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  1. Perinatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  2. Perinatal Patient Safety Project

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Julie; McFerran, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The Perinatal Patient Safety Project (PPSP) was created as a systemic strategy for creating high-reliability perinatal units by preventing identified causes of perinatal events in the clinical setting. With developmental funding from a Garfield grant, implementation of the PPSP has been completed at four pilot sites in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Region. Its success has resulted in implementation at all perinatal units in the KPNC Region as well as being promoted by National Risk Management for nationwide implementation. PPSP emphasizes structured communication, multidisciplinary rounds, a definition of fetal well-being, and practicing for emergencies. Steps taken to create high reliability perinatal care include improved communication, patient safety focus, and satisfaction among perinatal patients, providers, and staff. PMID:21660157

  3. Perinatal depression: A clinical update.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-05-19

    Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  4. Perinatal care in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Basys, V; Liubsys, A

    1997-01-01

    The Preventive Program of Perinatal, Neonatal and Congenital Abnormalities in Lithuania was launched in 1992. That was the beginning of the reorganization of the Soviet maternal and child health care system. The first stage of the Program provided for the years 1992 through 1996 and aimed to create a system of maternal and neonatal care; to create a system of diagnosis and prevention of congenital abnormalities; to collect, process, and analyze maternal and neonatal data (to establish a new database); to evaluate, distribute, and use available resources efficiently; to plan financial and human resources for a perinatal care infrastructure; and to train medical personnel and control the level and quality of their knowledge. The reorganization was based on a three-tiered maternal and neonatal care system. By the end of 1996 the major goal of the Program was achieved successfully (i.e., perinatal, neonatal, and infant mortality rates decreased significantly. During the next 5 years the Program will focus mainly on qualitative aspects of perinatal care. PMID:9210082

  5. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26899624

  6. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  7. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  8. Countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Stembera, Z; Kravka, A; Mandys, F

    1988-01-01

    The computer laboratory of the Research Institute for the Care of Mother and Child in Prague performs annually a countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome in order to obtain a background for the preparation of the optimal strategy for improving perinatal care in CSR in the future. The total as well as weight specific perinatal mortality rate further sub-divided into early neonatal death rate and late fetal death rate and differentiated according to the birthweight, was correlated with the incidence of different factors influencing the perinatal mortality rate both countrywide and for each of the eight provinces of CSR. This way a correlation was found between some of the mentioned perinatal outcomes and e.g. instrumental equipment of obstetrical departments and neonatal intensive care units, frequency of caesarean sections, or transport of LBW newborns in incubators or "in utero" etc. The results of this analysis have proved that there still remain in some provinces opportunity for further decrease in perinatal mortality due to the incomplete observance of the two intervention strategies "Risk approach" and "New technology" which were introduced in the whole country during the last 10 years. PMID:3221298

  9. Requesting perinatal autopsy: multicultural considerations.

    PubMed

    Chichester, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    The subject of perinatal autopsy is not frequently seen in the literature. Perinatal loss, particularly stillbirth, frequently remains unexplained, despite current technology and diagnostic procedures. Parents may automatically refuse an autopsy, despite the potentially valuable information it could provide about the current pregnancy and subsequent pregnancies and despite the possible comfort the results could provide for relatives. Other reasons for declining an autopsy could be cultural or religious prohibitions. In addition, healthcare providers sometimes lack the knowledge of circumstances under which a postmortem examination is permitted, and fail to use culturally sensitive and culturally competent discussions about the reasons a postmortem examination is important and permissible. This purpose of this article is to provide information on selected cultural and religious groups to assist the nurse who is seeking consent for a perinatal autopsy. PMID:17356412

  10. PeriStats: Perinatal Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... is developed by the March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center and provides access to maternal and infant health ... on PeriStats sometimes different from my health department's data? What should I do if pop-up blocker ... We acknowledge the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its support ...

  11. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  12. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

    The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

  13. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  14. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  15. Perinatal Depression: An Update and Overview

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; “perinatal”, as opposed to “postpartum”, is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES, and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, both by the woman’s obstetrician and the baby’s pediatrician. PMID:25034859

  16. Maternal diabetes and perinatal programming.

    PubMed

    Plagemann, A

    2011-11-01

    Alterations of the intrauterine and neonatal environment may predispose for disorders and diseases throughout later life (perinatal programming). Especially, hormones and nutrients are dose-dependent organizers of the developing organism. Studies in offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) have paradigmatically contributed to the perception of this developmental principle and our understanding of causal mechanisms. Fetal and neonatal hyperinsulinism in consequence of materno-fetal hyperglycaemia is the pathognomic feature in ODM. Epidemiological, clinical, as well as experimental data indicate that both insulin and glucose, when occurring in elevated concentrations during perinatal life, may epigenetically program a predisposition for obesity and diabetes later on. Similar may occur due to pre- and neonatal overfeeding. From a clinical point of view, avoidance of materno-fetal overnutrition, universal diabetes screening in all pregnant women and adequate therapy of all forms of diabetes during pregnancy, as well as avoidance of neonatal overfeeding are therefore recommended. These measures might serve as causal approaches of a genuine prevention to the benefit of long-term offspring health. PMID:21945359

  17. Perinatal Mortality in the United States, 1950-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell-Griner, Eve

    1986-01-01

    This report describes long-term trends in perinatal mortality in the United States in three basic parts: development of perinatal mortality measures, components of fetal and infant mortality, and trends and differentials in perinatal mortality. Perinatal deaths refer to the sum of spontaneous fetal deaths occurring after 20 weeks gestation plus…

  18. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  19. [Community education in perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Ortigosa-corona, E; Martinez-sanchez, C

    1990-01-01

    The National Institute of Perinatology develops educational programs for the population using its services in order to promote positive behavior related to reproduction. One of the most frequently observed problems during prenatal control is patient abandonment of the services offered by health institutions. We present an investigation of the relationship between the educational program for pregnant women offered by the Institute and compliance with prenatal care. A group of 215 patients elected to participate in the educational program. The program consisted of themes on the evolution and culmination of the pregnancy, preparation for nursing, nutrition, developmental milestones, and dental health. Another group was selected at the same time, equal in size to the first but without participation in the course, as a control group. Both groups contained patients categorized in the 3 perinatal risk groups accepted by the Institute. PMID:12283076

  20. Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

  1. Perinatal depression treatment preferences among Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Wisner, Katherine L; Burns, Rachel M; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego

    2014-02-01

    The study described here was designed to determine treatment preferences among Latinas to identify treatment options that meet their needs and increase their engagement. Focus group interviews were conducted with 22 prenatal and postpartum Latinas at risk for depression. The group interviews were conducted in Spanish and English using a standardized interview protocol. Focus group transcripts were analyzed to identify themes regarding perinatal depression coping strategies, preferred approaches to treating perinatal depression, and recommendations for engaging perinatal Latinas in treatment. The results suggest that Latinas' treatment preferences consist of a pathway (i.e., hierarchical) approach that begins with the use of one's own resources, followed by the use of formal support systems (e.g., home-visiting nurse), and supplemented with the use of behavioral therapy. Antidepressant use was judged to be acceptable only in severe cases or after delivery. The data indicate that to increase health-seeking behaviors among perinatal Latinas, practitioners should first build trust. PMID:24469693

  2. Sex and Pregnancy: A Perinatal Educator's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    2000-01-01

    This article is a continuation in the author's growing series of articles on intimacy and sexuality in the transition to parenthood and its relationship with perinatal education. So many couples in the author's perinatal education practice feel that health professionals are uncomfortable discussing sex and pregnancy. Indeed, the couples have so many questions and concerns regarding this subject; they are seeking answers so that they may better understand and cope with the changes in this aspect of their relationship. Perinatal education group encounters or special sessions are the ideal setting to discuss intimacy and sexuality during pregnancy. The objectives of this article are to provide the perinatal educator with content for the group sessions and tools for teaching strategies and activities. PMID:17273227

  3. Strategies for developing an evidence-based approach to perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K R; Knox, G E

    1999-01-01

    Today more than ever perinatal care providers must work together to develop practice patterns that will contribute to the best possible outcomes for women and newborns. Financial and human resource allocation are under intense scrutiny in most hospitals. Although the fundamental goals of health care institutions are to maximize health while conserving resources, unfortunately, these goals are often in conflict. Perinatal practice must be based on the combined weight of all available evidence rather than "the way we've always done it." Health care institutions that continue doing business as usual are not likely to survive. Using both clinical and financial data, routine perinatal practices without a scientific basis that establish a contribution to improved outcomes can be reevaluated, while practices that have been shown to be beneficial can be enhanced and supported. The first step in developing a standards and evidence-based approach to perinatal care is the establishment of a practice committee in which communication is open and direct and there exists a respect for the contributions of members from all related disciplines. True collaboration and communication between physicians and nurses is the foundation for establishing and implementing best practices. Fortunately, a growing body of research regarding the pros and cons of various perinatal practices is beginning to emerge; this research can be used by knowledgeable, informed perinatal professionals to advocate for a clinically appropriate approach to fiscal prudence. Commitment to practice based on standards and evidence is an ongoing process and may require substantial changes and more professional energy than the usual methods of implementing and evaluating changes in patient care routines. However, the initial investment in time to collaborate and become oriented to this process is worth the effort. PMID:10326315

  4. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  5. Perinatal risk factors and later social, thought, and attention problems after perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Harbert, Mary J; Jett, Micaela; Appelbaum, Mark; Nass, Ruth; Trauner, Doris A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Survivors of perinatal stroke may be at risk for behavioral problems. Perinatal risk factors that might increase the likelihood of later behavior problems have not been identified. The goal of this study was to explore whether perinatal factors might contribute to behavior problems after perinatal stroke. Methods. 79 children with unilateral perinatal stroke were studied. Perinatal factors included gender, gestational age, neonatal seizures, instrumented delivery, fetal distress, acute birth problems, birth weight, and time of diagnosis. Subjects with evidence of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were excluded. Parents completed the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (Achenbach 1985). The CBCL yields T-scores in several symptom scales. We focused on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scates. Results. Gestational age and the presence of uteroplacental insufficiency were associated with significant differences on the Thought Problems scale; Attention Problems scores approached significance for these variables. Fetal distress, neonatal seizures, or neonatal diagnosis was associated with 25-30% incidence of clinically significant T-scores on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scales. Conclusions. Several perinatal factors were associated with a high incidence of social, thought, and behavior problems in children with perinatal stroke. These findings may be useful in anticipatory guidance to parents and physicians caring for these children. PMID:22685688

  6. Fourth goal of perinatal medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ounsted, C; Roberts, J C; Gordon, M; Milligan, B

    1982-01-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality, infant mortality, and infant morbidity have been successively the goals of perinatal medicine. The fourth is to reduce bonding failure. In July 1978 a preventive service was started in the John Radcliffe Maternity Hospital. A twice-weekly round is made. Midwives refer families who cause them concern. In the first year the referral rate ws 20.5 per 1000 liveborn babies. The referred sample differed from the hospital population in terms of maternal psychiatric history, marital state and babies' admission to special care. The main reasons for referral were: doubt about parenting ability (27%), psychiatric history (15%), disturbed behaviour in hospital (14%), and diffuse social and medical problems (17%). Long-term care was needed for only 14% of families. At their first birthdays, six babies were placed away from their natural parents; the sample had had a slightly higher than expected admission rate to hospital; the distribution of weights did not differ from the expected; doctors and health visitors were still concerned about one-quarter of the families. Seven cases of screening failure were found among those not referred to our service, but only one was seriously abused. No child referred in the first year has been seriously neglected or abused. PMID:6802338

  7. Language Impairment in Children Perinatally Infected with HIV Compared to Children Who Were HIV-Exposed and Uninfected

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mabel L.; Buchanan, Ashley L.; Siberry, George K; Malee, Kathleen M.; Zeldow, Bret; Frederick, Toni; Purswani, Murli U.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Sirois, Patricia A.; Smith, Renee; Torre, Peter; Allison, Susannah M; Williams, Paige L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk for language impairment in children perinatally infected or exposed to HIV. Methods We evaluated the prevalence of language impairment (LI) in 7–16 year old children with perinatal HIV infection (HIV+) compared to children HIV-exposed and uninfected (HEU), using a comprehensive standardized language test (CELF-4). LI was classified as primary LI (Pri-LI) (monolingual English exposure and no cognitive or hearing impairment), concurrent LI (Con-LI) (cognitive or hearing impairment), or no LI. Associations of demographic, caregiver, HIV disease and antiretroviral treatment (ART) factors with LI category were evaluated using univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 468 children with language assessments, 184 (39%) had LI. No difference was observed by HIV infection status for overall LI or for Pri-LI or Con-LI; mean (SD) CELF-4 scores were 88.5 (18.4) for HIV+ vs 87.5 (17.9) for HEU. After adjustment, Black children had higher odds of Pri-LI vs no LI (aOR=2.43, p=0.03). Children who were Black, Hispanic, had a caregiver with low education or low IQ, or a non-biological parent as caregiver had higher odds of Con-LI vs no LI. Among HIV+ children, viral load >400 copies/ml (aOR=3.04, p<0.001), CDC Class C (aOR=2.19, p=0.02) and ART initiation <6 months of age (aOR=2.12, p=0.02) were associated with higher odds of Con-LI vs. no LI. Conclusions Children perinatally exposed to HIV are at high risk for LI, but such risk was not increased for youth with HIV. Risk factors differed for Pri-LI and Con-LI. PMID:22179050

  8. Perinatal Practices & Traditions Among Asian Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    As the population in the United States grows more diverse, nurses caring for childbearing women must be aware of the many cultural traditions and customs unique to their patients. This knowledge and insight supports women and their families with the appropriate care, information, and resources. A supportive relationship builds trust, offers guidance, and allows for the new family to integrate information from nurses and other healthcare providers with the practice of certain perinatal cultural traditions. The Asian Indian culture is rich in tradition, specifically during the perinatal period. To support the cultural beliefs and practices of Asian Indian women during this time, nurses need to be aware of and consider multiple factors. Many women are navigating the new role of motherhood while making sense of and incorporating important cultural rituals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of perinatal cultural practices and traditions specific to the Asian Indian culture that perinatal nurses may observe in the clinical setting. Cultural traditions and practices specific to the pregnancy and postpartum period are described together with symbolism and implications for nursing practice. It is important to note that information regarding perinatal customs is provided in an effort to promote culturally sensitive nursing care and may not pertain to all Asian Indian women living in the United States. PMID:26909722

  9. Inflammatory and Epigenetic Pathways for Perinatal Depression.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Mathews, Herbert L; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2016-05-01

    Depression during the perinatal period is common and can have adverse consequences for women and their children. Yet, the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying perinatal depression are not known. Adverse early life experiences increase the risk for adult depression. One potential mechanism by which this increased risk occurs is epigenetic embedding of inflammatory pathways. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual model that explicates the linkage between early life adversity and the risk for maternal depression. The model posits that early life adversity embeds a proinflammatory epigenetic signature (altered DNA methylation) that predisposes vulnerable women to depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period. As proposed, women with a history of early life adversity are more likely to exhibit higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and lower levels of oxytocin in response to the demands of pregnancy and new motherhood, both of which are associated with the risk for perinatal depression. The model is designed to guide investigations into the biobehavioral basis for perinatal depression, with emphasis upon the impact of early life adversity. Testing this model will provide a better understanding of maternal depressive risk and improve identification of vulnerable women who would benefit from targeted interventions that can reduce the impact of perinatal depression on maternal-infant health. PMID:26574573

  10. Neonatal-perinatal medicine: Diseases of the fetus and infant

    SciTech Connect

    Fanaroff, A.A.; Martin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 40 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Perinatal services and resources; Diabetes in pregnancy; Erythroblastosis fetalis; Placental pathology; Genetic disease and chromosomal abnormalities; Perinatal ultrasound; and Diagnostic imaging.

  11. Perinatal Health Statistics as the Basis for Perinatal Quality Assessment in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Urelija; Filipović-Grčić, Boris; Đelmiš, Josip; Glivetić, Tatjana; Juras, Josip; Mustapić, Željka; Grizelj, Ruža

    2015-01-01

    Context. Perinatal mortality indicators are considered the most important measures of perinatal outcome. The indicators reliability depends on births and deaths reporting and recording. Many publications focus on perinatal deaths underreporting and misclassification, disabling proper international comparisons. Objective. Description of perinatal health care quality assessment key indicators in Croatia. Methods. Retrospective review of reports from all maternities from 2001 to 2014. Results. According to reporting criteria for birth weight ≥500 g, perinatal mortality (PNM) was reduced by 31%, fetal mortality (FM) by 32%, and early neonatal mortality (ENM) by 29%. According to reporting criteria for ≥1000 g, PNM was reduced by 43%, FM by 36%, and ENM by 54%. PNM in ≥22 weeks' (wks) gestational age (GA) was reduced by 28%, FM by 30%, and ENM by 26%. The proportion of FM at 32–36 wks GA and at term was the highest between all GA subgroups, as opposed to ENM with the highest proportion in 22–27 wks GA. Through the period, the maternal mortality ratio varied from 2.4 to 14.3/100,000 live births. The process indicators have been increased in number by more than half since 2001, the caesarean deliveries from 11.9% in 2001 to 19.6% in 2014. Conclusions. The comprehensive perinatal health monitoring represents the basis for the perinatal quality assessment. PMID:26693484

  12. Substance Use in the Perinatal Period.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-11-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these, contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health, and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  13. The perinatal assessment of psychosocial risk.

    PubMed

    Haglund, L J; Britton, J R

    1998-06-01

    Although evaluation of psychosocial risk factors prior to perinatal hospital discharge has been advocated, the means for accomplishing such an evaluation are not well established. This article reviews several major psychosocial risk factors together with instruments that have been utilized to assess them during the perinatal period. Formal constructs reviewed include anxiety, depression, self-concept, general attitudes, life events, stress, adaptation, social support, marital and family functioning, and the home environment. Ongoing assessment of psychosocial status using formal instruments during routine perinatal care may provide a more complete picture of the psychosocial needs of the individual mother and her family, allowing for more appropriate, timely intervention and utilization of social and health care resources. PMID:9647002

  14. Perinatal episodes across the mood disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Arianna; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Heron, Jess; Jones, Lisa; Craddock, Nicholas; Jones, Ian

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Affective disorders are common in women, with many episodes having an onset in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE To investigate the occurrence and timing of perinatal mood episodes in women with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and recurrent major depression (RMD). SETTING AND PATIENTS Women were recruited in our ongoing research on the genetic and nongenetic determinants of major affective disorders. Participants were interviewed and case notes were reviewed. Best-estimate diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV criteria. The 1785 parous women identified included 1212 women with bipolar disorder (980 with type I and 232 with type II) and 573 with RMD. Data were available on 3017 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report the lifetime occurrence of perinatal mood episodes, the rates of perinatal episodes per pregnancy/postpartum period, and the timing of the onset of episodes in relation to delivery. RESULTS More than two-thirds of all diagnostic groups reported at least 1 lifetime episode of illness during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Women with bipolar I disorder reported an approximately 50% risk of a perinatal major affective episode per pregnancy/postpartum period. Risks were lower in women with RMD or bipolar II disorder, at approximately 40% per pregnancy/postpartum period. Mood episodes were significantly more common in the postpartum period in bipolar I disorder and RMD. Most perinatal episodes occurred within the first postpartum month, with mania or psychosis having an earlier onset than depression. CONCLUSIONS Although episodes of postpartum mood disorder are more common in bipolar I disorder and manic and psychotic presentations occur earlier in the postpartum period, perinatal episodes are highly prevalent across the mood disorder spectrum. PMID:23247604

  15. Essential program components for perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, L

    1994-10-01

    Home care will continue to be a rapidly expanding area of health care. This growth will be evident in the perinatal nursing specialty. There are multiple models for delivery of perinatal home services. In each case, consideration needs to be given to licensing and other standards; to operational areas such as staffing, supplies, equipment, and reimbursement; and to quality issues, such as staff development, internal and external customer service, and a continuous quality improvement program. Successful marketing of the services requires recognition that the product is nursing care. PMID:7836991

  16. A pathologist׳s perspective on the perinatal autopsy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M

    2015-02-01

    The perinatal autopsy is an important tool in the investigation of fetal and neonatal death, and a complete understanding of its risks and benefits is necessary for providers of perinatal care. This review, from the perspective of a perinatal pathologist, reports the details of the autopsy procedure, its goals, its value to individual patients and the health care system in general, and its alternatives. Even with new emerging technologies, the conventional perinatal autopsy remains the gold standard for determining the cause of death and the final summary of all pathologic findings. Therefore, the information provided in this review can help providers properly convey information about perinatal autopsy to bereaved families. PMID:25511296

  17. Perinatal mortality--an analysis of causes and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neeru

    2011-04-01

    Perinatal mortality is the most sensitive index while imparting healthcare to mother during pregnancy and delivery and also to the baby in perinatal period. Perinatal mortality is higher in rural areas than in urban areas. Worldover perinatal or infant mortality rate is on decline. Developed countries are ahead of developing nations in giving good antenatal, intrapartal as well as neonatal care. Factors responsible for perinatal mortality in Indian context lie in sociodemographic, maternal and foetal aspects. Regional differences also are there in India while assessing perinatal mortality and delivery practices. The lacunae are to be identified while recommending strategies to be taken to lower the perinatal mortality. A community based data system should be developed so that the information should flow from down to above, from village to subcentre to primary health centre and further from district to state. Some newborns need special care. Since newborns need early recognition of danger signs and prompt treatment measures. PMID:22187796

  18. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    PubMed Central

    Essen, Birgitta; Bodker, Birgit; Sjoberg, N-O; Gudmundsson, Saemundur; Ostergren, P-O; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women. PMID:12219153

  19. Perinatal Major Depression Biomarkers: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Serati, M; Redaelli, M; Buoli, M; Altamura, A C

    2016-03-15

    Postpartum depression, now termed perinatal depression by the DSM-5, is a clinically relevant disorder reaching 15% of incidence. Although it is quite frequent and associated with high social dysfunction, only recently its underpinning biological pathways have been explored, while multiple and concomitant risk factors have been identified (e.g. psychosocial stress). Peripartum depression usually has its onset during the third trimester of pregnancy or in the postpartum, being one of the most common medical complications in new mothers. Purpose of the present review is to summarize the state of art of biological biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of perinatal depression, in view of the fact that suboptimal prenatal milieu can induce permanent damage in subsequent offspring life and have a negative impact on mother-child relationship. Furthermore, parents' biological changes due to medical/psychiatric disorders or stress exposure could influence offspring life: a concept known as 'intergenerational transmission', acting by variations into gametes and the gestational uterine environment. Given the evidence that perinatal mental disorders involve risks for the mother and offspring, the search for reliable biomarkers in high-risk mothers actually represents a medical priority to prevent perinatal depression. PMID:26802316

  20. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Arsenic and Perinatal Outcomes
    DT Lobdell, Z Ning, RK Kwok, JL Mumford, ZY Liu, P Mendola

    Many studies have documented an association between drinking water arsenic (DWA) and cancer, vascular diseases, and dermatological outcomes, but few have investigate...

  1. Ethical Issues in Perinatal Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Anna R.; Shivakumar, Geetha; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen J.; Sadler, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review To review the background of current ethical standards for the conduct of perinatal mental health research and describe the ethical challenges in this research domain. Recent Findings Current literature reflects a growing sentiment in the scientific community that having no information regarding the impact of psychiatric treatment on the mother and developing fetus/infant poses dangers that may exceed the risks involved in research. However, without sufficient consensus across the scientific community, both regulatory bodies and perinatal researchers find themselves without a framework for decision making that satisfactorily limits the risks and facilitates the benefits of participation of pregnant and lactating women in clinical research. Summary Psychiatric research in perinatal mental health is critically important as it enables clinicians and patients to participate in informed decision-making concerning treatment for psychiatric disorders. Specific areas of concern include fetal safety, maternal risk, the therapeutic misconception, commercial interests, forensic/legal issues, the informed consent process, and study design. Developing guidelines that address ethical challenges and include the views and concerns of multiple stakeholders could improve the access of perinatal women to the benefits of participation in mental health research in addition to providing evidence-based mental health care for this subpopulation. PMID:19734786

  2. Perinatal home care: one entrepreneur's experience.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D G

    1994-10-01

    Nurses have responded to the entrepreneurial movement by entering into various nontraditional roles and starting their own businesses. This article describes the author's experience in establishing a perinatal home-care business. The characteristics of women and nurse entrepreneurs are discussed, as are the components of a business plan and how to manage a business. PMID:7836999

  3. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  4. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  5. Nutritional Interventions in Depression and Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Humphries, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the leading cause of mental disability worldwide. Women who are depressed during pregnancy are at a higher risk for preterm delivery, preeclampsia, birth difficulties, and postpartum depression. The treatment of depression in conventional medicine has focused on physiological factors that lead to impaired neurotransmitter function and treatments to improve neurotransmitter function. Pharmaceutical substances pose risks for pregnant and lactating women, and lower risk options are preferred. Micronutrients, including certain B vitamins, folate, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in the synthesis and absorption of neurotransmitters. Experimental studies suggest that supplementation with specific micronutrients may alleviate depressive symptoms and improve birth outcomes in patients with perinatal depression. Alternative treatments for depression, including nutritional supplements, are an important treatment option for depressive symptoms while limiting potential side effects and treatment costs. This article explores the biological basis of perinatal depression and reviews the potential benefits of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:23766734

  6. Bisphenol A: Perinatal exposure and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Beverly S.; Soto, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a component of polycarbonate and other plastics including resins that line food and beverage containers. BPA is known to leach from products in contact with food and drink, and is therefore thought to be routinely ingested. In a recent cross sectional study, BPA was detected in urine samples from 92.6% of the US population examined. The potential for BPA to influence body weight is suggested by in vitro studies demonstrating effects of BPA on adipocyte differentiation, lipid accumulation, glucose transport and adiponectin secretion. Data from in vivo studies have revealed dose-dependent and sex dependent effects on body weight in rodents exposed perinatally to BPA. The mechanisms through which perinatal BPA exposure acts to exert persistent effects on body weight and adiposity remain to be determined. Possible targets of BPA action are discussed. PMID:19433248

  7. Etiological analysis of presumed perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Canan; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the maternal, pre- and perinatal, and prothrombotic factors with congenital hemiparesis due to presumed perinatal stroke (PPS). Prothrombotic risk factors including protein C and S, antithrombin III, lipoprotein (a), homocystein, factor VIII levels; anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant; methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutations were investigated. Arterial ischemic stroke was detected in 60% and periventricular venous infarction in 40%. At least one prothrombotic risk factor was present in 69%, two in 17%, and three or more in 8.5% of cases. The most common combination was methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and factor V Leiden heterozygosity. The etiology and pathogenesis of PPS is still unclear. According to this study, most of the patients with PPS might have one or more prothrombotic risk factors and certain prenatal risk factors including intrauterine growth retardation, twin gestation and preeclampsia might be related to PPS. PMID:21561729

  8. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population. PMID:10859856

  9. Sleep and perinatal mood disorders: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lori E.; Murray, Brian J.; Steiner, Meir

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are recognized as times of vulnerability to mood disorders, including postpartum depression and psychosis. Recently, changes in sleep physiology and sleep deprivation have been proposed as having roles in perinatal psychiatric disorders. In this article we review what is known about changes in sleep physiology and behaviour during the perinatal period, with a focus on the relations between sleep and postpartum “blues,” depression and psychosis and on sleep-based interventions for the treatment and prevention of perinatal mood disorders. The interaction between sleep and perinatal mood disorders is significant, but evidence-based research in this field is limited. Studies that measure both sleep and mood during the perinatal period, particularly those that employ objective measurement tools such as polysomnography and actigraphy, will provide important information about the causes, prevention and treatment of perinatal mood disorders. PMID:16049568

  10. Perinatal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Fauveau, V; Wojtyniak, B; Mostafa, G; Sarder, A M; Chakraborty, J

    1990-09-01

    Perinatal deaths, comprising stillbirths and deaths during the first week of life, were monitored over the eight-year period 1979 to 1986 in a rural Bangladeshi population of 196,000. The perinatal mortality rate was 75 per 1000 total births. The rate was 13% higher in males than females. Stillbirth and early neonatal mortality rates were 37 and 38 per 1000 total births, respectively. The major causes of perinatal deaths are presented, as well as some of the maternal determinants. During the period under study, perinatal mortality declined regularly and significantly over time in an area covered by an intensive Family Planning and Health Services programme, but not in the adjacent control area. This raises the issue of the impact of such a programme upon perinatal mortality, and the need to include a strong maternity care component into primary healthcare strategies if further reductions of perinatal mortality are to be achieved. PMID:2262255

  11. Specific ultrasonographic features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Zankl, Andreas; Mornet, Etienne; Wong, Shell

    2008-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PL-HPH) by ultrasonography is difficult as PL-HPH must be differentiated from other skeletal dysplasias with short long bones and poor mineralization of the skeleton, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II and achondrogenesis/hypochondrogenesis. Here we present a case of molecularly confirmed PL-HPH and illustrate specific ultrasonographic findings that help to distinguish PL-HPH from similar conditions. PMID:18386808

  12. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  13. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  14. Behavioural outcomes of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    McAllister, B B; Kiryanova, V; Dyck, R H

    2012-12-13

    During and following pregnancy, women are at considerable risk of experiencing depression. For treatment, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed, yet the potential effects of perinatal exposure to these drugs on the brain and behaviour have not been examined in humans beyond childhood. This is despite abundant evidence from studies using rodents indicating that altered serotonin levels early in life affect neurodevelopment and behavioural outcomes. These reported effects on behaviour are inconsistent, however, and the testing of females has often been overlooked. In the present study, the behavioural outcomes of female mice perinatally (embryonic day 15 to postnatal day 12) treated with fluoxetine (25mg/kg/day) via a non-stressful method of maternal administration were assessed using a battery of tests. Maternal treatment resulted in subtle alterations in anxiety-like and depression-like behaviour in early adulthood, with a decrease in both types of behaviour as well as body weight. Though altered anxiety and depression have previously been reported in this area of research, decreased anxiety is a novel finding. While there was little effect of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment on many of the behaviours assessed, the capacity to alter "emotional" behaviours in mice has implications with regard to research on human infant fluoxetine exposure. PMID:23000627

  15. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:20530101

  16. Action plan to reduce perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    The government of India has set a goal of reducing perinatal mortality from its current rate of 48/1000 to 30-35/1000 by the year 2000. Perinatal deaths result from maternal malnutrition, inadequate prenatal care, complications of delivery, and infections in the postpartum period. Since reductions in perinatal mortality require attention to social, economic, and behavioral factors, as well as improvements in the health care delivery system, a comprehensive strategy is required. Social measures, such as raising the age at marriage to 18 years for females, improving the nutritional status of adolescent girls, reducing the strenuousness of work during pregnancy, improving female literacy, raising women's status in the society and thus in the family, and poverty alleviation programs, would all help eliminate the extent of complications of pregnancy. Measures required to enhance infant survival include improved prenatal care, prenatal tetanus toxoid immunization, use of sterile disposable cord care kits, the provision of mucus extractors and resuscitation materials to birth attendants, the creation of neonatal care units in health facilities, and more efficient referral of high-risk newborns and mothers. Since 90% of births in rural India take place at home priority must be given to training traditional birth attendants in the identification of high risk factors during pregnancy, delivery, and the newborn period. PMID:12316585

  17. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  18. New uses of legacy systems: examples in perinatal care.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, A.; Vázquez, R.; Mendoza, G.; Zignago, A.; López, A.; Lucián, H.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, new uses of the Perinatal Information System at the Uruguayan Social Security health care facilities are described. The perinatal information system has been in place for over 13 years, with about 40 thousand clinical records on electronic files. A newly created Web interface allows a distributed access to existing perinatal information within the National Social Security Wide Area a Network. Perinatal data is also exported to a management information system, allowing to dynamically answer questions and make managerial decisions, and eventually link these data with other sources. Future steps regarding clinical information systems are outlined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10566481

  19. Dual role of astrocytes in perinatal asphyxia injury and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Romero, J; Muñiz, J; Logica Tornatore, T; Holubiec, M; González, J; Barreto, G E; Guelman, L; Lillig, C H; Blanco, E; Capani, F

    2014-04-17

    Perinatal asphyxia represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. However, at the moment, most of the therapeutic strategies were not well targeted toward the processes that induced the brain injury during perinatal asphyxia. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related with the damage mechanisms of perinatal asphyxia. In this work, we propose to review possible protective as well as deleterious roles of astrocytes in the asphyctic brain with the aim to stimulate further research in this area of perinatal asphyxia still not well studied. PMID:24172702

  20. Treatment of severe perinatal mood disorders on a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Mary C; Lara-Cinisomo, S; Melvin, K; Di Florio, A; Brandon, A; Meltzer-Brody, S

    2016-08-01

    Perinatal patients with bipolar and psychotic mood disorder exacerbations are challenging to treat and often receive suboptimal care. We sought to examine the treatment patterns and outcomes on one of the only US-based Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Units (PPIU). Perinatal patients admitted to the PPIU completed self-report measures at admission and before discharge. Retrospective chart reviews extracted history, diagnoses (current and past), and medication treatment. Patients who had discharge diagnoses of bipolar disorder, major depression with psychotic features, or postpartum psychosis were included. Forty-seven met the diagnostic inclusion criteria. Over an average length of stay (ALOS) of 9.96 days, there was significant improvement in depressive and anxiety symptoms and daily functioning (Work and Social Adjustment Scale). Psychiatric comorbidity was common. Polypharmacy was utilized in 87 %. The most common medications prescribed at discharge were antipsychotics, alone or in combination with mood stabilizers or antidepressants. ECT was performed in 10 % of cases. The complexity of patients with severe mood disorders or psychosis admitted to the PPIU supports individualized treatment plans that address both primary diagnosis and psychiatric comorbidities. Our results provide important information that can be disseminated to others to improve clinical outcomes for severe perinatal mood disorders. PMID:26802019

  1. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  2. Modifying CBT for Perinatal Depression: What Do Women Want?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahen, Heather; Fedock, Gina; Henshaw, Erin; Himle, Joseph A.; Forman, Jane; Flynn, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for depression during the perinatal period is mixed. This was a qualitative study that aimed to understand the perinatal-specific needs of depressed women in an effort to inform treatment modifications that may increase the relevance and acceptability of CBT during this period. Stratified purposeful sampling…

  3. Community Conversations with Parents to Improve Perinatal Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The state of Indiana took a unique approach to developing a statewide plan to improve perinatal health outcomes by engaging parents in a series of focus groups, called Community Conversations in Perinatal Care (CCPC), to hear directly from consumers about their health care experiences and needs. Recognizing that disparities exist among different…

  4. Perinatal Screening for Chagas Disease in Southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Morven S; Rench, Marcia A; Todd, Charles W; Czaicki, Nancy; Steurer, Francis J; Bern, Caryn; Montgomery, Susan P

    2015-03-01

    Perinatal screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in a cohort of 4000 predominantly Hispanic women in southern Texas revealed that Chagas disease occurs with sufficient frequency (0.25%) that targeted perinatal screening should be considered to identify infected mothers and infants at risk for congenital infection. PMID:26407360

  5. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%–10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%–10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother–infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  6. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  7. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  8. Incarceration, Maternal Hardship, and Perinatal Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Dora M.; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. Methods We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Results Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had 0.86 the odds (95% CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Conclusions Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the U.S. simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

  9. Integrating Marriage Education into Perinatal Education

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alan J.; Gilliland, Tamara; Christiaens, Glenda; Carroll, Jason S.

    2002-01-01

    Couples making the transition to parenthood experience challenges that can threaten the quality and stability of their relationships and the health of family members. Currently, the educational infrastructure to support the delivery of couple-relationship education during the transition to parenthood is limited. Because new-parent couples interact with the health care system at many points during this transition time, an opportunity exists for strengthening couple relationships within the system to improve the well-being of adults and children. In this article, we propose a productive collaboration between marriage/couple educators and health care systems to integrate couple-relationship education into the standard of perinatal care. PMID:17273316

  10. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized. PMID:26902445

  11. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission

  12. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder. PMID:22646662

  13. Perinatal Asphyxia I: Pathogenesis of Multisystemic Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Fomufod, Antoine K.; Rahbar, Fariborz; White, Penny L.; Holloway, Albert Z.; Rampersaud, Swami R.; Henry, Lionel A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical and pathologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia manifested by 17 neonates treated at Howard University Hospital over an 18-month period. Multiple systemic complications, occurring in 76.5 percent of the patients, were the rule rather than the exception. All vital organs were involved, singly or in combination. Understanding the pathogenesis and extent of these complications is of utmost importance not only to those rendering health care to acutely ill newborns, but also to those responsible for prenatal and maternal intrapartum care. PMID:537116

  14. [Differences in perinatal mortality between provinces: dependence on many factors].

    PubMed

    Bonsel, Gouke J; Steegers, Eric A P

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch perinatal mortality rate is relatively high when viewed in a European perspective. There appear to be also substantial differences in perinatal mortality between provinces, large cities and even between neighbourhoods. Accumulation of obstetric risk factors as well as socioeconomic and urban risks seems to be involved as well. This should be taken into account in the process of risk selection to define a high risk population needing hospital care. In 85% of all cases of perinatal mortality, one or more of the following perinatal morbidities are present, designated as the 'Big 4': congenital abnormalities, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction and low Apgar score (< 7; 5 min after birth). Differences in perinatal mortality, the evaluation of organisational features of care and determinants like travel time from home to hospital should always be related to the case mix represented by this 'Big 4'. PMID:21382215

  15. Some observations on perinatal mortality in rural health centre.

    PubMed

    Damodar; Mathur, H N; Sharma, P N

    1983-01-01

    A 4-year study of perinatal mortality in Rural Health Training Centre, Vallabhnagar, affiliated to R.N.T. Medical College, Udaipur was conducted. The chief objective of the study was to analyze underlying causes of perinatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was calculated to be 74.19/100 births. Age and parity of mother and sex of the child did not affect perinatal mortality significantly. Antenatal care of mother had a significant role in determining fetal outcome and 1st week survival. Fate of the newborn was substantially affected by birth weight less than 2 kg. Training of "dais" in view of identification of "at risk" cases and nutrition education, better facilities in terms of personnel and equipment, and improvement in referral services emerged as necessary steps needed to plan strategy for lowering perinatal mortaltiy in rural areas. PMID:6680112

  16. Perinatal mortality in a rural district of south India.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, S; Rao, R S; Chakladar, B K; Krishnan, L; Nair, N S

    1998-01-01

    Perinatal mortality is one of the most sensitive indices of maternal and child health. The perinatal mortality rate is an indicator of the extent of pregnancy wastage as well as of the quality and quantity of health care available to the mother and the newborn. A community based prospective study carried out on 13,214 births in South Kanara district between Oct. 1991-Sept. 1992 revealed a perinatal mortality rate (PNMR) of 44.65/1000 births. Among the various factors influencing perinatal mortality, breech deliveries and babies of multiple pregnancies had a very high perinatal mortality rate of 180.81/1000 births (adjusted odd's ratio: 4.90) and 128/1000 births (adjusted odd's ratio: 2.64). The previous bad obstetric history of the mother, parity and sex of the newborn were among the other important factors influencing the PNMR. PMID:10773926

  17. Perinatal depression: a review of US legislation and law.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ann M; Segre, Lisa S

    2013-08-01

    Accumulating research documenting the prevalence and negative effects of perinatal depression, together with highly publicized tragic critical incidents of suicide and filicide by mothers with postpartum psychosis, have fueled a continuum of legislation. Specialists in perinatal mental health should recognize how their work influences legislative initiatives and penal codes, and take this into consideration when developing perinatal services and research. Yet, without legal expertise, the status of legislative initiatives can be confusing. To address this shortfall, we assembled an interdisciplinary team of academics specializing in law, as well as perinatal mental health, to summarize these issues. This review presents the relevant federal and state legislation and summarizes the criminal codes that governed the court decisions on cases in which a mother committed filicide because of postpartum psychosis. Moreover, the review aims to help researchers and providers who specialize in perinatal depression understand their role in this legal landscape. PMID:23740222

  18. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin. PMID:26446909

  19. Perinatal Bereavement: A Principle-based Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    FENSTERMACHER, Kimberly; HUPCEY, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of perinatal bereavement. Background The concept of perinatal bereavement emerged in the scientific literature during the 1970s. Perinatal bereavement is a practice based concept, although it is not well defined in the scientific literature and is often intermingled with the concepts of mourning and grief. Design Concept Analysis. Data Sources Using the term ‘perinatal bereavement’ and limits of only English and human, Pub Med and CINAHL were searched to yield 278 available references dating from 1974 – 2011. Articles specific to the experience of perinatal bereavement were reviewed. The final data set was 143 articles. Review Methods The methods of principle-based concept analysis were used. Results reveal conceptual components (antecedents, attributes and outcomes) which are delineated to create a theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement. Results The concept is epistemologically immature, with few explicit definitions to describe the phenomenon. Inconsistency in conceptual meaning threatens the construct validity of measurement tools for perinatal bereavement and contributes to incongruent theoretical definitions. This has implications for both nursing science (how the concept is studied and theoretically integrated) and clinical practice (timing and delivery of support interventions). Conclusions Perinatal bereavement is a multifaceted global phenomenon that follows perinatal loss. Lack of conceptual clarity and lack of a clearly articulated conceptual definition impede the synthesis and translation of research findings into practice. A theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement is offered as a platform for researchers to advance the concept through research and theory development. PMID:23458030

  20. Current concepts in perinatal mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2016-01-01

    The serum levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphate are maintained higher in the fetus than in the pregnant mother, especially in late gestation, to meet the demands of fetal bone development. In order to maintain this fetal stage-specific mineral homeostasis, the placenta plays a critical role through active transcellular mineral transport. Although the molecular mechanism of transplacental Ca transport has been well studied, little is known about the transport mechanism of phosphate and magnesium. Maternal mineral homeostasis is also altered during pregnancy to supply minerals to the fetus. In the lactating mother, osteocytic osteolysis is suggested to be involved in the supply of minerals to the baby. The levels of some calcitropic and phosphotropic (Ca- and phosphate-regulating, respectively) hormones in the fetus are also different from those in the adult. The PTH level in the fetus is lower than that in the mother and nonpregnant adult. It is suggested, however, that low fetal PTH plays an important role in fetal mineral metabolism. The concentration of PTHrP in the fetus is much higher than that of PTH and plays a critical role in perinatal Ca homeostasis. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms for fetal stage-specific mineral metabolism will lead to better management of perinatal patients with mineral abnormalities. PMID:26865750

  1. Current concepts in perinatal mineral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The serum levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphate are maintained higher in the fetus than in the pregnant mother, especially in late gestation, to meet the demands of fetal bone development. In order to maintain this fetal stage-specific mineral homeostasis, the placenta plays a critical role through active transcellular mineral transport. Although the molecular mechanism of transplacental Ca transport has been well studied, little is known about the transport mechanism of phosphate and magnesium. Maternal mineral homeostasis is also altered during pregnancy to supply minerals to the fetus. In the lactating mother, osteocytic osteolysis is suggested to be involved in the supply of minerals to the baby. The levels of some calcitropic and phosphotropic (Ca- and phosphate-regulating, respectively) hormones in the fetus are also different from those in the adult. The PTH level in the fetus is lower than that in the mother and nonpregnant adult. It is suggested, however, that low fetal PTH plays an important role in fetal mineral metabolism. The concentration of PTHrP in the fetus is much higher than that of PTH and plays a critical role in perinatal Ca homeostasis. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms for fetal stage-specific mineral metabolism will lead to better management of perinatal patients with mineral abnormalities. PMID:26865750

  2. Disasters and Perinatal Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harville, EW; Xiong, X; Buekens, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The empirical literature on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period is limited. The objective of this review was to examine the existing evidence on the effect of disasters on perinatal health. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycInfo), including literature on disasters and pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, low birthweight, congenital anomalies), mental health, and child development. 110 articles were identified, but many published reports were anecdotes or recommendations rather than systematic studies. The final review included 49 peer-reviewed studies that met inclusion criteria. Results Studies addressing the World Trade Center disaster of September 11th and other terrorist attacks, environmental/chemical disasters, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes were identified. Disasters of various types may reduce fetal growth in some women, though there does not appear to be an effect on gestational age at birth. Severity of exposure is the major predictor of mental health issues among pregnant and postpartum women. The mother's mental health after a disaster may more strongly influence on child development than any direct effect of disaster-related prenatal stress. Conclusions There is evidence that disaster impacts maternal mental health and some perinatal health outcomes, particular among highly-exposed women. Future research should focus on under-studied outcomes such as spontaneous abortion. Relief workers and clinicians should concentrate on the most exposed women, particularly with respect to mental health. PMID:21375788

  3. Perinatal testicular torsion and medicolegal considerations.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Troili, G M; Pelosi, M; Ricci, S

    2014-06-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) is a very complex condition because of rarity of presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. In presence of perinatal testicular torsion, the involvement of contralateral testis can be present also in absence of other indications which suggest the bilateral involvement; therefore, occurrences supported by literature do not exclude the use of surgery to avoid the risk of omitted or delayed diagnosis. The data on possible recovery of these testicles are not satisfactory, and treatment consists of an observational approach ("wait-and-see") or an interventional approach. The hypothesis of randomized clinical trials seems impracticable because of rarity of disease. The authors present a case of PTT, analyzing injuries due to clinical and surgical management of these patients, according to medicolegal profile. The delayed diagnosis and the choice of an incorrect therapeutic approach can compromise the position of healthcare professionals, defective in terms of skill, prudence and diligence. Endocrine insufficiency is an unfortunate event. The analysis of literature seems to support, because of high risk, a surgical approach aimed not only at resolution of unilateral pathology or prevention of a relapse, but also at prevention of contralateral testicular torsion. PMID:24826979

  4. [Perinatal corticosteroid therapy: modalities, efficacy, consequences].

    PubMed

    Magny, J F; Rigourd, V; Kieffer, F; Voyer, M

    2001-02-01

    During perinatal period, corticosteroid treatment has two major indications: first antenatally to improve fetal maturity and then to treat postnatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Antenatal corticosteroid treatment is widely proved to be efficient in reducing hyaline membrane disease and perinatal mortality incidence. Moreover, it has positive effects on intraventricular hemorrhage incidence, on hemodynamic failure, on persistent patent ductus arteriosus and on necrotizing enterocolitis. Side-effects are few and mild considering expected benefits and they usually occurs after multiple courses. Contra-indications are rare. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia comes with early, important and prolonged inflammatory processes. Corticotherapy allows decreasing significantly length of mechanical ventilation and oxygenotherapy among ventilated premature infants diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In the meantime, acute side-effects are frequent and benefits on mortality rate and long term outcome are not obvious. Main concern remains on possible long-term deleterious consequences on growth, lung and central nervous system development. In this field, clinical data are still insufficient as animal experimentation data promote caution and search for a minimal efficient therapeutic pathway. PMID:11240516

  5. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:26374177

  6. [Preventive vaccination strategy during the perinatal period].

    PubMed

    Pinquier, Didier; Gagneur, Amaud; Gaudelus, Joël; Marret, Stéphane

    2010-12-20

    Preventive vaccination strategy around the birth is a global approach requiring the coordination of several actors. To be efficacious, general practitioners are in the front line to provide preventive care and health education. The perinatal period represents a privileged situation from listening to this approach of vaccine prevention. The raising awareness around the birth contains several additional steps to bring to the future mother and child the best protection against infectious diseases with vaccine prevention. By being vaccinated, parents and other family members indirectly provide protection to very young infants until they are old enough to be vaccinated and so directly protected themselves. Numerous opportunities exist to make sensitive the parents in this preventive way, for them and their child, whether it is from the adolescence in the adulthood above all parental project, on the occasion of a pregnancy, at birth, during the stay in maternity hospital, or along the first weeks of the postpartum. The general practitioner is the key actor to coordinate this global approach in perinatal health around the mother, his child and his family. The arrival of the newborn will be the opportunity to update vaccinations of the whole family particularly according chicken pox, measles, rubella, whooping cough and flu vaccines. PMID:21425528

  7. Implementing a perinatal substance abuse screening tool.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Carol M; Smith, Pat Bohling; Moore, Karen

    2011-08-01

    Newborns exposed to illicit drugs or alcohol in utero can face physical, social, and emotional obstacles. Outcomes for children with fetal alcohol syndrome disorders are well documented in the literature. Data exist on the effects of maternal illicit drug use. Identifying perinatal substance abuse can increase positive outcomes for newborns and create the opportunity for mothers to access assistance through referrals to community resources.This article provides insight on how hospitals can implement an effective screening tool through patient surveying and testing, nurse education, and collaboration with community agencies in a multidisciplinary advisory committee setting.This discussed method of universal perinatal screening results in increased positive screens and increased referrals for care and support. Emphasis is placed on universal screening and testing methods. Nurses are trained in motivational interview techniques that convey empathy, listening, and objectivity. Community agencies partner with hospital staff through onsite meetings with families that determine the best discharge plan for the newborn. The multidisciplinary advisory committee meets continually to discuss future enhancements. PMID:22123347

  8. Mental health functioning among children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection and perinatal HIV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Malee, Kathleen M.; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Huo, Yanling; Siberry, George; Williams, Paige L.; Hazra, Rohan; Smith, Renee A.; Allison, Susannah M.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Kammerer, Betsy; Kapetanovic, Suad; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R.; Mellins, Claude A.

    2012-01-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) among children with perinatal HIV infection have been described prior to and during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Yet child, caregiver and socio-demographic factors associated with MHPs are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of MHPs among older children and adolescents with perinatal HIV exposure, including both perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHEU) youth. Our aims were to identify the impact of HIV infection by comparing PHIV+ and PHEU youth and to delineate risk factors associated with MHPs, in order to inform development of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. Youth and their caregivers were interviewed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd edition (BASC-2) to estimate rates of at-risk and clinically significant MHPs, including caregiver-reported behavioral problems and youth-reported emotional problems. The prevalence of MHPs at the time of study entry was calculated for the group overall, as well as by HIV status and by demographic, child health, and caregiver characteristics. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with youth MHPs. Among 416 youth enrolled between March 2007 and July 2009 (295 PHIV+, 121 PHEU), the overall prevalence of MHPs at entry was 29% and greater than expected based on recent national surveys of the general population. MHPs were more likely among PHEU than among PHIV+ children (38% versus 25%, p < 0.01). Factors associated with higher odds of MHPs at p < 0.10 included caregiver characteristics (psychiatric disorder, limit-setting problems, health-related functional limitations) and child characteristics (younger age and lower IQ). These findings suggest that PHEU children are at high risk for MHPs, yet current models of care for these youth may not support early diagnosis and treatment. Family-based prevention and intervention programs for HIV affected youth and

  9. Mental health functioning among children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection and perinatal HIV exposure.

    PubMed

    Malee, Kathleen M; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Huo, Yanling; Siberry, George; Williams, Paige L; Hazra, Rohan; Smith, Renee A; Allison, Susannah M; Garvie, Patricia A; Kammerer, Betsy; Kapetanovic, Suad; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R; Mellins, Claude A

    2011-12-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) among children with perinatal HIV infection have been described prior to and during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Yet child, caregiver and socio-demographic factors associated with MHPs are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of MHPs among older children and adolescents with perinatal HIV exposure, including both perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV +) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHEU) youth. Our aims were to identify the impact of HIV infection by comparing PHIV + and PHEU youth and to delineate risk factors associated with MHPs, in order to inform development of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. Youth and their caregivers were interviewed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd edition (BASC-2) to estimate rates of at-risk and clinically significant MHPs, including caregiver-reported behavioral problems and youth-reported emotional problems. The prevalence of MHPs at the time of study entry was calculated for the group overall, as well as by HIV status and by demographic, child health, and caregiver characteristics. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with youth MHPs. Among 416 youth enrolled between March 2007 and July 2009 (295 PHIV +, 121 PHEU), the overall prevalence of MHPs at entry was 29% and greater than expected based on recent national surveys of the general population. MHPs were more likely among PHEU than among PHIV + children (38% versus 25%, p < 0.01). Factors associated with higher odds of MHPs at p < 0.10 included caregiver characteristics (psychiatric disorder, limit-setting problems, health-related functional limitations) and child characteristics (younger age and lower IQ). These findings suggest that PHEU children are at high risk for MHPs, yet current models of care for these youth may not support early diagnosis and treatment. Family-based prevention and intervention programs for HIV affected youth and

  10. [Perinatal Information System. Incorporation latency and impact on perinatal clinical registry].

    PubMed

    Simini, F; Fernández, A; Sosa, C; Díaz Rossello, J L

    2001-10-01

    The Perinatal Information System (SIP) is a clinical record, local management and quality assurance software standard in Latin America and the Caribbean. The time to implement SIP in a Maternity Hospital is evaluated as well as the effect of statistics on perinatal health indicators in subsequent years. In the sample of 20 Maternity Hospitals (5 Countries, 40% Private and 60% Public) 85% had a reliable information system by the third year of use of SIP. 15% of hospitals still had problems at that time that were already clear during the second year, a time corrective measures can still be taken. The evaluation of the impact of yearly reports shows that 58% of recommendations were fulfilled, specially those regarding the complete filling-in of clinical records (62%) and to a lesser extent variables that reflect clinical practices and organization of services (52%). The conclusion is that Maternity Hospitals in Latin America and the Caribbean have the capacity to adopt a complex tool of computerized clinical records for quality assurance of perinatal care and monitoring of health indicators. PMID:11816526

  11. Support after perinatal death: a study of support and counselling after perinatal bereavement.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, G C; Standish, E; Baum, J D

    1982-01-01

    After an earlier study into the practical aspects of the management of perinatal death, a counselling service was introduced for parents whose baby had died in the perinatal period. The service was monitored, and the parents who received the service were compared with a group that did not. Fifty families were allocated randomly either to the counselling (supported) group or to the contrast group, who received routine hospital care. Assessment was carried out at six and 14 months after the death, using a semi-structured interview and two self-rating scales (the general health questionnaire and the Leeds scales). Two of 16 mothers in the supported group showed psychiatric disorder at six months, compared with 10 of 19 in the contrast group (p less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). There was no significant difference between the two groups at 14 months, when 80% of all the women studied had recovered psychiatric symptoms. Socially isolated women and those who marital relations lacked intimacy had a higher incidence of psychiatric symptoms at six months. Early pregnancy (within six months) was associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric symptoms in the unsupported group. The duration of bereavement reaction after perinatal death was appreciably shortened by support and counselling. PMID:6814610

  12. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  13. Cytokines in the perinatal period - Part I.

