S.; Lin, B.; Meadows, B. L.; Mills, C.; Nehrir, A. R.; Notari, A.; Prasad, N. S.; Kooi, S. A.; Vitullo, N.; Dobler, J. T.; Bender, J.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Horney, S.; McGregor, D.; Neal, M.; Shure, M.; Zaccheo, T.; Moore, B.; Crowell, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Welch, W.

    2013-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a NASA Langley Research Center project funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technologies being advanced are: (1) multiple transmitter and telescope-aperture operations, (2) high-efficiency CO2 laser transmitters, (3) a high bandwidth detector and transimpedance amplifier (TIA), and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The instrument architecture is being developed for ACES to operate on a high-altitude aircraft, and it will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. The above technologies are critical for developing an airborne simulator and spaceborne instrument with lower platform consumption of size, mass, and power, and with improved performance. This design employs several laser transmitters and telescope-apertures to demonstrate column CO2 retrievals with alignment of multiple laser beams in the far-field. ACES will transmit five laser beams: three from commercial lasers operating near 1.57-microns, and two from the Exelis atmospheric oxygen (O2) fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26-microns. The Master Oscillator Power Amplifier at 1.57-microns measures CO2 column concentrations using an Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach. O2 column amounts needed for calculating the CO2 mixing ratio will be retrieved using the Exelis laser system with a similar IPDA approach. The three aperture telescope design was built to meet the constraints of the Global Hawk high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). This assembly integrates fiber-coupled transmit collimators for all of the laser transmitters and fiber-coupled optical signals from the three telescopes to the aft optics and detector package. The detector

  17. Parasitic Infestation in Pediatric and Adolescent Appendicitis: A Local Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Ossama M.; Zakaria, Hazem M.; Daoud, Mohamed Yasser; Al Wadaani, Hamed; Al Buali, Waleed; Al-Mohammed, Hamdan; Al Mulhim, Abdulrahman S.; Zaki, Wafaa

    2013-01-01

    Objective The relationship between parasites and pediatric appendicitis is a highly debatable issue. This study aims to investigate the role of parasitic infestation in the etiology of acute pediatric appendicitis. Methods A retrospective study including 1600 pediatric and adolescent patients who had undergone surgical therapy for a diagnosis of acute appendicitis over a period of ten years from Jan 2001 to Dec 2010. Demographic data were retrieved including the patient's age, sex, clinical data, clinical presentations, laboratory investigations, operative data and pathological findings to identify the presence and type of parasites. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of parasites in the appendix lumen. In group I (n: 88), parasitic infestation was observed, whereas in group II (n: 1502), no parasitic infestation was present. Results Parasites were present in 5.5% (88 patients), and of those 88 parasitic infestations, 45 (51.1%) were Enterobaisis, 8 (9.1%) were Schistosomiasis, 23 (26.1%) were Ascariasis, 7 (8%) Trichuriasis, and 5 (5.7%) were Teania Saginata. The percentage of patients with suppurative, gangrenous or perforated appendicitis was similar in both groups with no statistical significance, irrespective of the presence or absence of parasitic infestation. Conclusion The low prevalence of parasites among the appendectomy specimens did not support the notion that parasites were a major cause of appendicitis in pediatric patients. PMID:23599875

  18. Abdominal actinomycosis presenting as appendicitis: two case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ken; Joseph, David; Lai, Ken; Kench, James; Ngu, Meng Chong

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis (AA) is a rare infection caused by filamentous Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria Actinomyces. We report two cases of adults with AA who initially presented with clinical and radiological features of appendicitis. Both patients underwent appendicectomy with histopathology diagnostic for actinomycosis of the appendix and subsequently completed prolonged courses of oral penicillin. AA is a rare differential diagnosis for appendicitis and should be considered especially in patients with a chronic, indolent course and nonspecific abdominal symptoms. A high index of suspicion may avoid unnecessary surgery, as treatment with prolonged antibiotic therapy is very effective. PMID:27147718

  19. Unusual presentation of a familiar pathology: chronic appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Sierakowski, Kyra; Pattichis, Andrew; Russell, Patrick; Wattchow, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a man who experienced night sweats, abdominal pain and fever for over 3 months, with incomplete response to broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Although CT imaging was insufficient to identify the cause for his chronic abdominal pain, the abnormality of a 'misty mesentery' was crucial in guiding further investigation. The final diagnosis of chronic appendicitis was made through laparoscopic and pathological examination. This case highlights the utility of a collaborative diagnostic effort between disciplines. Chronic appendicitis can cause lingering abdominal pain. Early recognition and appropriate referral can save patients months and even years of unnecessary suffering. PMID:26869622

  20. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soomin; Kang, Jeonghyun; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-04-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  1. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  2. Abdominal actinomycosis presenting as appendicitis: two case reports and review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ken; Joseph, David; Lai, Ken; Kench, James; Ngu, Meng Chong

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis (AA) is a rare infection caused by filamentous Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria Actinomyces. We report two cases of adults with AA who initially presented with clinical and radiological features of appendicitis. Both patients underwent appendicectomy with histopathology diagnostic for actinomycosis of the appendix and subsequently completed prolonged courses of oral penicillin. AA is a rare differential diagnosis for appendicitis and should be considered especially in patients with a chronic, indolent course and nonspecific abdominal symptoms. A high index of suspicion may avoid unnecessary surgery, as treatment with prolonged antibiotic therapy is very effective. PMID:27147718

  3. Acute appendicitis presenting as small bowel obstruction: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical problem however the diagnosis is often overlooked when it presents as a small bowel obstruction. In this report we present two cases of elderly patients who presented with small bowel obstruction and raised inflammatory markers. Both patients were successfully treated with a laparotomy, adhesiolysis and appendicectomy and went on to make a good recovery. PMID:20062683

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jie; Yao, Le; He, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Bin; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Accurate diagnosis is often hindered due to various presentations that differ from the typical signs of appendicitis, especially the position of the appendix. A delay in diagnosis or treatment may result in increased risks of complications, such as perforation, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis is extremely rare. We herein report a case of 50-year-old man presenting with an appendiceal abscess in local hospital. After ten days of conservative treatment with intravenous antibiotics, the patient complained about pain and swelling of the right lower limb and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a perforated appendix and gas and fluid collection extending from his retroperitoneal cavity to the subcutaneous layer of his right loin and right lower limb. He was transferred to our hospital and was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis. Emergency surgery including surgical debridement and appendectomy was performed. However, the patient died of severe sepsis and multiple organ failure two days after the operation. This case represents an unusual complication of a common disease and we should bear in mind that retroperitoneal inflammation and/or abscesses may cause necrotizing fasciitis through lumbar triangles. PMID:26045863

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jie; Yao, Le; He, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Bin; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Accurate diagnosis is often hindered due to various presentations that differ from the typical signs of appendicitis, especially the position of the appendix. A delay in diagnosis or treatment may result in increased risks of complications, such as perforation, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis is extremely rare. We herein report a case of 50-year-old man presenting with an appendiceal abscess in local hospital. After ten days of conservative treatment with intravenous antibiotics, the patient complained about pain and swelling of the right lower limb and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a perforated appendix and gas and fluid collection extending from his retroperitoneal cavity to the subcutaneous layer of his right loin and right lower limb. He was transferred to our hospital and was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis. Emergency surgery including surgical debridement and appendectomy was performed. However, the patient died of severe sepsis and multiple organ failure two days after the operation. This case represents an unusual complication of a common disease and we should bear in mind that retroperitoneal inflammation and/or abscesses may cause necrotizing fasciitis through lumbar triangles. PMID:26045863

  6. Harms of CT scanning prior to surgery for suspected appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William; Hoffman, Jerome; Noori, Naudereh

    2015-02-01

    In this brief analysis we compare the risks and benefits of performing a CT scan to confirm appendicitis prior to surgery instead of operating based on the surgeon's clinical diagnosis. We conclude that the benefit of universal imaging is to avoid 12 unnecessary appendectomies but the cost of those 12 avoided surgeries is one cancer death due to the imaging. PMID:25429870

  7. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  8. Non-seminomatous testicular metastasis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Beddy, P; Neary, P; Crotty, P; Keane, F B V

    2006-06-01

    This is the first report in the literature of a non-seminomatous metastasis from an occult testicular primary that presented as an acute appendicitis. The report highlights the necessity of testicular re-imaging in cases of occult malignancy and reviews the association of chromosome 12 with embryonal germ cell tumours. PMID:16764204

  9. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics. PMID:27437029

  10. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm3, a neutrophil count of 14144/mm3, and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  11. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins

    PubMed Central

    Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Summary Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV–vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  12. Analytical Description of Ascending Motion of Rockets in the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, H.; de Pinho, M. O.; Portes, D., Jr.; Santiago, A.

    2009-01-01

    In continuation of a previous work, we present an analytic study of ascending vertical motion of a rocket subjected to a quadratic drag for the case where the mass-variation law is a linear function of time. We discuss the detailed analytical solution of the model differential equations in closed form. Examples of application are presented and…

  13. Teaching Profoundly Retarded Adults to Ascend Stairs Safely.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The study was designed to modify the stair climbing behavior of two profoundly retarded residents through backward shaping with graduated guidance, edible rewards, a correction procedure, and a 30 second timeout. Both residents showed an increase in the number of correct steps used while ascending the stairs.

  14. Bacterial Hyaluronidase Promotes Ascending GBS Infection and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Vornhagen, Jay; Quach, Phoenicia; Boldenow, Erica; Merillat, Sean; Whidbey, Christopher; Ngo, Lisa Y.; Adams Waldorf, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preterm birth increases the risk of adverse birth outcomes and is the leading cause of neonatal mortality. A significant cause of preterm birth is in utero infection with vaginal microorganisms. These vaginal microorganisms are often recovered from the amniotic fluid of preterm birth cases. A vaginal microorganism frequently associated with preterm birth is group B streptococcus (GBS), or Streptococcus agalactiae. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GBS ascension are poorly understood. Here, we describe the role of the GBS hyaluronidase in ascending infection and preterm birth. We show that clinical GBS strains associated with preterm labor or neonatal infections have increased hyaluronidase activity compared to commensal strains obtained from rectovaginal swabs of healthy women. Using a murine model of ascending infection, we show that hyaluronidase activity was associated with increased ascending GBS infection, preterm birth, and fetal demise. Interestingly, hyaluronidase activity reduced uterine inflammation but did not impact placental or fetal inflammation. Our study shows that hyaluronidase activity enables GBS to subvert uterine immune responses, leading to increased rates of ascending infection and preterm birth. These findings have important implications for the development of therapies to prevent in utero infection and preterm birth. PMID:27353757

  15. Flow impeding fungal thrombus in the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiapeng; Bouvette, Michael J; Hagi, Yousef; Subramanian, Sujata; Zhou, Jing; Austin, Erle H

    2008-10-01

    Mycotic endoaortitis is a rarely occurring infectious entity with an extremely high mortality rate. We report an uncommon case of Phialemonium endoaortits with its management. This large fungal thrombus in the ascending aorta caused significant impediment to the blood flow. PMID:18805204

  16. Effect of surgical timing and outcomes for appendicitis severity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Maru; Kim, Sung Jeep

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of time of surgery for acute appendicitis on surgical outcomes to optimize the timing of appendectomies. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent an appendectomy were reviewed to obtain data on time of symptom onset, time of hospital presentation, and start times of surgery. Surgical findings were used to define appendicitis as either uncomplicated or complicated. The uncomplicated group included patients with simple, focal, or suppurative appendicitis, and the complicated group included patients with gangrenous, perforated appendicitis or periappendiceal abscess formation. The 2 groups were analyzed by age, sex, and time. Results A total of 192 patients were analyzed. The mean time from symptom onset to start of operation showed a significant difference between both groups (1,652.9 minutes vs. 3,383.8 minutes, P < 0.001). The mean time from hospital visit to start of operation showed no difference between both groups (398.7 minutes vs. 402.0 minutes, P = 0.895). Operating within 24 hours of symptom onset had a relative risk of 1.738 (95% confidence interval, 1.319–2.425) for complications. Operating more than 36 hours after symptom onset was associated with an increased risk of postoperative ileus and a longer hospital stay. Conclusion Complicated appendicitis is associated with a delay in surgery from symptom onset rather than a delay at hospital arrival. Surgeons should take into account the time from symptom onset when deciding on the timing of appendectomy. We recommend that appendectomy be performed within 36 hours from symptom onset. PMID:27478814

  17. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  18. Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The thick ascending limb occupies a central anatomic and functional position in human renal physiology, with critical roles in the defense of the extracellular fluid volume, the urinary concentrating mechanism, calcium and magnesium homeostasis, bicarbonate and ammonium homeostasis, and urinary protein composition. The last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in the understanding of the molecular physiology and pathophysiology of this nephron segment. These advances are the subject of this review, with emphasis on particularly recent developments. PMID:25318757

  19. Anterior cerebral artery territory infarctions presenting with ascending tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kensho; Hamada, Eri; Okuda, Bungo

    2004-01-01

    We describe a patient with ascending tetraparesis following stroke. The patient presented initially with spastic paraparesis which acutely evolved to tetraparesis with abulia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarctions in the bilateral medial frontal regions but not in the brainstem or spinal cord. Multiple infarctions in the anterior cerebral artery territory appeared to originate from artery to artery embolism. The present case provides distinct clinical features of anterior cerebral artery syndrome which mimic myelopathy or brainstem lesions. PMID:17903956

  20. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  1. Cecocolic Intussusception in Adult Caused by Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Young; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2014-01-01

    Intussusception in adult is rare. The etiology is different from that of childhood. The most common cause of intussusception in adult is known as malignancy. When dealing with adult intussusception, surgical resection is usually warranted for correct diagnosis and proper treatment. This is a case report of cecocolic intussusception caused by an acute appendicitis in adult. The causes of cecocolic intussusception were reported as appendiceal adenocarcinoma, appendiceal mucocele, appendiceal adenoma, or idiopathic. Although this patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy under suspicion of malignancy at cecum base, final pathologic diagnosis revealed only acute appendicitis. Thus, the present case emphasizes the importance of prior thorough examinations including colonoscopy when we encounter this rare kind of intussusception in adult. PMID:24826358

  2. Photoswitchable azobenzene-appended iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miqueo, J; Altube, A; García-Lecina, E; Tron, A; McClenaghan, N D; Freixa, Z

    2016-09-21

    Iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes have been used as models to study the effect that extended conjugation and substitution pattern has on the photochromic behavior of azobenzene-appended 2-phenylpyridyl (ppy) ligands. For this purpose four azobenzene-containing ppy ligands were synthesized. With these ligands, nine iridium(iii) complexes containing up to three appended azobenzenes were synthesized. Analysis of their photochromic behaviour by means of UV-vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy permitted us to conclude that the light-induced trans-to-cis isomerization of the azobenzene was strongly inhibited upon coordination to the Ir(iii) cation when the electronic conjugation was extended along the whole ligand. The use of an aliphatic spacer unit (either -CH2- or -OCH2-) between the azobenzene and the ppy fragment of the ligand sufficed to disrupt the electronic communication, and obtain photochromic organometallic complexes. PMID:27460186

  3. Constitutive modeling of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms using microstructural parameters.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Salvatore; Phillippi, Julie A; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; D'Amore, Antonio; Raffa, Giuseppe M; Pilato, Michele; Scardulla, Cesare; Watkins, Simon C; Wagner, William R; Gleason, Thomas G; Vorp, David A

    2016-02-01

    Ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA) has been associated with diminished biomechanical strength and disruption in the collagen fiber microarchitecture. Additionally, the congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) leads to a distinct extracellular matrix structure that may be related to ATAA development at an earlier age than degenerative aneurysms arising in patients with the morphological normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). The purpose of this study was to model the fiber-reinforced mechanical response of ATAA specimens from patients with either BAV or TAV. This was achieved by combining image-analysis derived parameters of collagen fiber dispersion and alignment with tensile testing data. Then, numerical simulations were performed to assess the role of anisotropic constitutive formulation on the wall stress distribution of aneurysmal aorta. Results indicate that both BAV ATAA and TAV ATAA have altered collagen fiber architecture in the medial plane of experimentally-dissected aortic tissues when compared to normal ascending aortic specimens. The study findings highlight that differences in the collagen fiber distribution mostly influences the resulting wall stress distribution rather than the peak stress. We conclude that fiber-reinforced constitutive modeling that takes into account the collagen fiber defect inherent to the aneurysmal ascending aorta is paramount for accurate finite element predictions and ultimately for biomechanical-based indicators to reliably distinguish the more from the less 'malignant' ATAAs. PMID:26669606

  4. Acute appendicitis as a rare complication of gastric band

    PubMed Central

    Petridis, Christos; Neofytou, Kyriakos; Petrou, Athanasios; Georgiou, Chrysanthos

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is a common and effective minimally invasive procedure in the treatment of morbid obesity. Common complications of the procedure include productive burping, ulceration, gastritis, erosion, slippage, problems with the port, bleeding and infection. We report a case of acute appendicitis caused by gastric banding in a female patient. Gastric band encircled the appendix causing lumen obstruction and infection. The patient developed symptoms of topical acute peritonitis and an appendisectomy was performed. PMID:24964326

  5. A Very Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis: Appendicovesical Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Alis, Deniz; Samanci, Cesur; Namdar, Yesim; Ustabasioglu, Fethi Emre; Yamac, Elif; Tutar, Onur; Ucpinar, Burak; Onal, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Appendicovesical fistula (AVF) is an uncommon type of enterovesical fistula and a very rare complication of acute appendicitis. Herein, we report a case of 39-year-old male patient who presented with persistent urinary tract infection, recurrent abdominal pain, and pneumaturia. Imaging techniques including ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to identify the abnormality. However, definitive diagnosis of AVF was made by cystoscopy. PMID:27239365

  6. [New ways in the surgery of acute appendicitis?].

