Science.gov

Sample records for asme fluids engineering

  1. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  2. 76 FR 36231 - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and New and Revised ASME Code Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... the ASME B&PV Code becomes available. This start date is expected to be about 4 months earlier than... last incorporated by reference into the regulations in a final rule dated September 10, 2008 (73 FR 52730), as corrected on October 2, 2008 (73 FR 57235), incorporating Section III of the 2004 Edition...

  3. 75 FR 24323 - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and New and Revised ASME Code Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... by reference into the regulations in a final rule dated September 10, 2008 (73 FR 52730), as corrected on October 2, 2008 (73 FR 57235), incorporating Section III of the 2004 Edition of the ASME B&PV..., 2008 (73 FR 52729). The NRC follows a three-step process to determine acceptability of new...

  4. Fluid mechanics phenomena in microgravity; ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siginer, Dennis A. (Editor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of symposia presenting research activity in microgravity fluid mechanics. General topics addressed include two-phase flow and transport phenomena, thermo-capillary flow, and interfacial stability. Papers present mathmatical models of fluid dynamics in the microgravity environment. Applications suggested include space manufacturing and storage of liquids in low gravity.

  5. Review and Application of ASME NOG-1 and ASME NUM-1-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, Bradford P.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The intent of the workshop is to review the application of the ASME Nuclear Crane Standards ASME NOG-1 and ASME NUM-1-2000. The ASME Nuclear Crane standards provide a basis for purchasing overhead handling equipment with enhanced safety features, based upon accepted engineering principles, and including performance and environmental parameters specific to nuclear facilities.

  6. Proceedings of the 1996 spring technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Volume 2: Engine design and engine systems; ICE-Volume 26-2

    SciTech Connect

    Uzkan, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although the cost of the petroleum crude has not increased much within the last decade, the drive to develop internal combustion engines is still continuing. The basic motivation of this drive is to reduce both emissions and costs. Recent developments in computer chip production and information management technology have opened up new applications in engine controls and monitoring. The development of new information is continuing at a rapid pace. Some of these research and development results were presented at the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division in Youngstown, Ohio, April 21--24, 1996. The papers presented covered various aspects of the design, development, and application of compression ignition and spark ignition engines. The conference was held at the Holiday Inn Metroplex Complex and hosted by Altronic Incorporated of Girard, Ohio. The written papers submitted to the conference have been published in three conference volumes. Volume 2 includes the papers on the topics of engine design, engine systems, and engine user experience.

  7. Proceedings of the 1996 spring technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Volume 3: Basic processes in IC engines; ICE-Volume 26-3

    SciTech Connect

    Uzkan, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although the cost of the petroleum crude has not increased much within the last decade, the drive to develop internal combustion engines is still continuing. The basic motivation of this drive is to reduce both emissions and costs. Recent developments in computer chip production and information management technology have opened up new applications in engine controls and monitoring. The development of new information is continuing at a rapid pace. Some of these research and development results were presented at the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division in Youngstown, Ohio, April 21--24, 1996. The papers presented covered various aspects of the design, development, and application of compression ignition and spark ignition engines. The conference was held at the Holiday Inn Metroplex Complex and hosted by Altronic Incorporated of Girard, Ohio. The written papers submitted to the conference have been published in three conference volumes. Volume 3 is devoted to the topic of basic processes in IC engines.

  8. Proceedings of the 1996 spring technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Volume 1: Engine emissions; ICE-Volume 26-1

    SciTech Connect

    Uzkan, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although the cost of the petroleum crude has not increased much within the last decade, the drive to develop internal combustion engines is still continuing. The basic motivation of this drive is to reduce both emissions and costs. Recent developments in computer chip production and information management technology have opened up new applications in engine controls and monitoring. The development of new information is continuing at a rapid pace. Some of these research and development results were presented at the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division in Youngstown, Ohio, April 21--24, 1996. The papers presented covered various aspects of the design, development, and application of compression ignition and spark ignition engines. The conference was held at the Holiday Inn Metroplex Complex and hosted by Altronic Incorporated of Girard, Ohio. The written papers submitted to the conference have been published in three conference volumes. Volume 1 is essentially devoted to the topic of engine emissions.

  9. DESIGN OF ENGINE INTAKE SYSTEMS USING COMPUTER SIMULATIONS ASME PAPER ICEF2002-523

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computational study of a direct injection engine intake system was conducted to determine if adding scrouds to the intake valves would improve the swirl performance in the engine. The results show that higher swril was generated with a single port and a shrouded valve.

  10. Stirling engine with air working fluid

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

  11. Engineering fluid flow using sequenced microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Xie, Yu; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Stone, Howard A.; di Carlo, Dino

    2013-05-01

    Controlling the shape of fluid streams is important across scales: from industrial processing to control of biomolecular interactions. Previous approaches to control fluid streams have focused mainly on creating chaotic flows to enhance mixing. Here we develop an approach to apply order using sequences of fluid transformations rather than enhancing chaos. We investigate the inertial flow deformations around a library of single cylindrical pillars within a microfluidic channel and assemble these net fluid transformations to engineer fluid streams. As these transformations provide a deterministic mapping of fluid elements from upstream to downstream of a pillar, we can sequentially arrange pillars to apply the associated nested maps and, therefore, create complex fluid structures without additional numerical simulation. To show the range of capabilities, we present sequences that sculpt the cross-sectional shape of a stream into complex geometries, move and split a fluid stream, perform solution exchange and achieve particle separation. A general strategy to engineer fluid streams into a broad class of defined configurations in which the complexity of the nonlinear equations of fluid motion are abstracted from the user is a first step to programming streams of any desired shape, which would be useful for biological, chemical and materials automation.

  12. Engineering fluid flow using sequenced microstructures.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Xie, Yu; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Stone, Howard A; Di Carlo, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the shape of fluid streams is important across scales: from industrial processing to control of biomolecular interactions. Previous approaches to control fluid streams have focused mainly on creating chaotic flows to enhance mixing. Here we develop an approach to apply order using sequences of fluid transformations rather than enhancing chaos. We investigate the inertial flow deformations around a library of single cylindrical pillars within a microfluidic channel and assemble these net fluid transformations to engineer fluid streams. As these transformations provide a deterministic mapping of fluid elements from upstream to downstream of a pillar, we can sequentially arrange pillars to apply the associated nested maps and, therefore, create complex fluid structures without additional numerical simulation. To show the range of capabilities, we present sequences that sculpt the cross-sectional shape of a stream into complex geometries, move and split a fluid stream, perform solution exchange and achieve particle separation. A general strategy to engineer fluid streams into a broad class of defined configurations in which the complexity of the nonlinear equations of fluid motion are abstracted from the user is a first step to programming streams of any desired shape, which would be useful for biological, chemical and materials automation. PMID:23652014

  13. 78 FR 37848 - ASME Code Cases Not Approved for Use

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... COMMISSION ASME Code Cases Not Approved for Use AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft... public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1233, ``ASME Code Cases not Approved for Use.'' This regulatory guide lists the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Cases that the NRC...

  14. Using Computers in Fluids Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Three approaches for using computers to improve basic fluids engineering education are presented. The use of computational fluid dynamics solutions to fundamental flow problems is discussed. The use of interactive, highly graphical software which operates on either a modern workstation or personal computer is highlighted. And finally, the development of 'textbooks' and teaching aids which are used and distributed on the World Wide Web is described. Arguments for and against this technology as applied to undergraduate education are also discussed.

  15. Engineering Fracking Fluids with Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2015-11-01

    There are no comprehensive simulation-based tools for engineering the flows of viscoelastic fluid-particle suspensions in fully three-dimensional geometries. On the other hand, the need for such a tool in engineering applications is immense. Suspensions of rigid particles in viscoelastic fluids play key roles in many energy applications. For example, in oil drilling the ``drilling mud'' is a very viscous, viscoelastic fluid designed to shear-thin during drilling, but thicken at stoppage so that the ``cuttings'' can remain suspended. In a related application known as hydraulic fracturing suspensions of solids called ``proppant'' are used to prop open the fracture by pumping them into the well. It is well-known that particle flow and settling in a viscoelastic fluid can be quite different from that which is observed in Newtonian fluids. First, it is now well known that the ``fluid particle split'' at bifurcation cracks is controlled by fluid rheology in a manner that is not understood. Second, in Newtonian fluids, the presence of an imposed shear flow in the direction perpendicular to gravity (which we term a cross or orthogonal shear flow) has no effect on the settling of a spherical particle in Stokes flow (i.e. at vanishingly small Reynolds number). By contrast, in a non-Newtonian liquid, the complex rheological properties induce a nonlinear coupling between the sedimentation and shear flow. Recent experimental data have shown both the shear thinning and the elasticity of the suspending polymeric solutions significantly affects the fluid-particle split at bifurcations, as well as the settling rate of the solids. In the present work, we use the Immersed Boundary Method to develop computer simulations of viscoelastic flow in suspensions of spheres to study these problems. These simulations allow us to understand the detailed physical mechanisms for the remarkable physical behavior seen in practice, and actually suggest design rules for creating new fluid recipes.

  16. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  17. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  18. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  19. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  20. Globalization of ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, Rick; Erler, Bryan A.

    2006-07-01

    With the globalization of the nuclear industry, it is clear that the reactor suppliers are based in many countries around the world (such as United States, France, Japan, Canada, South Korea, South Africa) and they will be marketing their reactors to many countries around the world (such as US, China, South Korea, France, Canada, Finland, Taiwan). They will also be fabricating their components in many different countries around the world. With this situation, it is clear that the requirements of ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards need to be adjusted to accommodate the regulations, fabricating processes, and technology of various countries around the world. It is also very important for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) to be able to assure that products meeting the applicable ASME Code requirements will provide the same level of safety and quality assurance as those products currently fabricated under the ASME accreditation process. To do this, many countries are in the process of establishing or changing their regulations, and it is important for ASME to interface with the appropriate organizations in those countries, in order to ensure there is effective use of ASME Codes and standards around the world. (authors)

  1. Tracing Injection Fluids in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. E.; Leecaster, K.; Mella, M.; Ayling, B.; Bartl, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The reinjection of produced fluids is crucial to the effective management of geothermal reservoirs, since it provides a mechanism for maintaining reservoir pressures while allowing for the disposal of a toxic byproduct. Tracers are essential to the proper location of injection wells since they are the only known tool for reliably characterizing the flow patterns of recirculated fluids. If injection wells are placed too close to production wells, then reinjected fluids do not have sufficient residence time to extract heat from the reservoir and premature thermal breakthrough results. If injection wells are placed too far away, then the reservoir risks unacceptable pressure loss. Several thermally stable compounds from a family of very detectable fluorescent organic compounds (the naphthalene sulfonates) were characterized and found to be effective for use as geothermal tracers. Through batch-autoclave reactions, their Arrhenius pseudo-first-order decay-rate constants were determined. An analytical method was developed that allows for the laboratory determination of concentrations in the low parts-per-trillion range. Field experiments in numerous geothermal reservoirs throughout the world have confirmed the laboratory findings. Whereas conservative tracers such as the naphthalene sulfonates are effective tools for indicating interwell flow patterns and for measuring reservoir pore volumes, 'reactive' tracers can be used to constrain fracture surface area, which is the effective area for heat extraction. This is especially important for engineered geothermal system (EGS) wells, since reactive tracers can be used to measure fracture surface area immediately after drilling and while the well stimulation equipment is still on site. The reactive properties of these tracers that can be exploited to constrain fracture surface area are reversible sorption, contrasting diffusivity, and thermal decay. Laboratory batch- and flow-reactor experiments in combination with numerical simulation studies have served to identify candidate compounds for use as reactive tracers. An emerging class of materials that show promise for use as geothermal and EGS tracers are colloidal nanocrystals (quantum dots). These are semiconductor particles that fluoresce as a function of particle size. Preliminary laboratory experimentation has demonstrated that these thermally stable, water-soluble particles can serve as conservative tracers for geothermal applications. Likewise, they show promise as potential reactive tracers, since their surfaces can be modified to be reversibly sorptive and their diameters are sufficiently large to allow for contrasts in diffusivity with solute tracers.

  2. Index to place of publication of ASME Papers, 1978--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Youngen, G.K.

    1990-06-01

    This index is a list of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Papers that are reprinted in the ASME Transactions series of journals. ASME Papers are often cited only by their paper number, making it difficult to determine if the article has ever appeared in print in the journal literature. This index will be useful for tracking down those papers published as journal articles by the ASME. It will also serve as a guide for retention for subscribers to the ASME Papers and Transaction Series. Paper numbers that appear in the journals may be weeded from the collection of ASME Papers.

  3. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  4. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. 57.02-2 Section... AND BRAZING General Requirements § 57.02-2 Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. (a) The... accordance with section IX of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code, as limited,...

  5. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. 57.02-2 Section... AND BRAZING General Requirements § 57.02-2 Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. (a) The... accordance with section IX of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code, as limited,...

  6. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. 57.02-2 Section... AND BRAZING General Requirements § 57.02-2 Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. (a) The... accordance with section IX of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code, as limited,...

  7. Proceedings of the ASME power conference 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    The first volume (Part A) contains the papers on: components, plant systems and design engineering; operations, maintenance, reliability, availability and maintainability; steam turbines and generators; and fuels, combustion and emission fuels. The second part (Part B) covers: renewable and advanced energy systems; combined cycles and combustion turbines; performance testing and performance test codes; and papers from the 2005 international conference on power engineering (ICOPE) held in conjunction with the ASME power conference.

  8. Fluid design studies of integrated modular engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfield, Bruce; Carek, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed to develop a fluid system design and show the feasibility of constructing an integrated modular engine (IME) configuration, using an expander cycle engine. The primary design goal of the IME configuration was to improve the propulsion system reliability. The IME fluid system was designed as a single fault tolerant system, while minimizing the required fluid components. This study addresses the design of the high pressure manifolds, turbopumps and thrust chambers for the IME configuration. A physical layout drawing was made, which located each of the fluid system components, manifolds and thrust chambers. Finally, a comparison was made between the fluid system designs of an IME system and a non-network (clustered) engine system.

  9. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  10. An example of a component replacement when applying ASME N509 and ASME N510 to older ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, T.E.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents an example of a component replacement (electric heater) when installed in an older ventilation system that was constructed before the issuance of ASME N509 and N510. Many of the existing ventilation systems at the Hanford Site were designed, fabricated, and installed before the issuance of ASME N509 and N510. Requiring the application of these codes to existing ventilation systems presents challenges to the engineer when design changes are needed. Although it may seem that the application of ASME N509 or N510 may be a hindrance at times, this does not need to occur. Proper preparation at the start of project or design modifications can minimize frustration to the engineer when it is judged that portions of ASME N509 and N510 do not apply in a particular application.

  11. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  12. Variability of computational fluid dynamics solutions for pressure and flow in a giant aneurysm: the ASME 2012 Summer Bioengineering Conference CFD Challenge.

    PubMed

    Steinman, David A; Hoi, Yiemeng; Fahy, Paul; Morris, Liam; Walsh, Michael T; Aristokleous, Nicolas; Anayiotos, Andreas S; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C; Berg, Philipp; Janiga, Gábor; Bols, Joris; Segers, Patrick; Bressloff, Neil W; Cibis, Merih; Gijsen, Frank H; Cito, Salvatore; Pallarés, Jordi; Browne, Leonard D; Costelloe, Jennifer A; Lynch, Adrian G; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Fu, Wenyu; Qiao, Aike; Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F; Kalsi, Hardeep; Long, Quan; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Finol, Ender A; Kono, Kenichi; Malek, Adel M; Lauric, Alexandra; Menon, Prahlad G; Pekkan, Kerem; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Marsden, Alison L; Oshima, Marie; Katagiri, Kengo; Peiffer, Véronique; Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Schaller, Jens; Goubergrits, Leonid; Usera, Gabriel; Mendina, Mariana; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Habets, Damiaan F; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George E; Shaffer, Nicholas; Loth, Francis

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated by a recent controversy regarding pressure drops predicted in a giant aneurysm with a proximal stenosis, the present study sought to assess variability in the prediction of pressures and flow by a wide variety of research groups. In phase I, lumen geometry, flow rates, and fluid properties were specified, leaving each research group to choose their solver, discretization, and solution strategies. Variability was assessed by having each group interpolate their results onto a standardized mesh and centerline. For phase II, a physical model of the geometry was constructed, from which pressure and flow rates were measured. Groups repeated their simulations using a geometry reconstructed from a micro-computed tomography (CT) scan of the physical model with the measured flow rates and fluid properties. Phase I results from 25 groups demonstrated remarkable consistency in the pressure patterns, with the majority predicting peak systolic pressure drops within 8% of each other. Aneurysm sac flow patterns were more variable with only a few groups reporting peak systolic flow instabilities owing to their use of high temporal resolutions. Variability for phase II was comparable, and the median predicted pressure drops were within a few millimeters of mercury of the measured values but only after accounting for submillimeter errors in the reconstruction of the life-sized flow model from micro-CT. In summary, pressure can be predicted with consistency by CFD across a wide range of solvers and solution strategies, but this may not hold true for specific flow patterns or derived quantities. Future challenges are needed and should focus on hemodynamic quantities thought to be of clinical interest. PMID:23445061

  13. Proceedings of industrial applications of fluid mechanics '91

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, T.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the fifth Forum on Industrial Applications of Fluid Mechanics sponsored by the Fluid Applications and Systems Technical Committee of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division. The Forum objective is to promote the discussion and interchange of current information on developing and state-of-the-art applications of fluid mechanics technology. The program is organized as a technical forum to encourage the presentation of new ideas, especially those which may be so innovative that a conservative review process might delay their dissemination to the fluids engineering community.

  14. ASME Nuclear Crane Standards for Enhanced Crane Safety and Increased Profit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, Stephen N.

    2000-01-01

    The ASME NOG-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes', covers top running cranes for nuclear facilities; with the ASME NUM-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Cranes, Monorails, and Hoists', covering the single girder, underhung, wall and jib cranes, as well as the monorails and hoists. These two ASME nuclear crane standards provide criteria for designing, inspecting and testing overhead handling equipment with enhanced safety to meet the 'defense-in-depth' approach of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents NUREG 0554 and NUREG 0612. In addition to providing designs for enhanced safety, the ASME nuclear crane standards provide a basis for purchasing overhead handling equipment with standard safety features, based upon accepted engineering principles, and including performance and environmental parameters specific to nuclear facilities. The ASME NOG-1 and ASME NUM-1 standards not only provide enhanced safety for handling a critical load, but also increase profit by minimizing the possibility of load drops, by reducing cumbersome operating restrictions, and by providing the foundation for a sound licensing position. The ASME nuclear crane standards can also increase profit by providing the designs and information to help ensure that the right standard equipment is purchased. Additionally, the ASME nuclear crane standards can increase profit by providing designs and information to help address current issues, such as the qualification of nuclear plant cranes for making 'planned engineered lifts' for steam generator replacement and decommissioning.

  15. Risk based ASME Code requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Balkey, K.R.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of this ASME Research Task Force is to develop and to apply a methodology for incorporating quantitative risk analysis techniques into the definition of in-service inspection (ISI) programs for a wide range of industrial applications. An additional objective, directed towards the field of nuclear power generation, is ultimately to develop a recommendation for comprehensive revisions to the ISI requirements of Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This will require development of a firm technical basis for such requirements, which does not presently exist. Several years of additional research will be required before this can be accomplished. A general methodology suitable for application to any industry has been defined and published. It has recently been refined and further developed during application to the field of nuclear power generation. In the nuclear application probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and information have been incorporated. With additional analysis, PRA information is used to determine the consequence of a component rupture (increased reactor core damage probability). A procedure has also been recommended for using the resulting quantified risk estimates to determine target component rupture probability values to be maintained by inspection activities. Structural risk and reliability analysis (SRRA) calculations are then used to determine characteristics which an inspection strategy must posess in order to maintain component rupture probabilities below target values. The methodology, results of example applications, and plans for future work are discussed.

  16. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME...

  17. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME...

  18. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME...

  19. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME...

  20. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  1. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-07-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  2. Testing of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Ed; Riga, Ken; Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand is under contract with the NASA Johnson Space Center to develop a scalable, evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It is being designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current Shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. The MFE system combines both functions into a single compact package with significant weight reduction and improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. The full scale MFE prototype will be constructed with four core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A sub-scale MFE engineering development unit (EDU) has been built, and is identical to one of the four sections of a full scale prototype. The EDU has completed testing at Hamilton Sundstrand. The overall test objective was to determine the thermal performance of the EDU. The first set of tests simulated how each of the four sections of the prototype would perform by varying the chamber pressure, evaporant flow rate, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature. A second set of tests was conducted with an outlet steam header in place to verify that the outlet steam orifices prevent freeze-up in the core while also allowing the desired thermal turn-down ratio. This paper discusses the EDU tests and results.

  3. Advances in numerical simulation of turbulent flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME and JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference, 1st, Portland, OR, June 23-27, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, I.; Kobayashi, T.; Ghia, K. N.; Kurokawa, J.

    The present conference discusses the modeling of swirling flows with advanced turbulence closures, algebraic expressions for Reynolds stresses, numerical simulation of 3D developing turbulent flows in a square duct with the anisotropic k-epsilon model, the prediction of normal Reynolds stresses with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, combustor flowfield turbulence modeling with the nonlinear k-epsilon model, and the large-eddy simulation of the unsteady turbulent wake of a circular cylinder using FEM. Also discussed are the direct simulation of transient turbulent flows using the generalized method of lines, simulation of 3D shear flows around a nozzle-afterbody, the interface oscillation phenomenon over a cavity in airflow, combustion-wave instabilities in turbulent flows, and modeling the buoyancy-production of dissipation in a plane turbulent plume.

  4. ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H. B.

    2005-07-13

    Support was provided by DOE for the 2nd ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development. The final conference program and abstracts book is attached. The conference presentations are organized around topics that are central to the current research areas in prokaryotic development. The program starts with topics that involve relatively simple models systems and ends with systems that are more complex. The topics are: i) the cell cycle, ii) the cytoskeleton, iii) morphogenesis, iv) developmental transcription, v) signaling, vi) multicellularity, and vii) developmental diversity and symbiosis. The best-studied prokaryotic development model systems will be highlighted at the conference through research presentations by leaders in the field. Many of these systems are also model systems of relevance to the DOE mission including carbon sequestration (Bradyrizobium, Synechococcus), energy production (Anabaena, Rhodobacter) and bioremediation (Caulobacter, Mesorhizobium). In addition, many of the highlighted organisms have important practical applications; the actinomycetes and myxobacteria produce antimicrobials that are of commercial interest. It is certain that the cutting-edge science presented at the conference will be applicable to the large group of bacteria relevant to the DOE mission.

  5. The low temperature differential Stirling engine with working fluid operated on critical condition

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    The research and development of low temperature differential Stirling engine has a great potential market since a lot of thermal energy at low temperature can supply it and the cost of this kind of engine is lower than general Stirling engine. The characteristics of low compression ratio and low differential temperature Stirling engine may be satisfied with working fluid compressed on critical conditions. By combining two phase heat transfer with forced convective flow in compression space and through the regenerator in the engine, a new heat transfer coefficient emerges capable of absorbing and releasing high heat fluxes without the corresponding low temperature increase. The current analysis focuses on the study of Stirling engines with working fluid compressed on critical conditions, thus at two-phase heat transfer in compression space and regenerator of the engine under forced convective flow conditions.

  6. Proceedings of industrial applications of fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sherif, S.A. ); Morrow, T.B. ); Marshall, L.R. ); Dalton, C. )

    1990-01-01

    The is the fourth Forum on Industrial Applications of Fluid Mechanics sponsored by the Fluid Mechanics Committee of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division. The Forum objective is to promote the discussion and interchange of current information on developing and state-of-the-art applications of fluid mechanics technology. The program is organized as a technical forum to encourage the presentation of new ideas, especially those which may be so innovative that a conservative review process might delay their dissemination to the fluids engineering community. Four sessions and a total of 17 papers are scheduled for this program. Three of the four sessions were devoted to contributed papers, while the fourth is a panel discussion with three invited presentations. All papers were reviewed editorially to assure that they are related to the forum theme The papers were not evaluated technically, and therefore carry no endorsement from the Fluid Mechanics Committee or the Fluids Engineering Division with regard to peer evaluation. The forum presentations will focus on specific applications of fluid mechanics technology. Lively discussion of the papers is encouraged at the forum. The Fluid Mechanics Committee plans to sponsor a forum with an industrial applications theme each year at the ASME Winter Annual Meeting. In 1991, the scope of the forum will be enlarged to include the topic of textile applications of fluid mechanics, and another panel session featuring speakers with industrial experience in different areas of fluid mechanics applications. In future years, it is anticipated that the forum will solicit papers from other areas where fluid mechanics technology is applied.

  7. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,

  8. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,…

  9. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the field of environmental engineering, modeling tools are playing an ever larger role in addressing air quality issues, including source pollutant emissions, atmospheric dispersion and human exposure risks. More detailed modeling of environmental flows requires tools for c...