    PubMed

    Chau, A; Markley, J C; Juang, J; Tsen, L C

    2016-05-01

    Successful pregnancy requires a state of immune homeostasis. Maternal tolerance of the genetically distinct fetoplacental unit is in part mediated by maternal and fetal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines have also been implicated in different pregnancy-related pathologic states. This two-part series seeks to provide anesthesiologists with an overview on selected perinatal cytokines in an effort to identify opportunities for research and improvements in clinical care. In part one, we review basic and pregnancy-related elements of the immune system, with an emphasis on the role of cytokines. From this foundation, we offer a perspective of a unique phenomenon witnessed within obstetric anesthesia - maternal temperature elevation associated with labor epidural analgesia. PMID:26970932

  14. Perinatal mortality at pre-Columbian Teotihuacan.

    PubMed

    Storey, R

    1986-04-01

    The skeletal population of 166 individuals from a low-status apartment compound of the pre-Columbian city of Teotihuacan contained 52 perinatal individuals. The most perilous time of the lifespan was around birth, as revealed by life table analysis. Femur length was not increasing during the last month of gestation, and individuals were probably shorter somatically at birth than modern standards or historic-period Arikara skeletal controls. The possibility of intrauterine growth retardation is investigated through paleo-pathological indicators of prenatal growth arrest. The evidence of prenatal stress and the high rate of mortality at birth seem to indicate that this New World preindustrial urban population faced similar health and nutritional stresses as Old World preindustrial cities. PMID:3521307

  15. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response. PMID:26246794

  16. [Perinatal clomiphene citrate treatment changes sexual orientations of male mice].

    PubMed

    He, Feng-Qin; Zhang, Heng-Rui

    2013-10-01

    Perinatal period and adolescence are critical for brain development, which is the biological basis of an individual's sexual orientation and sexual behavior. In this study, animals were divided into two groups and their sexual orientations were observed: one group experienced drug treatments during the perinatal period, and the other group was castrated at puberty. The results showed that estradiol treatment had no effect on mature male offspring's sexual orientations, but 9 days and 14 days of clomiphene citrate treatment significantly increased the chance of homosexuality and effeminized behavior. In addition, the sexual orientation of mature normal male offspring, which were castrated when they were 21 days old,was not significant different from the control animals. These findings suggest that the inhibition of perinatal estrogen activities could suppress individual male-typical responses, enhance female-typical responses and induce homosexual orientations. Moreover, the masculinizing effects of estrogen were more obvious during perinatal period than adolescence. PMID:24115661

  17. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  18. Magnitude of income-related disparities in adverse perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess and compare multiple measurements of socioeconomic position (SEP) in order to determine the relationship with adverse perinatal outcomes across various contexts. Methods A birth registry, the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, was confidentially linked to income tax and related information for the year in which delivery occurred. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine odds ratios between multiple indicators of SEP and multiple adverse perinatal outcomes in 117734 singleton births between 1988 and 2003. Models for after tax family income were also adjusted for neighborhood deprivation to gauge the relative magnitude of effects related to SEP at both levels. Effects of SEP were stratified by single- versus multiple-parent family composition, and by urban versus rural location of residence. Results The risk of small for gestational age and spontaneous preterm birth was higher across all the indicators of lower SEP, while risk for large for gestational age was lower across indicators of lower SEP. Higher risk of postneonatal death was demonstrated for several measures of lower SEP. Higher material deprivation in the neighborhood of residence was associated with increased risk for perinatal death, small for gestational age birth, and iatrogenic and spontaneous preterm birth. Family composition and urbanicity were shown to modify the association between income and some perinatal outcomes. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of understanding the definitions of SEP and the mechanisms that lead to the association between income and poor perinatal outcomes, and broadening the types of SEP measures used in some cases. PMID:24589212

  19. Agricultural pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in central Sudan.

    PubMed Central

    Taha, T. E.; Gray, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Hospital- and community-based studies were conducted in central Sudan to investigate the association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality. The cases were 197 stillbirths in the hospital and 36 perinatal deaths in the community; the controls were 812 liveborn, normal-birth-weight infants in the hospital, and 1505 liveborn infants who survived for the first 7 days after birth in the community. The odds ratio (OR) of perinatal death associated with pesticide exposure was estimated using multiple logistic regression. There was a consistent and significant association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in the hospital (adjusted OR = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.8) and the community populations (adjusted OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.4). The OR was significantly higher among women engaged in farming (3.6; 95% CI: 1.6-8.0), but not among women in nonfarming occupations (1.6; 95% CI: 0.8-3.3). The estimated attributable risks of perinatal death owing to pesticide exposure were 22.6% for hospital stillbirths and 15.7% for community perinatal deaths; but among women engaged in farming in the hospital population the attributable risks were substantially higher (34.5%). PMID:8324850

  20. Spatial Analysis of China Province-level Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    XIANG, Kun; SONG, Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Using spatial analysis tools to determine the spatial patterns of China province-level perinatal mortality and using spatial econometric model to examine the impacts of health care resources and different socio-economic factors on perinatal mortality. Methods: The Global Moran’s I index is used to examine whether the spatial autocorrelation exists in selected regions and Moran’s I scatter plot to examine the spatial clustering among regions. Spatial econometric models are used to investigate the spatial relationships between perinatal mortality and contributing factors. Results: The overall Moran’s I index indicates that perinatal mortality displays positive spatial autocorrelation. Moran’s I scatter plot analysis implies that there is a significant clustering of mortality in both high-rate regions and low-rate regions. The spatial econometric models analyses confirm the existence of a direct link between perinatal mortality and health care resources, socio-economic factors. Conclusions: Since a positive spatial autocorrelation has been detected in China province-level perinatal mortality, the upgrading of regional economic development and medical service level will affect the mortality not only in region itself but also its adjacent regions. PMID:27398334

  1. Quo vadis: perinatal AIDS issues--2004.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S H; Louria, D B

    1994-03-01

    acquisition of active SIV infection, suggesting that any such protection was only partial. It is also possible that cellular immune protection may be of varying efficacy against different types of exposure, particularly parenteral versus mucosal (such as sexual) exposures. There is also reason for specific optimism concerning interventions that might directly reduce the risk of perinatal transmission. Data from studies of twins suggest that a substantial proportion of perinatal transmission does not occur until after labor has commenced. Thus, caesarian sections may potentially reduce the risk of transmission to the fetus in some cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8013184

  2. Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy: Design, Implementation, and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Janice H.; Guarino, AJ.; Prager, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Maternal postpartum depression (PPD) and mother-infant relationship dysfunction have reciprocal effects on each other and thus an integrated approach that addresses both problems simultaneously may lead to improved outcomes. This study aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a new intervention, Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy (PDP), for the early treatment of maternal PPD. PDP is designed to promote maternal mental health and facilitate optimal mother-infant relationships via (a) a supportive, relationship-based, mother-infant psychotherapeutic component, and (b) a developmentally-based infant-oriented component focused on promoting positive mother-infant interactions. This paper describes the pilot use of PDP with six acutely depressed postpartum women. Nurses delivered the intervention over eight home visits. Results indicate that PDP is a feasible, acceptable, and safe intervention with this population. All participants achieved remission of depression with significant reduction in of depression and anxiety symptoms, suggesting that PDP is a promising treatment for PPD. PMID:23562990

  3. Perinatal induction of Cre recombination with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Lizen, Benoit; Claus, Melissa; Jeannotte, Lucie; Rijli, Filippo M; Gofflot, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Temporal control of site-specific recombination is commonly achieved by using a tamoxifen-inducible form of Cre or Flp recombinases. Although powerful protocols of induction have been developed for gene inactivation at adult stages or during embryonic development, induction of recombination at late gestational or early postnatal stages is still difficult to achieve. In this context, using the ubiquitous CMV-CreER(T2) transgenic mice, we have tested and validated two procedures to achieve recombination just before and just after birth. The efficiency of recombination was evaluated in the brain, which is known to be more problematic to target. For the late gestation treatment with tamoxifen, different protocols of complementary administration of progesterone and estrogen were tested. However, delayed delivery and/or mortality of pups due to difficult delivery were always observed. To circumvent this problem, pups were collected from tamoxifen-treated pregnant dams by caesarian section at E18.5 and given to foster mothers. For postnatal treatment, different dosages of tamoxifen were administered by intragastric injection to the pups during 3 or 4 days after birth. The efficiency of these treatments was analyzed at P7 using a transgenic reporter line. They were also validated with the Hoxa5 conditional allele. In conclusion, we have developed efficient procedures that allow achieving efficient recombination of floxed alleles at perinatal stages. These protocols will allow investigating the late/adult functions of many developmental genes, whose characterization has been so far restricted to embryonic development. PMID:26395370

  4. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  5. Behavioral effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-05-28

    Opioids are among the world's oldest known drugs used mostly for pain relief, but recreational use is also widespread. A particularly important problem is opioid exposure in females, as their offspring can also be affected. Adverse intrauterine and postnatal environments can affect offspring development and may lead to various disabilities later in life. It is clear that repetitive painful experiences, such as randomly occurring invasive procedures during neonatal intensive care, can permanently alter neuronal and synaptic organization and therefore later behavior. At the same time, analgesic drugs can also be harmful, inducing neuronal apoptosis or withdrawal symptoms in the neonate and behavioral alterations in adulthood. Hence, risk-benefit ratios should be taken into consideration when pain relief is required during pregnancy or in neonates. Recreational use of opioids can also alter many aspects of life. Intrauterine opioid exposure has many toxic effects, inducing poor pregnancy outcomes due to underdevelopment, but it is believed that later negative consequences are more related to environmental factors such as a chaotic lifestyle and inadequate prenatal care. One of the crucial components is maternal care, which changes profoundly in addicted mothers. In substance-dependent mothers, pre- and postnatal care has special importance, and controlled treatment with a synthetic opioid (e.g., methadone) could be beneficial. We aimed to summarize and compare human and rodent data, as it is important to close the gap between scientific knowledge and societal policies. Special emphasis is given to gender differences in the sensitivity of offspring to perinatal opioid exposure. PMID:24746901

  6. Cardiotocography in the Prognosis of Perinatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovic, Gordana; Babovic, Adnan; Rizvanovic, Mirzeta; Ljuca, Dzenita; Grgic, Gordana; Djuranovic–Milicic, Jadranaka

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The objective of the study was to examine whether cardiotocography can (CTG) predict asphyxia of the embryo, manifested as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to what extent one can rely on CTG record. Material and methods: Retrospective research was carried out at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics UKC Tuzla and medical documentation from the history of mothers and newborns was used. The study group consisted of 68 pregnancies and newborns who developed HIE. The control group consisted of 40 pregnancies, which resulted in birth of healthy newborns – without signs of asphyxia. CTG records were analyzed, Apgar score, the ways of finishing delivery. Results: Pathological CTG records (bradycardia 100, tachycardia 180, silent type of curve, late decelerations) were found in 45 (66,17%) cases of the study group in comparison to 11 (27,5%) in the control group. In the study group Apgar score in 5th minute lower than 7 had 17,46% newborns and the highest incidence of the normally finished deliveries. We conclude that cardiotocography is one of the reliable methods of fetal monitoring in pregnancy and delivery, and that pathological CTG record very likely indicates the possible presence of perinatal asphyxia. Conclusion: Achieving a low degree of correlation between pathological intrapartum cardiotocography findings and long-term outcome of children can be achieved by rapid and adequate obstetric intervention and the relatively short duration of fetal acidosis, and optimal procedures during intensive care of newborns. PMID:24937932

  7. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  8. Perinatal diseases, a neglected area of the medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Naeye, R L; Kissane, J M

    1981-01-01

    Little is known about the causes of some of the most frequent fetal and placental disorders, and some of these disorders commonly go unrecognized as the underlying causes of premature labor and fetal and neonatal deaths. It is widely known that incompetent cervix, placenta previa, abruptio placentae, and hydramnios shorten pregnancy, yet it is not widely recognized that coitus is a common cause of preterm delivery. The underlying disorders responsible for fetal and neonatal deaths in the US Collaborative Perinatal Project are presented in a table in the order of their frequency. The births of the Collaborative Perinatal Project occurred between 1959-66, and the total perinatal mortality rate for single born infants in the study was 30.4/100 births. The current perinatal mortality rate in the US is about half of that value. Amniotic fluid infections, abruptio placentae, premature rupture of the fetal membranes, and major congenital malformations were responsible for more than half of the perinatal deaths in the study. Prevention would remove a substantial burden from the health care system. The yearly cost of neonatal intensive care in the US was approximately US$462,000,000 in 1980. If these same infants were born at term and were healthy, the cost of their care would have been about US$53,000,000. These figures fail to consider the even greater financial burden, family stress, and nonproductive lives that result from the brain damage and other disabilities produced by the perinatal disorders. The hypoxic damage sometimes caused by abruptio placentae is widely recognized as a cause of disability. The consequences of major congenital malformations are universally recognized. The need to prevent these antenatal disorders is more pressing in the poor nations of the 3rd world. The total perinatal mortality rate in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 1976 was 69/1000, 5 times the current perinatal mortality rate in the US. High perinatal and infant mortality rates in the 3rd world

  9. Endophenotypes in Schizophrenia for the Perinatal Period: Criteria for Validation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Randal G.; Freedman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Endophenotypes are disease-associated phenotypes that are thought to reflect the neurobiological or other mechanisms that underlie the more overt symptoms of a psychiatric illness. Endophenotypes have been critical in understanding the genetics, neurobiology, and treatment of schizophrenia. Because psychiatric illnesses have multiple causes, including both genetic and nongenetic risk factors, an endophenotype linked to one of the mechanisms may be expressed more frequently than the disease itself. However, in schizophrenia research, endophenotypes have almost exclusively been studied in older adolescents or adults who have entered or passed through the age of risk for the disorder. Yet, schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder where prenatal development starts a cascade of brain changes across the lifespan. Endophenotypes have only minimally been utilized to explore the perinatal development of vulnerability. One major impediment to the development of perinatally-useful endophenotypes has been the established validity criteria. For example, the criterion that the endophenotype be more frequently present in those with disease than those without is difficult to demonstrate when there can be a decades-long period between endophenotype measurement and the age of greatest risk for onset of the disorder. This article proposes changes to the endophenotype validity criteria appropriate to perinatal research and reviews how application of these modified criteria helped identify a perinatally-usable phenotype of risk for schizophrenia, P50 sensory gating, which was then used to propose a novel perinatal primary prevention intervention. PMID:25943124

  10. Mapping Perinatal Nursing Process Measurement Concepts to Standard Terminologies.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Catherine H

    2016-07-01

    The use of standard terminologies is an essential component for using data to inform practice and conduct research; perinatal nursing data standardization is needed. This study explored whether 76 distinct process elements important for perinatal nursing were present in four American Nurses Association-recognized standard terminologies. The 76 process elements were taken from a valid paper-based perinatal nursing process measurement tool. Using terminology-supported browsers, the elements were manually mapped to the selected terminologies by the researcher. A five-member expert panel validated 100% of the mapping findings. The majority of the process elements (n = 63, 83%) were present in SNOMED-CT, 28% (n = 21) in LOINC, 34% (n = 26) in ICNP, and 15% (n = 11) in CCC. SNOMED-CT and LOINC are terminologies currently recommended for use to facilitate interoperability in the capture of assessment and problem data in certified electronic medical records. Study results suggest that SNOMED-CT and LOINC contain perinatal nursing process elements and are useful standard terminologies to support perinatal nursing practice in electronic health records. Terminology mapping is the first step toward incorporating traditional paper-based tools into electronic systems. PMID:27081756

  11. Low perinatal autopsy rate in Malaysia: time for a change.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geok Chin; Hayati, Abdul Rahman; Khong, Teck Yee

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine the perinatal autopsy rate in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia and to quantify the value of the perinatal autopsy. All stillbirths, miscarriages, therapeutic abortions, and neonatal deaths between January 1, 2004, and August 31, 2009, were identified from the archives. The autopsy findings were compared with the clinical diagnoses. The autopsy reports were also reviewed to determine if it would be possible to improve the quality of the autopsies. There were 807 perinatal deaths, of which 36 (4.5%) included an autopsy. There were ethnic differences in the rate of autopsy, with the lowest rate among the Malays. The autopsy provided the diagnosis, changed the clinical diagnosis, or revealed additional findings in 58.3% of cases. Ancillary testing, such as microbiology, chromosomal analysis, and biochemistry, could improve the quality of the autopsy. This study provides further data on the perinatal autopsy rate from an emerging and developing country. It reaffirms the value of the perinatal autopsy. Attempts must be made to improve on the low autopsy rate while recognizing that the performance of autopsies can be enhanced through the use of ancillary testing. PMID:20367214

  12. Perinatal 192 IgG-Saporin as Neuroteratogen.

    PubMed

    Petrosini, Laura; De Bartolo, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Gelfo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin selectively destroys basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that provide cholinergic input to the hippocampus, entire cortical mantle, amygdala, and olfactory bulb. Perinatal immunotoxic lesions by 192 IgG-saporin induce long-lasting cholinergic depletion mimicking a number of developmental disorders reported in humans. The perinatal injection of 192 IgG-saporin induces several brain modifications, which are observed in neocortex and hippocampus at short and long term. These plastic changes involve both structural (alterations in brain volume, neuronal morphology, and neurogenesis) and molecular (modulations of the levels of neurotransmitters and other proteins related to neurodegeneration) levels. Moreover, the perinatal injection of 192 IgG-saporin may interact with the brain plastic capacity to react to other injuries. Perinatal 192 IgG-saporin lesions allowed investigating the role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in modulating behavioral functions in developing as well as adult rats. After perinatal cholinergic depletion, rats display reduced ultrasonic vocalizations as neonates, learning and exploratory deficits as juveniles, altered discriminative abilities, impulsive and perseverative behaviors, and memory deficits as adults. Overall, these findings underline the importance of cholinergic system integrity for the development of specific structural and functional features. PMID:26695170

  13. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms. PMID:25578631

  14. Idiopathic Polyhydramnios: Severity and Perinatal Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Samantha L; Beamon, Carmen J; Chescheir, Nancy C; Stamilio, David

    2016-06-01

    Objective To estimate the association between the severity of idiopathic polyhydramnios and adverse outcomes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of deliveries at one hospital from 2000 to 2012 with an amniotic fluid index (AFI) measurement ≥24 + 0 weeks' gestation. Pregnancies complicated by diabetes, multiples, or fetal anomalies were excluded. Exposure was the degree of polyhydramnios: normal (AFI 5-24 cm), mild (≥ 24-30 cm), and moderate-severe (> 30 cm). Primary outcomes were perinatal mortality, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and postpartum hemorrhage. Results There were 10,536 pregnancies: 10,188 with a normal AFI, 274 mild (78.74%), and 74 moderate-severe polyhydramnios (21.26%). Adverse outcomes were increased with idiopathic polyhydramnios: NICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.77-4.99), postpartum hemorrhage (AOR 15.81, 95% CI 7.82-31.96), macrosomia (AOR 3.41, 95% CI 2.61-4.47), low 5-minute Apgar score (AOR 2.60, 95% CI 1.57-4.30), and cesarean (AOR 2.16, 95% CI 1.74-2.69). There were increasing odds of macrosomia (mild: AOR 3.19, 95% CI 2.36-4.32; moderate-severe: AOR 4.44, 95% CI 2.53-7.79) and low 5-minute Apgar score (mild: AOR 2.24, 95% CI 1.23-4.08; moderate-severe: AOR 3.93, 95% CI 1.62-9.55) with increasing severity of polyhydramnios. Conclusion Idiopathic polyhydramnios is independently associated with increased risks of morbidity. There appears to be a dose-response relationship for neonatal macrosomia and low 5-minute Apgar score risks. PMID:26862725

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M; Freeman, Marlene P

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine therapies are increasingly sought out by people with psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we review the evidence for several commonly used CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine, St John's Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence-based use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  17. Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Patricia Robin; Drake, Emily Eiwen

    2016-01-01

    The 3 decades of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing history share the same 3 decades as the birth of the information age and health information technology (HIT). This article summarizes the history of HIT and the corresponding publication history of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Health information technology content has evolved from being the "how-to operate" topic of a publication to being integrated within a nursing practice publication. The article concludes with current HIT challenges and implications for the future. PMID:27465451

  18. Perinatal Asphyxia from the Obstetric Standpoint: Diagnosis and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christina A; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a general term referring to neonatal encephalopathy related to events during birth. Asphyxia refers to a deprivation of oxygen for a duration sufficient to cause neurologic injury. Most cases of perinatal asphyxia are not necessarily caused by intrapartum events but rather associated with underlying chronic maternal or fetal conditions. Of intrapartum causes, obstetric emergencies are the most common and are not always preventable. Screening high-risk pregnancies with ultrasound, Doppler velocimetry, and antenatal testing can aid in identifying fetuses at risk. Interventions such as intrauterine resuscitation or operative delivery may decrease the risk of severe hypoxia from intrauterine insults and improve long-term neurologic outcomes. PMID:27524445

  19. Impact of an education program on perinatal care practices.

    PubMed

    Harlan, W R; Hess, G E; Borer, R C; Hiss, R G

    1980-12-01

    Education of health professionals has an important role in improving health care. A media-based, self-instructional, perinatal education program was developed and field tested in rural and urban regions of Michigan. Cognitive tests, chart audits, and consultation/referral times were used to measure the impact on education and patient care. The program effectively increased knowledge and improved patient care practices by physicians and nurses. This study presents evidence that a targeted educational program in a media-based format can significantly improve perinatal care. PMID:6161337

  20. Early intervention after perinatal stroke: Opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal stroke is the commonest cause of hemiplegic cerebral palsy. No standardised early intervention exists despite evidence for a critical time window for activity-dependent plasticity to mould corticospinal tract development in the first few years of life. Intervention during this unique period of plasticity could mitigate the consequences of perinatal stroke to an extent not possible with later intervention, by preserving the normal pattern of development of descending motor pathways. This article outlines the broad range of approaches currently under investigation. Improved early detection and outcome prediction remain important goals, despite significant progress in this area. PMID:24528276

  1. Griefwork online: perinatal loss, lifecourse disruption and online support.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Deborah; Letherby, Gayle

    2014-09-01

    The Internet provides new opportunities for accessing and giving support following perinatal loss and in this article we report on a project concerned to explore the use of social networking and online networks following such an experience. Perinatal loss can be defined and perceived as biographical disruption yet this type of loss sometimes lacks social recognition. Our ethnographic study reveals that not only do mothers, and sometimes fathers and grandmothers, seek support on the Internet but they also engage in griefwork (the work the bereaved do with others). PMID:25122092

  2. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. Material/Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. Results The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  3. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. RESULTS The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  4. Perinatal outcome and antenatal care in a black South African population.

    PubMed Central

    Menown, I. B.; Archbold, J. A.; Wills, C.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between perinatal outcome and antenatal care was investigated at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, by a case control retrospective study of pregnancy records in 165 perinatal deaths and 156 infants surviving the perinatal period. 82% of the mothers of live infants had booked for antenatal care compared with only 60% of those who experienced a perinatal death. Hospital booking was associated with a higher infant birthweight. For those who booked earlier there was no reduction in total perinatal mortality or the stillbirth:neonatal death ratio, and many of the mothers of highest risk failed to book. This suggests that the better perinatal outcome in booked mothers may have been secondary to the type of mother who chose to book, rather than the actual antenatal care. To help reduce perinatal mortality, methods must be employed which reach those mothers who are most likely to fail to book. PMID:8516973

  5. Relative Risk of Perinatal Complications in Common Childhood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    Perinatal complications have been associated with a myriad of later-developing behavioral, neurological, and psychological disorders. These have included school-related disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, mood and anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. This article reviews the research that considers the…

  6. Perinatal Antidepressant Use: Understanding Women’s Preferences and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    BATTLE, CYNTHIA L.; SALISBURY, AMY L.; SCHOFIELD, CASEY A.; ORTIZ-HERNANDEZ, SAMIA

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women’s concerns and treatment decisionmaking patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women’s treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women’s preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women’s concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

  7. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For developing countries, especially in remote rural areas, measures of maternal and perinatal health may be difficult to obtain because it is not systematically collected and/or electronic data is not available. We assisted the public health officials of Bayingnormen (BaMen), In...

  8. Trends in Perinatal Care and Implications for Frontline Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeannette T; Adams, Ellise D; Amis, Debby

    2016-01-01

    The perinatal trends presented in this article are based on recent topics from conferences, journals, the media, as well as from input from perinatal nurses. Trends in patient care are influenced by evidence known for decades, new research, emerging and innovative concepts in healthcare, patient and family preferences, and the media. Trends discussed in this article are rethinking the due date, birth outside the hospital setting, obstetric hospitalists as birth attendants, nitrous oxide for pain in childbirth, hydrotherapy and waterbirth in the hospital setting, delayed cord clamping, disrupters of an optimal infant microbiome, skin-to-skin care during cesarean surgery, and breast-sleeping and the breast-feeding dyad. In addition, the authors developed implications for perinatal nurses related to each trend. The goal is to stimulate reflection on evidence that supports or does not support current practice and to stimulate future research by discussing some of the current trends that may influence the care that perinatal nurses provide during the birthing year. PMID:27465460

  9. An Endangered Generation: Impact of Perinatal Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melanie M.

    This article reviews some of the literature on educational approaches for drug-exposed children. Common effects of prenatal and perinatal drug use on the female user, the developing fetus, and the neonate are reviewed. It is noted that female drug users have an increased incidence of medical complications during pregnancy; that the specific…

  10. Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Deborah A.; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V.; Miller, Judith S.; Dorius, Josette T.; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N = 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or…

  11. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  12. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted…

  13. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C James

    2013-05-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  14. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  15. Visual Deficits and Improvements in Children after Perinatal Hypoxia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groenendaal, F.; Van Hof-Van Duin, J.

    1992-01-01

    Study of the visual development of 38 infants, children, and youths who were neurologically impaired following perinatal hypoxia found that all children showed impairments of 1 or more visual functions, though visual development continued and visual improvements were demonstrated up to age 16. (Author/JDD)

  16. Perinatal Mental Health: Supporting New Families through Vulnerability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that because the perinatal periodfrom the later stages of pregnancy through the first 6 months of the infants lifeis a period of…

  17. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2740...

  18. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives. PMID:25300675

  19. Perinatal Pitocin as an Early ADHD Biomarker: Neurodevelopmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Lisa; Haussmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a potential relationship between coincidental increases in perinatal Pitocin usage and subsequent childhood ADHD onset in an attempt to isolate a specific risk factor as an early biomarker of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Method: Maternal labor/delivery and corresponding childbirth records of 172 regionally diverse,…

  20. Perinatal Substance Abuse: What's Best for the Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Marie Kanne

    This report, which is based on the work of the Perinatal Substance Exposure Think Tanks, establishes priorities for statewide services in California to young children who are prenatally exposed to alcohol and drugs. Although the report focuses on the developmental needs of children, it also examines efforts to provide prevention and treatment…

  1. CLOCK DRAWING IN CHILDREN WITH PERI-NATAL STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Yousefian, Omid; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Doo, Alex; Trauner, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with peri-natal stroke may show evidence of contralateral spatial neglect. The goal of this study was to determine whether a clock drawing task commonly used in adults to identify neglect would be effective in detecting neglect in children with peri-natal stroke. METHODS Thirty-eight individuals (age range 6–21 years) with left hemisphere (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) peri-natal onset unilateral lesions and one hundred seventy-nine age-matched controls were given the free-drawn Clock Drawing Task (CDT) in a cross-sectional design. An adapted scoring system that evaluated right- and left-sided errors separately was developed as part of the investigation. RESULTS Children with LH lesions made a greater number of errors on both the right and left sides of the clock drawings in all age subgroups (6–8 years, 9–14 years, and 15–21 years) compared to controls. Children with RH lesions showed greater left and right errors in the younger groups compared to controls, with significantly poorer performance on the left at 6–8 years, suggestive of contralateral neglect. However, by ages 15–21 years, the RH lesion subjects no longer differed from controls. CONCLUSIONS Clock drawing can identify spatial neglect in children with early hemispheric damage. However, brain development is a dynamic process, and as children age, spatial neglect may no longer be evident. These findings demonstrate the limitations of predicting long-term outcome after peri-natal stroke from early neuro-cognitive data. Children with peri-natal stroke may require different neural pathways to accomplish specific skills or to overcome deficits, but ultimately they may have “typical” outcomes. PMID:26002051

  2. Perinatal factors and the risk of bipolar disorder in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Chudal, Roshan; Sourander, Andre; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Lehti, Venla; Sucksdorff, Dan; Gissler, Mika; Brown, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complications during the perinatal period have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia and autism. However, similar studies on bipolar disorder (BPD) have been limited and the findings are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the association between perinatal risk factors and BPD. Methods This nested case-control study, based on the Finnish Prenatal Study of Bipolar Disorders (FIPS-B), identified 724 cases and 1419 matched controls from population based registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the associations between perinatal factors and BPD adjusting for potential confounding due to maternal age, psychiatric history and educational level, place of birth, number of previous births and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Results Children delivered by planned cesarean section had a 2.5-fold increased risk of BPD (95% CI: 1.32–4.78, P <0.01). No association was seen between other examined perinatal risk factors and BPD. Limitations The limitations of this study include: the restriction in the sample to treated cases of BPD in the population, and usage of hospital based clinical diagnosis for case ascertainment. In addition, in spite of the large sample size, there was low power to detect associations for certain exposures including the lowest birth weight category and pre-term birth. Conclusions Birth by planned caesarean section was associated with risk of BPD, but most other perinatal risk factors examined in this study were not associated with BPD. Larger studies with greater statistical power to detect less common exposures and studies utilizing prospective biomarker-based exposures are necessary in the future. PMID:24215899

  3. Approaching the millennium: perinatal problems and software solutions.

    PubMed

    Sokol, R J; Chik, L; Zador, I

    1992-01-01

    Strategic planning for rational development of perinatal computing capabilities for the year 2000 should be driven by anticipated trends in (1) the health care business, (2) computer technology and (3) medicine, as well as (4) the needs of perinatal practitioners. In the USA, health care is the fastest growing segment of the economy. This will produce increasing attention from hardware and software developers, and vendors, and will lead to a proliferation of computing platforms, operating systems and specific medical application software. Desktop computers, already capable of 20 million instructions per second (MIPS) with massive storage capacities, will continue to evolve and fall in price. Increasingly, perinatologists will develop software packages to facilitate patient care in their own environments. All of these trends will lead to severe fragmentation in medical computing. Simultaneously, however, the need for integrated institutional computer-based data access for quality assurance and fiscal and operations management will increase. Perinatal care will be more regionalized, complex and rigorous with new clinical trial- and effectiveness research-based interventions, as well as molecular diagnosis and therapy. To practice appropriately, clinicians will need to be familiar with computer capabilities. Having been exposed to computer-aided instruction (CAI) at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, they will except on-line access to detailed and accurate patient information with linkage to laboratory, radiology and other medical databases, as well as to reference databases, such as Medlines and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. Artificial intelligence (AI) software may support perinatal decision making; computerized professional and facility billing will be available. PMID:1396279

  4. Mozambican midwives' views on barriers to quality perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karen Odberg; Johansson, Eva; Pelembe, Maria de Fatima M; Dgedge, Clemencia; Christensson, Kyllike

    2006-02-01

    Our purpose in this study was to explore the midwives' perception of factors obstructing or facilitating their ability to provide quality perinatal care at a central labor ward in Maputo. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 midwives and were analyzed according to grounded theory technique. Barriers to provision of quality perinatal care were identified as follows: (i) the unsupportive environment, (ii) nonempowering and limited interaction with women in labor, (iii) a sense of professional inadequacy and inferiority, and (iv) nonappliance of best caring practices. A model based on the midwives' reflections on barriers to quality perinatal care and responses to these were developed. Actions aimed at overcoming the barriers were improvising and identifying areas in need of change. Identified evading actions were holding others accountable and yielding to dysfunction and structural control. In order to improve perinatal care, the midwives need to see themselves as change agents and not as victims of external and internal causal relationships over which they have no influence. It is moreover essential that the midwives chose actions aiming at overcoming barriers to quality perinatal care instead of choosing evading actions, which might jeopardize the health of the unborn and newborn infant. We suggest that local as well as national education programs need to correspond with existing reality, even if they provide knowledge that surpasses the present possibilities in practice. Quality of intrapartum and the immediate newborn care requires a supportive environment, however, which in the context of this study presented such serious obstacles that they need to be addressed on the national level. Structural and administrative changes are difficult to target as these depend on national organization of maternal health care (MHC) services and national health expenditures. PMID:16484159

  5. Applying a science-based method to improve perinatal care: the institute for healthcare improvement perinatal improvement community.

    PubMed

    Bisognano, Maureen; Cherouny, Peter H; Gullo, Sue

    2014-10-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement applies a systems-focused, science-based approach to improving perinatal care. This approach is based on the pioneering work in quality improvement and statistical process control performed by Walter Shewhart and W. Edwards Deming, and it uses the Model for Improvement, a simple and effective tool for accelerating improvement. In 2008, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement articulated a Triple Aim for improvement-better care, better health for populations, and lower per capita costs. The Triple Aim has become a guiding framework throughout health care and also guides much of the work of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement's collaborative effort to improve perinatal care-the Perinatal Improvement Community-is an ideal example of work that pursues all three dimensions of the Triple Aim. The improvement method used in the community creates the foundation for the kind of cultural transformation that Perinatal Improvement Community leaders and participants have learned is necessary to make significant and lasting change. Using a systems-focused and science-based approach to improvement equips obstetricians and gynecologists with the knowledge, skills, and tools they need to improve the systems of care they work in so they can deliver the best evidence-based care to all of their patients, all of the time. PMID:25198257

  6. Analysis of policy towards improvement of perinatal mortality in the Netherlands (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Vos, Amber A; van Voorst, Sabine F; Steegers, Eric A P; Denktaş, Semiha

    2016-05-01

    Relatively high perinatal mortality and morbidity rates(2) in the Netherlands resulted in a process which induced policy changes regarding the Dutch perinatal healthcare system. Aims of this policy analysis are (1) to identify actors, context and process factors that promoted or impeded agenda setting and formulation of policy regarding perinatal health care reform and (2) to present an overview of the renewed perinatal health policy. The policy triangle framework for policy analysis by Walt and Gilson was applied(3). Contents of policy, actors, context factors and process factors were identified by triangulation of data from three sources: a document analysis, stakeholder analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Analysis enabled us to chronologically reconstruct the policy process in response to the perinatal mortality rates. The quantification of the perinatal mortality problem, the openness of the debate and the nature of the topic were important process factors. Main theme of policy was that change was required in the entire spectrum of perinatal healthcare. This ranged from care in the preconception phase through to the puerperium. Furthermore emphasis was placed on the importance of preventive measures and socio-environmental determinants of health. This required involvement of the preventive setting, including municipalities. The Dutch tiered perinatal healthcare system and divergent views amongst curative perinatal health care providers were important context factors. This study provides lessons which are applicable to health care professionals and policy makers in perinatal care or other multidisciplinary fields. PMID:27080065

  7. Linkages among reproductive health, maternal health, and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Blanc, Ann; Donnay, France

    2010-12-01

    Some interventions in women before and during pregnancy may reduce perinatal and neonatal deaths, and recent research has established linkages of reproductive health with maternal, perinatal, and early neonatal health outcomes. In this review, we attempted to analyze the impact of biological, clinical, and epidemiologic aspects of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes through an elucidation of a biological framework for linking reproductive, maternal and newborn health (RHMNH); care strategies and interventions for improved perinatal and neonatal health outcomes; public health implications of these linkages and implementation strategies; and evidence gaps for scaling up such strategies. Approximately 1000 studies (up to June 15, 2010) were reviewed that have addressed an impact of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes. These include systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and stand-alone experimental and observational studies. Evidences were also drawn from recent work undertaken by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), the interconnections between maternal and newborn health reviews identified by the Global Alliance for Prevention of Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS), as well as relevant work by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. Our review amply demonstrates that opportunities for assessing outcomes for both mothers and newborns have been poorly realized and documented. Most of the interventions reviewed will require more greater-quality evidence before solid programmatic recommendations can be made. However, on the basis of our review, birth spacing, prevention of indoor air pollution, prevention of intimate partner violence before and during pregnancy, antenatal care during pregnancy, Doppler ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, birth and newborn care preparedness via community-based intervention

  8. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers’ mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  9. Perinatal Depression and Patterns of Attachment: A Critical Risk Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Valentina; Aceti, Franca; Giacchetti, Nicoletta; Carluccio, Giuseppe Mattia; Zaccagni, Michela; Marini, Isabella; Giancola, Orazio; Ciolli, Paola; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aims to verify if the presence and severity of perinatal depression are related to any particular pattern of attachment. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, who were administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Experience in Close Relationship (ECR). A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 89 subjects) was selected and compared with a control group (C), regarding psychopathological variables and attachment patterns. Results. The ECR showed a prevalence of “Fearful-Avoidant” attachment style in PND group (29.2% versus 1.1%, p < 0.001); additionally, the EPDS average score increases with the increasing of ECR dimensions (Avoidance and Anxiety). Conclusion. The severity of depression increases proportionally to attachment disorganization; therefore, we consider attachment as both an important risk factor as well as a focus for early psychotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26798510

  10. The prevention of psychological morbidity following perinatal death.

    PubMed Central

    Hammersley, L; Drinkwater, C

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a significant volume of hospital-based literature has been produced about the management of women and their families after a perinatal death. There has also been a considerable amount of work in the voluntary sector which has recognized this as an area of unmet need. The introduction of regional neonatal intensive care units and the shift from secondary to primary care make the development of a structured community-based approach for this group of vulnerable patients increasingly important. This article documents the evidence for high levels of psychological morbidity following perinatal death, reviews a variety of interventions designed to reduce morbidity, and makes some tentative proposals about the key elements of an effective community-based support programme. PMID:9406496

  11. High perinatal and neonatal mortality in rural India.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, N; Hasan, S B

    1993-04-01

    A prospective study conducted in rural India on pregnant women showed poor utilization of primary health services and very poor maternal care receptivity especially in terms of antenatal care. A very high perinatal mortality rate of 81.3/1000 live births and a neonatal mortality rate of 63.7/1000 live births was observed in the present study. Out of 204 live births, 72.05% of newborn developed complications within 6 weeks of the delivery. Most of the complications were of a minor nature and could be attributed to poor environmental conditions, lack of personal hygiene and ignorance. The study highlights the need for training of grass root level workers for the improvement of perinatal and neonatal care in rural India. PMID:8478893

  12. A community based surveillance system for perinatal and neonatal care.

    PubMed

    Dyal Chand, A; Khale, M

    1989-11-01

    The impact of maternal health services on perinatal and neonatal mortality depends on both the quantitative and qualitative coverage of pregnant women with obstetric services. In rural areas this becomes all the more difficult because of the requirement of a large decentralized infrastructure extending from village based health workers and subcentres to the Primary Health Centre and tertiary levels of referral. An effective introduction of socio-cultural, biomedical and managerial interventions is required to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality. A community based surveillance and monitoring system is central to and facilitates the introduction of all other interventions. Finally, the system operated by grass-root level workers is a motivational tool for achieving expected levels of performance. PMID:2630471

  13. Perinatal and Early Childhood Environmental Factors Influencing Allergic Asthma Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically over the past several decades. While hereditary factors are highly important, the rapid rise outstrips the pace of genomic variation. Great emphasis has been placed on potential modifiable early life exposures leading to childhood asthma. Methods We reviewed the recent medical literature for important studies discussing the role of the perinatal and early childhood exposures and the inception of childhood asthma. Results and Discussion Early life exposure to allergens (House dust mite (HDM), furred pets, cockroach, rodent and mold)air pollution (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM)) and viral respiratory tract infections (Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (hRV)) have been implicated in the development of asthma in high risk children. Conversely, exposure to microbial diversity in the perinatal period may diminish the development of atopy and asthma symptoms. PMID:24952205

  14. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers' mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  15. Building Perinatal Case Manager Capacity Using Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Improving breastfeeding rates among Black women is a potential strategy to address disparities in health outcomes that disproportionately impact Black women and children. This quality improvement (QI) initiative aimed to improve perinatal case manager knowledge and self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding among Black, low-income women who use services through Boston Healthy Start Initiative. QI methodology was used to develop and test a two-part strategy for perinatal case managers to promote and support breastfeeding. A positive change was observed in infant feeding knowledge and case manager self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding. Among the 24 mothers participating in this QI initiative, 100% initiated and continued breastfeeding at 1 week postpartum, and 92% were breastfeeding at 2 weeks postpartum. PMID:26937160

  16. Perinatal data collection: current practice in the Australian nursing and midwifery healthcare context.

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The collection of perinatal data within Queensland, Australia, has traditionally been achieved via a paper form completed by midwives after each birth. Recently, with an increase in the use of e-health systems in healthcare, perinatal data collection has migrated to an online system. It is suggested that this move from paper to an ehealth platform has resulted in improvement to error rates, completion levels, timeliness of data transfer from healthcare institutions to the perinatal data collection and subsequent publication of data items. Worldwide, perinatal data are collected utilising a variety of methods, but essentially data are used for similar purposes: to monitor outcome patterns within obstetrics and midwifery. This paper discusses current practice in relation to perinatal data collection worldwide and within Australia, with a specific focus on Queensland, highlights relevant issues for midwives, and points to the need for further research into the efficient use of an e-health platform for perinatal data collection. PMID:23640918

  17. Labour complications remain the most important risk factors for perinatal mortality in rural Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Renay; Ronsmans, Carine; Dorman, Ed; Jilo, Hilton; Muhoro, Anne; Shulman, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and quantify risk factors for perinatal mortality in a Kenyan district hospital and to assess the proportion of perinatal deaths attributable to labour complications, maternal undernutrition, malaria, anaemia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 910 births was conducted between January 1996 and July 1997 and risk factors for perinatal mortality were analysed. FINDINGS: The perinatal mortality rate was 118 per 1000 births. Complications of labour such as haemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes/premature labour, and obstructed labour/ malpresentation increased the risk of death between 8- and 62-fold, and 53% of all perinatal deaths were attributable to labour complications. Placental malaria and maternal HIV, on the other hand, were not associated with perinatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attention needs to be given to the quality of obstetric care provided in the rural district-hospital setting. PMID:14576887

  18. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Neira-Pena, Tanya; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Espina-Marchant, Pablo; Esmar, Daniela; Perez, Ronald; Muñoz, Valentina; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Manuel; Rivera, Benjamin; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Morales, Paola; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified. In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by overexpression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for NAD(+) during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat fetus into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that nicotinamide constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:24723845

  19. Robotic Quantification of Position Sense in Children With Perinatal Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kuczynski, Andrea M; Dukelow, Sean P; Semrau, Jennifer A; Kirton, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Background Perinatal stroke is the leading cause of hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Motor deficits and their treatment are commonly emphasized in the literature. Sensory dysfunction may be an important contributor to disability, but it is difficult to measure accurately clinically. Objective Use robotics to quantify position sense deficits in hemiparetic children with perinatal stroke and determine their association with common clinical measures. Methods Case-control study. Participants were children aged 6 to 19 years with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed unilateral perinatal arterial ischemic stroke or periventricular venous infarction and symptomatic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Participants completed a position matching task using an exoskeleton robotic device (KINARM). Position matching variability, shift, and expansion/contraction area were measured with and without vision. Robotic outcomes were compared across stroke groups and controls and to clinical measures of disability (Assisting Hand Assessment) and sensory function. Results Forty stroke participants (22 arterial, 18 venous, median age 12 years, 43% female) were compared with 60 healthy controls. Position sense variability was impaired in arterial (6.01 ± 1.8 cm) and venous (5.42 ± 1.8 cm) stroke compared to controls (3.54 ± 0.9 cm, P < .001) with vision occluded. Impairment remained when vision was restored. Robotic measures correlated with functional disability. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical sensory tests were modest. Conclusions Robotic assessment of position sense is feasible in children with perinatal stroke. Impairment is common and worse in arterial lesions. Limited correction with vision suggests cortical sensory network dysfunction. Disordered position sense may represent a therapeutic target in hemiparetic cerebral palsy. PMID:26747126

  20. How to establish a perinatal home care program.

    PubMed

    Miller, T H

    1990-09-01

    Current clinical data indicates that despite advances in the obstetric and neonatal arenas, preterm birth and subsequent low birth weight infants continue to be born. Technology-based perinatal home care programs are the fastest growing segment of services available to high-risk pregnant women, recuperating post-partum women, and newborns. It is anticipated that these services will alter forever the traditional measures of care for high-risk pregnant women and newborns. PMID:10107048

  1. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Neira-Pena, Tanya; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Espina-Marchant, Pablo; Esmar, Daniela; Perez, Ronald; Muñoz, Valentina; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Manuel; Rivera, Benjamin; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Morales, Paola; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified. In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by overexpression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for NAD+ during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat fetus into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that nicotinamide constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:24723845

  2. Successful management of quadruplet pregnancy in a perinatal unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shennan, A T; Milligan, J E; Yeung, P K

    1979-01-01

    A case of quadruplet pregnancy is outlined and the management is described to demonstrate the application of monitoring and therapeutic procedures currently available for a multifetal pregnancy. Recording of the nonstressed fetal heart rate, ultrasound monitoring and glucocorticoid stimulation of pulmonary biochemical maturity were done. A successful outcome was achieved with a combined obstetric-neonatal approach and the experience of a perinatal unit. PMID:519612

  3. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  4. State health agencies and quality improvement in perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Little, G A

    1999-01-01

    The origin of the federal-state partnership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) can be traced from the Children's Bureau grants of 1912, through the Sheppard-Towner Act, to the creation of Title V and other programs of today that mandate planning, accountability, and systems development. In the past decade with the transformation of the health care system and the emergence of managed care, there has been a resurgence of interest in public, professional, and governmental interest in quality measurement and accountability. Regional perinatal systems have been implemented in all states with varying levels of involvement by state health agencies and the public sector. This historical framework discusses two primary themes: the decades of evolution in the federal-state partnership, and the emergence in the last three decades of perinatal regional system policy, and suggests that the structure of the federal-state partnership has encouraged state variation. A survey of state MCH programs was undertaken to clarify their operational and perceived role in promoting quality improvement in perinatal care. Data and information from the survey, along with five illustrative state case studies, demonstrate great variation in how individual state agencies function. State efforts in quality improvement, a process to make things better, have four arenas of activity: policy development and implementation, definition and measurement of quality, data collection and analysis, and communication to affect change. Few state health agencies (through their MCH programs and perinatal staff) are taking action in all four arenas. This analysis concludes that there are improvements MCH programs could implement without significant expansion in their authority or resources and points out that there is an opportunity for states to be more proactive as they have the legal authority and responsibility for assuring MCH outcomes. PMID:9917467

  5. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-02-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  6. Perinatal Depression Screening and Intervention: Enhancing Health Provider Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Corder-Mabe, Joan; Austin, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The authors of this study collaborated in the analysis of public health survey data in order to inform future statewide interventions that could systematically enhance depression screening and mental health service use for women of reproductive age. The primary objective of the study was to empirically inform and test the program theory components of a motivational interviewing intervention that we anticipate will guide statewide practice and policy priorities. Methods Data were examined from a survey of healthcare practitioners statewide (n=1498) regarding their practices with and perceptions of perinatal depression care for women. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to measure two latent constructs: health provider confidence in the ability to diagnose and treat and the importance placed on screening and treatment. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test a program theory supporting motivational interviewing using a model implied relationship between confidence and importance on screening and treatment/referral practices. Results The data fit the model; the model provisionally supports motivational interviewing as an intervention influencing provider attitudes and practices surrounding perinatal depression screening and treatment/referral. Conclusions Ultimately, study findings support statewide public health efforts to expand the role of health providers in recognizing and responding to perinatal depression and suggest that motivational interviewing techniques that augment importance and confidence may lead to enhanced screening and referral/treatment outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women. PMID:22309209

  7. Perinatal taurine exposure affects adult arterial pressure control.

    PubMed

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Wyss, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant, free amino acid found in mammalian cells that contributes to many physiologic functions from that of a simple cell osmolyte to a programmer of adult health and disease. Taurine's contribution extends from conception throughout life, but its most critical exposure period is during perinatal life. In adults, taurine supplementation prevents or alleviates cardiovascular disease and related complications. In contrast, low taurine consumption coincides with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type II diabetes. This review focuses on the effects that altered perinatal taurine exposure has on long-term mechanisms that control adult arterial blood pressure and could thereby contribute to arterial hypertension through its ability to program these cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms very early in life. The modifications of these mechanisms can last a lifetime and transfer to the next generation, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms underlie the changes. The ability of perinatal taurine exposure to influence arterial pressure control mechanisms and hypertension in adult life appears to involve the regulation of growth and development, the central and autonomic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin system, glucose-insulin interaction and changes to heart, blood vessels and kidney function. PMID:23070226

  8. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Byatt, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy. PMID:26847216

  9. Iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effects on perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Pokhrel, T; Bastola, S P; Banjara, M R; Joshi, A B

    2011-06-01

    Iodine is an important micronutrient for mental growth and development. Limited information is available on the role of iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effect on perinatal outcome. We designed intervention study to assess the effect of iodine supplementation during second half pregnancy and its effect on perinatal outcomes (maternal and neonatal health). Among 60 intervened with oral iodine tablet in pregnancy and 60 control pregnant women in Sindhupalchowk District Hospital Chautara, we assessed maternal and neonatal health after the delivery. The significant differences were found among duration of pregnancy, weight of pregnant mother before and after intervention of at least three months duration (56.1 kg vs. 59.6 kg, p < 0.001), weight of neonate (3.3 kg in intervention vs. 3.0 kg in control, p < 0.001), and thyroxin hormone (1.1 ng in intervention vs. 1.2 ng in control, p < 0.001) of women between intervened and control subjects. Therefore, regular supplementation of iodine in oral form for more than three months during pregnancy preferably during early stage will bring significant positive changes in perinatal outcomes. PMID:22364098

  10. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. PMID:8311995

  11. Exposure to Perinatal Infections and Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Barichello, T; Badawy, M; Pitcher, M R; Saigal, P; Generoso, J S; Goularte, J A; Simões, L R; Quevedo, J; Carvalho, A F

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric disorder and a growing global public health issue. Notwithstanding BD has been conceptualized as a neuroprogressive illness, there are some evidences to suggest a role for neurodevelopmental pathways in the patho-etiology of this disorder. Evidences on the associations between perinatal infections and risk for bipolar disorder have been inconsistent across studies. Here, we performed a systematic review of observational studies on the relationship between exposure to perinatal pathogens and bipolar disorder. A computerized literature search of the PubMed, Embase, and PsyINFO databases till January 31(st), 2015 was performed. Twenty-three studies ultimately met inclusion criteria. Studies investigated exposure to several pathogens namely Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), Toxoplasma gondii, Influenza, and Varicella zoster virus (VZV). Overall, studies provided mixed evidences. Thus, contrary to schizophrenia, the role of perinatal infections as risk factors for BD remain inconclusive. Larger studies with a prospective design would be necessary to elucidate the role of previous exposure to infectious agents as a potential risk factor for BD. PMID:26812921

  12. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  13. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  14. Healthcare justice and human rights in perinatal medicine.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an approach to ethics of perinatal medicine in which "women and children first" plays a central role, based on the concept of healthcare justice. Healthcare justice requires that all patients receive clinical management based on their clinical needs, which are defined by deliberative (evidence-based, rigorous, transparent, and accountable) clinical judgment. All patients in perinatal medicine includes pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. Healthcare justice also protects the informed consent process, which is intended to empower the exercise of patient autonomy in the decision-making process about patient care. In the context of healthcare justice, the informed consent process should not be influenced by ethically irrelevant factors. Healthcare justice should be understood as a basis for the human rights to healthcare and to participate in decisions about one's healthcare. Healthcare justice in perinatal medicine creates an essential role for the perinatologist to be an effective advocate for pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients, i.e., for "women and children first." PMID:26811097

  15. Perinatal reduction of functional serotonin transporters results in developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, Yvet; Dirven, Bart; Janssen, Stefan; Kröhnke, Marijke; Barte, Ramona M; Middelman, Anthonieke; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing; Homberg, Judith R

    2016-10-01

    While there is strong evidence from rodent and human studies that a reduction in serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function in early-life can increase the risk for several neuropsychiatric disorders in adulthood, the effects of reduced 5-HTT function on behavior across developmental stages are underinvestigated. To elucidate how perinatal pharmacological and lifelong genetic inactivation of the 5-HTT affects behavior across development, we conducted a battery of behavioral tests in rats perinatally exposed to fluoxetine or vehicle and in 5-HTT(-/-) versus 5-HTT(+/+) rats. We measured motor-related behavior, olfactory function, grooming behavior, sensorimotor gating, object directed behavior and novel object recognition in the first three postnatal weeks and if possible the tests were repeated in adolescence and adulthood. We also measured developmental milestones such as eye opening, reflex development and body weight. We observed that both pharmacological and genetic inactivation of 5-HTT resulted in a developmental delay. Except for hypo-locomotion, most of the observed early-life effects were normalized later in life. In adolescence and adulthood we observed object directed behavior and decreased novel object recognition in the 5-HTT(-/-) rats, which might be related to the lifelong inactivation of 5-HTT. Together, these data provide an important contribution to the understanding of the effects of perinatal and lifelong 5-HTT inactivation on behavior across developmental stages. PMID:27208789

  16. Perinatal mortality and season of birth in captive wild ungulates.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, J K; Gaskin, C D; Markham, J

    1987-04-18

    The magnitude of perinatal mortality in 50 species of captive wild ungulates born at the Zoological Society of London's collections at Regent's Park and Whipsnade between 1975 and 1985 is reviewed. Thirty-five per cent of 2471 ungulates born during this 11 year period died before six months old and most deaths occurred in the first week after birth. Similar findings have been reported at other zoos and in the wild. The seasonal distribution of births is described in 43 species. Significantly higher perinatal mortality was found in species which breed throughout the year (notably axis deer and sitatunga) than in seasonal breeders, and differences associated with system of management were apparent in some species (eg, mouflon and scimitar-horned oryx) kept at Regent's Park and Whipsnade. Considerable advances have been made in the management of captive wild ungulates in recent years but it is likely that perinatal mortality rates could be further reduced by improved management and veterinary care of the dams and neonates. PMID:3590601

  17. Familial perinatal liver disease and fetal thrombotic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M; Grossman, Andrew B; Ruchelli, Eduardo D

    2008-01-01

    The association between placental fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV) and perinatal liver disease was not recognized until 2002, when Dahms and colleagues reported a series of 3 patients in whom severe liver disease developed in the first 2 days of life. All had abnormal liver histology and showed a variety of abnormalities, including Budd-Chiari syndrome, changes mimicking extrahepatic obstruction, lobular fibrosis, cholestasis, and hepatocyte giant cell transformation. We report recurrent significant perinatal liver disease in a family, associated with proven FTV in at least 1 pregnancy. A 30-year-old gravida 4 female with a history of heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate A1298C mutation had a normal 1st pregnancy and then experienced an intrauterine fetal demise at 38 weeks of gestation. Placental examination revealed extensive occlusive and mural thrombi of chorionic vessels associated with a large focus of avascular villi. Histologic examination of the liver showed extensive giant cell transformation and hepatocyte dropout. No excess hemosiderin pigment was present in the liver, pancreas, or heart. A 3rd pregnancy produced a live-born term infant with transient neonatal cholestasis. The 4th pregnancy also produced a term neonate who presented with acute hepatic failure of unknown cause, ultimately requiring liver transplantation. Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy is an underrecognized association with perinatal liver disease that may be associated with abnormal liver perfusion and that may recur in families, especially when a genetic thrombophilia is present. PMID:17990937

  18. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amritha; Byatt, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy. PMID:26847216

  19. The role of inflammation in perinatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina; Ferriero, Donna M.; Vannucci, Susan J.; Levison, Steven W.; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Gressens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is increasingly recognized as being a critical contributor to both normal development and injury outcome in the immature brain. The focus of this Review is to highlight important differences in innate and adaptive immunity in immature versus adult brain, which support the notion that the consequences of inflammation will be entirely different depending on context and stage of CNS development. Perinatal brain injury can result from neonatal encephalopathy and perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke, usually at term, but also in preterm infants. Inflammation occurs before, during and after brain injury at term, and modulates vulnerability to and development of brain injury. Preterm birth, on the other hand, is often a result of exposure to inflammation at a very early developmental phase, which affects the brain not only during fetal life, but also over a protracted period of postnatal life in a neonatal intensive care setting, influencing critical phases of myelination and cortical plasticity. Neuroinflammation during the perinatal period can increase the risk of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease throughout childhood and adulthood, and is, therefore, of concern to the broader group of physicians who care for these individuals. PMID:25686754

  20. Regionally specific alterations in the low-affinity GABAA receptor following perinatal exposure to diazepam.

    PubMed

    Gruen, R J; Elsworth, J D; Roth, R H

    1990-04-23

    Alterations in a low affinity form of the GABAA receptor were examined with [3H]bicuculline methylchloride in the adult rat following perinatal exposure to diazepam. Perinatal exposure resulted in a significant reduction in [3H]bicuculline binding in the cingulate cortex. A significant decrease in the ability of GABA to displace bound [3H]bicuculline was observed only in the hypothalamus. The results suggest that the effects of perinatal exposure to diazepam are regionally specific and that benzodiazepine receptors and low affinity GABAA receptors are functionally linked during the perinatal period. PMID:2162709

  1. Globalization and perinatal medicine--how do we respond?

    PubMed

    Kurjak, Asim; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Stanojevic, Milan

    2010-04-01

    Globalization is both inevitable and usually desirable and contains advantageous and disadvantageous issues. It is a source of both hope and of apprehension and is an accelerating process in flow of information, technology, goods and services, and production means. Globalization has a complex influence on perinatal health. The bonds that link perinatologists together transcend geographic, political, religious, and lingual differences, resulting in a globalization that optimizes perinatal care. In this review, we will discuss some of the global problems facing modern perinatologists. Close to 1.5 billion people in the world, live in extreme poverty, a situation which is particularly stark in the developing world, where 80% of them live. Poor people have little or no access to qualified health services and education, and do not participate in the decisions critical to their day-to-day lives. Poverty cannot be defined solely in terms of lack of income. A person, a family, even a nation is not deemed poor only because of low economic resources. Little or no access to health services, lack of access to safe water and adequate nutrition, illiteracy or low educational level, and a distorted perception of rights and needs are also essential components of poverty. Expression of poverty in perinatal health care in developing countries are high maternal death and morbidity rates, huge perinatal and childhood losses, and high birth rates. There are good reasons to define it as a global tragedy in our time. Although the mankind has come quite far because the development of civilization and more advances in the health care were made during the past 100 years than in all previous human history, some inhabitants of our planet are not able to experience it. According to some data, every 3 s a newborn dies, and every minute a pregnant woman dies in the globalized world. All together over 10 million deaths every year, which indicates that health security is not strong enough. It is

  2. Term perinatal mortality audit in the Netherlands 2010–2012: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Eskes, Martine; Waelput, Adja J M; Erwich, Jan Jaap H M; Brouwers, Hens A A; Ravelli, Anita C J; Achterberg, Peter W; Merkus, Hans (J) M W M; Bruinse, Hein W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the implementation and first results of a term perinatal internal audit by a standardised method. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting All 90 Dutch hospitals with obstetric/paediatric departments linked to community practices of midwives, general practitioners in their attachment areas, organised in perinatal cooperation groups (PCG). Population The population consisted of 943 registered term perinatal deaths occurring in 2010–2012 with detailed information, including 707 cases with completed audit results. Main outcome measures Participation in the audit, perinatal death classification, identification of substandard factors (SSF), SSF in relation to death, conclusive recommendations for quality improvement in perinatal care and antepartum risk selection at the start of labour. Results After the introduction of the perinatal audit in 2010, all PCGs participated. They organised 645 audit sessions, with an average of 31 healthcare professionals per session. Of all 1102 term perinatal deaths (2.3/1000) data were registered for 86% (943) and standardised anonymised audit results for 64% (707). In 53% of the cases at least one SSF was identified. Non-compliance to guidelines (35%) and deviation from usual professional care (41%) were the most frequent SSF. There was a (very) probable relation between the SSF and perinatal death for 8% of all cases. This declined over the years: from 10% (n=23) in 2010 to 5% (n=10) in 2012 (p=0.060). Simultaneously term perinatal mortality decreased from 2.3 to 2.0/1000 births (p<0.00001). Possibilities for improvement were identified in the organisation of care (35%), guidelines or usual care (19%) and in documentation (15%). More pregnancies were antepartum selected as high risk, 70% in 2010 and 84% in 2012 (p=0.0001). Conclusions The perinatal audit is implemented nationwide in all obstetrical units in the Netherlands in a short time period. It is possible that the audit contributed to the decrease in

  3. Perinatal Factors, Parenting Behavior, and Reactive Aggression: Does Cortisol Reactivity Mediate This Developmental Risk Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Stacy R.; Schechter, Julia C.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of action that link perinatal risk and the development of aggressive behavior. The aim of this study was to examine whether perinatal risk and parenting interacted to specifically predict reactive aggression, as opposed to general aggressive behavior, and to examine cortisol reactivity as a mediator of this…

  4. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA, DECEMBER 1996-DECEMBER 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy and Perinatal Health, Inner Mongolia, China, December 1996- December 1999
    Subtitle: Pregnancy and Perinatal Health, Inner Mongolia, China
    Authors: Z. Liu1, D.T. Lobdell2, L. He1, M. Yang1, R. Kwok2, J. Mumford2
    Affiliations:
    1 Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, ...