    PubMed

    Magdeburg, R; Kähler, G

    2013-06-01

    Acute appendicitis is still one of the most common abdominal emergencies necessitating operative treatment. For the past century, the conventional management of appendicitis has been open appendectomy. Since the introduction of laparoscopic appendectomy, it has been performed with increased frequency. Clinical trials evaluating outcomes comparing open appendectomy with laparoscopic appendectomy indicate that laparoscopic appendectomy is associated with lower complication rate and lower mortality and is to be considered the procedure of choice for patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Ever since Kalloo's first report on transgastric peritoneoscopy in a porcine model in 2004, this dramatic surgical revolution has prompted many surgeons and endoscopists to study this new technique. This complex technique involves breaching the wall of a hollow organ to gain access into the peritoneum: Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). In recent years, several NOTES experiments have been carried out in animal models and even on humans, including appendectomy. NOTES may help to reduce surgical pain and shorten recovery time. The concept of NOTES has generated intensive interest in the medical community as well as in the group of patients. Although the novel procedure is still far from being mature and many technical problems have to be overcome and more clinical studies have to be done before its widespread application in human appendectomy, NOTES is a promising procedure for the future. PMID:23325519

  7. An unusual presentation of perforated appendicitis in epigastric region☆

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Abuoglu, Hasan; Gunay, Emre; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Ozkan, Erkan; Aktekin, Ali; Muftuoglu, M.A. Tolga

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Atypical presentations of appendix have been reported including backache, left lower quadrant pain and groin pain from a strangulated femoral hernia containing the appendix. We report a case presenting an epigastric pain that was diagnosed after computed tomography as a perforated appendicitis on intestinal malrotation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 27-year-old man was admitted with a three-day history of epigastric pain. Physical examination revealed tenderness and defense on palpation of epigastric region. There was a left subcostal incision with the history of diaphragmatic hernia repair when the patient was 3 days old. He had an intestinal malrotation with the cecum fixed at the epigastric region and the inflamed appendix extending beside the left lobe of liver. DISCUSSION While appendicitis is the most common abdominal disease requiring surgical intervention seen in the emergency room setting, intestinal malrotation is relatively uncommon. When patients with asymptomatic undiagnosed gastrointestinal malrotation clinically present with abdominal pain, accurate diagnosis and definitive therapy may be delayed, possibly increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality. CONCLUSION Atypical presentations of acute appendicitis should be kept in mind in patients with abdominal pain in emergency room especially in patients with previous childhood operation for diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:24441442

  8. Pictorial essay: CT scan of appendicitis and its mimics causing right lower quadrant pain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Agrawal, Anjali

    2008-01-01

    CT scanning is widely used in the diagnostic workup of right lower quadrant pain. While appendicitis remains the most frequent cause, a majority of patients referred for suspected appendicitis turn out to have alternative diagnoses or a normal CT study. The purpose of our pictorial essay is to present an overview of the CT findings of appendicitis and its common mimics and to highlight the features that provide clues to alternative diagnoses.

  9. Sonography of Abdominal Pain in Children: Appendicitis and Its Common Mimics.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Corwin, Michael T; Davoodian, Andrew; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is very common in the pediatric population (<18 years of age). Sonography is a safe modality that can often differentiate the frequently encountered causes of abdominal pain in children. This pictorial essay will discuss the sonographic findings of acute appendicitis, including the imaging appearance of a perforated appendicitis. It will also present the sonographic features of the relatively common mimics of appendicitis, such as mesenteric adenitis/gastroenteritis, intussusception, Meckel diverticulum, and ovarian torsion. PMID:26892821

  10. Protective effect of angulated aorta for saving coronary artery during endovascular repair for ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Gun; Oh, Pyung Chun; Jeon, Yang Bin; Lee, Ji Yeon; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication after cardiothoracic surgery and the open surgical repair for this complication is challenging. We report on a patient who developed an ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm after aortic valve replacement (AVR), which was treated successfully with endovascular therapy. Our case showed that angulation of the ascending aorta is one of factors for consideration in application of endovascular therapy and endovascular therapy might be an option for management of ascending aortic pathology in patients with high surgical risk, particularly patients with a severely angulated proximal ascending aorta. PMID:27621896

  11. Factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc.

    PubMed

    Tsianos, G; Woolrich-Burt, L; Aitchison, T; Peacock, A; Watt, M; Montgomery, H; Watt, I; Grant, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc using a number of variables collected at the Gouter Hut (3,817 m) before and after an attempted ascent on the Mont Blanc summit. Subjects (n=285) were tested at 3,817 m prior to their ascent of Mont Blanc. Maximum height ascended in the last 14 days was recorded. End tidal CO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), heart rate and respiratory rate were measured using a Capnograph (Nellcor Patrick NPB75). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Summit information is available for 216 subjects. None of the subjects who attained 4,000 m in the previous 14 days failed to reach the summit (P=0.04). Previous recent exposure to an altitude of 4,000 m resulted in faster ascent times to the summit than those who had not been above 3,000 m in the previous 14 days (4.02+/-0.6 vs. 4.46+/-0.8 h, P=0.009), higher SaO2 on arrival at the Gouter Hut on day 1 (88.6+/-5 vs. 86.3+/-6%, P=0.004) and lower AMS scores upon arrival at the Gouter Hut after the attempted ascent to the summit 2.5+/-1.8 versus 4.7+/-2.5 U (P=0.001), respectively. It is concluded that recent exposure to 4,000 m confers an advantage to those who wish to ascend a 4,800 m peak. PMID:16235066

  12. Ascending Aorta Elastography After Kawasaki Disease Compared to Systemic Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nandlall, Ian; Maurice, Roch L; Fournier, Anne; Merouani, Aïcha; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis, classically affecting large- and medium-size arteries. The coronary arteries draw most of the clinical attention, whereas few studies have taken interest in the ascending aorta. Using a proprietary imaging-based mechanical biomarker (ImBioMark), we sought to determine aortic stiffness in KD compared to systemic hypertension (HTN) and healthy children. We evaluated parasternal long-axis views focused on the ascending aorta in 20 controls, 12 KD, and 8 HTN as a comparative clinical model of vascular stiffness. We calculated systolic and diastolic aortic wall strain with ImBioMark. Strain was tested for normality against height, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in normal subjects. Strain from KD and HTN was normalized (Z score) accordingly. Z score comparisons were performed using nonparametric statistics. Age was similar between KD and HTN (9.1 ± 5.3 and 9.9 ± 5.3 years old; p = NS). Systolic and diastolic strain values were normally distributed against height, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure in healthy subjects. HTN subjects had abnormal systolic and diastolic strain values (p < 0.0001). Whereas KD subjects had normal diastolic strain, systolic strain was significantly lower (p < 0.001), and systolic strain was intermediate between controls and HTN. There were no significant differences in aortic strain among KD, however, according to the presence of coronary artery aneurysms. Despite normal blood pressure, the ascending aorta in KD exhibits reduced strain during systole. This may reflect in situ rigidity of the aorta. The normal diastolic strain in KD may, in contrast, reflect normal peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:25921428

  13. Microvascular circulation of the ascending colon in horses.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J R; Tyler, W S; Pascoe, J R; Olander, H J; Bleifer, D R; Hinds, D M; Neves, J W

    1989-12-01

    Microvascular circulation of the ascending colon in healthy horses was studied using microangiography, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The pelvic flexure with 30 cm of ventral and dorsal colon attached was removed from 14 adult horses immediately after horses were euthanatized. The lumen was flushed with warm water, and this section of the ascending colon was placed in a 37-C bath of isotonic NaCl. In sections from 8 horses, colic vessels were perfused with a radio-opaque medium for microangiography. After angiographic evaluation, tissue sections were prepared for light microscopic observation, using standard histologic methods. In sections from 6 horses, injection replicas were made by perfusing the vessels with 2 types of plastics. The results of microangiography, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of vascular replicas were correlated, providing a comprehensive documentation of the microvasculature of the ascending colon at the pelvic flexure. Arteries branched from mesenteric colic vessels approximately every 2 cm toward the colonic tissue. Immediately after branching, arterial vessels formed an anastomotic plexus, the colonic rete. However, each branch from the colic vessel eventually continued into the colonic tissue. A second set of vessels originated from the colonic tissue. A second set of vessels originated from the colonic rete and supplied the mesenteric lymph nodes. Arterial vessels penetrated the tunica muscularis into the submucosa 3 to 4 cm toward the antimesenteric border forming a submucosal vascular network. From the submucosal arterioles, branching took place at right angles to supply the mucosal capillaries. Capillaries surrounded the colonic glands and anastomosed at the luminal surface, forming a superficial luminal honeycomb-appearing vascular plexus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2610433

  14. Emergence of Spatial Stream Segregation in the Ascending Auditory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Justin D.; Bremen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Stream segregation enables a listener to disentangle multiple competing sequences of sounds. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated that cortical neurons in anesthetized cats exhibit spatial stream segregation (SSS) by synchronizing preferentially to one of two sequences of noise bursts that alternate between two source locations. Here, we examine the emergence of SSS along the ascending auditory pathway. Extracellular recordings were made in anesthetized rats from the inferior colliculus (IC), the nucleus of the brachium of the IC (BIN), the medial geniculate body (MGB), and the primary auditory cortex (A1). Stimuli consisted of interleaved sequences of broadband noise bursts that alternated between two source locations. At stimulus presentation rates of 5 and 10 bursts per second, at which human listeners report robust SSS, neural SSS is weak in the central nucleus of the IC (ICC), it appears in the nucleus of the brachium of the IC (BIN) and in approximately two-thirds of neurons in the ventral MGB (MGBv), and is prominent throughout A1. The enhancement of SSS at the cortical level reflects both increased spatial sensitivity and increased forward suppression. We demonstrate that forward suppression in A1 does not result from synaptic inhibition at the cortical level. Instead, forward suppression might reflect synaptic depression in the thalamocortical projection. Together, our findings indicate that auditory streams are increasingly segregated along the ascending auditory pathway as distinct mutually synchronized neural populations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Listeners are capable of disentangling multiple competing sequences of sounds that originate from distinct sources. This stream segregation is aided by differences in spatial location between the sources. A possible substrate of spatial stream segregation (SSS) has been described in the auditory cortex, but the mechanisms leading to those cortical responses are unknown. Here, we investigated SSS in

  15. Successful in situ treatment of an infected ascending aortic graft.

    PubMed

    Mathes, D W; Yaremchuk, M J; Isselbacher, E M; Madsen, J C

    2000-10-01

    Infection of an ascending aortic prosthesis is a grave complication associated with a high mortality. In most cases, extraanatomic bypass and removal of the infected vascular graft are not possible. Furthermore, the standard approach to this problem, which includes excision and replacement or debridement and repair of infected thoracic aortic grafts, carries a high early mortality. We report the successful treatment of this life-threatening complication using a conservative strategy in which the aortic prosthesis was salvaged by in situ disinfection followed by coverage with tissue flaps. PMID:11081915

  16. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin for acute complicated appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; Yuasa, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Eiji; Goto, Yasutomo; Miyake, Hideo; Miyata, Kanji; Kato, Hideki; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rapid and reliable test for detection of complicated appendicitis would be useful when deciding whether emergency surgery is required. We investigated the clinical usefulness of procalcitonin for identifying acute complicated appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed 63 patients aged ≥15 years who underwent appendectomy without receiving antibiotics before admission and had preoperative data on the plasma procalcitonin level (PCT), body temperature (BT), white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil / lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio), and C-reactive protein level (CRP). Patients were classified into 3 groups: group A (inflammatory cell infiltration of the appendix with intact mural architecture), group B (inflammatory cell infiltration with destruction of mural architecture, but without abscess or perforation), and group C (macroscopic abscess and/or perforation). For identifying destruction of mural architecture, the diagnostic accuracy of PCT was similar to that of BT or CRP. However, the diagnostic accuracy of PCT was highest among the five inflammatory indices for identifying abscess and/or perforation, with the positive predictive value of PCT for abscess and/or perforation being higher than that of CRP (73% vs. 48%). Univariate analysis of the predictors of abscess and/or perforation revealed that a plasma PCT level ≥0.46 ng/mL had the highest odds ratio (30.3 [95% confidence interval: 6.5–140.5] versus PCT <0.46 ng/mL). These findings indicate that procalcitonin is a useful marker of acute appendicitis with abscess and/or perforation. PMID:27019529

  17. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra

    PubMed Central

    B.R., Ravikumar; Tejus, Chiranjeevi; K.M., Madappa; Prashant, Dharakh; G.S., Dhayanand

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. Materials and Methods In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. Results The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. Conclusion sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram. PMID:26005985

  18. Long Term Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Significant error has been observed in the long term prediction of the Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node on the Aqua spacecraft. This error of approximately 90 seconds over a two year prediction is a complication in planning and timing of maneuvers for all members of the Earth Observing System Afternoon Constellation, which use Aqua's MLTAN as the reference for their inclination maneuvers. It was determined that the source of the prediction error was the lack of a solid Earth tide model in the operational force models. The Love Model of the solid Earth tide potential was used to derive analytic corrections to the inclination and right ascension of the ascending node of Aqua's Sun-synchronous orbit. Additionally, it was determined that the resonance between the Sun and orbit plane of the Sun-synchronous orbit is the primary driver of this error. The analytic corrections have been added to the operational force models for the Aqua spacecraft reducing the two-year 90-second error to less than 7 seconds.

  19. Contained Ascending Aortic Rupture Disguised as a Right Atrial Mass

    PubMed Central

    Marzolino, Philip S.; Reynolds, Justin H.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Grigore, Alina M.

    2008-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography can incidentally detect cardiac masses. A right atrial mass has many possible causes, including metastatic extension from various solid organs, malignant melanoma, mediastinal cysts, hematoma, myxoma, lipoma, and artifact. Herein, we report our discovery of a right atrial mass during the initial intraoperative transesophageal echocardiographic examination of a patient who was undergoing repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm. The mass, with a smooth border and homogenous grayscale density, showed no flow during color-flow Doppler echocardiography. Further examination revealed tricuspid annular dilation and severe tricuspid insufficiency. When the mediastinum was opened, we found a large extracardiac hematoma along the right atrium within the pericardial space. These findings suggested an acute, contained rupture of the ascending aorta. After the hematoma was evacuated, imaging revealed complete resolution of the mass and reduction of tricuspid insufficiency. The patient underwent the scheduled aortic repair and was discharged from the hospital in good condition. In order to ensure an accurate diagnosis and to gain appropriate clinical guidance that can lead to a successful outcome, we suggest performing a thorough echocardiographic investigation to identify any such mass before planned surgery proceeds. PMID:18427651

  20. Maximum Aerodynamic Force on an Ascending Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Philip

    2012-03-01

    The March 2010 issue of The Physics Teacher includes a great article by Metz and Stinner on the kinematics and dynamics of a space shuttle launch. Within those pages is a brief mention of an event known in the language of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as "maximum dynamic pressure" (called simply "Max.AirPressure" in the article), where the combined effect of air density and the shuttles speed produce the greatest aerodynamic stress on the vehicle as it ascends through the atmosphere toward orbit. Official commentary during a launch2 refers to this point in the ascent with language such as "space shuttle main engines throttling back as vehicle enters area of maximum dynamic pressure" and occurs in a range between 45 and 60 s after launch. (In dealing with this stress, the space shuttles main engines reduce their thrust at approximately 45 s to reduce acceleration, and return to normal levels again some 15 s later as maximum dynamic pressure is traversed.) This paper presents an analysis, accessible to introductory-level students, that predicts the time of Max. AirPressure for a given ascending spacecraft.