  10. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  11. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. The role of computational fluid dynamics in aeronautical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takuji; Uchida, Takashi

    1988-12-01

    Numerical analyses by solving Euler/Navier-Stokes Equations has been used in practical aeronautical engineerings. Here, the results of two dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses of a multiple slotted flap, and a three dimensional wing design problem using Euler analyses are shown.

  13. Improvement of ASME NH for Grade 91

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard Riou

    2007-10-09

    This report has been prepared in the context of Task 3 of the ASME/DOE Gen IV material project. It has been identified that creep-fatigue evaluation procedures presently available in ASME (1) and RCC-MR (2) have been mainly developed for austenitic stainless steels and may not be suitable for cyclic softening materials such as mod 9 Cr 1 Mo steel (grade 91). The aim of this document is, starting from experimental test results, to perform a review of the procedures and, if necessary, provide recommendations for their improvements.

  14. Superhydrophobic surface as a fluid enhancement material in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetuko, Anggito P.; Khaerudini, Deni S.; Sardjono, Priyo; Sebayang, Perdamean; Rosengarten, Gary

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a superhydrophobic surface and its relation to the enhancement of the droplet fluid dynamics to the surface of the object materials was investigated. As the comparison, hydrophilic and uncoated surface of an object also investigated. The investigations used height of impact at 89 mm. The high quality speed camera is employed to investigate the droplet dynamic on a copper foil and a calcium fluoride surfaces. Both of the materials are coated with superhydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces separately. The droplet diameter was analyzed using the program PHANTOM. The droplet contact angle was analyzed by the Goniometry method. The water was dropped on the calcium fluoride and the copper foil using a syringe (sharp tip) with initial droplet diameter of 1.9 mm. To record the droplet fluid shape, the photo micro sensor was placed inside the trigger box below the syringe. The results showed that the superhydrophobic surface both on copper foil and calcium fluoride enhanced the mobility of a droplet compared to the hydrophilic and the uncoated surfaces. The results showed that the maximum droplet diameter on the copper foil coated by the superhydrophobic, the hydrophilic and the uncoated surfaces are 4.7, 5.0, 5.2 mm, respectively; and for the calcium fluoride are 4.5, 5.1 and 5.5 mm, respectively. Meanwhile, the results for the droplet contact angle on the copper foil coated by the superhydrophobic, the hydrophilic and the uncoated surfaces are 20°, 90°, 160°, respectively; and for the calcium fluoride are 25°, 95°, 165°, respectively.

  15. Inhomogeneity of fluid flow in Stirling engine regenerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.D. )

    1989-10-01

    The literature relating to inhomogeneity of flow regenerators is briefly reviewed. It is noted that, in contrast to other applications of regenerators, relatively little attention has been paid to the consequences of flow inhomogeneity for thermal regeneration in Stirling cycle machines. The construction of regenerator capsules for a large stationary Stirling engine is described. A test rig is developed to measure the gas velocity profile across the face of the packed regenerator capsules under steady flow conditions. Measured flow profiles for a number of different matrix materials and construction techniques are presented, and it is noted that stacked-mesh regenerator matrices tend to display marked inhomogeneities of flow. The consequences of flow inhomogeneity for flow friction and regenerator effectiveness are analyzed theoretically, and approximate formulae deduced. One method for reducing flow inhomogeneity in stacked-screen matrice

  16. Fluid flow and fuel-air mixing in a motored two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Stegeman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming was employed to obtain numerical solutions to the conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and energy to study the unsteady, multidimensional flow and mixing of fuel and air inside the combustion chambers of a two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine under motored conditions. The effects of the following engine design and operating parameters on fluid flow and fuel-air mixing during the intake and compression cycles were studied: engine speed, angle of gaseous fuel injection during compression cycle, and speed of the fuel leaving fuel injector.

  17. Fluid flow and fuel-air mixing in a motored two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Stegeman, J.

    1986-06-01

    The implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming was employed to obtain numerical solutions to the conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and energy to study the unsteady, multidimensional flow and mixing of fuel and air inside the combustion chambers of a two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine under motored conditions. The effects of the following engine design and operating parameters on fluid flow and fuel-air mixing during the intake and compression cycles were studied: engine speed, angle of gaseous fuel injection during compression cycle, and speed of the fuel leaving fuel injector.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics applied to flows in an internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, M. D.; Diwakar, R.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Jones, E.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of studies conducted by Diwakar et al. (1976) and Griffin et al. (1976), who reported the first computational fluid dynamic results for the two-dimensional flowfield for all four strokes of a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine cycle. An analysis of rectangular and cylindrical three-dimensional engine models is performed. The working fluid is assumed to be inviscid air of constant specific heats. Calculations are carried out of a four-stroke IC engine flowfield wherein detailed finite-rate chemical combustion of a gasoline-air mixture is included. The calculations remain basically inviscid, except that in some instances thermal conduction is included to allow a more realistic model of the localized sparking of the mixture. All the results of the investigation are obtained by means of an explicity time-dependent finite-difference technique, using a high-speed digital computer.

  19. The development of a transparent cylinder engine for piston engine fluid mechanics research

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.M.; Reynolds, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a unique flow visualization engine is discussed. The new research engine, called the Flow Diagnostics Engine (FDE), is a singlecylinder engine with a transparent cylinder made from single-crystal sapphire. In contrast to previous efforts, the FDE has an internal geometry very similar to that of production engines. A computer-controlled valveactuation system is used on the FDE. The valve actuators are fast electro-hydraulic devices which, with a minicomputer, provide complete control over the valve motion. To visualize the flows in the engine cylinder, a special Schlieren system was developed and demonstrated. In the new visualization system, a holographic optical element is used to correct system abberations. To demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of the FDE system, flows in both conventional and swirl engine geometries were visualized and recorded with high-speed cinematography. The visualization provides qualitative information about the flow and allows observation of: the development and motions of large recirculation zones during the intake event; the appearance of small-scale turbulence and the changes in scale caused by compression and expansion; the expansion of ring crevice gases into the cylinder during the beginning of the event; and the large-scale motions associated with intake swirl. The FDE system is very versatile and can accommodate a wide variety of engine geometries, operating conditions, and optical diagnostics.

  20. Quantification of fluid shear stress in bone tissue engineering scaffolds with spherical and cubical pore architectures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feihu; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that mechanical stimulation, in the form of fluid perfusion and mechanical compression, can enhance osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and bone cells within tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro. The precise nature of mechanical stimulation within tissue engineering scaffolds is not only dictated by the exogenously applied loading regime, but also depends on the geometric features of the scaffold, in particular architecture, pore size and porosity. However, the precise contribution of each geometric feature towards the resulting mechanical stimulation within a scaffold is difficult to characterise due to the wide range of interacting parameters. In this study, we have applied a fluid-structure interaction model to investigate the role of scaffold geometry (architecture, pore size and porosity) on pore wall shear stress (WSS) under a range of different loading scenarios: fluid perfusion, mechanical compression and a combination of perfusion and compression. It is found that scaffold geometry (spherical and cubical pores), in particular the pore size, has a significant influence on the stimulation within scaffolds. Furthermore, we observed an amplified WSS within scaffolds under a combination of fluid perfusion and mechanical compression, which exceeded that caused by individual fluid perfusion or mechanical compression approximately threefold. By conducting this comprehensive parametric variation study, an expression was generated to allow the design and optimisation of 3D TE scaffolds and inform experimental loading regimes so that a desired level of mechanical stimulation, in terms of WSS is generated within the scaffold. PMID:26224148

  1. High-pressure rocket engine turnaround duct computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Current and projected high-pressure, staged-combustion rocket engine designs, such as the XLR129 and space shuttle main engine (SSME), introduced a type of turnaround duct flowpath wherein the turnaround is accompanied by an increase in mean radius and a decrease in fluid velocity through a subsequent diffuser. This turnaround duct flowpath is needed in the rocket engine to conduct high-pressure turbopump turbine discharge gases toward the main injector while maintaining a compact turbomachinery and powerhead flowpath. Current experience in the SSME shows that this type of turnaround duct can experience flow separation with an attendant increase in flow turbulence levels. Advances in computational fluid dynamics techniques over the last decade produced a number of codes which are applicable to the analysis and prediction of flow field behavior within such ducts. A version of the TEACH code developed at Pratt & Whitney Engineering Division was used to analyze three representative turnaround duct configurations. The study included the effects of fluid properties, inlet velocity flowfields, solution grid mesh size, and numerical solution algorithm upon calculated flow. Results include flow streamline comparisons, velocity profiles, and calculated total pressure losses. The results showed that turnaround ducts of the type studied can exhibit separation but that appropriately designed turnaround ducts can be made to function without suffering from internal flow separation.

  2. Controlling health risks from workplace exposure to metalworking fluids in the United Kingdom engineering industry.

    PubMed

    Stear, Martin A

    2003-11-01

    On October 15, 2002, the United Kingdom (UK) Health and Safety Executive (HSE) launched new guidance for the engineering industry, aimed at reducing health risks from metalworking fluids (MWFs). This guidance was the culmination of many years of work on this subject. In the early 1990s, the UK occupational exposure standards (OES) for oil mist were 5 mg/m(-3) 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA), and 10 mg/m(-3) short-term exposure limit (STEL). This was only applicable to highly refined mineral oil mists and there was no exposure limit for water-mix MWFs (emulsions, semi-synthetics, and synthetics). HSE therefore undertook to review the existing exposure limit for neat mineral oil mists (neat oils are fluids that contain highly refined mineral oils and additives, and are used neat without mixing with water) and consider developing one for water-mix MWFs. This led to the development of new air-sampling methods, a comprehensive survey, and the development of new good practice guidance in the place of statutory exposure limits. This new good practice guidance has been endorsed and launched with the help of relevant industry supplier, employer, and employee associations. The guidance builds on the philosophy of tackling health risks as a holistic approach; for example, not just tackling mist control through the use of ventilation, but also fluid selection, fluid delivery, and fluid management (fluid management means to effectively manage all aspects of the fluid, from storage and stock preparation to sump cleaning and fluid disposal, etc.). Tools, such as laminated task sheets, are provided to make it user friendly. It also demonstrates the business benefits from this approach, that managing your MWFs effectively can reduce the incidence of ill health, reduce fluid and disposal costs, increase tool life, and improve machining performance. PMID:14555440

  3. Gas residues of engine starting fluid in postmortem sample from an arsonist.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, J

    1997-01-01

    Diethyl ether was found in samples of the blood, urine, and lung from a fire victim. Because the lung also carried a number of low-boiling paraffins, it was inferred that the detected compounds came from engine starting fluid, which the victim apparently had been exposed to while be intentionally used it as an accelerant to start the fire. The reported death illustrates the value of searching post mortem samples for highly volatile residues of possible arson accelerants. PMID:8988590

  4. Optimization of new magnetorheological fluid mount for vibration control of start/stop engine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jye Ung; Phu, Do Xuan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    The technologies related to saving energy/or green vehicles are actively researched. In this tendency, the problem for reducing exhausted gas is in development with various ways. Those efforts are directly related to the operation of engine which emits exhausted gas. The auto start/stop of vehicle engine when a vehicle stop at road is currently as a main stream of vehicle industry resulting in reducing exhausted gas. However, this technology automatically turns on and off engine frequently. This motion induces vehicle engine to transmit vibration of engine which has large displacement, and torsional impact to chassis. These vibrations causing uncomfortable feeling to passengers are transmitted through the steering wheel and the gear knob. In this work, in order to resolve this vibration issue, a new proposed magnetorheological (MR) fluid based engine mount (MR mount in short) is presented. The proposed MR mount is designed to satisfy large damping force in various frequency ranges. It is shown that the proposed mount can have large damping force and large force ratio which is enough to control unwanted vibrations of engine start/stop mode.

  5. Thermal/Fluid Analysis of a Composite Heat Exchanger for Use on the RLV Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dalton; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of efforts to design a regeneratively cooled composite nozzle ramp for use on the reusable vehicle (RLV) rocket engine, a C-SiC composite heat exchanger concept was proposed for thermal performance evaluation. To test the feasibility of the concept, sample heat exchanger panels were made to fit the Glenn Research Center's cell 22 for testing. Operation of the heat exchanger was demonstrated in a combustion environment with high heat fluxes similar to the RLV Aerospike Ramp. Test measurements were reviewed and found to be valuable for the on-going fluid and thermal analysis of the actual RLV composite ramp. Since the cooling fluid for the heat exchanger is water while the RLV Ramp cooling fluid is LH2, fluid and therma models were constructed to correlate to the specific test set-up. The knowledge gained from this work will be helpful for analyzing the thermal response of the actual RLV Composite Ramp. The coolant thermal properties for the models are taken from test data. The heat exchanger's cooling performance was analyzed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). Temperatures of the heat exchanger's structure were predicted in finite element models using Patran and Sinda. Results from the analytical models and the tests show that RSC's heat exchanger satisfied the combustion environments in a series of 16 tests.

  6. Thermal/Fluid Analysis of a Composite Heat Exchanger for Use on the RLV Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dalton

    2002-01-01

    As part of efforts to design a regeneratively cooled composite nozzle ramp for use on the reusable vehicle (RLV) rocket engine, an C-SiC composites heat exchanger concept was proposed for thermal performance evaluation. To test the feasibility of the concept, sample heat exchanger panels were made to fit the Glenn Research Center's cell 22 for testing. Operation of the heat exchanger was demonstrated in a combustion environment with high heat fluxes similar to the RLV Aerospike Ramp. Test measurements were reviewed and found to be valuable for the on going fluid and thermal analysis of the actual RLV composite ramp. Since the cooling fluid for the heat exchanger is water while the RLV Ramp cooling fluid is LH2, fluid and thermal models were constructed to correlate to the specific test set-up. The knowledge gained from this work will be helpful for analyzing the thermal response of the actual RLV Composite Ramp. The coolant thermal properties for the models are taken from test data. The heat exchanger's cooling performance was analyzed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). Temperatures of the heat exchanger's structure were predicted in finite element models using Patran and Sinda. Results from the analytical models and the tests show that RSC's heat exchanger satisfied the combustion environments in a series of 16 tests.

  7. Power enhancement of heat engines via correlated thermalization in a three-level "working fluid".

    PubMed

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Brumer, Paul; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    We explore means of maximizing the power output of a heat engine based on a periodically-driven quantum system that is constantly coupled to hot and cold baths. It is shown that the maximal power output of such a heat engine whose "working fluid" is a degenerate V-type three-level system is that generated by two independent two-level systems. Hence, level degeneracy is a thermodynamic resource that may effectively double the power output. The efficiency, however, is not affected. We find that coherence is not an essential asset in such multilevel-based heat engines. The existence of two thermalization pathways sharing a common ground state suffices for power enhancement. PMID:26394838

  8. Power enhancement of heat engines via correlated thermalization in a three-level working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Brumer, Paul; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-09-01

    We explore means of maximizing the power output of a heat engine based on a periodically-driven quantum system that is constantly coupled to hot and cold baths. It is shown that the maximal power output of such a heat engine whose working fluid is a degenerate V-type three-level system is that generated by two independent two-level systems. Hence, level degeneracy is a thermodynamic resource that may effectively double the power output. The efficiency, however, is not affected. We find that coherence is not an essential asset in such multilevel-based heat engines. The existence of two thermalization pathways sharing a common ground state suffices for power enhancement.

  9. Method for starting and operating an advanced regenerative parallel compound dual fluid heat engine-advanced Cheng cycle(ACC)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, D.Y.

    1993-08-10

    In a Cheng cycle, dual fluid heat engine of the type is described having: (i) a gas turbine engine including a compressor for compressing a first working fluid, having a compressor outlet, a combustion chamber in fluid communication with the compressor outlet, a turbine unit having an inlet in fluid communication with the combustion chamber for performing work by expansion of working fluid, and a turbine exhaust; (ii) a heat recovery steam generator coupled to the turbine exhaust for heating a second working fluid having a superheater with an outlet and an inlet, an evaporator having an outlet coupled to the superheater inlet and an evaporator inlet, a heat recovery boiler between the evaporator inlet and outlet having a drum; (iii) an injector for introducing heated second working fluid from the heat recovery steam generator into the gas turbine; (iv) a coolant inlet port for introducing coolant to at least one of turbine nozzles and blades in the gas turbine; and (v) control valve means for selectively throttling flow rate of second working fluid into the gas turbine connected upstream of the injector; (vi) a compressed gas source and pressure regulator selectively in communication with the drum; (vii) a sensor system coupled to gas turbine engine and the heat recovery steam generator for temperature and pressure detection; and (viii) a control system for operating fuel flow to the gas turbine; a method of operation of the heat engine comprising: (a) initializing start conditions in the gas turbine engine and the heat recovery steam generator with the control system; (b) setting the control valve means for idle flow condition of the heat engine; (c) pressurizing the drum with the compressed gas source, (d) starting the gas turbine engine from idle to full load; (e) throttling second working fluid flow rate with the control valve means and shutting off the compressed gas source.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME/EPA (AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS/ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION CONFERENCE HELD AT WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA ON MAY 27-29, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a proceedings of a 3-day conference among industry, government, professional engineers and scientists, and the general public concerning hazardous waste incineration which came at a time when EPA interim final rule incineration regulations had just been made public...

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Method Developed for Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Renewed interest in hypersonic propulsion systems has led to research programs investigating combined cycle engines that are designed to operate efficiently across the flight regime. The Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine is a propulsion system under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This engine integrates a high specific impulse, low thrust-to-weight, airbreathing engine with a low-impulse, high thrust-to-weight rocket. From takeoff to Mach 2.5, the engine operates as an air-augmented rocket. At Mach 2.5, the engine becomes a dual-mode ramjet; and beyond Mach 8, the rocket is turned back on. One Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine variation known as the "Strut-Jet" concept is being investigated jointly by NASA Lewis, the U.S. Air Force, Gencorp Aerojet, General Applied Science Labs (GASL), and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Work thus far has included wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations with the NPARC code. The CFD method was initiated by modeling the geometry of the Strut-Jet with the GRIDGEN structured grid generator. Grids representing a subscale inlet model and the full-scale demonstrator geometry were constructed. These grids modeled one-half of the symmetric inlet flow path, including the precompression plate, diverter, center duct, side duct, and combustor. After the grid generation, full Navier-Stokes flow simulations were conducted with the NPARC Navier-Stokes code. The Chien low-Reynolds-number k-e turbulence model was employed to simulate the high-speed turbulent flow. Finally, the CFD solutions were postprocessed with a Fortran code. This code provided wall static pressure distributions, pitot pressure distributions, mass flow rates, and internal drag. These results were compared with experimental data from a subscale inlet test for code validation; then they were used to help evaluate the demonstrator engine net thrust.

  12. Neutron imaging of hydrogen-rich fluids in geomaterials and engineered porous media: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Cheng, C.-L.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lamanna, J. M.; Gragg, M. J.; Wright, D. M.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in visualization technologies are providing new discoveries as well as answering old questions with respect to the phase structure and flow of hydrogen-rich fluids, such as water and oil, within porous media. Magnetic resonance and x-ray imaging are sometimes employed in this context, but are subject to significant limitations. In contrast, neutrons are ideally suited for imaging hydrogen-rich fluids in abiotic non-hydrogenous porous media because they are strongly attenuated by hydrogen and can "see" through the solid matrix in a non-destructive fashion. This review paper provides an overview of the general principles behind the use of neutrons to image hydrogen-rich fluids in both 2-dimensions (radiography) and 3-dimensions (tomography). Engineering standards for the neutron imaging method are examined. The main body of the paper consists of a comprehensive review of the diverse scientific literature on neutron imaging of static and dynamic experiments involving variably-saturated geomaterials (rocks and soils) and engineered porous media (bricks and ceramics, concrete, fuel cells, heat pipes, and porous glass). Finally some emerging areas that offer promising opportunities for future research are discussed.

  13. A method for certification of FRP piping fabricators for ASME B31.3 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, K.D.

    1996-07-01

    Cost-effective FRP piping is often the material of choice for transport of corrosive chemicals. Plant Managers and Engineers have great concern about the integrity of FRP piping joints and the safety of these systems. A specification requirement, in the bid documents, that all fabricators be Certified by the FRP piping manufacturer is a method to promote successful fabrication. A method is proposed, which is in accordance with ASME B31.3 Piping Code, to train and certify fabricators.

  14. Toward improved durability in advanced aircraft engine hot sections; Proceedings of the Thirty-third ASME International Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Congress and Exposition, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 5-9, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on durability improvement methods for advanced aircraft gas turbine hot-section components discusses NASA's 'HOST' project, advanced high-temperature instrumentation for hot-section research, the development and application of combustor aerothermal models, and the evaluation of a data base and numerical model for turbine heat transfer. Also discussed are structural analysis methods for gas turbine hot section components, fatigue life-prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials, and the service life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines.

  15. Movement of geothermal fluid in the Cerro Prieto field as determined from well log and reservoir engineering data

    SciTech Connect

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrogeologic model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in its undisturbed state, developed on the basis of well log and reservoir engineering data, is discussed. According to this model, geothermal fluid enters the field from the east through a deep (>10,000 ft) sandstone aquifer which is overlain by a thick shale unit which locally prevents the upward migration of the fluid. As it flows westward, the fluid gradually rises through faults and sandy gaps in the shale unit. Eventually, some of the fluid leaks to the surface in the western part of the field, while the rest mixes with surrounding colder waters.

  16. Design of a new engine mount for vertical and horizontal vibration control using magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phu, D. X.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new design of a magnetorheological fluid (MR) mount for vibration control considering both vertical forces and horizontal moments such as are met in various engine systems, including a medium high-speed engine of ship. The newly designed mount, called a MR brake mount, offers several salient benefits such as small size and relatively high load capacity compared with a conventional MR engine mount that can control vertical vibration only. The principal design parameters of the proposed mount are optimally determined to achieve maximum torque with geometric and spatial constraints. Subsequently, the proposed MR mount is designed and manufactured based on the optimized design parameters. It is shown from experimental testing that the proposed mount, which combines MR mount with MR brake, can produce the desired force and torque to reduce unwanted vibration of a medium high-speed engine system of ship subjected to both vertical and horizontal exciting motions. In addition, it is verified that there is no large difference between experiment results and simulation results that are obtained from an analytical model derived in this work.

  17. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in this part. The... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the...

  18. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in this part. The... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the...

  19. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in this part. The... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the...

  20. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in this part. The... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure...) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the...

  1. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  2. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  3. Atomization and dense-fluid breakup regimes in liquid rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-04-20

    Until recently, modern theory has lacked a fundamentally based model to predict the operating pressures where classical sprays transition to dense-fluid mixing with diminished surface tension. In this paper, such a model is presented to quantify this transition for liquid-oxygenhydrogen and n-decanegaseous-oxygen injection processes. The analysis reveals that respective molecular interfaces break down not necessarily because of vanishing surface tension forces but instead because of the combination of broadened interfaces and a reduction in mean free molecular path. When this occurs, the interfacial structure itself enters the continuum regime, where transport processes rather than intermolecular forces dominate. Using this model, regime diagrams for the respective systems are constructed that show the range of operating pressures and temperatures where this transition occurs. The analysis also reveals the conditions where classical spray dynamics persists even at high supercritical pressures. As a result, it demonstrates that, depending on the composition and temperature of the injected fluids, the injection process can exhibit either classical spray atomization, dense-fluid diffusion-dominated mixing, or supercritical mixing phenomena at chamber pressures encountered in state-of-the-art liquid rocket engines.

  4. Atomization and dense-fluid breakup regimes in liquid rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-04-20

    Until recently, modern theory has lacked a fundamentally based model to predict the operating pressures where classical sprays transition to dense-fluid mixing with diminished surface tension. In this paper, such a model is presented to quantify this transition for liquid-oxygen–hydrogen and n-decane–gaseous-oxygen injection processes. The analysis reveals that respective molecular interfaces break down not necessarily because of vanishing surface tension forces but instead because of the combination of broadened interfaces and a reduction in mean free molecular path. When this occurs, the interfacial structure itself enters the continuum regime, where transport processes rather than intermolecular forces dominate. Using this model, regime diagrams for the respective systems are constructed that show the range of operating pressures and temperatures where this transition occurs. The analysis also reveals the conditions where classical spray dynamics persists even at high supercritical pressures. As a result, it demonstrates that, depending on the composition and temperature of the injected fluids, the injection process can exhibit either classical spray atomization, dense-fluid diffusion-dominated mixing, or supercritical mixing phenomena at chamber pressures encountered in state-of-the-art liquid rocket engines.