  5. Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality in Offsprings of Diabetic Mothers in Qatif, Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dabbous, Ibrahim A. Al-; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality of diabetic mothers and their offspring in Qatif, Saudi Arabia. Suggests diabetes mellitus in pregnancy may be a common problem in Saudi Arabia, as poor maternal diabetic control results in high perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results suggest that health education and improved coverage of…

  6. Maternal Stress and Emotional Status during the Perinatal Period and Childhood Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anhalt, Karla; Telzrow, Cathy F.; Brown, Courtney L.

    2007-01-01

    An emerging literature suggests that maternal distress during the prenatal and perinatal period may adversely affect offspring development. The association between maternal stress and emotional status in the perinatal period (defined as 1 month after birth) and adjustment of first-grade children was examined in 948 mother-child dyads from the…

  7. Marketing and Quality of Life: A Model for Improving Perinatal Health Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, G. E. Alan; Smith, Leah T.; Stamps, Bunnie V.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: A marketing/business model using non-traditional Quality of Life measures was developed to assess perinatal health status on a micro-geographic level. This perinatal health status needs assessment study for Georgia South Central Region was conducted for the years 1994-1999. The model may be applied to any geographic unit in the…

  8. Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women Users of Illegal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tenilson Amaral; Bersusa, Ana Aparecida Sanches; Santos, Tatiana Fiorelli Dos; Aquino, Márcia Maria Auxiliadora de; Mariani Neto, Corintio

    2016-04-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perinatal outcomes in pregnant women who use illicit drugs. Methods A retrospective observational study of patients who, at the time of delivery, were sent to or who spontaneously sought a public maternity hospital in the eastern area of São Paulo city. We compared the perinatal outcomes of two distinct groups of pregnant women - illicit drugs users and non-users - that gave birth in the same period and analyzed the obstetric and neonatal variables. We used Student's t-test to calculate the averages among the groups, and the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test to compare categorical data from each group. Results We analyzed 166 women (83 users and 83 non-users) in both groups with a mean of age of 26 years. Ninety-five percent of the drug users would use crack or pure cocaine alone or associated with other psychoactive substances during pregnancy. Approximately half of the users group made no prenatal visit, compared with 2.4% in the non-users group (p < 0.001). Low birth weight (2,620 g versus 3,333 g on average, p < 0.001) and maternal syphilis (15.7% versus 0%, p < 0.001) were associated with the use of these illicit drugs. Conclusions The use of illicit drugs, mainly crack cocaine, represents an important perinatal risk. Any medical intervention in this population should combine adherence to prenatal care with strategies for reducing maternal exposure to illicit drugs. PMID:27088708

  9. Asfotase Alfa Treatment Improves Survival for Perinatal and Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Ozono, Keiichi; Riese, Richard; Moseley, Scott; Melian, Agustin; Thompson, David D.; Bishop, Nicholas; Hofmann, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism that, in its most severe perinatal and infantile forms, results in 50–100% mortality, typically from respiratory complications. Objectives: Our objective was to better understand the effect of treatment with asfotase alfa, a first-in-class enzyme replacement therapy, on mortality in neonates and infants with severe HPP. Design/Setting: Data from patients with the perinatal and infantile forms of HPP in two ongoing, multicenter, multinational, open-label, phase 2 interventional studies of asfotase alfa treatment were compared with data from similar patients from a retrospective natural history study. Patients: Thirty-seven treated patients (median treatment duration, 2.7 years) and 48 historical controls of similar chronological age and HPP characteristics. Interventions: Treated patients received asfotase alfa as sc injections either 1 mg/kg six times per week or 2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Main Outcome Measures: Survival, skeletal health quantified radiographically on treatment, and ventilatory status were the main outcome measures for this study. Results: Asfotase alfa was associated with improved survival in treated patients vs historical controls: 95% vs 42% at age 1 year and 84% vs 27% at age 5 years, respectively (P < .0001, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Whereas 5% (1/20) of the historical controls who required ventilatory assistance survived, 76% (16/21) of the ventilated and treated patients survived, among whom 75% (12/16) were weaned from ventilatory support. This better respiratory outcome accompanied radiographic improvements in skeletal mineralization and health. Conclusions: Asfotase alfa mineralizes the HPP skeleton, including the ribs, and improves respiratory function and survival in life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP. PMID:26529632

  10. Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the experiences and expectations of women across the continuum of antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care is important to assess the quality of maternal care and to determine problematic areas which could be improved. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with maternal satisfaction with hospital-based perinatal care in Serbia. Methods Our survey was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 50% of women who expected childbirths during the study period from all 76 public institutions with obstetric departments in Serbia. The following three composite outcome variables were constructed: satisfaction with technical and professional aspects of care; communication and interpersonal aspects of care; and environmental factors. Results We analyzed 34,431 completed questionnaires (84.2% of the study sample). The highest and lowest average satisfaction scores (4.43 and 3.25, respectively) referred to the overall participation of midwives during delivery and the quality of food served in the hospital, respectively. Younger mothers and multiparas were less concerned with the environmental conditions (OR = 0.55, p = 0.006; OR = 1.82, p = 0.004). Final model indicated that mothers informed of patients’ rights, pregnancy and delivery through the Maternal Counseling Service were more likely to be satisfied with all three outcome variables. The highest value of the Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was between the overall satisfaction score and satisfaction with communication and interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusions Our study illuminated the importance of interpersonal aspects of care and education for maternal satisfaction. Improvement of the environmental conditions in hospitals, the WHO program, Baby-friendly Hospital, and above all providing all pregnant women with antenatal education, are recommendations which would

  11. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C.; McFarland, Ashley M.; Meserve, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation–dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  12. Perinatal Changes in Mitral and Aortic Valve Structure and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Post, Allison D.; Laucirica, Daniel R.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    At birth, the mechanical environment of valves changes radically as fetal shunts close and pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances change. Given that valves are reported to be mechanosensitive, we investigated remodeling induced by perinatal changes by examining compositional and structural differences of aortic and mitral valves (AVs, MVs) between 2-day-old and 3rd fetal trimester porcine valves using immunohistochemistry and Movat pentachrome staining. Aortic valve composition changed more with birth than the MV, consistent with a greater change in AV hemodynamics. At 2 days, AV demonstrated a trend of greater versican and elastin (P = 0.055), as well as greater hyaluronan turnover (hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis, P = 0.049) compared with the 3rd-trimester samples. The AVs also demonstrated decreases in proteins related to collagen synthesis and fibrillogenesis with birth, including procollagen I, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, biglycan (all P ≤ 0.005), and decorin (P = 0.059, trend). Both AVs and MVs demonstrated greater delineation between the leaflet layers in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples, and AVs demonstrated greater saffron-staining collagen intensity, suggesting more mature collagen in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples (each P < 0.05). The proportion of saffron-staining collagen also increased in AV with birth (P < 0.05). The compositional and structural changes that occur with birth, as noted in this study, likely are important to proper neonatal valve function. Furthermore, normal perinatal changes in hemodynamics often do not occur in congenital valve disease; the corresponding perinatal matrix maturation may also be lacking and could contribute to poor function of congenitally malformed valves. PMID:20536360

  13. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C; McFarland, Ashley M; Meserve, Lee A

    2010-11-30

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation-dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  14. Epidemiological Risk Factors and Perinatal Outcomes of Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lissa Fernandes Garcia; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Crott, Gerson Claudio; Okido, Marcos Masaru; Berezowski, Aderson Tadeu; Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To identify the epidemiological risk factors for congenital anomalies (CAs) and the impact of these fetal malformations on the perinatal outcomes. Methods This prospective cohort study comprised 275 women whose fetuses had CAs. Maternal variables to establish potential risk factors for each group of CA and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. The primary outcome was CA. Secondary outcomes included: fetal growth restriction (FGR); fetal distress (FD); premature rupture of membranes (PROM); oligohydramnios or polyhydramnios; preterm delivery (PTD); stillbirth; cesarean section; low birth weight; Apgar score < 7 at the 1st and 5th minutes; need for assisted ventilation at birth; neonatal infection; need for surgical treatment; early neonatal death; and hospitalization time. Chi-square (χ(2)) test and multilevel regression analysis were applied to compare the groups and determine the effects of maternal characteristics on the incidence of CAs. Results The general prevalence of CAs was of 2.4%. Several maternal characteristics were associated to CAs, such as: age; skin color; level of education; parity; folic acid supplementation; tobacco use; and history of previous miscarriage. There were no significant differences among the CA groups in relation to FGR, FD, PROM, 1-minute Apgar score > 7, and need for assisted ventilation at birth. On the other hand, the prevalence of the other considered outcomes varied significantly among groups. Preterm delivery was significantly more frequent in gastrointestinal tract/abdominal wall defects. The stillbirth rate was increased in all CAs, mainly in isolated fetal hydrops (odds ratio [OR]: 27.13; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 2.90-253.47). Hospitalization time was higher for the urinary tract and congenital heart disease groups (p < 0.01). Neonatal death was significantly less frequent in the central nervous system anomalies group. Conclusion It was possible to identify several risk factors for CAs

  15. Unmarried at delivery. II. Perinatal morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Golding, J; Henriques, J; Thomas, P

    1986-12-01

    The British Birth Survey included 98% of all deliveries in Great Britain in one week of April 1970. For this report, singleton births to 934 Single (never-married), 301 Once-married (widowed, separated or divorced) and 15 225 Married mothers were compared. After allowing for maternal age, parity and smoking history, there was still a reduction in birth weight in the two unmarried groups, which was mainly associated with pre-term gestation rather than growth retardation. Perinatal mortality was considerably elevated, especially for the Once-married. The excess mortality was mainly among the 'Macerated normally formed stillbirths' and 'Asphyxia' categories of the Wigglesworth classification. PMID:3803267

  16. My approach to performing a perinatal or neonatal autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, H C

    2006-01-01

    An opportunity to determine the cause of death, factors that may have a role in it, and the extent and cause of malformations is provided by perinatal autopsy. The family may be assisted in finding closure after the death of their infant by the information obtained. Insight into classifying infants appearing normal into one of three groups, small, appropriate and large for gestational age, has been provided, as each group tends to have specific causes of death. In infants with congenital anomalies, patterns of malformation may lead us to the diagnosis. An accurate diagnosis is required to provide counselling for a subsequent pregnancy. PMID:16803946

  17. Maternal physical activity, birth weight and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Briend, A

    1980-11-01

    As a result of the acquisition of upright posture, adaptation to muscular exercise seems to be unique in man. It involves a redistribution of the cardiac output mediated by the sympathetic system towards priority organs which apparently do not include the pregnant uterus. This could explain the poor tolerance of the human fetus to maternal exercise. The hypothesis is supported by the independence of a detrimental effect of work from the effect of maternal nutrition and by an influence of maternal posture in late pregnancy on its outcome. Possible relations between maternal activity before and during late pregnancy and perinatal mortality are discussed in the context of this hypothesis. PMID:7005626

  18. Perinatal opiate treatment delays growth of cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, A A; Hammer, R P

    1990-07-31

    Basilar dendritic arborizations of layer II-III pyramidal neurons in primary somatosensory cortex of 5-day-old male rats were reconstructed following perinatal morphine, morphine/naltrexone, or saline vehicle administration. Morphine treatment was observed to reduce total dendritic length. This effect was limited to higher order dendritic branches, with terminal dendrites manifesting the greatest reduction of length. The action of morphine was presumably mediated by opiate receptors, since concurrent naltrexone administration completely reversed morphine effects on dendritic length and branching. These results suggest that opiates act during late ontogenesis to affect dendritic growth in cerebral cortex. PMID:2172870

  19. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure. PMID:26401205

  20. Can the preterm lung recover from perinatal stress?

    PubMed

    Hütten, Matthias C; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-12-01

    After birth, adequate lung function is necessary for the successful adaptation of a preterm baby. Both prenatal and postnatal insults and therapeutic interventions have an immediate effect on lung function and gas exchange but also interfere with fetal and neonatal lung development. Prenatal insults like chorioamnionitis and prenatal interventions like maternal glucocorticosteroids interact but might also determine the preterm baby's lung response to postnatal interventions ("second hit") like supplementation of oxygen and drug therapy. We review current experimental and clinical findings on the influence of different perinatal factors on preterm lung development and discuss how well-established interventions in neonatal care might be adapted to attenuate postnatal lung injury. PMID:27075524

  1. Meconium in perinatal imaging: associations and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Jerdee, Theodore; Newman, Beverley; Rubesova, Erika

    2015-04-01

    An abnormal location, distribution, volume, or appearance of meconium is associated with a spectrum of bowel abnormalities, including atresia, obstruction, perforation, fistula, aganglionosis, immaturity, and absorptive dysfunction. This review discusses the fetal and perinatal imaging of these entities, their differential diagnoses, clinical significance, and appropriate imaging workup. Understanding the spectrum of normal and abnormal, specific and nonspecific appearances of meconium and its associated abnormalities on imaging will provide a practical, useful framework for performing and interpreting imaging studies and guiding clinical management. PMID:26001945

  2. Illness perceptions associated with perinatal depression treatment use.

    PubMed

    O'Mahen, Heather A; Flynn, Heather A; Chermack, Stephen; Marcus, Sheila

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between psychological beliefs about depression and depression treatment use was examined in depressed pregnant and postpartum women using the Common Sense Model as a framework (CSM; Leventhal H, Nerenz DR, Steele DF (1984) A handbook of psychology and health illness representations and coping with health threats. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.). Pregnant women who screened >/ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; Cox et al. Br J Psychiatry 150:782-786, 1987) completed measures of depression symptoms, perceptions and treatment at three time points through 6 weeks postpartum. Understanding modifiable beliefs may be useful in improving low rates of perinatal depression treatment use. PMID:19471852

  3. Two children with both arm ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    McKasson, Marilyn J; Golomb, Meredith R

    2011-12-01

    It is rare for both limb ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke to occur in the same child during the perinatal period. Two children who appear to have had perinatal emboli to both an arm and a middle cerebral artery territory are presented here. One child required amputation of the ischemic limb below the shoulder, and the other required skin grafts to the distal ischemic fingers. Each of these children later received cerebral magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of developmental delay and was found to have what appeared to be old perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Both children were homozygous for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene variant. Eight other children with perinatal limb ischemia and stroke were found on literature review; several also had delayed diagnosis of perinatal stroke. This report examines the approach to diagnosis and treatment in each of these and makes suggestions for the similar cases in the future. PMID:21862833

  4. Under-reporting of maternal and perinatal adverse events in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Cynthia; Armstrong, Sarah; Kim, Boa; Masson, Vicki; Sadler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases, identified by the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee (PMMRC), that are also reported within the annual serious adverse events (SAEs) reports published by the Health Quality and Safety Commission (HQSC). Setting Nationally collated data from the PMMRC and HQSC, New Zealand. Participants Analysis of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity data 2009–2012. Interventions Every SAE report published by the HQSC from 2009 to 2012 was scrutinised for maternal and perinatal cases using the case history provided by district health boards (DHB). Further detail of each case was requested from each DHB to establish whether they had been identified as maternal or perinatal mortalities or morbidities by the PMMRC. Primary outcome measure The proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases identified by HQSC SAE reports, compared with PMMRC reporting. Results 58 maternal and perinatal SAEs were identified from the SAE reports 2009–2012. Of these, 50 fit under the PMMRC reporting definitions, all of which were also reported by the PMMRC. In the same time frame, the PMMRC captured 536 potentially avoidable maternal and perinatal mortalities and morbidities that fitted the HQSC SAE definition. Fewer than 9% of maternal and perinatal SAEs are captured by the HQSC SAE reporting process. Conclusions The rate of maternal and perinatal adverse event reporting to the HQSC is low and not improving annually, compared with PMMRC reporting of eligible events. This is of concern as these events may not be adequately reviewed locally, and because the SAE report is considered a measure of quality by the DHBs and the HQSC. Currently, the reporting of SAEs to the HQSC cannot be considered a reliable way to monitor or improve the quality of maternity services provided in New Zealand. PMID:26204910

  5. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  6. Multiple Endocrine Disrupting Effects in Rats Perinatally Exposed to Butylparaben.

    PubMed

    Boberg, J; Axelstad, M; Svingen, T; Mandrup, K; Christiansen, S; Vinggaard, A M; Hass, U

    2016-07-01

    Parabens comprise a group of preservatives commonly added to cosmetics, lotions, and other consumer products. Butylparaben has estrogenic and antiandrogenic properties and is known to reduce sperm counts in rats following perinatal exposure. Whether butylparaben exposure can affect other endocrine sensitive endpoints, however, remains largely unknown. In this study, time-mated Wistar rats (n = 18) were orally exposed to 0, 10, 100, or 500 mg/kg bw/d of butylparaben from gestation day 7 to pup day 22. Several endocrine-sensitive endpoints were adversely affected. In the 2 highest dose groups, the anogenital distance of newborn male and female offspring was significantly reduced, and in prepubertal females, ovary weights were reduced and mammary gland outgrowth was increased. In male offspring, sperm count was significantly reduced at all doses from 10 mg/kg bw/d. Testicular CYP19a1 (aromatase) expression was reduced in prepubertal, but not adult animals exposed to butylparaben. In adult testes, Nr5a1 expression was reduced at all doses, indicating persistent disruption of steroidogenesis. Prostate histology was altered at prepuberty and adult prostate weights were reduced in the high dose group. Thus, butylparaben exerted endocrine disrupting effects on both male and female offspring. The observed adverse developmental effect on sperm count at the lowest dose is highly relevant to risk assessment, as this is the lowest observed adverse effect level in a study on perinatal exposure to butylparaben. PMID:27122241

  7. Bone health in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Siberry, George K

    2013-01-01

    The long-term impact on bone health of lifelong HIV infection and prolonged ART in growing and developing children is not yet known. Measures of bone health in youth must be interpreted in the context of expected developmental and physiologic changes in bone mass, size, density and strength that occur from fetal through adult life. Low bone mineral density (BMD) appears to be common in perinatally HIV-infected youth, especially outside of high-income settings, but data are limited and interpretation complicated by the need for better pediatric norms. The potential negative effects of tenofovir on BMD and bone mass accrual are of particular concern as this drug may be used more widely in younger children. Emphasizing good nutrition, calcium and vitamin D sufficiency, weight-bearing exercise and avoidance of alcohol and smoking are effective and available approaches to maintain and improve bone health in all settings. More data are needed to inform therapies and monitoring for HIV-infected youth with proven bone fragility. While very limited data suggest lack of marked increase in fracture risk for youth with perinatal HIV infection, the looming concern for these children is that they may fail to attain their expected peak bone mass in early adulthood which could increase their risk for fractures and osteoporosis later in adulthood. PMID:23782476

  8. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  9. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Sarmento, Melina Vaz; Polli, Janaina Borges; Groff, Daniela de Paoli; Petry, Patrícia; de Mattos, Vinícius Freitas; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS). METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%). Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%); multiparous mothers (92.6%); vaginal delivery (77%); preterm birth (34.6%); birth weight <2500g (33.3%), and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75%) and in the 5th minute (42.9%). About half of them (53%) died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients. PMID:24473950

  10. Timing of cardiomyocyte growth, maturation, and attrition in perinatal sheep.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Sonnet S; Louey, Samantha; Giraud, George D; Thornburg, Kent L; Faber, J Job

    2015-10-01

    Studies in altricial rodents attribute dramatic changes in perinatal cardiomyocyte growth, maturation, and attrition to stimuli associated with birth. Our purpose was to determine whether birth is a critical trigger controlling perinatal cardiomyocyte growth, maturation and attrition in a precocial large mammal, sheep (Ovis aries). Hearts from 0-61 d postnatal lambs were dissected or enzymatically dissociated. Cardiomyocytes were measured by micromorphometry, cell cycle activity assessed by immunohistochemistry, and nuclear number counted after DNA staining. Integration of this new data with published fetal data from our laboratory demonstrate that a newly appreciated >30% decrease in myocyte number occurred in the last 10 d of gestation (P < 0.0005) concomitant with an increase in cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (P < 0.05), indicative of apoptosis. Bisegmental linear regressions show that most changes in myocyte growth kinetics occur before birth (median = 15.2 d; P < 0.05). Right ventricular but not left ventricular cell number increases in the neonate, by 68% between birth and 60 d postnatal (P = 0.028). We conclude that in sheep few developmental changes in cardiomyocytes result from birth, excepting the different postnatal degrees of free wall hypertrophy between the ventricles. Furthermore, myocyte number is reduced in both ventricles immediately before term, but proliferation increases myocyte number in the neonatal right ventricle. PMID:26139099

  11. Perinatal outcome of pre-eclampsia in parous women.

    PubMed

    Jian-Ying, Y; Xia, X

    2013-08-01

    Women with a second and recurrent pre-eclampsia pregnancy have more adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with women with pre-eclampsia in the first pregnancy. A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the clinical characteristics and perinatal outcomes of pre-eclampsia in parous women who had complicated pre-eclampsia in previous pregnancies (n = 69) and uncomplicated pre-eclampsia in previous pregnancies (n = 312) from 2006 to 2010, in the Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital. No statistical significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of: maternal age, admission blood pressure and BMI; prenatal care times, hospitalisation time, laboratory results and incident rates of complications. The incident and delivery weeks were earlier and the renal injury, caesarean section and small for gestational age (SGA) incidence rates were higher in recurrent pre-eclampsia women. Women with recurrent pre-eclampsia had adverse perinatal outcomes when compared with parous women with pre-eclampsia who had not had pre-eclampsia in prior pregnancies. PMID:23919854

  12. Neurobehavioral and somatic effects of perinatal PCB exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Overmann, S.R.; Kostas, J.; Wilson, L.R.; Shain, W.; Bush, B.

    1987-10-01

    Developing rats were exposed to TCBs via provision of diets containing 0.02 (no PCB added), 2.4, 26, or 269 ppm Aroclor 1254 to sperm-positive female rats from mating to weaning of their pups. Provision of the 269 ppm diet decreased the number of impregnated rats that delivered a litter and lowered pup birth weight, and most pups died within 7 days of birth. Preweaning pup growth was reduced in the 26 ppm condition and slightly reduced in the 2.5 ppm condition. The ontogeny of negative geotaxis, auditory startle, and air righting was delayed in pups from the 26 ppm condition. Pups in the 2.5 ppm condition had slightly delayed development of auditory startle. Maximal electroshock seizure tests on postweaning rats showed that perinatal PCB exposure decreased seizure severity of both the 2.5 and 26 ppm groups. PCB exposure increased pup liver weights at birth and dam and pup liver weights at weaning. Spleen and thymus weights were lower in PCB-exposed pups, while brain weights were unaffected. Analytical determination of PCB levels in brain showed greater maternal transfer of PCBs during lactation than during gestation. Elevated PCB levels were detectable in brains of perinatally exposed adult rats.

  13. Early Language Development After Peri-natal Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Trauner, Doris A.; Eshagh, Karin; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Bates, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Early unilateral brain damage has different implications for language development than does similar damage in adults, given the plasticity of the developing brain. The goal of this study was to examine early markers of language and gesture at 12 and 24 months in children who had peri-natal right hemisphere (RH) or left hemisphere (LH) stroke (n = 71), compared with typically developing controls (n = 126). Parents completed the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI): Words & Gestures (12 month data point), or the CDI: Words & Sentences (24 month data point). Statistical analyses were performed on percentile scores using analysis of variance techniques. At 12 months, there were no differences among groups for Words Understood, Phrases Understood or Words Produced. At 24 months, both lesion groups scored significantly lower than controls on Word Production, Irregular Words, and Mean Length of Sentences, but lesion groups did not differ from each other. In longitudinal subset of participants, expressive vocabulary failed to progress as expected from 12 to 24 months in the stroke group, with no differences based on lesion side. Gesture and word production were dissociated in the left hemisphere subjects. Findings suggest that early language development after peri-natal stroke takes a different course from that of typical language development, perhaps reflecting brain reorganization secondary to plasticity in the developing brain. PMID:23711573

  14. Pregnant African American women's attitudes toward perinatal depression prevention.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Sherryl H; Dimidjian, Sona; Williams, Kristen G

    2013-01-01

    Depression during the perinatal period is common, debilitating, and consequential for women and their children, particularly among low income African American women. Viable approaches to prevention of depression have emerged. Yet little is known about women's preferences for approaches to preventing depression. A sample of 60 pregnant, low-income African American women seeking routine prenatal care was presented with standardized descriptions of three approaches to depression prevention (pharmacotherapy and two psychosocial approaches) and measures of preferences, perceived credibility, and personal reactions to each approach. Women also completed measures of perceived barriers and facilitators and current depression. Consistent with expectations, both of the psychosocial approaches were rated as more strongly preferred, more credible, and associated with more positive personal reactions relative to the pharmacotherapy approach. Depression did not alter women's preferences among the approaches. Contrary to prediction, women with clinically significant levels of depression did not find the pharmacotherapy approach to be more credible or to have more favorable personal reactions to it than women with low depression symptom levels. Exploration of women's perceptions of barriers revealed the importance of logistics, beliefs, and stigma barriers whereas women reported that concern about depression being impairing and ease of pragmatics would both facilitate engagement with preventive interventions. The findings suggest the need to examine the role of preferences in tests of the effectiveness of approaches to the prevention of perinatal depression in order to enhance service delivery among low income African American women. PMID:23356356

  15. Perinatal Immunotoxicity: Why Adult Exposure Assessment Fails to Predict Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has pointed to the developing immune system as a remarkably sensitive toxicologic target for environmental chemicals and drugs. In fact, the perinatal period before and just after birth is replete with dynamic immune changes, many of which do not occur in adults. These include not only the basic maturation and distribution of immune cell types and selection against autoreactive lymphocytes but also changes designed specifically to protect the pregnancy against immune-mediated miscarriage. The newborn is then faced with critical immune maturational adjustments to achieve an immune balance necessary to combat myriad childhood and later-life diseases. All these processes set the fetus and neonate completely apart from the adult regarding immunotoxicologic risk. Yet for decades, safety evaluation has relied almost exclusively upon exposure of the adult immune system to predict perinatal immune risk. Recent workshops and forums have suggested a benefit in employing alternative exposures that include exposure throughout early life stages. However, issues remain concerning when and where such applications might be required. In this review we discuss the reasons why immunotoxic assessment is important for current childhood diseases and why adult exposure assessment cannot predict the effect of xenobiotics on the developing immune system. It also provides examples of developmental immunotoxicants where age-based risk appears to differ. Finally, it stresses the need to replace adult exposure assessment for immune evaluation with protocols that can protect the developing immune system. PMID:16581533

  16. Perinatal problems in developing countries: lessons learned and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Kurjak, A; Bekavac, I

    2001-01-01

    Every year, approximately 600,000 women die of pregnancy-related causes--98% of these deaths occur in developing countries. Complications of pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death and disability among women of reproductive age in developing countries. Of all human development indicators, the maternal mortality ratio shows the greatest discrepancy between developed and developing countries. In fact, maternal mortality itself contributes to underdevelopment, because of its severe impact on the lives of young children, the family and society in general. Furthermore, in addition to more than half a million maternal deaths each year 7 million perinatal deaths are recorded and 8 million infants die during the first year of life. Maternal morbidity and mortality as well as perinatal mortality can be reduced through the synergistic effect of combined interventions, without first attaining high levels of economic development. These include: education for all; universal access to basic health services and nutrition before, during and after childbirth; access to family planning services; attendance at birth by professional health workers and access to good quality care in case of complications; and policies that raise women's social and economic status, and their access to property, as well as the labor force. PMID:11447922

  17. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of dietary perinatal Trifolium pratense

    PubMed Central

    Daglioglu, Suzan

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential estrogenic effects of perinatal dietary phytoestrogens on the rat uterus. Pregnant rats were divided to three groups provided the following diets: (1) rat chow, (2) rat chow with 7.5% Trifolium (T.) pratense, or (3) rat chow supplemented with 17β-estradiol (0.5 mg/kg). The dams in each group were kept on the same diet during pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring were euthanized on day 21 at which time body and organ weights were recorded and tissue samples were taken for histology. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) levels. Our results revealed estrogen-like biological effects of perinatal T. pratense exposure. Relative uterus and ovary weights in the experimental groups were increased compared to control. The number of uterine glands and luminal epithelium heights were also increased. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in the immunostaining intensity of ERα and PR between the groups. PMID:21586870

  18. Engaging and Retaining Abused Women in Perinatal Home Visitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Bullock, Linda; Bhandari, Shreya; Ghazarian, Sharon; Udo, Ifeyinwa E.; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy affects 0.9% to 17% of women and affects maternal health significantly. The impact of IPV extends to the health of children, including an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and the neonatal period, mental health problems, and cognitive delays. Despite substantial sequelae, there is limited research substantiating best practices for engaging and retaining high-risk families in perinatal home visiting (HV) programs, which have been shown to improve infant development and reduce maltreatment. METHODS: The Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) is a multistate longitudinal study testing the effectiveness of a structured IPV intervention integrated into health department perinatal HV programs. The DOVE intervention, based on an empowerment model, combined 2 evidence-based interventions: a 10-minute brochure-based IPV intervention and nurse home visitation. RESULTS: Across all sites, 689 referrals were received from participating health departments. A total of 339 abused pregnant women were eligible for randomization; 42 women refused, and 239 women were randomly assigned (124 DOVE; 115 usual care), resulting in a 71% recruitment rate. Retention rates from baseline included 93% at delivery, 80% at 3 months, 76% at 6 months, and 72% at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Challenges for HV programs include identifying and retaining abused pregnant women in their programs. DOVE strategies for engaging and retaining abused pregnant women should be integrated into HV programs’ federal government mandates for the appropriate identification and intervention of women and children exposed to IPV. PMID:24187115

  19. Infant and perinatal pulmonary hypoplasia frequently associated with brainstem hypodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Mingrone, Rosaria; Lavezzi, Anna M; Matturri, Luigi

    2009-04-01

    Recent anatomo-pathological studies have revealed a frequent associated hypoplasia of both arcuate nucleus and lungs in stillbirths. The purpose of this study is to analyze the lung and brainstem development in sudden unexplained perinatal death and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A total of 51 cases were investigated. A complete autopsy was performed in each case. Anatomo-pathologic examination of the central autonomic nervous system included an in-depth study on histological serial sections of the brains where the main structures participating in control of the vital functions are located. The stage of lung development was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic criteria. In 52.9% of cases, a pulmonary hypoplasia was detected. The pulmonary hypoplasia was significantly more frequent in the SIDS group compared to the sudden perinatal unexplained death groups (p < 0.05). In 72.5% of cases, histological examination of the brainstem on serial sections showed hypodevelopment of the brainstem nuclei, particularly hypoplasia, of the arcuate nucleus (60.8%). In 47.1% of cases, pulmonary hypoplasia was associated with brainstem hypodevelopment. PMID:19288128

  20. Efforts to Improve Perinatal Outcomes for Women Enrolled in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Robinson, Lekisha; Cha, Stephen; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha

    2015-08-01

    Improving women's health and perinatal health outcomes is a high priority for Medicaid, the jointly financed federal-state health coverage program. The authorities provided by the Affordable Care Act give Medicaid new resources and opportunities to improve coverage and perinatal care. Given that the Medicaid program currently covers almost half of all births in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in partnership with states and other stakeholders, is using new and existing authorities to improve birth outcomes. Quality measurement, quality-improvement projects, and expanded models of care underscore the major quality approach of the center. As an outgrowth of an expert panel that included membership of several state Medicaid medical directors, Medicaid providers, and consumer representatives, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services launched the Maternal and Infant Health Initiative, which aims to increase postpartum visit rates and the use of effective contraception among women covered by Medicaid. This Initiative provides focus on key opportunities and strategies to improve the rate, measurement, timing, and content of postpartum visits. Additionally, a focus on contraception will serve to improve pregnancy planning and spacing and prevent unintended pregnancy. As the Initiative evolves, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services plans to identify policy, service delivery, and reimbursement policies to advance the Initiative's goals and improve outcomes for women covered by Medicaid. PMID:26241435

  1. Perinatal Outcome in the Liveborn Infant with Prenatally Diagnosed Omphalocele

    PubMed Central

    KOMINIAREK, Michelle A.; ZORK, Noelia; PIERCE, Sara Michelle; ZOLLINGER, Terrell

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare perinatal outcomes between liveborn non-isolated and isolated omphaloceles diagnosed during a prenatal ultrasound. Study Design Fetuses (n=86) with omphalocele were identified between 1995–2007 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were an omphalocele >14 weeks gestation, available fetal and/or neonatal karyotype, and a liveborn infant (n=46). Perinatal outcomes were compared in non-isolated (n=23) and isolated omphaloceles (n=23). Results For all omphaloceles, the majority delivered after 34 weeks by cesarean. Mean birth weight (2782 vs. 2704g), median length of stay (27 vs. 25 days), and mortality (2 in each group) was not different between the non-isolated and isolated groups, P>0.05. In the non-isolated group, 7 major anomalies were not confirmed postnatally. Of the prenatally diagnosed isolated omphaloceles, 8(35%) were diagnosed with a syndrome or other anomalies after birth. Conclusion The outcomes were similar in non-isolated and isolated prenatally diagnosed omphaloceles, but ultrasound did not always accurately determine the presence or absence of associated anomalies. PMID:21544770

  2. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J W; Harmsen, Martin C; Garland, Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-04-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We investigated whether adult S mice without wheels remain DIO-resistant when exposed - via the mother - to the HE diet during their perinatal stage (from 2 weeks prior to conception until weaning on post-natal day 21). While S1 and S2 females subjected to HE diet either perinatally or from weaning onwards (post-weaning) resisted increased adiposity at adulthood (as opposed to CON females), they lost this resistance when challenged with HE diet during these periods combined over one single cycle of breeding. When allowed one-week access to wheels (at week 6-8 and at 10 months), however, tendency for increased wheel-running behavior of S mice was unaltered. Thus, the trait for increased wheel-running behavior remained intact following combined perinatal and post-weaning HE exposure, but apparently this did not block HE-induced weight gain. At weaning, perinatal HE diet increased adiposity in all lines, but this was only associated with hyperleptinemia in S lines irrespective of gender. Because leptin has multiple developmental effects at adolescence, we argue that a trait for increased physical activity may advance maturation in times of plenty. This would be adaptive in nature where episodes of increased nutrient availability should be exploited maximally. Associated disturbances in glucose homeostasis and related co-morbidities at adulthood are probably pleiotropic side effects. PMID:26850290

  3. Sexual Health Knowledge in a Sample of Perinatally HIV-infected and Perinatally-exposed Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzka, Olga; Santamaria, E. Karina; Benavides, Jessica M.; Dolezal, Curtis; Elkington, Katherine S.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; McKay, Mary; Abrams, Elaine J.; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Ann Mellins, Claude

    2015-01-01

    This study describes sexual health knowledge in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally-exposed uninfected (PHIV-) ethnic-minority youth, ages 9–16 years, residing in NYC (n=316). Data on youth sexual health knowledge (e.g., pregnancy, STDs, birth control) and caregiver-adolescent communication about sexual health were examined. Participants in both groups answered only 35% of the sexual health knowledge questions correctly (mean=6.6/19). Higher scores were found among youth who reported more communication about sex with caregivers (vs. those who did not report talking about sex with caregivers; 8.54 vs. 5.84, p<.001) and among PHIV+ youth who were aware of their status (vs. PHIV+ youth who were not; 7.27 vs. 4.70, p<.001). Age was positively correlated with sexual health knowledge (beta=.489, p<.001). Both PHIV+ and PHIV− youth had poor sexual health knowledge, suggesting a need for sexual health education for both groups. Data suggest that interventions focused on caregiver-child risk communication may be important for prevention. PMID:26855617

  4. Perinatal statistics of a 15-year period in the Central Region of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sobaih, Badr H; Al-Shebly, Mashael M.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal statistics are one of the most essential outcome indicators used by many developed countries in order to evaluate perinatal services provided to newborns. In this retrospective study, we collected 15 years of perinatal data at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in order to determine stillbirth and other mortality rates in our institute and compare them with international figures. A total of 58,073 babies were evaluated. Data were collected from maternal and neonatal registry books and from perinatal mortality and morbidity meeting reports between 1994 and 2008. Data were entered and analyzed using Microsoft Office Excel 2007. The stillbirth rate was 11.7/1000, early neonatal death rate was 3.4/1000, perinatal mortality rate (PMR) was 14.9/1000, and corrected PMR was 11.9/1000. Our rates were not significantly different from those of North American and European ones. We noticed a dramatic reduction in the corrected PMR in the last 3 years of the study because of greater advancement in perinatal and neonatal care. Our mortality rates were comparable to the North American and European rates which may reflect the quality of perinatal care provided in our institute. PMID:27493354

  5. Late pregnancy thyroid-binding globulin predicts perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Garcia, Nacire; Stansbury, Melissa; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Previously we found that late pregnancy total and free thyroxine (TT4, FT4) concentrations were negatively related to greater pre and/or postpartum depressive symptoms. In a much larger cohort, the current study examined whether these thyroid indices measured earlier in the third trimester (31-33 weeks) predict subsequent perinatal depression and anxiety ratings as well as syndromal depression. Thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) concentrations increase markedly during pregnancy and may be an index of sensitivity to elevated estrogen levels. TBG was examined in this study because prior findings suggest that postpartum depression is related to sensitivity to mood destabilization by elevated sex hormone concentrations during pregnancy. Our cohort was 199 euthyroid women recruited from a public health obstetrics clinic (63.8% Hispanic, 21.6% Black). After screening and blood draws for hormone measures at pregnancy weeks 31-33, subjects were evaluated during home visits at pregnancy weeks 35-36 as well as postpartum weeks 6 and 12. Evaluations included psychiatric interviews for current and life-time DSM-IV psychiatric history (M.I.N.I.-Plus), subject self-ratings and interviewer ratings for depression and anxiety (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Montgomery-Ǻsberg Depression Rating Scale; Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Anxiety Inventory), as well as a standardized interview to obtain life-time trauma history. Numerous covariates were included in all regression analyses. Trauma and major depression history were robustly significant predictors of depression and anxiety ratings over the study period when these variables were analyzed individually or in a combined model including FT4 or TBG (p<.001). When analyzed alone, FT4 levels were a less strong but still significant predictor of all depression and anxiety ratings (p<.05) while TBG levels was a significant or nearly significant predictor of most ratings. FT4, TBG and trauma history, but not

  6. The Polomeno Family Intervention Framework for Perinatal Education: Preparing Couples for the Transition to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    2000-01-01

    Couples face many challenges as they transform themselves from dyad to triad. For some couples, these challenges are life-enriching experiences, while for others, chaos ensues, potentially leading to separation and divorce. The transition to first-time parenthood, even for well-functioning couples, is fraught with potential disorganization. At the same time, it provides opportunities for simultaneous self-growth and conjugal enrichment. What role can perinatal educators play in preparing couples to deal with the changes associated with this transition? To answer this vital question, the author presents her conceptualization of perinatal education as a primary family intervention framework during the perinatal period. PMID:17273190

  7. Localized intestinal perforations as a potential complication of brain hypothermic therapy for perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Naoto; Maiguma, Atsuko; Obinata, Kaoru; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Brain hypothermic therapy (BHT) is becoming a frequently used standard of care for perinatal asphyxia. Although cardiovascular side effects, coagulation disorders, renal impairment, electrolyte abnormalities, impaired liver function, opportunistic infections, and skin lesions are well-known adverse effects of BHT in newborns, little information is available on the clinical features of intestinal perforation-related BHT. We herein report a case of therapeutic brain cooling for perinatal asphyxia complicated by localized intestinal perforation. In practice, the neonatologist should be aware that intestinal perforation in an infant with perinatal asphyxia is possible, particularly following BHT. PMID:26445344

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Peer Support Program for Parents Facing Perinatal Loss.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Rachel M; Roose, Rosmarie E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to understand the perspectives of peer parents and parents receiving support within a peer support program for perinatal bereavement at a midsized hospital within the midwestern United States. To document participants' perceptions of the program, a focus group was conducted with peer parents, and surveys were completed by both peer parents and parents receiving support. In this article we review our model of a peer support program for perinatal bereavement and report on parents' evaluation of the program. Recommendations through which other organizations can develop peer support programs for parents who have experienced a perinatal loss are provided. PMID:27067931

  9. Down syndrome: perinatal complications and counseling experiences in 216 patients.

    PubMed

    Spahis, J K; Wilson, G N

    1999-06-25

    Two hundred and sixteen infant evaluations were selected for analysis from those of 669 outpatients (930 total visits) at a weekly Down syndrome clinic. Each record contained perinatal history and physical examination results, and 191 of the 216 included a systematic interview regarding parental experiences with diagnosis and counseling. Gastrointestinal problems (77% of neonates), cardiac anomalies (38%), and hematologic problems (11%) were the most common complications; cited problems included anal stenosis (11%), which is described as a newly recognized cause of constipation in early infancy. Counseling experiences were positive in 66 (34%) of the 191 parent interviews, with counselor knowledge, timing, setting, and attitudes being cited as key factors. Appropriate counseling and surveillance for gastrointestinal problems can greatly facilitate parental adjustment to the neonate with Down syndrome. PMID:10559764

  10. Personality and Perinatal Maternal Insomnia: A Study Across Childbirth.

    PubMed

    Dørheim, Signe K; Garthus-Niegel, Susan; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Personality may influence sleep in perinatal women. A follow-up study was conducted among 3,752 pregnant, then postpartum women at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. The Big Five personality dimensions were measured by the Mini-International Personality Item Pool in week 17 of pregnancy. Insomnia was measured by the Bergen Insomnia Scale in pregnancy week 32 and 8 weeks postpartum, along with self-reported sleep times. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale measured depression, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist measured anxiety. Adjusted for current anxiety, depression, and demographic variables, the personality traits Neuroticism and Agreeableness were associated with insomnia in pregnancy. No personality traits were associated with postpartum insomnia. Extraversion was associated with longer postpartum sleep duration and better sleep efficiency, and Agreeableness with shorter sleep duration. PMID:25174718

  11. Endocrine and other physiologic modulators of perinatal cardiomyocyte endowment.

    PubMed

    Jonker, S S; Louey, S

    2016-01-01

    Immature contractile cardiomyocytes proliferate to rapidly increase cell number, establishing cardiomyocyte endowment in the perinatal period. Developmental changes in cellular maturation, size and attrition further contribute to cardiac anatomy. These physiological processes occur concomitant with a changing hormonal environment as the fetus prepares itself for the transition to extrauterine life. There are complex interactions between endocrine, hemodynamic and nutritional regulators of cardiac development. Birth has been long assumed to be the trigger for major differences between the fetal and postnatal cardiomyocyte growth patterns, but investigations in normally growing sheep and rodents suggest this may not be entirely true; in sheep, these differences are initiated before birth, while in rodents they occur after birth. The aim of this review is to draw together our understanding of the temporal regulation of these signals and cardiomyocyte responses relative to birth. Further, we consider how these dynamics are altered in stressed and suboptimal intrauterine environments. PMID:26432905

  12. Diagnosis and acute management of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) can be an unrecognized cause of short- and long-term neurologic disability. Focal clonic seizure in the newborn period is the most common clinical presentation of PAIS. MRI is optimal in diagnosing PAIS; negative cranial ultrasound or CT does not rule out PAIS. Given the low rate of recurrence in combination with risk factors thought to be isolated to the maternal-fetal unit, anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment is usually not recommended. The majority of newborns with PAIS do not go on to develop epilepsy, although further research is warranted in this area. Long-term morbidity, including motor, cognitive, and behavioral disabilities, can follow PAIS, necessitating early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy initiation. PMID:25317375

  13. Language and affective facial expression in children with perinatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Philip T.; Reilly, Judy S.

    2015-01-01

    Children with perinatal stroke (PS) provide a unique opportunity to understand developing brain-behavior relations. Previous research has noted distinctive differences in behavioral sequelae between children with PS and adults with acquired stroke: children fare better, presumably due to the plasticity of the developing brain for adaptive reorganization. Whereas we are beginning to understand language development, we know little about another communicative domain, emotional expression. The current study investigates the use and integration of language and facial expression during an interview. As anticipated, the language performance of the five and six year old PS group is comparable to their typically developing (TD) peers, however, their affective profiles are distinctive: those with right hemisphere injury are less expressive with respect to affective language and affective facial expression than either those with left hemisphere injury or TD group. The two distinctive profiles for language and emotional expression in these children suggest gradients of neuroplasticity in the developing brain. PMID:26117314

  14. Developmental plasticity of coordinated action patterns in the perinatal rat

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Michele R.; Kauer, Sierra D.; Swann, Hillary E.

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most simple, stereotyped, reflexive and spinal-mediated motor behaviors expressed by animals display a level of flexibility and plasticity that is not always recognized. We discuss several examples of how coordinated action patterns have been shown to be flexible and adaptive in response to sensory feedback. We focus on interlimb and intralimb coordination during the expression of two action patterns (stepping and the leg extension response) in newborn rats, as well as interlimb motor learning. We also discuss the idea that the spinal cord is a major mechanism for supporting plasticity in the developing motor system. An implication of this research is that normally occurring sensory stimulation during the perinatal period influences the typical development and expression of action patterns, and that exploiting the developmental plasticity of the motor system may lead to improved strategies for promoting recovery of function in human infants with motor disorders. PMID:25739742

  15. Perinatal mortality and residential proximity to an industrial park.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Batia; Bentov, Yaakov; Kordysh, Ella; Karakis, Isabella; Bolotin, Arkady; Hershkovitz, Reli; Belmaker, Ilana

    2008-01-01

    The authors' objective was to determine whether residential proximity to an industrial park (IP) is associated with increased perinatal mortality (PM). This semiecological study included 63,850 delivered births with 840 cases of PM (1995-2000). The authors categorized the study populations by ethnicity (ie, Bedouin and Jewish) and type of locality. Residential distance from the IP served as a surrogate indicator of exposure. Among Bedouin newborns, proximity to the IP was associated with increased PM rates (relative risk = 1.45; 95% confidence interval = 1.22-1.72). The excess in PM was not related to maternal or newborn physical characteristics that the authors observed. The risk of PM and its components in the Jewish localities was not associated with IP proximity. The association between residential proximity to the IP and excess in PM among only Bedouin newborns may be related to vulnerability caused by the nomadic nature of the society. PMID:18479994

  16. Perinatal Licensing of Thermogenesis by IL-33 and ST2.

    PubMed

    Odegaard, Justin I; Lee, Min-Woo; Sogawa, Yoshitaka; Bertholet, Ambre M; Locksley, Richard M; Weinberg, David E; Kirichok, Yuriy; Deo, Rahul C; Chawla, Ajay

    2016-08-11

    For placental mammals, the transition from the in utero maternal environment to postnatal life requires the activation of thermogenesis to maintain their core temperature. This is primarily accomplished by induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes, the principal sites for uncoupled respiration. Despite its importance, how placental mammals license their thermogenic adipocytes to participate in postnatal uncoupled respiration is not known. Here, we provide evidence that the "alarmin" IL-33, a nuclear cytokine that activates type 2 immune responses, licenses brown and beige adipocytes for uncoupled respiration. We find that, in absence of IL-33 or ST2, beige and brown adipocytes develop normally but fail to express an appropriately spliced form of Ucp1 mRNA, resulting in absence of UCP1 protein and impairment in uncoupled respiration and thermoregulation. Together, these data suggest that IL-33 and ST2 function as a developmental switch to license thermogenesis during the perinatal period. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27453471

  17. Bilateral perinatal testicular torsion: successful salvage supports emergency surgery.

    PubMed

    Granger, Jeremy; Brownlee, Ewan M; Cundy, Thomas P; Goh, Day Way

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) has poor rates of testicular salvage. Although rare, bilateral PTT carries the risk of anorchia. We present a case of a 2-day-old term infant with acute onset right-sided scrotal discolouration and tenderness. The infant was promptly taken to the operating theatre for emergency scrotal exploration. Bilateral extravaginal testicular torsion was identified, with the right testis appearing to have a more established ischaemic appearance compared to that on the left side. Intraoperative findings were representative of metachronous PTT with a short time period of only several hours separating the torsion events. Both testes were detorted and fixated in the scrotum. The infant made an uneventful recovery. Outpatient clinic review at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively confirmed no clinical evidence of testicular atrophy. Given the potential for contralateral torsion and the morbidity of anorchia, our experience supports the role for emergency scrotal exploration in suspected PTT. PMID:27307430

  18. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in perinatal settings.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Dawn S

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is (a) to explain the role of omega-3 fatty acids in human health, specifically in fetal/neonatal development, (b) to summarize the recent research behind the innovations in infant formula manufacturing and advertisement of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for pregnant and lactating mothers, and (c) to relate the research findings to clinical practice. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in perinatal settings is discussed here from three vantage points: (a) supplementation of the third-trimester pregnant woman to enhance fetal development, (b) supplementation of the lactating mother to enhance development of the breastfeeding infant, and (c) supplementation of infant formulas to enhance development of the bottle-feeding infant. Supplementation can occur by increasing one's intake of foods high in omega-3 fatty acids or by ingesting fatty acid nutritional supplements. The challenge of supplementation for vegan and vegetarian women is also addressed. PMID:16940822

  19. Perinatal complications and schizophrenia: involvement of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Trisha A.