  1. Atypical presentation of appendicitis in an adolescent cheerleader.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Callahan, Lisa M

    2013-11-01

    A 15-year-old female cheerleader presented to a sports medicine physician for evaluation of a suspected hip flexor injury. Five weeks before presentation, the patient developed acute right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain. She was seen in a local emergency room where her vital signs, abdominal computed tomography, and ultrasound were normal. No definitive diagnosis was made. Her initial symptoms resolved. The patient then attended cheerleading camp where her RLQ pain recurred and she was referred to sports medicine for further evaluation. Her examination was significant for exquisite tenderness at McBurney point. She was referred for surgical evaluation for probable appendicitis. PMID:23846117

  2. Pill impaction mimicking appendicitis in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Torno, Mauro; Shallman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a frequent presenting symptom among HIV-positive patients seeking care at emergency departments. We report a case of a 45-year-old HIV-infected Hispanic man who presented with right lower quadrant pain accompanied by fever, decreased appetite, nausea, and vomiting. The results of a CT scan of his abdomen were normal with no evidence of appendicitis. A colonoscopy was performed and revealed an impacted pill in the appendiceal orifice. The pill was removed endoscopically, and pill impaction has not recurred. PMID:19209455

  3. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660-1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  4. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660–1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  5. Observing System Simulations for ASCENDS: Synthesizing Science Measurement Requirements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D. F.; Schuh, A. E.; Crowell, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Hammerling, D.; Michalak, A. M.; Wang, J. S.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Ott, L.; Zaccheo, T.; Abshire, J. B.; Browell, E. V.; Moore, B.; Crisp, D.

    2013-12-01

    The measurement of atmospheric CO2 from space using active (lidar) sensing techniques has several potentially significant advantages in comparison to current and planned passive CO2 instruments. Application of this new technology aims to advance CO2 measurement capability and carbon cycle science into the next decade. The NASA Active Sensing of Carbon Emissions, Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission has been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey for the next generation of space-based CO2 observing systems. ASCENDS is currently planned for launch in 2022. Several possible lidar instrument approaches have been demonstrated in airborne campaigns and the results indicate that such sensors are quite feasible. Studies are now underway to evaluate performance requirements for space mission implementation. Satellite CO2 observations must be highly precise and unbiased in order to accurately infer global carbon source/sink fluxes. Measurement demands are likely to further increase in the wake of GOSAT, OCO-2, and enhanced ground-based in situ and remote sensing CO2 data. The objective of our work is to quantitatively and consistently evaluate the measurement capabilities and requirements for ASCENDS in the context of advancing our knowledge of carbon flux distributions and their dependence on underlying physical processes. Considerations include requirements for precision, relative accuracy, spatial/temporal coverage and resolution, vertical information content, interferences, and possibly the tradeoffs among these parameters, while at the same time framing a mission that can be implemented within a constrained budget. Here, we attempt to synthesize the results of observing system simulation studies, commissioned by the ASCENDS Science Requirements Definition Team, into a coherent set of mission performance guidelines. A variety of forward and inverse model frameworks are employed to reduce the potential dependence of the results on model

  6. Acute appendicitis with intestinal non-rotation presenting with partial small bowel obstruction diagnosed on CT.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Kots, E; Shpindel, T; Shapiro-Feinberg, M

    2000-05-01

    The findings of acute appendicitis on CT have been extensively described in the literature. This is a report of a case of acute appendicitis in a patient with intestinal non-rotation presenting with partial small bowel obstruction. Analysis of the CT findings allowed a correct diagnosis. PMID:10884757

  7. Computer tomography imaging of an unusual cause of appendicitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mols, Pierre; Ramadan, Ahmed S. E.; Ngassa, Michèle; Towo, Pierre Youatou

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body occlusion of appendices lumen is a quite rare cause of appendicitis due to foreign body. We present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with right lower quadrant pain since 24 hours. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an acute appendicitis due to a metallic foreign body which was found to be a bullet. PMID:26029649

  8. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  9. Acute Appendicitis and Pneumatosis in a Duplicated Appendix With Schistosoma Remnants.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Bisseret, Damien; Dragoescu, Ema

    2016-02-01

    Appendiceal pneumatosis is rare, reported either in the context of acute appendicitis or enterocolitis. Here, we report the case of an elderly adult in whom the acute appendicitis was associated with pneumatosis and occurred in the context of a malformed appendix with pathogenic organism remnants. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal pain 3 weeks after posttraumatic dorsolumbar surgery. The computed tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and 2 diverticula. On microscopy, the appendix showed acute appendicitis along with a Cave-Wallbridge type A duplication. In addition, several optically clear spaces were observed in the entire appendiceal wall consistent with pneumatosis of the appendix. Focally, calcified structures suggesting pathogenic organisms such as Schistosoma were noted as well. In conclusion, we report a case of appendiceal pneumatosis occurring in the context of acute appendicitis in a duplicated appendix, with presence of calcified structures suggestive of pathogenic organisms. PMID:26272990

  10. Application of scoring systems with point-of-care ultrasonography for bedside diagnosis of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Urnal, Rıfat; Eser, Utku; Bilgin, Serkan; Hacıyanlı, Mehmet; Oyar, Orhan; Akoğlu, Haldun; Karagöz, Arif

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appendicitis is a common disease requiring surgery. Bedside ultrasound (BUS) is a core technique for emergency medicine (EM). The Alvarado score is a well-studied diagnostic tool for appendicitis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between patients’ symptoms, Alvarado score and ultrasound (US) findings, as performed by emergency physicians (EPs) and radiologists, of patients with suspected appendicitis. METHODS: Three EM specialists underwent the BUS course and core course for appendicitis assessment. Patients suspected of having appendicitis were selected and their Alvarado and modified (m) Alvarado scores calculated. The specialists performed the BUS. Then, patients were given a formal US and surgery consultation if necessary. Preliminary diagnoses, admission or discharge from the emergency department (ED) and final diagnosis were documented. The patients were also followed up after discharge from the hospital. RESULTS: The determined cut-off value was 2 for Alvarado and 3 for mAlvarado scores. The sensitivities of the two scores were 100%. Each score was used to rule out appendicitis. The results of EP-performed BUS were as follows: accuracy 70%, sensitivity 0.733, specificity 0.673, + LR 2.24, and – LR 0.40 (95%CI). Radiologists were better than EPs at diagnosing appendicitis and radiologists and EPs were equally strong at ruling out appendicitis by US. When US was combined with Alvarado and mAlvarado scores, EP US+Alvarado/mAlvarado scores <3 and radiology US+Alvarado/mAlvarado scores <4 perfectly ruled out appendicitis. CONCLUSION: BUS performed by EPs is moderately useful in detecting appendicitis. Combined with scoring systems, BUS may be a perfect tool for ruling out decisions in EDs. PMID:27313807

  11. Unusual histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens from patients with suspected acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Akbulut, Sami; Kutluturk, Koray; Sahin, Nurhan; Arabaci, Ebru; Ara, Cengiz; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and implications of unusual histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens from patients with suspected acute appendicitis. METHODS: The demographic and histopathological data of 1621 patients (≥ 16 years-old) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis between January 1999 and November 2011 were retrospectively assessed. Microscopic findings were used to classify the patients under six categories: appendix vermiformis, phlegmonous appendicitis, gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis, supurative appendicitis, and unusual histopathologic findings. The demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with unusual histopathologic findings were evaluated in detail, and re-analysis of archived resected appendix specimens was carried out. RESULTS: A total of 912 males and 709 females, from 16 to 94 years old, were included in the study and comprised 789 cases of suppurative appendicitis, 370 cases of appendix vermiformis, 243 cases of perforated gangrenous appendicitis, 53 cases of flegmaneous appendicitis, 32 cases of gangrenous appendicitis, and 134 (8.3%) cases of unusual histopathological findings. The unusual histopathological findings included fibrous obliteration (n = 62), enterobius vermicularis (n = 31), eosinophilic infiltration (n = 10), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 8), carcinoid tumor (n = 6), granulomatous inflammation (n = 5), adenocarcinoma (n = 4; one of them mucinous), and mucocele (n = 3), adenomatous polyp (n = 1), taenia sup (n = 1), ascaris lumbricoides (n = 1), appendiceal diverticula (n = 1), and B cell non-hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1). None of the 11 patients with subsequent diagnosis of tumor were suspected of cancer prior to the appendectomy. CONCLUSION: Even when the macroscopic appearance of appendectomy specimens is normal, histopathological assessment will allow early diagnosis of many unusual diseases. PMID:23840147

  12. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  13. Nematode infection: A rare mimic of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hotchen, Andrew; Chin, Kian; Raja, Mahzar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis is a common condition seen in all surgical units. One rare condition that can mimic acute appendicitis is a nematode infection of the bowel. There have been few reported cases of nematode infection within the appendix and none that have been accompanied by intra-operative pictures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 16-year-old female presented with a 12 h history of right iliac fossa pain and mild pyrexia. Bloods showed a neutrophilia and normal C-reactive protein. Laparoscopy was performed which revealed a non-inflamed appendix. The appendix was dissected and a live nematode was visualised exiting the base of the appendix. Anti-helminthics were given and the infection resolved. DISCUSSION Nematode infection is most commonly seen in Africa, Asia and South America. When seen within the United Kingdom (UK), it is seen most commonly within high-risk populations. Testing for these infections is not routine within the UK and when they are performed, the results take a considerable amount of time to return. These tests should be considered within high-risk populations so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. CONCLUSION This case highlights the importance of considering rare causes of right iliac fossa pain including nematode infection in a young patient. The case highlights this by giving intra-operative pictures of live nematodes upon dissection of the appendix. PMID:25024022

  14. Numerical study on 4-1 coal seam of Xiaoming mine in ascending mining.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tianwei; Zhang, Hongwei; Li, Sheng; Han, Jun; Song, Weihua; Batugin, A C; Tang, Guoshui

    2015-01-01

    Coal seams ascending mining technology is very significant, since it influences the safety production and the liberation of dull coal, speeds up the construction of energy, improves the stability of stope, and reduces or avoids deep hard rock mining induced mine disaster. Combined with the Xiaoming ascending mining mine 4-1, by numerical calculation, the paper analyses ascending mining 4-1 factors, determines the feasibility of ascending mining 4-1 coalbed, and proposes roadway layout program about working face, which has broad economic and social benefits. PMID:25866840

  15. Ascending infection of foot tendons in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mismar, Ayman; Yousef, Mohammad; Badran, Darwish; Younes, Nidal

    2013-12-01

    Bone and soft tissue infection in the foot of diabetic patients is a well-described issue in the literature. A sound anatomical knowledge of the foot anatomy and compartments is mandatory to understand the mechanisms of infection spread. We describe four cases of diabetic foot infection complicated by long ascending infection. All did not respond initially to antibiotic treatment and the usual surgical debridement and were cured only after excision of the infected tendons. We highlight a rare but serious complication of the diabetic foot disease not commonly seen by the surgical community. We hope that this report raises the awareness of this condition so that a prompt diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started, thereby reducing the risk of major lower limb amputations. PMID:24043670

  16. Attitudes toward Arab ascendance: Israeli and global perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Felicia; Saguy, Tamar; Stewart, Andrew L; Morselli, Davide; Foels, Rob; Aiello, Antonio; Aranda, María; Cidam, Atilla; Chryssochoou, Xenia; Durrheim, Kevin; Eicher, Veronique; Licata, Laurent; Liu, James H; Liu, Li; Meyer, Ines; Muldoon, Orla; Papastamou, Stamos; Petrovic, Nebojsa; Prati, Francesca; Prodomitis, Gerasimos; Sweetman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Arab nations are decades behind many other previously colonized nations in developing stronger economies, more democratic institutions, and more autonomy and self-government, in part as a result of external interference. The year 2011 brought the potential for greater Arab autonomy through popular uprisings against autocratic governments in Tunisia, Egypt, and Yemen, and through the Palestinian request for state recognition by the United Nations. We examined the psychology of support for Arab ascendancy among adults in 14 nations in the Balkans, the Middle East, Asia, Oceania, Europe, and North America. We predicted and found that people low on social dominance orientation endorsed forming an independent Palestinian state and desired that the Arab uprisings succeed. Rejection of ideologies that legitimize outside interference with Arabs mediated this support. Measures and model results were robust across world regions. We discuss theoretical implications regarding the advent of new ideologies and extending social dominance theory to address international relations. PMID:24311474

  17. An oxygen enrichment device for lowlanders ascending to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When ascending to the high altitude, people living in low altitude areas will suffer from acute mountain sickness. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that whether an oxygen concentration membrane can be made and used to construct a new portable oxygen enrichment device for individuals in acute exposure to the high altitude. Methods The membrane was fabricated using vinylsiloxane rubber, polyphenylene oxide hydrogen silicone polymers, chloroplatinic acid and isopropyl alcohol. The membrane was assembled in a frame and the performance was tested in terms of concentration of oxygen, flow rate of oxygen enriched air, pressure ratio across the membrane and ambient temperature. Furthermore, the oxygen concentration device was constructed using the membrane, a DC fan, vacuum pump and gas buffer. A nonrandomized preliminary field test was conducted, in which eight healthy male subjects were flown to Tibet (Lhasa, 3,700 m). First, subjects wore the oxygen enrichment device and performed an incremental exercise on cycle ergometer. The test included heart rate (HR), saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2) and physical work capacity (PWC). Then, after a rest period of 4 hours, the experimental protocol was repeated without oxygen enrichment device. Results The testing showed that the membrane could increase the oxygen concentration by up to 30%. Simulation test indicated that although the performance of the oxygen enrichment device decreased with altitudes, the oxygen concentration could still maintain 28% with flow rate of enriched air 110 cm3/s at 5000 m. The field test showed that higher SpO2, lower HR, and better PWC (measured by the PWC-170) were observed from all the subjects using oxygen enrichment device compared with non-using (P < 0.01). Conclusions We concluded that the new portable oxygen enrichment device would be effective in improving exercise performance when ascending to the high altitude. PMID:24103365

  18. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  19. Functional subdivisions of the ascending visual pathways in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, O; Hahmann, U

    1999-02-01

    This study represents an attempt to examine an alternative view of the functional architecture of the ascending visual pathways in pigeons. According to this conception the pars dorsalis (GLd) of the thalamofugal system represents the lateral monocular field of view and is frontally blind to a large extent. The tectofugal system, on the other hand, processes frontal visual input within the framework of asymmetrical tectorotundal connections. As a result, the left, but not the right, rotundus should be able to integrate to an important degree the input from both eyes via the tecta of both hemispheres. Two lesion studies were conducted to test these assumptions. In the first psychophysical experiment, the visual acuity was determined in head-fixed pigeons. After thresholds were determined, stereotaxic lesions were placed in the GLd and/or the rotundus. Multiple regressions between structure specific lesion extents and postoperative threshold alterations demonstrated that only GLd lesions contributed to acuity reductions. In the second experiment the acuity threshold of pigeons under binocular and monocular conditions was determined in a conventional skinner box before GLd and/or rotundus lesions. Multiple regression analyses showed that rotundus--but not GLd lesions--contributed to performance losses. The left rotundus lesions were significantly related to threshold elevations under both monocular conditions, while the right rotundus only contributed together with the left rotundus to binocular performance. The double dissociation revealed in these experiments indicates that the ascending pathways in pigeons are functionally segregated and differentially process frontal and lateral as well as left- and right-sided inputs. PMID:10683107

  20. [Ultrasound study of "acute appendicitis," an elective procedure or obligation in general surgery. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Meiser, G; Meissner, K; Sattlegger, P