  5. Atomization and dense-fluid breakup regimes in liquid rocket engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oefelein, Joseph; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-04-20

    Until recently, modern theory has lacked a fundamentally based model to predict the operating pressures where classical sprays transition to dense-fluid mixing with diminished surface tension. In this paper, such a model is presented to quantify this transition for liquid-oxygen–hydrogen and n-decane–gaseous-oxygen injection processes. The analysis reveals that respective molecular interfaces break down not necessarily because of vanishing surface tension forces but instead because of the combination of broadened interfaces and a reduction in mean free molecular path. When this occurs, the interfacial structure itself enters the continuum regime, where transport processes rather than intermolecular forces dominate. Using this model,more » regime diagrams for the respective systems are constructed that show the range of operating pressures and temperatures where this transition occurs. The analysis also reveals the conditions where classical spray dynamics persists even at high supercritical pressures. As a result, it demonstrates that, depending on the composition and temperature of the injected fluids, the injection process can exhibit either classical spray atomization, dense-fluid diffusion-dominated mixing, or supercritical mixing phenomena at chamber pressures encountered in state-of-the-art liquid rocket engines.« less

  6. New Developments of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Their Applications to Practical Engineering Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hudong

    2001-06-01

    There have been considerable advances in Lattice Boltzmann (LB) based methods in the last decade. By now, the fundamental concept of using the approach as an alternative tool for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been substantially appreciated and validated in mainstream scientific research and in industrial engineering communities. Lattice Boltzmann based methods possess several major advantages: a) less numerical dissipation due to the linear Lagrange type advection operator in the Boltzmann equation; b) local dynamic interactions suitable for highly parallel processing; c) physical handling of boundary conditions for complicated geometries and accurate control of fluxes; d) microscopically consistent modeling of thermodynamics and of interface properties in complex multiphase flows. It provides a great opportunity to apply the method to practical engineering problems encountered in a wide range of industries from automotive, aerospace to chemical, biomedical, petroleum, nuclear, and others. One of the key challenges is to extend the applicability of this alternative approach to regimes of highly turbulent flows commonly encountered in practical engineering situations involving high Reynolds numbers. Over the past ten years, significant efforts have been made on this front at Exa Corporation in developing a lattice Boltzmann based commercial CFD software, PowerFLOW. It has become a useful computational tool for the simulation of turbulent aerodynamics in practical engineering problems involving extremely complex geometries and flow situations, such as in new automotive vehicle designs world wide. In this talk, we present an overall LB based algorithm concept along with certain key extensions in order to accurately handle turbulent flows involving extremely complex geometries. To demonstrate the accuracy of turbulent flow simulations, we provide a set of validation results for some well known academic benchmarks. These include straight channels, backward-facing steps, flows over a curved hill and typical NACA airfoils at various angles of attack including prediction of stall angle. We further provide numerous engineering cases, ranging from external aerodynamics around various car bodies to internal flows involved in various industrial devices. We conclude with a discussion of certain future extensions for complex fluids.

  7. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  8. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  9. The First ASME Code Stamped Cryomodule at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M P; Crofford, M T; Douglas, D L; Kim, S -H; Steward, S T; Strong, W H; Afanador, R; Hannah, B S; Saunders, J

    2012-07-01

    The first spare cryomodule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been designed, fabricated, and tested by SNS personnel. The approach to design for this cryomodule was to hold critical design features identical to the original design such as bayonet positions, coupler positions, cold mass assembly, and overall footprint. However, this is the first SNS cryomodule that meets the pressure requirements put forth in the 10 CFR 851: Worker Safety and Health Program. The most significant difference is that Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code was applied to the vacuum vessel of this cryomodule. Applying the pressure code to the helium vessels within the cryomodule was considered. However, it was determined to be schedule prohibitive because it required a code case for materials that are not currently covered by the code. Good engineering practice was applied to the internal components to verify the quality and integrity of the entire cryomodule. The design of the cryomodule, fabrication effort, and cryogenic test results will be reported in this paper.

  10. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional fluid flow in rotating bioreactors for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Botchwey, Edward A; Pollack, Solomon R; Levine, Elliot M; Johnston, Eric D; Laurencin, Cato T

    2004-05-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a viable alternative to the problem of organ and tissue shortage. Our laboratory has developed matrices for bone tissue engineering based on sintered spherical particles and, using bioreactor technology, has demonstrated the ability to produce highly mineralized matrices in vitro. In this study, porous microcapsule scaffolds were developed for bone tissue engineering in the high aspect ratio vessel rotating bioreactor. The motion of individual microcapsules as well as scaffolds in the bioreactor were studied by numerical simulation and in situ imaging analysis. Results show that spherical microcapsules with density less than the surrounding fluid exhibited two motions: (1) a periodic circular orbit with tangential speed equal to the free fall speed of the particle, and (2) an inward radial migration of the circular orbit toward the center of the bioreactor vessel. Lighter-than-water scaffolds were fabricated by sintering poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) hollow microcarriers with diameter from 500 to 860 microm into a fixed three-dimensional geometry with approximately 30% pore volume and 180 to 190 microm median pore size. Scaffolds were fabricated with aggregate densities ranging from 0.65 g/mL and 0.99 g/mL by appropriate combinations of hollow and solid microcarriers within the scaffold. Scaffold velocity in the bioreactor for the above range of densities was accurately predicted by numerical simulation and ranged from 100 mm/s to 3 mm/s. Maximum shear stress estimation due to media flow over the exterior of the scaffold ranged from 0.3 N/m(2) to 0.006 N/m(2). Internal perfusion velocity through scaffolds also was calculated and ranged from 13 mm/s to 0.2 mm/s. Estimates of maximum interior shear stress ranged from 0.03 to 0.0007 N/m(2). These analytical methods provide an excellent vehicle for the study of bone tissue synthesis in three-dimensional culture with fluid flow. PMID:15057993

  11. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  13. ASME code considerations for the compact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nestell, James; Sham, Sam

    2015-08-31

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy is to advance nuclear power in order to meet the nation's energy, environmental, and energy security needs. Advanced high temperature reactor systems such as sodium fast reactors and high and very high temperature gas-cooled reactors are being considered for the next generation of nuclear reactor plant designs. The coolants for these high temperature reactor systems include liquid sodium and helium gas. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO₂), a fluid at a temperature and pressure above the supercritical point of CO₂, is currently being investigated by DOE as a working fluid for a nuclear or fossil-heated recompression closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system that operates at 550°C (1022°F) at 200 bar (2900 psi). Higher operating temperatures are envisioned in future developments. All of these design concepts require a highly effective heat exchanger that transfers heat from the nuclear or chemical reactor to the chemical process fluid or the to the power cycle. In the nuclear designs described above, heat is transferred from the primary to the secondary loop via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and then from the intermediate loop to either a working process or a power cycle via a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). The IHX is a component in the primary coolant loop which will be classified as "safety related." The intermediate loop will likely be classified as "not safety related but important to safety." These safety classifications have a direct bearing on heat exchanger design approaches for the IHX and SHX. The very high temperatures being considered for the VHTR will require the use of very high temperature alloys for the IHX and SHX. Material cost considerations alone will dictate that the IHX and SHX be highly effective; that is, provide high heat transfer area in a small volume. This feature must be accompanied by low pressure drop and mechanical reliability and robustness. Classic shell and tube designs will be large and costly, and may only be appropriate in steam generator service in the SHX where boiling inside the tubes occurs. For other energy conversion systems, all of these features can be met in a compact heat exchanger design. This report will examine some of the ASME Code issues that will need to be addressed to allow use of a Code-qualified compact heat exchanger in IHX or SHX nuclear service. Most effort will focus on the IHX, since the safety-related (Class A) design rules are more extensive than those for important-to-safety (Class B) or commercial rules that are relevant to the SHX.

  14. Reviews of ASME Section 11 pump and valve relief requests: Post Generic Letter 89-04

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiasio, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of ASME Section 11 Pump and Valve Inservice Testing relief request reviews by the NRC and their contractors. Topics that will be discussed include the scope of USNRC reviews in Technical Evaluation Reports (TERs) (and Safety Evaluation, SEs); including the basis for granting relief requests, the status of relief requests in IST Program updates, and the Generic Letter 89-04 approval process; and the level of technical detail required in submitted programs. This presentation is based on the experiences of Brookhaven National Laboratory in reviewing IST Programs for the Mechanical Engineering Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  15. Reviews of ASME Section 11 pump and valve relief requests: Post Generic Letter 89-04

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiasio, A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents a discussion of ASME Section 11 Pump and Valve Inservice Testing relief request reviews by the NRC and their contractors. Topics that will be discussed include the scope of USNRC reviews in Technical Evaluation Reports (TERs) (and Safety Evaluation, SEs); including the basis for granting relief requests, the status of relief requests in IST Program updates, and the Generic Letter 89-04 approval process; and the level of technical detail required in submitted programs. This presentation is based on the experiences of Brookhaven National Laboratory in reviewing IST Programs for the Mechanical Engineering Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  16. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mings, W.J.; Koploy, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  17. Application of the ASME code in the design of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mings, W.J. ); Koploy, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing two spent fuel shipping casks for transport by legal weight truck (LWT). The casks are designed to the loading, environmental conditions and safety requirements defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71). To ensure that all components of the cask meet the 10CFR71 rules, GA established structural design criteria for each component based on NRC Regulatory Guides and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code). This paper discusses the criteria used for different cask components, how they were applied and the conservatism and safety margins built into the criteria and assumption.

  18. Thermomechanical analysis of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions in engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bumsoo; Teo, Ka Yaw; Ghosh, Soham; Dutton, J. Craig; Grinnell, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of functional engineered tissues (ETs) is significant to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but it is extremely challenging to develop a successful protocol because the effects of cryopreservation parameters on the post-thaw functionality of ETs are not well understood. Particularly, the effects on the microstructure of their extracellular matrix (ECM) have not been well studied, which determines many functional properties of the ETs. In this study, we investigated the effects of two key cryopreservation parameters – i) freezing temperature and corresponding cooling rate; and ii) the concentration of cryoprotective agent (CPA) on the ECM microstructure as well as the cellular viability. Using dermal equivalent as a model ET and DMSO as a model CPA, freezing-induced spatiotemporal deformation and post-thaw ECM microstructure of ETs was characterized while varying the freezing temperature and DMSO concentrations. The spatial distribution of cellular viability and the cellular actin cytoskeleton was also examined. The results showed that the tissue dilatation increased significantly with reduced freezing temperature (i.e., rapid freezing). A maximum limit of tissue deformation was observed for preservation of ECM microstructure, cell viability and cell-matrix adhesion. The dilatation decreased with the use of DMSO, and a freezing temperature dependent threshold concentration of DMSO was observed. The threshold DMSO concentration increased with lowering freezing temperature. In addition, an analysis was performed to delineate thermodynamic and mechanical components of freezing-induced tissue deformation. The results are discussed to establish a mechanistic understanding of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction and phase change behavior within ETs in order to improve cryopreservation of ETs. PMID:23246556

  19. Fluid mechanics of combustion systems; Proceedings of the Fluids Engineering Conference, Boulder, CO, June 22, 23, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Lohmann, R. P.; Rackley, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The work examines such topics as the parametric variations of a heat balanced engine, the calculation of pulverized coal combustion in an axisymmetrical furnace, optical tomography for diagnostics in combusting flows, the numerical simulation of swirling flow in a cyclone chamber, and the flow aerodynamics modeling of an MHD swirl combustor. Consideration is also given to the interaction between strain fields and flames in spark ignition engines, the flow and combustion characteristics of turbulent reacting flames, the application of numerical modeling to gas turbine combustor development problems, and the prediction of swirling flow fields in axisymmetric combustor geometries.

  20. Evaluation of space shuttle main engine fluid dynamic frequency response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine the POGO stability characteristics of the space shuttle main engine liquid oxygen (LOX) system, the fluid dynamic frequency response functions between elements in the SSME LOX system was evaluated, both analytically and experimentally. For the experimental data evaluation, a software package was written for the Hewlett-Packard 5451C Fourier analyzer. The POGO analysis software is documented and consists of five separate segments. Each segment is stored on the 5451C disc as an individual program and performs its own unique function. Two separate data reduction methods, a signal calibration, coherence or pulser signal based frequency response function blanking, and automatic plotting features are included in the program. The 5451C allows variable parameter transfer from program to program. This feature is used to advantage and requires only minimal user interface during the data reduction process. Experimental results are included and compared with the analytical predictions in order to adjust the general model and arrive at a realistic simulation of the POGO characteristics.

  1. Engineered diamond nanopillars as mobile probes for high sensitivity metrology in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrich, P.; de Las Casas, C. F.; Heremans, F. J.; Awschalom, D. D.; Aleman, B. J.; Ohno, K.; Lee, J. C.; Hu, E. L.

    2015-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center`s optical addressability and exceptional spin coherence properties at room temperature, along with diamond`s biocompatibility, has put this defect at the frontier of metrology applications in biological environments. To push the spatial resolution to the nanoscale, extensive research efforts focus on using NV centers embedded in nanodiamonds (NDs). However, this approach has been hindered by degraded spin coherence properties in NDs and the lack of a platform for spatial control of the nanoparticles in fluid. In this work, we combine the use of high quality diamond membranes with a top-down patterning technique to fabricate diamond nanoparticles with engineered and highly reproducible shape, size, and NV center density. We obtain NDs, easily releasable from the substrate into a water suspension, which contain single NV centers exhibiting consistently long spin coherence times (up to 700 μs). Additionally, we demonstrate highly stable, three-dimensional optical trapping of the nanoparticles within a microfluidic circuit. This level of control enables a bulk-like DC magnetic sensitivity and gives access to dynamical decoupling techniques on contactless, miniaturized diamond probes. This work was supported by DARPA, AFOSR, and the DIAMANT program.

  2. Comparison between ASME and ISO standards on surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kai; Jiang, Xiangqian; Liu, Xiaojun; Xu, Zhengao

    2006-11-01

    Surface texture is generally a significant technique requirement of high-tech products. Surface quality information can usually play an increasing role in achieving interoperability among existing products, create order in markets, simplify production and ensure safety. As the most authoritative standard organizations, ASME and ISO services are used throughout the world, their codes and standards influence global manufacturers and consumers. ASME B46.1 is one of many vital tools to promote surface measurement techniques, while ISO has a set standard system for surface measurement, analysis and evaluation. This paper compares the ASME B46.1 (2002) standard (Surface texture: surface roughness, waviness, and lay) with ISO 3274 (1997) standard on methods of surface profiles filtering. It preformed the present research in order to show the latest developments of the ASME B46.1 (2002) in the regime of contact profiling techniques where the degree of measurement control is highly advanced, and a large range of other techniques that present valid and useful descriptions of surface texture. Also, this paper shows the differences of terms, definitions and surface texture parameters between ASME B46.1 (2002) and ISO 4287 (1998). The different evaluation results have been calculated based on above two standards for the same surface data. Obviously, it is necessary to consider the divergence above to develop China's standards (GB) on surface texture.

  3. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Keyster, Eric S.; Merchant, Jack A.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  4. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in stirling engine modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  5. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in Stirling engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  6. System and method for improving performance of a fluid sensor for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Kubinski, David; Zawacki, Garry

    2009-03-03

    A system and method for improving sensor performance of an on-board vehicle sensor, such as an exhaust gas sensor, while sensing a predetermined substance in a fluid flowing through a pipe include a structure for extending into the pipe and having at least one inlet for receiving fluid flowing through the pipe and at least one outlet generally opposite the at least one inlet, wherein the structure redirects substantially all fluid flowing from the at least one inlet to the sensor to provide a representative sample of the fluid to the sensor before returning the fluid through the at least one outlet.

  7. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this can ensure its low cost and high quality for development.

  8. First Microbial Community Assessment of Borehole Fluids from the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, D. P.; Anderson, C.; Bang, S.; Jones, T. L.; Boutt, D.; Kieft, T.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Murdoch, L. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Bruckner, J.; Fisher, J. C.; Newburn, J.; Wheatley, A.; Onstott, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid and gas samples were collected from two flowing boreholes at the 4100 (1,250 m) and 4850 ft (1478 m) levels of the former Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, South Dakota. Service- and flood water samples were also collected as comparative benchmarks. With a maximum depth of 8,000 ft, (2,438 m), this mine currently hosts the Sanford Laboratory and is the proposed location for the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The uncased 4100L hole is a legacy of mining; whereas, the cased 4850 hole was drilled in 2009 in support of large cavity construction. Both were packered or valved to exclude mine air and sampled anaerobically using aseptic technique. Physical measurements, aquatic and dissolved gas chemistry, cell counts, and microbial community assessments (SSU rRNA libraries) were performed on all samples. This study represents the first at Sanford Lab/DUSEL specifically focused on the deep biosphere rather than mine microbiology. Fluids from the two holes differed markedly, with that from 4100L being characterized by NaHCO3 and 4850 by Na2SO4. pH values of 8.2 vs. 7.5, conductivities (μS) of 1790 vs. 7667 and alkalinities (mg/L) of 767 vs. 187 were obtained from 4100L and 4850, respectively. As expected, the deeper 4850L hole had the higher temperature (38 vs. 30 oC). Neither had measureable nitrate, but both had similar dissolved organic C (DOC) concentrations (0.8 vs. 0.9 mg/L). Sulfate was present at 337 vs. 4,470 mg/L in 4100L and 4850L. Major dissolved gases were N2 (91 and 81 vol%), O2 (12 and 16 vol%) and CH4 (0.07 and 3.35 vol%) in 4100L and 4850L. The δ13C of CH4 was -51 and -56.7 permil in 4100L and 4850, respectively. The uncorrected 14C age of DIC was calculated at 25,310 (+/- 220) and 47,700 (+/-3,100) years for the two fluids. Cell counts were 5.9e3 and 2.01e5 in 4100L and 4850. Microbial community structure was diverse in both holes and distinct from that of service water. A large proportion of rRNA library clones were Proteobacteria and closely related to known or expected aerobes including: Thiobacillus, Siderooxidans, Leptothrix, Hydrogenophaga, Pseaudomonas, Methylomonas and Thiothrix, consistent with possible mine water or air contamination. Conversely, Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicute clones, often very closely related to others detected from deep mine or sediment habitats, suggests a deep subsurface component as well. Archaeal clones from 4100L were dominated by a deeply-branching clade with no cultivated representatives; whereas, those from 4850 were mostly related to known methanogens (e.g. Methanolobus). Collectively, this dataset suggests mixed end-member or deeply-sourced water partially overprinted by mine-related artifacts. However, until more is known concerning the deep hydrogeology of this system, it will be difficult to ascertain indigenous from impacted microbial communities in DUSEL.

  9. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  10. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  11. Mechanics of granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids in civil and mining engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alehossein, H.; Qin, Z.

    2013-10-01

    The shear stress generated in mine backfill slurries and fresh concrete contains both velocity gradient dependent and frictional terms, categorised as frictional viscous plastic fluids. This paper discusses application of the developed analytical solution for flow rate as a function of pressure and pressure gradient in discs, pipes and cones for such frictional Bingham-Herschel-Bulkley fluids. This paper discusses application of this continuum fluid model to industrial materials like mine and mineral slurries, backfills and fresh concrete tests.

  12. ASME B31.3: Recent changes and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Koves, W.J.; Frikken, D.

    1996-12-01

    ASME B31.3 has undergone significant changes in recent years to better serve the industries that it supports. The Code has changed in response to changing technology, inquiries to the committee, technical needs, clarification of requirements and editorial considerations. This paper discusses those significant changes and planned future developments.

  13. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Amy L.; Pribbenow, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation) Biology Scholars Program (BSP) to promote undergraduate education reform by 1) supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2) engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists’ leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3) participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to more than 270 participants (“scholars”) from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER). To identify the BSP’s long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program’s 2010–2014 scholars (n = 127) and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life sciences and helps catalyze biology education reform efforts. PMID:27158300

  14. Adoption of ASME Code Section XI for ISI to Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfik, Y.E.; El-sesy, I.A.; Shaban, H.I.; Ibrahim, M.M

    2002-07-01

    ETRR-2 (Second Egyptian thermal research reactor) is a multi-purpose, pool- type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. The core power is 22 MWth, cooled and moderated by light water and with beryllium reflectors. It contains plate- type fuel elements (MTR type, 19.7% enriched uranium) with aluminum clad. The ETRR-2 reactor consist of 57 systems and around 200 subsystems. These systems contain many mechanical components such as tanks, pipes, valves, pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, air compressors, and supports. In this present work, a trial was made to adopt the general requirements of ASME code, section XI to ETRR-2 research reactor. ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) boiler and pressure vessel Code, section XI, provides requirements for in-service inspection (ISI) and in-service testing (IST) of components and systems, and repair/replacement activities in a nuclear power plant. Also, IAEA (International Atomic Energy Authority) has published some recommendations for ISI for research reactors similar to that rules and requirements specified in ASME. The complete ISI program requires several steps that have to be performed in sequence. These steps are described in many logic flow charts (LFC's). These logic flow charts include; the general LFC's for all steps required to complete ISI program, the LFC's for examination requirements, the LFC's for flaw evaluation modules, and the LFC's for acceptability of welds for class 1 components. This program includes, also, the inspection program for welded parts of the reactor components during its lifetime. This inspection program is applied for each system and subsystem of ETRR-2 reactor. It includes the examination area type, the component type, the part to be examined, the weld type, the examination method, the inspection program schedule, and the detailed figures of the welded components. (authors)

  15. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Amy L; Pribbenow, Christine M

    2016-05-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation) Biology Scholars Program (BSP) to promote undergraduate education reform by 1) supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2) engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists' leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3) participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to more than 270 participants ("scholars") from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER). To identify the BSP's long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program's 2010-2014 scholars (n = 127) and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life sciences and helps catalyze biology education reform efforts. PMID:27158300

  16. The new ASME consensus on operating practices for the control of feedwater and boilerwater chemistry in modern industrial boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Tvedt, T.J. Jr.; Holloway, R.T.

    1997-09-01

    In 1979 the American Society of Mechanical Engineers first published Consensus on Operating Practices for the Control of Feedwater and Boiler Water Quality in Modern Industrial boilers. This document quickly became accepted throughout the world. However, as time went on, it became apparent that the document needed to be revised and expanded. For example, the use of equipment not addressed in the original document (such as waste heat recovery boilers and electrode boilers) became much more common. Furthermore, the original document never addressed issues such as steam purity. In 1994 the ASME Committee on Water and Steam in Thermal Power Systems reissued the Consensus document which included guidance on these and many other important feedwater and boiler water parameters. This paper will briefly contrast the new document with the original one, then discuss the content of the present document. Numerous examples will be used to illustrate the practices recommended by the ASME committee.

  17. Radiation-induced temperature shift of thhe ASME K/sub Ic/ curve

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the temperature shift and shape of the K/sub Ic/ curve described in Sect. XI of the ASME Boiler and pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plate. Charpy impact, tensile, dropweight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick were fabricated and tested to provide a large data for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 101.6 mm thick, irradiated at about 288/degree/C to a mean fluence of about 1.6 /times/ 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, were tested to provide a similarly large data base with which to evaluate the temperature shift and shape of the ASME K/sub Ic/ curves. Testing was performed by both Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Materials Engineering Associates. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze test results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Overview of the lattice Boltzmann method for nano- and microscale fluid dynamics in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, D.

    2004-11-01

    The article gives an overview of the lattice Boltzmann method as a powerful technique for the simulation of single and multi-phase flows in complex geometries. Owing to its excellent numerical stability and constitutive versatility it can play an essential role as a simulation tool for understanding advanced materials and processes. Unlike conventional Navier-Stokes solvers, lattice Boltzmann methods consider flows to be composed of a collection of pseudo-particles that are represented by a velocity distribution function. These fluid portions reside and interact on the nodes of a grid. System dynamics and complexity emerge by the repeated application of local rules for the motion, collision and redistribution of these coarse-grained droplets. The lattice Boltzmann method, therefore, is an ideal approach for mesoscale and scale-bridging simulations. It is capable to tackling particularly those problems which are ubiquitous characteristics of flows in the world of materials science and engineering, namely, flows under complicated geometrical boundary conditions, multi-scale flow phenomena, phase transformation in flows, complex solid-liquid interfaces, surface reactions in fluids, liquid-solid flows of colloidal suspensions and turbulence. Since the basic structure of the method is that of a synchronous automaton it is also an ideal platform for realizing combinations with related simulation techniques such as cellular automata or Potts models for crystal growth in a fluid or gas environment. This overview consists of two parts. The first one reviews the philosophy and the formal concepts behind the lattice Boltzmann approach and presents also related pseudo-particle approaches. The second one gives concrete examples in the area of computational materials science and process engineering, such as the prediction of lubrication dynamics in metal forming, dendritic crystal growth under the influence of fluid convection, simulation of metal foam processing, flow percolation in confined geometries, liquid crystal hydrodynamics and processing of polymer blends.

  19. Heat Transfer and Fluid Dynamics Measurements in the Expansion Space of a Stirling Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Nan; Simon, Terrence W.