    2013-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that, at least in part, events occurring within the intrauterine or perinatal environment at critical times of brain development underlies emergence of the psychosis observed during adulthood, and brain pathologies that are hypothesized to be from birth. All potential risks stimulate activation of the immune system, and are suggested to act in parallel with an underlying genetic liability, such that an imperfect regulation of the genome mediates these prenatal or early postnatal environmental effects. Epidemiologically based animal models looking at environment and with genes have provided us with a wealth of knowledge in the understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and give us the best possibility for interventions and treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:23805069

  20. Fetal asphyctic preconditioning alters the transcriptional response to perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic reprogramming is thought to be, at least in part, responsible for the protective effect of brain preconditioning. Unraveling mechanisms of this endogenous neuroprotection, activated by preconditioning, is an important step towards new clinical strategies for treating asphyctic neonates. Therefore, we investigated whole-genome transcriptional changes in the brain of rats which underwent perinatal asphyxia (PA), and rats where PA was preceded by fetal asphyctic preconditioning (FAPA). Offspring were sacrificed 6 h and 96 h after birth, and whole-genome transcription was investigated using the Affymetrix Gene1.0ST chip. Microarray data were analyzed with the Bioconductor Limma package. In addition to univariate analysis, we performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) in order to derive results with maximum biological relevance. Results We observed minimal, 25% or less, overlap of differentially regulated transcripts across different experimental groups which leads us to conclude that the transcriptional phenotype of these groups is largely unique. In both the PA and FAPA group we observe an upregulation of transcripts involved in cellular stress. Contrastingly, transcripts with a function in the cell nucleus were mostly downregulated in PA animals, while we see considerable upregulation in the FAPA group. Furthermore, we observed that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are exclusively regulated in FAPA animals. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate whole-genome transcription in the neonatal brain after PA alone, and after perinatal asphyxia preceded by preconditioning (FAPA). We describe several genes/pathways, such as ubiquitination and proteolysis, which were not previously linked to preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Furthermore, we observed that the majority of upregulated genes in preconditioned animals have a function in the cell nucleus, including several epigenetic players such as HDACs, which suggests that epigenetic

  1. Perinatal hepatitis B prevention program in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Ko, Stephen; Lv, Jingjing; Ji, Feng; Yan, Bingyu; Xu, Fujie; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) alone is highly effective in preventing perinatal hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and the World Health Organization recommends administering HepB to all infants within 24 h after delivery. Maternal screening for HBsAg and administration of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) in addition to HepB for infants born to HBsAg-positive pregnant women can increase the effectiveness of post-exposure prophylaxis for perinatal HBV transmission. In Shangdong Province, China which has a high prevalence of chronic HBV infection, HepB birth dose and HBIG were integrated into the routine childhood immunization program in 2002 and July 2011 respectively. We assessed progress toward implementation of these measures. Hospital-based reporting demonstrated an increase in maternal screening from 70.7% to 96.9% from 2004–2012; HepB birth dose coverage (within 24 h) remained high (96.3–97.1%) during this period. For infants with known HBsAg-positive mothers, the coverage of HBIG increased from 85.0% (before July 2011) to 92.1% (after July 2011). However, HBIG coverage in western areas of Shandong Province remained at 81.1% among infants with known HBsAg-positive mothers. Preterm/low-birth-weight and illness after birth were the most commonly reported reasons for delay in the first dose of HepB to >24 h of birth. Additional education on the safety and immune protection from HepB and HBIG might help to correct delays in administering the HepB birth dose and low HBIG coverage in the western areas of the Shandong Province. PMID:25483482

  2. Racial disparity in placental pathology in the collaborative perinatal project

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Lisu; Zhang, Huijuan; Klebanoff, Mark; Yang, Zujing; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There is substantial disparity in perinatal outcomes between white and African-American women, but the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. The placenta is the principal metabolic, respiratory, excretory, and endocrine organ of the fetus. We studied the association between maternal race and types and severity of placental pathology. Methods: Using data from the U.S. Collaborative Perinatal Project (1959-1966), we studied 32,295 African-American and white women with singleton births. CPP pathologists conducted detailed placental examinations following a standard protocol with quality control procedures. Logistic regression modeling was used to test the association between race and placental pathology adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Compared to white women, African-American women had a higher risk of fetal neutrophilic infiltration (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.4), and 1.5-fold higher risk of low placental weight (95% CI, 1.3-1.7). However, various placental vascular lesions were significantly less common in African-American women, including infarcts and thrombosis in the cut surface, villous infarcts in the intervillous space, emergence of stromal fibrosis and Langerhans layer in the terminal villi, old hemorrhage in the maternal surface, thrombosis in the intervillous space, and calcification throughout the cut surface (aOR ranging from 0.5 to 0.8). Similar patterns were observed in pregnancies with pregnancy associated hypertension, small-for-gestational-age, and preterm birth. Conclusion: As compared with white women, African-American had higher prevalence of inflammatory lesions but lower prevalence of vascular lesions in placental pathology. PMID:26823843

  3. Perinatal undernutrition programmes thyroid function in the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Moreno, Rosario; Racotta, Radu; Anguiano, Brenda; Aceves, Carmen; Quevedo, Lucía

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that alterations in early nutrition programme physiological changes in adulthood. In the present study, we determined the effects of undernutrition during gestation and lactation on the programming of thyroid function in adult rat offspring. Perinatal undernutrition was achieved by a 40% food restriction in female Wistar rats from the mating day to weaning. On postpartum day 21, the offspring of the control and food-restricted dams were weaned and given free access to a commercial diet until adulthood. The results showed that undernourished rats exhibited decreased 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) levels but had normal thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels at weaning; on day 90, these rats displayed a significant flip, exhibiting normalised T3 (total and free) and total T4 levels, but low free T4 and persistently higher TSH levels, which were maintained even on postnatal day 140. This profile was accompanied by a scarce fat depot, a lower RMR and an exacerbated sympathetic brown adipose tissue (BAT) tone (deiodinase type 2 expression) in basal conditions. Moreover, when a functional challenge (cold exposure) was applied, the restricted group exhibited partial changes in TSH (29 v. 100%) and T4 (non-response v. 17%) levels, a significant decrease in leptin levels (75 v. 32%) and the maintenance of a sympathetic BAT over-response (higher noradrenaline levels) in comparison with the control group. The findings of the present study suggest that undernutrition during the perinatal period produces permanent changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis with consequent low body weight and decreased RMR and facultative thermogenesis. We hypothesise that these changes predispose individuals to exhibiting adult subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:23800456

  4. Obstetric and perinatal complications in placentas with fetal thrombotic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleemuddin, Aasia; Tantbirojn, Patou; Sirois, Kathleen; Crum, Christopher P; Boyd, Theonia K; Tworoger, Shelley; Parast, Mana M

    2010-01-01

    Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV) is a placental lesion characterized by regionally distributed avascular villi and is often accompanied by upstream thrombosis in placental fetal vessels. Previous studies, using preselected populations, have shown associations of this lesion with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes and potentially obstructive lesions of the umbilical cord. We investigated the prevalence of obstetric complications, perinatal disease, and placental abnormalities in cases with FTV. One hundred thirteen cases of placentas with FTV were identified in our pathology database over an 18-year period. Two hundred sixteen placentas without the diagnosis of FTV, frequency matched on year of birth, were selected as controls. Electronic medical records and pathology reports were used to extract maternal and gestational age, method of delivery, neonatal outcome, lesions of the umbilical cord, obstetric complications, and fetal abnormalities. Placentas with FTV were associated with a 9-fold increase in rate of stillbirth and a 2-fold increase in intrauterine growth restriction. The increase in pregnancy-induced hypertension/preeclampsia was not significant when adjusted for maternal and gestational age. Although the rate of potentially obstructive cord lesions was similar in both groups, there was an almost 6-fold increase in the presence of oligohydramnios in FTV placentas, compared with controls. Finally, FTV was associated with a 6-fold increase in fetal cardiac abnormalities. Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy is associated with a significantly higher rate of obstetric and perinatal complications. This study points to abnormal fetal circulation, either in the form of congenital heart disease or oligohydramnios predisposing to cord compression, as a risk factor for FTV. PMID:20438299

  5. Perinatal Outcome After Diagnosis of Oligohydramnious at Term

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie Kahkhaie, Kolsoum; Keikha, Fateme; Rezaie Keikhaie, Khadije; Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Salehin, Shahrbanoo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oligohydramnious is threatening condition to fetal health for which some treatment are available and some are under evaluation. Oligohydramnious, is associated with increased pregnancy complication, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. There is an inverse relationship between the amniotic fluid index (AFI) and the adverse perinatal outcome. Oligo hydramnlious is clinical condition characteries by amniotic fluid index (AFI) of 5cm or less. Its incidence is 3-5 % of all the pregnancies an accurate and reproducible method of determining abnormality in amniotic fluid volume (AFI) is sonographic asessment of amniotic fluid index (AFI). It often increase the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) and also the incidence of cesarean section, meconium stained, low apgar score and Neonatal intensive care (NICU) admission. Objectives: The aim of study was to analyze the fetal out come in low risk pregnant women with oligohydramnious at term. This is a prospective, descriptive study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at Amiralmomenin hospital in Zabol for a period of 8 months from 2012/Mar/27 to 2012/Nov/5.It included 100 pregnant women diagnosed with the AFI of or less than 5cm at term. Control group included 300 pregnant women with AFI more than 8cm. Comparison was done between the study group and the control group. Regarding the fetal and pregnancy outcome using chi square and p value, detail were recorded in terms of fetal weight, apgar score at 1 and 5 minutes. Results: Mode of delivery, NICU admission neonatal death and induction of labour. Oligohydramnious is associated with a high rate of pregnancy complication and increased preinatal morbidity and mortality. Women with oligohydramnious usually have low birth babies. Conclusions: However, it can expect a safe and good outcome for which proper fetal surveillance and regular antenatal care visits are required. PMID:25031851

  6. Identifying patients at risk of perinatal mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Topiwala, Anya; Hothi, Gurjiven; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2012-05-01

    Perinatal mental illness influences obstetric outcomes, mother-baby interactions and longer term emotional and cognitive development of the child. Psychiatric disorders have consistently been found to be one of the leading causes of maternal deaths, often through suicide. Postnatal depression and puerperal psychosis are two disorders most commonly associated with the perinatal period. The most efficient strategy to identify patients at risk relies on focussing on clinically vulnerable subgroups: enquiries about depressive symptoms should be made at the usual screening visits. Attention should be paid to any sign of poor self-care, avoidance of eye contact, overactivity or underactivity, or abnormalities in the rate of speech. Particular care should be taken to ask about suicidal ideation and thoughts of harming others, including the baby. One of the most important risk factors is a previous history of depression. The degree of risk is directly correlated with severity of past episodes. Both antenatal and postnatal depression are being increasingly recognised in men. Puerperal psychosis is rare (1 to 2 per 1,000). Sixty per cent of women with puerperal psychosis already have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder. Women with a personal history of postpartum psychosis or bipolar affective disorder should be considered as high risk for postpartum psychosis. All pregnant women who are identified as being at high risk should have a shared care plan for their late pregnancy and early postnatal psychiatric management. Women with current mood disorder of mild or moderate severity who have a first-degree relative with a history of bipolar disorder or postpartum psychosis should be referred for psychiatric assessment. PMID:22774377

  7. Perinatally Influenced Autonomic System Fluctuations Drive Infant Vocal Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yisi S; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2016-05-23

    The variable vocal behavior of human infants is the scaffolding upon which speech and social interactions develop. It is important to know what factors drive this developmentally critical behavioral output. Using marmoset monkeys as a model system, we first addressed whether the initial conditions for vocal output and its sequential structure are perinatally influenced. Using dizygotic twins and Markov analyses of their vocal sequences, we found that in the first postnatal week, twins had more similar vocal sequences to each other than to their non-twin siblings. Moreover, both twins and their siblings had more vocal sequence similarity with each other than with non-sibling infants. Using electromyography, we then investigated the physiological basis of vocal sequence structure by measuring respiration and arousal levels (via changes in heart rate). We tested the hypothesis that early-life influences on vocal output are via fluctuations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) mediated by vocal biomechanics. We found that arousal levels fluctuate at ∼0.1 Hz (the Mayer wave) and that this slow oscillation modulates the amplitude of the faster, ∼1.0 Hz respiratory rhythm. The systematic changes in respiratory amplitude result in the different vocalizations that comprise infant vocal sequences. Among twins, the temporal structure of arousal level changes was similar and therefore indicates why their vocal sequences were similar. Our study shows that vocal sequences are tightly linked to respiratory patterns that are modulated by ANS fluctuations and that the temporal structure of ANS fluctuations is perinatally influenced. PMID:27068420

  8. Maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal outcomes in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to high levels of arsenic has been reported to increase adverse birth outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birthweight. This study evaluated the relationship between maternal arsenic exposure and perinatal endpoints (term birthweight, preterm ...

  9. Maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal outcomes in Inner Mongolia, China, Journal

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Bayingnormen is a region located in western Inner Mongolia China with a population that is exposed to a wide range of drinking water Arsenic concentrations. This study evaluated the relationship between maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal endpoints ...

  10. Perinatal medical variables predict executive function within a sample of preschoolers born very low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Susanne W; Erickson, Sarah J; MacLean, Peggy; Lowe, Jean R

    2015-05-01

    The goal was to identify perinatal predictors of early executive dysfunction in preschoolers born very low birth weight. Fifty-seven preschoolers completed 3 executive function tasks: Dimensional Change Card Sort-Separated (inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility), Bear Dragon (inhibition and working memory), and Gift Delay Open (inhibition). Relationships between executive function and perinatal medical severity factors (gestational age, days on ventilation, size for gestational age, maternal steroids, and number of surgeries) and chronological age were investigated by multiple linear regression and logistic regression. Different perinatal medical severity factors were predictive of executive function tasks, with gestational age predicting Bear Dragon and Gift Open; and number of surgeries and maternal steroids predicting performance on Dimensional Change Card Sort-Separated. By understanding the relationship between perinatal medical severity factors and preschool executive outcomes, we can identify children at highest risk for future executive dysfunction, thereby focusing targeted early intervention services. PMID:25117418

  11. Ranking risk factors for perinatal mortality. Analysis of a nation-wide study.

    PubMed

    Samueloff, A; Mor-Yosef, S; Seidman, D S; Adler, I; Persitz, E; Schenker, J G

    1989-01-01

    This paper analyses data from the Israeli nationwide perinatal census, with the aim of revealing the possible causes of perinatal death, and to assess the effects of risk factors, using a logistic regression analysis. The analysis provided an estimate of the net effect of each characteristic independently, thus identifying high-risk pregnancies that should be monitored with greater intensity. Five variables were found to have a significant effect on perinatal death. Among these, in order of decreasing risk: fetal presentation, maternal diseases complicating pregnancy, number of fetuses, ethnic origin, and maternal age. Other variables such as parity, standard of hospital, the mother's country of birth and domiciliary circumstances, did not significantly affect perinatal mortality. PMID:2631538

  12. Perinatal nutrition programs neuroimmune function long-term: mechanisms and implications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Our early life nutritional environment can influence several aspects of physiology, including our propensity to become obese. There is now evidence to suggest perinatal diet can also independently influence development of our innate immune system. This review will address three not-necessarily-exclusive mechanisms by which perinatal nutrition can program neuroimmune function long-term: by predisposing the individual to obesity, by altering the gut microbiota, and by inducing epigenetic modifications that alter gene transcription throughout life. PMID:23964195

  13. Alanine aminotransferase as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcomes in women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ekiz, Ali; Kaya, Basak; Avci, Muhittin Eftal; Polat, Ibrahim; Dikmen, Selin; Yildirim, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the associations between adverse perinatal outcomes and serum transaminase levels at the time of diagnosis in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for evaluation of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy from January 2013 to June 2014 in a tertiary center. Seventy-one patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group I) or absence of adverse perinatal outcomes (Group II). Results: The mean aminotransferase levels and conjugated bilirubin levels at the time of diagnosis were significantly higher in Group I than in Group II. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the alanine aminotransferase level could predict adverse perinatal outcomes with 76.47% sensitivity and 78.38% specificity, and the cut-off value was 95 IU/L. Among patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, those with adverse perinatal outcomes were significantly older, had an earlier diagnosis, and had higher alanine aminotransferase levels. Using the 95-IU/L cut-off value, patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy had a 3.54-fold increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and high alanineaminotransferase levels should be followed up for possible adverse perinatal outcomes.

  14. Linking databases on perinatal health: a review of the literature and current practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szamotulska, K.; Hindori-Mohangoo, A.D.; Blondel, B.; Macfarlane, A.J.; Dattani, N.; Barona, C.; Berrut, S.; Zile, I.; Wood, R.; Sakkeus, L.; Gissler, M.; Zeitlin, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: International comparisons of perinatal health indicators are complicated by the heterogeneity of data sources on pregnancy, maternal and neonatal outcomes. Record linkage can extend the range of data items available and thus can improve the validity and quality of routine data. We sought to assess the extent to which data are linked routinely for perinatal health research and reporting. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature by searching PubMed for perinatal health studies from 2001 to 2011 based on linkage of routine data (data collected continuously at various time intervals). We also surveyed European health monitoring professionals about use of linkage for national perinatal health surveillance. Results: 516 studies fit our inclusion criteria. Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, the US and the UK contributed 76% of the publications; a further 29 countries contributed at least one publication. Most studies linked vital statistics, hospital records, medical birth registries and cohort data. Other sources were specific registers for: cancer (70), congenital anomalies (56), ART (19), census (19), health professionals (37), insurance (22) prescription (31), and level of education (18). Eighteen of 29 countries (62%) reported linking data for routine perinatal health monitoring. Conclusion: Research using linkage is concentrated in a few countries and is not widely practiced in Europe. Broader adoption of data linkage could yield substantial gains for perinatal health research and surveillance. PMID:26891058

  15. Congenital Malformations in Perinatal Autopsies – A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Andola, Uma S; AM, Anita; Ahuja, Mukta; Andola, Sainath K

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital malformations remain a common cause of perinatal deaths and even though ultrasonogram can give fairly accurate diagnosis, perinatal autopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis and look for associated malformations. Objectives To emphasize the importance of perinatal autopsy in diagnosing congenital malformations and to compare the same with the prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods The present study comprises 100 consecutive perinatal autopsies conducted after obtaining the approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. In cases where prenatal ultrasound findings were available they were compared with the autopsy findings. Results Out of 100 perinatal autopsies, 44 cases were congenital anomalies with M:F = 1:1.5. Majority of the fetuses with congenital malformations (36.36%) were therapeutically terminated, Cental nervous system malformations being the commonest indication. The most common timing of therapeutic termination being 20 -24weeks. Congenital malformations were common between 35-39 weeks gestational age and birth weight range 350- 1000g. The malformations involving the central nervous system were commonest, seen in 15 cases (34.09%) followed by renal anomalies in 9 cases (20.45%) and multiple malformations in 7cases ( 15.91%). Autopsy confirmed the prenatal ultrasound findings in 50% of the cases, added to diagnosis in 29.54%, while it completely changed the primary diagnosis in 9.09% of the cases. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of perinatal autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of congenital anomalies by prenatal ultrasound findings. PMID:23373038

  16. Does use of computer technology for perinatal data collection influence data quality?

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Population health data, collected worldwide in an effort to monitor mortality and morbidity of mothers and babies, namely, perinatal data, are mandated at a federal level within Australia. The data are used to monitor patterns in midwifery, obstetric and neonatal practice, health outcomes, used for research purposes, funding allocation and education. Accuracy in perinatal data is most often reported via quantitative validation studies of perinatal data collections both internationally and in Australia. These studies report varying levels of accuracy and suggest researchers need to be more aware of the quality of data they use. This article presents findings regarding issues of concern identified by midwives relating to their perceptions of how technology affects the accuracy of perinatal data records. Perinatal data records are perceived to be more complete when completed electronically. However, issues regarding system functionality, the inconsistent use of terminology, lack of data standards and the absence of clear, written records contribute to midwives' perceptions of the negative influence of technology on the quality of perinatal data. PMID:25391847

  17. Factors related to nurse comfort when caring for families experiencing perinatal loss: evidence for bereavement program enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, June; Long, Kathleen; Seelinger, Connie; Crawford, Cecelia L; Valdez, Regina

    2015-01-01

    As nurses provide holistic support, their own comfort in caring for parents and families experiencing perinatal loss must be considered. Study results showed that, although education is essential, experience independently predicted comfort in delivering perinatal bereavement care. Evidence from this study promotes the discussion of how nurse educators can structure professional development programs to best transfer the experience and confidence of perinatal nurses who are already comfortable with bereavement care to nurses who are not. PMID:25993455

  18. Perinatal outcome after in-vitro fertilization-surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, J; Tran, C; Tan, T; Nelson, J; Batzofin, J; Serafini, P

    1999-03-01

    The perinatal outcome of pregnancies (both single and multiple) established after in-vitro fertilization (IVF)-surrogacy was evaluated and compared to the outcome of pregnancies that resulted from standard IVF. Analysis of medical records and a telephone interview with physicians, IVF-surrogates, and commissioning mothers were conducted to assess prenatal follow up and delivery care in several hospitals. 95 IVF-surrogates delivered 128 liveborn (65 singletons, 27 sets of twins and two sets of triplets). The commissioning mothers and the IVF-surrogates average ages were 37.7 +/- 5.0 and 30.4 +/- 4.7 years old respectively. IVF-surrogates carrying twin and triplet gestations delivered substantially earlier than those who gestated singleton pregnancies (36.2 +/- 0.4 versus 35.5 versus 38.7 +/- 0.3 weeks gestation respectively; P < 0.001). Twin newborns were significantly lighter than singleton infants born through IVF-surrogacy (2.7 +/- 0.06 versus 3.5 +/- 0.07 kg; P < 0.001). The incidence of low birth weight infants rose from 3.3% in the single births to 29.6% (P < 0.01) in the twins and to 33.3% in the triplets born through IVF-surrogacy. The incidence of prematurity was significantly greater in both twins delivered by IVF-surrogates (20.4%) and infertile IVF patients (58%). The occurrence of pregnancy-induced hypertension and bleeding in the third trimester was four to five times lower in the IVF-surrogates, independently of whether they were carrying multiples. The incidence of Caesarean section was 21.3% for singleton gestations, while two times higher in the IVF-surrogates carrying multiples (56.3%). Postpartum complications occurred in 6.3% of patients and the incidence of malformation was similar to those reported for the general population. The results provide general reassurance regarding perinatal outcome to couples who wish to pursue IVF-surrogacy. PMID:10221693

  19. Prenatal and perinatal analgesic exposure and autism: an ecological link

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental disorders. Susceptibility is believed to be the interaction of genetic heritability and environmental factors. The synchronous rises in autism/ASD prevalence and paracetamol (acetaminophen) use, as well as biologic plausibility have led to the hypothesis that paracetamol exposure may increase autism/ASD risk. Methods To explore the relationship of antenatal paracetamol exposure to ASD, population weighted average autism prevalence rates and paracetamol usage rates were compared. To explore the relationship of early neonatal paracetamol exposure to autism/ASD, population weighted average male autism prevalence rates for all available countries and U.S. states were compared to male circumcision rates – a procedure for which paracetamol has been widely prescribed since the mid-1990s. Prevalence studies were extracted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Summary of Autism/ASD Prevalence Studies database. Maternal paracetamol usage and circumcision rates were identified by searches on Pub Med. Results Using all available country-level data (n = 8) for the period 1984 to 2005, prenatal use of paracetamol was correlated with autism/ASD prevalence (r = 0.80). For studies including boys born after 1995, there was a strong correlation between country-level (n = 9) autism/ASD prevalence in males and a country’s circumcision rate (r = 0.98). A very similar pattern was seen among U.S. states and when comparing the 3 main racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. The country-level correlation between autism/ASD prevalence in males and paracetamol was considerably weaker before 1995 when the drug became widely used during circumcision. Conclusions This ecological analysis identified country-level correlations between indicators of prenatal and perinatal paracetamol exposure and autism/ASD. State level correlation was also identified for the indicator of perinatal

  20. A pilot study of heart rate variability biofeedback therapy in the treatment of perinatal depression on a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Beckham, A Jenna; Greene, Tammy B; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) therapy may be useful in treating the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression. We investigated the use of this non-pharmacologic therapy among women hospitalized with severe perinatal depression. Three questionnaires, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale, and Linear Analog Self Assessment, were administered to 15 women in a specialized inpatient perinatal psychiatry unit. Participants were also contacted by telephone after discharge to assess continued use of HRVB techniques. The use of HRVB was associated with an improvement in all three scales. The greatest improvement (-13.867, p < 0.001 and -11.533, p < 0.001) was among STAI scores. A majority (81.9 %, n = 9) of women surveyed by telephone also reported continued frequent use at least once per week, and over half (54.6 %, n = 6) described the use of HRVB techniques as very or extremely beneficial. The use of HRVB was associated with statistically significant improvement on all instrument scores, the greatest of which was STAI scores, and most women reported frequent continued use of HRVB techniques after discharge. These results suggest that HRVB may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression, both in inpatient and outpatient settings. PMID:23179141

  1. Intimate partner violence among women with eating disorders during the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Abigail; Lewis, Rebecca; Howard, Louise M.; Micali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective  Prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is estimated to be 4%–8%. Women with mental health difficulties are at increased risk for IPV during the perinatal period. Prevalence of IPV is high among women with eating disorders (ED); however, prevalence of IPV during the perinatal period among women with ED is unknown. Method  We studied women from a population‐based cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Prevalence and odds of physical and emotional IPV during and after the perinatal period was investigated among women with lifetime ED, with (n = 174) or without pregnancy shape and weight concern and/or purging behaviors (n = 189), and women with no ED (n = 8723). Results  Women with lifetime ED showed higher prevalence of IPV during and after the perinatal period (physical = 9.6%–14.3% and emotional = 24.1%–28.1%). Lifetime ED was associated with higher odds of physical IPV during the perinatal period (odds ratio: 2.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.11–4.93, p = .03). Lifetime ED with and without pregnancy shape and weight concerns and/or purging was associated with higher odds of IPV after the perinatal period, and higher odds of reporting emotional IPV at all time points. Associations were moderated by partner's response to pregnancy and maternal experience of childhood sexual abuse. Discussion  Mothers with ED and their children may be vulnerable to negative effects due to maternal ED and IPV combined, both of which have been associated with severe and long‐lasting harmful consequences. Partner's response to pregnancy and maternal experience of childhood sexual abuse might contribute to the association between ED and IPV perinatally. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Eating Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2015; 48:727–735) PMID:26032597

  2. Episode-Based Payment for Perinatal Care in Medicaid: Implications for Practice and Policy.

    PubMed

    Jarlenski, Marian; Borrero, Sonya; La Charité, Trey; Zite, Nikki B

    2016-06-01

    Medicaid is an important source of health insurance coverage for low-income pregnant women and covers nearly half of all deliveries in the United States. In the face of budgetary pressures, several state Medicaid programs have implemented or are considering implementing episode-based payments for perinatal care. Under the episode-based payment model, Medicaid programs make a single payment for all pregnancy-related medical services provided to women with low- and medium-risk pregnancies from 40 weeks before delivery through 60 days postpartum. The health care provider who delivers a live birth is assigned responsibility for all care and must meet certain quality metrics and stay within delineated cost-per-episode parameters. Implementation of cost- and quality-dependent episode-based payments for perinatal care is notable because there is no published evidence about the effects of such initiatives on pregnancy or birth outcomes. In this article, we highlight challenges and potential adverse consequences related to defining the perinatal episode and assigning a responsible health care provider. We also describe concerns that perinatal care quality metrics may not address the most pressing health care issues that are likely to improve health outcomes and reduce costs. In their current incarnations, Medicaid programs' episode-based payments for perinatal care may not improve perinatal care delivery and subsequent health outcomes. Rigorous evaluation of the new episode-based payment initiatives is critically needed to inform policymakers about the intended and unintended consequences of implementing episode-based payments for perinatal care. PMID:27159762

  3. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  4. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  5. Lung eicosanoids in perinatal rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ijsselstijn, H.; Zijlstra, F. J.; Van Dijk, J. P. M.; De Jongste, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Abnormal levels of pulmonary eicosanoids have been reported in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We hypothesized that a dysbalance of vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids is involved in PPH in CDH patients. The levels of several eicosanoids in lung homogenates and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of controls and rats with CDH were measured after caesarean section or spontaneous birth. In controls the concentration of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-PGF1α), thromboxane A2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) decreased after spontaneous birth. CDH pups showed respiratory insufficiency directly after birth. Their lungs had higher levels of 6- keto-PGF1α, reflecting the pulmonary vasodilator prostacyclin (PGI2), than those of controls. We conclude that in CDH abnormal lung eicosanoid levels are present perinatally. The elevated levels of 6-keto-PGF1α in CDH may reflect a compensation mechanism for increased vascular resistance. PMID:18472832

  6. Perinatal Outcomes and Unconventional Natural Gas Operations in Southwest Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Shaina L.; Brink, LuAnn L.; Larkin, Jacob C.; Sadovsky, Yoel; Goldstein, Bernard D.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Talbott, Evelyn O.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional gas drilling (UGD) has enabled extraordinarily rapid growth in the extraction of natural gas. Despite frequently expressed public concern, human health studies have not kept pace. We investigated the association of proximity to UGD in the Marcellus Shale formation and perinatal outcomes in a retrospective cohort study of 15,451 live births in Southwest Pennsylvania from 2007–2010. Mothers were categorized into exposure quartiles based on inverse distance weighted (IDW) well count; least exposed mothers (first quartile) had an IDW well count less than 0.87 wells per mile, while the most exposed (fourth quartile) had 6.00 wells or greater per mile. Multivariate linear (birth weight) or logistical (small for gestational age (SGA) and prematurity) regression analyses, accounting for differences in maternal and child risk factors, were performed. There was no significant association of proximity and density of UGD with prematurity. Comparison of the most to least exposed, however, revealed lower birth weight (3323 ± 558 vs 3344 ± 544 g) and a higher incidence of SGA (6.5 vs 4.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 1.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.63). While the clinical significance of the differences in birth weight among the exposure groups is unclear, the present findings further emphasize the need for larger studies, in regio-specific fashion, with more precise characterization of exposure over an extended period of time to evaluate the potential public health significance of UGD. PMID:26039051

  7. Metabolic imprinting by prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal overnutrition: a review.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jennifer Shine; Rosenfeld, Charles R

    2011-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that metabolic programming is one of the critical factors contributing to the etiology of obesity as well as concurrent increase in related chronic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease). Metabolic programming is the phenomenon whereby a nutritional stress/stimulus applied during critical periods of early development permanently alters an organism's physiology and metabolism, the consequences of which are often observed much later in life. The idea of metabolic programming originated from the fetal origins hypothesis proposed by Barker in which he suggested that disproportionate size at birth of the newborn due to an adverse intrauterine environment correlated well with an increased risk of adult-onset ill health outcomes (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease). The fetal origins hypothesis, proposed by Barker, suggests that adequate nutrition during fetal development is critical. Overnutrition is a form of malnutrition that has increased in the United States over the past several decades in which nutrients are oversupplied relative to the amounts required for normal growth, development, and metabolism. Evidence for the effects of maternal obesity and overnutrition on metabolic programming is reviewed during critical prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal periods. PMID:21769766

  8. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  9. Perinatal outcomes and unconventional natural gas operations in Southwest Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Shaina L; Brink, LuAnn L; Larkin, Jacob C; Sadovsky, Yoel; Goldstein, Bernard D; Pitt, Bruce R; Talbott, Evelyn O

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional gas drilling (UGD) has enabled extraordinarily rapid growth in the extraction of natural gas. Despite frequently expressed public concern, human health studies have not kept pace. We investigated the association of proximity to UGD in the Marcellus Shale formation and perinatal outcomes in a retrospective cohort study of 15,451 live births in Southwest Pennsylvania from 2007-2010. Mothers were categorized into exposure quartiles based on inverse distance weighted (IDW) well count; least exposed mothers (first quartile) had an IDW well count less than 0.87 wells per mile, while the most exposed (fourth quartile) had 6.00 wells or greater per mile. Multivariate linear (birth weight) or logistical (small for gestational age (SGA) and prematurity) regression analyses, accounting for differences in maternal and child risk factors, were performed. There was no significant association of proximity and density of UGD with prematurity. Comparison of the most to least exposed, however, revealed lower birth weight (3323 ± 558 vs 3344 ± 544 g) and a higher incidence of SGA (6.5 vs 4.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 1.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.63). While the clinical significance of the differences in birth weight among the exposure groups is unclear, the present findings further emphasize the need for larger studies, in regio-specific fashion, with more precise characterization of exposure over an extended period of time to evaluate the potential public health significance of UGD. PMID:26039051

  10. [Perinatal palliative care in France: Who? Why? How?].

    PubMed

    Tosello, B

    2016-09-01

    Severe congenital or morphologic anomalies are one of the main causes of infant morbidity and mortality. Some of these prenatally-diagnosed pathologies are incompatible with postnatal survival. In this context, some women choose to continue with pregnancy. Subsequently, perinatal palliative care seems to be a constructive answer to offer in such situations. At international level, this is a new clinical practice where decision dilemmas exist (prognostic uncertainty, prolonged survival, and attachment to the infant). It might be necessary to identify the factors that can affect these ethical tensions. With no national data, we explored the perceptions and professional practices that may influence parental requests for continuing with pregnancy, despite the uncertainty corresponding to the postnatal condition of a newborn with a lethal pathology. This exploration aims to question and debate current norms, especially in medical termination of pregnancy, discussing the dilemmas and divergences that affect decision-making and professional practices in neonatal palliative care. Reflection is also necessary on how to find an answer that can make sense within a request for continuation of pregnancy, despite the uncertainty inherent in the postnatal period in case of live birth of a newborn with a lethal abnormality. PMID:27472997

  11. Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes in Women with Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Temming, Lorene A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Stout, Molly J; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2016-07-01

    Objective This study aims to estimate the risks of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with insulin resistance below the threshold of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 5,983 women with singleton pregnancies undergoing universal GDM screening between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. Subjects were divided into those with a normal 1-hour glucose challenge test (GCT), those with an elevated GCT with all normal values on a 3-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT), and those with an elevated GCT with one abnormal value on GTT. Outcomes included macrosomia, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), cesarean section and operative delivery, shoulder dystocia, indicated-preterm birth, and other neonatal outcomes. Logistic regression was performed to compare outcomes among groups. Results The risk of macrosomia was increased for those with an elevated GCT and all normal values on GTT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12, 1.97), and for those with an elevated GCT and one abnormal value (aOR, 2.69; 95% CI: 1.49, 4.83). Risks of PIH, cesarean section, and indicated-preterm birth were also increased in those with an elevated 1-hour GCT and no GDM. Conclusion There are increased risks of macrosomia, PIH, indicated-preterm birth, and cesarean section among those with insulin resistance even in the absence of GDM. PMID:26906185

  12. Quality assessment of perinatal and infant postmortem examinations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Pakis, Isil; Karapirli, Mustafa; Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu; Akyildiz, Elif; Polat, Oguz

    2008-09-01

    An autopsy examination is important in identifying the cause of death and as a means of auditing clinical and forensic practice; however, especially in perinatal and infantile age groups determining the cause of death leads to some difficulties in autopsy practice. In this study, 15,640 autopsies recorded during the years 2000-2004 in the Mortuary Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine were reviewed. Autopsy findings of 510 cases between 20 completed weeks of gestation and 1 year of age were analyzed retrospectively. The quality of each necropsy report was assessed using a modification of the system gestational age assessment described by Rushton, which objectively scores aspects identified by the Royal College of Pathologists as being part of a necropsy. According to their ages, the cases were subdivided into three groups. Intrauterine deaths were 31% (158 cases), neonatal deaths were 24% (123 cases), and infantile deaths were 45% (229 cases) of all cases. Scores for the quality of the necropsy report were above the minimum acceptable score with 44% in intrauterine, 88% in neonatal and infantile deaths. PMID:18637051

  13. The expression of perinatal depression in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Pamela; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Asampong, Emmanuel; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2015-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, perinatal depression (PND) has been associated with poor infant health outcomes, including frequency of infant diarrheal episodes, preterm delivery and low birth weight, and discontinuation or problems breastfeeding. Yet little is known about the awareness or expression of PND depression in Ghana. A total of 12 in-depth key-informant interviews were conducted with women who had experienced PND within the previous two-and-a-half years. Three focus-group discussions were conducted with new mothers (n = 11), grandmothers (n = 8), and fathers (n = 9) for contextual and supporting information. ‘Thinking too much’ was the term most commonly used to describe PND. The women saw their distress as caused largely by poverty, lack of social support, and domestic problems. Women sought help through family and religious organizations, rather than through medical services. Problems producing breast milk or breastfeeding were nearly universal complaints and suggest significant effects on infant health in the study area. These results present evidence to support the increasing consensus that depression presents in similar and disabling ways across cultures and contexts. This formative qualitative data is required to tailor depression prevention or treatment interventions to this particular socio-cultural context. PMID:26539247

  14. Experience of the Manitoba Perinatal Screening Program, 1965-85.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J G

    1987-01-01

    The Manitoba Perinatal Screening Program is guided by a committee of medical specialists with skills in the diagnosis and management of disorders of metabolism in the newborn. The program is voluntary and is centralized at Cadham Provincial Laboratory, in Winnipeg. A filter card blood specimen is collected from newborns on discharge from hospital, and a filter card urine sample is collected and mailed to the laboratory by the mother when the infant is about 2 weeks of age. The overall compliance rates for the blood and urine specimens are approximately 100% and 84% respectively. The blood specimen is screened for phenylalanine and other amino acids, thyroxine, galactose, galactose-1-phosphate and biotinidase. The urine specimen is screened for amino acids, including cystine, as well as methylmalonic acid and homocystine. Between 1965 and 1985, 83 cases of metabolic disorders were detected, including 23 cases of primary hypothyroidism, 14 of classic phenylketonuria, 5 of galactosemia variants, 3 of galactosemia, 2 of maple syrup urine disease and 1 of hereditary tyrosinemia. The direct cost per infant screened is $5.50, and the cost:benefit ratio is approximately 7.5:1. Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein screening is being made available as the necessary supporting clinical facilities become available. On the basis of this experience, the author outlines the components that are important for an effective screening program. PMID:3676929

  15. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres – Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, T.; Kraml, F.; Wagner, S.; Hack, C. C.; Thiel, F. C.; Kehl, S.; Winkler, M.; Frobenius, W.; Faschingbauer, F.; Beckmann, M. W.; Lux, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the “best” patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100 % bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services

  16. The Perinatal Risk Index: Early Risks Experienced by Domestic Adoptees in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; De Araujo-Greecher, Marielena; Miller, Emily S.; Massey, Suena H.; Mayes, Linda C.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess comprehensively the prevalence of perinatal risks experienced by a potentially high-risk yet understudied population of children domestically adopted in the United States. Data are from participant report and medical records from mothers (n = 580) who completed a domestic adoption placement with nonrelatives at or near birth (Mean placement age = 7 days). We describe a comprehensive measure of perinatal risks, including divergences from previous assessment tools and the incorporation of multiple reporters, and report the prevalence of various types of perinatal risks. The prevalence of each specific risk factor was generally low, although several risks were more prevalent in this sample than estimates from nationally representative publicly available data. Nearly the entire sample (99%) experienced some type of risk exposure. Birth mothers who placed their children for adoption domestically in the US experience higher levels of perinatal risks than the national average, but not for all specific types of risk. Thus, the developmental trajectories of children adopted domestically may systematically differ from the general population to the extent that these specific perinatal risks impact development. PMID:27010541

  17. Allocation of health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area -CPS Symposium 1996.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Lee, S; Serediak, M; Finn, J; Saigal, S; Walker, C

    1999-01-01

    There have been publically expressed concerns about the costs and allocation of neonatal and perinatal health care resources in Canada and elsewhere for the past 15 years. This paper reports information from a symposium held during the 1996 Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) annual meeting sponsored by the CPS Section on Perinatal Medicine. Experts in perinatal epidemiology, health care economics, public policy and finance, and consumer perspectives on the outcomes of neonatal and perinatal intensive care explored the following questions: How should the need for health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area be objectively determined? When there are competing needs between the maternal-newborn area and other areas, how should these be rationalized? What evidence should be used (or should be available) to support the present use of resources? What evidence should be available (or is needed) to change or introduce new uses of resources? The conclusions indicated that there are no generally accepted methods to determine the allocation of health care resources but that considerations need to include population characteristics, desired outcomes, achievable results, values, ethics, legalities, cost-benefit analyses and political objectives. Information from families and adolescents who required the use of high technology and/or high cost programs will contribute individual, family and societal values that complement cost-efficacy analyses. PMID:20212990

  18. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Perinatal Mortality: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Andréa Paula Peneluppi; Gouveia, Nelson; Machado, Reinaldo Paul Pérez; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Alencar, Gizelton Pereira; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; de Almeida, Márcia Furquim

    2009-01-01

    Background Ambient levels of air pollution may affect the health of children, as indicated by studies of infant and perinatal mortality. Scientific evidence has also correlated low birth weight and preterm birth, which are important determinants of perinatal death, with air pollution. However, most of these studies used ambient concentrations measured at monitoring sites, which may not consider differential exposure to pollutants found at elevated concentrations near heavy-traffic roadways. Objectives Our goal was to examine the association between traffic-related pollution and perinatal mortality. Methods We used the information collected for a case–control study conducted in 14 districts in the City of São Paulo, Brazil, regarding risk factors for perinatal deaths. We geocoded the residential addresses of cases (fetal and early neonatal deaths) and controls (children who survived the 28th day of life) and calculated a distance-weighted traffic density (DWTD) measure considering all roads contained in a buffer surrounding these homes. Results Logistic regression revealed a gradient of increasing risk of early neonatal death with higher exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Mothers exposed to the highest quartile of the DWTD compared with those less exposed exhibited approximately 50% increased risk (adjusted odds ratio = 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.67–3.19). Associations for fetal mortality were less consistent. Conclusions These results suggest that motor vehicle exhaust exposures may be a risk factor for perinatal mortality. PMID:19165399

  19. Perinatal distress and depression in Malawi: an exploratory qualitative study of stressors, supports and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert C; Umar, Eric; Gleadow-Ware, Selena; Creed, Francis; Bristow, Katie

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative studies have demonstrated that depression and anxiety in the perinatal period are common amongst women in low- and middle-income countries and are associated with a range of psychosocial and health-related stressors. In this exploratory qualitative study conducted in southern Malawi, we investigated the thoughts and emotions experienced by women in pregnancy and the postnatal period, their expectations of support from husband and others, problems and difficulties faced and the impact of these on psychological wellbeing. We conducted 11 focus group discussions with a total of 98 parous women. A thematic analysis approach was used. Three major themes were identified: pregnancy as a time of uncertainty, the husband (and others) as support and stressor, and the impact of stressors on mental health. Pregnancy was seen as bringing uncertainty about the survival and wellbeing of both mother and unborn child. Poverty, lack of support, HIV, witchcraft and child illness were identified as causes of worry in the perinatal period. Husbands were expected to provide emotional, financial and practical support, with wider family and friends having a lesser role. Infidelity, abuse and abandonment were seen as key stressors in the perinatal period. Exposure to stressors was understood to lead to altered mental states, the symptoms of which are consistent with the concept of common perinatal mental disorder. This study confirms and expands on evidence from quantitative studies and provides formative data for the development of a psychosocial intervention for common perinatal mental disorder in Malawi. PMID:24957779

  20. Social and cultural factors associated with perinatal grief in Chhattisgarh, India.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lisa R; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W; Anderson, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Stillbirth is a globally significant public health problem with many medical causes. There are also indirect causal pathways including social and cultural factors which are particularly salient in India's traditional society. The purpose of this study was to explore women's perceptions of stillbirth and to determine how issues of gender and power, social support, coping efforts, and religious beliefs influence perinatal grief outcomes among poor women in rural Chhattisgarh, India. Structured interviews were done face-to-face in 21 randomly selected villages among women of reproductive age (N=355) who had experienced stillbirth (n=178) and compared to those who had not (n=177), in the Christian Hospital, Mungeli catchment area. Perinatal grief was significantly higher among women with a history of stillbirth. Greater perinatal grief was associated with lack of support, maternal agreement with social norms, and younger maternal age. These predictors must be understood in light of an additional finding-distorted sex ratios, which reflect gender discrimination in the context of Indian society. The findings of this study will allow the development of a culturally appropriate health education program which should be designed to increase social support and address social norms, thereby reducing psychological distress to prevent complicated perinatal grief. Perinatal grief is a significant social burden which impacts the health women. PMID:21956647

  1. Heterogeneous functions of perinatal mesenchymal stromal cells require a preselection before their banking for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Juliette; Montespan, Florent; Thepenier, Cédric; Boutin, Laetitia; Uzan, Georges; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Perinatal sources of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have raised growing interest because they are readily and widely available with minimal ethical/legal issues and can easily be stored for allogeneic settings. In addition, perinatal tissues are known to be important in mediating the fetomaternal tolerance of pregnancy, which confer upon perinatal-MSCs (P-MSCs) a particular interest in immunomodulation. It has been recently shown that it is possible to deeply modify the secreted factor profiles of MSCs with different cytokine stimuli such as interferon gamma or tumor necrosis factor alpha to license MSCs for a better immunosuppresive potential. Therefore, we aimed to compare adult bone marrow-MSCs with MSCs from perinatal tissues (cord blood, umbilical cord, amnion, and chorion) on their in vitro immunological and stromacytic efficiencies under different priming conditions. Our results showed that P-MSCs had a potential to modulate the in vitro immune response and be useful for hematopoietic progenitor cell ex vivo expansion. However, we showed contrasted effects of cytokine priming embedded in an important between-donor variability. In conclusion, our study highlights the importance to elaborate predicitive in vitro tests to screen between-donor variability of perinatal tissues for banking allogeneic standardized MSCs. PMID:25203666

  2. Tobacco control policies and perinatal health: a national quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Peelen, Myrthe J.; Sheikh, Aziz; Kok, Marjolein; Hajenius, Petra; Zimmermann, Luc J.; Kramer, Boris W.; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W.; Reiss, Irwin K.; Mol, Ben W.; Been, Jasper V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether changes in perinatal outcomes occurred following introduction of key tobacco control policies in the Netherlands: smoke-free legislation in workplaces plus a tobacco tax increase and mass media campaign (January-February 2004); and extension of the smoke-free law to the hospitality industry, accompanied by another tax increase and mass media campaign (July 2008). This was a national quasi-experimental study using Netherlands Perinatal Registry data (2000–2011; registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02189265). Primary outcome measures were: perinatal mortality, preterm birth, and being small-for-gestational age (SGA). The association with timing of the tobacco control policies was investigated using interrupted time series logistic regression analyses with adjustment for confounders. Among 2,069,695 singleton births, there were 13,027 (0.6%) perinatal deaths, 116,043 (5.6%) preterm live-births and 187,966 (9.1%) SGA live-births. The 2004 policies were not associated with significant changes in the odds of developing any of the primary outcomes. After the 2008 policy change, a -4.4% (95% CI -2.4; -6.4, p < 0.001) decrease in odds of being SGA was observed. A reduction in SGA births, but not preterm birth or perinatal mortality, was observed in the Netherlands after extension of the smoke-free workplace law to bars and restaurants in conjunction with a tax increase and mass media campaign. PMID:27103591

  3. Population Attributable Risk Fractions of Maternal Overweight and Obesity for Adverse Perinatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, Natasha; Woolcott, Christy G; McDonald, Sarah; Kuhle, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the proportion of adverse perinatal outcomes that could be potentially prevented if maternal obesity were to be reduced or eliminated (population attributable risk fractions, PARF); and the number needed to treat (NNT) of overweight or obese women to prevent one case of adverse perinatal outcome. Data from the Atlee Perinatal Database on 66,689 singleton infants born in Nova Scotia, Canada, between 2004 and 2014, and their mothers were used. Multivariable-adjusted PARFs and NNTs of maternal pre-pregnancy weight status were determined for various perinatal outcomes under three scenarios: If all overweight and obese women were to i) become normal weight before pregnancy; ii) shift down one weight class; or iii) lose 10% of their body weight, significant relative reductions would be seen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, 57/33/15%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP, 26/16/6%), caesarean section (CS, 18/10/3%), and large for gestational age births (LGA, 24/14/3%). The NNT were lowest for the outcomes GDM, induction of labour, CS, and LGA, where they ranged from 13 to 73. The study suggests that a substantial proportion of adverse perinatal outcomes may be preventable through reductions in maternal pre-pregnancy weight. PMID:26961675

  4. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF INTERVENTIONS TARGETING PATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH IN THE PERINATAL PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Rominov, Holly; Pilkington, Pamela D; Giallo, Rebecca; Whelan, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Interventions targeting parents' mental health in the perinatal period are critical due to potential consequences of perinatal mental illness for the parent, the infant, and their family. To date, most programs have targeted mothers. This systematic review explores the current status and evidence for intervention programs aiming to prevent or treat paternal mental illness in the perinatal period. Electronic databases were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed studies that described an intervention targeting fathers' mental health in the perinatal period. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, and stress as well as more general measures of psychological functioning. Eleven studies were identified. Three of five psychosocial interventions and three massage-technique interventions reported significant effects. None of the couple-based interventions reported significant effects. A number of methodological limitations were identified, including inadequate reporting of study designs, and issues with the timing of interventions. The variability in outcomes measures across the studies made it difficult to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the interventions. Father-focused interventions aimed at preventing perinatal mood problems will be improved if future studies utilize more rigorous research strategies. PMID:27079685

  5. Tobacco control policies and perinatal health: a national quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Peelen, Myrthe J; Sheikh, Aziz; Kok, Marjolein; Hajenius, Petra; Zimmermann, Luc J; Kramer, Boris W; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W; Reiss, Irwin K; Mol, Ben W; Been, Jasper V

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether changes in perinatal outcomes occurred following introduction of key tobacco control policies in the Netherlands: smoke-free legislation in workplaces plus a tobacco tax increase and mass media campaign (January-February 2004); and extension of the smoke-free law to the hospitality industry, accompanied by another tax increase and mass media campaign (July 2008). This was a national quasi-experimental study using Netherlands Perinatal Registry data (2000-2011; registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02189265). Primary outcome measures were: perinatal mortality, preterm birth, and being small-for-gestational age (SGA). The association with timing of the tobacco control policies was investigated using interrupted time series logistic regression analyses with adjustment for confounders. Among 2,069,695 singleton births, there were 13,027 (0.6%) perinatal deaths, 116,043 (5.6%) preterm live-births and 187,966 (9.1%) SGA live-births. The 2004 policies were not associated with significant changes in the odds of developing any of the primary outcomes. After the 2008 policy change, a -4.4% (95% CI -2.4; -6.4, p < 0.001) decrease in odds of being SGA was observed. A reduction in SGA births, but not preterm birth or perinatal mortality, was observed in the Netherlands after extension of the smoke-free workplace law to bars and restaurants in conjunction with a tax increase and mass media campaign. PMID:27103591

  6. The Impact of Previous Perinatal Loss on Subsequent Pregnancy and Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Elizabeth H.