    1987-08-01

    576 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively assessed by sonography following physical examination. The collective comprised - as proven by operation - 156 patients with acute appendicitis, 178 patients with chronic appendicitis or mesenteric lymphadenitis, as proven by observation, 186 patients suffering from gastroenteritis. 56 patients suffered from other diseases and 21 of them required urgent surgery. Based on clinical symptoms, correct diagnosis had been made in 433 patients (75%): gastroenteritis n = 186, chronic appendicitis or lymphadenitis n = 111 and acute appendicitis n = 136 (87%). In 123 patients the diagnosis was false positive, in 20 patients false negative. Based on sonographic assessment, 537 patients (93%) were correctly diagnosed; thus, in 129 patients (83%) an inflamed appendix was confirmed, in 56 patients; diagnosis of unrelated entities requiring urgent surgery correct in 21 cases. In 12 patients with mesenteric lymphadenitis - as proven by operation-a false positive, in another 27 patients with acute appendicitis a false negative diagnosis was made. The combination of clinical assessment and sonographic diagnosis yielded a correct diagnosis in 97% (560/576) comprising 414 true negative and 146 true positive results (94%) in respect of acute appendicitis. PMID:3313723

  1. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p < 0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of GERD for cases was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08~2.33) compared to controls. The adjusted ORs of prior GERD for patients aged 18~39, 40~59, and ≥60 years with appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group. PMID:26932391

  2. Significance of CD4+ T-cell count in the management of appendicitis in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kumiko; Saito, Kazuhiro; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of complicated appendicitis (CA) is critical to the management of appendicitis. However, previous studies have not investigated indicators of CA among patients with HIV or whether it is safe to use conservative treatment for appendicitis in these patients. Among 322 patients with appendicitis, we identified 14 who had HIV. Six of them were operated and 8 were treated with antibiotics; CA was diagnosed in 4. Patients with HIV and CA had a significantly lower CD4+ T-cell count than those with uncomplicated appendicitis. A white blood cell count lower than 7.4 × 109/L was observed exclusively in patients with CA. No patient with HIV whose appendicitis was treated conservatively died or experienced a recurrence. We discuss our findings, which suggest the possibility of conservative treatment of appendicitis in patients with HIV and identification of CA by low CD4+ T-cell count. PMID:26424690

  3. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-03-01

    The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively.We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis.Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age <18, a (CCI) <2, medical center admission, and a longer time to recurrence were correlated with using laparoscopy to treat recurrence. Neither type of appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach.In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity. PMID:27015200

  4. Macroamylasemia in a patient with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Um, J W; Kim, K H; Kang, M S; Choe, J H; Bae, J W; Hong, Y S; Suh, S O; Kim, Y C; Whang, C W; Kim, S M

    1999-12-01

    Macroamylasemia is a condition of persistent, elevated serum amylase activity with no apparent clinical symptoms of a pancreatic disorder. In Korea, however, no such case has been reported to date. We report a case of a 17-year-old female diagnosed with macroamylasemia and acute appendicitis. One day earlier, she developed epigastric and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. She was characterized by high level of serum amylase, but normal lipase. Amylase isoenzyme analysis demonstrated increased fraction of salivary type and follow-up amylase level was persistently increased. Immunofixation disclosed the macroamylase binding with an immunoglobulin, consisting of IgA and kappa chain. The patient was treated by appendectomy, and the abdominal pain subsided. PMID:10642949

  5. Missed appendicitis: did unexpected intraluminal densities play a role?

    PubMed

    Harper, Rachel; Friedman, Benjamin T; Strote, Jared

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old boy presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain. His history, examination and laboratory evaluation raised concern for appendicitis. A CT study of the abdomen and pelvis was carried out by the radiologist and emergency physician and was notable only for a large amount of unexpected high-attenuation intraluminal material. With further history, this was thought to be most likely retained bismuth from over-the-counter medicine ingestion. The patient was discharged home without a diagnosis. Further review of the CT scan by a second radiologist revealed a concern for appendiceal enlargement and associated free fluid. The patient was called back for further evaluation and treatment and ultimately an appendectomy was performed. Physicians should be aware of the causes and impact of unexpected radiopaque intraluminal contents on radiological studies. Most commonly from ingested medicine, such findings can obscure mucosal details, mimic active bleeding or create a distraction from other abnormalities. PMID:27605197

  6. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  7. [Acute appendicitis in children: serious complications when treatment is delayed].

    PubMed

    Tan, E C T H; Rieu, P N M A; Severijnen, R S V M

    2002-08-10

    Three children, two boys aged 9 and 6 and a 12-year-old girl, had diffuse abdominal complaints, diarrhoea and a (sub)febrile temperature for several days. On admission, they were found to have a perforated inflamed appendix and peritonitis. Following asystole, intra-abdominal abscesses and an enterocutaneous fistula, the oldest boy showed good recovery after a hospital stay of two months; the girl recovered after one month in hospital following a psoas muscle abscess and two episodes of constrictive pericarditis with threatened tamponade. The younger boy was dead on arrival at the hospital. Appendicitis is not always easy to diagnose. An atypical presentation, very often with diarrhoea, can result in diagnostic delay. Early surgical consultation is mandatory in a child with progressive abdominal pain. PMID:12198823

  8. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  9. Appendicular mass complicating acute appendicitis in a patient with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Low, Y N; Cheong, B M K

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal pain with dengue fever can be a diagnostic challenge. Typically, pain is localised to the epigastric region or associated with hepatomegaly. Patients can also present with acute abdomen. We report a case of a girl with dengue fever and right iliac fossa pain. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made only after four days of admission. An appendicular mass and a perforated appendix was noted during appendectomy. The patient recovered subsequently. Features suggestive of acute appendicitis are persistent right iliac fossa pain, localised peritonism, persistent fever and leucocytosis. Repeated clinical assessment is important to avoid missing a concurrent diagnosis like acute appendicitis. PMID:27326951

  10. Acute appendicitis with intestinal malrotation: the usefulness of coronal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Koyama, Takao; Ishii, Seigo; Takeuchi, Taizo; Sanda, Hiroki; Nakata, Kouhei; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Kishi, Kazushi; Sato, Morio

    2014-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of acute appendicitis with intestinal malrotation. Coronal images of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed the small intestine on the right side and the large intestine on the left side, thus indicating intestinal malrotation (non-rotation type). In addition, an enhanced, tubular, fluid-filled structure was detected attached to the cecum, which was located superior to the urinary bladder, suggesting acute appendicitis. The present study shows that coronal CT images provide important information for the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis in patients with intestinal malrotation. PMID:25030562

  11. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy. PMID:26817927

  12. Endometriosis of the appendix presenting as acute appendicitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uwaezuoke, Stanley; Udoye, Ezenwa; Etebu, Ebitimitula

    2013-03-01

    Endometriosis is a common disease generally, but appendiceal endometriosis causing acute appendicitis is a very uncommon clinical phenomenon and a few cases have been reported. The authors aim to highlight the rarity of such clinical entity in Nigeria. A 29 year old nulliparous woman presented with severe right iliac fossa pains, tenderness and rebound tenderness on her second day of menstruation. She subsequently had appendicectomy and a histopathological diagnosis of appendiceal endometriosis causing acute appendicitis. Appendiceal endometriosis causing acute appendicitis is rare, and definitive diagnosis is performed through histopathological evaluation. Post-operative gynaecological follow-up is highly recommended. PMID:23559841

  13. Left-Sided Appendicitis in an Elderly Patient with Midgut Malrotation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Pei Wen; Huang, Bo-Ming; Liu, Chung Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chin; Tsai, Ming-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Appendicitis is a common surgical abdominal disease with various presentations. Its diagnosis may be obscured by asymptomatic congenital anatomical anomalies like midgut malrotation. Midgut malrotation is a rare fetal anomaly resulting from incomplete or failure of midgut rotation and fixation. It is mostly presented with bowel obstruction or volvulus in early life. Presentation in adult is rare. Here, we report an elderly patient presented with left lower abdominal pain and urinary tract infection. Abdominal computed tomography revealed left-sided appendicitis with non-rotational-type midgut malrotation. Clinicians should bear in mind the possibility of underlying midgut malrotation, as appendicitis could be the first presentation of this rare congenital condition. PMID:27011586

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric appendicitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael M; Kulaylat, Afif N; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Engbrecht, Brett W; Dillman, Jonathan R; Methratta, Sosamma T

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of appendicitis in children has rapidly increased recently. This change has been primarily driven by the desire to avoid CT radiation dose. This meta-analysis reviews the diagnostic performance of MRI for pediatric appendicitis and discusses current knowledge of cost-effectiveness. We used a conservative Haldane correction statistical method and found pooled diagnostic parameters including a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.3-97.8%), specificity of 96.1% (95% CI: 93.5-97.7%), positive predictive value of 92.0% (95% CI: 89.3-94.0%) and negative predictive value of 98.3% (95% CI: 97.3-99.0%), based on 11 studies. Assessment of patient outcomes associated with MRI use at two institutions indicates that time to antibiotics was 4.7 h and 8.2 h, time to appendectomy was 9.1 h and 13.9 h, and negative appendectomy rate was 3.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Alternative diagnoses were present in ~20% of cases, most commonly adnexal cysts and enteritis/colitis. Regarding technique, half-acquisition single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) pulse sequences are crucial. While gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequences might be helpful, any benefit beyond non-contrast MRI has not been confirmed. Balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are generally noncontributory. Protocols do not need to exceed five sequences; four-sequence protocols are commonly utilized. Sedation generally is not indicated; patients younger than 5 years might be attempted based on the child's ability to cooperate. A comprehensive pediatric cost-effectiveness analysis that includes both direct and indirect costs is needed. PMID:27229509

  15. ACES: The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Prasad, N. S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Dobler, J. T.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T.; Campbell, J.; Chen, S.; Cleckner, C. S.; DiJoseph, M.; Little, A.; Notari, A.; Refaat, T. F.; Rosenbaum, D.; Vanek, M. D.; Bender, J.; Braun, M.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Neal, M.; Rayner, P. J.; Rosiewicz, A.; Shure, M.; Welch, W.

    2012-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a NASA Langley Research Center project funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technologies being advanced are: (1) a high bandwidth detector, (2) a multi-aperture telescope assembly, (3) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination, and (4) high-efficiency, multiple-amplifier CO2 and O2 laser transmitters. The instrument architecture will be developed to operate on a high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are viewed as critical towards developing an airborne simulator and eventual spaceborne instrument with lower size, mass, and power consumption, and improved performance. The detector effort will improve the existing detector subsystem by increasing its bandwidth to a goal of 5 MHz, reducing its overall mass from 18 lbs to <10 lbs, and stretching the duration of autonomous, service-free operation periods from 4 hrs to >24 hrs. The development goals are to permit higher laser modulation rates, which provides greater flexibility for implementing thin-cloud discrimination algorithms as well as improving range resolution and error reduction, and to enable long flights on a high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The telescope development consists of a three-telescope design built for the constraints of the Global Hawk aircraft. This task addresses the ability of multiple smaller telescopes to provide equal or greater collection efficiency compared with a single larger telescope with a reduced impact on launch mass and cost. The telescope assembly also integrates fiber-coupled transmit collimators for all of the laser transmitters and fiber-coupled optical

  16. Surgical repair for giant ascending aortic aneurysm to superior vena cava fistula with positive syphilitic test.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Ono, Makoto; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2015-10-01

    Syphilitic aortitis is usually associated with thoracic aortic saccular aneurysm, aortic regurgitation and coronary ostial stenosis. However, syphilitic aneurysms have rarely been reported today. Here, we report a patient with ascending aortic aneurysm with aorta-superior vena cava (SVC) fistula with positive syphilitic test. A 52-year-old man was admitted to our institution with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm complicated with SVC syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a giant ascending aneurysm 79 mm in diameter. The result of serodiagnostic tests for syphilis had not been judged yet preoperatively. Total arch replacement concomitant with elephant trunk was performed. Intraoperatively, we detected the ascending aorta to SVC fistula. Postoperatively, we suspected the syphilitic aneurysm strongly, because preoperative serodiagnostic test was concluded to be positive. However, histological examination did not show typical syphilitic features. The patient remains asymptomatic 1 year later. Although extremely rarely today, syphilitic aneurysm should be still considered in the differential diagnosis of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:24000069

  17. Atmospheric CO2 Variability Observed From ASCENDS Flight Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Browell, Edward; Campbell, Joel; Choi, Yonghoon; Dobler, Jeremy; Fan, Tai-Fang; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Liu, Zhaoyan; Meadows, Byron; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales were observed during ASCENDS flight campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200x300 sq km over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Even over extended forests, about 2-ppm CO2 column variability was measured within about 500-km distance. For winter times, especially over snow covered ground, relatively less horizontal CO2 variability was observed, likely owing to minimal interactions between the atmosphere and land surface. Inter-annual variations of CO2 drawdown over cornfields in the Mid-West were found to be larger than 5 ppm due to slight differences in the corn growing phase and meteorological conditions even in the same time period of a year. Furthermore, considerable differences in atmospheric CO2 profiles were found during winter and summer campaigns. In the winter CO2 was found to decrease from about 400 ppm in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to about 392 ppm above 10 km, while in the summer CO2 increased from 386 ppm in the ABL to about 396 ppm in free troposphere. These and other CO2 observations are discussed in this presentation.

  18. Patient specific stress and rupture analysis of ascending thoracic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Davis, Frances M; Rodriguez-Matas, Jose F; Duprey, Ambroise; Avril, Stéphane

    2015-07-16

    An ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA) is a serious medical condition which, more often than not, requires surgery. Aneurysm diameter is the primary clinical criterion for determining when surgical intervention is necessary but, biomechanical studies have suggested that the diameter criterion is insufficient. This manuscript presents a method for obtaining the patient specific wall stress distribution of the ATAA and the retrospective rupture risk for each patient. Five human ATAAs and the preoperative dynamic CT scans were obtained during elective surgeries to replace each patient's aneurysm with a synthetic graft. The material properties and rupture stress for each tissue sample were identified using bulge inflation tests. The dynamic CT scans were used to generate patient specific geometries for a finite element (FE) model of each patient's aneurysm. The material properties from the bulge inflation tests were implemented in the FE model and the wall stress distribution at four different pressures was estimated. Three different rupture risk assessments were compared: the maximum diameter, the rupture risk index, and the overpressure index. The peak wall stress values for the patients ranged from 28% to 94% of the ATAA's failure stress. The rupture risk and overpressure indices were both only weakly correlated with diameter (ρ=-0.29, both cases). In the future, we plan to conduct a large experimental and computational study that includes asymptomatic patients under surveillance, patients undergoing elective surgery, and patients who have experienced rupture or dissection to determine if the rupture risk index or maximum diameter can meaningfully differentiate between the groups. PMID:25979384

  19. Local mechanical properties of human ascending thoracic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frances M; Luo, Yuanming; Avril, Stéphane; Duprey, Ambroise; Lu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    Ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs) are focal, asymmetric dilatations of the aortic wall which are prone to rupture. To identify potential rupture locations in advance, it is necessary to consider the inhomogeneity of the ATAA at the millimeter scale. Towards this end, we have developed a combined experimental and computational approach using bulge inflation tests, digital image correlation (DIC), and an inverse membrane approach to characterize the pointwise stress, strain, and hyperelastic properties of the ATAA. Using this approach, the pointwise hyperelastic material properties were identified on 10 human ATAA samples collected from patients undergoing elective surgery to replace their ATAAs with a graft. Our method was able to capture the varying levels of heterogeneity in the ATAA from regional to local. It was shown for the first time that the material properties in the ATAA are unmistakably heterogeneous at length scales between 1mm and 1cm, which are length scales where vascular tissue is typically treated as homogeneous. The distributions of the material properties for each patient were also examined to study the inter- and intra-patient variability. Large inter-subject variability was observed in the elastic properties. PMID:27077532

  20. Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, G P; Spach, M S; Effmann, E L; Sabiston, D C

    1987-01-01

    Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the aorta is a congenital malformation usually associated with serious symptoms in the first year of life and characterized by a poor prognosis. Sixty-five patients with this disorder have been reviewed in the literature, and 95% presented during the first year with signs of congestive heart failure. All had cardiomegaly by radiographic and electrocardiographic examination. An accurate diagnosis was established by cineangiography, and associated cardiovascular anomalies were present in 85%. Origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta is much more common than origin of the left pulmonary artery from this vessel (8 to 1). Twenty-three patients were managed without operation with a 30% 1-year survival rate. Among those patients managed surgically, the survival rate was 84% at 1 year. It is now clear that operation should be done as early as possible to prevent irreversible changes occurring in the pulmonary arterial vasculature since microscopic features of pulmonary hypertension have been seen during the first month of life. One patient was operated on at 5 months with correction of the deformity. The pulmonary arterial pressure decreased to normal after operation. This child is now asymptomatic and his 10-year postoperative follow-up is the longest found in the literature. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2A. Fig. 2B. Fig. 2C. Fig. 3. Fig. 4A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:3606229

  1. Patient-specific finite element analysis of ascending aorta aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Elefteriades, John

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic ascending aorta aneurysm (AsAA) dissection and rupture can be prevented by elective surgical repair, but identifying individuals at risk remains a challenge. Typically the decision to operate is based primarily on the overall aneurysm size, which may not be a reliable indicator of risk. In this study, AsAA inflation and rupture was simulated in 27 patient-specific finite element models constructed from clinical CT imaging data and tissue mechanical testing data from matching patients. These patients included n = 8 with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), n = 10 with bovine aortic arch (BAA), and n = 10 with neither BAV nor BAA. AsAA rupture risk was found to increase with elevated systolic wall stress and tissue stiffness. The aortic size index was sufficient for identifying the patients with the lowest risk of rupture, but unsuitable for delineating between patients at moderate and high risk. There was no correlation between BAV or BAA and AsAA rupture risk; however, the AsAA morphology was different among these patients. These results support the use of mechanical parameters such as vessel wall stress and tissue stiffness for AsAA presurgical evaluation. PMID:25770248

  2. Studies of a Space Lidar Instrument for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Chen, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Pulsed laser signals and a time gated receiver are used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere, and measure the surface height and scattering profile in the path. We have recently completed a second design study for the space instrument. For the study, we selected a nominal sun-synchronous orbit with an altitude of 400 km and equator crossing time of 1:30 pm, and a receiver telescope with 1.5 m diameter.