    2006-01-01

    The heater (or acceptor) of a Stirling engine, where most of the thermal energy is accepted into the engine by heat transfer, is the hottest part of the engine. Almost as hot is the adjacent expansion space of the engine. In the expansion space, the flow is oscillatory, impinging on a two-dimensional concavely-curved surface. Knowing the heat transfer on the inside surface of the engine head is critical to the engine design for efficiency and reliability. However, the flow in this region is not well understood and support is required to develop the CFD codes needed to design modern Stirling engines of high efficiency and power output. The present project is to experimentally investigate the flow and heat transfer in the heater head region. Flow fields and heat transfer coefficients are measured to characterize the oscillatory flow as well as to supply experimental validation for the CFD Stirling engine design codes. Presented also is a discussion of how these results might be used for heater head and acceptor region design calculations.

  20. Comparisons between measurement and analysis of fluid motion in internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P.O.

    1981-10-01

    The Engine Combustion Technology Project was created for the purpose of promoting the development of advanced piston engine concepts by the development of techniques to measure, analyze, and understand the combustion process. The technologies emphasized in the project include laser-based measurement techniques and large-scale computer simulations. Considerable progress has already been achieved by project participants in modeling engine air motion, fuel sprays, and engine combustion phenomena. This milestone report covers one part of that progress, summarizing the current capabilities of multi-dimensional computer codes being developed by the project to predict the behavior of turbulent air motion in an engine environment. Computed results are compared directly with experimental data in six different areas of importance to internal combustion engines: (1) Induction-generated ring-vortex structures; (2) Piston-induced vortex roll-up; (3) Behavior of turbulence during compression; (4) Decay of swirling flow during compression; (5) Decay of swirling flow in a constant volume engine simulator; (6) Exhaust-pipe flow. The computational procedures used include vortex dynamics, rapid distortion theory, and finite difference models employing two-equation and subgrid-scale turbulence models. Although the capability does not yet exist to predict the air motion in an engine from its geometric configuration alone, the results presented show that many flowfield sub-processes can be predicted given well-specified initial and boundary conditions.

  1. Method for optimizing the mechanical output of a fluid pressure free piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrell, E.W.; Schaich, W.A.

    1988-07-05

    The method is described for minimizing rotational speed variations of a centrifugal piston expander engine comprising the steps of: (1) supplying a pressured gas to a centrifugal piston expander engine having a rotatable output element and a discharge conduit for cooled exhaust gas; (2) expanding and cooling the pressured gas in the centrifugal piston expander engine to produce cyclically varying oppositely directed, positive and negative torques on the rotatable output shaft; (3) driving a rotary load in the positive torque direction by the rotatable output element through one rotatable element of a unidirectional clutch having two rotating elements relatively movable in only the negative torque direction; and (4) connecting a battery operated motor-generator unit to the rotatable output shaft to supplement the rotary speed of the output shaft during periods of negative torque output by the centrifugal piston expander engine and to recharge the battery during periods of maximum positive torque output of the centrifugal expander engine.

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a high-swirl engine used for evaluation of computational fluid dynamics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, D.L.; Kuo, T.W.; Khalighi, B.; Haworth, D.; Rosalik, M.

    1995-12-31

    Two-dimensional in-cylinder velocity distributions measured with Particle Image Velocimetry were compared with computed results from Computational Fluid Dynamics codes. A high-swirl, two-valve, four-stroke transparent-combustion-chamber research engine was used. Comparisons were made of mean-flow velocity distributions, swirl-ratio evolution during the intake and compression strokes, and turbulence distributions at top-dead-center compression. This comparison with the measured flows led to more accurate calculations by identifying code improvements including swirl in the residual gas, modeling of the gas exchange during the valve overlap, and improved numerical accuracy. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Recent changes to ASME B31.3

    SciTech Connect

    Becht, C. IV; Frikken, D.R.; Bane, E.J.

    1996-07-01

    The code for process piping, ASME B31.3 Chemical Plant and Petroleum Refinery Piping, has undergone significant changes and additions in recent years. This includes many aspects of design, materials, and fabrication. Included are substantial changes to material impact testing requirements, qualification procedures for unlisted components, coverage of bellows expansion joints, and safety relief set pressure requirements. This paper provides an update on some of these recent changes to the Code together with some background on reasons for the changes.

  4. Computational thermo-fluid dynamics contributions to advanced gas turbine engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The design practices for the gas turbine are traced throughout history with particular emphasis on the calculational or analytical methods. Three principal components of the gas turbine engine will be considered: namely, the compressor, the combustor and the turbine.

  5. Positron emission tomography: A new technique for observing fluid behavior in engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, P. A. E.; Rogers, J. D.; Skelton, R. T.; Salter, P.; Allen, M.; Parker, R.; Davis, P.; Fowles, P.; Hawkesworth, M. R.; Odwyer, M. A.

    1988-09-01

    Positron emission tomography for flow tracing and measurement within metal structures in general and operating engines in particular is introduced. The principles involved are outlined, and a mobile positron camera system is described. Examples of the camera's capability drawn from its use to study annular oil volumes simulated by positron line sources in a power turbine shaft and in a small helicopter engine are presented.

  6. Teaching Computer-Aided Design of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Engineering Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, A. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a teaching program for fluid mechanics and heat transfer which contains both computer aided learning (CAL) and computer aided design (CAD) components and argues that the understanding of the physical and numerical modeling taught in the CAL course is essential to the proper implementation of CAD. (Author/CMV)

  7. Achievements of engineering students on a fluid mechanics course in relation to the use of illustrative interactive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Carlos; Martínez, Elvira

    2013-07-01

    Among other skills, a capacity for abstraction and good spatial awareness are needed to succeed in physics courses. According to the prevailing low percentages of passed students on these courses, a great proportion of those students are likely to lack these skills. Our working hypothesis is that simulations could help engineering students visualize physical phenomena and thereby gain a better understanding of physical theoretical concepts and achieve higher grades. Two groups of students (n1 = 40 and n2 = 43) took the same fluid mechanics course at an engineering school. Both groups took the same end-of-course examination, but only group 1 was simulation-taught. For that purpose, 15 original simulations were created with GeoGebra software. Simulation-taught students completed a questionnaire on the interest of using simulations to teach fluid mechanics. Simulations designed in this work covered all the concepts taught on the course and overcame criticisms made on previous simulations also created to teach fluid mechanics. At the examination, the average grade and the percentage of passed students were higher in group 1 than in group 2. When surveyed, group 1 students declared that they enjoyed interacting with the simulations and considered them to be a good complement to the theoretical explanations because simulations helped them revise previously explained concepts. Simulations assisted students with difficulties to visualize and understand physical theoretical concepts but still students performed poorly on the examination. Additional strategies need to be adopted in order to help students develop the skills required to succeed in physics courses.

  8. 77 FR 3073 - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and New and Revised ASME Code Cases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Register on June 21, 2011 (76 FR 36232). The final rule amended the NRC's regulations to incorporate by... INFORMATION: The NRC published a final rule in the Federal Register on June 21, 2011 (76 FR 36232), amending...--of PWR nickel-alloy upper vessel head penetration nozzles. List of Subjects in 10 CFR Part...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  11. Large-eddy simulations of real-fluid effects in rocket engine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Peter C.; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Ihme, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    This study is concerned with the LES-modeling of real-fluid effects in rocket combustors. The non-ideal fluid behavior is modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and high-pressure effects on the thermo-viscous transport properties are also considered. An efficient and robust algorithm is developed to evaluate the thermodynamic state-vector. The highly non-linear coupling of the primitive thermodynamic variables in regions near the critical point requires special consideration to avoid spurious numerical oscillations. To avoid these non-physical oscillations, a second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme is applied in regions that are identified by a density-based sensor. The resulting algorithm is applied in LES to a coaxial rocket-injector, and super- and transcritical operating conditions are considered. Simulation results and comparisons with experimental data will be presented, and the influence of boundary conditions on the mixing characteristics will be discussed.

  12. Design of a nanomechanical fluid control valve based on functionalized silicon cantilevers: coupling molecular mechanics with classical engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-11-01

    Process engineering design relies on a host of mechanical devices that enable transport phenomena to take place under controlled conditions. These devices include pipes, valves, pumps, chemical reactors, heat exchangers, packed columns, etc. Mass, energy, and momentum transfer will also be essential phenomena in nanoprocess engineering, particularly at the interface between micro- and nanodevices. Control valves are one of the most fundamental components. In this paper we explore the design of a silicon cantilever valve for fluid transport control at the molecular level (34.5-70 nm in length). We utilize design elements that can be synthesized with existing or emerging chemical and solid state fabrication methods. Thus, the valve is constructed with functionalized silicon surfaces, single-wall carbon nanotubes, and organic monolayers. While molecular mechanics design limitations were overcome with help from classical engineering approximations, nonlinear effects, such as nanotube crimping (for an in-line valve design), are accounted for through full-physics atomistic simulations. Optimal design geometries and operating deflection ranges have been estimated for a device containing over 75 000 atoms.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  14. Enhancing Student Learning in Food Engineering Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Shin Y.; Connelly, Robin K.; Hartel, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    The current generation of students coming into food science and engineering programs is very visually oriented from their early experiences. To increase their interest in learning, new and visually appealing teaching materials need to be developed. Two diverse groups of students may be identified based on their math skills. Food science students…

  15. Enhancing Student Learning in Food Engineering Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Shin Y.; Connelly, Robin K.; Hartel, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    The current generation of students coming into food science and engineering programs is very visually oriented from their early experiences. To increase their interest in learning, new and visually appealing teaching materials need to be developed. Two diverse groups of students may be identified based on their math skills. Food science students

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Fluids in Microporous and Mesoporous Earth and Engineered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Rother, Gernot

    The behavior of liquids in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs, due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement, from their bulk behavior in many ways. Phase transitions (i.e., freezing and capillary condensation), sorption and wetting, and dynamical properties, including diffusion and relaxation, may be modified, with the strongest changes observed for pores ranging in size from <2 to 50 nm—the micro- and mesoporous regimes. Important factors influencing the structure and dynamics of confined liquids include the average pore size and pore size distribution, the degree of pore interconnection, and the character of the liquid-surface interaction. While confinement of liquids in hydrophobic matrices, such as carbon nanotubes, or near the surfaces of mixed character, such as many proteins, has also been an area of rapidly growing interest, the confining matrices of interest to earth and materials sciences usually contain oxide structural units and thus are hydrophilic. The pore size distribution and the degree of porosity and inter-connection vary greatly amongst porous matrices. Vycor, xerogels, aerogels, and rocks possess irregular porous structures, whereas mesoporous silicas (e.g., SBA-15, MCM-41, MCM-48), zeolites, and layered systems, for instance clays, have high degrees of internal order. The pore type and size may be tailored by means of adjusting the synthesis regimen. In clays, the interlayer distance may depend on the level of hydration. Although studied less frequently, matrices such as artificial opals and chrysotile asbestos represent other interesting examples of ordered porous structures. The properties of neutrons make them an ideal probe for comparing the properties of bulk fluids with those in confined geometries. In this chapter, we provide a brief review of research performed on liquids confined in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (silicas, aluminas, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those neutron scattering techniques that assess both structural modification and dynamical behavior. Quantitative understanding of the complex solid-fluid interactions under different thermodynamic situations will impact both the design of better substrates for technological applications (e.g., chromatography, fluid capture, storage and release, and heterogeneous catalysis) as well as our fundamental understanding of processes encountered in the environment (i.e., fluid and waste mitigation, carbon sequestration, etc.).

  17. Sructure and dynamics of fluids in micropous and mesoporous earth and engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, David R; Mamontov, Eugene; Rother, Gernot

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of liquids in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs, due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometri-cal confinement, from their bulk behavior in many ways. Phase transitions (i.e., freezing and capillary condensation), sorption and wetting, and dy-namical properties, including diffusion and relaxation, may be modified, with the strongest changes observed for pores ranging in size from <2 nm to 50 nm the micro- and mesoporous regimes. Important factors influ-encing the structure and dynamics of confined liquids include the average pore size and pore size distribution, the degree of pore interconnection, and the character of the liquid-surface interaction. While confinement of liq-uids in hydrophobic matrices, such as carbon nanotubes, or near the sur-faces of mixed character, such as many proteins, has also been an area of rapidly growing interest, the confining matrices of interest to earth and ma-terials sciences usually contain oxide structural units and thus are hydro-philic. The pore size distribution and the degree of porosity and inter-connection vary greatly amongst porous matrices. Vycor, xerogels, aerogels, and rocks possess irregular porous structures, whereas mesopor-ous silicas (e.g., SBA-15, MCM-41, MCM-48), zeolites, and layered sys-tems, for instance clays, have high degrees of internal order. The pore type and size may be tailored by means of adjusting the synthesis regimen. In clays, the interlayer distance may depend on the level of hydration. Al-though studied less frequently, matrices such as artificial opals and chry-sotile asbestos represent other interesting examples of ordered porous structures. The properties of neutrons make them an ideal probe for com-paring the properties of bulk fluids with those in confined geometries. In this chapter, we provide a brief review of research performed on liquids confined in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (silicas, aluminas, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those neutron scattering techniques which assess both structural modification and dynamical behav-ior. Quantitative understanding of the complex solid-fluid interactions under different thermodynamic situations will impact both the design of bet-ter substrates for technological applications (e.g., chromatography, fluid capture, storage and release, and heterogeneous catalysis) as well as our fundamental understanding of processes encountered in the environment (i.e., fluid and waste mitigation, carbon sequestration, etc.).

  18. ASME reports on combustion excursions from rotary kiln incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    According to a study by the ASME Research Committee in Industrial and Municipal Waste, rotary kilns are a proven technology for thermal treatment of a wide variety of combustible waste materials ranging from consumer products to organic chemicals. Because products to organic chemicals. Because discrete units of waste of irregular size are charged to rotary kilns, occasional combustion excursions can occur when combustible material volatilize too rapidly and creates an organic vapor cloud which cannot be thoroughly mixed with oxygen in the combustions changer, and under extreme conditions creates oxygen demand which exceeds the supply.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Image of Hyper-X Research Vehicle at Mach 7 with Engine Operating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) image shows the Hyper-X vehicle at a Mach 7 test condition with the engine operating. The solution includes both internal (scramjet engine) and external flow fields, including the interaction between the engine exhaust and vehicle aerodynamics. The image illustrates surface heat transfer on the vehicle surface (red is highest heating) and flowfield contours at local Mach number. The last contour illustrates the engine exhaust plume shape. This solution approach is one method of predicting the vehicle performance, and the best method for determination of vehicle structural, pressure and thermal design loads. The Hyper-X program is an ambitious series of experimental flights to expand the boundaries of high-speed aeronautics and develop new technologies for space access. When the first of three aircraft flies, it will be the first time a non-rocket engine has powered a vehicle in flight at hypersonic speeds--speeds above Mach 5, equivalent to about one mile per second or approximately 3,600 miles per hour at sea level. Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration. The body of the vehicle itself forms critical elements of the engine. The forebody acts as part of the intake for airflow and the aft section serves as the nozzle. The X-43A vehicles were manufactured by Micro Craft, Inc., Tullahoma, Tennessee. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Chandler, Arizona, built the Pegasus rocket booster used to launch the X-43 vehicles. For the Dryden research flights, the Pegasus rocket booster and attached X-43 will be air launched by Dryden's B-52 'Mothership.' After release from the B-52, the booster will accelerate the X-43A vehicle to the established test conditions (Mach 7 to 10) at an altitude of approximately 100,000 feet where the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power and preprogrammed control.

  20. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  1. Reciprocating seals: Lubrication and wear resistance. (Latest citations from Fluidex (Fluid Engineering Abstracts) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical and practical analyses of reciprocating seal wear and lubrication. Topics include behavior, friction coefficient, cylinder wear, lubrication film thickness, friction forces, design innovations, lubricating oil viscosity, and wear modeling relative to reciprocating seal frictional wear and lifetime optimization. Applications in piston ring lubrication, internal combustion engines, and vehicle suspension systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. A new cascade-less engine operated from subsonic to hypersonic conditions: designed by computational fluid dynamics of compressible turbulence with chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Ken; Nakamura, Kazushi; Emoto, Takehiro

    2010-12-01

    By using our computational fluid dynamic models, a new type of single engine capable of operating over a wide range of Mach numbers from subsonic to hypersonic regimes is proposed for airplanes, whereas traditional piston engines, turbojet engines, and scram engines work only under a narrower range of operating conditions. The new engine has no compressors or turbines such as those used in conventional turbojet engines. An important point is its system of super multijets that collide to compress gas for the transonic regime. Computational fluid dynamics is applied to clarify the potential of this engine. The peak pressure at the combustion center is over 2.5 MPa, while that just before ignition is over 1.0 MPa. The maximum power of this engine will be sufficient for actual use. Under the conditions of higher Mach numbers, the main intake passage located in front of the super multijet nozzles, takes in air more. That results in a ram or scramjet engine for supersonic and hypersonic conditions.

  3. Advanced airbreathing engine lubricants study with a tetraester fluid and a synthetic paraffinic oil at 492 K (425 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1972-01-01

    Groups of 120-mm-bore angular-contact ball bearings made from AISI M-50 steel were fatigue tested with a tetraester and a synthetic paraffinic oil at a bearing temperature of 492 K (425 F) in an air environment. Bearing life exceeded AFBMA-predicted (catalog) life by factors in excess of 4 and 10 for the tetraester and synthetic paraffinic fluids, respectively. The final viscosities after 500 hours of operation were 14 and 6 times the initial values, respectively. During the same time period, when the test oil is replaced at a rate approximating the replenishment rate in actual commerical engine usage, no significant increase in lubricant viscosity with time was observed.

  4. Designing and Creating a Set of New Lab Experiments for a Traditional Fluid Mechanics Course in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, Dan

    2013-11-01

    Many fluids lab facilities and their associated student experiences were built back in the 1960-1970 time frames. They typically consisted of large facilities that included wind tunnels, flumes, wet wells, pump stations, etc. Today these labs are physically and pedagogically out dated and the need for lab space is forcing the closing of large scale labs. This is the same basic problem within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Thus we have replaced all the old equipment and lab experiences with small bench top experiments with a focus on applying the large body of knowledge associate with better student learning experiences. This paper will describe the concepts behind the design of the new experiments and the learning improvements discovered as a result of moving from a few large experiments to a larger number of smaller scale experiments.

  5. An engineering approach to characterizing synthetic-based drilling fluids for deepwater and extended reach drilling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, W.M.; Robinson, G.; Mullen, G.A.

    1998-12-31

    Rheological techniques currently employed to characterize drilling fluids are based upon models and instrumentation that were in existence over forty years ago. A great deal of literature exists that questions the degree to which these techniques address the requirements placed on drilling muds in today`s drilling environment. The solution to many of the problems facing companies operating in deepwater requires an in-depth understanding of the rheological properties of synthetic-based drilling muds. These problems include lost circulation, hole cleaning and barite sag. This paper discusses the application of sophisticated rheological instrumentation and techniques that specifically address the needs of deepwater drilling operations. Focus has been placed on studying the gel structure of synthetics, particularly at low temperatures, in order to provide engineered solutions to get strength-related problems encountered in deepwater.

  6. Transcytosis in the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier of the mouse brain with an engineered receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; Galera-Prat, Albert; Meyers, Craig; Chen, Weijun; Singh, Jasbir; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Crossing the blood–brain and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barriers (BCSFB) is one of the fundamental challenges in the development of new therapeutic molecules for brain disorders because these barriers prevent entry of most drugs from the blood into the brain. However, some large molecules, like the protein transferrin, cross these barriers using a specific receptor that transports them into the brain. Based on this mechanism, we engineered a receptor/ligand system to overcome the brain barriers by combining the human transferrin receptor with the cohesin domain from Clostridium thermocellum, and we tested the hybrid receptor in the choroid plexus of the mouse brain with a dockerin ligand. By expressing our receptor in choroidal ependymocytes, which are part of the BCSFB, we found that our systemically administrated ligand was able to bind to the receptor and accumulate in ependymocytes, where some of the ligand was transported from the blood side to the brain side. PMID:26491705

  7. Interstitial fluid pressure regulates collective invasion in engineered human breast tumors via Snail, vimentin, and E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski-Daspit, Alexandra S; Tien, Joe; Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-03-14

    Many solid tumors exhibit elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). This elevated pressure within the core of the tumor results in outward flow of interstitial fluid to the tumor periphery. We previously found that the directionality of IFP gradients modulates collective invasion from the surface of patterned three-dimensional (3D) aggregates of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we used this 3D engineered tumor model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying IFP-induced changes in invasive phenotype. We found that IFP alters the expression of genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Specifically, the levels of Snail, vimentin, and E-cadherin were increased under pressure conditions that promoted collective invasion. These changes in gene expression were sufficient to direct collective invasion in response to IFP. Furthermore, we found that IFP modulates the motility and persistence of individual cells within the aggregates, which are also influenced by the expression levels of EMT markers. Together, these data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that guide collective invasion from primary tumors in response to IFP. PMID:26853861

  8. ASM Based Synthesis of Handwritten Arabic Text Pages.

    PubMed

    Dinges, Laslo; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Elzobi, Moftah; El-Etriby, Sherif; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Document analysis tasks, as text recognition, word spotting, or segmentation, are highly dependent on comprehensive and suitable databases for training and validation. However their generation is expensive in sense of labor and time. As a matter of fact, there is a lack of such databases, which complicates research and development. This is especially true for the case of Arabic handwriting recognition, that involves different preprocessing, segmentation, and recognition methods, which have individual demands on samples and ground truth. To bypass this problem, we present an efficient system that automatically turns Arabic Unicode text into synthetic images of handwritten documents and detailed ground truth. Active Shape Models (ASMs) based on 28046 online samples were used for character synthesis and statistical properties were extracted from the IESK-arDB database to simulate baselines and word slant or skew. In the synthesis step ASM based representations are composed to words and text pages, smoothed by B-Spline interpolation and rendered considering writing speed and pen characteristics. Finally, we use the synthetic data to validate a segmentation method. An experimental comparison with the IESK-arDB database encourages to train and test document analysis related methods on synthetic samples, whenever no sufficient natural ground truthed data is available. PMID:26295059

  9. Modelling wastewater transformation in sewers based on ASM3.

    PubMed

    Huisman, J L; Gujer, W

    2002-01-01

    A deterministic model for wastewater transformations in the sewer that includes activity in the wastewater and in the sewer wall biofilm was developed. It is based on the Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3). The mass transfer processes in the biofilm were modelled with the effectiveness approach. This approach allowed for fast calculation, required only a limited number of parameters and gave good results. The ASM3 related parameters were calibrated and validated with laboratory experiments. An equation for the aeration of the wastewater through the water surface was determined with a method based on the inert gas sulphur hexafluoride. The other model parameters such as wall roughness, attachment of particles to the biofilm and biofilm erosion were calibrated and validated with field experiments in a main sewer. The resulting model described the oxygen concentration and wastewater respiration well. It can be easily linked for integrated urban hydrology modelling with the WWTP Activated Sludge Model and the newly proposed River Water Quality Model No. 1. PMID:11989878

  10. ASM Based Synthesis of Handwritten Arabic Text Pages

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Laslo; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Elzobi, Moftah; El-etriby, Sherif; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Document analysis tasks, as text recognition, word spotting, or segmentation, are highly dependent on comprehensive and suitable databases for training and validation. However their generation is expensive in sense of labor and time. As a matter of fact, there is a lack of such databases, which complicates research and development. This is especially true for the case of Arabic handwriting recognition, that involves different preprocessing, segmentation, and recognition methods, which have individual demands on samples and ground truth. To bypass this problem, we present an efficient system that automatically turns Arabic Unicode text into synthetic images of handwritten documents and detailed ground truth. Active Shape Models (ASMs) based on 28046 online samples were used for character synthesis and statistical properties were extracted from the IESK-arDB database to simulate baselines and word slant or skew. In the synthesis step ASM based representations are composed to words and text pages, smoothed by B-Spline interpolation and rendered considering writing speed and pen characteristics. Finally, we use the synthetic data to validate a segmentation method. An experimental comparison with the IESK-arDB database encourages to train and test document analysis related methods on synthetic samples, whenever no sufficient natural ground truthed data is available. PMID:26295059

  11. Quantitative, single shot, two-dimensional spontaneous Raman measurements for fluid mechanics and engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsis, Dimitrios Constantinou

    Spontaneous Raman Scattering was used for quantitative, two-dimensional, single-shot measurements of species concentration in optically accessible confinements and in an experimental single-cylinder internal combustion engine. The study comprised three parts. In the first part, the technique was used for methane concentration measurements in a laminar jet issuing into compressed nitrogen (10 bar, 293 K). The injection Reynolds number was 550. Initial results showed unexpected structures in the acquired concentration profiles. Thus, the steadiness of the laminar flow was confirmed with high speed shadowgraph movies and laser induced fluorescence measurements. Eventually, it was proven that the structures were due to characteristics of the camera system. A technique was then devised for the proper acquisition and processing of data and spatial resolution of 500 mum was achieved. Methane number density equal to 12% of the number density of pure methane (0.247E+26 molecules/msp3) was then measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 3. The measurements were compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of the flow field. In the second part, measurements in a laminar hydrogen jet were taken. Because of the reduced Raman signal of hydrogen, the incident laser power was increased by installing the pressurized chamber within the laser cavity. This yielded an increase in power by a factor of 2.5. For the measurement of the laser sheet intensity in the laser cavity, insertion of a fluorescent dye cell and Rayleigh scattering were used and evaluated comparatively. The precise location of the waist of the laser sheet was determined by trial and error. The spatial resolution of the measurements was 650 mum and a number density of 0.371E+26 hydrogen molecules/msp3 was measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The measurements were again compared with results of direct numerical simulation. In the third part, the feasibility of two-dimensional single-shot Spontaneous Raman measurements in an engine cylinder was established. Measurements of methane concentration after direct injection in the cylinder of an experimental single-cylinder engine were taken. The engine was not fired to avoid laser induced incandescence interference. The spatial resolution was limited to 800 mum by the thickness of the laser sheet. Fast mixing of the methane jet was documented but a precise evaluation of the equivalence ratio was beyond the resolution of this first attempt. Finally, existing hardware for data acquisition and algorithms for two dimensional data reduction were reviewed and recommendations were made for the extraction of quantitative information from two-dimensional, single-shot Spontaneous Raman signals which are weak and noisy.