    2002-01-01

    The loss of any pregnancy through miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, or neonatal death presents as a significant life crisis for any woman and has far-reaching implications into a couple's future aspirations. Planning another pregnancy after dealing with a perinatal loss is difficult and plagued by ambivalence, doubts, and insecurities. Despite this ambivalence, a majority of women do become pregnant within a year following a perinatal loss. Four recurring issues surrounding perinatal loss and subsequent pregnancy have been identified in this literature review: the effect of the grief process on the subsequent pregnancy; parental coping mechanisms during the subsequent pregnancy; replacement or vulnerable child syndrome; and parenting issues with the subsequent live-born child. Issues surrounding anxiety as a coping mechanism during a pregnancy following a perinatal loss are documented consistently in the literature; however, less is known about the impact that a loss has on parenting behaviors with subsequent children. Further research is imperative to examine these issues in more detail so that evidence-based practices can be established and updated. Health care providers are in a unique position to assist these couples in dealing with the issues that a perinatal loss may place on subsequent pregnancies. By providing a reassuring and supportive environment, women can achieve a positive pregnancy outcome with the correct tools to decrease anxiety and enhance attachment to the subsequent healthy child. PMID:17273295

  7. A 10-year history of perinatal care at the Brockington Mother and Baby Unit Stafford.

    PubMed

    Green, Debra J; Hofberg, Kristina; Carr, Caroline; Fanneran, Tina; Sumathipala, Athula

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal mother and baby units are an essential service for women suffering from perinatal mental illness by allowing the baby to stay with the mother whilst receiving inpatient mental health care. Such units enable the mother to develop a relationship with her baby in a safe and supportive environment whilst caring for her mental health needs and allow her to gain confidence in her role as a mother. This article presents the development of the Brockington Mother and Baby unit and its progressive advancement towards an exemplary service for women suffering from perinatal mental illness. The Brockington Mother and Baby unit (MBU) at South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare Foundation Trust (SSSFT) is celebrating its 10th anniversary and is one of six MBUs accredited as excellent by the Royal College of Psychiatry (RCPsych). The unit is a member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Quality Care Network and thereby adheres to their national standard of care. This article describes the journey from a single lone worker in perinatal mental health to an exemplary service caring for women with perinatal mental illness during the first 12 months following the birth of their child. PMID:26439484

  8. The Perinatal Risk Index: Early Risks Experienced by Domestic Adoptees in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; De Araujo-Greecher, Marielena; Miller, Emily S; Massey, Suena H; Mayes, Linda C; Ganiban, Jody M; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess comprehensively the prevalence of perinatal risks experienced by a potentially high-risk yet understudied population of children domestically adopted in the United States. Data are from participant report and medical records from mothers (n = 580) who completed a domestic adoption placement with nonrelatives at or near birth (Mean placement age = 7 days). We describe a comprehensive measure of perinatal risks, including divergences from previous assessment tools and the incorporation of multiple reporters, and report the prevalence of various types of perinatal risks. The prevalence of each specific risk factor was generally low, although several risks were more prevalent in this sample than estimates from nationally representative publicly available data. Nearly the entire sample (99%) experienced some type of risk exposure. Birth mothers who placed their children for adoption domestically in the US experience higher levels of perinatal risks than the national average, but not for all specific types of risk. Thus, the developmental trajectories of children adopted domestically may systematically differ from the general population to the extent that these specific perinatal risks impact development. PMID:27010541

  9. Perinatal outcome in singleton pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and eclampsia in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Phoa, K Y N; Chedraui, P; Pérez-López, F R; Wendte, J F; Ghiabi, S; Vrijkotte, T; Pinto, P

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia in Ecuador is an understudied subject since available epidemiological data are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe perinatal outcomes among singleton pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and eclampsia in a sample of low-income Ecuadorian women. Pregnant women complicated with preeclampsia (mild and severe) and eclampsia (defined according to criteria of the ACOG) delivering at the Enrique C. Sotomayor Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador were surveyed with a structured questionnaire containing maternal (socio-demographic) and neonatal data. Perinatal outcomes were compared according to severity of clinical presentation. A total of 163 women with preeclampsia [mild (23.9%), severe (68.7%) and eclampsia (7.4%)] were surveyed. Perinatal mortality and stillbirth rate was similar among studied groups (mild vs. severe preeclampsia/eclampsia cases). However, severe cases displayed higher rates of adverse perinatal outcomes: lower birth Apgar scores, more preterm births, and more low birth weight and small for gestational age infants. Caesarean-section rate and the number of admissions to intensive or intermediate neonatal care were higher in severe cases. A similar trend was found when analysis excluded preterm gestations. In conclusion, in this specific low-income Ecuadorian population perinatal outcome was adverse in pregnancies complicated with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. PMID:26790539

  10. Pathophysiology and neuroprotection of global and focal perinatal brain injury: lessons from animal models

    PubMed Central

    Manganozzi, Lucilla; Moretti, Raffaella; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Gressens, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Arterial ischemic stroke occurs most frequently in term newborns than in the elderly, and brain immaturity affects mechanisms of ischemic injury and recovery. The susceptibility to injury of the brain was assumed to be lower in the perinatal period as compared to childhood. This concept was recently challenged by clinical studies showing marked motor disabilities after stroke in neonates, with the severity of motor and cortical sensory deficits similar in both perinatal and childhood ischemic stroke. The understanding of the triggers and the pathophysiological mechanisms of perinatal stroke has greatly improved in recent years, but many aspects remain still unclear. METHODS In this review, we will focus on the pathophysiology of perinatal stroke and on therapeutic strategies that can protect the immature brain from the consequences of stroke by targeting inflammation and brain microenvironment. RESULTS Studies in neonatal rodent models of cerebral ischemia have shown a potential role for soluble inflammatory molecules as important modulators of injury and recovery. A great effort has been made and is still in act to try neuroprotective molecules based on the new physiopatological acquisition. CONCLUSION In this review we aim to give a comprehensive view of new insights concerning pathophysiological mechanism of focal and global perinatal brain injury and its new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26002050

  11. Perinatal nicotine exposure induces asthma in second generation offspring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background By altering specific developmental signaling pathways that are necessary for fetal lung development, perinatal nicotine exposure affects lung growth and differentiation, resulting in the offsprings' predisposition to childhood asthma; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists can inhibit this effect. However, whether the perinatal nicotine-induced asthma risk is restricted to nicotine-exposed offspring only; whether it can be transmitted to the next generation; and whether PPARγ agonists would have any effect on this process are not known. Methods Time-mated Sprague Dawley rat dams received either placebo or nicotine (1 mg/kg, s.c.), once daily from day 6 of gestation to postnatal day (PND) 21. Following delivery, at PND21, generation 1 (F1) pups were either subjected to pulmonary function tests, or killed to obtain their lungs, tracheas, and gonads to determine the relevant protein markers (mesenchymal contractile proteins), global DNA methylation, histone 3 and 4 acetylation, and for tracheal tension studies. Some F1 animals were used as breeders to generate F2 pups, but without any exposure to nicotine in the F1 pregnancy. At PND21, F2 pups underwent studies similar to those performed on F1 pups. Results Consistent with the asthma phenotype, nicotine affected lung function in both male and female F1 and F2 offspring (maximal 250% increase in total respiratory system resistance, and 84% maximal decrease in dynamic compliance following methacholine challenge; P < 0.01, nicotine versus control; P < 0.05, males versus females; and P > 0.05, F1 versus F2), but only affected tracheal constriction in males (51% maximal increase in tracheal constriction following acetylcholine challenge, P < 0.01, nicotine versus control; P < 0.0001, males versus females; P > 0.05, F1 versus F2); nicotine also increased the contractile protein content of whole lung (180% increase in fibronectin protein levels, P < 0.01, nicotine versus control, and P

  12. Reprint of "Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke" [Brain and Language 105 (2008) 99-111

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  13. Resilience in perinatal HIV+ adolescents in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude A.; Small, Latoya; Nestadt, Danielle F.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Petersen, Inge; Machanyangwa, Sphindile; McKay, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing numbers of perinatally HIV (PHIV+)-infected youth are surviving into adulthood with better access to treatment. However, few studies examine positive outcomes in the face of adversity (resilience) for PHIV+ youth. Social Action Theory (SAT) provided the theoretical framework for this study of PHIV + youth in South Africa (SA), allowing examination of contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors that influence behavioral health. Data were from youth and caregiver baseline interviews, simply pooled from a pilot (N=66) and larger (n=111) randomized control trial (RCT) of the VUKA Family program. For this analysis, outcomes included emotional and behavioral functioning (total difficulties), and prosocial behaviors. Potential SAT correlates included socio-demographics; caregiver health and mental health; parent-child relationship factors; stigma, and child coping, support; and self-esteem. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and study revealed significant associations at the contextual, social, and self-regulation level. Lower total child difficulties scores were associated with lower caregiver depression (β = 3.906,p < .001), less caregiver-reported communication about difficult issues (β = 1.882, p = .009) and higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.119, p = .020). Greater prosocial behaviors were associated with greater caregiver-reported communication (β = 0.722, p = .020) and child use of wishful thinking for coping (β = 5.532, p = .009). Less youth depression was associated with higher caregiver education (β =−0.399, p = .010), greater caregiver supervision (β = −1.261, p = .012), more social support seeking (β = −0.453, p = .002), higher youth self-esteem (β = −0.067, p < .001), lower internalized stigma (β = 0.608, p = .040), and child use of resignation for coping (β = 1.152, p = .041). Our data support evidence-based family interventions that also promote youth self-regulation skills to enhance the health and mental

  14. Season of birth and other perinatal risk factors for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Kristina; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the main risk factor for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), but its specific effect in infancy is unknown. We examined whether season of birth, a proxy for solar UVR exposure in the first few months of life, is associated with CMM in childhood through young adulthood. Methods: National cohort study of 3 571 574 persons born in Sweden in 1973–2008, followed up for CMM incidence through 2009 (maximum age 37 years) to examine season of birth and other perinatal factors. Results: There were 1595 CMM cases in 63.9 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in CMM risk by season of birth (P = 0.006), with peak risk corresponding to birthdates in spring (March–May). Adjusted odds ratios for CMM by season of birth were 1.21 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05–1.39; P = 0.008] for spring, 1.07 (95% CI, 0.92–1.24; P = 0.40) for summer and 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96–1.29; P = 0.14) for winter, relative to fall. Spring birth was associated with superficial spreading subtype of CMM (P = 0.02), whereas there was no seasonal association with nodular subtype (P = 0.26). Other CMM risk factors included family history of CMM in a sibling (>6-fold) or parent (>3-fold), female gender, high fetal growth and high paternal education level. Conclusions: In this large cohort study, persons born in spring had increased risk of CMM in childhood through young adulthood, suggesting that the first few months of life may be a critical period of UVR susceptibility. Sun avoidance in early infancy may play an important role in the prevention of CMM in high-risk populations. PMID:24453238

  15. Default Mode Connectivity in Youth With Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Megan M.; Uban, Kristina A.; Williams, Paige L.; Gautam, Prapti; Huo, Yanling; Malee, Kathleen; Yogev, Ram; Csernansky, John; Wang, Lei; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Youth with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (PHIV+) survive longer with combination antiretroviral therapy, but remain at risk for poor cognitive outcomes. We evaluated whether markers of HIV disease severity relate to default mode resting-state functional connectivity in PHIV+ youth. We conducted resting-state functional neuroimaging and cognitive testing in a subset of 40 PHIV+ youth recruited from a single study site of the Adolescent Master Protocol study conducted by the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) network. Current and past HIV disease severity measures (nadir CD4 lymphocyte percentages and peak HIV RNA plasma levels) were obtained from medical charts. We evaluated associations of both HIV disease severity measures and cognitive functioning with between- and within- default mode network (DMN) connectivity using Analysis of Functional NeuroImaging multiple regression analyses, controlling for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 youth, 31 (mean age = 16.5 years) with minimal motion during scans were included. We observed global alterations in DMN within- and between-network connectivity, with significant associations between disease severity and DMN BOLD correlations. Furthermore, patterns of connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that varied as a function of peak HIV RNA were found to predict processing speed ability. Alterations in within- and between-network DMN connectivity in PHIV+ youth may reflect global reorganization of the DMN; this could lead to compensatory alterations in both the within- and between-connectivity of large-scale networks, which may ultimately relate to known cognitive processing difficulties in PHIV+ youth. PMID:26376381

  16. Perinatal complications associated with maternal asthma during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephanie; Said, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most common medical illnesses occurring in pregnancy and its incidence amongst the obstetric population is increasing. Previous studies have suggested that asthma is not a benign illness in pregnancy, and can contribute towards increased rates of pregnancy complications. Methods We undertook a retrospective audit of 6458 deliveries during 2008 at The Royal Women's Hospital to determine the perinatal outcomes for women with a self-reported diagnosis of asthma. Results We found that 501 (7.8%) deliveries were to women who identified themselves as asthmatics. Of these, 15.6% reported exacerbations of their asthma symptoms during pregnancy, with the remainder reporting improvement or stabilization. There was an increased rate of preterm birth (12.9%) in the asthmatic population, compared to the non-asthmatic population (OR = 1.48, CI [1.12–1.95], P = 0.005). Asthma remained significantly associated with an increased risk of preterm birth after adjusting for maternal smoking status using logistic regression analysis (Adjusted OR 1.41, CI [1.07–1.86], P = 0.01). Women were also at increased risk of developing pre-eclampsia (OR 1.71, CI [1.09–2.67], P = 0.02) but not fetal growth restriction. Women identifying themselves as asthmatics were also more likely to deliver by caesarean section (OR 1.32, CI [1.09–1.6], P = 0.003). Conclusion These findings suggest that maternal asthma may be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, pre-eclampsia and caesarean delivery.

  17. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. PMID:26116983

  18. [Planning of perinatal health: the case of France].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, P E

    1990-01-01

    Since 1970 the perinatal health (PH) status of the French population has been one of the highest in the world as a resulting of systematic efforts in social and economic development. This article is a case study to determine the reasons for France's success in achieving such a high standard in Ph. The study is a prospective quasi-social experiment and the data was gathered at 3 intervals: 1970, 1976 and 1981. The methodology used was based on the planning process and analyzed the data from both the microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. The 9 stages of the planning process include the following: 1) definition of the problem; 2) financial and economic costs of PH; 3) identification of causal relationships between cause and effect of the problem; 4) census of resources needed for PH; 5) establishment of policy goals and objectives; 6) categorizing all potential interventions and integrating these into action programs; 7) quantifying the program costs; 8) classifying programs according to cost-efficiency and 9) developing a national policy. The national policy was implemented in France in 1971 with evaluations in 1976 and 1981. The reasons attributed to the successful implementation of this national program in France are: 1) a high degree of social participation and mobilization; 2) a high level of economic prosperity achieved after the 1960's; 3) the basic health needs of the population were met; 4) the existence of a research infrastructure that allowed national and international interventions; and 5) the multidisciplinary and economic focus of the planning process. PMID:12342827

  19. Resilience in perinatal HIV+ adolescents in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude A; Small, Latoya; Nestadt, Danielle F; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Petersen, Inge; Machanyangwa, Sphindile; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Increasing numbers of perinatally HIV (PHIV+)-infected youth are surviving into adulthood with better access to treatment. However, few studies examine positive outcomes in the face of adversity (resilience) for PHIV+ youth. Social Action Theory (SAT) provided the theoretical framework for this study of PHIV + youth in South Africa (SA), allowing examination of contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors that influence behavioral health. Data were from youth and caregiver baseline interviews, simply pooled from a pilot (N=66) and larger (n=111) randomized control trial (RCT) of the VUKA Family program. For this analysis, outcomes included emotional and behavioral functioning (total difficulties), and prosocial behaviors. Potential SAT correlates included socio-demographics; caregiver health and mental health; parent-child relationship factors; stigma, and child coping, support; and self-esteem. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and study revealed significant associations at the contextual, social, and self-regulation level. Lower total child difficulties scores were associated with lower caregiver depression (β = 3.906,p < .001), less caregiver-reported communication about difficult issues (β = 1.882, p = .009) and higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.119, p = .020). Greater prosocial behaviors were associated with greater caregiver-reported communication (β = 0.722, p = .020) and child use of wishful thinking for coping (β = 5.532, p = .009). Less youth depression was associated with higher caregiver education (β =-0.399, p = .010), greater caregiver supervision (β = -1.261, p = .012), more social support seeking (β = -0.453, p = .002), higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.067, p < .001), lower internalized stigma (β = 0.608, p = .040), and child use of resignation for coping (β = 1.152, p = .041). Our data support evidence-based family interventions that also promote youth self-regulation skills to enhance the health and mental health of PHIV

  20. Maternal health literacy progression among rural perinatal women.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Sandra C; Thomas, Suzanne Dixson; Sutherland, Donald E; Hudgins, Jodi; Ange, Brittany L; Johnson, Maribeth H

    2014-10-01

    This research examined changes in maternal health literacy progression among 106 low income, high risk, rural perinatal African American and White women who received home visits by Registered Nurse Case Managers through the Enterprise Community Healthy Start Program. Maternal health literacy progression would enable women to better address intermediate factors in their lives that impacted birth outcomes, and ultimately infant mortality (Lu and Halfon in Mater Child Health J 7(1):13-30, 2003; Sharma et al. in J Natl Med Assoc 86(11):857-860, 1994). The Life Skills Progression Instrument (LSP) (Wollesen and Peifer, in Life skills progression. An outcome and intervention planning instrument for use with families at risk. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2006) measured changes in behaviors that represented intermediate factors in birth outcomes. Maternal Health Care Literacy (LSP/M-HCL) was a woman's use of information, critical thinking and health care services; Maternal Self Care Literacy (LSP/M-SCL) was a woman's management of personal and child health at home (Smith and Moore in Health literacy and depression in the context of home visitation. Mater Child Health J, 2011). Adequacy was set at a score of (≥4). Among 106 women in the study initial scores were inadequate (<4) on LSP/M-HCL (83 %), and on LSP/M-SCL (30 %). Significant positive changes were noted in maternal health literacy progression from the initial prenatal assessment to the first (p < .01) postpartum assessment and to the final (p < .01) postpartum assessment using McNemar's test of gain scores. Numeric comparison of first and last gain scores indicated women's scores progressed (LSP/M-HCL; p < .0001) and (LSP/M-SCL; p < .0001). Elevated depression scores were most frequent among women with <4 LSP/M-HCL and/or <4 LSP/M-SCL. Visit notes indicated lack or loss of relationship with the father of the baby and intimate partner discord contributed to higher depression scores. PMID:24469358

  1. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  2. Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. )

    1991-07-15

    This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

  3. Neonatal body water turnover: a putative index of perinatal morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    MacLennan, A.H.; Millington, G.; Grieve, A.; McIntosh, J.E.; Seamark, R.F.; Cox, L.W.

    1981-04-15

    The water metabolism of 46 newborn babies was determined during a 10 day period by means of an isotope dilution technique, and correlations were sought with the clinical assessment of the babies by multiple obstetric and pediatric clinical criteria. The babies, 48 to 72 hours of age, were given a single oral dose (2 ml/kg) of deuterated water (D/sub 2/O), a nonradioactive tracer, and the urinary excretion rate was followed by means of infrared spectrophotometry. After a period of equilibration of the D/sub 2/O with body water (20 hours), the rate of D2O clearance was found to be a single exponential decay process, thus allowing the fraction of total body water lost each hour (the rate constant) to be calculated for each baby. The median values of the rate constants X 10(4)(h-1) for 14 growth-retarded babies ws 104 (98% confidence limits, 97.8 to 122) compared with 76.3 (67.0 to 80.2) for 16 normal mature babies and 82.1 (73.4 to 90.6) for 16 normal premature babies. These data indicate that, compared with normal mature or normal premature babies, growth-retarded infants have a significantly (P less than 0.05) faster turnover of water during the first 10 days of postnatal life. Since there was little overlap in results between the normally grown and the retarded infants, the measurement of water turnover may provide a useful index of perinatal morbidity.

  4. [Fetal programming: prevention of perinatal acquired predispositions of diseases in later life].

    PubMed

    Kainer, F

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the metabolic and hormonal environment of the fetus may cause predispositions to the development of disorders and diseases in later life. The timing, duration, severity, and type of insult during development determines the specific physiological outcome. Intrauterine programming of physiological systems occurs at the gene, cell, tissue, organ, and system levels and causes permanent structural and functional changes. Elevated insulin concentrations during critical periods of perinatal life may induce a lasting 'malprogramming' of neuroendocrine systems regulating body weight, food intake, and metabolism. Similar characteristics may occur due to perinatal hyperleptinism, hypercortisolism. Diagnosis and therapy of gestational diabetes in time may prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in later life. This concept has new important implications for chances and challenges of perinatal preventive medicine in the future. PMID:17327986

  5. Trends in fetal and perinatal mortality in the United States, 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Elizabeth C W; MacDorman, Marian F; Martin, Joyce A

    2014-11-01

    Total, early, and late fetal mortality rates were generally flat in the United States from 2006 through 2012. Over this same period, fetal mortality rates were also essentially unchanged among each of the three largest race and Hispanic origin groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women. The perinatal mortality rate declined 4% from 2006 through 2011, a result of a decrease in early neonatal mortality. The perinatal mortality rate fell 8% for non- Hispanic black women; declines among non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women were not statistically significant. The continued decline in the perinatal mortality rate is noteworthy. The rate is down 10% since 2000 (4), and the pace of decline for the most current period, 2006–2011, is consistent with that for 2000–2005. The U.S. fetal mortality rate, however, did not improve during 2006–2012. PMID:25408960

  6. Therapeutic interventions in perinatal and infant mental health services: a mixed methods inquiry.

    PubMed

    Myors, Karen Anne; Schmied, Virginia; Johnson, Maree; Cleary, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Perinatal mental health disorders potentially have long-term negative sequelae for women, their infants and their families. Multidisciplinary perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) services are an emerging specialty in mental health designed to improve mother-infant outcomes. This mixed methods study explored the characteristics of women referred to a specialist PIMH service and the therapeutic interventions that PIMH clinicians use. Women referred to the service were identified with multiple and complex risk factors. Perinatal and infant mental health clinicians use a range of interventions, dependent upon their training, such as family of origin work/genograms, non-directive counseling, and strategies to manage anxiety and depression. Clinicians also emphasized the therapeutic relationship and the interventions they use within an attachment-based framework, which warrants further research. PMID:24766172

  7. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: its association with maternal morbidity and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Schieve, L A; Handler, A; Hershow, R; Persky, V; Davis, F

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The effects of antepartum urinary tract infection on adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were examined. Antepartum urinary tract infection has been previously implicated as a risk factor for numerous outcomes. METHODS. Crude and multivariable analyses were performed with a perinatal registry cohort of 25,746 mother/infant pairs. RESULTS. Elevated risks were observed for exposure to urinary tract infection and low birthweight, prematurity, preterm low birthweight, premature labor, hypertension/preeclampsia, maternal anemia, and amnionitis. Urinary tract infection was associated with perinatal death only among subjects 20 to 29 years of age. CONCLUSIONS. These findings underscore the importance of antepartum urine screening to identify patients at risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:8129056

  8. Role of self-compassion in psychological well-being among perinatal women.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jennifer N; Lemon, Elizabeth; Shea, Kerry; Kripke, Kate; Dimidjian, Sona

    2016-08-01

    Self-compassion is associated with depression and anxiety in general samples. Although recent research indicates that dysfunctional maternal attitudes predict the development of perinatal depression and anxiety symptoms, no research to date has examined the construct of self-compassion and its relationship with psychological well-being in perinatal women. Pregnant and postpartum women (N = 189) completed self-report measures of depression and anxiety history, current depression and anxiety symptom severity, and self-compassion. Women with higher depression and anxiety symptom severity had significantly lower self-compassion. Additionally, women with self-reported prior history of depression or anxiety had significantly lower self-compassion even while controlling for current depression or anxiety symptom severity, respectively. Our results suggest that self-compassion warrants further attention in the study of the development, maintenance, and treatment of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:27138783

  9. Strategies for reducing the risk of malpractice litigation in perinatal nursing.

    PubMed

    Koniak-Griffin, D

    1999-01-01

    Perinatal nurses are involved in malpractice litigation most often as employees of a hospital being sued. Contemporary case examples from malpractice claims provide the foundation for examining how perinatal nurses can become the focus of such litigation. Increasing demand for individual nurse accountability, cost containment strategies that require nurses to broaden their scope of practice and to supervise unlicensed assistive personnel, increasing use of medical technologies, and the reality of compromised newborns and unexplained outcomes place perinatal nurses at risk for continued malpractice vulnerability. Specific strategies for risk reduction can be used by the individual nurse and the institution in relation to hospital policies and procedures, application of the nursing process, documentation, birth videos, and delegation of tasks to unlicensed assistive personnel. PMID:10363541

  10. Perinatal mortality in rural Burkina Faso: a prospective community-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of reliable data on perinatal mortality (PNM) in Sub-Saharan Africa. The PROMISE-EBF trial, during which we promoted exclusive breastfeeding, gave us the opportunity to describe the epidemiology of PNM in Banfora Health District, South-West in Burkina Faso. Study objectives To measure the perinatal mortality rate (PNMR) in the PROMISE-EBF cohort in Banfora Health District and to identify potential risk factors for perinatal death. Methods We used data collected prospectively during the PROMISE-EBF-trial to estimate the stillbirth rate (SBR) and early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR). We used binomial regression with generalized estimating equations to identify potential risk factors for perinatal death. Results 895 pregnant women were enrolled for data collection in the EBF trial and followed-up to 7 days after birth. The PNMR, the SBR and the ENMR, were 79 per 1000 (95% CI: 59-99), 54 per 1000 (95% CI: 38-69) and 27 per 1000 (95% CI: 9-44), respectively. In a multivariable analysis, nulliparous women (RR = 2.90, 95% CI: 1.6-5.0), primiparae mothers (RR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.2-3.9), twins (RR = 4.0, 95% CI: 2.3-6.9) and giving birth during the dry season (RR = 2.1 95% CI: 1.3-3.3) were factors associated with increased risk of perinatal death. There was no evidence that risk of perinatal death differed between deliveries at home and at a health centre Conclusion Our study observed the highest PNMR ever reported in Burkina. There is an urgent need for sustainable interventions to improve maternal and newborn health in the country. PMID:20716352

  11. Macrosomia, Perinatal and Infant Mortality in Cree Communities in Quebec, 1996-2010

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Dan-Li; Torrie, Jill; Auger, Nathalie; McHugh, Nancy Gros-Louis; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Cree births in Quebec are characterized by the highest reported prevalence of macrosomia (~35%) in the world. It is unclear whether Cree births are at greater elevated risk of perinatal and infant mortality than other First Nations relative to non-Aboriginal births in Quebec, and if macrosomia may be related. Methods This was a population-based retrospective birth cohort study using the linked birth-infant death database for singleton births to mothers from Cree (n = 5,340), other First Nations (n = 10,810) and non-Aboriginal (n = 229,960) communities in Quebec, 1996–2010. Community type was ascertained by residential postal code and municipality name. The primary outcomes were perinatal and infant mortality. Results Macrosomia (birth weight for gestational age >90th percentile) was substantially more frequent in Cree (38.0%) and other First Nations (21.9%) vs non-Aboriginal (9.4%) communities. Comparing Cree and other First Nations vs non-Aboriginal communities, perinatal mortality rates were 1.52 (95% confidence intervals 1.17, 1.98) and 1.34 (1.10, 1.64) times higher, and infant mortality rates 2.27 (1.71, 3.02) and 1.49 (1.16, 1.91) times higher, respectively. The risk elevations in perinatal and infant death in Cree communities attenuated after adjusting for maternal characteristics (age, education, marital status, parity), but became greater after further adjustment for birth weight (small, appropriate, or large for gestational age). Conclusions Cree communities had greater risk elevations in perinatal and infant mortality than other First Nations relative to non-Aboriginal communities in Quebec. High prevalence of macrosomia did not explain the elevated risk of perinatal and infant mortality in Cree communities. PMID:27517613

  12. PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone reverses perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma in rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    In a rat model, downregulation of homeostatic mesenchymal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) signaling following perinatal nicotine exposure contributes to offspring asthma, which can be effectively prevented by concomitant administration of PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ). However, whether perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma can be reversed is not known. We hypothesized that perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma would be reversed by PPAR-γ agonist RGZ. Pregnant rat dams received either placebo or nicotine from embryonic day 6 until term. Following spontaneous delivery at term, dams were continued on the assigned treatments, up to postnatal day 21 (PND21). However, at delivery, pups were divided into two groups; one group received placebo, and the other group received RGZ from PND1 to PND21. At PND21, pulmonary function and the expression of mesenchymal markers of airway contractility (α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen III) were determined by immunoblotting and immunostaining for the evidence of reversibility of perinatal nicotine exposure-induced lung effects. Compared with controls, perinatal nicotine exposure caused 1) a significant increase in airway resistance and a decrease in airway compliance following methacholine challenge, 2) a significant increase in acetylcholine-induced tracheal constriction, and 3) increased pulmonary and tracheal expression of the mesenchymal markers of contractility. Treatment with RGZ, starting on PND1, reversed all of the nicotine-induced molecular and functional pulmonary effects, virtually normalizing the pulmonary phenotype of the treated animals. We conclude that perinatal nicotine exposure-induced functional and molecular alterations in upper and lower airways can be reversed by PPAR-γ agonist RGZ, allowing an effective intervention even when started postnatally. PMID:25659902

  13. Integrated phrenic responses to carotid afferent stimulation in adult rats following perinatal hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L; Olson, E B; Vidruk, E H; Mitchell, G S

    1997-01-01

    1. Hypoxic ventilatory responses are greatly attenuated in adult rats exposed to moderate hyperoxia (60% O2) during the first month of life (perinatal treated rats). The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that perinatal hyperoxia impairs central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs, thereby diminishing the hypoxic ventilatory response. 2. Time-dependent phrenic nerve responses to electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) and steady-state relationships between CSN stimulation frequency and phrenic nerve output were compared in control and perinatal treated rats. The rats were urethane anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed and artificially ventilated. End-tidal CO2 was monitored and maintained at isocapnic levels; arterial blood gases were determined. 3. Two stimulation protocols were used: (1) three 2 min episodes of CSN stimulation (20 Hz, 0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 5 min intervals; and (2) nine 45 s episodes of CSN stimulation with stimulus frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 20 Hz (0.2 ms duration, 3 x threshold), separated by 4 min intervals. 4. The mean threshold currents to elicit phrenic responses were similar between groups. Burst frequency (f, burst min-1), peak amplitude of integrated phrenic activity (integral of Phr), and minute phrenic activity (integral of Phr x f) during and after CSN stimulation were not distinguishable between groups in either protocol at any time or at any stimulus intensity (P > 0.05). 5. Perinatal hyperoxia does not alter temporal or steady-state phrenic responses to CSN stimulation, suggesting that the central integration of carotid chemoreceptor afferent inputs is not impaired in perinatal treated rats. It is speculated that carotid chemoreceptors per se are impaired in perinatal treated rats. PMID:9161991

  14. Parent and family impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Perinatal stroke is a leading cause of early brain injury, cerebral palsy, and lifelong neurological morbidity. No study to date has examined the impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke on parents and families. However, a large breadth of research suggests that parents, especially mothers, may be at increased risk for psychological concerns. The primary aim of this study was to examine the impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke on mothers’ wellbeing. A secondary aim was to examine how caring for a child with perinatal stroke differentially affects mothers and fathers. Methods In Study I, a matched case-control design was used to compare the wellbeing of mothers of children with perinatal stroke and mothers of children with typical development. In Study II, a matched case-control design was used to compare mother-father dyads. Participants completed validated measures of anxiety and depression, stress, quality of life and family functioning, marital satisfaction, and marital distress. Parents of children with perinatal stroke also completed a recently validated measure of the psychosocial impact of perinatal stroke including guilt and blame outcomes. Disease severity was categorized by parents, validated by the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM), and compared across the above outcomes in Study I. Results A total of 112 mothers participated in Study I (n = 56 per group; mean child age = 7.42 years), and 56 parents participated in Study II (n = 28 per group; mean child age = 8.25 years). In Study I, parent assessment of disease severity was correlated with PSOM scores (γ = 0.75, p < .001) and associated with parent outcomes. Mothers of children with mild conditions were indistinguishable from controls on the outcome measures. However, mothers of children with moderate/severe conditions had poorer outcomes on measures of depression, marital satisfaction, quality of life, and family functioning. In Study II

  15. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, carotid body function and erythropoietin production in adult rats perinatally exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Ramirez, Maria; Olea, Elena; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Cogolludo, Angel; Castañeda, Javier; Yubero, Sara; Agapito, Teresa; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Rocher, Asuncion; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; González, Constancio

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalians possess three cell systems that are activated by acute bodily hypoxia: pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), carotid body chemoreceptor cells (CBCC) and erythropoietin (EPO)-producing cells. In rats, chronic perinatal hyperoxia causes permanent carotid body (CB) atrophy and functional alterations of surviving CBCC. There are no studies on PASMC or EPO-producing cells. Our aim is to define possible long-lasting functional changes in PASMC or EPO-producing cells (measured as EPO plasma levels) and, further, to analyse CBCC functional alterations. We used 3- to 4-month-old rats born and reared in a normal atmosphere or exposed to perinatal hyperoxia (55–60% O2 for the last 5–6 days of pregnancy and 4 weeks after birth). Perinatal hyperoxia causes an almost complete loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which was correlated with lung oxidative status in early postnatal life and prevented by antioxidant supplementation in the diet. O2-sensitivity of K+ currents in the PASMC of hyperoxic animals is normal, indicating that their inhibition is not sufficient to trigger HPV. Perinatal hyperoxia also abrogated responses elicited by hypoxia on catecholamine and cAMP metabolism in the CB. An increase in EPO plasma levels elicited by hypoxia was identical in hyperoxic and control animals, implying a normal functioning of EPO-producing cells. The loss of HPV observed in adult rats and caused by perinatal hyperoxia, comparable to oxygen therapy in premature infants, might represent a previously unrecognized complication of such a medical intervention capable of aggravating medical conditions such as regional pneumonias, atelectases or general anaesthesia in adult life. Key points Adult animals that have been perinatally exposed to oxygen-rich atmospheres (hyperoxia), recalling those used for oxygen therapy in infants, exhibit a loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas vasoconstriction elicited by depolarizing agents is

  16. Perinatal sadness among Shuar women: support for an evolutionary theory of psychic pain.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Edward H; Barrett, H Clark

    2007-03-01

    Psychiatry faces an internal contradiction in that it regards mild sadness and low mood as normal emotions, yet when these emotions are directed toward a new infant, it regards them as abnormal. We apply parental investment theory, a widely used framework from evolutionary biology, to maternal perinatal emotions, arguing that negative emotions directed toward a new infant could serve an important evolved function. If so, then under some definitions of psychiatric disorder, these emotions are not disorders. We investigate the applicability of parental investment theory to maternal postpartum emotions among Shuar mothers. Shuar mothers' conceptions of perinatal sadness closely match predictions of parental investment theory. PMID:17405696

  17. Perinatal and paediatric post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR): sequences and technique.

    PubMed

    Norman, Wendy; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Jones, Rod; Taylor, Andrew M; Arthurs, Owen J

    2016-06-01

    As post-mortem MRI (PMMR) becomes more widely used for investigation following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the best possible images should be acquired. In this article, we review the most widely used published PMMR sequences, together with outlining our acquisition protocol and sequence parameters for foetal, perinatal and paediatric PMMR. We give examples of both normal and abnormal appearances, so that the reader can understand the logic behind each acquisition step before interpretation, as a useful day-to-day reference guide to performing PMMR. PMID:26916282

  18. Racial and ethnic disparities in perinatal mortality: applying the perinatal periods of risk model to identify areas for intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Besculides, Melanie; Laraque, Fabienne

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the feto-infant mortality rate for New York City, assess racial/ethnic variations and identify areas for intervention using the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach. METHODS: The PPOR model examines fetal and infant deaths by age at death (fetal, neonatal, postneonatal) and birthweight (500-1499, > or =1500 g). It groups age at death and birthweight into four categories to identify problems hypothesized to lead to the death: factors related to Maternal Health and Prematurity, Maternal Care, Newborn Care and Infant Health. The model was applied to fetal and infant deaths occurring in New York City using Vital Records data from 1996-2000. Analysis was completed for the entire city and by race/ethnicity (white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, Hispanic, Asians/Pacific Islander). RESULTS: The overall feto-infant mortality rate was 11.5/1,000 live births plus fetal deaths. This rate varied by race/ethnicity; black non-Hispanics had a higher rate than other racial/ethnic groups. Conditions related to maternal health and prematurity were the largest contributing factors to feto-infant mortality (5.9/1000) in New York City. Among blacks and Hispanics, problems related to maternal health and prematurity contributed a larger share than among whites and Asians/Pacific Islanders. CONCLUSION: The use of the PPOR approach shows that the racial/ethnic disparities in feto-infant mortality that exist in New York City are largely related to maternal health and prematurity. Interventions to reduce the feto-infant mortality rate should include preconception care and improvements in women's health. PMID:16173328

  19. Perinatal Mortality Magnitude, Determinants and Causes in West Gojam: Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yirgu, Robel; Molla, Mitike; Sibley, Lynn; Gebremariam, Abebe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Ethiopia, even if a significant reduction in child mortality is recorded recently, perinatal mortality rate is still very high. This study assessed the magnitude, determinants and causes of perinatal death in West Gojam zone, Ethiopia. Methods and materials A nested case control study was conducted on 102 cases (mothers who lost their newborns for perinatal death) and 204 controls (mothers who had live infants in the same year) among a cohort of 4097 pregnant mothers in three districts of the West Gojam zone, from Feb 2011 to Mar 2012. Logistic regression models were used to identify the independent determinant factors for perinatal mortality. The World Health Organization verbal autopsy instrument for neonatal death was used to collect mortality data and cause of death was assigned by a pediatrician and a neonatologist. Result Perinatal mortality rate was 25.1(95% CI 20.3, 29.9) per 1000 live and stillbirths. Primiparous mothers had a higher risk of losing their newborn babies for perinatal death than mothers who gave birth to five or more children (AOR = 3.15, 95% CI 1.03–9.60). Babies who were born to women who had a previous history of losing their baby to perinatal death during their last pregnancy showed higher odds of perinatal death than their counterparts (AOR = 9.55, 95% CI 4.67–19.54). Preterm newborns were more at risk for perinatal death (AOR = 9.44, 95%CI 1.81–49.22) than term babies. Newborns who were born among a household of more than two had a lesser risk of dying during the perinatal period as compared to those who were born among a member of only two. Paradoxically, home delivery was found to protect against perinatal death (AOR = 0.07 95% CI, 0.02–0.24) in comparison to institutional delivery. Bacterial sepsis, birth asphyxia and obstructed labour were among the leading causes of perinatal death. Conclusion Perinatal mortality rate remains considerably high, but proper maternal and child health care services can

  20. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  1. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  2. Reaching Perinatal Women Online: The Healthy You, Healthy Baby Website and App

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Lydia; Miller, Margaret; Lester, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence reveals the close link between unwarranted weight gain among childbearing women and childhood adiposity. Yet current barriers limit the capacity of perinatal health care providers (PHCPs) to offer healthy lifestyle counselling. In response, today's Internet savvy women are turning to online resources to access health information, with the potential of revolutionising health services by enabling PHCPs to guide women to appropriate online resources. This paper presents the findings of a project designed to develop an online resource to promote healthy lifestyles during the perinatal period. The methodology involved focus groups and interviews with perinatal women and PHCPs to determine what online information was needed, in what form, and how best it should be presented. The outcome was the development of the Healthy You, Healthy Baby website and smartphone app. This clinically-endorsed, interactive online resource provides perinatal women with a personalised tool to track their weight, diet, physical activity, emotional wellbeing, and sleep patterns based on the developmental stage of their child with links to quality-assured information. One year since the launch of the online resource, data indicates it provides a low-cost intervention delivered across most geographic and socioeconomic strata without additional demands on health service staff. PMID:24872891

  3. Contributions of Selected Perinatal Variables to Seven-Year Psychological and Achievement Test Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, N. B.; And Others

    Perinatal variables were used to predict 7-year outcome for 538 children, 32% Negro and 68% white. Mother's age, birthplace, education, occupation, marital status, neuropsychiatric status, family income, number supported, birth weight, one- and five-minute Apgar scores were regressed on 7-year Verbal, Performance and Full Scale IQ, Bender, Wide…

  4. Presumed Perinatal Stroke in a Child with Down Syndrome and Moyamoya Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pysden, Karen; Fallon, Penny; Moorthy, Bhagavatheswaran; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2010-01-01

    Moyamoya disease describes a cerebral arteriopathy characterized by stenosis or occlusion of the terminal internal carotid and/or the proximal middle cerebral arteries. We report a female child with trisomy 21 and bilateral moyamoya disease who presented, unusually, with a presumed perinatal cerebral infarct. The clinical, radiological, and…

  5. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  6. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Intellectual, Language and Academic Functions in Children with Ischaemic Perinatal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A.

    2008-01-01

    The developing brain has the capacity for a great deal of plasticity. A number of investigators have demonstrated that intellectual and language skills may be in the normal range in children following unilateral perinatal stroke. Questions have been raised, however, about whether these skills can be maintained at the same level as the brain…

  7. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells-a key mediator for regeneration after perinatal morbidity?

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin; Wolfs, Tim G A; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Gavilanes, Antonio W D; Surbek, Daniel; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal complications in both term- and preterm-born infants are a leading cause of neonatal morbidities and mortality. Infants face different challenges in the neonatal intensive care unit with long-term morbidities such as perinatal brain injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia being particularly devastating. While advances in perinatal medicine have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis, effective therapies to prevent and/or reduce the severity of these disorders are still lacking. The potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) therapy has emerged during the last two decades, and an increasing effort is conducted to address brain- and lung-related morbidities in neonates at risk. Various studies support the notion that MSCs have protective effects. MSCs are an easy source and may be readily available after birth in a clinical setting. MSCs' mechanisms of action are diverse, including migration and homing, release of growth factors and immunomodulation, and the potential to replace injured cells. Here, we review the pathophysiology of perinatally acquired brain and lung injuries and focus on MSCs as potential candidates for therapeutic strategies summarizing preclinical and clinical evidence. PMID:26869264

  8. Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Among Children and Youth in the United States With Perinatal HIV.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Russell B; Patel, Kunjal; Kagan, Ron M; Karalius, Brad; Traite, Shirley; Meyer, William A; Tassiopoulos, Katherine K; Seage, George R; Seybolt, Lorna M; Burchett, Sandra; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-07-01

    Among 234 US youths with perinatal human immunodeficiency virus, 75% had antiretroviral resistance, substantially higher than that of the reference laboratory overall (36%-44%). Resistance to newer antiretrovirals and to all antiretrovirals in a class was uncommon. The only factor independently associated with future resistance was a higher peak viral load. PMID:27056398

  9. Relationship of Perinatal PCB Exposure to Neurodevelopmental Outcomes: Reply to Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladen, Beth C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2004-01-01

    D.V. Cicchetti, A.S. Kaufman, and S.S. Sparrow (this issue) examine various technical issues related to six studies of perinatal PCB exposure and neurodevelopment and one study of adult PCB exposure and motor function. They raise questions about possible imperfections of the studies, but many of their assertions are unsupported or frankly…

  10. Co-Occurring Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Diagnoses in Perinatal Women

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Nancy L.; Tang, Wan; Chaudron, Linda H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To describe the co-occurrence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and mental health burden among perinatal mothers attending well-baby visits with their infants in the first year of life. We compare rates of depression, anxiety disorder, and substance abuse diagnoses between mothers who reported IPV within the past year to those who did not. Methods This cross-sectional study of 188 mothers of infants (under 14 months) was conducted in an urban hospital pediatric clinic. Participants reported demographics and IPV and completed a semistructured psychiatric diagnostic interview. Results Mothers reporting IPV were more likely to be diagnosed with mood and/or anxiety diagnoses (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test), specifically current depressive diagnoses (p<0.01, Fisher's exact test) and panic disorder (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test). There was a trend for more posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (p<0.06) among abused mothers. Substance abuse and dependence, age, race, insurance status, employment, education, and family arrangements did not differ between groups. Prior major or minor depression increases the odds for perinatal depression threefold (OD 3.18). Conclusion These findings have implications for practitioners who encounter perinatal women. Findings suggest providers should explore signs and symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders among women reporting IPV. Similarly, when perinatal mothers report symptoms of depression, PTSD, or panic disorder, practitioners should be alert to the possible contributory role of IPV. PMID:21923282

  11. Perinatal White Matter Injury: The Changing Spectrum of Pathology and Emerging Insights into Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury in survivors of premature birth has a unique and unexplained predilection for periventricular cerebral white matter. Periventricular white-matter injury (PWMI) is now the most common cause of brain injury in preterm infants and the leading cause of chronic neurological morbidity. The spectrum of chronic PWMI includes focal…

  12. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO THE PESTICIDE HEPTACHLOR PRODUCES ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE FUNCTION PARAMETERS IN SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO THE PESTICIDE HEPTACHLOR PRODUCES ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE FUNCTION PARAMETERS IN SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS. R A Matulka1, AA Rooney3, W Williams2, CB Copeland2, and R J Smialowicz2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ITB, ETD, NHEERL, RT...

  13. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Perinatal Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Shannon M.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Litz, Brett T.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal loss, typically defined as fetal death beyond 20 weeks gestation through infant death 1-month postpartum, is a potentially traumatizing experience for parents occurring in approximately 1% of births in the United States. Although many women recover, 15% to 25% have enduring grief-related symptomatology and functional impairment.…

  14. Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Dolezal, Curtis; McKay, Mary; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    A study found that youth and caregiver mental health problem have greater impact than key environmental factors and family functioning on sex and drug use risk behaviors in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHIV+) and PHIV- youths. No differences in the rates of sexual risk behavior and substance use were observed between…

  15. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  16. Measuring Grief Following Miscarriage: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Perinatal Grief Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Chung, Tony K. H.; Lee, Dominic T. S.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Lok, Ingrid H.

    2013-01-01

    Grief following miscarriage is a complex psychological response. This study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS). A total of 280 Chinese women completed the PGS immediately following a diagnosis of miscarriage (baseline) and were reassessed at 12 months follow-up. The factor…

  17. The perinatal: special care unit: expert care for high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Meagher, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Labor and delivery units are often used to provide care for nonlaboring patients requiring intensive medical and nursing care. The utilization of labor beds in this manner, however, can result in a shortage of beds for those patients who are truly in labor. Unfortunately, patient dissatisfaction, use of supplemental staffing, and ill-prepared, overworked nurses can then become the result of this practice. Clearly, an improved, innovative model of providing care for high-risk perinatal patients is needed. The purpose of this article is to describe how one hospital and its interdisciplinary team met the challenge of providing expert care for complex perinatal patients by creating a unique model of patient care delivery, the perinatal special care unit (PSCU). An advanced practice nursing role, the perinatal nurse practitioner (PNNP) was implemented to provide collaborative care for these patients. This article includes a discussion of positive and negative outcomes that occurred after the PSCU became a reality. Overall, housing patients on the PSCU has eliminated inappropriate use of labor and delivery beds and has led to a more satisfying childbearing experience for all involved. PMID:15867684

  18. Narrowly versus Broadly Defined Autism Spectrum Disorders: Differences in Pre-and Perinatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Janne C.; Rommelse, Nanda; Vink, Lianne; Schrieken, Margo; Oosterling, Iris J.; Gaag, Rutger J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the differential contribution of pre-and perinatal risks in narrowly versus broadly defined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and across core symptom domains, IQ and co-morbid problems. Children with a DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder (AD) (n = 121) or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)…

  19. Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors for Specific Language Impairment: A Prospective Pregnancy Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Shelton, W. M. R.; Ing, Caleb; Newnham, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although genetic factors are known to play a causal role in specific language impairment (SLI), environmental factors may also be important. This study examined whether there are prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal factors that are associated with childhood SLI. Method: Participants were members of the Raine Study, a prospective cohort…

  20. Sleep, daily activity rhythms and postpartum mood: A longitudinal study across the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, Elizabeth M; Minuzzi, Luciano; Simpson, William; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-01-01

    Women with a diagnosis of bipolar and major depressive disorders are at higher risk to develop postpartum depression. The primary objective of this longitudinal study was to determine whether daily activity rhythms and sleep parameters differ between women with and without a history of a mood disorder across the perinatal period. A secondary objective was to determine whether changes in these parameters were associated with postpartum mood. In total, 33 women were included in this study, 15 of which had a history of a mood disorder (high-risk group) and 18 who did not (low-risk group). Sleep and daily rhythms were assessed subjectively and objectively during the third trimester (≥26 weeks gestation) and again at 6-12 weeks postpartum. Mood was also assessed at both time points. Women in the high-risk group showed greater subjective daily rhythms and sleep disturbances across the perinatal period. Objective sleep efficiency was worse in the high-risk group in the postpartum period. Changes in both subjective daily rhythms and objective sleep efficiency were predictive of changes in depressive symptoms across the perinatal period. These findings encourage the development of preventative therapeutics to ensure circadian rhythm and sleep stability throughout the perinatal period. PMID:27097327

  1. Impact of Prematurity and Perinatal Antibiotics on the Developing Intestinal Microbiota: A Functional Inference Study

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Sánchez, Borja; Solís, Gonzalo; Fernández, Nuria; Suárez, Marta; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Milani, Christian; Margolles, Abelardo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Ventura, Marco; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The microbial colonization of the neonatal gut provides a critical stimulus for normal maturation and development. This process of early microbiota establishment, known to be affected by several factors, constitutes an important determinant for later health. Methods: We studied the establishment of the microbiota in preterm and full-term infants and the impact of perinatal antibiotics upon this process in premature babies. To this end, 16S rRNA gene sequence-based microbiota assessment was performed at phylum level and functional inference analyses were conducted. Moreover, the levels of the main intestinal microbial metabolites, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate, were measured by Gas-Chromatography Flame ionization/Mass spectrometry detection. Results: Prematurity affects microbiota composition at phylum level, leading to increases of Proteobacteria and reduction of other intestinal microorganisms. Perinatal antibiotic use further affected the microbiota of the preterm infant. These changes involved a concomitant alteration in the levels of intestinal SCFA. Moreover, functional inference analyses allowed for identifying metabolic pathways potentially affected by prematurity and perinatal antibiotics use. Conclusion: A deficiency or delay in the establishment of normal microbiota function seems to be present in preterm infants. Perinatal antibiotic use, such as intrapartum prophylaxis, affected the early life microbiota establishment in preterm newborns, which may have consequences for later health. PMID:27136545

  2. Cerebral Dysfunctions Related to Perinatal Organic Damage: Clinical-Neuropathologic Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towbin, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Recent neuropathology studies identify hypoxia as the main cause of perinatal cerebral damage. Cerebral lesions present at birth, with transition to chronic scar lesions, are correlated to mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and minimal brain dysfunction. Gestation age and severity of hypoxic exposure essentially determine the cerebral…

  3. A rare type of congenital Sturge-Weber Syndrome: presenting with history of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Obuoha; Odume, Calistus; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndu, Ikenna; Imanyikwa, Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    The presentation of a newborn with perinatal asphyxia and poor developmental milestones in a resource-poor setting. Many a times, obscured, unsuspected, and uncommon etiologies compound well-known causes of failure to thrive; in this case a rare finding of Type III Sturge-Weber Syndrome was revealed by Brain CT scanning. PMID:27525070

  4. Sexual Behavior and Perceived Peer Norms: Comparing Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Affected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51%…

  5. Mothers’ Perception of Quality of Services from Health Centers after Perinatal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sereshti, Manije; Nahidi, Fateme; Simbar, Masomeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Zayeri, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perinatal loss is one of the most stressful life events that parents and caregivers experience. Providing an empathetic, caring environment to support mothers who experience perinatal loss is necessary. The aim of this study was to assess mothers’ perception of the quality of services received from health centers after perinatal loss. Methods This study was conducted in 2014–2015 using qualitative content analysis. Participants in the study were 40 women with a history of miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death who live in Tehran and Shahrekord, Iran. Data were collected from the participants through semi-structured, in-depth interviews, and they were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results One theme and six main categories were developed, and they indicated the mothers’ experiences and understandings of the quality of service received after perinatal loss. The major theme was ‘dissatisfaction with the quality of care received.’ The main categories included: 1) effective communication, 2) expecting responsiveness, 3) expecting to respect the patient’s dignity, 4) expecting better care, 5) tension of medical expenses, and 6) insufficient facilities. Conclusion The findings of this study highlighted the weaknesses, inadequacies, strengths, and opportunities in providing health services. They can help reproductive health policy-makers reduce the pain and suffering of the affected families with appropriate measures. PMID:27054012

  6. Safer Beginnings: Perinatal Child-Parent Psychotherapy for Newborns and Mothers Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alicia F.; Diaz, Manuela A.; Van Horn, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is a time of heightened risk for domestic violence and of increased vulnerability to traumatic events. In this article, the authors explain how the experience of domestic violence during pregnancy threatens the newborn's healthy development as well as the parent-child relationship. San Francisco General Hospital's Perinatal Child-Parent…

  7. Factors Associated with the Academic Achievement of Perinatally HIV-Infected Elementary and Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that perinatally HIV-infected children experience difficulty in learning as well as behavioral and social problems in the school setting. While the research is mixed on the effect of the HIV virus on behavioral and social problems, it is much clearer on the effect of this virus on learning. This exploratory study identifies…

  8. Rates and Types of Psychiatric Disorders in Perinatally Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Youth and Seroreverters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude Ann; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Elkington, Katherine S.; Dolezal, Curtis; Wiznia, Andrew; McKay, Mary; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use disorders in perinatally HIV-infected (HIV+) adolescents and 2) the association between HIV infection and these mental health outcomes by comparing HIV+ youths to HIV exposed but uninfected youths (HIV-) from similar communities. Methods: Data…

  9. Perinatal inflammation: a common factor in the early origins of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Maria U; Wallace, Megan J; Pepe, Salvatore; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Moss, Timothy J; Burgner, David

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Traditional risk factors account for only part of the attributable risk. The origins of atherosclerosis are in early life, a potential albeit largely unrecognized window of opportunity for early detection and treatment of subclinical cardiovascular disease. There are robust epidemiological data indicating that poor intrauterine growth and/or prematurity, and perinatal factors such as maternal hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, diabetes and obesity, are associated with adverse cardiovascular intermediate phenotypes in childhood and adulthood. Many of these early-life risk factors result in a heightened inflammatory state. Inflammation is a central mechanism in the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but few studies have investigated the role of overt perinatal infection and inflammation (chorioamnionitis) as a potential contributor to cardiovascular risk. Limited evidence from human and experimental models suggests an association between chorioamnionitis and cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Early life inflammatory events may be an important mechanism in the early development of cardiovascular risk and may provide insights into the associations between perinatal factors and adult cardiovascular disease. This review aims to summarise current data on the early life origins of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, with particular focus on perinatal inflammation. PMID:26223841

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  11. The Community Perinatal Care Study: Home Visiting and Nursing Support for Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, David; Tough, Suzanne; Siever, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    This article describes The Community Perinatal Care Study, a community-based study of pregnancy support that was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between 2001 and 2004. The study was conducted to learn how to improve community-based pregnancy care and to improve prenatal care and healthy births, particularly for women with increased…

  12. Early Intervention and Perinatal Depression: Is There a Need for Provider Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Elizabeth; Stacks, Ann M.; McComish, Judith Fry

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 5-25% of women suffer from perinatal depression (PD). If left untreated, PD can have negative consequences for maternal and child mental health. During pregnancy and the postpartum period, women are in contact with a variety of professionals and paraprofessionals such as public health nurses, early childhood providers and home…

  13. Anxiety Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Nine Months after Perinatal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, Martha E.; Muzik, Maria; Sen, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perinatal loss (stillbirth after 20 weeks gestational age or infant death in the first month) impacts 1–2 infants per hundred live births in the United States and can be a devastating experience for parents. We assessed prevalence of anxiety disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) among bereaved and live-birth mothers. Methods We collaborated with the Michigan Department of Public Health to survey Michigan mothers with perinatal death or live birth. We measured symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorder, and OCD using validated written self-report screens and collected data on maternal demographics, psychiatric history, social support, and intimate partner violence. Results 609/1400 mothers (44%) participated, returning surveys nine months post-delivery. 232 mothers had live birth and 377 had perinatal loss. In unadjusted analyses, bereaved mothers had higher odds of all four disorders. In logistic regression adjusted for covariates, bereaved mothers still had higher odds of moderate-severe generalized anxiety disorder (OR: 2.39, CI: 1.10–5.18, p=0.028) and social phobia (OR: 2.32, CI: 1.52–3.54, p<0.0005 but not panic disorder or OCD. Conclusion Bereaved mothers struggle with clinically-significant anxiety disorders in the first year after perinatal loss; improved identification and treatment are essential to improve mental health for this vulnerable population. PMID:25305711

  14. Evaluating the clinical effectiveness of a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Brandon, Anna R; Pearson, Brenda; Burns, Lynne; Raines, Christena; Bullard, Elizabeth; Rubinow, David

    2014-04-01

    Women experiencing severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum have unique needs when psychiatric hospitalization is indicated. Although many countries have established mother-baby psychiatric units, similar facilities have not been available in the US. In 2011, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill inaugurated the first Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit in the US. We describe the unique characteristics of the patient population and report clinical outcomes guiding development and refinement of treatment protocols. Ninety-two perinatal patients were admitted between September 2011 and September 2012, and 91 completed self-report measures at admission and discharge. Perinatal unipolar mood disorder was the most frequent primary diagnosis (60.43 %), and 11 patients (12 %) were admitted with psychosis. The data document clinically and statistically significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and active suicidal ideation between admission and discharge (p < 0.0001), as assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale. Overall functioning was also improved, demonstrated by a significant mean difference of -10.96 in total scores of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (p < 0.0001). Data suggest that delivering specialized and targeted interventions for severe maternal mental illness in a safe and supportive setting produces positive patient outcomes. PMID:24201978

  15. Workshop on perinatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds. I. Summary.

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, G; Hooper, K; Petreas, M; Stephens, R; Gilman, A

    1995-01-01

    An international workshop reviewed 20 ongoing or recently completed studies of the effects of perinatal exposures to dioxins, dibenzofurans, and PCBs on the reproductive, endocrine, neurodevelopmental, and immune systems. Many of the observed effects are consistent with these compounds acting as "environmental hormones" or endocrine disrupters. This report summarizes the conclusions and future directions described at the workshop. PMID:7614935

  16. Perinatal exposure to methoxychlor enhances adult cognitive responses and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Mariangela; Calandreau, Ludovic; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Keller, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    During perinatal life, sex steroids, such as estradiol, have marked effects on the development and function of the nervous system. Environmental estrogens or xenoestrogens are man-made chemicals, which animal and human population encounter in the environment and which are able to disrupt the functioning of the endocrine system. Scientific interest in the effects of exposure to xenoestrogens has focused more on fertility and reproductive behaviors, while the effects on cognitive behaviors have received less attention. Therefore, the present study explored whether the organochlorine insecticide Methoxychlor (MXC), with known xenoestrogens properties, administered during the perinatal period (from gestational day 11 to postnatal day 8) to pregnant-lactating females, at an environmentally relevant dose (20 µg/kg (body weight)/day), would also affect learning and memory functions depending on the hippocampus of male and female offspring mice in adulthood. When tested in adulthood, MXC perinatal exposure led to an increase in anxiety-like behavior and in short-term spatial working memory in both sexes. Emotional learning was also assessed using a contextual fear paradigm and MXC treated male and female mice showed an enhanced freezing behavior compared to controls. These results were correlated with an increased survival of adult generated cells in the adult hippocampus. In conclusion, our results show that perinatal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of MXC has an organizational effect on hippocampus-dependent memory and emotional behaviors. PMID:24982620

  17. Relation of Perinatal Risk and Early Parenting to Executive Control at the Transition to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Executive control (EC) develops rapidly during the preschool years and is central to academic achievement and functional outcome. Although children with perinatal adversity are at known risk for EC impairments, little is known about the underlying nature of these impairments or the mechanisms that contribute to their development over time. Drawing…

  18. Early Gesture Predicts Language Delay in Children with Pre- Or Perinatal Brain Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Eve; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Does early gesture use predict later productive and receptive vocabulary in children with pre- or perinatal unilateral brain lesions (PL)? Eleven children with PL were categorized into 2 groups based on whether their gesture at 18 months was within or below the range of typically developing (TD) children. Children with PL whose gesture was within…

  19. Reaching perinatal women online: the Healthy You, Healthy Baby website and app.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Miller, Margaret; Lester, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence reveals the close link between unwarranted weight gain among childbearing women and childhood adiposity. Yet current barriers limit the capacity of perinatal health care providers (PHCPs) to offer healthy lifestyle counselling. In response, today's Internet savvy women are turning to online resources to access health information, with the potential of revolutionising health services by enabling PHCPs to guide women to appropriate online resources. This paper presents the findings of a project designed to develop an online resource to promote healthy lifestyles during the perinatal period. The methodology involved focus groups and interviews with perinatal women and PHCPs to determine what online information was needed, in what form, and how best it should be presented. The outcome was the development of the Healthy You, Healthy Baby website and smartphone app. This clinically-endorsed, interactive online resource provides perinatal women with a personalised tool to track their weight, diet, physical activity, emotional wellbeing, and sleep patterns based on the developmental stage of their child with links to quality-assured information. One year since the launch of the online resource, data indicates it provides a low-cost intervention delivered across most geographic and socioeconomic strata without additional demands on health service staff. PMID:24872891

  20. Birth, Interaction and Attachment: Exploring the Foundations for Modern Perinatal Care. Pediatric Round Table: 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Marshall H., Ed.; Robertson, Martha Oschrin, Ed.