  3. Appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Naoki; Furonaka, Makoto; Kikutani, Kazuya; Haji, Keiko; Fujisaki, Seiji; Nishida, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Peritoneal disseminations from lung cancer are difficult to detect during the patient's clinical course. Therefore, complications of this condition are unclear. We report a case in which peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis. A 74-year-old man with lung cancer who was receiving maintenance therapy presented at our hospital because of abdominal pain. It was the seventh day after the 14th cycle of maintenance therapy with bevacizumab. He was diagnosed with acute appendicitis. The resected appendix showed acute appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis from lung cancer. Adenocarcinoma was observed predominantly in the serous membrane from the neck to the tail of the appendix. The distribution of the adenocarcinoma was diffuse. Peritoneal dissemination was considered the route of metastasis. He was admitted to the palliative care unit 10 months after appendectomy. Appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis in our patient who had been receiving bevacizumab. PMID:27512565

  4. Appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furonaka, Makoto; Kikutani, Kazuya; Haji, Keiko; Fujisaki, Seiji; Nishida, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peritoneal disseminations from lung cancer are difficult to detect during the patient's clinical course. Therefore, complications of this condition are unclear. We report a case in which peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis. A 74‐year‐old man with lung cancer who was receiving maintenance therapy presented at our hospital because of abdominal pain. It was the seventh day after the 14th cycle of maintenance therapy with bevacizumab. He was diagnosed with acute appendicitis. The resected appendix showed acute appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis from lung cancer. Adenocarcinoma was observed predominantly in the serous membrane from the neck to the tail of the appendix. The distribution of the adenocarcinoma was diffuse. Peritoneal dissemination was considered the route of metastasis. He was admitted to the palliative care unit 10 months after appendectomy. Appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis in our patient who had been receiving bevacizumab. PMID:27512565

  5. Use of Clinical Data to Predict Appendicitis in Patients with Equivocal US Findings.

    PubMed

    Athans, Brett S; Depinet, Holly E; Towbin, Alexander J; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Bin; Trout, Andrew T

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the incremental value of clinical data in patients with ultrasonographic (US) examinations that were interpreted as being equivocal for acute appendicitis. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval, with a waiver of informed consent, was obtained for this analysis of clinical and imaging data in patients younger than 18 years old who were evaluated for acute appendicitis. Findings from US examinations were reported in a structured fashion, including two possible equivocal impressions. Clinical data were captured as Pediatric Appendicitis (PAS) or Alvarado scores and considered as categoric (high, intermediate, or low likelihood) and continuous variables to simulate stratification of equivocal US examinations to predict appendicitis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to define score cutoffs, and logistic regression was used to assess individual clinical variables as predictors of appendicitis. Results The study population was made up of 776 patients (mean age, 11.7 years ± 3.7), with 429 (55.2%) girls. A total of 203 (26%) patients had appendicitis. US had a negative predictive value of 96.2% and a positive predictive value of 93.3% for depicting appendicitis, with 89 of 782 (11.4%) equivocal examinations. Categoric PAS and Alvarado scores were equivocal for 59.5% (53 of 89) and 50.6% (45 of 89) of equivocal US examinations, respectively. Categoric low- and high-likelihood PAS and Alvarado scores correctly predicted the presence of appendicitis in 61.1% (22 of 36) and 77.3% (34 of 44) of equivocal US examinations, respectively. As continuous variables, a PAS or Alvarado score of 5 or lower could be used to exclude appendicitis, with a 80.8% (21 of 26) and 90% (18 of 20) negative predictive value, respectively. Conclusion The study confirms the excellent performance of US for depicting pediatric appendicitis. In the subset of equivocal US examinations, a low clinical score (≤5) may be used to identify patients

  6. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  7. A Rare Case of Neonatal Complicated Appendicitis in a Child with Patau's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Valentina; Bartoli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal appendicitis is a rare condition with high mortality rate. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific, imaging modalities are not always diagnostic, and preoperative diagnosis is difficult with subsequent delay and complications. Its pathophysiology may be different from appendicitis in older children and comorbidities can be found. We report a case of a female neonate with Patau's syndrome, intestinal malrotation, and Fallot tetralogy in whom perforated appendix, probably occurring during fetal period due to vascular insufficiency, was found at laparotomy. PMID:25276460

  8. Abdominal computed tomography during pregnancy for suspected appendicitis: a 5-year experience at a maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Garrett, Nan M; Carpenter, Wendy S; Shah, Yogesh P; Roberts, Candace

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in a pregnant patient with right lower quadrant pain in whom there was a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. During a 5-year period the clinical records of all pregnant women who underwent imaging examination for clinically suspected appendicitis were reviewed. The imaging findings were correlated with patient management and final outcome. Thirty-nine pregnant patients were referred for imaging, of which 35 underwent initial evaluation with sonography, 23 of these women underwent a computed tomographic examination, and an additional 4 patients were directly imaged with CT without earlier sonographic assessment. Surgery confirmed appendicitis in all 5 patients who were operated on on the basis of findings of appendicitis on a CT scan. Two patients underwent surgery based on an alternate diagnosis suggested preoperatively (tubal torsion = 1, ovarian torsion = 1). All patients with negative findings at CT had an uneventful clinical course. In those patients who were evaluated only with ultrasound, a diagnosis of appendicitis was missed in 5 patients. The sensitivity of CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in our study group was 100%, compared with a sensitivity of 46.1% for ultrasound. CT provides an accurate diagnosis in patients suspected to have acute appendicitis and is of value in avoiding false negative exploratory laparatomy with its consequent risk of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although sonography is the preferred initial imaging modality as its lack of ionizing radiation, CT is more accurate in providing a timely diagnosis and its use is justified to reduce maternal mortality and mortality in patients with appendicitis. PMID:20102691

  9. The utility of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in diagnosing acute appendicitis and staging its severity

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; İçer, Mustafa; Oğuz, Abdullah; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Çetinçakmak, Mehmet Güli; Teke, Memik

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging to diagnose acute appendicitis. METHODS Abdominal ultrasonography (US) and ARFI imaging were performed in 53 patients that presented with right lower quadrant pain, and the results were compared with those obtained in 52 healthy subjects. Qualitative evaluation of the patients was conducted by Virtual Touch™ tissue imaging (VTI), while quantitative evaluation was performed by Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification (VTQ) measuring the shear wave velocity (SWV). The severity of appendix inflammation was observed and rated using ARFI imaging in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Alvarado scores were determined for all patients presenting with right lower quadrant pain. All patients diagnosed with appendicitis received appendectomies. The sensitivity and specificity of ARFI imaging relative to US was determined upon confirming the diagnosis of acute appendicitis via histopathological analysis. RESULTS The Alvarado score had a sensitivity and specificity of 70.8% and 20%, respectively, in detecting acute appendicitis. Abdominal US had 83.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity, while ARFI imaging had 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity, in diagnosing acute appendicitis. The median SWV value was 1.11 m/s (range, 0.6–1.56 m/s) for healthy appendix and 3.07 m/s (range, 1.37–4.78 m/s) for acute appendicitis. CONCLUSION ARFI imaging may be useful in guiding the clinical management of acute appendicitis, by helping its diagnosis and determining the severity of appendix inflammation. PMID:25323836

  10. Co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Kasra H; Fakhar, Mahdi; Nematian, Javad; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe an unusual case of verminous appendicitis due to Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata in a 29-year-old woman from Iran. The histopathological examinations and parasitological descriptions of both worms found in the appendix lumen are discussed. The removed appendix exhibited the macroscopic and microscopic features of acute appendicitis. Antihelminthic therapy was initiated with single doses of praziquantel for the taeniasis and mebendazole for the enterobiasis, and the patient was discharged. PMID:26754203

  11. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  12. Angiotensin II Induces Region-Specific Medial Disruption during Evolution of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Davis, Frank M.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; O’Connor, William N.; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II–induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor–null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45+ cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  13. Angiotensin II induces region-specific medial disruption during evolution of ascending aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Rateri, Debra L; Davis, Frank M; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A; Moorleghen, Jessica J; O'Connor, William N; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II-induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor-null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45(+) cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  14. Long Telomeres in Blood Leukocytes Are Associated with a High Risk of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Huusko, Tuija J.; Santaniemi, Merja; Kakko, Sakari; Taskinen, Panu; Ukkola, Olavi; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Savolainen, Markku J.; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2012-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001). Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01). Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:23209831

  15. PREFACE: Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul; Erdélyi, Robert; Norton

    2013-06-01

    A total solar eclipse is the most spectacular and awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon most people will ever see in their lifetimes. Even hardened solar scientists draw inspiration from it. The eclipse with 2 minutes totality in the early morning of 14 November 2012 (local time) drew over 120 solar researchers (and untold thousands of the general public) to the small and picturesque resort town of Palm Cove just north of Cairns in tropical north Queensland, Australia, and they were rewarded when the clouds parted just before totality to reveal a stunning solar display. Eclipse photograph The eclipse was also the catalyst for an unusually broad and exciting conference held in Palm Cove over the week 12--16 November. Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending served as GONG 2012, LWS/SDO-5, and SOHO 27, indicating how widely it drew on the various sub-communities within solar physics. Indeed, as we neared the end of the ascending phase of the peculiar Solar Cycle 24, it was the perfect time to bring the whole community together to discuss our Sun's errant recent behaviour, especially as Cycle 24 is the first to be fully observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The whole-Sun perspective was a driving theme of the conference, with the cycle probed from interior (helioseismology), to atmosphere (the various lines observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assemble (AIA) aboard SDO, the several instruments on Hinode, and other modern observatories), and beyond (CMEs etc). The quality of the presentations was exceptional, and the many speakers are to be commended for pitching their talks to the broad community present. These proceedings draw from the invited and contributed oral presentations and the posters exhibited in Palm Cove. They give an (incomplete) snapshot of the meeting, illustrating its broad vistas. The published contributions are organized along the lines of the conference sessions, as set out in the Contents, leading off with a provocative view of

  16. 'Non-hypotensive' hypovolaemia reduces ascending aortic dimensions in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Brown, T. E.; Hayano, J.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    1. The notion that small, 'non-hypotensive' reductions of effective blood volume alter neither arterial pressure nor arterial baroreceptor activity is pervasive in the experimental literature. We tested two hypotheses: (a) that minute arterial pressure and cardiac autonomic outflow changes during hypovolaemia induced by lower body suction in humans are masked by alterations in breathing, and (b) that evidence for arterial baroreflex engagement might be obtained from measurements of thoracic aorta dimensions. 2. In two studies, responses to graded lower body suction at 0 (control), 5, 10, 15, 20 and 40 mmHg were examined in twelve and ten healthy young men, respectively. In the first, arterial pressure (photoplethysmograph), R-R interval, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia amplitude (complex demodulation) were measured during uncontrolled and controlled breathing (constant breathing frequency and tidal volume). In the second, cross-sectional areas of the ascending thoracic aorta were calculated from nuclear magnetic resonance images. 3. Lower body suction with controlled breathing resulted in an increased arterial pulse pressure at mild levels (5-20 mmHg; ANOVA, P < 0.05) and a decreased arterial pulse pressure at moderate levels (40 mmHg; ANOVA, P < 0.05). Both R-R intervals and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were negatively related to lower body suction level, whether group averages (general linear regression, r > 0.92) or individual subjects (orthogonal polynomials, 12 of 12 subjects) were assessed. 4. Aortic pulse area decreased progressively and significantly during mild lower body suction, with 47% of the total decline occurring by 5 mmHg. 5. These results suggest that small reductions of effective blood volume reduce aortic baroreceptive areas and trigger haemodynamic adjustments which are so efficient that alterations in arterial pressure escape detection by conventional means.

  17. Synthesis, computational modeling, and properties of benzo-appended BODIPYs.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Timsy; Hu, Xiaoke; Fronczek, Frank R; Maschek, Stephanie; Bobadova-Parvanova, Petia; Vicente, M Graça H

    2012-03-26

    A series of new functionalized mono- and dibenzo-appended BODIPY dyes were synthesized from a common tetrahydroisoindole precursor following two different synthetic routes. Route A involved the assembly of the BODIPY core prior to aromatization, while in Route B the aromatization step was performed first. In general, Route A gave higher yields of the target dibenzo-BODIPYs, due to the ease of aromatization of the BODIPYs compared with the corresponding dipyrromethenes, probably due to their higher stability under the oxidative conditions (2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone in refluxing toluene). However, due to the slow oxidation of highly electron-deficient BODIPY 3 c bearing a meso-C(6)F(5) group, dibenzo-BODIPY 4 c was obtained, in 35 % overall from dipyrromethane, only by Route B. Computational calculations performed at the 6-31G(d,p) level are in agreement with the experimental results, showing similar relative energies for all reaction intermediates in both routes. In addition, BODIPY 3 c had the highest molecular electrostatic potential (MEPN), confirming its high electron deficiency and consequent resistance toward oxidation. X-ray analyses of eight BODIPYs and several intermediates show that benzannulation further enhances the planarity of these systems. The π-extended BODIPYs show strong red-shifted absorptions and emissions, about 50-60 nm per benzoannulated ring, at 589-658 and 596-680 nm, respectively. In particular, db-BODIPY 4 c bearing a meso-C(6)F(5) group showed the longest λ(max) of absorption and emission, along with the lowest fluorescence quantum yield (0.31 in CH(2)Cl(2)); on the other hand monobenzo-BODIPY 8 showed the highest quantum yield (0.99) of this series. Cellular investigations using human carcinoma HEp2 cells revealed high plasma membrane permeability for all dibenzo-BODIPYs, low dark- and photo-cytotoxicities and intracellular localization in the cell endoplasmic reticulum, in addition to other

  18. Cecal volvulus in a dairy cow: partial resection of the proximal portion of the ascending colon.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, R L; Fubini, S L; Stehman, S

    1987-08-15

    Cecal volvulus in a dairy cow with vascular compromise of the proximal portion of the ascending colon was corrected surgically with preservation of the ileocecocolic junction. Partial cecectomy was combined with resection of the proximal portion of the ascending colon and anastomosis of the remaining cecum to the distal portion of the ascending colon. The procedure was done with the use of mechanical suturing devices while the cow was standing. Previously, general anesthesia and relocation of the ileocecocolic junction had been suggested. PMID:3654317

  19. Analytic investigation of helicopter rotor blade appended aeroelastic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic evaluations of four different passive aeroelastic devices appended to helicopter rotor blades are presented. The devices consist of a passive tuned tab, a control coupled tab, an all-flying tip and a harmonic dilational airfoil tip. Each device was conceived for improving either aerodynamic performance or reducing vibratory control loads or hub shears. The evaluation was performed using a comprehensive rotor aeroelastic analysis (the G400PA code with appropriate modifications), together with data for a realistic helicopter rotor blade (the UH-60A Blackhawk), in high speed flight (90 m/s, 175 kts). The results of this study show that significant performance (L/(D sub e)) gains can be achieved with the all-flying free tip. Results from the harmonic dilational airfoil tip show the potential for moderate improvements in L/(D sub e). Finally, the results for the passive tuned tab and the control coupled tab, as configured for this study, show these devices to be impractical. Sections are included which describe the operation of each device, the required G400PA modifications, and the detailed results obtained for each device.