  12. Reaction Engineering International and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Addressing computational fluid dynamics needs of the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communications and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective to industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms. Information in this report on the staff exchange of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff with Reaction Engineering International (REI) includes the significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefit of that work. The objectives of this project were as follows: Work with REI to develop an understanding of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) needs of the chemical process industry; assess the combined capabilities of the PNL and REI software analysis tools to address these needs; and establish a strategy for a future programmatically funded, joint effort to develop a new CFD tool for the chemical process industry.

  13. The Hybrid Sterling Engine: boosting photovoltaic efficiency and deriving mechanical work from fluid expansion and heat capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beets, Nathan; Wake Forest CenterNanotechnology; Molecular Materials Team; Fraunhofer Institute Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Two major problems with many third generation photovoltaics is their complex structure and greater expense for increased efficiency. Spectral splitting devices have been used by many with varying degrees of success to collect more and more of the spectrum, but simple, efficient, and cost-effective setups that employ spectral splitting remain elusive. This study explores this problem, presenting a solar engine that employs stokes shifting via laser dyes to convert incident light to the wavelength bandgap of the solar cell and collects the resultant infrared radiation unused by the photovoltaic cell as heat in ethylene glycol or glycerin. When used in conjunction with micro turbines, fluid expansion creates mechanical work, and the temperature difference between the cell and the environment is made available for use. The effect of focusing is also observed as a means to boost efficiency via concentration. Experimental results from spectral scans, vibrational voltage analysis of the PV itself and temperature measurements from a thermocouple are all compared to theoretical results using a program in Mathematica written to model refraction and lensing in the devices used, a quantum efficiency test of the cells, the absorption and emission curves of the dues used to determine the spectrum shift, and the various equations for fill factor, efficiency, and current in different setups. An efficiency increase well over 50% from the control devices is observed, and a new solar engine proposed.

  14. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume II: HSR Engine Special Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) will be the largest engine ever built and operated at maximum conditions for long periods of time. It is being developed collaboratively with NASA, FAA, Boeing-McDonnell Douglas, Pratt & Whitney, and General Electric. This document provides an initial step toward defining high speed research (HSR) sealing needs. The overview for HSR seals includes defining objectives, summarizing sealing and material requirements, presenting relevant seal cross-sections, and identifying technology needs. Overview presentations are given for the inlet, turbomachinery, combustor and nozzle. The HSCT and HSR seal issues center on durability and efficiency of rotating equipment seals, structural seals and high speed bearing and sump seals. Tighter clearances, propulsion system size and thermal requirements challenge component designers.

  15. In vitro fabrication of autologous living tissue-engineered vascular grafts based on prenatally harvested ovine amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Benedikt; Kehl, Debora; Bleul, Ulrich; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sébastien; Frese, Laura; Ksiazek, Agnieszka; Achermann, Josef; Stranzinger, Gerald; Robert, Jérôme; Sanders, Bart; Sidler, Michele; Brokopp, Chad E; Proulx, Steven T; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schoenauer, Roman; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Falk, Volkmar; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFCs) have been proposed as a valuable source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, before clinical implementation, rigorous evaluation of this cell source in clinically relevant animal models accepted by regulatory authorities is indispensable. Today, the ovine model represents one of the most accepted preclinical animal models, in particular for cardiovascular applications. Here, we investigate the isolation and use of autologous ovine AFCs as cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Fetal fluids were aspirated in vivo from pregnant ewes (n = 9) and from explanted uteri post mortem at different gestational ages (n = 91). Amniotic non-allantoic fluid nature was evaluated biochemically and in vivo samples were compared with post mortem reference samples. Isolated cells revealed an immunohistochemical phenotype similar to ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and showed expression of stem cell factors described for embryonic stem cells, such as NANOG and STAT-3. Isolated ovine amniotic fluid-derived MSCs were screened for numeric chromosomal aberrations and successfully differentiated into several mesodermal phenotypes. Myofibroblastic ovine AFC lineages were then successfully used for the in vitro fabrication of small- and large-diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts (n = 10) and cardiovascular patches (n = 34), laying the foundation for the use of this relevant pre-clinical in vivo assessment model for future amniotic fluid cell-based therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23881794

  16. A Design-Oriented Approach to the Integration of Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer in the Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whale, MacMurray D.; Cravalho, Ernest G.

    This paper describes two parallel efforts that attempt to implement a new approach to the teaching of thermal fluids engineering. In one setting, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the subject matter is integrated into a single year-long subject at the introductory level. In the second setting, at Victoria (British Columbia,…

  17. Modeling In Vivo Interactions of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Pulmonary Alveolar Lining Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary; Schwander, Stephan; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products may result in widespread human inhalation exposures. Due to their high surface area per unit mass, inhaled ENMs interact with multiple components of the pulmonary system, and these interactions affect their ultimate fate in the body. Modeling of ENM transport and clearance in vivo has traditionally treated tissues as well-mixed compartments, without consideration of nanoscale interaction and transformation mechanisms. ENM agglomeration, dissolution and transport, along with adsorption of biomolecules, such as surfactant lipids and proteins, cause irreversible changes to ENM morphology and surface properties. The model presented in this article quantifies ENM transformation and transport in the alveolar air to liquid interface and estimates eventual alveolar cell dosimetry. This formulation brings together established concepts from colloidal and surface science, physics, and biochemistry to provide a stochastic framework capable of capturing essential in vivo processes in the pulmonary alveolar lining layer. The model has been implemented for in vitro solutions with parameters estimated from relevant published in vitro measurements and has been extended here to in vivo systems simulating human inhalation exposures. Applications are presented for four different ENMs, and relevant kinetic rates are estimated, demonstrating an approach for improving human in vivo pulmonary dosimetry. PMID:26240755

  18. Thesaurus of engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book is published jointly by ASM International and the Institute of Metals in London. It contains the vocabulary for classification, processing, and properties of polymers, ceramics, and composites. Over 500 main terms are included, together with cross-reference terms and a list of index terms. The book is the basis for the terminology used in the recently introduced Engineered Materials Abstracts.

  19. Encapsulating connections on SoC designs using ASM++ charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Santiago; Herrero, Luis C.; Martínez, Fernando; Rey, Alexis B.

    This article presents a methodology to encapsulate, not only the functionality of several SoC modules, but also the connections between those modules. To achieve these results, the possibilities of Algorithmic State Machines (ASM charts) have been extended to develop a compiler. Using this approach, a SoC design becomes a set of chart boxes and links: several boxes describe parameterized modules in a hierarchical fashion, other boxes encapsulate their connections, and all boxes are linked together using simple lines. At last, a compiler processes all required files and generates the corresponding VHDL or Verilog code, valid for simulation and synthesis. A small SoC design with two DSP processors is shown as an example.

  20. ASM stepper alignment through thick epitaxial silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Iain

    1999-04-01

    High voltage bipolar and BiCMOS processes often use thick epitaxially grown layers of silicon. These films 12-24 micrometers thick offer a considerable challenge to the alignment of subsequent process layers due to the 'wash out' and image distortion, caused to any underlying pattern, which render automatic alignment mark recognition difficult it not impossible. Historically using projection aligner technology these immediately post Epi layers have been manually aligned with future automatic alignment target defined at the first opportunity post Epi. This is not possible using ASM steppers, as these depend upon marks etched into the silicon, before first processing, to create marks, to which all subsequent layers are registered. To allow the stepper to run wafers with these Epi films a new approach was required.

  1. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  2. Effects of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions on the cells and extracellular matrix of engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ka Yaw; DeHoyos, Tenok O.; Dutton, J. Craig; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2011-01-01

    The two most significant challenges for successful cryopreservation of engineered tissues (ETs) are preserving tissue functionality and controlling highly tissue-type dependent preservation outcomes. In order to address these challenges, freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions should be understood, which determine the post-thaw cell viability and extracellular matrix (ECM) microstructure. However, the current understanding of this tissue-level biophysical interaction is still limited. In this study, freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and their impact on the cells and ECM microstructure of ETs were investigated using dermal equivalents as a model ET. The dermal equivalents were constructed by seeding human dermal fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices with varying cell seeding density and collagen concentration. While these dermal equivalents underwent an identical freeze/thaw condition, their spatiotemporal deformation during freezing, post-thaw ECM microstructure, and cellular level cryoresponse were characterized. The results showed that the extent and characteristics of freezing-induced deformation were significantly different among the experimental groups, and the ETs with denser ECM microstructure experienced a larger deformation. The magnitude of the deformation was well correlated to the post-thaw ECM structure, suggesting that the freezing-induced deformation is a good indicator of post-thaw ECM structure. A significant difference in the extent of cellular injury was also noted among the experimental groups, and it depended on the extent of freezing-induced deformation of the ETs and the initial cytoskeleton organization. These results suggest that the cells have been subjected to mechanical insult due to the freezing-induced deformation as well as thermal insult. These findings provide insight on tissue-type dependent cryopreservation outcomes, and can help to design and modify cryopreservation protocols for new types of tissues from a pre-developed cryopreservation protocol. PMID:21549425

  3. Constitutive overexpression of asm18 increases the production and diversity of maytansinoids in Actinosynnema pretiosum.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanren; Lu, Chunhua; Chang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Yuemao

    2016-03-01

    Ansamitocins isolated from Actinosynnema pretiosum, potent antitumor compounds, belong to the family of maytansinoids, and the antibody-maytansinoid conjugates are currently under different phases of clinical trials. The clinical applications of ansamitocins have stimulated extensive studies to improve their production yields. In this study, we investigated the function of a pathway-specific S treptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family regulator, Asm18, and observed that ectopic overexpression of the asm18 gene increased the production of N-demethyl-4,5-desepoxy-maytansinol (2) to 50 mg/L in the HGF052 + pJTU824-asm18 strain, an increase by 4.7-fold compared to that of the control strain HGF052 + pJTU824. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the overexpression of the asm18 gene selectively increased the transcription levels of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the starter unit (asm43), polyketide assembly (asmA), post-PKS modification (asm21), as well as the transcription levels of the regulatory gene (asm8), which is a specific LAL-type activator in ansamitocin biosynthesis. With the increase of fermentation titre, seven ansamitocin analogs (1-7) including three new ones (1, 5, and 6) and maytansinol (7) were isolated from the HGF052 + pJTU824-asm18 strain. Our results not only pave the way for further improving the production of ansamitocin analogs but also indicate that the post-PKS modifications of ansamitocin biosynthesis are flexible, which brings a potential of producing maytansinol, the most fascinating intermediate for the synthesis of antibody-maytansinoid conjugates, by optimizing the HGF052 and/or HGF052 + pJTU824-asm18 strains. PMID:26572523

  4. Investigation of Respiratory and Dermal Symptoms Associated with Metal Working Fluids at an Aircraft Engine Manufacturing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Francisco; Chen, Lilia; Hudson, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Background Each year, 1.2 million metalworkers are exposed to metalworking fluids (MWFs), which can cause dermal and respiratory disease. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a health hazard evaluation of MWF exposures at an aircraft engine manufacturing facility. The objectives were to determine employee exposures to endotoxin and MWFs in the air, characterize symptoms experienced by employees working with MWFs, compare them to symptoms of employees unexposed to MWFs, and make recommendations for reducing exposures based on results. Methods 407 workers were categorized as MWF exposed or MWF unexposed and completed questionnaires. Estimated prevalence ratios (PR) of dermatitis, asthma, and work-related asthma (WRA) symptoms were calculated. Airborne concentrations of MWF and endotoxin were measured, and work practices observed. Results MWF exposed workers had a significantly higher prevalence of dermatitis on wrists/forearms (PR 2.59; 95% CI 1.22, 5.46), asthma symptoms (PR 1.49; 95% CI 1.05, 2.13) and WRA symptoms (PR 2.10; 95% CI 1.22, 3.30) than unexposed workers. Airborne concentrations of MWF were below the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) for MWF aerosols (thoracic particulate mass). Conclusions Despite MWF exposures below the NIOSH REL, exposed workers had a higher prevalence of asthma, WRA, and dermatitis symptoms than unexposed workers. Recommendations to reduce exposure included configuring mist collectors to automatically turn on when the machine is in use, and enforcing enclosure use. PMID:24122918

  5. Bare carbon steel electrodes and fluxes for submerged arc welding (ASME SFA-5. 17 with additional requirements)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This standard covers bare carbon steel electrodes and fluxes for submerged arc welding in nuclear and associated applications. Material shall conform to the requirements of ASME SFA-5.17; to the requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code), Section III, Article NB-2000; and to the additional requirements of this standard.

  6. Regulation of dynein-mediated autophagosomes trafficking by ASM in CASMCs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Qiufang; Li, Pin-Lan; Nguyen, Thaison; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM; gene symbol Smpd1) has been shown to play a crucial role in autophagy maturation by controlling lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which ASM controls autophagolysosomal fusion remains unknown. In primary cultured CASMCs, lysosomal Ca2+ induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket, an atherogenic stimulus and autophagy inducer) was markedly attenuated by ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing suggesting that ASM signaling is required for TRPML1 channel activity and subsequent lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In these CASMCs, ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing markedly inhibited 7-Ket-induced dynein activation. In addition, 7-Ket-induced autophagosome trafficking, an event associated with lysosomal Ca(2+) release and dynein activity, was significantly inhibited in ASM-deficient (Smpd1(-/-)) CASMCs compared to that in Smpd1(+/+) CASMCs. Finally, overexpression of TRPML1 proteins restored 7-Ket-induced lysosomal Ca(2+) release and autophagosome trafficking in Smpd1-/- CASMCs. Collectively, these results suggest that ASM plays a critical role in regulating lysosomal TRPML1-Ca(2+) signaling and subsequent dynein-mediated autophagosome trafficking, which leads its role in controlling autophagy maturation in CASMCs under atherogenic stimulation. PMID:26709800

  7. Regulation of dynein-mediated autophagosomes trafficking by ASM in CASMCs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pin-Lan; Nguyen, Thaison; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM; gene symbol Smpd1) has been shown to play a crucial role in autophagy maturation by controlling lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which ASM controls autophagolysosomal fusion remains unknown. In primary cultured CASMCs, lysosomal Ca2+ induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket, an atherogenic stimulus and autophagy inducer) was markedly attenuated by ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing suggesting that ASM signaling is required for TRPML1 channel activity and subsequent lysosomal Ca2+ release. In these CASMCs, ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing markedly inhibited 7-Ket-induced dynein activation. In addition, 7-Ket-induced autophagosome trafficking, an event associated with lysosomal Ca2+ release and dynein activity, was significantly inhibited in ASM-deficient (Smpd1−/−) CASMCs compared to that in Smpd1+/+ CASMCs. Finally, overexpression of TRPML1 proteins restored 7-Ket-induced lysosomal Ca2+ release and autophagosome trafficking in Smpd1−/− CASMCs. Collectively, these results suggest that ASM plays a critical role in regulating lysosomal TRPML1-Ca2+ signaling and subsequent dynein-mediated autophagosome trafficking, which leads its role in controlling autophagy maturation in CASMCs under atherogenic stimulation. PMID:26709800

  8. D0 Silicon Upgrade: ASME Code and Pressure Calculations for Liquid Nitrogen Subcooler

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwazaki, Andrew; Leicht, Todd; /Fermilab

    1995-10-04

    Included in this engineering note are three separate calculation divisions. The first calculations are the determination of the required thickness of the LN{sub 2} subcooler flat head according to ASME code. This section includes Appendix A-C. The minimum plate thickness determined was 0.563 in. The actual thickness chosen in fabrication was a 3/4-inch plate milled to 0.594-inch at the bolt circle. Along with the plate thickness, this section calculates the required reinforcement area at the top plate penetrations. It was found that a 1/4-inch fillet weld at each penetration was adequate. The next set of calculations were done to prove that the subcooler internal pressure will always be less than 15 psig and therefore will not be classified as a pressure vessel. The subcooler is always open to a vent pipe. Appendix D calculations show that the vent pipe has a capacity of 1042 lbs/hr if 15 psig is present at the subcooler. It goes on to show that the inlet piping would at that flow rate, see a pressure drop of 104 psig. The maximum supply pressure of the LN{sub 2} storage dewar is 50 psig. Appendix E addresses required flow rates for steady state, loss of vacuum, or fire conditions. Page E9 shows a summary which states the maximum pressure would be 1.50 psig at fire conditions and internal pressure.

  9. Start Up Research Effort in Fluid Mechanics. Advanced Methods for Acoustic and Thrust Benefits for Aircraft Engine Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Samuel G.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    1997-01-01

    In accordance with the project plan for the report period in the proposal titled above, HU and FML teams investigated two sets of concepts for reduction of noise and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles of aircraft engines and screws for mixers, fans, propellers and boats. The main achievements in the report period are: (a) Publication of the paper in the AIAA Journal, which described our concepts and some results. (b) The Award in the Civil Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) competition. This 2 year grant for Hampton University (HU) and Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute (TSAGI, Moscow, Russia) supports the research implementation under the current NASA FAR grant. (c) Selection for funding by NASA HQ review panel of the Partnership Awards Concept Paper. This two year grant also will support our current FAR grant. (d) Publication of a Mobius Strip concept in NASA Technical Briefs, June, 1996, and a great interest of many industrial companies in this invention. Successful experimental results with the Mobius shaped screw for mixers, which save more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard screws. Creation of the scientific-popular video-film which can be used for commercial and educational purposes. (e) Organization work, joint meetings and discussions of the NASA LARC JNL Team and HU professors and administration for the solution of actual problems and effective work of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Hampton University. In this report the main designs are enumerated. It also contains for both concept sets: (1) the statement of the problem for each design, some results, publications, inventions, patents, our vision for continuation of this research, and (2) present and expected problems in the future.

  10. 115-year-old society knows how to reach young scientists: ASM Young Ambassador Program.

    PubMed

    Karczewska-Golec, Joanna

    2015-12-25

    With around 40,000 members in more than 150 countries, American Society for Microbiology (ASM) faces the challenge of meeting very diverse needs of its increasingly international members base. The newly launched ASM Young Ambassador Program seeks to aid the Society in this effort. Equipped with ASM conceptual support and financing, Young Ambassadors (YAs) design and pursue country-tailored approaches to strengthen the Society's ties with local microbiological communities. In a trans-national setting, the active presence of YAs at important scientific events, such as 16th European Congress on Biotechnology, forges new interactions between ASM and sister societies. The paper presents an overview of the Young Ambassadors-driven initiatives at both global and country levels, and explores the topic of how early-career scientists can contribute to science diplomacy and international relations. PMID:25449541

  11. A minimal path searching approach for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shengwen; Fei, Baowei

    2009-02-01

    We are developing a minimal path searching method for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation for detection of lung boundaries on digital radiographs. With the conventional ASM method, the position and shape parameters of the model points are iteratively refined and the target points are updated by the least Mahalanobis distance criterion. We propose an improved searching strategy that extends the searching points in a fan-shape region instead of along the normal direction. A minimal path (MP) deformable model is applied to drive the searching procedure. A statistical shape prior model is incorporated into the segmentation. In order to keep the smoothness of the shape, a smooth constraint is employed to the deformable model. To quantitatively assess the ASM-MP segmentation, we compare the automatic segmentation with manual segmentation for 72 lung digitized radiographs. The distance error between the ASM-MP and manual segmentation is 1.75 +/- 0.33 pixels, while the error is 1.99 +/- 0.45 pixels for the ASM. Our results demonstrate that our ASM-MP method can accurately segment the lung on digital radiographs.

  12. A Minimal Path Searching Approach for Active Shape Model (ASM)-based Segmentation of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shengwen; Fei, Baowei

    2009-03-27

    We are developing a minimal path searching method for active shape model (ASM)-based segmentation for detection of lung boundaries on digital radiographs. With the conventional ASM method, the position and shape parameters of the model points are iteratively refined and the target points are updated by the least Mahalanobis distance criterion. We propose an improved searching strategy that extends the searching points in a fan-shape region instead of along the normal direction. A minimal path (MP) deformable model is applied to drive the searching procedure. A statistical shape prior model is incorporated into the segmentation. In order to keep the smoothness of the shape, a smooth constraint is employed to the deformable model. To quantitatively assess the ASM-MP segmentation, we compare the automatic segmentation with manual segmentation for 72 lung digitized radiographs. The distance error between the ASM-MP and manual segmentation is 1.75 ± 0.33 pixels, while the error is 1.99 ± 0.45 pixels for the ASM. Our results demonstrate that our ASM-MP method can accurately segment the lung on digital radiographs. PMID:24386531

  13. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  14. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples

  15. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  16. Proceedings of seismic engineering 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of the Seismic Engineering Technical Subcommittee of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division. Topics covered include: seismic damping and energy absorption, advanced seismic analysis methods, new analysis techniques and applications of advanced methods, seismic supports and test results, margins inherent in the current design methods, and risk assessment, and component and equipment qualification.

  17. New technology in large bore engines

    SciTech Connect

    Chrisman, B. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the 12th Annual Fall Technical Conference of the ASME International Combustion Engine Division. Included are the following papers. Gaseous and particulate emissions from diesel locomotive engines, an integrated model of ring pack performance, optical alignment of reciprocating compressors.

  18. Sloshing, fluid-structure interaction and structural response due to shock and impact loads 1994. PVP-Vol. 272

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C. ); Shin, Y.S.; Brochard, D.; Fujita, K.

    1994-01-01

    This volume is comprised of papers presented in two symposia at the 1994 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. These sessions, sponsored by the Fluid-Structure Interaction and Seismic Engineering Technical Committees, provided a forum for the discussion of recent advances in sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics produced by high energy excitations. The papers presented at the four technical sessions on Sloshing and Fluid-Structure Interaction represent a broad spectrum of fluid-structure systems: sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and dynamic and seismic response of various fluid-structure systems such as reactor components, liquid storage tanks, submerged structures and piping systems, etc. The paper presented at the session on Structural Dynamics Produced by High-Energy Excitations cover underwater explosion effects on submerged structures, bubble loading phenomena, finite element mesh refinements on failure predictions, penetration and impact problems, and dynamic design of blast containment vessels. Also included are numerical analysis, design, and testing to understand difficult transient response phenomena. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 papers in this volume.

  19. Report on the activities of the ASME-NQA Committee Working Group on Quality Assurance Requirements for Research and Development, April 1990 to August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dronkers, J.J.

    1991-09-01

    This report transmits to the public eye the activities of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers-Nuclear Quality Assurance (ASME-NQA) Committee Working Group on Quality Assurance Requirements for Research and Development. The appendix lists the members of this group as of August 1991. The report covers a period of 17 months. The working group met eight times in this period, and much intellectual ground was traversed. There was seldom agreement on the nature of the task, but there was no doubt as to its urgency. The task was how to adapt the nuclear quality assurance standard, the NQA-1, to research and development work. 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  20. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine... Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS... immediately behind the firewall, and each portion of any engine pod attaching structure containing...

  1. A study on vortex flow control on inlet distortion in the re-engined 727-100 center inlet duct using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Huang, Pao S.; Paschal, William A.; Cavatorta, Enrico

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate the management of inlet distortion by the introduction of discrete vorticity sources at selected locations in the inlet for the purpose of controlling secondary flow. These sources of vorticity were introduced by means of vortex generators. A series of design observations were made concerning the importance of various vortex generator design parameters in minimizing engine face circumferential distortion. The study showed that vortex strength, generator scale, and secondary flow field structure have a complicated and interrelated influence on the engine face distortion, over and above the initial geometry and arrangement of the generators. The installed vortex generator performance was found to be a function of three categories of variables: the inflow conditions, the aerodynamic characteristics associated with the inlet duct, and the design parameters related to the geometry, arrangement, and placement of the vortex generators within the outlet duct itself.