    Provided are summaries of conference presentations discussing aspects of birth, parent/child interaction, and attachment behavior. Material in part I explores perspectives on pregnancy and the perinatal period. Included are discussions of birth in nonindustrial societies, progress in the study of maternal behavior in animals, the physiological…

  1. Psychosocial impact of mothers with perinatal loss and its contributing factors: an insight*

    PubMed Central

    Sutan, Rosnah; Amin, Rosnah Mohamad; Ariffin, Khatija Banu; Teng, Tang Zoun; Kamal, Mohd Faiz; Rusli, Rusli Zaim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychosocial impact among mothers with perinatal loss and its contributing factors. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from April 2008 to May 2009 using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and self administered questionnaire. Results: Sixty-two respondents were included and most of them were working mothers (77.4%). The mean age of the respondents was (31.0±5.6) years and a majority of the subjects aged between 20–34 years (77.4%). According to the EPDS score, 53.2% of the respondents had a psychosocial impact with a total score of >9, out of 30. There was a significant relationship between psychosocial impact after perinatal loss and support from friends (P=0.019). However, there were no significant differences between psychosocial impact and history of previous perinatal loss, ethnicity, occupation, educational level, age or total income. Conclusion: Mothers with perinatal loss should be screened for psychosocial impact and offered support when needed. Family and friends should continue to provide emotional support. People who have experienced similar problem before will be able to provide better support than those who have not. PMID:20205307

  2. Spatial Analysis after Perinatal Stroke: Patterns of Neglect and Exploration in Extra-Personal Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thareja, Tarika; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether school-aged children who had experienced a perinatal stroke demonstrate evidence of persistent spatial neglect, and if such neglect was specific to the visual domain or was more generalized. Two studies were carried out. In the first, 38 children with either left hemisphere (LH) or right hemisphere…

  3. Perinatal Support in Substance Abuse: The Requirements of Relationship and Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Stacey R.

    2009-01-01

    Substance abuse creates enormous risks for the developing relationship between mother and infant. Thus, the perinatal period is a critical aspect of addiction treatment. This article highlights the importance of relationships and the reflective supervision that is crucial in the delivery of integrated infant mental health service for pregnant…

  4. Preventing Perinatal Depression in Low-Income Home Visiting Clients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Perry, Deborah F.; Mendelson, Tamar; Kemp, Karen; Leis, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of a 6-week cognitive-behavioral intervention in preventing the onset of perinatal depression and reducing depressive symptoms among low-income women in home visitation programs. Method: Sixty-one women who were pregnant or who had a child less than 6 months of age and who were assessed as at risk for perinatal…

  5. Stress and Grief of a Perinatal Loss: Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Volker; Striegel, Phil

    1995-01-01

    Examined how parents grieve loss of a baby through miscarriage or stillbirth. Interviewed 26 couples 2 weeks after a perinatal loss. Ethnographic content analysis revealed 12 themes closely related to resources, meaning of the stressful event, and coping strategies, all of which are elements, of Hill's ABC-X stress model. (JBJ)

  6. A Culturally Relevant and Responsive Approach to Screening for Perinatal Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye; Handrick, Sandii Leland

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a culturally relevant and responsive approach to screening for perinatal depression in low-income, predominantly African American women. Method: The study details the development of the community-informed instrument and subsequent evaluation of its psychometric…

  7. Interaffectivity, Attachment, and Perinatal Vulnerability: Complexities of Motherhood in the Nineties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissmann, Lenore; Kromelow, Susan; Harding, Carol Gibb; Mroz, Cheryl; Lynn, Laura; Noll, Lisa

    This study explored the role of perinatal vulnerability (PV) in mothers and infants in relationship to the development of interaffectivity and attachment, and the relationship between interaffectivity and attachment. Participating were a low-risk sample of 74 middle-class mother/first-born infant dyads who had participated as volunteers in a…

  8. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  9. Construct Validity of the Infant Motor Profile: Relation with Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Fidler, Vaclav; Middelburg, Karin J.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The Infant Motor Profile (IMP) is a qualitative assessment of motor behaviour of infants aged 3 to 18 months. The aim of this study was to investigate construct validity of the IMP through the relation of IMP scores with prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal variables, including the presence of brain pathology indicated by neonatal ultrasound…

  10. Current Principles and Practice of Ethics and Law in Perinatal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    BERCEANU, C.; ALBU, SIMONA ELENA; BOȚ, MIHAELA; GHELASE, M.ȘT.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most controversial discussion topics in modern bioethics, science or philosophy is represented by the beginning of the individual human life. It is ethically, medically and scientifically correct that the human conception product to be born, so to gain personality and individuality, to be treated as a patient since the intrauterine life. Intrauterine foetal interventions, performed in various therapeutic purposes are still in the experimental stage even in centres with rich experience in perinatal medicine. Progresses truly outstanding are present especially in the prenatal diagnostic methods. Non invasive prenatal testing represents without a doubt a great progress in prenatal diagnosis, but from this point of view, the role of practitioners in the field of perinatal medicine, on counselling and addressing the indication of this test becomes essential. Beyond cultural, national, social or related differences, in perinatal medicine practice is particularly important to respect and permanently reassess the ethical codes. Our paper is targeting to spotlight the essential principles and practice of ethics and law in perinatal medicine nowadays on one hand, and to bring an update review on a controversial topic on the other hand. PMID:25729600

  11. Perinatal Education and Grandparenting: Creating an Interdependent Family Environment. Part I: Documenting the Need

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    1999-01-01

    This is the first of two articles on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a grandparenting perinatal education program. In part one, a review of the literature is presented, along with the planned content and objectives for the program. PMID:22988414

  12. Perinatal Education and Grandparents: Creating an Interdependent Family Environment Part II: The Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    1999-01-01

    This second of two articles presents a study of the grandparenting perinatal education program. The following aspects are featured: recruitment, the setting, the program's content, supporting material and teaching aids, and the program's organization. An evaluation of the program was conducted and is presented in the article. PMID:22945993

  13. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN RELATION TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes in Relation to Drinking Water Arsenic Exposure in BaMen, Inner Mongolia, China
    Danelle T. Lobdell, Zhixiong Ning, Richard K. Kwok, Judy Mumford, Zhi Yi Liu, Pauline Mendola

    Introduction: Close to 40 million people worldwide are exposed t...

  14. Barriers to Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Perinatal Deaths in Rural Gambia: A Qualitative In-Depth Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Jammeh, Abdou; Sundby, Johanne; Vangen, Siri

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The Gambia has one of the world's highest perinatal mortality rates. We explored barriers of timely access to emergency obstetric care services resulting in perinatal deaths and in survivors of severe obstetric complications in rural Gambia. Method. We applied the “three delays” model as a framework for assessing contributing factors to perinatal deaths and obstetric complications. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 survivors of severe obstetric complications at home settings within three to four weeks after hospital discharge. Family members and traditional birth attendants were also interviewed. The interviews were translated into English and transcribed verbatim. We used content analysis to identify barriers of care. Results. Transport/cost-related delays are the major contributors of perinatal deaths in this study. A delay in recognising danger signs of pregnancy/labour or decision to seek care outside the home was the second important contributor of perinatal deaths. Decision to seek care may be timely, but impaired access precluded utilization of EmOC services. Obtaining blood for transfusion was also identified as a deterrent to appropriate care. Conclusion. Delays in accessing EmOC are critical in perinatal deaths. Thus, timely availability of emergency transport services and prompt decision-making are warranted for improved perinatal outcomes in rural Gambia. PMID:21766039

  15. Perinatal Outcome in Women with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Endeshaw, Gezehagn; Berhan, Yifru

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are multisystem diseases known to increase the risk of perinatal mortality worldwide, with a significant proportion of these deaths occurring in low income countries. However, little is known about the obstetric and treatment predictors of perinatal mortality in women with HDP. Methods. A retrospective cohort study design was used to include 1015 hypertensive pregnant women who gave birth to 1110 babies between 2008 and 2013 in three university teaching hospitals. Bivariate and multivariate regression models were used to estimate the associations between selected predictor variables and perinatal mortality taking the onset of HDP illness to death or discharge from the hospital as the time period. Results. There were 322 perinatal deaths resulting in a perinatal mortality rate (PMR) of 290/1000 total births. The proportion of stillbirths was more than 4-fold higher than early neonatal deaths (81% versus 19%). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that multiparity (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.12–228), grand multiparity (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.55–4.92), preterm (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.02–2.35) and very preterm gestational age (OR, 7.7; 95% CI, 5.26–11.20), lack of antenatal care (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.43–2.67), having eclampsia (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 2.85–6.04), antepartum or before (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 3.40–12.75) and intrapartum onset of HDP (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.99–8.04), raised SGOT level (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.30–3.91), vaginal delivery (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 2.93–9.54), low fetal birth weight (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 2.56–7.23), and maternal death (OR, 12.8; 95% CI, 2.99–54.49) were independent predictors of perinatal mortality. Conclusion. This study showed that the PMR of HDP was among the highest in the world. Parity, gestational age, type and onset of HDP, mode of delivery, birthweight, and maternal outcome were strong predictors of perinatal mortality.

  16. Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a detailed account on how they could be improved. Methods A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in eight major hospitals in Dar es Salaam in January 2009. An in-depth interview guide was used for 29 health managers and members of the audit committees to investigate the existence, structure, process and outcome of such audits in clinical practice. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 30 health care providers in the maternity wards to assess their awareness, attitude and practice towards audit systems. The 2007 institutional pregnancy outcome records were reviewed. Results Overall hospital based maternal mortality ratio was 218/100,000 live births (range: 0 - 385) and perinatal mortality rate was 44/1000 births (range: 17 - 147). Maternal and perinatal audit systems existed only in 4 and 3 hospitals respectively, and key decision makers did not take part in audit committees. Sixty percent of care providers were not aware of even a single action which had ever been implemented in their hospitals because of audit recommendations. There were neither records of the key decision points, action plan, nor regular analysis of the audit reports in any of the facilities where such audit systems existed. Conclusions Maternal and perinatal audit systems in these institutions are poorly established in structure and process; and are less effective to improve the quality of care. Fundamental changes are urgently needed for successful audit systems in these institutions. PMID

  17. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  18. Autonomic and behavioral thermoregulation in golden hamsters exposed perinatally to dioxin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Yang, Y; Gray, L E

    1996-03-01

    Perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) cause s a permanent change in thermoregulatory control of male offspring of the rat, characterized by a reduced core temperature (Tc over a wide range of ambient temperatures (Ta). To examine the similarities in this effect across species, the thermoregulatory effects of perinatal TCDD were evaluated in the golden hamster, a species which is very resistant to the lethal effects of TCDD. Adult male hamsters exposed on Gestational Day 11.5-11.75 to 2.0 microgram TCDD/kg by gavage were subjected to a variety of behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory measurements. Nocturnal Tc of TCDD-treated animals was 0.4 to 1.0 degrees C below that of controls over a Ta range of 14 to 34 degrees C. Hypothermia persisted in spite of normal metabolic responses to cold exposure. The hypothermic effect of perinatal TCDD exposure was found to persist over a 24-hr period in unrestrained hamsters monitored by radiotelemetry. The TCDD-treated hamster offspring placed in a temperature gradient exhibited a preference for warm Ta's for 2 to 3 hr; however, when maintained over a 22-hr period in the gradient there was no effect of TCDD on behavioral thermoregulation. TCDD had no effect on motor activity measured over a 24-hr period. TCDD resulted in an approximately 30% reduction in body weight compared to controls; however, this weight loss appeared to have no bearing on the thermoregulatory deficiencies of the TCDD-treated animals. TCDD-treated hamsters displayed a normal metabolic response to cold exposure; thus, it would appear that perinatal exposure to TCDD leads to a dysfunction in the central control of body temperature. The perinatal effects of TCDD on thermoregulation in the rat and hamster appear to be similar. PMID:8607137

  19. Trends and Correlates of Good Perinatal Outcomes in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil; Kissin, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Session, Donna; Macaluso, Maurizio; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate trends in good perinatal outcomes (singleton live births at term with birthweight more than 2,500 g) among live births after assisted reproductive technology in the United States from 2000 to 2008, and associated factors among singletons in 2008. METHODS Using retrospective cohort data from the National Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance System from 2000 to 2008, we calculated relative change and χ2 tests for trend in the proportion of good perinatal outcomes among assisted reproductive technology live births (n=444,909) and liveborn singletons (n=222,500). We conducted univariable analyses followed by multiple logistic regression to estimate the effects of various characteristics on the outcome among singletons born in 2008 after fresh, nondonor assisted reproductive technology cycles (n=20,780). RESULTS The proportion of good perinatal outcomes among all liveborn neonates increased from 38.6% in 2000 to 42.5% in 2008, whereas it declined marginally among singletons from 83.6% to 83.4%. One previous birth, transfer of fewer than three embryos, and the presence of fewer than three fetal hearts on 6-week ultrasound examination were associated with good perinatal outcome among singletons. Non-Hispanic black race, tubal factor infertility, uterine factor infertility, ovulatory disorder, and 5-day embryo culture were associated with reduced odds for a good outcome. The strongest association was the presence of one fetal heart compared with more than two (adjusted odds ratio 2.43, 95% confidence interval 1.73–3.42). CONCLUSION From 2000 to 2008, good perinatal outcomes increased among assisted reproductive technology live births. Among singleton live births, odds for good outcome were greatest with the presence of a single fetal heart and lowest in women of non-Hispanic black race. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II PMID:22996102

  20. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600–4,100 m) residents aged 18–25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  1. [The influence of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system on adolescent academic achievements and behavioural deviations].

    PubMed

    Ukleba, K O; Pavlenishvili, I V; Zurabashvili, D Z

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our research was to study long-term influence of hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system on adolescent academic achievements and behavioural deviations. It was found that perinatal pathologies highly determine the deviant behaviour. The conducted research revealed law intellectual capacity (IQ) in youth with perinatal pathology--2.26. The majority of youths involved in adolescent antisocial behavior suffered from hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system during perinatal period (76%--tend to narcotic and toxic substance addictions; 82%--to criminal behaviour). PMID:23787509

  2. [Peloid therapy in the complex sanatorium treatment of children of early age with complications of perinatal brain damage].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, S O; Babina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The search for novel approaches to multimodality prophylaxis and treatment of sequelae of perinatal nervous system affection as well as introduction of the early diagnostic criteria are topical problems in present-day pediatric neurology. Peloid therapy efficacy in combined sanatorium treatment was studied (Peloterm unit) in 44 infants aged 1 to 3 years. They suffered from sequelae of perinatal affections of the central nervous system including infantile cerebral paralysis. A positive effect (improvement of motor and psychic-speech development) was achieved in 98% cases. This indicates validity of this method in the treatment of CNS affections following perinatal affection of the brain in infants over 1 year of age. PMID:14753007

  3. A longitudinal study of the interactive effects of perinatal complications and early family adversity on cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Stanton, W R; McGee, R O; Silva, P A

    1989-06-01

    The effects of high, medium and low levels of perinatal complications and family adversity on intelligence quotient (IQ) scores were examined in a large sample of Dunedin children tested every second year in the age group 3-13 years. The aim was to test the hypothesis that favourable environmental circumstances attenuate the effects of perinatal complications on later cognitive ability. The results did not support this hypothesis but rather suggested that perinatal complications and family adversity have independent adverse effects on the development of children's cognitive ability. PMID:2764834

  4. Screening to Treatment: Obstacles and Predictors in Perinatal Depression (STOP-PPD) in the Dallas Healthy Start program.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, Geetha; Brandon, Anna R; Johnson, Neysa L; Freeman, Marlene P

    2014-12-01

    Healthy Start programs have made tremendous contributions toward improving the health of mothers and infants through the screening and early detection of perinatal depression. In a collaborative partnership with the Dallas Healthy Start (DHS) program, this pilot study investigated rates of follow-up to systematic referrals for the treatment of perinatal depression in the DHS, as well as identified specific barriers and predictors or treatment follow-up. Results of this study support strengthening existing community-based treatment programs for perinatal depression. PMID:25012198

  5. Perinatal mortality and morbidity among babies delivered in water: surveillance study and postal survey

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ruth E; Tookey, Pat A

    1999-01-01

    Aim To compare perinatal morbidity and mortality for babies delivered in water with rates for babies delivered conventionally (not in water). Design Surveillance study (of all consultant paediatricians) and postal survey (of all NHS maternity units). Setting British Isles (surveillance study); England and Wales (postal survey). Subjects Babies born in the British Isles between April 1994 and March 1996 who died perinatally or were admitted for special care within 48 hours of birth after delivery in water or after labour in water followed by conventional delivery (surveillance study); babies delivered in water in England and Wales in the same period (postal survey). Main outcome measures Number of deliveries in water in the British Isles that resulted in perinatal death or in admission to special care within 48 hours of birth; and proportions (of such deliveries) of all water births in England and Wales. Results 4032 deliveries (0.6% of all deliveries) in England and Wales occurred in water. Perinatal mortality was 1.2/1000 (95% confidence interval 0.4 to 2.9) live births; 8.4/1000 (5.8 to 11.8) live births were admitted for special care. No deaths were directly attributable to delivery in water, but 2 admissions were for water aspiration. UK reports of mortality and special care admission rates for babies of women considered to be at low risk of complications during delivery who delivered conventionally ranged from 0.8/1000 (0.2 to 4.2) to 4.6/1000 (0.1 to 25) live births and from 9.2 (1.1 to 33) to 64/1000 (58 to 70) live births respectively. Compared with regional data for low risk, spontaneous, normal vaginal deliveries at term, the relative risk for perinatal mortality associated with delivery in water was 0.9 (99% confidence interval 0.2 to 3.6). Conclusions Perinatal mortality is not substantially higher among babies delivered in water than among those born to low risk women who delivered conventionally. The data are compatible with a small increase or

  6. [Experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in critical care of respiratory failure in newborn with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in perinatal center].

    PubMed

    Burov, A A; Nikiforov, D V; Podurovskaia, Iu L; Dorofeeva, E I; Abramian, M A; Makhalin, M V; Shatalov, K V; Nikiforov, V S; Degtiarev, D N

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with an experience of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in preterm infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia during postoperative period in the perinatal center. PMID:24749262

  7. A Systematic Review of the Physical, Mental, Social, and Economic Problems of Immigrant Women in the Perinatal Period in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kita, Sachiko; Minatani, Mariko; Hikita, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Shiraishi, Mie; Haruna, Megumi

    2015-12-01

    The perinatal mortality of immigrants in Japan is higher than that of Japanese women. However, details of the problems of immigrant perinatal women that contribute to worsening of their health are still unknown. This review describes the physical, psychological, social, and economic problems of immigrant women during the perinatal period in Japan. Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Igaku-Chuo Zasshi were searched and 36 relevant articles were reviewed. The related descriptions were collected and analyzed by using content analysis. The results showed that immigrant perinatal women in Japan experienced the following problems: language barriers, a problematic relationship with a partner, illegal residency, emotional distress, physical distress, adjustment difficulties, lack of utilization of services, social isolation, lack of support, lack of information, low economic status, unsatisfactory health care, and discrimination. These results indicated that multilingual services, strengthening of social and support networks, and political action are necessary to resolve their problems. PMID:25784144

  8. SOCIAL PLAY BEHAVIOR IS ALTERED IN THE RAT BY PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ANDROGENS AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGEN, VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    During mammalian sexual differentiation, the androgens, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are critical for the organization of the male phenotype. In rats, play behavior is sexually dimorphic. Administration of exogenous androgens during the perinatal period results in masculi...

  9. Attenuation of the hypoxic ventilatory response in adult rats following one month of perinatal hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L; Olson, E B; Vidruk, E H; Mitchell, G S

    1996-01-01

    1. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that perinatal suppression of peripheral arterial chemoreceptor inputs attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response in adult rats. Perinatal suppression of peripheral chemoreceptor activity was achieved by exposing rats to hyperoxia throughout the first month of life. 2. Late-gestation pregnant rats were housed in a 60% O2 environment, exposing the pups to hyperoxia from several days prior to birth until they were returned to normoxia on postnatal day 28. These perinatally treated rats were then reared to adulthood (3-5 months old) in normoxia. In addition to the mother rats, adult male rats were also exposed to hyperoxia, creating an adult-treated control group. Two to four months after the hyperoxic exposure, treated rats were compared with untreated male rats of similar age. 3. A whole-body, flow-through plethysmograph was used to measure hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses of the unanaesthetized adult rats. In moderate hypoxia (arterial oxygen partial pressure, Pa,O2 approximately 48 mmHg). VE (minute ventilation) and the ratio VE/VCO2 (ventilation relative to CO2 production) increased by 16.7 +/- 4.0 and 35.4 +/- 3.4%, respectively, in perinatal-treated rats (means +/- S.E.M.), but increased more in untreated control rats (51.4 +/- 2.8 and 83.1 +/- 4.3%; both P < 10(-6)). 4. In contrast to the impaired hypoxic ventilatory response, ventilatory responses to hypercapnia (5% CO2) were similar between untreated control and perinatal-treated rats. 5. Impaired hypoxic responsiveness was unique to the perinatal-treated rats since hypoxic ventilatory responses were not attenuated in adult-treated rats. 6. The results indicate that ventilatory responses to hypoxaemia are greatly attenuated in adult rats that had experienced hyperoxia during their first month of life, and suggest that normal hypoxic ventilatory control mechanisms are susceptible to developmental plasticity. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8887766

  10. Psychosocial adjustment in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus infected or exposed children – a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zalwango, Sarah K; Kizza, Florence N; Nkwata, Allan K; Sekandi, Juliet N; Kakaire, Robert; Kiwanuka, Noah; Whalen, Christopher C; Ezeamama, Amara E

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether perinatal HIV infection and exposure adversely affected psychosocial adjustment (PA) between 6 and 18 years of life (i.e. during school-age and adolescence). Methods We enrolled 58 perinatally HIV-infected, 56 HIV-exposed uninfected and 54 unexposed controls from Kampala, Uganda. Perinatal HIV status was determined by 18 months of age using a DNA-polymerase chain-reaction test and was confirmed via HIV rapid diagnostic test at psychosocial testing when the children were 6 to 18 years old. Five indicators of PA (depressive symptoms, distress, hopelessness, positive future orientation and esteem) were measured using validated, culturally adapted and translated instruments. Multivariable linear regression analyses estimated HIV-status-related percent differences (β) in PA indicators and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results During school-age and adolescence, positive outlook (β=−3.8, 95% CI: −7.2, −0.1) and self-esteem (β=−4.3, 95% CI: −6.7, −1.8) scores were significantly lower, whereas depressive (β=11.4, 95% CI: 3.3, 19.5) and distress (β=12.3, 95% CI: 5.9, 18.7) symptoms were elevated for perinatally HIV-infected, compared to unexposed controls and exposed uninfected children. Similarly, positive outlook (β=−4.3, 95% CI: −7.3, −1.2) and self-esteem were lower for exposed controls versus HIV-unexposed children. Hopelessness was similar by perinatal HIV status. Likewise, the distress and depressive symptom levels were comparable for HIV-exposed uninfected and HIV-unexposed children. Conclusions Perinatal HIV infection predicted higher distress and depressive symptoms, while HIV-affected status (infection/exposure) predicted low self-esteem and diminished positive outlook in the long term. However, HIV-affected status had no impact on hopelessness, suggesting that psychosocial interventions as an integral component of HIV care for infected children or primary care exposed uninfected children may

  11. Public views of acceptability of perinatal mental health screening and treatment preference: a population based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background At a prevalence rate of 13-25%, mental health problems are among the most common morbidities of the prenatal and postnatal periods. They have been associated with increased risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, child developmental delay, and poor child mental health. However, very few pregnant and postpartum women proactively seek help or engage in treatment and less than 15% receive needed mental healthcare. While system-related barriers limit accessibility and availability of mental health services, personal barriers, such as views of mental health and its treatment, are also cited as significant deterrents of obtaining mental healthcare. The purposes of this population-based study were to identify the public’s views regarding mental health screening and treatment in pregnant and postpartum women, and to determine factors associated with those views. Methods A computer-assisted telephone survey was conducted by the Population Research Laboratory with a random sample of adults in Alberta, Canada. Questions were drawn from the Perinatal Depression Monitor, an Australian population-based survey on perinatal mental health; additional questions were developed and tested to reflect the Canadian context. Interviews were conducted in English and were less than 30 minutes in duration. Descriptive and multivariable regression analyses were conducted. Results Among the 1207 respondents, 74.8% had post-secondary education, 16.3% were 18-34 years old, and two-thirds (66.1%) did not have children <18 years living at home. The majority of respondents strongly agreed/agreed that all women should be screened in the prenatal (63.0%) and postpartum periods (72.7%). Respondents reported that when seeking help and support their first choice would be a family doctor. Preferred treatments were talking to a doctor or midwife and counseling. Knowledge of perinatal mental health was the main factor associated with different treatment preferences. Conclusions The high

  12. Regression analysis of time trends in perinatal mortality in Germany 1980-1993.

    PubMed Central

    Scherb, H; Weigelt, E; Brüske-Hohlfeld, I

    2000-01-01

    Numerous investigations have been carried out on the possible impact of the Chernobyl accident on the prevalence of anomalies at birth and on perinatal mortality. In many cases the studies were aimed at the detection of differences of pregnancy outcome measurements between regions or time periods. Most authors conclude that there is no evidence of a detrimental physical effect on congenital anomalies or other outcomes of pregnancy following the accident. In this paper, we report on statistical analyses of time trends of perinatal mortality in Germany. Our main intention is to investigate whether perinatal mortality, as reflected in official records, was increased in 1987 as a possible effect of the Chernobyl accident. We show that, in Germany as a whole, there was a significantly elevated perinatal mortality proportion in 1987 as compared to the trend function. The increase is 4.8% (p = 0.0046) of the expected perinatal death proportion for 1987. Even more pronounced levels of 8.2% (p = 0. 0458) and 8.5% (p = 0.0702) may be found in the higher contaminated areas of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), including West Berlin, and of Bavaria, respectively. To investigate the impact of statistical models on results, we applied three standard regression techniques. The observed significant increase in 1987 is independent of the statistical model used. Stillbirth proportions show essentially the same behavior as perinatal death proportions, but the results for all of Germany are nonsignificant due to the smaller numbers involved. Analysis of the association of stillbirth proportions with the (137)Cs deposition on a district level in Bavaria discloses a significant relationship. Our results are in contrast to those of many analyses of the health consequences of the Chernobyl accident and contradict the present radiobiologic knowledge. As we are dealing with highly aggregated data, other causes or artifacts may explain the observed effects. Hence, the findings

  13. Congenital anomalies in Canada 2013: a perinatal health surveillance report by the Public Health Agency of Canada's Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Irvine, B; Luo, W; León, J A

    2015-03-01

    Congenital Anomalies in Canada 2013: A Perinatal Health Surveillance Report is the second national surveillance report from the Public Health Agency of Canada dedicated to congenital anomalies. It provides comprehensive data on congenital anomalies in Canada, focussing on 6 categories of congenital anomalies: Down syndrome, neural tube defects, congenital heart defects, orofacial clefts, limb deficiency defects and gastroschisis. The report presents national-level birth prevalence data and temporal trends, provincial and territorial estimates, and international comparisons. Known risk factors, prevalence-related impacts of prenatal diagnosis and preventative measures are also discussed. PMID:25811402

  14. Perinatal Asphyxia Affects Rat Auditory Processing: Implications for Auditory Perceptual Impairments in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Strata, Fabrizio; Stoianov, Ivilin P.; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Bonham, Ben; Martone, Tiziana; Kenet, Tal; Chang, Edward F.; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Merzenich, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia, a naturally and commonly occurring risk factor in birthing, represents one of the major causes of neonatal encephalopathy with long term consequences for infants. Here, degraded spectral and temporal responses to sounds were recorded from neurons in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of adult rats exposed to asphyxia at birth. Response onset latencies and durations were increased. Response amplitudes were reduced. Tuning curves were broader. Degraded successive-stimulus masking inhibitory mechanisms were associated with a reduced capability of neurons to follow higher-rate repetitive stimuli. The architecture of peripheral inner ear sensory epithelium was preserved, suggesting that recorded abnormalities can be of central origin. Some implications of these findings for the genesis of language perception deficits or for impaired language expression recorded in developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, contributed to by perinatal asphyxia, are discussed. PMID:21203459

  15. [Relationship between perinatal pathology and refractogenesis, incidence and type of ocular diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Parameĭ, O V; Sidorenko, E I

    1999-01-01

    Three-year-old children with a history of perinatal diseases differed from healthy age-matched children by a higher incidence of ocular diseases (78.9% vs. 21.6% in the control, p < 0.001). These children often presented with severe visual disorders: partial atrophy and hypoplasia of ocular nerves (7.2%), congenital abnormalities in the eyeball membranes (5.2%), retinopathy neonatorum (5.2%), cortical blindness (3.1%), oculomotor disorders (20.8%), and congenital deformations of the eyelids (19.7%). Disorders of refractogenesis in these children presented as a higher incidence of myopia (19.8% vs. 3.8% in the control, p < 0.001) and a shift of the percentage of refraction abnormalities towards myopia. Therefore, all children with a history of perinatal disease should be referred to a group at a high risk of ocular disease. PMID:10665287

  16. Access, Use, and Preferences for Technology-Based Perinatal and Breastfeeding Support Among Childbearing Women.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Jill Radtke; Cohen, Susan M; Parker, Maris; Holmes, Ashleigh; Bogen, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed 146 postpartum women who birthed at 34-37 6/7 weeks of gestation and intended to breastfeed about their use of and preferences regarding technology to obtain perinatal and breastfeeding support. Most participants owned smartphones and used technology during pregnancy to track pregnancy data, follow fetal development, address pregnancy concerns, and obtain breastfeeding information. Internet, e-mail, apps, and multiplatform resources were the most popular technologies used and preferred. Demographic differences existed in mobile technology access and preferences for different technologies. In terms of technology-based breastfeeding support, women wanted encouragement, anticipatory guidance, and information about milk production. A nuanced understanding of the technology childbearing women use and desire has the potential to impact clinical care and inform perinatal support interventions. PMID:26848248

  17. Is the Perinatal Outcome of Placental Abruption Modified by Clinical Presentation?

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Seishi; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Ohashi, Masanao; Nagai, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the impact of the clinical presentation on perinatal outcome in placental abruption. Study Design. A retrospective study was performed in 97 placental abruptions. Placental abruptions were classified according to clinical presentation: pregnancy-induced hypertension (HT, n = 22), threatened premature labor and/or premature rupture of membranes (TPL/ROM, n = 35), clinically low risk (LR, n = 27), and others (n = 13). Perinatal outcomes were compared among the HT, TPL/ROM, and LR groups. Results. The HT had significantly higher incidence of IUGR, IFUD, and low fibrinogen. The TPL/ROM had less severe disease. However, the LR had significantly higher incidence of IUFD, low UA pH < 7.1, low Apgar score of <7 at 5 min, and low fibrinogen. Conclusion. Disease severity in placental abruption is likely to depend on the clinical presentation. PMID:21490793

  18. Adverse Prenatal, Perinatal and Neonatal Experiences in Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnco, Carly; Lewin, Adam B; Salloum, Alison; Murphy, Tanya K; Crawford, Erika A; Dane, Brittney F; McBride, Nicole M; Storch, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the incidence of adverse prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal experiences amongst children with anxiety disorders, and the relationship to clinical symptomology and functional impairment in treatment-seeking children (N = 107) with a primary anxiety disorder. Anxious children had higher rates of reported maternal prescription medication use during pregnancy, maternal smoking and illness during pregnancy and neonatal complications (including neonatal intensive care and feeding issues) compared with population base rates and non-affected children. Almost one-third had early problems with sleep. Developmental problems were common with more than half having at least one area of delay. More than three quarters of anxious children had a first-degree family member with a psychiatric history. There were several associations between neonatal complications and subsequent clinical symptomology, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depressive comorbidity, anxiety severity and functional impairment. Findings suggest higher rates of perinatal complications in anxious children. PMID:26206734

  19. Developmental programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet: focus on inflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Jessica L.; Bilbo, Staci D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is now epidemic worldwide. Beyond associated diseases such as diabetes, obesity is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Alarmingly maternal obesity and high-fat diet consumption during gestation/lactation may “program” offspring longterm for increased obesity themselves, along with increased vulnerability to mood disorders. We review the evidence that programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet is propagated by inflammatory mechanisms, as obesity and high-fat diets are independently associated with exaggerated systemic levels of inflammatory mediators. Due to the recognized dual role of these immune molecules (eg, interleukin [IL]-6, 11-1β) in placental function and brain development, any disruption of their delicate balance with growth factors or neurotransmitters (eg, serotonin) by inflammation early in life can permanently alter the trajectory of fetal brain development. Finally, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory pathways is a likely candidate for persistent changes in metabolic and brain function as a consequence of the perinatal environment. PMID:25364282

  20. Human factors and error in perinatal care: the interplay between nurses, machines, and the work environment.

    PubMed

    Mahlmeister, Laura R

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal nurses work with intricate systems requiring frequent interface with complex technology. This interplay is strongly influenced by the work environment and systems operations. The interplay among worker, technology, and the environment increases the risk of medical error, adverse patient outcomes, and in some instances, healthcare team member injury. Human factors engineering is an applied science that provides the study of the interface between people and machines. Human factors engineers design operations and systems that recognize the capacities and limitations of human beings and make it difficult for errors to occur. This article discusses the role of human factors research in healthcare design and the application of human factors engineering to perinatal settings. Recommendations are offered for the development of ultrasafe, high-reliability operations based on knowledge accrued through human factors research. PMID:20147826

  1. Perinatal outcomes among immigrant mothers over two periods in a region of central Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of immigrants has increased in Italy in the last twenty years (7.2% of the Italian population), as have infants of foreign-born parents, but scanty evidence on perinatal outcomes is available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether infants of foreign-born mothers living in Italy have different odds of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to those of native-born mothers, and if such measures changed over two periods. Methods The source of this area-based study was the regional hospital discharge database that records perinatal information on all births in the Lazio region. We analysed 296,739 singleton births born between 1996-1998 and 2006-2008. The exposure variable was the mother's region of birth. We considered five outcomes of perinatal health. We estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the association between mother's region of birth and perinatal outcomes. Results Perinatal outcomes were worse among infants of immigrant compared to Italian mothers, especially for sub-Saharan and west Africans, with the following crude ORs (in 1996-1998 and 2006-2008 respectively): 1.80 (95%CI:1.44-2.28) and 1.95 (95%CI:1.72-2.21) for very preterm births, and 1.32 (95%CI:1.16-1.50) and 1.32 (95%CI:1.25-1.39) for preterm births; 1.18 (95%CI:0.99-1.40) and 1.17 (95%CI:1.03-1.34) for a low Apgar score; 1.22 (95%CI:1.15-1.31) and 1.24 (95%CI:1.17-1.32) for the presence of respiratory diseases; 1.47 (95%CI:1.30-1.66) and 1.45 (95%CI:1.34-1.57) for the need for special or intensive neonatal care/in-hospital deaths; and 1.03 (95%CI:0.93-1.15) and 1.07 (95%CI:1.00-1.15) for congenital malformations. Overall, time did not affect the odds of outcomes differently between immigrant and Italian mothers and most outcomes improved over time among all infants. None of the risk factors considered confounded the associations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that migrant status is a risk factor for adverse perinatal

  2. Interconception care for couples after perinatal loss: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tanya; Parrish, Heather; Black, Beth Perry

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal loss can be emotionally devastating for couples who experience miscarriage, fetal or neonatal death. Nurses in a variety of settings can assist couples through their grief by providing emotional support, giving information about the grief process, and in planning for a future pregnancy or deciding to forego future childbearing. This article explicates the relationship between grief and perinatal loss and its effects on couples, specifically in the interconception period, when the initial grief and distress have begun to subside. Interconception care focuses on bridging the couple from the end of the postpartum period to the subsequent pregnancy or decision not to conceive again. Nurses assist couples in distinguishing between uncomplicated grief, complicated grief, and depression, and make appropriate referrals. Openness to expressions of grief, helping couples mobilize support, considering readiness for another pregnancy, and directing couples to useful Internet sites are essential nursing interventions. PMID:21311269

  3. THE POTENTIAL FOR CELL-BASED THERAPY IN PERINATAL BRAIN INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andre W.; Johnston, Michael V.; Fatemi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injuries are a leading cause of cerebral palsy worldwide. The potential of stem cell therapy to prevent or reduce these impairments has been widely discussed within the medical and scientific communities and an increasing amount of research is being conducted in this field. Animal studies support the idea that a number of stem cells types, including cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have a neuroprotective effect in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Both these cell types are readily available in a clinical setting. The mechanisms of action appear to be diverse, including immunomodulation, activation of endogenous stem cells, release of growth factors, and anti-apoptotic effects. Here, we review the different types of stem cells and progenitor cells that are potential candidates for therapeutic strategies in perinatal brain injuries, and summarize recent preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:23814628

  4. Perinatal S100B Protein Assessment in Human Unconventional Biological Fluids: A Minireview and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gazzolo, Diego; Michetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence is now available on the use of S100B protein as a valuable marker of brain damage and its role as a neurotrophic factor. Bearing in mind, among different S100B protein properties that are still being investigated, the possibility of measuring this protein in different biological fluids renders it suitable for use in several disciplines. This is the case with perinatal medicine where even more noninvasive techniques are particularly desirable in order to ensure the minimal handling diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In this setting, the present minireview reports data on the presence and the usefulness of S100B protein as brain damage marker and as a neurotrophic factor in the so-called unconventional biological fluids such as saliva and human milk, respectively. Results offer new possibilities for the use of S100B in perinatal medicine as a key-protein for the investigations focusing on central nervous system development and damage. PMID:20634930

  5. Translation and validation of a French version of Brown's Support Behaviors Inventory in perinatal health.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Céline; Polomeno, Viola; Laizner, Andréa Maria; Marcil, Isabelle; Lang, Ariella

    2003-08-01

    This article describes the process used for translation, testing for reliability and validity, and establishing factor structure of a French version of Brown's Support Behaviors Inventory (SBI-Fr). The objective was to provide an adequate self-report measure of satisfaction with social support during the perinatal period for use with a Francophone population in Québec, Canada. When compared with the English version, the French version had similar qualities regarding reliability and validity, but principal component analysis (N = 271) revealed that the SBI-Fr measures two distinct subscales, perceived satisfaction with partner's and others' support. The availability of the SBI-Fr will facilitate the inclusion of Francophone respondents in studies of satisfaction with social support during the perinatal period and permit cross-cultural comparison between Francophone and other populations in not only Canada but also other French-speaking countries. PMID:12955972

  6. Short- and long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia: looking for neuroprotective strategies.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Marschitz, M; Neira-Peña, T; Rojas-Mancilla, E; Morales, P; Bustamante, D; Leyton, L; Gebicke-Haerter, P

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. A primary insult is first produced by the length of the time without oxygenation, leading to hypoxia/ischemia and death if oxygenation is not promptly established. A second insult is produced by re-oxygenation, eliciting a cascade of biochemical events for restoring function, implying, however, improper homeostasis. The effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia can be explained by over-expression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for oxidised nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) during re-oxygenation. Asphyxia also induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, including nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and its subunit p65, whose translocation to the nucleus is significantly increased in brain tissue from asphyxia-exposed animals, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. It is proposed that PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.Nicotinamide is a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor, whose effects have been studied in an experimental model of global perinatal asphyxia in rats, inducing the insult by immersing rat foetuses into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, immediately treated, or given to surrogate dams for nursing, pending further experiments. Systemic administration of nicotinamide 1 h after the insult inhibited PARP-1 overactivity in peripheral and brain tissue, preventing several of the long-term consequences elicited by perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that it constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:25287541

  7. The Impact of HAART on Cardiomyopathy among Children and Adolescents Perinatally Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Colan, Steven D.; Oleske, James M.; Seage, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of cardiomyopathy among children perinatally infected with HIV were conducted before the routine use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Nucleoside analogues (NRTIs), the backbone of HAART, have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity, which can lead to cardiomyopathy. We evaluated the association of HAART and specific NRTIs associated with mitochondrial toxicity, on development of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. Design 3,035 perinatally HIV-infected children enrolled in a US-based multicenter prospective cohort study, were followed for cardiomyopathy, defined as a clinical diagnosis or initiation of digoxin, from 1993–2007. Methods Cox models were used to estimate the effects of HAART and NRTIs on cardiomyopathy, identify predictors of cardiomyopathy among HAART users, and estimate the association between development of cardiomyopathy and mortality. Results 99 cases of cardiomyopathy were identified over follow-up (incidence rate: 5.6 cases per 1,000 person-years) at a median age of 9.4 years. HAART was associated with a 50% lower incidence of cardiomyopathy compared to no HAART use (95% confidence interval: 20%, 70%). Zalcitabine (ddC) use, however, was associated with an 80% higher incidence of cardiomyopathy. Among HAART users, older age at HAART initiation, ddC use before HAART initiation, initiating a HAART regimen containing zidovudine (ZDV), and a nadir CD4<15% were independently associated with a higher rate of cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy was associated with a 6-fold higher mortality rate. Conclusions HAART has dramatically decreased the incidence of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. However, they remain at increased risk for cardiomyopathy and ongoing ZDV exposure may increase this risk. PMID:22781228

  8. The model of palliative care in the perinatal setting: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The notion of Palliative Care (PC) in neonatal and perinatal medicine has largely developed in recent decades. Our aim was to systematically review the literature on this topic, summarise the evolution of care and, based on the available data, suggest a current standard for this type of care. Methods Data sources included Medline, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and the bibliographies of the papers retrieved. Articles focusing on neonatal/perinatal hospices or PC were included. A qualitative analysis of the content was performed, and data on the lead author, country, year, type of article or design, and direct and indirect subjects were obtained. Results Among the 1558 articles retrieved, we did not find a single quantitative empirical study. To study the evolution of the model of care, we ultimately included 101 studies, most of which were from the USA. Fifty of these were comments/reflections, and only 30 were classifiable as clinical studies (half of these were case reports). The analysis revealed a gradual conceptual evolution of the model, which includes the notions of family-centered care, comprehensive care (including bereavement) and early and integrative care (also including the antenatal period). A subset of 27 articles that made special mention of antenatal aspects showed a similar distribution. In this subset, the results of the four descriptive clinical studies showed that, in the context of specific programmes, a significant number of couples (between 37 and 87%) opted for PC and to continue with the pregnancy when the foetus has been diagnosed with a lethal illness. Conclusions Despite the interest that PC has aroused in perinatal medicine, there are no evidence-based empirical studies to indicate the best model of care for this clinical setting. The very notion of PC has evolved to encompass perinatal PC, which includes, among other things, the idea of comprehensive care, and early and integrative care initiated antenatally. PMID:22409881

  9. A Thematic Analysis of Stigma and Disclosure for Perinatal Depression on an Online Forum

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Susan; Drey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Perinatal mental illness is a global health concern; however, many women do not get the treatment they need to recover. Some women choose not to seek professional help and get no treatment because they feel stigmatized. Online forums for various health conditions, including perinatal mental health, can be beneficial for members. Little is known about the role that online forums for perinatal mental illness play in reducing stigma and subsequent disclosure of symptoms to health care providers and treatment uptake. Objective This study aimed to examine stigma and disclosure in forums and describe any potential disadvantages of forum use. Methods An online forum for mothers was examined and 1546 messages extracted from 102 threads from the antenatal and postnatal depression section. These messages were subjected to deductive systematic thematic analysis to identify common themes regarding stigma and disclosure of symptoms and potential disadvantages of forum use. Results Two major themes were identified: stigma and negative experiences of disclosure. Stigma had 3 subthemes: internal stigma, external stigma, and treatment stigma. Many women were concerned about feeling like a “bad” or “failed” mother and worried that if they disclosed their symptoms to a health care provider they would be stigmatized. Posts in response to this frequently encouraged women to disclose their symptoms to health care providers and accept professional treatment. Forum discourse reconstructed the ideology of motherhood as compatible with perinatal mental illness, especially if the woman sought help and adhered to treatment. Many women overcame stigma and replied that they had taken advice and disclosed to a health care provider and/or taken treatment. Conclusions Forum use may increase women's disclosure to health care providers by challenging their internal and external stigma and this may strengthen professional treatment uptake and adherence. However, a few posts

  10. Perspectives on glenohumeral joint contractures and shoulder dysfunction in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gharbaoui, Idris S; Gogola, Gloria R; Aaron, Dorit H; Kozin, Scott H

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder joint deformities continue to be a challenging aspect of treating upper plexus lesions in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP). It is increasingly recognized that PBPP affects the glenohumeral joint specifically, and that abnormal scapulothoracic movements are a compensatory development. The pathophysiology and assessment of glenohumeral joint contractures, the progression of scapular dyskinesia and skeletal dysplasia, and current shoulder imaging techniques are reviewed. PMID:25835253

  11. Sexual differentiation of the brain requires perinatal kisspeptin-GnRH neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Busby, Ellen R; Kirilov, Milen; Schütz, Günther; Sherwood, Nancy M; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-11-12

    Sex differences in brain function underlie robust differences between males and females in both normal and disease states. Although alternative mechanisms exist, sexual differentiation of the male mammalian brain is initiated predominantly by testosterone secreted by the testes during the perinatal period. Despite considerable advances in understanding how testosterone and its metabolite estradiol sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that generates the male-specific perinatal testosterone surge. In mice, we show that a male-specific activation of GnRH neurons occurs 0-2 h following birth and that this correlates with the male-specific surge of testosterone occurring up to 5 h after birth. The necessity of GnRH signaling for the sexually differentiating effects of the perinatal testosterone surge was demonstrated by the persistence of female-like brain characteristics in adult male, GnRH receptor knock-out mice. Kisspeptin neurons have recently been identified to be potent, direct activators of GnRH neurons. We demonstrate that a population of kisspeptin neurons appears in the preoptic area of only the male between E19 and P1. The importance of kisspeptin inputs to GnRH neurons for the process of sexual differentiation was demonstrated by the lack of a normal neonatal testosterone surge, and disordered brain sexual differentiation of male mice in which the kisspeptin receptor was deleted selectively from GnRH neurons. These observations demonstrate the necessity of perinatal GnRH signaling for driving brain sexual differentiation and indicate that kisspeptin inputs to GnRH neurons are essential for this process to occur. PMID:25392497

  12. Perinatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Angiotensin II Receptor-Mediated Vascular Contractility in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, DaLiao; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that perinatal nicotine exposure causes development of hypertensive phenotype in adult offspring. Aims The present study was to determine whether perinatal nicotine exposure causes an epigenetic programming of vascular Angiotensin II receptors (ATRs) and their-mediated signaling pathway leading to heightened vascular contraction in adult offspring. Main methods Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth. The experiments were conducted at 5 months of age of male offspring. Key Findings Nicotine treatment enhanced Angitension II (Ang II)-induced vasoconstriction and 20-kDa myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC20-P) levels. In addition, the ratio of Ang II-induced tension/MLC-P was also significantly increased in nicotine-treated group compared with the saline group. Nicotine-mediated enhanced constrictions were not directly dependent on the changes of [Ca2+]i concentrations but dependent on Ca2+ sensitivity. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly enhanced vascular ATR type 1a (AT1aR) but not AT1bR mRNA levels in adult rat offspring, which was associated with selective decreases in DNA methylation at AT1aR promoter. Contrast to the effect on AT1aR, nicotine decreased the mRNA levels of vascular AT2R gene, which was associated with selective increases in DNA methylation at AT2R promoter. Significance Our results indicated that perinatal nicotine exposure caused an epigenetic programming of vascular ATRs and their-mediated signaling pathways, and suggested that differential regulation of AT1R/AT2R gene expression through DNA methylation mechanism may be involved in nicotine-induced heightened vasoconstriction and development of hypertensive phenotype in adulthood. PMID:25265052

  13. Perinatal nicotine exposure suppresses PPARγ epigenetically in lung alveolar interstitial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gong, M; Liu, J; Sakurai, R; Corre, A; Anthony, S; Rehan, V K

    2015-04-01

    Due to the active inhibition of the adipogenic programming, the default destiny of the developing lung mesenchyme is to acquire a myogenic phenotype. We have previously shown that perinatal nicotine exposure, by down-regulating PPARγ expression, accentuates this property, culminating in myogenic pulmonary phenotype, though the underlying mechanisms remained incompletely understood. We hypothesized that nicotine-induced PPARγ down-regulation is mediated by PPARγ promoter methylation, controlled by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), two known key regulators of DNA methylation. Using cultured alveolar interstitial fibroblasts and an in vivo perinatal nicotine exposure rat model, we found that PPARγ promoter methylation is strongly correlated with inhibition of PPARγ expression in the presence of nicotine. Methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored the nicotine-induced down-regulation of PPARγ expression and the activation of its downstream myogenic marker fibronectin. With nicotine exposure, a specific region of PPARγ promoter was significantly enriched with antibodies against chromatin repressive markers H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, dose-dependently. Similar data were observed with antibodies against DNA methylation regulatory factors DNMT1 and MeCP2. The knock down of DNMT1 and MeCP2 abolished nicotine-mediated increases in DNMT1 and MeCP2 protein levels, and PPARγ promoter methylation, restoring nicotine-induced down regulation of PPARγ and upregulation of the myogenic protein, fibronectin. The nicotine-induced alterations in DNA methylation modulators DNMT1 and MeCP2, PPARγ promoter methylation, and its down-stream targets, were also validated in perinatally nicotine exposed rat lung tissue. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into nicotine-induced epigenetic silencing of PPARγ that could be exploited to design novel targeted molecular interventions against the smoke exposed lung injury in general and

  14. Perinatal Autopsy Findings in a Case of De Novo Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Nagaraju, Smitha; Kangle, Rajit; Gosavi, Mansi

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia are group of inherited disorders involving the developmental defects of ectodermal structures like hair, teeth, nails, sweat glands, and others. X-linked recessive inheritance is most common. Here we describe perinatal autopsy findings in a case of de novo ectodermal dysplasia in a female fetus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fetal autopsy description in a case of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:26417167

  15. More similar than you think: Frog metamorphosis as a model of human perinatal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Daniel R

    2015-12-15

    Hormonal control of development during the human perinatal period is critically important and complex with multiple hormones regulating fetal growth, brain development, and organ maturation in preparation for birth. Genetic and environmental perturbations of such hormonal control may cause irreversible morphological and physiological impairments and may also predispose individuals to diseases of adulthood, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Endocrine and molecular mechanisms that regulate perinatal development and that underlie the connections between early life events and adult diseases are not well elucidated. Such mechanisms are difficult to study in uterus-enclosed mammalian embryos because of confounding maternal effects. To elucidate mechanisms of developmental endocrinology in the perinatal period, Xenopus laevis the African clawed frog is a valuable vertebrate model. Frogs and humans have identical hormones which peak at birth and metamorphosis, have conserved hormone receptors and mechanisms of gene regulation, and have comparable roles for hormones in many target organs. Study of molecular and endocrine mechanisms of hormone-dependent development in frogs is advantageous because an extended free-living larval period followed by metamorphosis (1) is independent of maternal endocrine influence, (2) exhibits dramatic yet conserved developmental effects induced by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones, and (3) begins at a developmental stage with naturally undetectable hormone levels, thereby facilitating endocrine manipulation and interpretation of results. This review highlights the utility of frog metamorphosis to elucidate molecular and endocrine actions, hormone interactions, and endocrine disruption, especially with respect to thyroid hormone. Knowledge from the frog model is expected to provide fundamental insights to aid medical understanding of endocrine disease, stress, and endocrine disruption affecting the perinatal period in humans

  16. Perinatal Specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris (Dinosauria: Hadrosauridae), from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Leonard; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav; Barsbold, Rinchen; Garcia, Géraldine; Stein, Koen; Escuillié, François; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background The Late Cretaceous Nemegt Formation, Gobi Desert, Mongolia has already yielded abundant and complete skeletons of the hadrosaur Saurolophus angustirostris, from half-grown to adult individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we describe perinatal specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris, associated with fragmentary eggshell fragments. The skull length of these babies is around 5% that of the largest known S. angustirostris specimens, so these specimens document the earliest development stages of this giant hadrosaur and bridge a large hiatus in our knowledge of the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. Conclusions/Significance The studied specimens are likely part of a nest originally located on a riverbank point bar. The perinatal specimens were buried by sediment carried by the river current presumably during the wet summer season. Perinatal bones already displayed diagnostic characters for Saurolophus angustirostris, including premaxillae with a strongly reflected oral margin and upturned premaxillary body in lateral aspect. The absence of a supracranial crest and unfused halves of the cervical neural arches characterize the earliest stages in the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. The eggshell fragments associated with the perinatal individuals can be referred to the Spheroolithus oogenus and closely resemble those found in older formations (e.g. Barun Goyot Fm in Mongolia) or associated with more basal hadrosauroids (Bactrosaurus-Gilmoreosaurus in the Iren Dabasu Fm, Inner Mongolia, China). This observation suggests that the egg microstructure was similar in basal hadrosauroids and more advanced saurolophines. Competing Interests One of the authors (FE) is employed by the commercial organization Eldonia. Eldonia provided support in the form of a salary for FE, but did not have any additional role or influence in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript and it does not alter the authors

  17. Dynamic Metabolic Disruption in Rats Perinatally Exposed to Low Doses of Bisphenol-A

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Cabaton, Nicolas J.; Canlet, Cécile; Gautier, Roselyne; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Jourdan, Fabien; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Vinson, Florence; Soto, Ana M.; Zalko, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Along with the well-established effects on fertility and fecundity, perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, and notably to xeno-estrogens, is strongly suspected of modulating general metabolism. The metabolism of a perinatally exposed individual may be durably altered leading to a higher susceptibility of developing metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes; however, experimental designs involving the long term study of these dynamic changes in the metabolome raise novel challenges. 1H-NMR-based metabolomics was applied to study the effects of bisphenol-A (BPA, 0; 0.25; 2.5, 25 and 250 μg/kg BW/day) in rats exposed perinatally. Serum and liver samples of exposed animals were analyzed on days 21, 50, 90, 140 and 200 in order to explore whether maternal exposure to BPA alters metabolism. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) was independently applied to each time point, demonstrating a significant pair-wise discrimination for liver as well as serum samples at all time-points, and highlighting unequivocal metabolic shifts in rats perinatally exposed to BPA, including those exposed to lower doses. In BPA exposed animals, metabolism of glucose, lactate and fatty acids was modified over time. To further explore dynamic variation, ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (A-SCA) was used to separate data into blocks corresponding to the different sources of variation (Time, Dose and Time*Dose interaction). A-SCA enabled the demonstration of a dynamic, time/age dependent shift of serum metabolome throughout the rats’ lifetimes. Variables responsible for the discrimination between groups clearly indicate that BPA modulates energy metabolism, and suggest alterations of neurotransmitter signaling, the latter finding being compatible with the neurodevelopmental effect of this xenoestrogen. In conclusion, long lasting metabolic effects of BPA could be characterized over 200 days, despite physiological (and thus metabolic) changes connected

  18. Perinatal Resveratrol Supplementation to Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Dams Mitigates the Development of Hypertension in Adult Offspring.