  20. An accurate test for acute appendicitis: In-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dosRemedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.

    1985-05-01

    The decision to operate when acute appendicitis (APPY) is suspected is often difficult. Surgeons accept up to a 20% false positive rate to avoid any delay that may result in appendiceal rupture and peritonitis. The authors have successfully improved early diagnostic accuracy by using abdominal imaging beginning 2 hours after injecting In-111 labeled WBC. Patients with clear-cut (APPY) had laparotomy and were not studied. Those who were to be observed in the ER for possible (APPY) had their leukocytes harvested, labeled with In-111 oxine, and reinjected. Abnormal localized activity in the right lower quadrant (RLQ) imaged at 2 hours was graded relative to bone marrow activity (8M): 0, 1+BM. When available the surgical specimen was imaged for In-111 activity. Of 31 patients studied there were 13 with positive scans for (APPY) all surgically confirmed. There were 4 additional abnormal studies all demonstrating known diagnostic patterns, 2 of pertonitis and 2 of colitis. There were 14 negative studies in 8 of whom the clinical course was benign; the remaining 6 had laparotomy with 3 having (APPY) and 3 not. Thus there were no false positives and 3 false negatives. One case negative at 2 hours had appendiceal activity later. The 3 cases with 3+ activity all had apendiceal abscesses. This new application of In-111 oxine WBC imaging is safe, simple, sensitive and specific. It shortens the time to surgical intervention and should reduce the surgical false positive rate.

  1. An alternate solution for the treatment of ascending aortic aneurysms: the wrapping technique

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aortic Dacron wrapping technique is a surgical technique used under certain circumstances in cases of ascending aorta dilatation. Herein, we are presenting our experience on the method performed on multimorbid patients who denied major aortic surgery. Methods We included in our series 7 patients (5 male-2 female) with mild to moderate ascending aortic dilatation, who were operated with the wrapping technique. One patient was submitted to biological aortic valve replacement during the same procedure. The number of conventionally operated patients during the same period (2 years) was 21. Results Mortality during the 18-months follow-up control was 0%. One patient had to be operated with biological aortic valve replacement 18 months after the initial wrapping operation, although the diameter of her ascending aorta remained stable. Conclusions The Dacron wrapping technique is a method that can alternatively be used in multimorbid patients with mild to moderate ascending aortic dilatation without dissecting elements and has generally good results. PMID:21047398

  2. The Use of Delta Neutrophil Index and Myeloperoxidase Index for Predicting Acute Complicated Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Yong Sung; Hwang, Sung Oh; Jang, Ji Young; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background In children with acute appendicitis, 30% to 75% present with a complication, such as perforation, and the early diagnosis of complications is known to improve outcomes. Serum delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase index (MPXI) are new inflammatory markers, and thus, in the present study, the authors evaluated the predictive values of these two markers for the presence of a complication in children with acute appendicitis. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted on 105 consecutive children (<12 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 31-month period. DNI, MPXI, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBCs) were measured in an emergency department and investigated with respect to their abilities to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis. Results Twenty-nine of the 105 patients (median age, 9 years) were allocated to the complicated group (27.6%) and 76 to the non-complicated group (72.4%). Median serum DNI and CRP were significantly higher in the complicated group [0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001 and 0.65 mg/dL vs. 8.0 mg/dL, p<0.001], but median MPXI was not (p = 0.316). Area under curve (AUC) for the ability of serum DNI and CRP to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis were 0.738 and 0.840, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed initial CRP [odds ratio 1.301, 95% confidence interval (1.092–1.549), p = 0.003] significantly predicted the presence of a complication. The optimal cutoff for serum CRP was 4.0 mg/dL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 83%, AUC 0.840). Conclusions Although serum DNI values were significantly higher in children with acute complicated appendicitis, no evidence was obtained to support the notion that serum DNI or serum MPXI aid the differentiation of acute complicated and non-complicated appendicitis in the ED setting. PMID:26859663

  3. The Diagnostic Value of Surface Markers in Acute Appendicitis; A Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholi Mezerji, Naser Mohammad; Rafeie, Mohammad; Shayan, Zahra; Mosayebi, Ghasem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic value of blood cells surface markers in patients with acute appendicitis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 71 patients who underwent appendectomy following a diagnosis of appendicitis were recruited during a one-year period. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with histopathologically confirmed acute appendicitis and subjects with normal appendix. Blood cell surface markers of all patients were measured. Univariate and multivariate analytical methods were applied to identify the most useful markers. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were also used to find the best cut-off point, sensitivity, and specificity. Results: Overall we included 71 patients with mean age of 22.6±10.7 years. Of the 71 cases, 45 (63.4%) had acute appendicitis while 26 (36.6%) were normal. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the age (p=0.151) and sex (p=0.142). The initial WBC count was significantly higher in those with acute appendicitis (p=0.033). Maximum and minimum area under the ROC curve in univariate analysis was reported for CD3/RA (0.71) and CD38 (0.533), respectively. Multivariate regression models revealed the percentage of accurate diagnoses based on the combination of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RO, and CD3/RA markers to be 74.65%. Maximum area under the ROC curve (0.79) was also obtained for the same combination. Conclusion: the best blood cell surface markers in the prediction of acute appendicitis were HLA-DR+CD19, a/β TCR, and CD3/RA. The simultaneous use of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RA, and CD3/RO showed the highest diagnostic value in acute appendicitis. PMID:27162905

  4. Characteristics and Outcomes of Ascending Versus Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vapnik, Joshua S; Kim, Joon Bum; Isselbacher, Eric M; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Cheng, Yisha; Sundt, Thoralf M; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cambria, Richard P; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-05-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAs) occur in reproducible patterns, but etiologic factors determining the anatomic distribution of these aneurysms are not well understood. This study sought to gain insight into etiologic differences and clinical outcomes associated with repetitive anatomic distributions of TAs. From 3,247 patients registered in an institutional Thoracic Aortic Center database from July 1992 to August 2013, we identified 844 patients with full aortic dimensional imaging by computerized axial tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan (mean age 62.8 ± 14 years, 37% women, median follow-up 40 months) with TA diameter >4.0 cm and without evidence of previous aortic dissection. Patient demographic and imaging data were analyzed in 3 groups: isolated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (AAs; n = 628), isolated descending TAs (DTAs; n = 130), and combined AA and DTA (mixed thoracic aortic aneurysm, MTA; n = 86). Patients with DTA had more hypertension (82% vs 59%, p <0.001) and a higher burden of atherosclerosis (88% vs 9%, p <0.001) than AA. Conversely, patients with isolated AA were younger (59.5 ± 13.5 vs 71.0 ± 11.8 years, p <0.001) and contained almost every case of overt, genetically triggered TA. Patients with isolated DTA were demographically indistinguishable from patients with MTA. In follow-up, patients with DTA/MTA experienced more aortic events (aortic dissection/rupture) and had higher mortality than patients with isolated AA. In multivariate analysis, aneurysm size (odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.16, p <0.001) and the presence of atherosclerosis (odds ratio 5.7, 95% CI 2.02 to 16.15, p <0.001) independently predicted adverse aortic events. We find that DTA with or without associated AA appears to be a disease more highly associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, and advanced age. In contrast, isolated AA appears to be a clinically distinct entity with a greater burden of genetically triggered disease. PMID:27015890

  5. Dissection of ascending aorta. Rare complication of aortocoronary venous bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, P; Perrenoud, J J; Périat, M

    1981-01-01

    Dissection of the ascending aorta is a rare complication of aortocoronary bypass surgery. A 63-year-old man who had received a double graft was found to have dissection of the ascending aorta, which was shown angiographically four months after operation. Since the patient was asymptomatic, operation was postponed. He has been followed up regularly and two years later his condition is still satisfactory. Images PMID:6976179

  6. Ascending aortic graft thrombosis and diffuse embolization from early endoluminal Aspergillus infection.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Domenico; Bashir, Mohammad; Gailey, Michael P

    2012-10-01

    We present a 43-year-old man who underwent emergent replacement of the ascending aorta for type A dissection and hemiarch reconstruction with a 28-mm prosthetic graft. Dramatic neurologic symptoms, renal failure, and bowel ischemia developed on postoperative day 5. A computed tomography scan showed a large floating thrombus in the ascending aortic graft and massive peripheral embolization throughout the body. PMID:23006693

  7. A rare presentation of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy secondary to cement leakage in percutaneous vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Rohit Prakash; Barman, Apurba; Varghese, Shiela Mary; Chatterjee, Ahana; Mammen, Suraj; George, Jacob; Thomas, Raji

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is used to manage osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications after vertebroplasty ranging from minor to devastatingly major ones have been described. Cement leakage into the spinal canal is one such complication. Subacute progressive ascending myelopathy is an infrequent neurologic complication after spinal cord injury, typically presenting as ascending neurologic deficit within weeks after the initial insult. The precise cause of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy still remains an enigma, considering the rarity of this disorder. The authors present the case of a 62-yr-old woman with osteoporotic vertebral fracture who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty and developed T6 complete paraplegia because of cement leakage. A few weeks later, the neurologic level ascended to higher cervical level (C3). To date, no case of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy secondary to cement leakage after percutaneous vertebroplasty has been reported. Literature is reviewed regarding subacute progressive ascending myelopathy, and the rehabilitation challenges in the management of this patient are discussed. PMID:24322431

  8. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  9. An Imaging Diagnostic Protocol in Children with Clinically Suspected Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Matias; Antonio de Medeiros Lima, Marco; Corrêa, Patricia; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate a new diagnostic strategy using clinical findings followed by ultrasound (US) and, in selected cases, MRI. This study included 166 children presenting signs and symptoms suggesting acute appendicitis. Cases classified as suggesting appendicitis according to clinical exams had to be referred to surgery, whereas the other cases were discharged. Unclear cases were evaluated using US. If the US results were considered inconclusive, patients underwent MRI. Of the 166 patients, 78 (47%) had acute appendicitis and 88 (53%) had other diseases. The strategy under study had a sensitivity of 96 per cent, specificity of 100 per cent, positive predictive value of 100 per cent, negative predictive value of 97 per cent, and accuracy of 98 per cent. Eight patients remained undiagnosed and underwent MRI. After MRI two girls presented normal appendixes and were discharged. One girl had an enlarged appendix on MRI and appendicitis could have been confirmed by surgery. In the other five patients, no other sign of the disease was detected by MRI such as an inflammatory mass, free fluid or an abscess in the right iliac fossa. All of them were discharged after clinical observation. In the vast majority of cases the correct diagnosis was reached by clinical and US examinations. When clinical assessment and US findings were inconclusive, MRI was useful to detect normal and abnormal appendixes and valuable to rule out other abdominal pathologies that mimic appendicitis. PMID:27215717

  10. [The role and place of helical ct for preporative diagnosis of acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Nemsadze, G Sh; Urushadze, O P; Tokhadze, L T; Lomidze, M N; Kipshidze, N N

    2009-09-01

    The goal of our study was to ascertain the role and place of helical CT for preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Our study relied upon the results of helical CT scans of 60 patients, which were diagnosed probable acute appendicitis based upon clinical signs. Of these 60 patients 49 (81,6%) were female, 11 (18,4%) male. For all patients laboratory studies of blood were made, 31 patients were examined by ultrasonography. Among this group the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was verified by CT scan in 41 patients. In the case of 5 patients the scan was equivocal because of smaller amount of omentum; in this subgroup of 5 patients (5% overall) three were given radiocontrast dye, and two (3,3% overall) were not. In 11 (18,3%) cases the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was not verified, and in three cases the diagnosis was incorrect. According to data of our study and intraoperative data analysis, sensitivity of this method approaches 93% and the specificity - 92%, and overall diagnostic accuracy 93%. Helical CT may be stated as diagnostic method of choice in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. It is helpful in clinical decision making, and reducing the amount of false appendectomies. PMID:19801721

  11. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:26643405

  12. Accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in adult patients: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasound is a widely used technique in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis; nevertheless, its utilization still remains controversial. Methods The accuracy of the Ultrasound technique in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the adult patient, as shown in the literature, was searched for. Results The gold standard for the diagnosis of appendicitis still remains pathologic confirmation after appendectomy. In the published literature, graded-compression Ultrasound has shown an extremely variable diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (sensitivity range from 44% to 100%; specificity range from 47% to 99% ). This is due to many reasons, including lack of operator skill, increased bowel gas content, obesity, anatomic variants, and limitations to explore patients with previuos laparotomies. Conclusions Graded-compression Ultrasound still remains our first-line method in patients referred with clinically suspected acute appendicitis: nevertheless, due to variable diagnostic accuracy, individual skill is requested not only to perform a successful exam, but also in order to triage those equivocal cases that, subsequently, will have to undergo assessment by means of Computed Tomography. PMID:23902717

  13. Evaluation of Tc-99m leukocyte scan in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Marcus, C.S.; Henneman, P.L.; Inkelis, S.H.; Wilson, S.E.

    1987-05-01

    A new /sup 99m/Tc Microlite leukocyte scan was performed in 38 patients to assess its value in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Autologous leukocytes are labeled with /sup 99m/Tc by inducing phagocytosis of /sup 99m/Tc albumin microcolloid particles. The advantages of this test over the standard indium-111 scan include superior imaging capability, a marked reduction (greater than 75%) in the radiation dose, and performance of the test including labeling, in less than 3 hr. Imaging is performed at 5-90 min postinjection of labeled cells. There were 19 male and 19 female patients with ages ranging from 10 to 80 years, in whom the diagnosis of appendicitis was indeterminate on clinical examination. Of the 13 of the 38 patients (34%) who came to surgery 12 had acute appendicitis. The WBC scan correctly identified 10 of the 12 cases of appendicitis. There were two false-negative studies. In the nonoperative group of 25 patients admitted for observation, 21 studies were reported as negative and four identified other sites of inflammation. All patients with a negative study have remained asymptomatic on follow-up. With a sensitivity of 83% (10/12) and a specificity of 100% (26/26) the /sup 99m/Tc leukocyte scan provides a rapid and highly accurate method for diagnosis of appendicitis in this preliminary study of patients with equivocal clinical exams.