  2. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  3. Fluid Power Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Fluid power technicians, sometimes called hydraulic and pneumatic technicians, work with equipment that utilizes the pressure of a liquid or gas in a closed container to transmit, multiply, or control power. Working under the supervision of an engineer or engineering staff, they assemble, install, maintain, and test fluid power equipment.

  4. Fluid Power Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Fluid power technicians, sometimes called hydraulic and pneumatic technicians, work with equipment that utilizes the pressure of a liquid or gas in a closed container to transmit, multiply, or control power. Working under the supervision of an engineer or engineering staff, they assemble, install, maintain, and test fluid power equipment.…

  5. Fluid delivery control system

    DOEpatents

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  6. Formulation and evaluation of C-Ether fluids as lubricants useful to 260 C. [air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, F. S.; Miller, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three base stocks were evaluated in bench and bearing tests to determine their suitability for use at bulk oil temperatures (BOT) from -40 C to +260 C. A polyol ester gave good bearing tests at a bulk temperature of 218 C, but only a partially successful run at 274 C. These results bracket the fluid's maximum operating temperature between these values. An extensive screening program selected lubrication additives for a C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) base stock. One formulation lubricated a bearing for 111 hours at 274 C (BOT), but this fluid gave many deposit related problems. Other C-ether blends produced cage wear or fatigue failures. Studies of a third fluid, a C-ether/disiloxane blend, consisted of bench oxidation and lubrication tests. These showed that some additives react differently in the blend than in pure C-ethers.

  7. Impact of Safety-Engineered Devices on the Incidence of Occupational Blood and Body Fluid Exposures Among Healthcare Personnel in an Academic Facility, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hajime; Weber, David J; DiBiase, Lauren M; Pitman, Karen L; Consoli, Stephanie A; Hill, James; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Rutala, William A

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Legislative actions and advanced technologies, particularly dissemination of safety-engineered devices, have aided in protecting healthcare personnel from occupational blood and body fluid exposures (BBFE). OBJECTIVE To investigate the trends in BBFE among healthcare personnel over 15 years and the impact of safety-engineered devices on the incidence of percutaneous injuries as well as features of injuries associated with these devices. METHODS Retrospective cohort study at University of North Carolina Hospitals, a tertiary care academic facility. Data on BBFE in healthcare personnel were extracted from Occupational Health Service records (2000-2014). Exposures associated with safety-engineered and conventional devices were compared. Generalized linear models were applied to measure the annual incidence rate difference by exposure type over time. RESULTS A total of 4,300 BBFE, including 3,318 percutaneous injuries (77%), were reported. The incidence rate for overall BBFE was significantly reduced during 2000-2014 (incidence rate difference, 1.72; P=.0003). The incidence rate for percutaneous injuries was also dramatically reduced during 2001-2006 (incidence rate difference, 1.37; P=.0079) but was less changed during 2006-2014. Percutaneous injuries associated with safety-engineered devices accounted for 27% of all BBFE. BBFE was most commonly due to injecting through skin, placing intravenous catheters, and blood drawing. CONCLUSIONS Our study revealed significant overall reduction in BBFE and percutaneous injuries likely due in part to the impact of safety-engineered devices but also identified that a considerable proportion of percutaneous injuries is now associated with these devices. Additional prevention strategies are needed to further reduce percutaneous injuries and improve design of safety-engineered devices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:497-504. PMID:26856246

  8. A design strategy for the use of vortex generators to manage inlet-engine distortion using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Levy, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    A reduced Navier-Stokes solution technique was successfully used to design vortex generator installations for the purpose of minimizing engine face distortion by restructuring the development of secondary flow that is induced in typical 3-D curved inlet ducts. The results indicate that there exists an optimum axial location for this installation of corotating vortex generators, and within this configuration, there exists a maximum spacing between generator blades above which the engine face distortion increases rapidly. Installed vortex generator performance, as measured by engine face circumferential distortion descriptors, is sensitive to Reynolds number and thereby the generator scale, i.e., the ratio of generator blade height to local boundary layer thickness. Installations of corotating vortex generators work well in terms of minimizing engine face distortion within a limited range of generator scales. Hence, the design of vortex generator installations is a point design, and all other conditions are off design. In general, the loss levels associated with a properly designed vortex generator installation are very small; thus, they represent a very good method to manage engine face distortion. This study also showed that the vortex strength, generator scale, and secondary flow field structure have a complicated and interrelated influence over engine face distortion, over and above the influence of the initial arrangement of generators.

  9. The ASM Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Microbiology: A Case Study of the Advocacy Role of Societies in Reform Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Rachel E. A.; Merkel, Susan; Chang, Amy

    2015-01-01

    A number of national reports, including Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action, have called for drastic changes in how undergraduate biology is taught. To that end, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has developed new Curriculum Guidelines for undergraduate microbiology that outline a comprehensive curriculum for any undergraduate introductory microbiology course or program of study. Designed to foster enduring understanding of core microbiology concepts, the Guidelines work synergistically with backwards course design to focus teaching on student-centered goals and priorities. In order to qualitatively assess how the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are used by educators and learn more about the needs of microbiology educators, the ASM Education Board distributed two surveys to the ASM education community. In this report, we discuss the results of these surveys (353 responses). We found that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are being implemented in many different types of courses at all undergraduate levels. Educators indicated that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines were very helpful when planning courses and assessments. We discuss some specific ways in which the ASM Curriculum Guidelines have been used in undergraduate classrooms. The survey identified some barriers that microbiology educators faced when trying to adopt the ASM Curriculum Guidelines, including lack of time, lack of financial resources, and lack of supporting resources. Given the self-reported challenges to implementing the ASM Curriculum Guidelines in undergraduate classrooms, we identify here some activities related to the ASM Curriculum Guidelines that the ASM Education Board has initiated to assist educators in the implementation process. PMID:25949769

  10. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  11. ASM LabCap's contributions to disease surveillance and the International Health Regulations (2005).

    PubMed

    Specter, Steven; Schuermann, Lily; Hakiruwizera, Celestin; Sow, Mah-Séré Keita

    2010-01-01

    The revised International Health Regulations [IHR(2005)], which requires the Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop core capacities to detect, assess, report, and respond to public health threats, is bringing new challenges for national and international surveillance systems. As more countries move toward implementation and/or strengthening of their infectious disease surveillance programs, the strengthening of clinical microbiology laboratories becomes increasingly important because they serve as the first line responders to detect new and emerging microbial threats, re-emerging infectious diseases, the spread of antibiotic resistance, and the possibility of bioterrorism. In fact, IHR(2005) Core Capacity #8, "Laboratory", requires that laboratory services be a part of every phase of alert and response.Public health laboratories in many resource-constrained countries require financial and technical assistance to build their capacity. In recognition of this, in 2006, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) established an International Laboratory Capacity Building Program, LabCap, housed under the ASM International Board. ASM LabCap utilizes ASM's vast resources and its membership's expertise-40,000 microbiologists worldwide-to strengthen clinical and public health laboratory systems in low and low-middle income countries. ASM LabCap's program activities align with HR(2005) by building the capability of resource-constrained countries to develop quality-assured, laboratory-based information which is critical to disease surveillance and the rapid detection of disease outbreaks, whether they stem from natural, deliberate or accidental causes.ASM LabCap helps build laboratory capacity under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and under a sub-contract with the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Successful activities of ASM LabCap have occurred throughout Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean. In addition, ASM LabCap coordinates efforts with international agencies such as the WHO in order to maximize resources and ensure a unified response, with the intended goal to help build integrated disease surveillance and response capabilities worldwide in compliance with HR(2005)'s requirements. PMID:21143829

  12. Shape Optimization of Vehicle Radiator Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (cfd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddipatla, Sridhar; Guessous, Laila

    2002-11-01

    Automotive manufacturers need to improve the efficiency and lifetime of all engine components. In the case of radiators, performance depends significantly on coolant flow homogeneity across the tubes and overall pressure drop between the inlet and outlet. Design improvements are especially needed in tube-flow uniformity to prevent premature fouling and failure of heat exchangers. Rather than relying on ad-hoc geometry changes, the current study combines Computational Fluid Dynamics with shape optimization methods to improve radiator performance. The goal is to develop an automated suite of virtual tools to assist in radiator design. Two objective functions are considered: a flow non-uniformity coefficient,Cf, and the overall pressure drop, dP*. The methodology used to automate the CFD and shape optimization procedures is discussed. In the first phase, single and multi-variable optimization methods, coupled with CFD, are applied to simplified 2-D radiator models to investigate effects of inlet and outlet positions on the above functions. The second phase concentrates on CFD simulations of a simplified 3-D radiator model. The results, which show possible improvements in both pressure and flow uniformity, validate the optimization criteria that were developed, as well as the potential of shape optimization methods with CFD to improve heat exchanger design. * Improving Radiator Design Through Shape Optimization, L. Guessous and S. Maddipatla, Paper # IMECE2002-33888, Proceedings of the 2002 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, November 2002

  13. Proceedings of the 1998 ASME energy sources technology conference (ETCE`98)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The approximately 160 papers in these proceedings have been arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Computers in engineering -- Technical databases and applied computing; Workgroup computing; Software process models; Internet computing; (2) Drilling technology -- Coiled tubing technology; Drilling dynamics and drilling systems; Advances in drill bits; Advances in percussion drilling; Testing field and laboratory; Novel/scientific drilling; Advances in drilling fluids; (3) Emerging energy technology -- Spray and combustion; Fuel cells; Flammability and flames; Fuels and engines; Miscellaneous combustion topics; (4) Composite materials design and analysis -- Interaction of cracks, notched strength, and free edge effects in laminated composites; Stress analysis of composites; Material response identification, property alteration, damage detection, and environmental effects; Wave propagation in elastic medium, numerical methods for composites; Process and property characterization of advanced materials; Fatigue degradation, viscoplasticity in composites, and numerical simulation of reinforced concrete structures; Aging, creep, plastic anisotropy, joining of different materials, and time history analysis; Shock fronts in compressible medium; Numerical simulation of propagating fronts and shocks in compressible medium; Computational methods and numerical simulation; Analysis and modeling techniques; (5) Manufacturing and services -- Drilling equipment; Process equipment; Patents and intellectual property; Computational methods in manufacturing; (6) Non-destructive evaluation engineering -- NDE applications: Visual inspections; Material property determination/flaw sizing; (7) Offshore engineering and operations -- Environmental and safety issues in offshore operations; Floating production system; Offshore topside facilities; Offshore facility infrastructure; Offshore structures and pipelines; (8) Pipeline engineering and operations -- Pipeline risk management; Pipeline integrity; Evaluation and rehabilitation; Multiphase flow; Pipeline simulation; Pipeline design and operations; New technology; Erosion and corrosion; (9) Plant engineering and reliability -- Reliability methods; Reliability techniques; (10) Petroleum production technology -- Pipeline risk management; Multiphase flow; Multiphase flow equipment; Drilling fluids and completions; Erosion and corrosion; Multiphase pumping; (11) Tribology -- Manufacturing processes; Land-based gas turbine research; Lubrication, tribo-physics and tribo-chemistry. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  14. 46 CFR 56.01-5 - Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and other standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), as limited, modified, or replaced... subchapter. See 46 CFR 56.60-1(b) for the other adopted commercial standards applicable to piping systems... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and...

  15. 46 CFR 56.01-5 - Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and other standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), as limited, modified, or replaced... subchapter. See 46 CFR 56.60-1(b) for the other adopted commercial standards applicable to piping systems... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and...

  16. 46 CFR 56.01-5 - Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and other standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), as limited, modified, or replaced... subchapter. See 46 CFR 56.60-1(b) for the other adopted commercial standards applicable to piping systems... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and...

  17. 46 CFR 56.01-5 - Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and other standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), as limited, modified, or replaced... subchapter. See 46 CFR 56.60-1(b) for the other adopted commercial standards applicable to piping systems... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and...

  18. 46 CFR 56.01-5 - Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and other standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), as limited, modified, or replaced... subchapter. See 46 CFR 56.60-1(b) for the other adopted commercial standards applicable to piping systems... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of ASME B31.1 for power piping, and...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1182 Nacelle areas behind firewalls....1187, 25.1189, and 25.1195 through 25.1203, including those concerning designated fire zones. However, engine pod attaching structures need not contain fire detection or extinguishing means. (b) For each...

  20. Physics of Mechanical, Gaseous, and Fluid Systems. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Peggy; And Others

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum. The SET Curriculum integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and electronic technology. The objective of this curriculum development project is to train technicians in the use of…

  1. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....1187, 25.1189, and 25.1195 through 25.1203, including those concerning designated fire zones. However, engine pod attaching structures need not contain fire detection or extinguishing means. (b) For each area...: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1182 Nacelle areas behind...

  2. PHASE I MATERIALS PROPERTY DATABASE DEVELOPMENT FOR ASME CODES AND STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    To support the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes and Standard (BPVC) in modern information era, development of a web-based materials property database is initiated under the supervision of ASME Committee on Materials. To achieve efficiency, the project heavily draws upon experience from development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook and the Nuclear System Materials Handbook. The effort is divided into two phases. Phase I is planned to deliver a materials data file warehouse that offers a depository for various files containing raw data and background information, and Phase II will provide a relational digital database that provides advanced features facilitating digital data processing and management. Population of the database will start with materials property data for nuclear applications and expand to data covering the entire ASME Code and Standards including the piping codes as the database structure is continuously optimized. The ultimate goal of the effort is to establish a sound cyber infrastructure that support ASME Codes and Standards development and maintenance.

  3. Evaluation of ASME Section XI Reference Level Sensitivity for Initiation of Ultrasonic Inspection Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T. T.; Selby, G. P.

    1981-04-01

    This report evaluates the change in inspection sensitivity resulting in major changes of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI between 1974 and 1977 Editions. It was found that the inspection sensitivity resulting from requirements of the 1977 Edition of Section XI were not adequate to detect minimum flaws referenced by same Code.

  4. Simulation and optimization of a coking wastewater biological treatment process by activated sludge models (ASM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yang; Wu, Gaoming; Mao, Juan; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Applications of activated sludge models (ASM) in simulating industrial biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are still difficult due to refractory and complex components in influents as well as diversity in activated sludges. In this study, an ASM3 modeling study was conducted to simulate and optimize a practical coking wastewater treatment plant (CWTP). First, respirometric characterizations of the coking wastewater and CWTP biomasses were conducted to determine the specific kinetic and stoichiometric model parameters for the consecutive aeration-anoxic-aeration (O-A/O) biological process. All ASM3 parameters have been further estimated and calibrated, through cross validation by the model dynamic simulation procedure. Consequently, an ASM3 model was successfully established to accurately simulate the CWTP performances in removing COD and NH4-N. An optimized CWTP operation condition could be proposed reducing the operation cost from 6.2 to 5.5 €/m(3) wastewater. This study is expected to provide a useful reference for mathematic simulations of practical industrial WWTPs. PMID:26439861

  5. ASME cogen turbo power `94. IGTI-Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, H.A.; Cooke, D.H.; Fransson, T.H.; Greitzer, E.M.

    1994-12-31

    This is a collection of papers presented at the 8th Congress and Exposition on Gas Turbines in Cogeneration and Utility, Industrial and Independent Power Generation. The topics of the papers include pacesetter plants and retrofits, plant economics and applications, manufacturing and materials, turbomachinery component design, internal aerodynamic analysis, thermodynamic cycle theory, new engine and cycle developments, performance monitoring and software, emission control, environmental issues, controls and instrumentation, combustion technology, coal and biomass gasification technology, biomass power plant technology, internal and cycle component heat transfer, and cogeneration: grid vs host compatibility characteristics.

  6. Three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A framework for fluid transport modeling and engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Spengler, R.W.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.

    1993-12-31

    A three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model of the central block of Yucca MounEain. Nevada, illustrates how some activities can serve both site characterization and dcsign and construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Site-characterization activities supported bv this model include characterizing the three-dimensional geometry of lithologic units and faults, and providing boundary conditions for geostatistical models and site-scale fluid flow modeling. The model supports the conceptual design as construction efforts for the proposed ramps of the ESF and potential high-level nuclear waste repository.

  7. Fluid mass and thermal loading effects on the modal characteristics of space shuttle main engine liquid oxygen inlet splitter vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panossian, H. V.; Boehnlein, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis and evaluation of experimental modal survey test data on the variations of modal characteristics induced by pressure and thermal loading events are presented. Extensive modal survey tests were carried out on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test article using liquid nitrogen under cryogenic temperatures and high pressures. The results suggest that an increase of pressure under constant cryogenic temperature or a decrease of temperature under high pressure induces an upward shift of frequencies of various modes of the structures.

  8. Report on task assignment No. 3 for the Waste Package Project; Parts A & B, ASME pressure vessel codes review for waste package application; Part C, Library search for reliability/failure rates data on low temperature low pressure piping, containers, and casks with long design lives

    SciTech Connect

    Trabia, M.B.; Kiley, M.; Cardle, J.; Joseph, M.

    1991-07-01

    The Waste Package Project Research Team, at UNLV, has four general required tasks. Task one is the management, quality assurance, and overview of the research that is performed under the cooperative agreement. Task two is the structural analysis of spent fuel and high level waste. Task three is an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code review for waste package application. Finally, task four is waste package labeling. This report includes preliminary information about task three (ASME Pressure Vessel Code review for Waste package Application). The first objective is to compile a list of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code that can be applied to waste package containers design and manufacturing processes. The second objective is to explore the use of these applicable codes to the preliminary waste package container designs. The final objective is to perform a library search for reliability and/or failure rates data on low pressure, low temperature, containers and casks with long design lives.

  9. Numerical Study of Granular Scaffold Efficiency to Convert Fluid Flow into Mechanical Stimulation in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cruel, Magali; Bensidhoum, Morad; Nouguier-Lehon, Cécile; Dessombz, Olivier; Becquart, Pierre; Petite, Hervé; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Controlling the mechanical environment in bioreactors represents a key element in the reactors' optimization. Positive effects of fluid flow in three-dimensional bioreactors have been observed, but local stresses at cell scale remain unknown. These effects led to the development of numerical tools to assess the micromechanical environment of cells in bioreactors. Recently, new possible scaffold geometry has emerged: granular packings. In the present study, the primary goal was to compare the efficiency of such a scaffold to the other ones from literature in terms of wall shear stress levels and distributions. To that aim, three different types of granular packings were generated through discrete element method, and computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate the flow within these packings. Shear stress levels and distributions were determined. A linear relationship between shear stress and inlet velocity was observed, and its slope was similar to published data. The distributions of normalized stress were independent of the inlet velocity and were highly comparable to those of widely used porous scaffolds. Granular packings present similar features to more classical porous scaffolds and have the advantage of being easy to manipulate and seed. The methods of this work are generalizable to the study of other granular packing configurations. PMID:25634115

  10. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  11. ASM Specialty Handbook{reg_sign}: Carbon and alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon and alloy steels are the workhorse of structural materials in modern engineering because of their very reasonable costs coupled with their many and varied properties that allow their use in such a large array of applications. it`s very easy to take steel for granted and forget how much it`s relied upon in critical uses such as cars, bridges, buildings, landing gear assemblies, and more. There are in-depth reviews on formability weldability, machineability, and hardenability of the various steel grades. One can also discover how adding certain alloys can significantly improve steel processing. The strength and toughness section has been greatly expanded with more coverage than ever before of corrosion fatigue. One has access to extensive reports detailing which steels are more susceptible to environmental damage such as stress-corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. Temperature effects relating to mechanical properties and corrosion are also discussed.

  12. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  13. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  14. Proceedings of the tenth ASME wind energy symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Veers, P.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Wind Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers to discuss fundamental issues and basic problems confronting the advancement of wind technology. Wind energy research includes activities in atmospheric fluid aerodynamics, structural dynamics, crack mechanics and fatigue analysis, electrical systems, control systems, and system analysis. The technology continues to show signs of maturity, and there is a growing recognition that the major problems are generic - the details for HAWTs may differ from those for VAWTs, but the basic problems are the same. The authors obviously need more knowledge of the cyclic loading and resulting fatigue damage that is leading to blade failures on all the machines in the field. This need has lead to more emphasis being placed on detailed inflow, and aerodynamic and structural dynamic measurements in an effort to better understand turbulence-induced phenomena. In addition, wind models are being compared and evaluated in detail, and unsteady airfoil testing is providing data that will lead to more accurate dynamic stall models and result in better aerodynamic-load codes that more accurately predict turbulence-induced loads. The results presented in this volume on economic studies for next-generation machines indicate that those machines should produce energy at prices very competitive with today's energy prices. If, as is the emerging trend, environmental costs are taken into account, wind becomes an extremely attractive source of energy. Before we can benefit from those advances, however, reliable machines must be built and placed into service.

  15. Evaluation of feasibility of measuring EHD film thickness associated with cryogenic fluids. [for space shuttle main engine bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.; Stockwell, R. D.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring elastohydrodynamic (EHD) films as formed with a cryogenic (LN2) fluid is evaluated. Modifications were made to an existing twin disk EHD apparatus to allow for disk lubrication with liquid nitrogen. This disk apparatus is equipped with an X-ray system for measuring the thickness of any lubricant film that is formed between the disks. Several film thickness experiments were conducted with the apparatus which indicate that good lubrication films are filmed with LN2. In addition to the film thickness studies, failure analyses of three bearings were conducted. The HPOTP turbine end bearings had experienced axial loads of 36,000 to 44,000 N (8,000 to 10,000 lb). High continuous radial loads were also experienced, which were most likely caused by thermal growth of the inner race. The resulting high internal loads caused race spalling and ball wear to occur.

  16. Numerical Analysis of the Interaction between Thermo-Fluid Dynamics and Auto-Ignition Reaction in Spark Ignition Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijyo, Katsuya; Nishiwaki, Kazuie; Yoshihara, Yoshinobu

    The CFD simulations were performed integrating the low-temperature oxidation reaction. Analyses were made with respect to the first auto-ignition location in the case of a premixed-charge compression auto-ignition in a laminar flow field and in the case of the auto-ignition in an end gas during an S. I. Engine combustion process. In the latter simulation, the spatially-filtered transport equations were solved to express fluctuating temperatures in a turbulent flow in consideration of strong non-linearity to temperature in the reaction equations. It is suggested that the first auto-ignition location does not always occur at higher-temperature locations and that the difference in the locations of the first auto-ignition depends on the time period during which the local end gas temperature passes through the region of shorter ignition delay, including the NTC region.

  17. FLUID TRANSPORT THROUGH POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluid transport through porous media is a relevant topic to many scientific and engineering fields. Soil scientists, civil engineers, hydrologists and hydrogeologists are concerned with the transport of water, gases and nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants through porous earth m...

  18. ASME AG-1 Section FC Qualified HEPA Filters; a Particle Loading Comparison - 13435

    SciTech Connect

    Stillo, Andrew; Ricketts, Craig I.

    2013-07-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters used to protect personnel, the public and the environment from airborne radioactive materials are designed, manufactured and qualified in accordance with ASME AG-1 Code section FC (HEPA Filters) [1]. The qualification process requires that filters manufactured in accordance with this ASME AG-1 code section must meet several performance requirements. These requirements include performance specifications for resistance to airflow, aerosol penetration, resistance to rough handling, resistance to pressure (includes high humidity and water droplet exposure), resistance to heated air, spot flame resistance and a visual/dimensional inspection. None of these requirements evaluate the particle loading capacity of a HEPA filter design. Concerns, over the particle loading capacity, of the different designs included within the ASME AG-1 section FC code[1], have been voiced in the recent past. Additionally, the ability of a filter to maintain its integrity, if subjected to severe operating conditions such as elevated relative humidity, fog conditions or elevated temperature, after loading in use over long service intervals is also a major concern. Although currently qualified HEPA filter media are likely to have similar loading characteristics when evaluated independently, filter pleat geometry can have a significant impact on the in-situ particle loading capacity of filter packs. Aerosol particle characteristics, such as size and composition, may also have a significant impact on filter loading capacity. Test results comparing filter loading capacities for three different aerosol particles and three different filter pack configurations are reviewed. The information presented represents an empirical performance comparison among the filter designs tested. The results may serve as a basis for further discussion toward the possible development of a particle loading test to be included in the qualification requirements of ASME AG-1 Code sections FC and FK[1]. (authors)

  19. A 2015 Igrf Candidate Model Based on Swarm's Experimental ASM Vector Mode Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Olsen, N.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Brocco, L.; Sirol, O.; Coisson, P.; Lalanne, X.; Chulliat, A.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Alpha, Bravo and Charlie satellites of the ESA Swarm mission carries an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (CNES customer furnished ASM instrument designed by CEA-Lti) that provides the nominal 1 Hz scalar data of the mission, but also delivers 1 Hz experimental vector data. Tests during the commissioning and calibration/validation phase have shown that these data and the rigidity of the boom mechanically linking the ASM to the star imager (STR) on Alpha and Bravo were of such good quality that an IGRF candidate geomagnetic field model could possibly be produced from such ASM-only data (without having to resort to any of the nominal vector field magnetometer (VFM) data of the mission). In this presentation, we will report on our efforts to build such an IGRF candidate, which intends to provide an image of the January 1, 2015 Geomagnetic Field, alternative to the images provided by IGRF candidate models based on Swarm nominal L1b data, or other data.