    PubMed

    Care, Alison S; Sung, Miranda M; Panahi, Sareh; Gragasin, Ferrante S; Dyck, Jason R B; Davidge, Sandra T; Bourque, Stephane L

    2016-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether perinatal maternal resveratrol (Resv)-a phytoalexin known to confer cardiovascular protection-could prevent the development of hypertension and improve vascular function in adult spontaneously hypertensive rat offspring. Dams were fed either a control or Resv-supplemented diet (4 g/kg diet) from gestational day 0.5 until postnatal day 21. Indwelling catheters were used to assess blood pressure and vascular function in vivo; wire myography was used to assess vascular reactivity ex vivo. Perinatal Resv supplementation in dams had no effect on fetal body weights, albeit continued maternal treatment postnatally resulted in growth restriction in offspring by postnatal day 21; growth restriction was no longer evident after 5 weeks of age. Maternal perinatal Resv supplementation prevented the onset of hypertension in adult offspring (-18 mm Hg;P=0.007), and nitric oxide synthase inhibition (withl-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester) normalized these blood pressure differences, suggesting improved nitric oxide bioavailability underlies the hemodynamic alterations in the Resv-treated offspring. In vivo and ex vivo, vascular responses to methylcholine were not different between treatment groups, but prior treatment withl-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester attenuated the vasodilation in untreated, but not Resv-treated adult offspring, suggesting a shift toward nitric oxide-independent vascular control mechanisms in the treated group. Finally, bioconversion of the inactive precursor big endothelin-1 to active endothelin-1 in isolated mesenteric arteries was reduced in Resv-treated offspring (-28%;P<0.05), and this difference could be normalized byl-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester treatment. In conclusion, perinatal maternal Resv supplementation mitigated the development of hypertension and causes persistent alterations in vascular responsiveness in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:26928803

  19. Malignant Perinatal Variant of Long-QT Syndrome Caused by a Profoundly Dysfunctional Cardiac Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dao W.; Crotti, Lia; Shimizu, Wataru; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Cantu', Francesco; De Filippo, Paolo; Kishiki, Kanako; Miyazaki, Aya; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility contributes to sudden death during infancy and may contribute to perinatal and neonatal mortality, but the molecular basis of this risk and the relationship to genetic disorders presenting later in life is unclear. We studied the functional and pharmacological properties of a novel de novo cardiac sodium channel gene (SCN5A) mutation associated with an extremely severe perinatal presentation of long-QT syndrome in unrelated probands of different ethnicity. Methods and Results Two subjects exhibiting severe fetal and perinatal ventricular arrhythmias were screened for SCN5A mutations and the functional properties of a novel missense mutation (G1631D) were determined by whole-cell patch clamp recording. In vitro electrophysiological studies revealed a profound defect in sodium channel function characterized by ~10-fold slowing of inactivation, increased persistent current, slowing of recovery from inactivation, depolarized voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. Single channel recordings demonstrated increased frequency of late openings, prolonged mean open time and increased latency to first opening for the mutant. Subjects carrying this mutation responded clinically to the combination of mexiletine with propranolol and survived. Pharmacologically, the mutant exhibited 2-fold greater tonic and use-dependent mexiletine block than wildtype channels. The mutant also exhibited enhanced tonic (2.4-fold) and use-dependent block (~5-fold) by propranolol, and we observed additive effects of the two drugs on the mutant. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the molecular basis for a malignant perinatal presentation of long-QT syndrome, illustrates novel functional and pharmacological properties of SCN5A-G1631D which caused the disorder, and reveals therapeutic benefits of propranolol block of mutant sodium channels in this setting. PMID:19808432

  20. Changes in Thyroid Status During Perinatal Development of MCT8-Deficient Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Marcinkowski, Teresa; Bernal, Juan; Weiss, Roy E.; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) deficiency syndrome present with a severe psychomotor retardation and abnormal serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels, consisting of high T3 and low T4 and rT3. Mice deficient in Mct8 replicate the thyroid phenotype of patients with the MCT8 gene mutations. We analyzed the serum TH levels and action in the cerebral cortex and in the liver during the perinatal period of mice deficient in Mct8 to assess how the thyroid abnormalities of Mct8 deficiency develop and to study the thyroidal status of specific tissues. During perinatal life, the thyroid phenotype of Mct8-deficient mice is different from that of adult mice. They manifest hyperthyroxinemia at embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 0. This perinatal hyperthyroxinemia is accompanied by manifestations of TH excess as evidenced by a relative increase in the expression of genes positively regulated by T3 in both the cerebral cortex and liver. An increased tissue accumulation of T4 and T3 and the expression of TH alternative transporters, including Lat1, Lat2, Oatp1c1, and Oatp3a1 in the cortex and Lat2 and Oatp1b2 in the liver, suggested that Mct8 deficiency either directly interferes with tissue efflux of TH or indirectly activates other transporters to increase TH uptake. This report is the first to identify that the ontogenesis of TH abnormalities in Mct8-deficient mice manifests with TH excess in the perinatal period. PMID:23696569

  1. Metabolic imprinting: critical impact of the perinatal environment on the regulation of energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barry E

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies in humans suggest that maternal undernutrition, obesity and diabetes during gestation and lactation can all produce obesity in offspring. Animal models have allowed us to investigate the independent consequences of altering the pre- versus post-natal environments on a variety of metabolic, physiological and neuroendocrine functions as they effect the development in the offspring of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia (the ‘metabolic syndrome’). During gestation, maternal malnutrition, obesity, type 1 and type 2 diabetes and psychological, immunological and pharmacological stressors can all promote offspring obesity. Normal post-natal nutrition can reduce the adverse impact of some of these pre-natal factors but maternal high-fat diets, diabetes and increased neonatal access to food all enhance the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in offspring. The outcome of these perturbations of the perinatal environmental is also highly dependent upon the genetic background of the individual. Those with an obesity-prone genotype are more likely to be affected by factors such as maternal obesity and high-fat diets than are obesity-resistant individuals. Many perinatal manipulations appear to promote offspring obesity by permanently altering the development of central neural pathways, which regulate food intake, energy expenditure and storage. Given their strong neurotrophic properties, either excess or an absence of insulin and leptin during the perinatal period are likely to be effectors of these developmental changes. Because obesity is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality and because of its resistance to treatment, prevention is likely to be the best strategy for stemming the tide of the obesity epidemic. Such prevention should begin in the perinatal period with the identification and avoidance of factors which produce permanent, adverse alterations in neural pathways which control energy homeostasis

  2. Timing of treatment initiation for mild gestational diabetes and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik, Anna; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Reddy, Uma M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Sorokin, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between gestational age (GA) at the time of treatment initiation for gestational diabetes (GDM) and maternal and perinatal outcomes. Study Design A secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of mild GDM in which women with mild GDM were randomized to treatment versus usual care. The primary outcome of the original trial, as well as this analysis, was a composite perinatal adverse outcome that included neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and perinatal mortality. Other outcomes examined included the frequency of large for gestational age (LGA), birth weight, neonatal intensive care unit admission (NICU), gestational hypertension / preeclampsia and cesarean delivery. The interaction between GA at treatment initiation (stratified as 24-26 weeks, 27 weeks, 28 weeks, 29 weeks, ≥30 weeks) and treatment group (treated vs. routine care), with the outcomes of interest, was used to determine whether GA at treatment initiation was associated with outcome differences. Results Of 958 women analyzed, those who initiated treatment at an earlier GA did not gain an additional treatment benefit compared to those who initiated treatment at a later GA (p-value for interaction with the primary outcome is 0.44). Similarly, there was no evidence that other outcomes were significantly improved by earlier initiation of GDM treatment (LGA p=0.76; NICU admission p=0.8; cesarean delivery p=0.82). The only outcome that had a significant interaction between GA and treatment was gestational hypertension/preeclampsia (p=0.04), although there was not a clear cut GA trend where this outcome improved with treatment. Conclusion Earlier initiation of treatment of mild GDM was not associated with stronger effect of treatment on perinatal outcomes. PMID:26071920

  3. Perinatal Exposure to Glufosinate Ammonium Herbicide Impairs Neurogenesis and Neuroblast Migration through Cytoskeleton Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Herzine, Ameziane; Laugeray, Anthony; Feat, Justyne; Menuet, Arnaud; Quesniaux, Valérie; Richard, Olivier; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Perche, Olivier; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis, a process of generating functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions such as the subventricular zone (SVZ). During this process, newly generated neurons migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb to replace granule cells and periglomerular neurons. This neuronal migration is pivotal not only for neuronal plasticity but also for adapted olfactory based behaviors. Perturbation of this highly controlled system by exogenous chemicals has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We reported recently that perinatal exposure to low dose herbicide glufosinate ammonium (GLA), leads to long lasting behavioral defects reminiscent of Autism Spectrum Disorder-like phenotype in the offspring (Laugeray et al., 2014). Herein, we demonstrate that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA induces alterations in neuroblast proliferation within the SVZ and abnormal migration from the SVZ to the olfactory bulbs. These disturbances are not only concomitant to changes in cell morphology, proliferation and apoptosis, but are also associated with transcriptomic changes. Therefore, we demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA alters SVZ neurogenesis. Jointly with our previous work, the present results provide new evidence on the link between molecular and cellular consequences of early life exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of ASD-like phenotype later in life. PMID:27555806

  4. Perinatal Taurine Alters Arterial Pressure Control and Renal Function in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Lerdweeraphon, Wichaporn; Malila, Pisamai; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Wyss, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of perinatal taurine exposure on renal function in adult, female rats on a high sugar diet. Perinatal taurine depleted (TD), supplemented (TS) or untreated control (C) female offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water (CW,TDW or TSW) or tap water with 5% glucose (CG, TDG or TSG) after weaning. At 7–8 weeks of age, renal function was studied in the conscious, restrained rats. Mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in TDW, TDG, and TSG rats. Plasma sodium concentration was significantly lower in all glucose treated animals, but the greatest decrease was in TDW rats. Basal renal blood flow was lowest in TSW and TSG, and the responses to a saline load were also lowest in those two groups. These changes were consistent with increased renal vascular resistance. The basal glomerular filtration rate was lowest in TSW, but the responses to a saline load were similar in all of the groups. Water excretion was lower in TSG and TSW, consistent with increased renal tubular water reabsorption. These data suggest that perinatal taurine exposure alters normal renal function and renal responses to dietary sugar in adult female offspring. PMID:19239145

  5. The metallochaperone Atox1 plays a critical role in perinatal copper homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamza, I; Faisst, A; Prohaska, J; Chen, J; Gruss, P; Gitlin, J D

    2001-06-01

    Copper plays a fundamental role in the biochemistry of all aerobic organisms. The delivery of this metal to specific intracellular targets is mediated by metallochaperones. To elucidate the role of the metallochaperone Atox1, we analyzed mice with a disruption of the Atox1 locus. Atox1(-/-) mice failed to thrive immediately after birth, with 45% of pups dying before weaning. Surviving animals exhibited growth failure, skin laxity, hypopigmentation, and seizures because of perinatal copper deficiency. Maternal Atox1 deficiency markedly increased the severity of Atox1(-/-) phenotype, resulting in increased perinatal mortality as well as severe growth retardation and congenital malformations among surviving Atox1(-/-) progeny. Furthermore, Atox1-deficient cells accumulated high levels of intracellular copper, and metabolic studies indicated that this defect was because of impaired cellular copper efflux. Taken together, these data reveal a direct role for Atox1 in trafficking of intracellular copper to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells and demonstrate that this metallochaperone plays a critical role in perinatal copper homeostasis. PMID:11391006

  6. Socio-cultural factors surrounding mental distress during the perinatal period in Zambia: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The presence of mental distress during pregnancy and after childbirth imposes detrimental developmental and health consequences for families in all nations. In Zambia, the Ministry of Health (MoH) has proposed a more comprehensive approach towards mental health care, recognizing the importance of the mental health of women during the perinatal period. Aim The study explores factors contributing to mental distress during the perinatal period of motherhood in Zambia. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Lusaka, Zambia with nineteen focus groups comprising 149 women and men from primary health facilities and schools respectively. Findings There are high levels of mental distress in four domains: worry about HIV status and testing; uncertainty about survival from childbirth; lack of social support; and vulnerability/oppression. Conclusion Identifying mental distress and prompt referral for interventions is critical to improving the mental health of the mother and prevent the effects of mental distress on the baby. Recommendation Strategies should be put in place to ensure pregnant women are screened for possible perinatal mental health problems during their visit to antenatal clinic and referral made to qualified mental health professionals. In addition further research is recommended in order to facilitate evidence based mental health policy formulation and implementation in Zambia. PMID:22954173

  7. Parkin-mediated mitophagy directs perinatal cardiac metabolic maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guohua; Song, Moshi; Csordas, Gyorgy; Kelly, Daniel P; Matkovich, Scot J; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-12-01

    In developing hearts, changes in the cardiac metabolic milieu during the perinatal period redirect mitochondrial substrate preference from carbohydrates to fatty acids. Mechanisms responsible for this mitochondrial plasticity are unknown. Here, we found that PINK1-Mfn2-Parkin-mediated mitophagy directs this metabolic transformation in mouse hearts. A mitofusin (Mfn) 2 mutant lacking PINK1 phosphorylation sites necessary for Parkin binding (Mfn2 AA) inhibited mitochondrial Parkin translocation, suppressing mitophagy without impairing mitochondrial fusion. Cardiac Parkin deletion or expression of Mfn2 AA from birth, but not after weaning, prevented postnatal mitochondrial maturation essential to survival. Five-week-old Mfn2 AA hearts retained a fetal mitochondrial transcriptional signature without normal increases in fatty acid metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Myocardial fatty acylcarnitine levels and cardiomyocyte respiration induced by palmitoylcarnitine were concordantly depressed. Thus, instead of transcriptional reprogramming, fetal cardiomyocyte mitochondria undergo perinatal Parkin-mediated mitophagy and replacement by mature adult mitochondria. Mitophagic mitochondrial removal underlies developmental cardiomyocyte mitochondrial plasticity and metabolic transitioning of perinatal hearts. PMID:26785495

  8. MATERNAL GRIEVING AND THE PERCEPTION OF AND ATTACHMENT TO CHILDREN BORN SUBSEQUENT TO A PERINATAL LOSS.

    PubMed

    Al-Maharma, Dua' Yousef; Abujaradeh, Hiba; Mahmoud, Khadejah Fahmi; Jarrad, Reem Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between maternal grieving for perinatal loss (PL) and the perception of and attachment to children born subsequent to a recent PL among mothers in Jordan. A cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design was used. A convenience sample of 190 mothers of full-term, healthy newborns born subsequent to a recent PL was recruited from seven Maternal and Child Health Care Centers in Jordan. These mothers were assessed using the Perinatal Grief Scale (L.J. Toedter, J.N. Lasker, & J.M. Alhadeff), 1988, the Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale (J.T. Condon & C.J. Corkindale, 1998), and the Neonatal Perception Inventory II (E. Broussard, 1979). Results showed a significant negative relationship between grief intensity and the attachment level, r = -.37, p = .000, and a significant positive relationship between the attachment level and neonatal perception, r = .28, p = .000. Mothers' grief intensity was significantly affected by their demographic characteristics; however, there was no significant relationship between grief intensity and neonatal perception, r = .23, p = .23. Perinatal grief was negatively related to maternal attachment to the subsequent child. Nurses should address bereaved mothers and their children who might be at risk for developing attachment disturbances to facilitate positive adaptation to the subsequent pregnancy and parenthood. PMID:27333264

  9. Prenatal, Perinatal and Neonatal Risk Factors for Intellectual Disability: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-01-01

    Background The etiology of non-genetic intellectual disability (ID) is not fully known, and we aimed to identify the prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors for ID. Method PubMed and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the association between pre-, peri- and neonatal factors and ID risk (keywords “intellectual disability” or “mental retardation” or “ID” or “MR” in combination with “prenatal” or “pregnancy” or “obstetric” or “perinatal” or “neonatal”. The last search was updated on September 15, 2015. Summary effect estimates (pooled odds ratios) were calculated for each risk factor using random effects models, with tests for heterogeneity and publication bias. Results Seventeen studies with 55,344 patients and 5,723,749 control individuals were eligible for inclusion in our analysis, and 16 potential risk factors were analyzed. Ten prenatal factors (advanced maternal age, maternal black race, low maternal education, third or more parity, maternal alcohol use, maternal tobacco use, maternal diabetes, maternal hypertension, maternal epilepsy and maternal asthma), one perinatal factor (preterm birth) and two neonatal factors (male sex and low birth weight) were significantly associated with increased risk of ID. Conclusion This systemic review and meta-analysis provides a comprehensive evidence-based assessment of the risk factors for ID. Future studies are encouraged to focus on perinatal and neonatal risk factors and the combined effects of multiple factors. PMID:27110944

  10. Umbilical Coiling Index as a Marker of Perinatal Outcome: An Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, T.; Sushanth, Y. S.; Raghavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To measure umbilical coiling index (UCI) postnatally and to study the association of normocoiling, hypocoiling and hypercoiling to maternal and perinatal outcome. Method(s). One thousand antenatal women who went into labour were studied and umbilical coiling index calculated at the time of delivery. UCI was determined by dividing the total number of coils by the total umbilical cord length in centimeters. Its association with various maternal and perinatal risk factors were noted. The statistical tests were the Chi-square test and assessed with SPSS version 13.0 software and statistically analyzed. P value of less than 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Results. The mean umbilical coiling index was found to be 0.24 ± 0.09. Hypocoiling (<0.12) was found to be significantly associated with hypertensive disorders, abruptio placentae, preterm labour, oligohydramnios, and fetal heart rate abnormalities. Hypercoiling (>0.36) was found to be associated with diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, cesarean delivery, congenital anomalies, and respiratory distress of the newborn. Conclusion. Abnormal umbilical coiling index is associated with several antenatal and perinatal adverse features. PMID:22496697

  11. Perinatal risk factors in offenders with severe personality disorder: a population-based investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Bakiyeva, Liliya; Cnattingius, Sven; Grann, Martin; Hultman, Christina M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Geddes, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Although perinatal factors are associated with the development of several psychiatric disorders, it is unknown whether these factors are linked with personality disorder. Cases of personality disorder were drawn from a national registry of all forensic psychiatric evaluations (n=150). Two control groups were used: 1. A sample of forensic evaluations without any psychiatric disorder (n=97) allowing for a nested case-control investigation; 2: A population-based sample matched by age and gender with no history of psychiatric hospitalization (n=1498). Prematurity (<37 weeks of completed gestation) was significantly associated with a diagnosis of personality disorder, both in the nested and the population-based case-control comparisons with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for this risk factors ranging from 2 to 4. Asphyxia (adjusted OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.4-4.1) and complicated delivery (adjusted OR=1.5, 1.0-2.1) were associated with personality disorder in the population-based study, and the former remained significant in multivariate models. Overall, perinatal complications were found to be associated with a later diagnosis of personality disorder in this selected sample. As with other psychiatric disorders where such associations have been demonstrated, changes during the perinatal period may lead to abnormal brain development and function. PMID:23013342

  12. MMPI-2: Cluster Analysis of Personality Profiles in Perinatal Depression—Preliminary Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Alessandra; Lauriola, Marco; Giacchetti, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    Background. To assess personality characteristics of women who develop perinatal depression. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, to which was administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2 (MMPI-2). A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 55 subjects) was selected; clinical and validity scales of MMPI-2 were used as predictors in hierarchical cluster analysis carried out. Results. The analysis identified three clusters of personality profile: two “clinical” clusters (1 and 3) and an “apparently common” one (cluster 2). The first cluster (39.5%) collects structures of personality with prevalent obsessive or dependent functioning tending to develop a “psychasthenic” depression; the third cluster (13.95%) includes women with prevalent borderline functioning tending to develop “dysphoric” depression; the second cluster (46.5%) shows a normal profile with a “defensive” attitude, probably due to the presence of defense mechanisms or to the fear of stigma. Conclusion. Characteristics of personality have a key role in clinical manifestations of perinatal depression; it is important to detect them to identify mothers at risk and to plan targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25574499

  13. Neurosteroid modulation of respiratory rhythm in rats during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Greer, John J

    2006-07-15

    Neurosteroids regulate neuronal excitability and are expressed at particularly high levels in the CNS during the perinatal period. Further, neurosteroid levels are increased by a variety of stressors including hypoxia, asphyxia, parturition, ethanol exposure and infection. One mechanism by which neurosteroids regulate neuronal activity is by negative or positive modulation of GABA(A) receptor function. Perinatal respiration is strongly modulated by GABAergic synaptic drive, and GABA release is increased during hypoxia to contribute to hypoxia-induced depression of neonatal ventilation. Here, we use in vitro and in vivo rat models to test the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of perinatal respiration is markedly influenced by the presence of neurosteroids. The principal finding of this study was that the efficacy of GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of respiratory membrane potential and rhythmogenesis is markedly enhanced by allopregnanolone and depressed by dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate. These data demonstrate that the modulation of breathing via GABA(A) receptor activation will be determined by the overall balance of negative and positive neurosteroid modulators within respiratory nuclei. This adds a level of complexity that must be considered when examining the depression of breathing in mammals associated with various behavioural states and pathogenic conditions such as apnoea and sudden death suspected to be associated with central respiratory dysfunction. PMID:16690709

  14. Perinatal mortality in rural India with special reference to high risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Misra, P K; Thakur, S; Kumar, A; Tandon, S

    1993-02-01

    One-thousand-and-sixty-five pregnant mothers among a rural population of 30,000 in Uttar Pradesh were followed for 1 year. A still birth rate of 26.1 and perinatal mortality rate of 121.1 per thousand births were registered. Early neonatal mortality rate was found to be 97.4 per thousand live births. Twenty per cent of the women were identified with high risk factors. Inadequate or no antenatal care, bad obstetric history, and prolonged labour attributed to 13, 20, and 27 per cent of the risk, respectively, with a respective relative risk of 2.23, 3.1, and 4.09 times. These three factors were found to be the major and significant contributors to high perinatal mortality amongst the 'high risk' group. Selective extension of comprehensive M.C.H. Care to this group using the high risk approach is expected to lower perinatal mortality in rural community where M.C.H. services are far from optimum. PMID:8445688

  15. Maternal care receptivity and its relation to perinatal and neonatal mortality. A rural study.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, N; Hasan, S B; Zaheer, M

    1995-04-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted on 212 pregnant women from May 1987 to April 1988. Maternal Care Receptivity (MCR) "an innovative approach" was adopted for the assessment of maternal care services provided to pregnant mothers at their door steps. During follow-up, scores were allotted to each of the services rendered and antenatal status of pregnant women. Depending on the score--MCR was classified as high (11 to 8), moderate (7 to 4) or poor (3 to 0). Perinatal and neonatal deaths were recorded and an inverse relationship between MCR and perinatal and mortalities was observed (z = 5.46, p < 0.0001). Significantly, no perinatal or neonatal deaths occurred in women with high MCR. One of the most important cause of high PNMR and neonatal mortality rate in developing countries is poor MCR, i.e., under utilization of even the existing maternal health services. The main reasons for this under utilization appear to be poverty, illiteracy, ignorance and lack of faith in modern medicine. PMID:8635804

  16. Head morphology in perinatal dolphins: a window into phylogeny and ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Rauschmann, Michael A; Huggenberger, Stefan; Kossatz, Lars S; Oelschläger, Helmut H A

    2006-11-01

    In this paper on the ontogenesis and evolutionary biology of odontocete cetaceans (toothed whales), we investigate the head morphology of three perinatal pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) with the following methods: computer-assisted tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, conventional X-ray imaging, cryo-sectioning as well as gross dissection. Comparison of these anatomical methods reveals that for a complete structural analysis, a combination of modern imaging techniques and conventional morphological methods is needed. In addition to the perinatal dolphins, we include series of microslides of fetal odontocetes (S. attenuata, common dolphin Delphinus delphis, narwhal Monodon monoceros). In contrast to other mammals, newborn cetaceans represent an extremely precocial state of development correlated to the fact that they have to swim and surface immediately after birth. Accordingly, the morphology of the perinatal dolphin head is very similar to that of the adult. Comparison with early fetal stages of dolphins shows that the ontogenetic change from the general mammalian bauplan to cetacean organization was characterized by profound morphological transformations of the relevant organ systems and roughly seems to parallel the phylogenetic transition from terrestrial ancestors to modern odontocetes. PMID:17051542

  17. Perinatal exposure to high-fat diet programs energy balance, metabolism and behavior in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Elinor L; Smith, M Susan; Grove, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    The perinatal environment plays an important role in programming many aspects of physiology and behavior including metabolism, body weight set point, energy balance regulation and predisposition to mental health-related disorders such as anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Maternal health and nutritional status heavily influence the early environment and have a long-term impact on critical central pathways, including the melanocortinergic, serotonergic system and dopaminergic systems. Evidence from a variety of animal models including rodents and nonhuman primates indicates that exposure to maternal high-fat diet (HFD) consumption programs offspring for increased risk of adult obesity. Hyperphagia and increased preference for fatty and sugary foods are implicated as mechanisms for the increased obesity risk. The effects of maternal HFD consumption on energy expenditure are unclear, and future studies need to address the impact of perinatal HFD exposure on this important component of energy balance regulation. Recent evidence from animal models also indicates that maternal HFD consumption increases the risk of offspring developing mental health-related disorders such as anxiety. Potential mechanisms for perinatal HFD programming of neural pathways include circulating factors, such as hormones (leptin, insulin), nutrients (fatty acids, triglycerides and glucose) and inflammatory cytokines. As maternal HFD consumption and obesity are common and rapidly increasing, we speculate that future generations will be at increased risk for both metabolic and mental health disorders. Thus, it is critical that future studies identify therapeutic strategies that are effective at preventing maternal HFD-induced malprogramming. PMID:21079387

  18. Health rights in the balance: the case against perinatal shackling of women behind bars.

    PubMed

    Dignam, Brett; Adashi, Eli Y

    2014-01-01

    Rationalized for decades on security grounds, perinatal shackling entails the application of handcuffs, leg irons, and/or waist shackles to the incarcerated woman prior to, during, and after labor and delivery. During labor and delivery proper, perinatal shackling may entail chaining women to the hospital bed by the ankle, wrist, or both. Medically untenable, legally challenged, and ever controversial, perinatal shackling remains the standard of practice in most US states despite sustained two-decades-long efforts by health rights legal advocates, human rights organizations, and medical professionals. Herein we review the current statutory, regulatory, legal, and medical framework undergirding the use of restraints on pregnant inmates and explore potential avenues of redress and relief to this challenge. We also recognize the courage of the women whose stories are being told. If history is any guide, the collective thrust of domestic and international law, attendant litigation, dedicated advocacy, and strength of argument bode well for continued progress toward restraint-free pregnancies in correctional settings. PMID:25569721

  19. Relation of perinatal risk and early parenting to executive control at the transition to school.

    PubMed

    Clark, Caron A C; Woodward, Lianne J

    2015-07-01

    Executive control (EC) develops rapidly during the preschool years and is central to academic achievement and functional outcome. Although children with perinatal adversity are at known risk for EC impairments, little is known about the underlying nature of these impairments or the mechanisms that contribute to their development over time. Drawing on a cohort of 110 high-risk children born very preterm (VPT; < 33 weeks / < 1500 g) and 113 healthy full-term children, this study examined the implications of perinatal adversity and early parenting for children's EC as they transitioned to formal schooling. Parent supportive presence, intrusiveness, and parent-child synchrony were observed during a series of problem-solving tasks at ages 2 and 4 years. At age 6, children completed a comprehensive battery of EC tasks. Academic outcomes were assessed at age 9. The VPT group showed global EC impairments at age 6, although the unitary factor that best characterized the structure of EC was the same in both groups. High-risk dyads were characterized by more intrusive and less synchronous parent-child interactions in early childhood, which in turn predicted poorer child EC at age 6. EC partially mediated the relation of risk status to poorer academic achievement at age 9. Findings demonstrate the cumulative effects of perinatal adversity on children's EC in the crucial transition to schooling. They also highlight the importance of the parent-child relationship as a target for intervention efforts to help mitigate these effects. PMID:25288501

  20. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  1. Introduction and overview. Perinatal carcinogenesis: growing a node for epidemiology, risk management, and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lucy M

    2004-09-01

    Perinatal carcinogenesis as a cross-disciplinary concern is the subject of this special issue of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, which consists of a total of eight reviews or commentaries in the areas of epidemiology, risk assessment, and animal models. Some of the conclusions from these articles, and the Questions and Answers section that follows most of them, are summarized here. There is adequate reason to suspect that perinatal exposures contribute to human cancer risk, both childhood cancers, and those appearing later in life. The latter type of risk may actually be quantitatively the more important, and involve a wide range of types of effects, but has received only limited attention. With regard to childhood cancers, fetal irradiation and diethylstilbestrol exposure are known etiological agents, and it is likely, but not yet certain, there are additional external causes of a portion of these. Some current focal points of interest here include nitroso compounds, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors, viruses, anti-AIDS drugs, and endocrine disruptors. Regulatory agencies must rely heavily on animal data for estimation of human risk due to perinatal exposures to chemicals, and the quantity and quality of these data presently available for this purpose are greatly limiting. Correctly designed conventional animal studies with suspect chemicals are still needed. Furthermore, genetically engineered mouse models for childhood cancers, especially medulloblastoma, have become available, and could be used for screening of candidate causative agents for this cancer type, and for better understanding of gene-environment interactions. PMID:15313581

  2. Assessment of levels of otoacoustic emission response in neonates with perinatal asphyxia☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Georgea Espindola; da Silva, Daniela Polo Camargo; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of perinatal asphyxia on the level of the response to transient otoacoustic emissions in infants. Methods: Otoacoustic emissions in 154 neonates were performed: 54 infants who suffered asphyxia at birth, measured by Apgar score and medical diagnosis, and 100 infants without risk were compared. Scores less than 4 in the first minute and/or less than 6 in the fifth minute were considered as "low Apgar". Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the Kruskal, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests. Results: Lower levels of response were observed in transient otoacoustic emission in the group that suffered perinatal asphyxia, with significant values for the frequencies 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 Hz in the right ear, and 2,000 and 4,000 Hz in the left ear. Conclusions: The analysis of the intrinsic characteristics of the otoacoustic emissions evidenced low performance of outer hair cells in neonates who had perinatal asphyxia, which may affect the development of listening skills in this population. PMID:25479848

  3. Perinatal Exposure to Glufosinate Ammonium Herbicide Impairs Neurogenesis and Neuroblast Migration through Cytoskeleton Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Herzine, Ameziane; Laugeray, Anthony; Feat, Justyne; Menuet, Arnaud; Quesniaux, Valérie; Richard, Olivier; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Perche, Olivier; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis, a process of generating functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions such as the subventricular zone (SVZ). During this process, newly generated neurons migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb to replace granule cells and periglomerular neurons. This neuronal migration is pivotal not only for neuronal plasticity but also for adapted olfactory based behaviors. Perturbation of this highly controlled system by exogenous chemicals has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We reported recently that perinatal exposure to low dose herbicide glufosinate ammonium (GLA), leads to long lasting behavioral defects reminiscent of Autism Spectrum Disorder-like phenotype in the offspring (Laugeray et al., 2014). Herein, we demonstrate that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA induces alterations in neuroblast proliferation within the SVZ and abnormal migration from the SVZ to the olfactory bulbs. These disturbances are not only concomitant to changes in cell morphology, proliferation and apoptosis, but are also associated with transcriptomic changes. Therefore, we demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA alters SVZ neurogenesis. Jointly with our previous work, the present results provide new evidence on the link between molecular and cellular consequences of early life exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of ASD-like phenotype later in life. PMID:27555806

  4. Effects of perinatal stress and maternal traumatic stress on the cortisol regulation of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Habersaat, Stephanie; Borghini, Ayala; Nessi, Jennifer; Forcada-Guex, Margarita; Müller-Nix, Carole; Pierrehumbert, Blaise; Ansermet, François

    2014-08-01

    Preterm infants experience intense stress during the perinatal period because they endure painful and intense medical procedures. Repeated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during this period may have long-term effects on subsequent cortisol regulation. A premature delivery may also be intensely stressful for the parents, and they may develop symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Usable saliva samples were collected (4 times per day over 2 days, in the morning at awakening, at midday, in the afternoon, and in the evening before going to bed) to assess the diurnal cortisol regulation from 46 preterm infants when the infants were 12 months of corrected age (∼ 14 months after birth). Mothers reported their level of PTSD symptoms. The results showed an interaction between perinatal stress and maternal traumatic stress on the diurnal cortisol slope of preterm infants (R(2) = .32). This suggests that the HPA axis of preterm infants exposed to high perinatal stress may be more sensitive to subsequent environmental stress. PMID:25158643

  5. Perinatal outcomes of Southeast Asians with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus or preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; O'Brien, William; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A

    2012-10-01

    To examine risks for adverse perinatal outcomes among Southeast Asian women with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or preeclampsia. Perinatal outcomes of singleton births of Cambodian (3,489), Laotian (2,038), Vietnamese (11,605), Japanese (3,083) and non-Hispanic White women (33,088) were analyzed using Washington state linked birth certificate and hospitalization discharge records (1993-2006). Both Cambodian (aOR = 1.68) and Laotian (aOR = 1.71) women with GDM had increased odds of macrosomia when compared with Japanese women with GDM. Southeast Asian women with GDM had reduced odds of macrosomia when compared with White women. Southeast Asian women with preeclampsia had increased odds for preterm delivery when compared with Japanese and White women with preeclampsia. Research is needed to understand why Southeast Asian women with GDM are more likely to have better perinatal outcomes when compared with White women. Vigilant monitoring and culturally sensitive care for Southeast Asian women with preeclampsia is needed. PMID:22002706

  6. Relationship in Japan between maternal grandmothers' perinatal support and their self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Atsuko; Ohashi, Kazutomo

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the influence on their mental well-being of the perinatal support given by Japanese grandmothers. The Rosenberg self-esteem and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scales were used to assess grandmothers' mental well-being before and after their daughters' childbirth. Of 198 grandmothers, 176 (88.9%) supported their daughters and three patterns of perinatal support were observed: grandmothers' support at the grandparents' house before childbirth (n = 95) (Satogaeri bunben; Japanese traditional perinatal support), grandmothers' support at the grandparents' house after childbirth (n = 53); and grandmothers' support at the daughters' house (n = 28). Those who supported their daughters at the grandparents' house before childbirth - especially the middle-aged (less than 60 years old) - showed significantly lower scores of self-esteem. Scores of CES-D did not significantly change before and after childbirth in either subgroup of grandmothers. It was concluded that grandmothers play an important role in supporting their daughters, and Satogaeri bunben is a typical event in modern Japan. However, Satogaeri bunben is a burden for middle-aged grandmothers, and we need to support them. PMID:23809679

  7. Reaction on Twitter to a Cluster of Perinatal Deaths: A Mixed Method Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in social networking sites is commonplace and the micro-blogging site Twitter can be considered a platform for the rapid broadcasting of news stories. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the Twitter status updates and subsequent responses relating to a number of perinatal deaths which occurred in a small maternity unit in Ireland. Methods An analysis of Twitter status updates, over a two month period from January to March 2014, was undertaken to identify the key themes arising in relation to the perinatal deaths. Results Our search identified 3577 tweets relating to the reported perinatal deaths. At the height of the controversy, Twitter updates generated skepticism in relation to the management of not only of the unit in question, which was branded as unsafe, but also the governance of the entire Irish maternity service. Themes of concern and uncertainty arose whereby the professional motives of the obstetric community and staffing levels in the maternity services were called into question. Conclusions Twitter activity provides a useful insight into attitudes towards health-related events. The role of the media in influencing opinion is well-documented and this study underscores the challenges that clinicians face in light of an obstetric media scandal. Further study to identify how the obstetric community could develop tools to utilize Twitter to disseminate valid health information could be beneficial. PMID:27466002

  8. Perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia: a prospective study from India.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, Mayoor M; Jena, Rabindra K; Kar, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, the homozygous genotype of sickle cell disease is one of the most common heritable diseases in the world. The Arab-Asian haplotype present in India is one of the least severe of all haplotypes. Many sickle cell anemia patients are now leading a symptom-free productive life due to hydroxyurea (HU) and better supportive care. Although pregnancy in sickle cell anemia patients is considered a high-risk category, it perinatal outcome is least studied, particularly among carriers of the Arab-Asian haplotype. Thus, the present prospective, randomized study was performed to assess the perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia. Neonatal outcome such as low birth weight, perinatal mortality rate, special care newborn unit (SCNU) admission, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and pre term births were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers. Maternal outcome such as severe anemia, preeclampsia, vasoocclusive crisis (VOC), pulmonary complications, jaundice and blood transfusion requirements were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers, which were successfully managed. Cesarian section rate was not significantly different from normal controls. Successful pregnancies were achieved in 84.44% of cases. However, we strongly recommend that pregnancies in these patients should be managed in an institutional setup. PMID:23952263

  9. Perceptions of predisposing and protective factors for perinatal depression in same-sex parents.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lori E; Steele, Leah; Sapiro, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women are choosing to have children in the context of same-sex relationships or as "out" lesbian or bisexual individuals. This study used qualitative methods to assess perceived predisposing and protective factors for perinatal depression in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) women. Two focus groups with LGBQ women were conducted: 1) biological parents of young children and 2) nonbiological parents of young children or whose partners were currently pregnant. Three major themes emerged. Issues related to social support were primary, particularly related to disappointment with the lack of support provided by members of the family of origin. Participants also described issues related to the couple relationship, such as challenges in negotiating parenting roles. Finally, legal and policy barriers (e.g., second parent adoption) were identified as a significant source of stress during the transition to parenthood. Both lack of social support and relationship problems have previously been identified as risk factors for perinatal depression in heterosexual women, and legal and policy barriers may represent a unique risk factor for this population. Therefore, additional study of perinatal mental health among LGBQ women is warranted. PMID:16260356

  10. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  11. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  12. Perinatal stem cells: A promising cell resource for tissue engineering of craniofacial bone

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jia-Wen; Wang, Xu-Dong; Shen, Steve GF

    2015-01-01

    In facing the mounting clinical challenge and suboptimal techniques of craniofacial bone defects resulting from various conditions, such as congenital malformations, osteomyelitis, trauma and tumor resection, the ongoing research of regenerative medicine using stem cells and concurrent advancement in biotechnology have shifted the focus from surgical reconstruction to a novel stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for customized and functional craniofacial bone regeneration. Given the unique ontogenetical and cell biological properties of perinatal stem cells, emerging evidence has suggested these extraembryonic tissue-derived stem cells to be a promising cell source for extensive use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In this review, we summarize the current achievements and obstacles in stem cell-based craniofacial bone regeneration and subsequently we address the characteristics of various types of perinatal stem cells and their novel application in tissue engineering of craniofacial bone. We propose the promising feasibility and scope of perinatal stem cell-based craniofacial bone tissue engineering for future clinical application. PMID:25621114

  13. Chromosomal variation and perinatal mortality in San Diego zoo Soemmerring's gazelles.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Cynthia C; Charter, Suellen J; Goddard, Natalie; Davis, Heidi; Brandt, Margot; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver A

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations play a fundamental role in the evolution and speciation of antelopes (Antilopinae, Bovidae), with several species exhibiting polymorphism for centric fusions. For the past 35 years, the San Diego Zoo Global (SDZG) captive population of Soemmerring's gazelles has revealed complex karyotypes resulting from chromosomal translocations with diploid numbers ranging from 34 to 39. Poor reproductive performance of this species in captivity and elevated mortality the first month of life (perinatal) has been attributed to this chromosomal dynamism. We have extended the studies of karyotypic variation in the SDZG Soemmerring's gazelle population and analyzed the effect of chromosomal and genetic variation upon perinatal mortality. Karyotypes from 149 captive Soemmerring's gazelles were evaluated revealing two unreported autosomal combinations, now constituting a total of 15 distinct karyotypes for the 3 Robertsonian centric fusions originally described for this population. Among SDZG founders, distinct chromosomal variation and nuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure were detected corresponding to the institution of origin of the founders. Low levels of genetic distance and nucleotide diversity among individuals, in addition to high relatedness values, suggested that outbreeding is less of a concern than inbreeding for maintaining a sustainable captive population. Finally, analysis of karyotypes of offspring born into the SDZG Soemmerring's gazelle herds, in conjunction with the maternal karyotype showed association of chromosomal makeup with perinatal mortality. This supports the importance of continuing cytogenetic screening efforts, particularly to evaluate the presence of deleterious chromosomal rearrangements in stillborns. PMID:26011774

  14. A survey comparing the attitudes toward perinatal bereavement care of nurses from three Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Chan, Moon Fai; Lou, Feng-lan; Arthur, David Gordon

    2010-12-01

    Caring for parents whose infant has died is extremely demanding, difficult, and stressful. In some situations, nurses may experience personal failure, feel helpless, and need to distance themselves from bereaved parents because they are unable to deal with the enormity of the parental feelings of loss. The aim of the study was to describe and compare attitudes toward perinatal bereavement care across a sample of nurses working in five obstetrics and gynecology settings from three Asian cities, as well as the factors associated with these attitudes. A survey was conducted, and 573 nurses were recruited from 2006 to 2007. The data were collected using the perinatal bereavement attitudes scale, which involves an 11-item self-report questionnaire. Nurses' attitudes were mainly positive, but differed across cities, with the attitude of Jinan nurses being significantly more positive than nurses from the other two cities, and the attitude of Hong Kong nurses being significantly the lowest. Positive attitudes were associated with position, and nurses who were well informed of hospital policy and received training for bereavement care were statistically significantly more likely to have a positive attitude toward perinatal bereavement care. Although nurses' attitudes to prenatal bereavement care differ significantly across the three Asian cities, they are generally similar. The differences observed could be related to the wider social, cultural, and organizational circumstances of nursing practice. PMID:21149395

  15. Different Plasticity Patterns of Language Function in Children With Perinatal and Childhood Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tomberg, Tiiu; Kepler, Joosep; Laugesaar, Rael; Kaldoja, Mari-Liis; Kepler, Kalle; Kolk, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity of language function after brain damage can depend on maturation of the brain. Children with left-hemisphere perinatal (n = 7) or childhood stroke (n = 5) and 12 controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The verb generation and the sentence comprehension tasks were employed to activate the expressive and receptive language areas, respectively. Weighted laterality indices were calculated and correlated with results assessed by neuropsychological test battery. Compared to controls, children with childhood stroke showed significantly lower mean scores for the expressive (P < .05) and receptive (P = .05) language tests. On functional magnetic resonance imaging they showed left-side cortical activation, as did controls. Perinatal stroke patients showed atypical right-side or bilateral language lateralization during both tasks. Negative correlation for stroke patients was found between scores for expressive language tests and laterality index during the verb generation task. (Re)organization of language function differs in children with perinatal and childhood stroke and correlates with neurocognitive performance. PMID:23748202

  16. Domestic Violence and Perinatal Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Louise M.; Oram, Sian; Galley, Helen; Trevillion, Kylee; Feder, Gene

    2013-01-01

    Background Domestic violence in the perinatal period is associated with adverse obstetric outcomes, but evidence is limited on its association with perinatal mental disorders. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and odds of having experienced domestic violence among women with antenatal and postnatal mental disorders (depression and anxiety disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], eating disorders, and psychoses). Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (PROSPERO reference CRD42012002048). Data sources included searches of electronic databases (to 15 February 2013), hand searches, citation tracking, update of a review on victimisation and mental disorder, and expert recommendations. Included studies were peer-reviewed experimental or observational studies that reported on women aged 16 y or older, that assessed the prevalence and/or odds of having experienced domestic violence, and that assessed symptoms of perinatal mental disorder using a validated instrument. Two reviewers screened 1,125 full-text papers, extracted data, and independently appraised study quality. Odds ratios were pooled using meta-analysis. Sixty-seven papers were included. Pooled estimates from longitudinal studies suggest a 3-fold increase in the odds of high levels of depressive symptoms in the postnatal period after having experienced partner violence during pregnancy (odds ratio 3.1, 95% CI 2.7–3.6). Increased odds of having experienced domestic violence among women with high levels of depressive, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms in the antenatal and postnatal periods were consistently reported in cross-sectional studies. No studies were identified on eating disorders or puerperal psychosis. Analyses were limited because of study heterogeneity and lack of data on baseline symptoms, preventing clear findings on causal directionality. Conclusions High levels of symptoms of perinatal depression, anxiety, and PTSD are significantly associated with

  17. Community Mobilization in Mumbai Slums to Improve Perinatal Care and Outcomes: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    More, Neena Shah; Bapat, Ujwala; Das, Sushmita; Alcock, Glyn; Patil, Sarita; Porel, Maya; Vaidya, Leena; Fernandez, Armida; Joshi, Wasundhara; Osrin, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Improving maternal and newborn health in low-income settings requires both health service and community action. Previous community initiatives have been predominantly rural, but India is urbanizing. While working to improve health service quality, we tested an intervention in which urban slum-dweller women's groups worked to improve local perinatal health. Methods and Findings A cluster randomized controlled trial in 24 intervention and 24 control settlements covered a population of 283,000. In each intervention cluster, a facilitator supported women's groups through an action learning cycle in which they discussed perinatal experiences, improved their knowledge, and took local action. We monitored births, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths, and interviewed mothers at 6 weeks postpartum. The primary outcomes described perinatal care, maternal morbidity, and extended perinatal mortality. The analysis included 18,197 births over 3 years from 2006 to 2009. We found no differences between trial arms in uptake of antenatal care, reported work, rest, and diet in later pregnancy, institutional delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, or care-seeking. The stillbirth rate was non-significantly lower in the intervention arm (odds ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.60–1.22), and the neonatal mortality rate higher (1.48, 1.06–2.08). The extended perinatal mortality rate did not differ between arms (1.19, 0.90–1.57). We have no evidence that these differences could be explained by the intervention. Conclusions Facilitating urban community groups was feasible, and there was evidence of behaviour change, but we did not see population-level effects on health care or mortality. In cities with multiple sources of health care, but inequitable access to services, community mobilization should be integrated with attempts to deliver services for the poorest and most vulnerable, and with initiatives to improve quality of care in both public and private sectors. Trial registration

  18. Neurometabolite Alterations Associated With Cognitive Performance in Perinatally HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Van Dalen, Yvonne W; Blokhuis, Charlotte; Cohen, Sophie; Ter Stege, Jacqueline A; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Kuhle, Jens; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Scherpbier, Henriette J; Kuijpers, Taco W; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2016-03-01

    Despite treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), cognitive impairment is still observed in perinatally HIV-infected children. We aimed to evaluate potential underlying cerebral injury by comparing neurometabolite levels between perinatally HIV-infected children and healthy controls. This cross-sectional study evaluated neurometabolites, as measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), in perinatally HIV-infected children stable on cART (n = 26) and healthy controls (n = 36).Participants were included from a cohort of perinatally HIV-infected children and healthy controls, matched group-wise for age, gender, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), myo-inositol (mI), and choline (Cho) levels were studied as ratios over creatine (Cre). Group differences and associations with HIV-related parameters, cognitive functioning, and neuronal damage markers (neurofilament and total Tau proteins) were determined using age-adjusted linear regression analyses.HIV-infected children had increased Cho:Cre in white matter (HIV-infected = 0.29 ± 0.03; controls = 0.27 ± 0.03; P value = 0.045). Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell Z-scores were associated with reduced neuronal integrity markers NAA:Cre and Glu:Cre. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stage C diagnosis was associated with higher glial markers Cho:Cre and mI:Cre. Poorer cognitive performance was mainly associated with higher Cho:Cre in HIV-infected children, and with lower NAA:Cre and Glu:Cre in healthy controls. There were no associations between neurometabolites and neuronal damage markers in blood or CSF.Compared to controls, perinatally HIV-infected children had increased Cho:Cre in white matter, suggestive of ongoing glial proliferation. Levels of several neurometabolites were associated with cognitive performance, suggesting that MRS may be a useful method to assess cerebral changes potentially linked to cognitive outcomes