  14. Clinical significance of elevated serum and urine amylase levels in patients with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Swensson, E E; Maull, K I

    1981-12-01

    During the 45 month period beginning January 1977, 251 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of acute appendicitis underwent celiotomy at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A preoperative serum or urine amylase determination was recorded in 155 of the patients (62 percent). Of this group, 15 patients (10 percent) had elevation of serum amylase or 2 hour urine amylase. Hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria directly led to misdiagnosis or treatment delay in 5 of the 15 patients. Appendiceal rupture occurred in three patients, two of whom had prolonged (greater than 1 month) hospitalizations directly attributable to the misdiagnosis. As a result of this study, we conclude that (1) acute appendicitis and elevated amylase levels may occur concurrently, (2) hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria should not dissuade the surgeon from early operation if other clinical features suggest appendicitis, and (3) abdominal pain and elevation of amylase level define significant intraabdominal disease, not specifically pancreatic disease. PMID:6172043

  15. A young man with concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated right indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia rarely present in the same episode. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case at the Chiang Mai University Hospital. Method Case report. Result A 20-year-old man visited the Chiang Mai University Hospital with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass which could not be reduced. The computerized tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and omentum in the hernia sac. Operative treatment was an appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from our hospital without any complications. Conclusion Concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia are very rare, but should be kept in mind if a patient presents with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass. Further investigation may be helpful if the diagnosis is uncertain. Operative priority treatment depends on each individual case. PMID:26834499

  16. Metastatic gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma: A rare cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Erçetin, Candaş; Dural, Ahmet Cem; Özdenkaya, Yaşar; Dural, Özlem; Dada, Huriye Gözde Muhafız; Yeğen, Gülçin; Kapran, Yersu; Erbil, Yeşim

    2016-01-01

    We report a 32-year-old patient who underwent laparoscopy with classical symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis. An inflamed, edematous and non-perforated appendix, also a large amount gelatinous ascites, omental and peritoneal implants were seen. Appendectomy was performed and multiple biopsies were taken from omentum and peritoneum for definitive diagnosis. Histopathologic diagnosis was a metastatic gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma (GSRCC) involving appendix and other specimens. A flat lesion involving corpus to antrum was diagnosed by gastroscopy and GSRCC was verified histopathologically in a tertiary centre and the case evaluated as stage IV gastric carcinoma. This case with no sign of gastric cancer was presented as an acute appendicitis. Metastatic carcinoma to the appendix, causing acute appendicitis is extremely rare in clinical practice and usually associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  17. Transumbilical Laparoscopic-Assisted Appendectomy in the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Noviello, Carmine; Romano, Mercedes; Martino, Ascanio; Cobellis, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted appendectomy (TULAA) is increasingly being performed worldwide. The authors report their experience in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children with TULAA. From January 2008 to December 2012 all types of acute appendicitis were divided, according to the clinical and ultrasonographic findings, into complicated (appendiceal mass/abscess, diffuse peritonitis) and uncomplicated. Complicated appendicitis was treated by open appendectomy (OA). All patients with the suspicion of uncomplicated appendicitis were offered TULAA by all surgeons of the team. Conversion to open or laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) was performed in case of impossibility to complete TULAA, depending on the choice of surgeon. The histopathologic examination of appendix was always performed. 444 children (252 males) with acute appendicitis were treated. The mean age was 9.2 years (range, 2 to 14 years). Primary OA was performed in 144 cases. In 300 patients a transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted approach was performed. TULAA was completed in 252 patients. Conversion to OA was performed in 45 patients and to LA in 3. Conversion was related to the impossibility to adequately expose the appendix in 47 patients and bleeding in 1. The mean operative time for TULAA was 42 minutes. Histopathologic examination of the appendix removed by TULAA showed a phlegmonous/gangrenous type in 92.8% of cases. Among the 252 TULAA there were 11 cases of umbilical wound infection. TULAA is a feasible and effective procedure for uncomplicated appendicitis in children. It combines the advantages of open and laparoscopic technique (low operative time, low complications rate, and excellent cosmetic results). PMID:26491433

  18. Optimised z-axis coverage at multidetector-row CT in adults suspected of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Brassart, N; Winant, C; Tack, D; Gevenois, P A; De Maertelaer, V

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare diagnostic performances of two reduced z-axis coverages to full coverage of the abdomen and pelvis for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and alternative diseases at unenhanced CT. Methods: This study included 152 adults suspected of appendicitis who were enrolled in two ethical committee-approved previous prospective trials. Based on scans covering the entire abdomen and pelvis (set L), two additional sets of images were generated, each with reduced z-axis coverages: (1) from the top of the iliac crests to the pubis (set S) and (2) from the diaphragmatic crus to the pubis (set M). Two readers independently coded the visualisation of the appendix, measured its diameter and proposed a diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Final diagnosis was based on surgical findings or clinical follow-up. Fisher exact and McNemar tests and logistic regression were used. Results: 46 patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis and 53 of alternative diseases. The frequency of appendix visualisation was lower for set S than set L for both readers (89% and 84% vs 95% and 91% by Readers A and B, respectively; p=0.021 and 0.022). The probability of giving a correct diagnosis was lower for set S (68%) than set L (78%; odds ratio, 0.611; p=0.008) for both readers, without significant difference between sets L and M (77%, p=0.771); z-axis coverage being reduced by 25% for set M. Conclusion: Coverage from diaphragmatic crus to pubis, but not focused on pelvis only, can be recommended in adults suspected of appendicitis. Advances in knowledge: In suspected appendicitis, CT-coverage can be reduced from diaphragmatic crus to pubis. PMID:23690436

  19. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ateş, Oğuz; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0° scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm “conventional umbilical port” for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 ± 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 ± 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 ± 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  20. Culture-Independent Evaluation of the Appendix and Rectum Microbiomes in Children with and without Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Katherine P.; Fraser, Claire M.; Sandler, Anthony D.; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The function of the appendix is largely unknown, but its microbiota likely contributes to function. Alterations in microbiota may contribute to appendicitis, but conventional culture studies have not yielded conclusive information. We conducted a pilot, culture-independent 16S rRNA-based microbiota study of paired appendix and rectal samples. Methods We collected appendix and rectal swabs from 21 children undergoing appendectomy, six with normal appendices and fifteen with appendicitis (nine perforated). After DNA extraction, we amplified and sequenced 16S rRNA genes and analyzed sequences using CLoVR. We identified organisms differing in relative abundance using ANOVA (p<0.05) by location (appendix vs. rectum), disease (appendicitis vs. normal), and disease severity (perforated vs. non-perforated). Results We identified 290 taxa in the study's samples. Three taxa were significantly increased in normal appendices vs. normal rectal samples: Fusibacter (p = 0.009), Selenomonas (p = 0.026), and Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.049). Five taxa were increased in abundance in normal vs. diseased appendices: Paenibacillaceae (p = 0.005), Acidobacteriaceae GP4 (p = 0.019), Pseudonocardinae (p = 0.019), Bergeyella (p = 0.019) and Rhizobium (p = 0.045). Twelve taxa were increased in the appendices of appendicitis patients vs. normal appendix: Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.0003), Bilophila (p = 0.0004), Bulleidia (p = 0.012), Fusobacterium (p = 0.018), Parvimonas (p = 0.003), Mogibacterium (p = 0.012), Aminobacterium (p = 0.019), Proteus (p = 0.028), Actinomycineae (p = 0.028), Anaerovorax (p = 0.041), Anaerofilum (p = 0.045), Porphyromonas (p = 0.010). Five taxa were increased in appendices in patients with perforated vs. nonperforated appendicitis: Bulleidia (p = 0.004), Fusibacter (p = 0.005), Prevotella (p = 0.021), Porphyromonas (p = 0.030), Dialister (p = 0.035). Three taxa

  1. Diagnosing appendicitis: What works, what does not and where to go from here?

    PubMed

    Craig, Simon; Dalton, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery in children, diagnosis is far from straightforward. Delays in diagnosis can result in significant complications, whereas over-diagnosis can result in costly inter-hospital transfers and unnecessary surgery. This article aims to describe current evidence-based assessment of children with possible appendicitis presenting to the emergency department. We provide an overview of the literature relating to the various available diagnostic approaches, including the application of history, examination, pathology tests, imaging, and clinical decision rules. PMID:26437742

  2. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Fusari, Mario; Sorrentino, Nicoletta; Bottazzi, Enrico Coppola; Del Vecchio, Walter; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Maurea, Simone; Salvatore, Marco; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix is a very rare neoplasm that usually presents with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis and in particular with a right lower abdominal pain. Preoperative imaging detection of appendiceal adenocarcinoma has an important value because it may result in an appropriate surgical procedure. We report a rare case of primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the vermiform appendix in an 80-year-old man who was misdiagnosed on computed tomography (CT) scan as acute appendicitis. PMID:23986852

  3. Meralgia Paresthetica as a Presentation of Acute Appendicitis in a Girl With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Miho; Kodama, Yuichi; Fukano, Reiji; Okamura, Jun; Ogaki, Kippei; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Migita, Masahiro; Inagaki, Jiro

    2015-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed recurrent fever and meralgia paresthetica (MP) during chemotherapy, which resolved after administration of antibiotics. Five months after the onset of these symptoms, enhanced computed tomography showed a periappendiceal abscess extending into the psoas muscle. The cause of her fever and MP was thought to be appendicitis, which probably developed during induction chemotherapy but did not result in typical abdominal pain. Patients with recurrent fever and MP should be evaluated by imaging examinations including computed tomography to search for appendicitis. PMID:24942034

  4. Ascending Aortic Constriction in Rats for Creation of Pressure Overload Cardiac Hypertrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    S, Santhosh Kumar; G, Sanjay; Kartha, Chandrasekharan Cheranellore

    2014-01-01

    Ascending aortic constriction is the most common and successful surgical model for creating pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Here, we describe a detailed surgical procedure for creating pressure overload and cardiac hypertrophy in rats by constriction of the ascending aorta using a small metallic clip. After anesthesia, the trachea is intubated by inserting a cannula through a half way incision made between two cartilage rings of trachea. Then a skin incision is made at the level of the second intercostal space on the left chest wall and muscle layers are cleared to locate the ascending portion of aorta. The ascending aorta is constricted to 50–60% of its original diameter by application of a small sized titanium clip. Following aortic constriction, the second and third ribs are approximated with prolene sutures. The tracheal cannula is removed once spontaneous breathing was re-established. The animal is allowed to recover on the heating pad by gradually lowering anesthesia. The intensity of pressure overload created by constriction of the ascending aorta is determined by recording the pressure gradient using trans-thoracic two dimensional Doppler-echocardiography. Overall this protocol is useful to study the remodeling events and contractile properties of the heart during the gradual onset and progression from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure stage. PMID:24998889

  5. Ascending aorta of hooded seals with particular emphasis on its vasa vasorum.

    PubMed

    Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Kuttner, Samuel; Messelt, Edward B

    2016-07-01

    The pressure-volume relationship in the ascending aorta ("windkessel") of the hooded seal was determined and the morphology of its vasa vasorum described in some detail. We found that the ascending aorta has a high compliance and can easily accommodate the entire stroke volume when the peripheral vascular resistance becomes much increased and maintain perfusion pressure during the much extended diastole and thereby reduce cardiac stroke work during diving. We also found that the 3- to 5-mm thick wall of the ascending aorta had a very elaborate vasa vasorum interna with a hitherto undescribed vascular structure that penetrates the entire vascular wall. If similar structures with similar importance for the nutrition of the wall of the vessel are found in humans, important implications for the understanding of pathological conditions, such as aneurisms, may be indicated. PMID:27122367

  6. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  7. The imaging assessment and specific endograft design for the endovascular repair of ascending aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yepeng; Tang, Hanfei; Zhou, JianPing; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Changjian; Qiao, Tong; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Endovascular option has been proposed for a very limited and selected number of Stanford type A aortic dissection (TAAD) patients. We have performed a computed tomography (CT)-based TAAD study to explore appropriate endograft configurations for the ascending aortic pathology. Methods TAAD patients treated with optimal CT scans were retrospectively reviewed, and their entry tears (ETs) were identified using three-dimensional and multiplanar reconstructions in an EndoSize workstation. After generating a centerline of flow, measurements, including numerous morphologic characteristics of anatomy, were evaluated and a selected subset of patients were determined to be suitable for endovascular treatments. Proximal diameter and distal diameter of endograft were selected based on diameters measured at the ET level and at the innominate artery (IA) level, with 10% oversizing with respect to the true lumen, but not exceeding the original aortic diameter. The length of the endograft was determined by the distance from the sinotubular junction to IA. Results This study covered 126 TAAD patients with primary ET in ascending aorta, among which, according to the assumed criteria, 48 (38.1%) patients were deemed to be suitable for endovascular treatment. The diameters of ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the IA level presented a downward trend, and the proximal diameters differed significantly from distal diameters of the endograft for TAAD (39.9 versus 36.2 mm, P<0.01), implying that the conical endograft might be compatible with the ascending pathology. In the ascending aorta, lengths of the endograft should be 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 mm in five (10.4%), 22 (45.9%), 13 (27.1%), six (12.5%), and two (4.2%) patients, respectively. Conclusion In this selected number of Chinese patients, the suitability of endovascular repair has been demonstrated based on the CT imaging. Shorter, larger, and bare spring-free conical endografts were preferred in the

  8. Aortic Root Enlargement with Ascending-to-Descending Aortic Bypass in Repair of Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Paul A; Young, Nilas

    2015-07-01

    Ascending-to-descending aortic bypass is a valuable technique for addressing coarctation of the aorta when additional cardiac procedures are indicated in adults. Among these, aortic valve replacement is one of the most commonly performed concomitant procedures, and there are instances in which aortic root enlargement is required. Herein, a novel technique is described for performing simultaneous ascending-to-descending aortic bypass in conjunction with aortic root enlargement which incorporates the bypass graft as part of the aortic root enlargement. PMID:26897826

  9. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention in an anomalous single coronary trunk arising anomalously from ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mohit D; Girish, M P; Bansal, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Vivek; Trehan, Vijay; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    A 45-year-old male patient presented with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction. Angiography revealed a single coronary trunk arising from the ascending aorta above the coronary sinuses and giving rise to right coronary artery, left circumflex artery and critical stenosis in the left anterior descending artery. This report also highlights the feasibility of performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in this rare anomaly and discusses the important technical considerations to be kept in mind while attempting such a case. This is the first report of such an anomalous origin of a single coronary trunk arising from ascending aorta. PMID:26138250

  10. Huge dissected ascending aorta associated with pseudo aneurysm and aortic coarctation feridoun.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-07-01

    We report a unique case of chronic dissection of the ascending aorta complicated with huge and thrombotic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with coarctation of descending aorta. Preoperative investigations such as transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) confirmed the diagnosis of dissection. Intraoperative findings included a12 cm eccentric bulge of the right lateral side of dilated the ascending aorta filled with the clot and a circular shaped intimal tear communicating with an extended hematoma and dissection of the media layer. The rarity of the report is an association of the chronic dissection with huge pseudoaneurysm and coarctation. The patient underwent staged repair of an aneurysm and coarctation and had an uneventful postoperative recovery period. PMID:26520633

  11. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta and aortic valve following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Charles, K P; Davidson, K G; Miller, H; Caves, P K

    1977-02-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta at the level of the isthmus is a well-recognized injury following blunt chest trauma. By contrast, rupture of the ascending aorta and of the aortic valve in a road traffic accident is rare and does not appear to have been previously reported. The occurrence of such an injury in a 56-year-old man involved in a road traffic accident is reported. The diagnosis was made preoperatively following aortography and successful surgical correction involved aortic valve replacement with resection and grafting of the damaged area of the ascending aorta. The probable mechanisms involved in the production of this unusual injury are discussed. PMID:834060

  12. Acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In healthy subjects, Cytomegalovirus infection can be asymptomatic or manifest as mononucleosis syndrome, but organ disease has also been reported. However, in immunocompromised patients this infection can lead to its most significant and severe disease and even mortality. When Cytomegalovirus causes a gastrointestinal tract infection, it more commonly manifests with luminal tract disease and is usually characterized by ulcerative lesions. Appendicitis is a rare manifestation, and has been reported mainly in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients or patients with other causes of immunocompromise. Case presentation The authors report on a case of acute primary Cytomegalovirus infection complicated with acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent 24-year-old Caucasian man also suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations, serology results, as well as microbiological and histological findings. Treatment consisted of surgery and anti-Cytomegalovirus therapy. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus should be included among the etiologic agents of acute appendicitis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no definitive data regarding the frequency of Cytomegalovirus appendicitis and the role of anti-Cytomegalovirus treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-negative and apparently immunocompetent subjects. PMID:24612821

  13. Systemic Mastocytosis Presenting as Acute Appendicitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    A. Akbar, Syed; Raza, Shahzad; E. Denney, Jason; J. Johannesen, Eric; C. Doll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by abnormal growth and accumulation of mast cells in various organs. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common disease manifestations in this disease and can significantly impair the quality of life. Signs of GI systemic mastocytosis include steatorrhea, malabsorption, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, portal hypertension, and ascites. Acute appendicitis as a presenting feature in systemic mastocytosis has not been reported in the literature previously. In this report, we discuss the case of a female patient with systemic mastocytosis (c-KIT D816V (+)) who was admitted for right-sided acute abdominal pain. Laboratory study revealed an normal white blood cell count with eosinophilia and an elevated serum tryptase level of 23 μg/l. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed an enlarged appendix of 12 mm in diameter, with minimal wall enhancement. Laparoscopic appendectomy was performed. The appendix was found to be hyperemic and firm, and it was densely adherent to the posterior cecum, the surrounding peritoneal wall, and the overlying mesenteric fat. Pathology revealed acute appendicitis with greater than 30 mast cells per high-power field by immunoperoxidase studies with mast cell tryptase and CD117. The patient subsequently improved and was discharged home. This case is the first reported case with a histological diagnosis of acute appendicitis resulting from mast cell infiltration. Physicians should be aware of acute appendicitis as a manifestation of systemic mastocytosis. Prompt diagnosis and management may prevent potentially fatal complications of appendiceal perforation and peritonitis. PMID:23626557

  14. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  15. Unusual presentation of left sided acute appendicitis in elderly male with asymptomatic midgut malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Rajaratnam, Joshua; Singla, Apresh A.; Wiltshire, Stephanie; Kwik, Charlotte; Smigelski, Michelle; Morgan, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in the setting of midgut malrotation is uncommon. Midgut malrotation commonly presents within the first month of life. A minority remain asymptomatic and may present with concomitant abdominal pathology making diagnosis difficult. Presentation of case This paper reports a rare case of a 73-year-old male diagnosed with acute appendicitis and asymptomatic MM .The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy, but had an unplanned return to theatre for washout of post-operative intra-abdominal haematoma. Discussion Midgut malrotation is commonly described by the stringer classification and type 1a is the most common in adults. There have only been a handful of documented cases of acute appendicitis with midgut malrotation occurring in the adult population. Previous delay in diagnosis has led to a delay in definitive management. Both laparoscopic and open surgery has been used in the past. Conclusion Acute appendicitis with malrotation should be considered in elderly patients presenting with atypical signs and symptoms. Imaging offers significant advantage for timely and definitive management. PMID:26520036