  20. RXTE ASM Observations of GRB991216 - A One Hour Old X-ray Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, R.; Smith, D. A.

    The Gamma-ray Burst 991216 (the ``Beethoven" burst) was both very bright itself and also had an unusually bright X-ray afterglow. This afterglow was observed and localized by the RXTE PCA 4 hours after the burst occurred (Takeshima et al. 1999). This position determination then enabled an optical afterglow to be found (Uglesich et al 1999). Serendipitously, the RXTE ASM obtained a sequence of 7 observations covering this source in a period of 11 minutes starting just 1 hour after the burst peak. From these 7 dwells, a flux of 32 +/- 8 mCrabs (1 sigma error) was determined which is consistent with a power-law extrapolation of RXTE PCA flux measurements. While GRB afterglows are generally faint and thus difficult for the RXTE ASM to study, due to its modest collecting area and short observation times, we believe that this unusually bright afterglow has indeed been detected. These results indicate that the RXTE ASM has provided a measurement of an X-ray afterglow light curve at times which have previously not been studied.

  1. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 from BATSE and ASM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Linqing; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of observations of Cygnus X-1 by the RXTE/ASM (1.5-12 keV) and CGRO/BATSE (20-300 keV), including about 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between intensities and hardnesses in different energy bands from 1.5 keV to 300 keV. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness (as previously reported) but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the flux in the 20-100 keV range. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. The observations show that there has to be another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superimposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependence of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We interpret the observed correlations in terms of theoretical Comptonization models. In the hard state, the variability appears to be driven mostly by changing flux in seed photons Comptonized in a hot thermal plasma cloud with an approximately constant power supply. In the soft state, the variability is consistent with flares of hybrid, thermal/nonthermal, plasma with variable power above a stable cold disk. Also, based on broadband pointed observations simultaneous with those of the ASM and BATSE, we find the intrinsic bolometric luminosity increases by a factor of approximately 3-4 from the hard state to the soft one, which supports models of the state transition based on a change of the accretion rate.

  2. ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Ferrada, Juan J; Curd, Warren; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni; Barabash, Vladimir; Kim, Seokho H

    2011-01-01

    During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support from Northrop Grumman, and OneCIS). ITER International Organization (ITER-IO) is responsible for design oversight and equipment installation in Cadarache, France. TCWS equipment will be fabricated using ASME design codes with quality assurance and oversight by an Agreed Notified Body (approved by the French regulator) that will ensure regulatory compliance. This paper describes the TCWS design and how U.S. ITER and fabricators will use ASME codes to comply with EU Directives and French Orders and Decrees.

  3. ASM-3 Acid Sphingomyelinase Functions as a Positive Regulator of the DAF-2/AGE-1 Signaling Pathway and Serves as a Novel Anti-Aging Target

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsoon; Sun, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In C. elegans, the highly conserved DAF-2/insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling (IIS) pathway regulates longevity, metabolism, reproduction and development. In mammals, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to produce ceramide. ASM has been implicated in CD95 death receptor signaling under certain stress conditions. However, the involvement of ASM in growth factor receptor signaling under physiological conditions is not known. Here, we report that in vivo ASM functions as a positive regulator of the DAF-2/IIS pathway in C. elegans. We have shown that inactivation of asm-3 extends animal lifespan and promotes dauer arrest, an alternative developmental process. A significant cooperative effect on lifespan is observed between asm-3 deficiency and loss-of-function alleles of the age-1/PI 3-kinase, with the asm-3; age-1 double mutant animals having a mean lifespan 259% greater than that of the wild-type animals. The lifespan extension phenotypes caused by the loss of asm-3 are dependent on the functions of daf-16/FOXO and daf-18/PTEN. We have demonstrated that inactivation of asm-3 causes nuclear translocation of DAF-16::GFP protein, up-regulates endogenous DAF-16 protein levels and activates the downstream targeting genes of DAF-16. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of asm-3 in regulation of lifespan and diapause by modulating IIS pathway. Importantly, we have found that two drugs known to inhibit mammalian ASM activities, desipramine and clomipramine, markedly extend the lifespan of wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that achieved by genetic inactivation of the asm genes. Our studies illustrate a novel strategy of anti-aging by targeting ASM, which may potentially be extended to mammals. PMID:23049887

  4. Measurement and mitigation of corrosion on self-contained fluid filled (SCFF) submarine circuits for New York Power Authority: Volume 1 -- Engineering evaluation for potential corrosion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) installed a 345-kV submarine cable circuit across Long Island Sound between substations at Davenport Neck and Hempstead Harbor. During design and installation of the cable circuit, utility and cable manufacturers engineers identified corrosion as a possible problem for the cable system. They considered such effects in the cable design and discussed preliminary requirements for a cathodic protection system on Long Island Sound circuit. EPRI cosponsored this review of the corrosion effects with NYPA and Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp. (ESEERCO). Volume 1 of this report discusses the results from an in-depth evaluation of the self-contained fluid-filled (SCFF) cable construction materials and their susceptibility to corrosion. Volume 2 provides extended stray current field measurements and a preliminary design for a cathodic protection system to ensure cable service reliability. This study provides a blueprint for East or West Coast utilities evaluating site-specific corrosion processes and cable circuit protection methods suitable for underwater environments.

  5. Critical-fluid extraction of organics from water. Volume I. Engineering analysis. Final report, 1 October 1979-30 November 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.M.; de Filippi, R.P.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-fluid extraction of several organic solutes from water was investigated analytically and experimentally to determine the energy conservation potential of the technology relative to distillation. This Volume gives the results of an engineering analysis. The process uses condensed or supercritical carbon dioxide as an extracting solvent to separate aqueous solutions of common organics such as ethanol, isopropanol and sec-butanol. Energy input to the systems is electric power to drive compressors. A detailed process analysis included evaluation and correlation of thermophysical properties and phase equilibria for the two- and three-component systems involved. The analysis showed that a plant fed with 10 weight percent ethanol feed would consume 0.65 kilowatt-hours (kwh) of power for compression energy per gallon of alcohol. This energy consumption would be 5300 Btu of steam-equivalent, or 6500 Btu of fossil-fuel-equivalent energy. The extraction product, however, would require additional energy to produce high-purity alcohol. Doubling the ethanol feed concentration to 20 weight percent would reduce the energy required to about 0.30 kwh per gallon. Halving the ethanol feed concentration to 5 weight percent would increase the energy required to about 1.35 kwh per gallon. For the same feed composition, isopropanol can be separated with 48% of the energy required for ethanol. The same separation of sec-butanol can be done with 25% of the ethanol energy requirement.

  6. Engine having multiple pumps driven by a single shaft

    DOEpatents

    Blass, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An engine comprises an engine housing. A first engine fluid sub-system that includes a first pump and the engine housing defining a first fluid passage is also included in the engine. The engine also includes at least one additional engine fluid sub-system that includes a second pump and the engine housing defining a second fluid passage. A rotating shaft is at least partially positioned in the engine housing, the first pump and the second pump.

  7. Applied fluid dynamics handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, R. D.

    The fundamental principles of fluid dynamics and its applications in engineering, design, atmospheric science, and oceanography are discussed; computation techniques are explained; and numerical data from analytical and experimental studies are compiled in tables, graphs, diagrams, and maps. Topics covered include dimensional analysis; conservation equations; pipe and duct flow nozzles, diffusers, and Venturis; open-channel flow; jets, plumes, wakes, and shear layers; fluid-dynamic drag; wind and atmospheric processes; ocean waves and coastal processes; porous media, fluid bearings, and fluid seals; and the properties of gases and liquids. The Navier-Stokes and boundary-layer equations, Reynolds stress and turbulence measurements, and potential flow are treated in appendices.

  8. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    DOEpatents

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  9. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids

  10. Case study of the propagation of a small flaw under PWR loading conditions and comparison with the ASME code design life. Comparison of ASME Code Sections III and XI

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Richardson, A.K.; Server, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cooperative study was performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the degree of conservatism and consistency in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III fatigue evaluation procedure and Section XI flaw acceptance standards. A single, realistic, sample problem was analyzed to determine the significance of certain points of criticism made of an earlier parametric study by staff members of the Division of Engineering Standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The problem was based on a semielliptical flaw located on the inside surface of the hot-leg piping at the reactor vessel safe-end weld for the Zion 1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR). Two main criteria were used in selecting the problem; first, it should be a straight pipe to minimize the computational expense; second, it should exhibit as high a cumulative usage factor as possible. Although the problem selected has one of the highest cumulative usage factors of any straight pipe in the primary system of PWRs, it is still very low. The Code Section III fatigue usage factor was only 0.00046, assuming it was in the as-welded condition, and fatigue crack-growth analyses predicted negligible crack growth during the 40-year design life. When the analyses were extended past the design life, the usage factor was less than 1.0 when the flaw had propagated to failure. The current study shows that the criticism of the earlier report should not detract from the conclusion that if a component experiences a high level of cyclic stress corresponding to a fatigue usage factor near 1.0, very small cracks can propagate to unacceptable sizes.

  11. History of the internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Somerscales, E.F.C. ); Zagotta, A.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The study of engineering history by the practioners of engineering is not well-developed. This is unfortunate, because if nothing else, it is the culture of our profession, but even more importantly, it provides us with a proper understanding of current and future engineering. Without an adequate historical background the engineer could, for example, respond incorrectly to problems that might arise in some device or make inappropriate changes in the design. History can also suggest the path that might be followed by a new product, and thereby guide the development and marketing. Because of the fuller appreciation of the art and science of engineering that is provided by an awareness of engineering history, it seems appropriate for the ASME to recognize the role in our profession. The papers in this volume, which deal and various aspects of the history of the internal combustion engine, were presented in a session at the Fall Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division held in Dearborn, Michigan on October 17, 1989. The session was jointly sponsored and arranged by the Internal Combustion Engine Division and by the History and Heritage Committee of ASME. It is the first in what the latter hopes will be a regular series of sessions at various Society meetings jointly sponsored with the different divisions of the Society. It is hoped in this way to raise the consciousness of the engineering community to its history and to encourage in particular the preparation of historical papers by engineer-historians, who are involved in the practice of engineering. An approximate chronological order has been chosen for the arrangement of the papers, with the first, by H.O. Hardenberg, being on the gunpowder engines, which were experimented with from the sixteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century.

  12. Assessment of ASME code examinations on regenerative, letdown and residual heat removal heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, Stephen R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Tinsley, G. A.; Lydell, B.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-07-01

    Inservice inspection requirements for pressure retaining welds in the regenerative, letdown, and residual heat removal heat exchangers are prescribed in Section XI Articles IWB and IWC of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Accordingly, volumetric and/or surface examinations are performed on heat exchanger shell, head, nozzle-to-head, and nozzle-to-shell welds. Inspection difficulties associated with the implementation of these Code-required examinations have forced operating nuclear power plants to seek relief from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The nature of these relief requests are generally concerned with metallurgical, geometry, accessibility, and radiation burden. Over 60% of licensee requests to the NRC identify significant radiation exposure burden as the principle reason for relief from the ASME Code examinations on regenerative heat exchangers. For the residual heat removal heat exchangers, 90% of the relief requests are associated with geometry and accessibility concerns. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was funded by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to review current practice with regard to volumetric and/or surface examinations of shell welds of letdown heat exchangers regenerative heat exchangers and residual (decay) heat removal heat exchangers Design, operating, common preventative maintenance practices, and potential degradation mechanisms are reviewed. A detailed survey of domestic and international PWR-specific operating experience was performed to identify pressure boundary failures (or lack of failures) in each heat exchanger type and NSSS design. The service data survey was based on the PIPExp database and covers PWR plants worldwide for the period 1970-2004. Finally a risk assessment of the current ASME Code inspection requirements for residual heat removal, letdown, and regenerative heat exchangers is performed. The results are then reviewed to discuss the examinations relative to plant safety and occupational radiation exposures.

  13. Materials and design bases issues in ASME Code Case N-47

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the design bases (principally ASME Code Case N-47) was conducted for design and operation of reactors at elevated temperatures where the time-dependent effects of creep, creep-fatigue, and creep ratcheting are significant. Areas where Code rules or regulatory guides may be lacking or inadequate to ensure the operation over the expected life cycles for the next-generation advanced high-temperature reactor systems, with designs to be certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have been identified as unresolved issues. Twenty-two unresolved issues were identified and brief scoping plans developed for resolving these issues.

  14. New methods of analysis of materials strength data for the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile and creep data of the type used to establish allowable stress levels for the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code have been examined for type 321H stainless steel. Both inhomogeneous, unbalanced data sets and well-planned homogeneous data sets have been examined. Data have been analyzed by implementing standard manual techniques on a modern digital computer. In addition, more sophisticated techniques, practical only through the use of the computer, have been applied. The result clearly demonstrates the efficacy of computerized techniques for these types of analyses.

  15. Overview of the new ASME Performance Test Code for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1986-01-01

    The principal technical features of the ASME Performance Test Code for wind turbines are presented and such issues as what sizes and types of wind turbines should be included, what the principal measure of performance should be, and how wind speed should be measured are discussed. It is concluded that the present test code is applicable to wind turbine systems of all sizes. The principal measure of performance as defined by this code is net energy output and the primary performance parameter is the 'test energy ratio' which is based on a comparison between the measured and predicted energy output for the test period.

  16. ASME N510 test results for Savannah River Site AACS filter compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.; Punch, T.M.

    1994-07-01

    The K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site recently implemented design improvements for the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) by procuring, installing, and testing new Air Cleaning Units, or filter compartments, to ASME AG-1, N509, and N510 requirements. Specifically, these new units provide documentable seismic resistance to a Design, Basis Accident earthquake, provide 2 in. adsorber beds with 0.25 second residence time, and meet all AG-1, N509, and N510 requirements for testability and maintainability. This paper presents the results of the Site acceptance testing and discusses an issue associated with sample manifold qualification testing.

  17. Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterkamp, W. R.; Gray, J. R.; Narayanan, M.

    2002-12-01

    Present day Engineers need to understand water, its properties, its distribution as well as its movement. Certain engineering disciplines may require a course in Hydraulics and Hydrology. However, most other disciplines require courses in Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics. The author believes Hydrology is an essential knowledge that most engineers should possess, regardless of their discipline. Water is consumed or circulated in huge quantities in certain types of industries and location of water resources / supply may play a key role in the selection of a future factory site. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing Industries, Chemical Industries, Heat Treatment Facilities are just a few that one can mention. A typical Engineering Fluid Mechanics Course normally covers the broad discipline of Engineering Mechanics that is concerned with the behavior of Liquids and gases at rest or in motion. Water, of course is one of the liquids discussed. Regardless, Engineers are totally ignorant of the subject matter of Hydrology or the Hydrologic Cycle and their importance in the twenty-first century Engineering Environment. In this short paper, the author outlines the methods of successfully incorporating Hydrology into an Engineering Fluid Mechanics Course.

  18. Migration from hierarchal storage management to ASM storage server: a case study.

    PubMed

    Baune, D; Bookman, G

    1999-05-01

    The Department of Radiology at the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics had to make a change from its current hierarchical storage management (HSM) system. The HSM software is the heart of any near-line data storage system and any change in this software affects all near-line and on-line data storage. In this case, over a terabyte of data had been migrated in more than 2 million files. The traditional method of reading in the old data and then writing it out to the new system was calculated to take more than 60 years. Here, we will examine the reasons for making such a radical change in the HSM used. We will also discuss why ASM (the new HSM software) was selected, and the performance improvements seen. A second, less difficult transition was made a few months later, of upgrading to a newer faster tape technology. The two types of tapes were incompatible, but the storage software and robotics used allowed for a peaceful coexistence during the transition. The transition from HSM to ASM was not a trivial task. It required a reasonable implementation/migration plan, which involved finding the correct resources and thinking outside the norm for solutions. All sites that have any amount of data stored in near-line devices will face similar conversions. This presentation should help in the event that a data conversion plan is not already in place. PMID:10342172

  19. Methods for incorporating effects of LWR coolant environment into ASME code fatigue evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1999-04-15

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Appendix I to Section HI of the Code specifies design fatigue curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels can be a factor of {approx}70 lower in an LWR environment than in air. These results raise the issue of whether the design fatigue curves in Section III are appropriate for the intended purpose. This paper presents the two methods that have been proposed for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs in LWR environments are discussed.

  20. ASME PTC47.4 -- IGCC performance testing issues for the power block

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, A.K.; Parmar, J.

    1999-07-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants that utilize solid and unconventional liquid fuels have now reached commercialization stage as evidenced by their worldwide construction and new orders. The complex nature or integration between the power generating and the fuel gas generating gasification units of an IGCC has created a need to provide guidance and procedures on how to conduct the performance test for the users and owners of these power plants. ASME Performance Test Code 47 (PTC47) and the associated subsets (PTC47.1, PTC47.2, PTC47.3 and PTC47.4) are being written to define the significant performance factors and provide recommendations how these factors should be applied on test measurements to evaluate the deviation from the IGCC equipment guarantees. This paper reports the progress and issues pertaining to the PTC 47.4 for the IGCC Power Block and how it differs from ASME PTC 46 test code. The paper also discusses the creation of a thermodynamic Power Block model of Wabash River Repowering IGCC plant using a proprietary software. Correction curves derived from the model, which define the performance at design and off design from site conditions are also presented.

  1. Overview of new rules and recent changes in ASME code, Section VIII, pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    In this presentation, some of the new rules and recent changes to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Divisions 1 and 2, are reviewed. On July 1, 1995, the 1995 Edition of the ASME Code was issued. This 1995 Edition incorporates those items which were added of changed in the 1992, 1993, and 1994 Addenda to the 1992 Edition of the Code. The 1995 Edition contains no new items which were not included in the previous edition and three addenda. With the possibility of an extended time before some of the new rules are able to appear in the addenda, the recent trend is to put the rules in Code Cases which are approved earlier. Consequently, it is necessary to review new Code Cases as well as Code changes. Updates continue for impact requirements for standard components as well as for materials other than UCS, carbon steel and low alloys. Extensive changes have been made for UHA, high-alloy, materials regarding impact requirements. Example problems have been revised to include these effects. Significant changes are reviewed.

  2. Results from Evaluation of Proposed ASME AG-1 Section FI Metal Media Filters - 13063

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John A.; Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration technology is commonly used in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that require control of radioactive particulate matter (PM) emissions due to treatment or management of radioactive materials. Although HEPA technology typically makes use of glass fiber media, metal and ceramic media filters are also capable of filtering efficiencies beyond the required 99.97%. Sintered metal fiber filters are good candidates for use in DOE facilities due to their resistance to corrosive environments and resilience at high temperature and elevated levels of relative humidity. Their strength can protect them from high differential pressure or pressure spikes and allow for back pulse cleaning, extending filter lifetime. Use of these filters has the potential to reduce the cost of filtration in DOE facilities due to life cycle cost savings. ASME AG-1 section FI has not been approved due to a lack of protocols and performance criteria for qualifying section FI filters. The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) with the aid of the FI project team has developed a Section FI test stand and test plan capable of assisting in the qualification ASME AG-1 section FI filters. Testing done at ICET using the FI test stand evaluates resistance to rated air flow, test aerosol penetration and resistance to heated air of the section FI filters. Data collected during this testing consists of temperature, relative humidity, differential pressure, flow rate, upstream particle concentration, and downstream particle concentration. (authors)

  3. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of ASME Section III Hydrostatic Test: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton,, P. H.; Taylor,, T. T.; Dawson,, J. F.; Pappas,, R. A.; Kurtz,, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    Through the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has installed instrumentation on Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 for the purpose of test and evaluation of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping for flaw detection. This report describes the acoustic emission monitoring performed during the ASME Section III hydrostatic testing of Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and the results obtained. Highlights of the results are: • Spontaneous AE was detected from a nozzle area during final pressurization. • Evaluation of the apparent source of the spontaneous AE using an empirically derived AE/fracture mechanics relationship agreed within a factor of two with an evaluation by ASME Section XI Code procedures. • AE was detected from a fracture specimen which was pressure coupled to the 10-inch accumulator nozzle. This provided reassurance of adequate system sensitivity. • High background noise was observed when all four reactor coolant pumps were operating. Work is continuing at Watts Bar Unit 1 toward AE monitoring hot functional testing and subsequently monitoring during reactor operation.

  4. 3D automatic anatomy segmentation based on iterative graph-cut-ASM

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xinjian; Bagci, Ulas

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This paper studies the feasibility of developing an automatic anatomy segmentation (AAS) system in clinical radiology and demonstrates its operation on clinical 3D images. Methods: The AAS system, the authors are developing consists of two main parts: object recognition and object delineation. As for recognition, a hierarchical 3D scale-based multiobject method is used for the multiobject recognition task, which incorporates intensity weighted ball-scale (b-scale) information into the active shape model (ASM). For object delineation, an iterative graph-cut-ASM (IGCASM) algorithm is proposed, which effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the globally optimal delineation capability of the GC method. The presented IGCASM algorithm is a 3D generalization of the 2D GC-ASM method that they proposed previously in Chen et al.[Proc. SPIE, 7259, 72590C1-72590C-8 (2009)]. The proposed methods are tested on two datasets comprised of images obtained from 20 patients (10 male and 10 female) of clinical abdominal CT scans, and 11 foot magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The test is for four organs (liver, left and right kidneys, and spleen) segmentation, five foot bones (calcaneus, tibia, cuboid, talus, and navicular). The recognition and delineation accuracies were evaluated separately. The recognition accuracy was evaluated in terms of translation, rotation, and scale (size) error. The delineation accuracy was evaluated in terms of true and false positive volume fractions (TPVF, FPVF). The efficiency of the delineation method was also evaluated on an Intel Pentium IV PC with a 3.4 GHZ CPU machine. Results: The recognition accuracies in terms of translation, rotation, and scale error over all organs are about 8 mm, 10 deg. and 0.03, and over all foot bones are about 3.5709 mm, 0.35 deg. and 0.025, respectively. The accuracy of delineation over all organs for all subjects as expressed in TPVF and FPVF is 93.01% and 0.22%, and all foot bones for all subjects are 93.75% and 0.28%, respectively. While the delineations for the four organs can be accomplished quite rapidly with average of 78 s, the delineations for the five foot bones can be accomplished with average of 70 s. Conclusions: The experimental results showed the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed automatic anatomy segmentation system: (a) the incorporation of shape priors into the GC framework is feasible in 3D as demonstrated previously for 2D images; (b) our results in 3D confirm the accuracy behavior observed in 2D. The hybrid strategy IGCASM seems to be more robust and accurate than ASM and GC individually; and (c) delineations within body regions and foot bones of clinical importance can be accomplished quite rapidly within 1.5 min.

  5. Comparison of ASME Code NB-3200 and NB-3600 results for fatigue analysis of B31.1 branch nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Nitzel, M.E.; Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.

    1996-06-01

    Fatigue analyses wre conducted on two reactor coolant system branch nozzles in an operating PWR designed to the B31.1 Code, for which no explicit fatigue analysis was required by the licensing basis. These analyses were performed as part of resolving issues connected with NRC`s Fatigue Action Plan to determine if the cumulative usage factor (CUF) for these nozzles, using the 1992 ASME Code and representative PWR transients, were comparable to nozzles designed and analyzed to the ASME Code. Both NB-3200 and NB-3600 ASME Code methods were used. NB-3200 analyses included the development of finite element models for each nozzle. Although detailed thermal transients were not available for the plant analyzed, representative transients from similar PWRs were applied in each method. CUFs calculated using NB-3200 methods were significantly less than using NB-3600. The paper points out differences in analysis methods and highlights difficulties and unknowns in performing more detailed analyses to reduce conservative assumptions.

  6. Viscosity of diesel engine fuel oil under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, Mayo D

    1929-01-01

    In the development of Diesel engine fuel injection systems it is necessary to have an approximate knowledge of the absolute viscosity of the fuel oil under high hydrostatic pressures. This report presents the results of experimental tests conducted by Mr. Jackson Newton Shore, utilizing the A.S.M.E. high pressure equipment.

  7. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  8. Fluid Overload.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael E; Prowle, John R

    2015-10-01

    Most critically ill patients experience external or internal fluid shifts and hemodynamic instability. In response to these changes, intravenous fluids are frequently administered. However, rapid losses of administered fluids from circulation and the indirect link between the short-lived plasma volume expansion and end points frequently result in transient responses to fluid therapy. Therefore, fluid overload is a common finding in intensive care units. The authors consider the evidence of harm associated with fluid overload and the physiologic processes that lead to fluid accumulation in critical illness. The authors then consider methods to prevent fluid accumulation and/or manage its resolution. PMID:26410146

  9. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium ( hyponatremia , hypernatremia), potassium ( hypokalemia , hyperkalemia ), and other chemicals that help regulate body fluids. Medicines can also affect fluid balance. The most common are water pills (diuretics) to ...