  19. Rate and Time Trend of Perinatal, Infant, Maternal Mortality, Natality and Natural Population Growth in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work has been the presentation of the rate and time trends of some indicators of the heath condition of mothers and children in Kosovo: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. Methods: The data were taken from: register of the patients treated in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina, World Health Organization, Mother and Child Health Care, Reproductive Health Care, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kosovo, Statistical Department of Kosovo, the National Institute of Public Health and several academic texts in the field of pediatrics. Some indicators were analyzed in a period between year 1945-2010 and 1950-2010, whereas some others were analyzed in a time period between year 2000 and 2011. Results: The perinatal mortality rate in 2000 was 29.1‰, whereas in 2011 it was 18.7‰. The fetal mortality rate was 14.5‰ during the year 2000, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰, in 2000 the early neonatal mortality was 14.8‰, in 2011 it was 7.5‰. The infant mortality in Kosovo was 164‰ in 1950, whereas in 2010 it was 20.5‰. The most frequent causes of infant mortality have been: lower respiratory tract infections, acute infective diarrhea, perinatal causes, congenital malformations and unclassified conditions. Maternal death rate varied during this time period. Maternal death in 2000 was 23 whereas in 2010 only two cases were reported. Regarding the natality, in 1950 it reached 46.1 ‰, whereas in 2010 it reached 14‰, natural growth of population rate in Kosovo was 29.1‰ in 1950, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰. Conclusion: Perinatal mortality rate in Kosovo is still high in comparison with other European countries (Turkey and Kyrgyzstan have the highest perinatal mortality rate), even though it is in a

  20. Sociocultural factors and perinatal health in a Mexican-American community.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, M; Stern, G; Schensul, S L

    1982-10-01

    The complex relationship between sociocultural variables, such as ethnicity, language, and working status, and the utilization of facilities for perinatal health care were explored in a predominantly Mexican American community in Chicago. The project, which was initiated in 1977, was designed to provide objective data on utilization patterns of perinatal health facilities and to assess the importance of the migratory experience on the utilization of perinatal services among Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans living in the community. Patterns of utilization of perinatal health facilities by pregnant women, preference for the ethnicity, language, and sex of the health care provider, and different patterns that influence the months of prenatal care were examined in the context of the migration factor. An interview instrument was developed to include both quantitative and qualitative data. Ages among the sample of women ranged from 16-41. 60 women were immigrants born in Mexico and 29 women were Mexican Americans born in the US. Women in the sample were using 2 major health care "tracks" for their perinatal care: public facilities for prenatal care, delivery, and pediatric care for the infant; and private physicians for prenatal care, pediatric care, and delivery in the small, Catholic hospitals where the physicians tended to have admitting privileges. 34 women were attending private facilities, and 55 women were using public facilties. 27 women (30.3%) cited economic considerations as the reason for choosing a physician or facility. Other reasons included personal referral or recommendation (27%), previously used (16.9%), and geographic proximity (6.7%). The use of public prenatal clinics correlated significantly with the citing of economic considerations as the basis for choosing this type of care. 32 women (36%) were working during their pregnancy. There was a significant relationship between choosing a private physician for prenatal care and being employed

  1. Vitamin D supplementation blocks pulmonary structural and functional changes in a rat model of perinatal vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yurt, Methap; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Gong, Ming; Husain, Sumair M.; Siddiqui, Mohammed A.; Husain, Maleha; Villarreal, Patricia; Akcay, Fatih; Torday, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas epidemiological data strongly link vitamin D (VD) deficiency to childhood asthma, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Although VD is known to stimulate alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, promoting perinatal lung maturation, whether VD supplementation during this period protects against childhood asthma has not been demonstrated experimentally. Using an in vivo rat model, we determined the effects of perinatal VD deficiency on overall pulmonary function and the tracheal contraction as a functional marker of airway contractility. One month before pregnancy, rat dams were put on either a no cholecalciferol-added or a 250, 500, or 1,000 IU/kg cholecalciferol-added diet, which was continued throughout pregnancy and lactation. At postnatal day 21, offspring plasma 25(OH)D levels and pulmonary function (whole body plethysmography and tracheal contraction response to acetylcholine) were determined. 25(OH)D levels were lowest in the no cholecalciferol-supplemented group, increasing incrementally in response to cholecalciferol supplementation. Compared with the 250 and 500 IU/kg VD-supplemented groups, the no cholecalciferol-supplemented group demonstrated a significant increase in airway resistance following methacholine challenge. However, the cholecalciferol deficiency-mediated increase in tracheal contractility in the cholecalciferol-depleted group was only blocked by supplementation with 500 IU/kg cholecalciferol. Therefore, in addition to altering alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal signaling, perinatal VD deficiency also alters airway contractility, providing novel insights to asthma pathogenesis in perinatally VD-deficient offspring. Perinatal VD supplementation at 500 IU/kg appears to effectively block these effects of perinatal VD deficiency in the rat model used, providing a strong clinical rationale for effective perinatal VD supplementation for preventing childhood asthma. PMID:25305247

  2. The physical and psychological effects of HIV infection and its treatment on perinatally HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; McHenry, Megan S; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) transforms human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into a manageable chronic disease, new challenges are emerging in treating children born with HIV, including a number of risks to their physical and psychological health due to HIV infection and its lifelong treatment. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate the evidence on the physical and psychological effects of perinatal HIV (PHIV+) infection and its treatment in the era of HAART, including major chronic comorbidities. Results and discussion Perinatally infected children face concerning levels of treatment failure and drug resistance, which may hamper their long-term treatment and result in more significant comorbidities. Physical complications from PHIV+ infection and treatment potentially affect all major organ systems. Although treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has reduced incidence of severe neurocognitive diseases like HIV encephalopathy, perinatally infected children may experience less severe neurocognitive complications related to HIV disease and ARV neurotoxicity. Major metabolic complications include dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, complications that are associated with both HIV infection and several ARV agents and may significantly affect cardiovascular disease risk with age. Bone abnormalities, particularly amongst children treated with tenofovir, are a concern for perinatally infected children who may be at higher risk for bone fractures and osteoporosis. In many studies, rates of anaemia are significantly higher for HIV-infected children. Renal failure is a significant complication and cause of death amongst perinatally infected children, while new data on sexual and reproductive health suggest that sexually transmitted infections and birth complications may be additional concerns for perinatally infected children in adolescence. Finally, perinatally infected children may face psychological challenges, including

  3. Perinatal complications in unaffected sisters of anorexia nervosa patients: testing a covariation model between genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Angela; Tenconi, Elena; Bosello, Romina; Degortes, Daniela; Santonastaso, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Although perinatal complications are hypothesized to be risk factors for the development of anorexia nervosa (AN), no study to date explored this issue using a discordant sibling design. This type of design allows to explore whether the risk for obstetric complications is itself a consequence of the genetic vulnerability for AN (covariation model) or whether obstetric complications increase the risk of AN independently of (additive model), or in interaction with (interaction model), the disorder's genetic liability. The presence of perinatal complications was assessed through review of the obstetric records of 60 AN subjects, 60 unaffected sisters, and 70 healthy subjects. Unaffected sisters and healthy controls were compared in relation to perinatal characteristics and complications. There was no evidence for an elevated rate of complications in unaffected siblings of AN patients. Mothers with a positive psychiatric history tended to have more perinatal complications. Perinatal complications seem to be independent risk factors that may interact with, but are not caused by, familial risk factors for AN. In terms of prevention, a particular attention should be paid to mothers with a lifetime history of psychiatric disorders. PMID:21193995

  4. Exposure to Pre- and Perinatal Risk Factors Partially Explains Mean Differences in Self-Regulation between Races

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. C.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Miller, J. Mitchell; DeShay, Rashaan A.; Beaver, Kevin M.; White, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether differential exposure to pre- and perinatal risk factors explained differences in levels of self-regulation between children of different races (White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Other). Methods Multiple regression models based on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (n ≈ 9,850) were used to analyze the impact of pre- and perinatal risk factors on the development of self-regulation at age 2 years. Results Racial differences in levels of self-regulation were observed. Racial differences were also observed for 9 of the 12 pre-/perinatal risk factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that a portion of the racial differences in self-regulation was explained by differential exposure to several of the pre-/perinatal risk factors. Specifically, maternal age at childbirth, gestational timing, and the family’s socioeconomic status were significantly related to the child’s level of self-regulation. These factors accounted for a statistically significant portion of the racial differences observed in self-regulation. Conclusions The findings indicate racial differences in self-regulation may be, at least partially, explained by racial differences in exposure to pre- and perinatal risk factors. PMID:26882110

  5. Perinatal Exposure of Mice to the Pesticide DDT Impairs Energy Expenditure and Metabolism in Adult Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Karey, Emma; Moshier, Erin; Lindtner, Claudia; La Frano, Michael R.; Newman, John W.; Buettner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used extensively to control malaria, typhus, body lice and bubonic plague worldwide, until countries began restricting its use in the 1970s. Its use in malaria control continues in some countries according to recommendation by the World Health Organization. Individuals exposed to elevated levels of DDT and its metabolite dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have an increased prevalence of diabetes and insulin resistance. Here we hypothesize that perinatal exposure to DDT disrupts metabolic programming leading to impaired metabolism in adult offspring. To test this, we administered DDT to C57BL/6J mice from gestational day 11.5 to postnatal day 5 and studied their metabolic phenotype at several ages up to nine months. Perinatal DDT exposure reduced core body temperature, impaired cold tolerance, decreased energy expenditure, and produced a transient early-life increase in body fat in female offspring. When challenged with a high fat diet for 12 weeks in adulthood, female offspring perinatally exposed to DDT developed glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and altered bile acid metabolism. Perinatal DDT exposure combined with high fat feeding in adulthood further impaired thermogenesis as evidenced by reductions in core temperature and in the expression of numerous RNA that promote thermogenesis and substrate utilization in the brown adipose tissue of adult female mice. These observations suggest that perinatal DDT exposure impairs thermogenesis and the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids which may increase susceptibility to the metabolic syndrome in adult female offspring. PMID:25076055

  6. Perinatal distress in women in low- and middle-income countries: allostatic load as a framework to examine the effect of perinatal distress on preterm birth and infant health.

    PubMed

    Premji, Shahirose

    2014-12-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), determinants of women's and children's health are complex and differential vulnerability may exist to risk factors of perinatal distress and preterm birth. We examined the contribution of maternal perinatal distress on preterm birth and infant health in terms of infant survival and mother-infant interaction. A critical narrative and interpretive literature review was conducted. Peer-reviewed electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, CINHAL), grey literature, and reference lists were searched, followed by a consultation exercise. The literature was predominantly from high-income countries. We identify determinants of perinatal distress and explicate changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic, immune and cardiovascular systems, and behavioral responses resulting in pathophysiological effects. We suggest cultural-neutral composite measures of allostatic mediators (i.e., several biomarkers) of maternal perinatal distress as objective indicators of dysregulation in body systems in pregnant women in LMIC. Understanding causal links of maternal perinatal distress to preterm birth in women in LMIC should be a priority. The roles of allostasis and allostatic load are considered within the context of the health of pregnant women and fetuses/newborns in LMIC with emphasis on identifying objective indicators of the level of perinatal distress and protective factors or processes contributing to resilience while facing toxic stress. We propose a prospective study design with multiple measures across pregnancy and postpartum requiring complex statistical modeling. Building research capacity through partnering researchers in high-income countries and LMIC and reflecting on unique ethical challenges will be important to generating new knowledge in LMIC. PMID:24748241

  7. Comparison of Perinatal Risk Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID), and Co-Occurring ASD and ID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieve, Laura A.; Clayton, Heather B.; Durkin, Maureen S.; Wingate, Martha S.; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    While studies report associations between perinatal outcomes and both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID), there has been little study of ASD with versus without co-occurring ID. We compared perinatal risk factors among 7547 children in the 2006-2010 Autism and Developmental Disability Monitoring Network classified as…

  8. Long-lived epigenetic interactions between perinatal PBDE exposure and Mecp2308 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Rima; Vallero, Roxanne O.; Golub, Mari S.; Suarez, Joanne K.; Ta, Tram Anh; Yasui, Dag H.; Chi, Lai-Har; Kostyniak, Paul J.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Berman, Robert F.; LaSalle, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of persistent organic polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as commercial flame retardants has raised concern about potential long-lived effects on human health. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, are responsive to environmental influences and have long-lasting consequences. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have complex neurodevelopmental origins whereby both genetic and environmental factors are implicated. Rett syndrome is an X-linked ASD caused by mutations in the epigenetic factor methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). In this study, an Mecp2 truncation mutant mouse (Mecp2308) with social behavioral defects was used to explore the long-lasting effects of PBDE exposure in a genetically and epigenetically susceptible model. Mecp2308/+ dams were perinatally exposed daily to 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether 47 (BDE-47) and bred to wild-type C57BL/6J males, and the offspring of each sex and genotype were examined for developmental, behavioral and epigenetic outcomes. Perinatal BDE-47 exposure negatively impacted fertility of Mecp2308/+ dams and preweaning weights of females. Global hypomethylation of adult brain DNA was observed specifically in female offspring perinatally exposed to BDE-47 and it coincided with reduced sociability in a genotype-independent manner. A reversing interaction of Mecp2 genotype on BDE-47 exposure was observed in a short-term memory test of social novelty that corresponded to increased Dnmt3a levels specifically in BDE-47-exposed Mecp2308/+ offspring. In contrast, learning and long-term memory in the Morris water maze was impaired by BDE-47 exposure in female Mecp2308/+ offspring. These results demonstrate that a genetic and environmental interaction relevant to social and cognitive behaviors shows sexual dimorphism, epigenetic dysregulation, compensatory molecular mechanisms and specific behavioral deficits. PMID:22343140

  9. Neurobehavioral assessments of rats perinatally exposed to a commercial mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Philip J; Moser, Virginia C; MacPhail, Robert C; Oshiro, Wendy M; Derr-Yellin, Ethel C; Phillips, Pamela M; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S

    2002-07-01

    Because of behavioral deficits associated with gestational exposure to PCBs in children, we sought to quantify neurobehavioral effects of perinatal exposure to Aroclor 1254(R) (A1254), a commercial mixture of PCBs, in rats. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were fed A1254 at doses of 0, 1.0, or 6.0 mg/kg/day throughout gestation and nursing. The growth and behavior of their male and female offspring were assessed both during development and as adults, using a variety of behavioral tests that included a neurobehavioral screening battery (functional observational battery [FOB] and automated tests of locomotor activity), habituation of motor activity, acquisition of a visual discrimination, and performance of a visual signal-detection task. During the suckling period, A1254 at 6 mg/kg reduced survival and body weight gain of offspring of both sexes; however, locomotor activity was unaffected, and only small and transient changes in other measures were evident. In adulthood, perinatal exposure to A1254 did not affect habituation of locomotor activity, acquisition of the visual discrimination, or sustained attention. Rats performing the signal-detection task were challenged with cocaine (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg) and haloperidol (0, 0.003, 0.010, 0.030 mg/kg) to probe the integrity of dopaminergic systems in the central nervous system (CNS). A1254 did not alter the impairment of attention caused by haloperidol. Cocaine reduced false alarms more in controls than in rats exposed to A1254, but the effect was not clearly related to the dose of A1254. Perinatal exposure to this commercial PCB mixture had very little effect on these tests of behavior during development and in adulthood. PMID:12075116

  10. The impact of perinatal depression on exclusive breastfeeding: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Atif; Hafeez, Assad; Bilal, Rakshanda; Sikander, Siham; Malik, Abid; Minhas, Fareed; Tomenson, Barbara; Creed, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Perinatal depression is associated with infant undernutrition. We hypothesised that perinatal depression was associated with early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding and reduced quantity of breast milk in rural Pakistan. We used a prospective cohort design to study a population-based sample of 132 depressed and 147 non-depressed women from the third trimester of pregnancy to 6 months post-natal. Current major depressive episode was measured in the third trimester and 6 months post-natal using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnosis. In a convenience sample of 24 depressed and 31 non-depressed exclusively breastfeeding mothers, breast milk quantity was assessed (mL kg(-1) infant weight per 24 h) at 4 months using the dose-to-mother deuterium dilution method. We administered also the Perception of Insufficient Milk questionnaire at 6 months post-natal. Depression was associated with fewer days of exclusive breastfeeding (91.8 (SD = 47.1) vs. 108.7 days (SD = 54.3) (95% CI: 3.4 to 30.3 P = 0.014). Women with persistent depression ceased exclusive breastfeed earliest. There was no difference in the quantity of breast milk produced by depressed and non-depressed mothers: 89.3 (SD = 38.1) vs. 83.9 (29.0) ml/kg infant wt/24 hours, P = 0.57. Depressed mothers were significantly more likely to report insufficient milk: PIM scores were 34.4 (SD = 14.3) for depressed and 39.7 (SD = 10.4) for non-depressed women (P = 0.004). In Cox regression PIM score mediated the association between depression and early cessation of breastfeeding. In this area of rural Pakistan, perinatal depression is associated with early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding and this is associated with mothers' perceptions of insufficiency of breast milk but not reduced milk production. PMID:25682731

  11. Perinatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters the functional differentiation of the adult rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Bosquiazzo, Verónica L; Vigezzi, Lucía; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2013-11-01

    The exposure to endocrine disrupters and female reproductive tract disorders has not been totally clarified. The present study assessed the long-term effect of perinatal (gestation+lactation) exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) on the rat uterus and the effect of estrogen replacement therapy. DES (5μg/kg bw/day) was administered in the drinking water from gestational day 9 until weaning and we studied the uterus of young adult (PND90) and adult (PND360) females. To investigate whether perinatal exposure to DES modified the uterine response to a long-lasting estrogen treatment, 12-month-old rats exposed to DES were ovariectomized and treated with 17β-estradiol for 3 months (PND460). In young adult rats (PND90), the DES treatment decreased both the proliferation of glandular epithelial cells and the percentage of glandular perimeter occupied by α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. The other tissue compartments remained unchanged. Cell apoptosis was not altered in DES-exposed females. In control adult rats (PND360), there were some morphologically abnormal uterine glands. In adult rats exposed to DES, the incidence of glands with cellular anomalies increased. In response to estrogens (PND460), the incidence of cystic glands increased in the DES group. We observed glands with daughter glands and conglomerates of glands only on PND460 and in response to estrogen replacement therapy, independently of DES exposure. The p63 isoforms were expressed without changes on PND460. Estrogen receptors α and β showed no changes, while the progesterone receptor decreased in the subepithelial stroma of DES-exposed animals with estrogen treatment. The long-lasting effects of perinatal exposure to DES included the induction of abnormalities in uterine tissues of aged female rats and an altered response of the adult uterus to estradiol. PMID:23454116

  12. Cannabinoids: well-suited candidates for the treatment of perinatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, Maria Angeles; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury can be induced by a number of different damaging events occurring during or shortly after birth, including neonatal asphyxia, neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke-induced focal ischemia. Typical manifestations of these conditions are the presence of glutamate excitoxicity, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, the combination of which can potentially result in apoptotic-necrotic cell death, generation of brain lesions and long-lasting functional impairment. In spite of the high incidence of perinatal brain injury, the number of clinical interventions available for the treatment of the affected newborn babies is extremely limited. Hence, there is a dramatic need to develop new effective therapies aimed to prevent acute brain damage and enhance the endogenous mechanisms of long-term brain repair. The endocannabinoid system is an endogenous neuromodulatory system involved in the control of multiple central and peripheral functions. An early responder to neuronal injury, the endocannabinoid system has been described as an endogenous neuroprotective system that once activated can prevent glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium accumulation, activation of cell death pathways, microglia activation, neurovascular reactivity and infiltration of circulating leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier. The modulation of the endocannabinoid system has proven to be an effective neuroprotective strategy to prevent and reduce neonatal brain injury in different animal models and species. Also, the beneficial role of the endocannabinoid system on the control of the endogenous repairing responses (neurogenesis and white matter restoration) to neonatal brain injury has been described in independent studies. This review addresses the particular effects of several drugs that modulate the activity of the endocannabinoid system on the progression of different manifestations of perinatal brain injury during both the acute and chronic recovery phases using

  13. Chronic activation of FXR in transgenic mice caused perinatal toxicity and sensitized mice to cholesterol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Inaba, Yuka; Lu, Peipei; Xu, Meishu; He, Jinhan; Zhao, Yueshui; Guo, Grace L; Kuruba, Ramalinga; de la Vega, Rona; Evans, Rhobert W; Li, Song; Xie, Wen

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4, or NR1H4) is highly expressed in the liver and intestine. Previous reports have suggested beneficial functions of FXR in the homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose, as well as in promoting liver regeneration and inhibiting carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of chronic FXR activation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and tissue specifically express the activated form of FXR in the liver and intestine. Unexpectedly, the transgenic mice showed several intriguing phenotypes, including partial neonatal lethality, growth retardation, and spontaneous liver toxicity. The transgenic mice also displayed heightened sensitivity to a high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatotoxicity but resistance to the gallstone formation. The phenotypes were transgene specific, because they were abolished upon treatment with doxycycline to silence the transgene expression. The perinatal toxicity, which can be rescued by a maternal vitamin supplement, may have resulted from vitamin deficiency due to low biliary bile acid output as a consequence of inhibition of bile acid formation. Our results also suggested that the fibroblast growth factor-inducible immediate-early response protein 14 (Fn14), a member of the proinflammatory TNF family, is a FXR-responsive gene. However, the contribution of Fn14 induction in the perinatal toxic phenotype of the transgenic mice remains to be defined. Because FXR is being explored as a therapeutic target, our results suggested that a chronic activation of this nuclear receptor may have an unintended side effect especially during the perinatal stage. PMID:25719402

  14. WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health in Latin America: classifying caesarean sections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Caesarean section rates continue to increase worldwide with uncertain medical consequences. Auditing and analysing caesarean section rates and other perinatal outcomes in a reliable and continuous manner is critical for understanding reasons caesarean section changes over time. Methods We analyzed data on 97,095 women delivering in 120 facilities in 8 countries, collected as part of the 2004-2005 Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health in Latin America. The objective of this analysis was to test if the "10-group" or "Robson" classification could help identify which groups of women are contributing most to the high caesarean section rates in Latin America, and if it could provide information useful for health care providers in monitoring and planning effective actions to reduce these rates. Results The overall rate of caesarean section was 35.4%. Women with single cephalic pregnancy at term without previous caesarean section who entered into labour spontaneously (groups 1 and 3) represented 60% of the total obstetric population. Although women with a term singleton cephalic pregnancy with a previous caesarean section (group 5) represented only 11.4% of the obstetric population, this group was the largest contributor to the overall caesarean section rate (26.7% of all the caesarean sections). The second and third largest contributors to the overall caesarean section rate were nulliparous women with single cephalic pregnancy at term either in spontaneous labour (group 1) or induced or delivered by caesarean section before labour (group 2), which were responsible for 18.3% and 15.3% of all caesarean deliveries, respectively. Conclusion The 10-group classification could be easily applied to a multicountry dataset without problems of inconsistencies or misclassification. Specific groups of women were clearly identified as the main contributors to the overall caesarean section rate. This classification could help health care providers to plan practical

  15. Effects of Low Doses of Bisphenol A on the Metabolome of Perinatally Exposed CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cabaton, Nicolas J.; Canlet, Cécile; Wadia, Perinaaz R.; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier, Roselyne; Molina, Jérôme; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Rubin, Beverly S.; Soto, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known endocrine disruptor used to manufacture polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Exposure of pregnant rodents to low doses of BPA results in pleiotropic effects in their offspring. Objective: We used metabolomics—a method for determining metabolic changes in response to nutritional, pharmacological, or toxic stimuli—to examine metabolic shifts induced in vivo by perinatal exposure to low doses of BPA in CD-1 mice. Methods: Male offspring born to pregnant CD-1 mice that were exposed to vehicle or to 0.025, 0.25, or 25 µg BPA/kg body weight/day, from gestation day 8 through day 16 of lactation, were examined on postnatal day (PND) 2 or PND21. Aqueous extracts of newborns (PND2, whole animal) and of livers, brains, and serum samples from PND21 pups were submitted to 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Data were analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Results: Examination of endogenous metabolic fingerprints revealed remarkable discrimination in whole extracts of the four PND2 newborn treatment groups, strongly suggesting changes in the global metabolism. Furthermore, statistical analyses of liver, serum, and brain samples collected on PND21 successfully discriminated among treatment groups. Variations in glucose, pyruvate, some amino acids, and neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) were identified. Conclusions: Low doses of BPA disrupt global metabolism, including energy metabolism and brain function, in perinatally exposed CD-1 mouse pups. Metabolomics can be used to highlight the effects of low doses of endocrine disruptors by linking perinatal exposure to changes in global metabolism. PMID:23425943

  16. Temperature regulation and metabolism in rats exposed perinatally to dioxin: permanent change in regulated body temperature?

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Gray, L E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Miller, D B

    1995-07-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been shown to lower thyroxine levels and cause hypothermia in the adult rat; however, there is little known regarding the perinatal effects of TCDD on metabolism and temperature regulation of the offspring. To address this issue, thermoregulatory responses were assessed in adult male rat offspring exposed perinatally to 1.0 micrograms TCDD/kg body wt by gavage on Gestational Day 15. Individual castrated offspring were placed in a gradient-layer calorimeter for 5 hr during their nocturnal period while ambient temperature (Ta) was maintained at 10, 16, 24, or 28 degrees C. Metabolic rate (M), as measured from the total heat loss in the calorimeter, was determined along with evaporative heat loss (EHL), dry thermal conductance, and body core temperature (Tc). Animals exposed to TCDD had a significantly lower body temperature at TaS of 10, 16, and 24 degrees C and a higher thermal conductance. M was unaffected by TCDD, indicating that TCDD did not impair the effector to regulate Tc during cold exposure. EHL was also unaffected by TCDD. Skin blood flow of the interscapular area was measured in anesthetized rats with laser Doppler velocimetry and found to be the same in control and TCDD groups. The reduction in body temperature over a wide range of TaS concomitant with normal thermoregulatory effector function suggests that perinatal exposure to TCDD results in a reduction in the regulated body temperature (i.e., decrease in set-point). PMID:7597705

  17. Outbreak of Hepatitis E in Urban Bangladesh Resulting in Maternal and Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Paul, Repon C.; Sazzad, Hossain M. S.; Islam, M. Saiful; Parveen, Shahana; Faruque, Labib I.; Husain, Mushtuq; Ara, Khorshed; Jahan, Yasmin; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes outbreaks of jaundice associated with maternal mortality. Four deaths among pregnant women with jaundice occurred in an urban community near Dhaka, Bangladesh, in late 2008 and were reported to authorities in January 2009. We investigated the etiology and risk factors for jaundice and death. Methods. Field workers identified suspected cases, defined as acute onset of yellow eyes or skin, through house-to-house visits. A subset of persons with suspected HEV was tested for immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to HEV to confirm infection. We used logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for HEV disease and for death. We estimated the increased risk of perinatal mortality associated with jaundice during pregnancy. Results. We identified 4751 suspected HEV cases during August 2008–January 2009, including 17 deaths. IgM antibodies to HEV were identified in 56 of 73 (77%) case-patients tested who were neighbors of the case-patients who died. HEV disease was significantly associated with drinking municipally supplied water. Death among persons with HEV disease was significantly associated with being female and taking paracetamol (acetaminophen). Among women who were pregnant, miscarriage and perinatal mortality was 2.7 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.2–6.1) in pregnancies complicated by jaundice. Conclusions. This outbreak of HEV was likely caused by sewage contamination of the municipal water system. Longer-term efforts to improve access to safe water and license HEV vaccines are needed. However, securing resources and support for intervention will rely on convincing data about the endemic burden of HEV disease, particularly its role in maternal and perinatal mortality. PMID:24855146

  18. Chronic Activation of FXR in Transgenic Mice Caused Perinatal Toxicity and Sensitized Mice to Cholesterol Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Inaba, Yuka; Lu, Peipei; Xu, Meishu; He, Jinhan; Zhao, Yueshui; Guo, Grace L.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; de la Vega, Rona; Evans, Rhobert W.; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4, or NR1H4) is highly expressed in the liver and intestine. Previous reports have suggested beneficial functions of FXR in the homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose, as well as in promoting liver regeneration and inhibiting carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of chronic FXR activation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and tissue specifically express the activated form of FXR in the liver and intestine. Unexpectedly, the transgenic mice showed several intriguing phenotypes, including partial neonatal lethality, growth retardation, and spontaneous liver toxicity. The transgenic mice also displayed heightened sensitivity to a high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatotoxicity but resistance to the gallstone formation. The phenotypes were transgene specific, because they were abolished upon treatment with doxycycline to silence the transgene expression. The perinatal toxicity, which can be rescued by a maternal vitamin supplement, may have resulted from vitamin deficiency due to low biliary bile acid output as a consequence of inhibition of bile acid formation. Our results also suggested that the fibroblast growth factor-inducible immediate-early response protein 14 (Fn14), a member of the proinflammatory TNF family, is a FXR-responsive gene. However, the contribution of Fn14 induction in the perinatal toxic phenotype of the transgenic mice remains to be defined. Because FXR is being explored as a therapeutic target, our results suggested that a chronic activation of this nuclear receptor may have an unintended side effect especially during the perinatal stage. PMID:25719402

  19. Determination of maternal body composition in pregnancy and its relevance to perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Strauss, Boyd J G; Walker, Susan P; Permezel, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Three models and 10 specific methods for determining maternal body composition are discussed and their perinatal relevance reviewed. English language publications (1950 to January 2004) were searched electronically and by hand. Search terms included "body composition," "human," " pregnancy," "obesity," "adiposity," "regional," "2-, 3-, 4-component," "truncal," "peripheral," "central," "visceral" along with specific techniques and outcomes listed subsequently. Three models of body composition are described: 2-component being fat and fat-free mass; 3-component being fat, water, and protein; and 4-component being fat, water, protein, and osseous mineral. Ten techniques of body composition assessment are described: 1) anthropometric techniques including skinfold thicknesses and waist-hip ratio; 2) total body water (isotopically labeled); 3) hydrodensitometry (underwater weighing); 4) air-displacement plethysmography; 5) bio-impedance analysis (BIA); 6) total body potassium (TBK); 7) dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA); 8) computed tomography (CT); 9) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and 10) ultrasound (USS). Most methods estimate total adiposity. Regional fat distribution-central (truncal) compared with peripheral (limb) or visceral compared with subcutaneous-is important because of regional variation in adipocyte metabolism. Skinfolds, DEXA, CT, MRI, or USS can distinguish central from peripheral fat. CT, MRI, or USS can further subdivide central fat into visceral and subcutaneous. Perinatal outcomes examined in relation to body composition include pregnancy duration, birth weight, congenital anomalies, gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, and the fetal origins of adult disease. A few studies suggest that central compared with peripheral fat correlates better with birth weight, gestational carbohydrate intolerance, and hypertension. Means of accurately assessing maternal body composition remain cumbersome and impractical, but may more accurately

  20. Maternal and perinatal health research priorities beyond 2015: an international survey and prioritization exercise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality has declined by nearly half since 1990, but over a quarter million women still die every year of causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal-health related targets are falling short of the 2015 Millennium Development Goals and a post-2015 Development Agenda is emerging. In connection with this, setting global research priorities for the next decade is now required. Methods We adapted the methods of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) to identify and set global research priorities for maternal and perinatal health for the period 2015 to 2025. Priority research questions were received from various international stakeholders constituting a large reference group, and consolidated into a final list of research questions by a technical working group. Questions on this list were then scored by the reference working group according to five independent and equally weighted criteria. Normalized research priority scores (NRPS) were calculated, and research priority questions were ranked accordingly. Results A list of 190 priority research questions for improving maternal and perinatal health was scored by 140 stakeholders. Most priority research questions (89%) were concerned with the evaluation of implementation and delivery of existing interventions, with research subthemes frequently concerned with training and/or awareness interventions (11%), and access to interventions and/or services (14%). Twenty-one questions (11%) involved the discovery of new interventions or technologies. Conclusions Key research priorities in maternal and perinatal health were identified. The resulting ranked list of research questions provides a valuable resource for health research investors, researchers and other stakeholders. We are hopeful that this exercise will inform the post-2015 Development Agenda and assist donors, research-policy decision makers and researchers to invest in research that will ultimately make the most

  1. Systemic and luminal influences on the perinatal development of the gut.

    PubMed

    Trahair, J F; Sangild, P T

    1997-06-01

    At birth, the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT) must be able to support a shift from mainly parenteral nutrition in the fetus (via the placenta) to enteral nutrition in the neonate. In the perinatal period the GIT therefore undergoes enhanced growth as well as morphological and functional differentiation, and this maturational programme is influenced by a complex interplay of local, systemic and luminal factors. This review shows how systemic and luminal factors may influence GIT development in the perinatal period of the pig and sheep, two long-gestation species. Adrenocortical hormones play a pivotal role in the prepartum maturation of the GIT in addition to their better known effects on the development of many other tissues and body systems. More particularly, in the fetal pig and sheep, the prenatal development of gastric acid and gastrin secretion, and of GIT hydrolase activities (chymosin, pepsin, amylase, lactase, aminopeptidases) is influenced by cortisol. Additionally, glucocorticoids exert effects throughout the GIT by influencing morphological, cytological, and functional differentiation. Since the GIT epithelial cells comprise a renewing cell population there are also changes in cell kinetics. In addition to systemic factors, the presence of growth factors, hormones and nutrients from swallowed amniotic fluid (fetus) and colostrum (neonate) may influence GIT development. In utero, fetal fluid ingestion has been shown to modulate tissue growth, macromolecule and immunoglobulin transport, enterocyte differentiation, cell turnover and activity of brush-border hydrolases. These effects may be mediated via regulatory peptides (e.g. insulin-like growth factor I, gastrin-releasing peptides, insulin, epidermal growth factor, gastrin). A physiological role of luminally derived growth factors is supported by a number of unique structural and functional adaptations of the GIT in the fetus and neonate (low luminal proteolysis, intestinal macromolecule

  2. Epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP Signaling Regulates Multiple Biological Processes during Perinatal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, James P.; Schehr, Angelica; Wang, Yanhua; Huo, Liya; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout postnatal life. Defects in the surfactant system are associated with common pulmonary disorders including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults. Lipogenesis is essential for the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant by type II epithelial cells lining the alveoli. This study sought to identify the role of pulmonary epithelial SREBP, a transcriptional regulator of cellular lipid homeostasis, during a critical time period of perinatal lung maturation in the mouse. Genome wide mRNA expression profiling of lung tissue from transgenic mice with epithelial-specific deletions of Scap (ScapΔ/Δ, resulting in inactivation of SREBP signaling) or Insig1 and Insig2 (Insig1/2Δ/Δ, resulting in activation of SREBP signaling) was assessed. Differentially expressed genes responding to SREBP perturbations were identified and subjected to functional enrichment analysis, pathway mapping and literature mining to predict upstream regulators and transcriptional networks regulating surfactant lipid homeostasis. Through comprehensive data analysis and integration, time dependent effects of epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP deletion and defined SCAP/INSIG/SREBP-associated genes, bioprocesses and downstream pathways were identified. SREBP signaling influences epithelial development, cell death and cell proliferation at E17.5, while primarily influencing surfactant physiology, lipid/sterol synthesis, and phospholipid transport after birth. SREBP signaling integrated with the Wnt/β-catenin and glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathways during perinatal lung maturation. SREBP regulates perinatal lung lipogenesis and maturation through multiple mechanisms by interactions with distinct sets of regulatory partners. PMID:24806461

  3. Effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake on Secondary Sex Ratio and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kohta; Yamagata, Zentaro; Kawado, Miyuki; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of natural disasters on secondary sex ratio (SSR) and perinatal outcomes has been suggested. This study aimed to examine effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake on perinatal outcomes using vital statistics of Japan. Methods Birth registration data from vital statistics of Japan between March 2010 and March 2012 were used. Pregnant women who experienced the earthquake were categorized according to their gestational period as of March 11, 2011, as follows: gestational weeks 4–11, 12–19, 20–27, and 28–36 (2011 group). Similarly, pregnant women who did not experience the earthquake were categorized according to their gestational period as of March 11, 2010 and used as controls (2010 group). We also categorized prefectures as “extremely affected”, “moderately affected”, and “slightly or unaffected” regions. SSR, birth weight, and gestational period were compared between both groups. Results The number of singleton births was 688 479 in the 2010 group and 679 131 in the 2011 group. In the extremely affected region, the SSR among women at 4–11 weeks of gestation was significantly lower in the 2011 group compared with the 2010 group (49.8% vs 52.1%, P = 0.009). In the extremely affected region, children born to women who experienced the earthquake at 28–36 weeks of gestation had significantly lower birth weights. Conclusions The SSR declined among women who experienced the earthquake during early pregnancy, particularly in the extremely affected region. However, no apparent negative effect of the earthquake on perinatal outcomes was observed, although birth weight of infants who were born to women who experienced the earthquake at 28–36 weeks of gestation were lower. PMID:26639751

  4. Maternal mortality and psychiatric morbidity in the perinatal period: challenges and opportunities for prevention in the Australian setting.

    PubMed

    Austin, Marie-Paule; Kildea, Susan; Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2007-04-01

    Maternal mortality associated with psychiatric illness in the perinatal period (pregnancy to the end of the first year postpartum) has until recently been under-reported in Australia due to limitations in the scope of the data collection and methods of detection. The recent United Kingdom report Why mothers die 2000-2002 identified psychiatric illness as the leading cause of maternal death in the UK. Findings from the last three reports on maternal deaths in Australia (covering the period 1994-2002) suggest that maternal psychiatric illness is one of the leading causes of maternal death, with the majority of suicides occurring by violent means. Such findings strengthen the case for routine perinatal psychosocial screening programs, with clear referral guidelines and assertive perinatal treatment of significant maternal psychiatric morbidity. Data linkage studies are needed to measure the full extent of maternal mortality associated with psychiatric illness in Australia. PMID:17407434

  5. Pharmacological and gene modification-based models for studying the impact of perinatal metabolic disturbances in adult life.

    PubMed

    Villarroya, Francesc; Bocos, Carlos; Giralt, Marta; Pilar Ramos, Maria; Herrera, Emilio; Sevillano, Julio; Gual, Margalida; Rosell, Meritxell; Iglesias, Roser

    2009-01-01

    Genetic modification approaches or pharmacological interventions may be useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which nutrient derivatives and metabolites exert their effects in the perinatal period and how they may influence longterm metabolism in adults. Examples for such experimental settings in rodents are targeted disruption of the gene for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-a, a lipid sensor and master regulator of lipid catabolism, or maternal treatment with agonists of PPARgamma, a master regulator of adipogenesis and target of insulin sensitizing drugs in adults. All these interventions show differential effects in the perinatal period compared to adults and indicate that altered activity of master regulators of metabolism results in profound metabolic alterations in the perinatal period that may influence adult metabolism. PMID:19536673

  6. The meaning of body image experiences during the perinatal period: A systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    PubMed

    Watson, Brittany; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Broadbent, Jaclyn; Skouteris, Helen

    2015-06-01

    Literature reporting body image disturbances across the perinatal period has produced inconsistent findings, owing to the complexity of body image experiences during pregnancy and the first year postpartum. Existing qualitative data might provide potential avenues to advance understanding of pregnancy-related body image experiences and guide future quantitative research. The present systematic review synthesised the findings of 10 qualitative studies exploring the body image experiences of women through the perinatal period, albeit the majority focused only on pregnancy. Themes emerging included malleability of body image ideals across pregnancy (including the shift from aesthetic to functional concerns about one's appearance), the salience of stomach and breasts for self-rated body satisfaction, and perceived pressure to limit weight gain across pregnancy in order to return quickly to pre-pregnancy figure following birth. These qualitative findings suggest greater complexity of body image experiences during perinatal period than can be captured by typically used self-report measures. PMID:25950953

  7. A mother–baby psychiatric day hospital: History, rationale, and why perinatal mental health is important for obstetric medicine

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    Background Women frequently experience depression, anxiety, or other mental health concerns during pregnancy and postpartum, impacting her and her infant’s health. Patients who require management of medical conditions during the perinatal period are even more likely to experience depression and anxiety compared to those without comorbid medical issues. Despite the availability of effective treatments, perinatal mental health utilization rates are strikingly low. Methods To address common treatment barriers, we developed a specialized mother–baby day hospital for women with psychiatric distress during the peripartum. In this report, we summarize findings from 800 patient satisfaction surveys collected from women treated at the program between 2007 and 2012. Results Findings suggest that women are highly satisfied with the treatment received, often noting that the inclusion of the baby in their treatment is a highly valued feature of care. Conclusion The relevance of perinatal mental health services for patients who are followed by obstetrical medicine specialists is discussed.

  8. Closing the Gap between Policy and Practice in Screening for Perinatal Depression: A Policy Analysis and Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Sampson, McClain

    2016-10-01

    Although perinatal depression (PND) is one of the most common maternal morbidities, it is frequently undetected. Screening for early detection and intervention has the potential to prevent depressive symptoms from worsening. In the United States, five states have enacted legislation in relation to screening for PND, but a gap remains between policy and practice in providing continuum of care for mothers who may be suffering from depressive symptoms. From the perspective of policy formation, the reasons for this gap include a discrepancy between policy and practice goals, lack of regulations on capability building among perinatal care providers, and few pathways for establishing collaborations between medical providers and mental health professionals. The authors recommend involving social workers in the process to promote a better continuum of care after screening through comprehensive policy that explicitly states goals to effectively screen women in the perinatal period. PMID:27254263

  9. Infant arousal in an en-face exchange with a new partner: effects of prematurity and perinatal biological risk.

    PubMed

    Eckerman, C O; Hsu, H C; Molitor, A; Leung, E H; Goldstein, R F

    1999-01-01

    Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants of higher (n = 18) and lower (n = 29) perinatal biological risk were contrasted at 4 months adjusted age with healthy full-term infants (n = 32) in their arousal during a standardized peekaboo game with an examiner. VLBW infants showed less positive arousal, more negative arousal, and 3 mixtures of behavioral cues across the peekaboo game seldom seen for full-term infants-strong cues of both positive and negative arousal, strong cues of negative arousal alone, and no strong cues of either positive or negative arousal. Contrary to expectations, perinatal biological risk did not strongly predict variations in arousal within the VLBW group. Possible changes in how internal and external sources of arousal are integrated provide one explanation for the presence of strong relationships between perinatal biological risk and social responsiveness near term age and their disappearance by 4 months of age. PMID:9923482

  10. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Getty, Caitlyn M; Dilger, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  11. Moderate Perinatal Choline Deficiency Elicits Altered Physiology and Metabolomic Profiles in the Piglet

    PubMed Central

    Getty, Caitlyn M.; Dilger, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of dietary choline on the health and well-being of swine, and those pivotal papers were aimed at determining dietary requirements for sows and growing pigs. This is of importance as the piglet is becoming a widely accepted model for human infant nutrition, but little is known about the impacts of perinatal choline status on overall health and metabolism of the growing piglet. In the present study, sows were provided either a choline deficient (CD, 625 mg choline/kg dry matter) or choline sufficient (CS, 1306 mg choline/kg dry matter) diet for the last 65 d of gestation (prenatal intervention). Piglets were weaned from the sow 48 h after farrowing and provided either a CD (477 mg choline/kg dry matter) or CS (1528 mg choline/kg dry matter) milk replacer (postnatal intervention) for 29 ± 2 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 treatment (prenatal/postnatal) groups: CS/CS, CS/CD, CD/CS, and CD/CD. Piglet growth was normal for artificially-reared piglets, and was not impacted by perinatal choline status. Piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment had lower (P < 0.01) plasma choline and choline-containing phospholipid concentrations and higher (P < 0.05) liver enzyme (alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) values compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Hepatic lipid content of piglets receiving the postnatal CD treatment was higher (P < 0.01) compared with piglets receiving the postnatal CS treatment. Additionally, postnatally CD piglets had lower (P = 0.01) plasma cholesterol than postnatally CS piglets. Brain development was also impacted by perinatal choline status, with brains of piglets exposed to prenatal CD being smaller (P = 0.01) than those of prenatally CS piglets. These findings support the hypothesis that the piglet is a sensitive model for choline deficiency during the perinatal period. In the present study, piglets exhibited similarities in health markers and metabolomic

  12. Trajectories of Sleep Quality and Associations with Mood during the Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Tomfohr, Lianne M.; Buliga, Elena; Letourneau, Nicole L.; Campbell, Tavis S.; Giesbrecht, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate trajectories of sleep quality and associations with mood in the perinatal period. Although it is commonly accepted that subjective sleep quality declines during pregnancy and the transition to parenthood, some women may follow qualitatively distinct trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants: Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Data were collected from 293 women at four time points: during early pregnancy, at Time 1 (T1; < 22 w gestational age [GA]; late pregnancy, at Time 2 (T2; 32 w GA); during the postnatal period at Time 3 (T3; 3 mo postpartum); and Time 4 (T4; 6 mo postpartum). A group-based semiparametric mixture model was used to estimate patterns of sleep quality throughout the perinatal period. Results: Four trajectory groups were identified, including patterns defined by high sleep quality throughout (21.5%), mild decrease in sleep quality (59.5%), significant decrease in sleep quality (12.3%) and a group with poor sleep quality throughout (6.7%). Women who had the worst sleep quality at Time 1 and those who experienced significant increases in sleep problems throughout pregnancy were also the groups who reported the highest levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in early pregnancy and the lowest levels of social support. After controlling for covariates, the groups with worst subjective sleep quality during pregnancy were also the most likely to experience high symptoms of depression in the postpartum period. Conclusions: Most of the women in our sample reported mild sleep disturbances through the perinatal period. A subgroup of women reported a significant decline in sleep quality from early to late pregnancy and another reported poor subjective sleep quality throughout pregnancy; these groups had the greatest risk of experiencing high symptoms of depression in the postpartum period. Citation: Tomfohr LM, Buliga E, Letourneau NL, Campbell TS, Giesbrecht GF

  13. Mobile Phone Intervention Reduces Perinatal Mortality in Zanzibar: Secondary Outcomes of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Vibeke; Hemed, Maryam; Boas, Ida Marie; Said, Azzah; Said, Khadija; Makundu, Mkoko Hassan; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile phones are increasingly used in health systems in developing countries and innovative technical solutions have great potential to overcome barriers of access to reproductive and child health care. However, despite widespread support for the use of mobile health technologies, evidence for its role in health care is sparse. Objective We aimed to evaluate the association between a mobile phone intervention and perinatal mortality in a resource-limited setting. Methods This study was a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, controlled trial with primary health care facilities in Zanzibar as the unit of randomization. At their first antenatal care visit, 2550 pregnant women (1311 interventions and 1239 controls) who attended antenatal care at selected primary health care facilities were included in this study and followed until 42 days after delivery. Twenty-four primary health care facilities in six districts were randomized to either mobile phone intervention or standard care. The intervention consisted of a mobile phone text message and voucher component. Secondary outcome measures included stillbirth, perinatal mortality, and death of a child within 42 days after birth as a proxy of neonatal mortality. Results Within the first 42 days of life, 2482 children were born alive, 54 were stillborn, and 36 died. The overall perinatal mortality rate in the study was 27 per 1000 total births. The rate was lower in the intervention clusters, 19 per 1000 births, than in the control clusters, 36 per 1000 births. The intervention was associated with a significant reduction in perinatal mortality with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.50 (95% CI 0.27-0.93). Other secondary outcomes showed an insignificant reduction in stillbirth (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.34-1.24) and an insignificant reduction in death within the first 42 days of life (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.36-1.74). Conclusions Mobile phone applications may contribute to improved health of the newborn and should be considered by policy

  14. Severe Primary HSV-2 in a Perinatal HIV-Infected Woman with Advanced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lana; Agwu, Allison; Hutton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is most commonly associated with mucocutaneous manifestations; however, coinfections with HIV may be associated with atypical and more severe presentations of clinical disease. We present a case of a young woman with advanced perinatally acquired AIDS presenting with severe purulent pharyngitis, fevers, and toxic appearance with a subsequent diagnosis of disseminated primary HSV-2 infection in multiple noncontiguous mucocutaneous sites. This case highlights an unusual presentation of the protean nature of primary HSV infection and the potential severity of illness in patients with advanced immunosuppression. PMID:22899940

  15. Perinatal Management for a Pregnant Woman with an MYH9 Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Rei; Oikawa, Yoshie; Ariizumi, Hirotsugu; Hamada, Shoko; Shirato, Nahoko; Matsuoka, Ryu; Ogawa, Kohichi; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    We diagnosed a primipara woman with an MYH9 disorder during her pregnancy. A peripheral blood smear with an immunofluorescence analysis is the established method of diagnosing MYH9 disorders. We provided genetic counseling, as required, which included apprising the woman of the inheritance pattern, the importance of a genetic analysis, and the potential delivery risks for the patient and her offspring. Given that the potential delivery risks are reportedly low, special perinatal management is not necessary for patients with an MYH9 disorder whose platelet count is above 5.0 × 104/μL, except for rapid blood access. PMID:27437156

  16. Lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia in pregnancy is related to perinatal mortality: a cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes related morbidity increases along the continuum of the glycemic spectrum. Perinatal mortality, as a complication of gestational diabetes, has been little investigated. In early studies, an association was found, but in more recent ones it has not been confirmed. The Brazilian Study of Gestational Diabetes, a cohort of untreated pregnant women enrolled in the early 1990's, offers a unique opportunity to investigate this question. Thus, our objective is to evaluate whether perinatal mortality increases in a continuum across the maternal glycemic spectrum. Methods We prospectively enrolled and followed 4401 pregnant women attending general prenatal care clinics in six Brazilian state capitals, without history of diabetes outside of pregnancy, through to birth, and their offspring through the early neonatal period. Women answered a structured questionnaire and underwent a standardized 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Obstetric care was maintained according to local protocols. We obtained antenatal, delivery and neonatal data from hospital records. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression. Results We ascertained 97 perinatal deaths (67 fetal and 31 early neonatal). Odds of dying increased according to glucose levels, statistically significantly so only for women delivering at gestational age ≥34 weeks (p < 0.05 for glycemia-gestational age interaction). ORs for a 1 standard deviation difference in glucose, when analyzed continuously, were for fasting 1.47 (95% CI 1.12, 1.92); 1-h 1.55 (95% CI 1.15, 2.07); and 2-h 1.53 (95% CI 1.15, 2.02). The adjusted OR for IADPSG criteria gestational diabetes was 2.21 (95% CI 1.15, 4.27); and for WHO criteria gestational diabetes, 3.10 (95% CI 1.39, 6.88). Conclusions In settings of limited detection and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus, women across a spectrum of lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia, experienced a continuous rise in perinatal death with

  17. A pilot randomized controlled trial comparing prenatal yoga to perinatal health education for antenatal depression.

    PubMed

    Uebelacker, Lisa A; Battle, Cynthia L; Sutton, Kaeli A; Magee, Susanna R; Miller, Ivan W

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a prenatal yoga intervention to perinatal-focused health education in pregnant women with depression. Findings document acceptability and feasibility of the yoga intervention: no yoga-related injuries were observed, instructors showed fidelity to the yoga manual, and women rated interventions as acceptable. Although improvements in depression were not statistically different between groups, they favored yoga. This study provides support for a larger scale RCT examining prenatal yoga to improve mood during pregnancy. PMID:26385456

  18. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ibi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26633355

  19. Perinatal and lifetime exposure to methylmercury in the mouse: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Bernard; Stern, Sander; Cox, Christopher; Balys, Marlene

    2005-08-01

    This project was undertaken to more completely understand the consequences of lifetime exposure to methylmercury. A series of experiments examined how perinatal or lifetime exposure to methylmercury affected behavioral performances in the adult mouse at different ages. One hundred female B6C3F1/HSD mice were assigned to one of three dose groups, 0 ppm, 1 ppm, or 3 ppm methylmercury chloride administered in a 5 nM sodium carbonate drinking solution. Four weeks after initiating dosing, the females were bred with male CBA/J HSD mice to produce the trihybrid offspring B6C3F1/HSD x CBA/J HSD. The methylmercury-treated litters were split into two subgroups, one exposed throughout its lifetime to the original dose, the other exposed through postnatal day 13. Altogether, then, five groups were studied: Control, 1 ppm perinatal, 1 ppm lifetime, 3 ppm perinatal, and 3 ppm lifetime. Three neurobehavioral indices were evaluated: (1) delayed spatial alternation (a test of memory) and (2) running in a wheel to earn food pellets (schedule-controlled operant behavior) were assessed starting at 5 and 15 months of age; (3) hindlimb splay, a measure of motor function, was assessed at 5, 15, and 26 months of age. Subjects tested at one age were littermates of those tested at the other ages. MeHg altered the hindlimb splay distance; control mice differed from methylmercury-exposed mice, the 1 ppm lifetime and 3 ppm lifetime groups differed from each other, and the analysis yielded an age by dose interaction. MeHg exposure altered different measures of wheel running under the 3 ppm lifetime condition. In the delayed alternation procedure, the mouse was required to respond to one of two locations in a strictly alternating sequence. More mice from the treated groups, except for the 1 ppm perinatal group, failed to meet the criterion at longer delay values. Overall, the results show that exposure to low levels of methylmercury produces behavioral effects that depend on the test procedure

  20. Ischemic perinatal stroke: summary of a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K; Nelson, Karin B; Ferriero, Donna; Lynch, John Kylan

    2007-09-01

    Ischemic perinatal stroke is a disorder associated with significant long-term neurologic morbidity. With an estimated incidence of 1 in 2300 to 5000 births, stroke is more likely to occur in the perinatal period than at any time in childhood. The incidence of ischemic perinatal stroke ranks second only to that of strokes in the elderly population. Although ischemic perinatal stroke is a well-recognized disorder, many aspects remain to be studied. There is no consensus on its terminology, definition, or classification. Several risk factors have been identified, but their precise roles in causing stroke are not well understood. There are no reliable predictors of ischemic perinatal stroke on which to base prevention or treatment strategies. To review these important issues and propose a research agenda, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke convened a workshop in August 2006. This article provides a summary of the workshop. PMID:17766535