  16. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mohammed H; Chan, Wilson W; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  17. Acute Appendicitis as Complication of Colon Transit Time Study; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Roshanravan, Reza; Khodaei, Shahin; Rahimi Kazerooni, Salar; Moslemi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Colon transit time study with radio opaque markers is a simple method for assessment of colon motility disorder in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation. We report a case of acute appendicitis that was induced by impaction of radio opaque markers after colon transit time study. We think that this case report is first significant complication of colon transit time study until now PMID:26396723

  18. Appendicitis in children less than five years old: A challenge for the general practitioner.

    PubMed

    Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Germani, Claudio; Krauss, Baruch S; Barbi, Egidio

    2015-05-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common indications for abdominal surgery in pediatrics with peak incidence in the second decade of life. Acute appendicitis in the first years of life is an uncommon event. The clinical presentation is often varied and the diagnosis may be overshadowed by other medical conditions. Gastroenteritis is the most common misdiagnosis, with a history of diarrhea present in 33% to 41% of patients. Pain is the most common presenting symptom in children less than 5 years old, followed by vomiting, fever, anorexia and diarrhea. The most common physical sign is focal tenderness (61% of the patients) followed by guarding (55%), diffuse tenderness (39%), rebound (32%), and mass (6%). Neonatal appendicitis is a very rare disease with high mortality; presenting symptoms are nonspecific with abdominal distension representing the main clinical presentation. The younger the patient, the earlier perforation occurs: 70% of patients less than 3 years develop a perforation within 48 h of onset of symptoms. A timely diagnosis reduces the risk of complications. We highlight the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical signs and laboratory clues of appendicitis in young children and suggest an algorithm for early diagnosis. PMID:26015876

  19. Comparison of Alvarado Score Evaluation and Clinical Judgment in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Bassem Abou; Khalil, Mahmoud; Daoud, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in children, but its diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The aim: of this study is to evaluate retrospectively the Alvarado score in relation to the surgical management based on clinical judgment. Methods: Medical files of 232 children who underwent appendectomy at Makassed General Hospital from January 1997 till December 2006 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, symptoms and signs, laboratory results and imaging findings for all children were recorded. Results: The positive predictive value of our clinical judgment was 86.4% and the negative appendectomy rate was 13.6% based on the pathology results. The reliability of Alvarado score in our population found a PPV of 80.7% and a negative appendectomy rate of 11.3%. A multivariate analysis revealed that anorexia, neutrophils left shift and rebound tenderness are significantly correlated with a correct diagnosis of appendicitis (p = 0.012, 0.023 and 0.046 respectively). Conclusion: Although, Alvarado score provides measurably useful diagnostic information in evaluating children with suspected appendicitis, we found that good clinical judgment remain the main stay of correct diagnosis of appendicitis. PMID:24783903

  20. Water templated hydrogen-bonded network of pyridine amide appended carbamate in solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kumaresh; Adhikari, Suman; Fröhlich, Roland

    2006-03-01

    The pyridine amide appended carbamates 1 and 2 have been synthesized and their hydrogen-bonded self-assemblies in solid state have been described. The self-association pattern is dependent on the nature the anchored group of the carbamate moiety and influenced by water inclusion. Inclusion of water molecule gives a ladder type hydrogen bonded assemblies with cavities.

  1. Posttraumatic appendicitis: further extending the extended Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma examination.

    PubMed

    Derr, Charlotte; Goldner, D Eliot

    2009-06-01

    Several cases of appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma have been reported in the literature. A 41-year-old man on a cruise ship began to experience acute abdominal pain several hours after cliff diving from a 20-ft height and landing hard against the water on his right side. The patient's symptoms were treated and he remained on the ship until its scheduled arrival in port 2 days later. In the emergency department, a bedside extended Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (eFAST) examination showed no evidence of free fluid in the abdominal cavity, pericardial effusion, or pneumothorax. Next, an ultrasound of the right lower quadrant was performed, which revealed a 1.06 cm, noncompressible appendix consistent with appendicitis. Although physical examination remains the gold standard for evaluation of the acute abdomen, the presentation of acute appendicitis is historically unreliable and delays in its diagnosis can result in significant increases in morbidity and mortality. Ultrasonography has been shown to have clear value in the evaluation of the acute abdomen. It is the authors' opinion that ultrasonography may have an unrealized potential as a diagnostic tool for traumatic appendicitis in the trauma bay and as a triage tool for the cruise ship physician who must evaluate a patient with traumatic abdominal pain and determine the need for medical evacuation. PMID:19497487

  2. Appendicitis in children less than five years old: A challenge for the general practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Germani, Claudio; Krauss, Baruch S; Barbi, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common indications for abdominal surgery in pediatrics with peak incidence in the second decade of life. Acute appendicitis in the first years of life is an uncommon event. The clinical presentation is often varied and the diagnosis may be overshadowed by other medical conditions. Gastroenteritis is the most common misdiagnosis, with a history of diarrhea present in 33% to 41% of patients. Pain is the most common presenting symptom in children less than 5 years old, followed by vomiting, fever, anorexia and diarrhea. The most common physical sign is focal tenderness (61% of the patients) followed by guarding (55%), diffuse tenderness (39%), rebound (32%), and mass (6%). Neonatal appendicitis is a very rare disease with high mortality; presenting symptoms are nonspecific with abdominal distension representing the main clinical presentation. The younger the patient, the earlier perforation occurs: 70% of patients less than 3 years develop a perforation within 48 h of onset of symptoms. A timely diagnosis reduces the risk of complications. We highlight the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical signs and laboratory clues of appendicitis in young children and suggest an algorithm for early diagnosis. PMID:26015876

  3. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wilson W.; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  4. Interleukin 6 and lipopolysaccharide binding protein - markers of inflammation in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Brănescu, C; Serban, D; Dascălu, A M; Oprescu, S M; Savlovschi, C

    2013-01-01

    The rate of incidence of acute appendicitis is 12% in the case of male patients and 25% in case of women, which represents about 7% of the world population. The appendectomy rate has remained constant (i.e. 10 out of 10,000 patients per year). Appendicitis most often occurs in patients aged between 11-40 years, on the threshold between the third and fourth decades, the average age being 31.3 years. Since the first appendectomy performed by Claudius Amyand (1681/6 -1740), on December, 6th, 1735 to our days, i.e., 270 years later, time has confirmed the efficiency of both the therapy method and the surgical solution. The surgical cure in case of acute appendicitis has proved to be acceptable within the most widely practised techniques in general surgery. The variety of clinical forms has reached all age ranges, which in its turn has resulted in a large number of semiotic signs. In the case of acute appendicitis, interdisciplinarity has allowed the transfer of concept and methodology transfer among many areas of expertise, aimed at a better, minute understanding of the inflammatory event itself. Acute appendicitis illustrates inflammation development at digestive level and provides for a diagnostic and paraclinical exploration which continually upgrades. The recent inclusion in the studies of the Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)- type inflammation markers has laid the foundation of the latter's documented presence in the case of acute appendicitis-related inflammation. Proof of the correlation between the histopathological, clinical and evolutive forms can be found by identifying and quantifying these inflammation markers. The importance of studying inflammation markers allows us to conduct studies going beyond the prognosis of the various stages in which these markers were identified. The present article shows the results of a 1-year monitoring of the inflammation markers' values for Interleukin-6 and Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)-types, both pre

  5. Appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip in the management of complicated acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Closure of appendicular stump has been performed in different ways; however, the use of the metal endoclip in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, has not been evaluated yet in a prospective way. Objective To establish the effectiveness of appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip for complicated appendicitis. Method From January 2009 to January 2011 were evaluated 131 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated acute appendicitis. From those, 118 underwent appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip. The patient’s age ranged from 12 to 75 years old (31.7 ± 13.3) and 52.7% were male. Complicated appendicitis refers to gangrenous and/or perforated appendix, which may lead to abscess formation and degrees of peritonitis. The outcomes viability, operative time, infection complication, operative complications, and conversion rate were chosen to evaluate the procedure. Results The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip was used in 90% of cases. The presence of appendix base necrosis was the most important factor involved in failure of the procedure. Laparoscopic knot (1.5%), laparoscopic endo-suture (3.8%) and video assisted laparotomy (4.7%) were the alternatives used in difficult cases. The mean operative time was (67.54 ± 28.13 minutes). The wound and intra-abdominal infection rates were 2.54% and 5.08%, respectively. There were no operative complications and the conversion rate was 0.85%. Conclusion The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip, in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, is a safe and effective procedure. In patients with appendix base necrosis it should be avoided in favor of other alternatives. PMID:24047531

  6. Pediatric appendicitis rupture rate: a national indicator of disparities in healthcare access.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Kathleen A; Guagliardo, Mark F

    2005-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The U.S. National Healthcare Disparities Report is a recent effort to measure and monitor racial and ethnic disparities in health and healthcare. The Report is a work in progress and includes few indicators specific to children. An indicator worthy of consideration is racial/ethnic differences in the rate of bad outcomes for pediatric acute appendicitis. Bad outcomes for this condition are indicative of poor access to healthcare, which is amenable to social and healthcare policy changes. METHODS: We analyzed the KID Inpatient Database, a nationally representative sample of pediatric hospitalization, to compare rates of appendicitis rupture between white, African American, Hispanic and Asian children. We ran weighted logistic regression models to obtain national estimates of relative odds of rupture rate for the four groups, adjusted for developmental, biological, socioeconomic, health services and hospital factors that might influence disease outcome. RESULTS: Rupture was a much more burdensome outcome than timely surgery and rupture avoidance. Rupture cases had 97% higher hospital charges and 175% longer hospital stays than non-rupture cases on average. These burdens disproportionately affected minority children, who had 24% - 38% higher odds of appendicitis rupture than white children, adjusting for age and gender. These differences were reduced, but remained significant after adjusting for other factors. CONCLUSION: The racial/ethnic disparities in pediatric appendicitis outcome are large and are preventable with timely diagnosis and surgery for all children. Furthermore, estimating this disparity using the KID survey is a relatively straightforward process. Therefore pediatric appendicitis rupture rate is a good candidate for inclusion in the National Healthcare Disparities Report. As with most other health and healthcare disparities, efforts to reduce disparities in income, wealth and access to care will most likely improve the odds of favorable

  7. Diagnostic Value of White Blood Cell and C-Reactive Protein in Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Sarac, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute appendicitis (AA) associated with acute phase reaction is the most prevalent disease which requires emergency surgery. Its delayed diagnosis and unnecessarily performed appendectomies lead to numerous complications. In our study, we aimed to detect the role of WBC and CRP in the exclusion of acute and complicated appendicitis and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric age group. Methods. Appendectomized patient groups were constructed based on the results of histological evaluation. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results. When WBC and CRP were used in combination, based on cut-off values of ≥13.1 × 10(3)/μL for WBC counts and ≥1.17 mg/dL for CRP level, diagnostic parameters were as follows: sensitivity, 98.7%; specificity, 71.3%; PPV, 50.6%; NPV, 99.5%; diagnostic accuracy, 77.6%; LR(+), 3.44; LR(-), 0.017. AUC values were 0.845 (95% CI 0.800-0.891) for WBC and 0.887 (95% CI 0.841-0.932) for CRP. Conclusions. For complicated appendicitis, CRP has the highest degree of diagnostic accuracy. The diagnosis of appendicitis should be made primarily based on clinical examination, and obviously more specific and systemic inflammatory markers are needed. Combined use of cut-off values of WBC (≥13100/μL) and CRP (≥1.17 mg/L) yields a higher sensitivity and NPV for the diagnosis of complicated appendicitis. PMID:27274988

  8. Feasibility of a Nonoperative Management Strategy for Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Minneci, Peter C; Sulkowski, Jason P; Nacion, Kristine M; Mahida, Justin B; Cooper, Jennifer N; Moss, R. Lawrence; Deans, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Background Urgent operation has been considered the only appropriate management of acute appendicitis in children for decades. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of non-operative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis in children. Study Design A prospective non-randomized clinical trial of children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis comparing non-operative management to urgent appendectomy was performed. The primary outcome is the 30-day success rate of non-operative management. Secondary outcomes include comparisons of disability days, missed school days, hospital length of stay (LOS), and measures of quality of life and healthcare satisfaction. Results Seventy-seven patients were enrolled during October 2012–October 2013; 30 chose non-operative management and 47 chose surgery. There were no significant differences in demographic or clinical characteristics. The immediate and 30-day success rates of non-operative management were 93% (n=28/30) and 90% (n=27/30). There was no evidence of progression of appendicitis to rupture at the time of surgery in the three patients that failed non-operative management. Compared to the surgery group, the non-operative group had fewer disability days (3 vs. 17 days, p<0.0001), returned to school more quickly (3 vs. 5 days, p=0.008), and exhibited higher quality of life scores in both the child (93 vs. 88, p=0.01) and the parent (96 vs. 90, p=0.03), but incurred a longer LOS (38 vs. 20 hours, p<0.0001). Conclusions Non-operative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis in children is feasible with a high 30-day success rate and short-term benefits including a quicker recovery and improved quality of life scores. Additional follow-up will allow for determination of a longer-term success rate, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24951281

  9. Role of drains in laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis at a busy county hospital.

    PubMed

    Pakula, Andrea M; Skinner, Ruby; Jones, Amber; Chung, Ray; Martin, Maureen

    2014-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) has become the treatment of choice for acute appendicitis with equal or better outcomes than traditional open appendectomy (OA). LA in patients with a gangrenous or perforated appendicitis carries increased rate of pelvic abscess formation when compared with OA. We hypothesized routine placement of pelvic drains in gangrenous or perforated appendicitis decreases pelvic abscess formation after LA. Three hundred thirty-one patients undergoing LA between January 2007 and June 2011 were reviewed. Patients with perforated or gangrenous appendicitis were included. Group I had a Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain(s) placed and Group II had no JP drain. Data included patient demographics, emergency department laboratory values and vital signs, and computed axial tomography scan findings, intra-abdominal or pelvic abscess postoperatively, interventional radiology drainage, and length of stay. Clinic follow-up notes were reviewed. One hundred forty-eight patients were identified. Forty-three patients had placement of JP drains (Group I) and 105 patients had no JP drain (Group II). Three patients (three of 43 [6%]) in Group I developed pelvic abscess and 21 of 105 (20%) patients in Group II developed pelvic abscesses requiring subsequent drainage. This was statistically significant. Patient demographics, temperature, and mean white blood count before surgery were similar. Presurgery computed tomography (CT) with appendicolith and CT with abscess were more prevalent in Group I. The use of JP drainage in patients with perforated or gangrenous appendicitis during LA has decreased rates of pelvic abscess. This was demonstrated despite the drain group having appendicolith or abscess on preoperative CT. PMID:25264664

  10. Diagnostic Value of White Blood Cell and C-Reactive Protein in Pediatric Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Sarac, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute appendicitis (AA) associated with acute phase reaction is the most prevalent disease which requires emergency surgery. Its delayed diagnosis and unnecessarily performed appendectomies lead to numerous complications. In our study, we aimed to detect the role of WBC and CRP in the exclusion of acute and complicated appendicitis and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric age group. Methods. Appendectomized patient groups were constructed based on the results of histological evaluation. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results. When WBC and CRP were used in combination, based on cut-off values of ≥13.1 × 103/μL for WBC counts and ≥1.17 mg/dL for CRP level, diagnostic parameters were as follows: sensitivity, 98.7%; specificity, 71.3%; PPV, 50.6%; NPV, 99.5%; diagnostic accuracy, 77.6%; LR(+), 3.44; LR(−), 0.017. AUC values were 0.845 (95% CI 0.800–0.891) for WBC and 0.887 (95% CI 0.841–0.932) for CRP. Conclusions. For complicated appendicitis, CRP has the highest degree of diagnostic accuracy. The diagnosis of appendicitis should be made primarily based on clinical examination, and obviously more specific and systemic inflammatory markers are needed. Combined use of cut-off values of WBC (≥13100/μL) and CRP (≥1.17 mg/L) yields a higher sensitivity and NPV for the diagnosis of complicated appendicitis. PMID:27274988