  10. Interaction between endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress (ER/SR stress), mitochondrial signaling and Ca2+ regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM)1

    PubMed Central

    Delmotte, Philippe; Sieck, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway inflammation is a key aspect of diseases such as asthma. Several inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL-13) increase cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) responses to agonist stimulation and Ca2+ sensitivity of force generation, thereby enhancing airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility (hyper-reactive state). Inflammation also induces ASM proliferation and remodeling (synthetic state). In normal ASM, the transient elevation of [Ca2+]cyt induced by agonists leads to a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) that may be important in matching ATP production with ATP consumption. In human ASM (hASM) exposed to TNFα and IL-13, the transient increase in [Ca2+]mito is blunted despite enhanced [Ca2+]cyt responses. We also found that TNFα and IL-13 induce reactive oxidant species (ROS) formation and endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress (unfolded protein response) in hASM. ER/SR stress in hASM is associated with disruption of mitochondrial coupling with the ER/SR membrane, which relates to reduced mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression. Thus, in hASM it appears that TNFα and IL-13 result in ROS formation leading to ER/SR stress, reduced Mfn2 expression, disruption of mitochondrion–ER/SR coupling, decreased mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased cell proliferation. PMID:25506723

  11. Interaction between endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress (ER/SR stress), mitochondrial signaling and Ca(2+) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM).

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Sieck, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Airway inflammation is a key aspect of diseases such as asthma. Several inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL-13) increase cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) responses to agonist stimulation and Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation, thereby enhancing airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility (hyper-reactive state). Inflammation also induces ASM proliferation and remodeling (synthetic state). In normal ASM, the transient elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonists leads to a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]mito) that may be important in matching ATP production with ATP consumption. In human ASM (hASM) exposed to TNFα and IL-13, the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]mito is blunted despite enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses. We also found that TNFα and IL-13 induce reactive oxidant species (ROS) formation and endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress (unfolded protein response) in hASM. ER/SR stress in hASM is associated with disruption of mitochondrial coupling with the ER/SR membrane, which relates to reduced mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression. Thus, in hASM it appears that TNFα and IL-13 result in ROS formation leading to ER/SR stress, reduced Mfn2 expression, disruption of mitochondrion-ER/SR coupling, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased cell proliferation. PMID:25506723

  12. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall...

  13. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall...

  14. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall...

  15. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall...

  16. 46 CFR 54.01-2 - Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 54.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption of division 1 of section VIII of the ASME... division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. (a) Pressure vessels shall...

  17. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  18. The Impact of ASME Section XI Appendix L Inspections on Piping Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.

    2001-12-31

    Appendix L of the ASME Section XI code sets standards for augmented inspections of piping components that have experienced high levels of fatigue usage, and provides a basis for continued operation of components beyond their original design life. This paper describes probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that estimate the reductions in piping failure probabilities associated with the Appendix L inspections. The improvements in piping reliability are a function of the frequency of the inspections and the quality of the ultrasonic examination methods (probability of flaw detection). Both preexisting fabrication flaws and flaws initiated by fatigue cycling are included in the probabilistic calculations. The calculations show that a program of Appendix L inspections can maintain piping failure rates during a period of extended operation at levels that are at or below the failure frequencies that are estimated for the original period of the design life.

  19. Crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade 2 steel in hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic-load crack growth measurements were performed on ASME SA-105 Grade 2 steel specimens exposed to 10,000- and 15,000-psi hydrogen and to 5000-psi helium, all at ambient temperatures. The cyclic-load crack growth rate was found to be faster in high-pressure hydrogen than in helium. Cyclic-load crack growth rates in this steel were not reduced by preloading in air to a stress intensity of 1.5 times the cyclic K sub max in hydrogen. There are indications that holding under load in hydrogen, and loading and unloading in helium retards hydrogen-accelerated cyclic-load crack growth. Cyclic frequency and R (ratio of K sub min/k sub max) were important variables determining crack growth rate. The crack growth rate increased as a logarithm of the cycle duration and decreased with increasing R.

  20. ASM conference report: genetics and molecular biology of industrial microorganisms 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The ASM Conference on Genetics and Molecular Biology of Industrial Microorganisms was held Sept. 30 to Oct. 3, 1984 in Bloomington, Indiana. The meetings reflected the progress in applying molecular techniques to the genetic analysis of industrial microorganisms. Topics of discussion included; gene expression in yeasts; the cloning of an Aspergillus sp. gene for glucomylase into S. cerevisiae; the construction of a yeast acentric ring plasmid (YARpl); the cloning of hygromycin resistant genes into Cephalosporium; optimization of gene expression in E. coli; a model for the initiation of translation in E. coli based on experiments with T4rIIb mutants; the role of proteases in protein turnover; evidence indicating which segments on RNAs are needed for the initiation of DNA synthesis; the application of various gene expression systems for the production of vaccines; the sporulation genes of Bacillus; the inducible chloramphenicol resistance found in Bacillus; gene expression in Streptomyces; enzyme activities in Streptomyces; and cloning of genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis.

  1. Change of nonlinear acoustics in ASME grade 122 steel welded joint during creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Toshihiro; Honma, Takumi; Ishii, Yutaka; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Hirao, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we described the changes of two nonlinear acoustic characterizations; resonant frequency shift and three-wave interaction, with electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) throughout the creep life in the welded joints of ASME Grade 122, one of high Cr ferritic heat resisting steels. EMAR was a combination of the resonant acoustic technique with a non-contact electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). These nonlinear acoustic parameters decreased from the start to 50% of creep life. After slightly increased, they rapidly increased from 80% of creep life to rupture. We interpreted these phenomena in terms of dislocation recovery, recrystallization, and restructuring related to the initiation and growth of creep void, with support from the SEM and TEM observation.

  2. Calibration and simulation of ASM2d at different temperatures in a phosphorus removal pilot plant.

    PubMed

    García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2006-01-01

    In this work, an organic and nutrient removal pilot plant was used to study the temperature influence on phosphorus accumulating organisms. Three experiments were carried out at 13, 20 and 24.5 degrees C, achieving a high phosphorus removal percentage in all cases. The ASM2d model was calibrated at 13 and 20 degrees C and the Arrhenius equation constant was obtained for phosphorus removal processes showing that the temperature influences on the biological phosphorus removal subprocesses in a different degree. The 24.5 degrees C experiment was simulated using the model parameters obtained by means of the Arrhenius equation. The simulation results for the three experiments showed good correspondence with the experimental data, demonstrating that the model and the calibrated parameters were able to predict the pilot plant behaviour. PMID:16889256

  3. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  4. 76 FR 11191 - Hazardous Materials: Adoption of ASME Code Section XII and the National Board Inspection Code

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... the ANPRM published on December 23, 2010 (ANPRM; 75 FR 80765). The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On December 23, 2010, PHMSA published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM; 75 FR...

  5. Impact of the A18.1 ASME Standard on Platform Lifts and Stairway Chairlifts on Accessibility and Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmer, David C.

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the effect of the ASME A18.1 Standard concerning accessibility and usability of Platform Lifts and their remaining technological challenges. While elevators are currently the most effective means of vertical transportation related to speed, capacity, rise and usability, their major drawbacks for accessibility are cost and…

  6. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1) as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in this part. The... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53.01-3 Section 53.01-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  7. Impact of the A18.1 ASME Standard on Platform Lifts and Stairway Chairlifts on Accessibility and Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmer, David C.

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the effect of the ASME A18.1 Standard concerning accessibility and usability of Platform Lifts and their remaining technological challenges. While elevators are currently the most effective means of vertical transportation related to speed, capacity, rise and usability, their major drawbacks for accessibility are cost and

  8. Materials Reliability Program: Risk-Informed Revision of ASME Section XI Appendix G - Proof of Concept (MRP-143)

    SciTech Connect

    B. Bishop; et al

    2005-03-30

    This study indicates that risk-informed methods can be used to significantly relax the current ASME and NRC Appendix G requirements while still maintaining satisfactory levels of reactor vessel structural integrity. This relaxation in Appendix G requirements directly translates into significant improvements in operational flexibility.

  9. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  10. The Variety of Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Francis; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses three research topics which are concerned with eminently practical problems and deal at the same time with fundamental fluid dynamical problems. These research topics come from the general areas of chemical and biological engineering, geophysics, and pure mathematics. (HM)

  11. Fluid Film Bearing Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of rocket engine turbopumps is being developed by industry through Government-directed contracts. These turbopumps will use fluid film bearings because they eliminate the life and shaft-speed limitations of rolling-element bearings, increase turbopump design flexibility, and reduce the need for turbopump overhauls and maintenance. The design of the fluid film bearings for these turbopumps, however, requires sophisticated analysis tools to model the complex physical behavior characteristic of fluid film bearings operating at high speeds with low viscosity fluids. State-of-the-art analysis and design tools are being developed at the Texas A&M University under a grant guided by the NASA Lewis Research Center. The latest version of the code, HYDROFLEXT, is a thermohydrodynamic bulk flow analysis with fluid compressibility, full inertia, and fully developed turbulence models. It can predict the static and dynamic force response of rigid and flexible pad hydrodynamic bearings and of rigid and tilting pad hydrostatic bearings. The Texas A&M code is a comprehensive analysis tool, incorporating key fluid phenomenon pertinent to bearings that operate at high speeds with low-viscosity fluids typical of those used in rocket engine turbopumps. Specifically, the energy equation was implemented into the code to enable fluid properties to vary with temperature and pressure. This is particularly important for cryogenic fluids because their properties are sensitive to temperature as well as pressure. As shown in the figure, predicted bearing mass flow rates vary significantly depending on the fluid model used. Because cryogens are semicompressible fluids and the bearing dynamic characteristics are highly sensitive to fluid compressibility, fluid compressibility effects are also modeled. The code contains fluid properties for liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, and liquid nitrogen as well as for water and air. Other fluids can be handled by the code provided that the user inputs information that relates the fluid transport properties to the temperature.

  12. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  13. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics: Complex flows requiring supercomputers. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information services for the Physics and Engineering Communities database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a new technology in computational science for complex flow simulations using supercomputers. Citations discuss the design, analysis, and performance evaluation of aircraft, rockets and missiles, and automobiles. References to supercomputers, array processes, parallel processes, and computational software packages are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. ASME Section VIII Recertification of a 33,000 Gallon Vacuum-jacketed LH2 Storage Vessel for Densified Hydrogen Testing at NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanger, Adam M.; Notardonato, William U.; Jumper, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) has been developed at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. GODU-LH2 has three main objectives: zero-loss storage and transfer, liquefaction, and densification of liquid hydrogen. A cryogenic refrigerator has been integrated into an existing, previously certified, 33,000 gallon vacuum-jacketed storage vessel built by Minnesota Valley Engineering in 1991 for the Titan program. The dewar has an inner diameter of 9.5 and a length of 71.5; original design temperature and pressure ranges are -423 F to 100 F and 0 to 95 psig respectively. During densification operations the liquid temperature will be decreased below the normal boiling point by the refrigerator, and consequently the pressure inside the inner vessel will be sub-atmospheric. These new operational conditions rendered the original certification invalid, so an effort was undertaken to recertify the tank to the new pressure and temperature requirements (-12.7 to 95 psig and -433 F to 100 F respectively) per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. This paper will discuss the unique design, analysis and implementation issues encountered during the vessel recertification process.

  16. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-12-25

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

  17. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  18. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  19. Creep Effects on Design below the Temperature Limits of ASME Section III Subsection NB

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I; Eno, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Some recent studies of material response have identified an issue that crosses over and blurs the boundary between ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III Subsection NB and Subsection NH. For very long design lives, the effects of creep show up at lower and lower temperature as the design life increases. Although true for the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties, the effect is more apparent, e.g. creep effects show up sooner, at local structural discontinuities and peak thermal stress locations. This is because creep is a function of time, temperature and stress and the higher the localized stress, the lower in temperature creep begins to cause damage. If the threshold is below the Subsection NB to NH temperature boundary, 700 F for ferritic steels and 800 F for austenitic materials, then this potential failure mode will not be considered. Unfortunately, there is no experience base with very long lives at temperatures close to but under the Subsection NB to NH boundary to draw upon. This issue is of particular interest in the application of Subsection NB rules of construction to some High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) concepts. The purpose of this paper is, thus, twofold; one part is about statistical treatment and extrapolation of sparse data for a specific material of interest, A533B; the other part is about how these results could impact current design procedures in Subsection NB.

  20. Creep Effects on Design below the Temperature Limits of ASME Section III Subsection NB

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I; Eno, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Some recent studies of material response have identified an issue that crosses over and blurs the boundary between ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III Subsection NB and Subsection NH. For very long design lives, the effects of creep show up at lower and lower temperature as the design life increases. Although true for the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties, the effect is more apparent, e.g. creep effects show up sooner, at local structural discontinuities and peak thermal stress locations. This is because creep is a function of time, temperature and stress and the higher the localized stress, the lower in temperature creep begins to cause damage. If the threshold is below the Subsection NB to NH temperature boundary, 700 F for ferritic steels and 800 F for austenitic materials, then this potential failure mode will not be considered. Unfortunately, there is no experience base with very long lives at temperatures close to but under the Subsection NB to NH boundary to draw upon. This issue is of particular interest in the application of Subsection NB rules of construction to some High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) concepts. The purpose of this paper is, thus, twofold; one part is about statistical treatment and extrapolation of sparse data for a specific material of interest, A533B; the other part is about how these results could impact current design procedures in Subsection NB.

  1. Unsteady Simulation of an ASME Venturi Flow in a Cross Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady numerical simulations of an ASME venturi flow into a cross flow were performed. The velocity ratios between the venturi flow and the free stream were 25, 50, and 75%. Two cases of the venturi with and without a tube extension have been investigated. The tube extension length was approximately 4D (here D is the inner diameter of the venturi's outlet), connecting the venturi to the bottom surface of the numerical wind tunnel. A finite volume approach with the Wilcox K-φ turbulence model were used. Results that include contours of the mean velocity, velocity vector, turbulent kinetic energy, pressure and vortices within the venturi as well as downstream in the interaction region indicate that when the venturi is flushed with the surface, there is evidence of flow separation within the venturi, near the outlet. However, when the tube extension was added, the pressure recovery was sustained and flow separation within the venturi was not present and the characteristics of the flow in the interaction region were similar to the corresponding characteristics of a pipe jet in a cross flow.

  2. Development of the present reference fracture toughness curves in the ASME nuclear code

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, S.; Merkle, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Since the early 1970's, the Sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code concerned with nuclear power plant components have included fracture mechanics procedures to analyze the effects of postulated or detected flaws. These procedures are contained in Appendix G of Section III and in Appendix A of Section XI of the Code. Specifically, Appendix G procedures are concerned with designing for protection against nonductile failures while Appendix A procedures are for evaluating the disposition of flaws detected during in-service inspection. An important element of the procedures is the inclusion of recommended material fracture toughness values. This paper describes the origin and development of these recommended fracture toughness values. Since these values appear in the Code in a graphical format, the values are often referred to as reference toughness curves. In the context of Code terminology, reference toughness means the allowable values of fracture toughness for the materials of concern that can be used in conjunction with the analytical procedures of Appendices G and A. The paper discusses the basis and rationale underlying the original formulation of these reference toughness curves and the modifications incorporated into them in the course of their adoption into the Code.

  3. Full-scale application of the IAWQ ASM No. 2d model.

    PubMed

    Carrette, R; Bixio, D; Thoeye, C; Ockier, P

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the EU-funded TTP-UPM project (Technology Transfer Project--Urban Pollution Management) the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) of Tielt was modelled with the recently issued IAWQ ASM No. 2d model. Up to 41 % of the total COD load is originating from a textile industry. A measurement campaign was conducted during a period with industrial discharge and a period with only domestic sewage. The stop of the industrial discharge resulted in a highly dynamic response of the system. Based on an expert-approach the calibration was obtained changing only four parameters (anaerobic hydrolysis reduction factor etafe, reduction factor for denitrification etaNO3, the decay rate of autotrophs bAUT and the decay rate of the bio-P organism building blocks bPAO, bPHA, bPP). Influent fractionation remains a critical step within the model calibration. A proven procedure to characterise the influent determinants by standard physical chemical analysis failed to assess the influent COD fractions when the textile waste water is discharged to the WWTP. Selected bench-scale experiments, instead, succeeded in providing the adequate influent characterisation accuracy. For characterising the readily biodegradable COD fraction respirometry is to be preferred. PMID:11547980

  4. Three-dimensional ASM-based segmentation of the subcortical nucleus from volumetric MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yili; Gao, Wenpeng; Xiao, Yongfei; Wang, Shuguo

    2009-10-01

    Delineation of the subcortical nucleus in MR images is prerequisite for advanced radiotheraphy, surgical planning and morphometric analysis. However, it is always difficult to implement such a complicated work. We proposed a novel framework of 3D active shape model (ASM) based segmentation of the subcortical nucleus in MR images. Firstly, the most representative one of all samples represented by the segmented MR volumes is selected as the template and triangulated to generate a triangulated surface mesh. Then, free form deformation is used to establish dense point correspondences between the template and the other samples. A set of consistent triangle meshes are obtained to build the model by a statistical analysis. To fit the model to a MR volume, the model is initialized with Talairach transformation and the edge map around the model is extracted using watershed transform. An algorithm of robust point matching is used to find a transformation matrix and model parameters to transpose the model near the target nucleus and match the model to the target nucleus, respectively. The proposed framework was tested on 18 brain MR volumes. The caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, and hippocampus were selected as the objects. In comparison with manual segmentation, the accuracy (Mean+/-SD) of the proposed framework is 0.90+/-0.04 for all objects.

  5. Modelling waste stabilisation ponds with an extended version of ASM3.

    PubMed

    Gehring, T; Silva, J D; Kehl, O; Castilhos, A B; Costa, R H R; Uhlenhut, F; Alex, J; Horn, H; Wichern, M

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an extended version of IWA's Activated Sludge Model No 3 (ASM3) was developed to simulate processes in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The model modifications included the integration of algae biomass and gas transfer processes for oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia depending on wind velocity and a simple ionic equilibrium. The model was applied to a pilot-scale WSP system operated in the city of Florianpolis (Brazil). The system was used to treat leachate from a municipal waste landfill. Mean influent concentrations to the facultative pond of 1,456 g(COD)/m(3) and 505 g(NH4-N)/m(3) were measured. Experimental results indicated an ammonia nitrogen removal of 89.5% with negligible rates of nitrification but intensive ammonia stripping to the atmosphere. Measured data was used in the simulations to consider the impact of wind velocity on oxygen input of 11.1 to 14.4 g(O2)/(m(2) d) and sun radiation on photosynthesis. Good results for pH and ammonia removal were achieved with mean stripping rates of 18.2 and 4.5 g(N)/(m(2) d) for the facultative and maturation pond respectively. Based on measured chlorophyll a concentrations and depending on light intensity and TSS concentration it was possible to model algae concentrations. PMID:20150708

  6. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1), as limited, modified, or replaced by specific requirements in... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure....25-7 PVG-1 through PVG-12 modified by 52.25-10 A-19 through A-21 modified by 52.01-50 1...

  7. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  8. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  9. Engineering rheology

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a guide, with some illustrations, to the behavior or non-Newtonian fluids in engineering. The book is centered around kinematics: that there is a great interplay of the microscopic variables relevant to a non-Newtonian fluid and the stresses developed in a given large-scale kinematic field. The text starts with surveys of some typical non-Newtonian behavior and of classical continuum mechanics and this is followed by a description of the two main kinematic fields - shearing and extensional flows. Recommendations are made for the choice of constitutive relation for various problems - kinematics is the main factor in the choice of equation.

  10. High Level Analysis, Design and Validation of Distributed Mobile Systems with CoreASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, R.; Glässer, U.; Jackson, P. J.; Vajihollahi, M.

    System design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes (desired requirements and resulting properties) so as to ensure these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. We explore here the practical side of using the abstract state machine (ASM) formalism in combination with the CoreASM open source tool environment for high-level design and experimental validation of complex distributed systems. Emphasizing the early phases of the design process, a guiding principle is to support freedom of experimentation by minimizing the need for encoding. CoreASM has been developed and tested building on a broad scope of applications, spanning computational criminology, maritime surveillance and situation analysis. We critically reexamine here the CoreASM project in light of three different application scenarios.

  11. An ASM/ADM model interface for dynamic plant-wide simulation.

    PubMed

    Nopens, Ingmar; Batstone, Damien J; Copp, John B; Jeppsson, Ulf; Volcke, Eveline; Alex, Jens; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2009-04-01

    Mathematical modelling has proven to be very useful in process design, operation and optimisation. A recent trend in WWTP modelling is to include the different subunits in so-called plant-wide models rather than focusing on parts of the entire process. One example of a typical plant-wide model is the coupling of an upstream activated sludge plant (including primary settler, and secondary clarifier) to an anaerobic digester for sludge digestion. One of the key challenges when coupling these processes has been the definition of an interface between the well accepted activated sludge model (ASM1) and anaerobic digestion model (ADM1). Current characterisation and interface models have key limitations, the most critical of which is the over-use of X(c) (or lumped complex) variable as a main input to the ADM1. Over-use of X(c) does not allow for variation of degradability, carbon oxidation state or nitrogen content. In addition, achieving a target influent pH through the proper definition of the ionic system can be difficult. In this paper, we define an interface and characterisation model that maps degradable components directly to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids (and their soluble analogues), as well as organic acids, rather than using X(c). While this interface has been designed for use with the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), it is widely applicable to ADM1 input characterisation in general. We have demonstrated the model both hypothetically (BSM2), and practically on a full-scale anaerobic digester treating sewage sludge. PMID:19232670

  12. SPASM: a 3D-ASM for segmentation of sparse and arbitrarily oriented cardiac MRI data.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Hans C; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G; Frangi, Alejandro F; Ordás, Sebastián; Westenberg, Jos J M; Reiber, Johan H C; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2006-04-01

    A new technique (SPASM) based on a 3D-ASM is presented for automatic segmentation of cardiac MRI image data sets consisting of multiple planes with arbitrary orientations, and with large undersampled regions. Model landmark positions are updated in a two-stage iterative process. First, landmark positions close to intersections with images are updated. Second, the update information is propagated to the regions without image information, such that new locations for the whole set of the model landmarks are obtained. Feature point detection is performed by a fuzzy inference system, based on fuzzy C-means clustering. Model parameters were optimized on a computer cluster and the computational load distributed by grid computing. SPASM was applied to image data sets with an increasing sparsity (from 2 to 11 slices) comprising images with different orientations and stemming from different MRI acquisition protocols. Segmentation outcomes and calculated volumes were compared to manual segmentation on a dense short-axis data configuration in a 3D manner. For all data configurations, (sub-)pixel accuracy was achieved. Performance differences between data configurations were significantly different (p<0.05) for SA data sets with less than 6 slices, but not clinically relevant (volume differences<4 ml). Comparison to results from other 3D model-based methods showed that SPASM performs comparable to or better than these other methods, but SPASM uses considerably less image data. Sensitivity to initial model placement proved to be limited within a range of position perturbations of approximately 20 mm in all directions. PMID:16439182

  13. Computational fluid dynamics: Complex flows requiring supercomputers. (Latest citations from the iINSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a new method in computational science to perform complex flow simulations in three dimensions. Applications include aerodynamic design and analysis for aircraft, rockets and missiles, and automobiles; heat transfer studies; and combustion processes. Included are references to supercomputers, array processors, and parallel processors where needed for complete, integrated design. Also included are software packages and grid generation techniques required to apply CFD numerical solutions. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Fluid management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Fluid Management Panel's assessment of the technology is summarized. Since a baseline space station was not defined as a reference guide and the results of the eight contracted space station studies were not available as input, the assessment focused on technology and not programmatics. The ground rules that were key to the deliberations and guided the assessment are: (1) The space station will be operational in 1991, and (2) A space-based OTV will be operational in 1992. Thus, the capability to transport, transfer, and resupply all fluids, including those for the OTV, is required in the initial space station. The only evolutionary aspect is the refinement of capability. Fluid management includes fluid transport to orbit, liquid storage/supply, fluid transfer/resupply, and integral thermal control.

  15. Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

    2011-12-01

    With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

  16. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    SciTech Connect

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  17. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility); (5) ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, 2-dimensional ultrasound including optic nerve sheath diameter, globe flattening, and retina-choroid thickness, Doppler ultrasound of ophthalmic and retinal arteries, and veins); (6) cardiac variables by ultrasound (inferior vena cava, tricuspid flow and tissue Doppler, pulmonic valve, stroke volume, right heart dimensions and function, four-chamber views); and (7) ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, and ICP calculated by MRI). On the ground, acute head-down tilt will induce cephalad fluid shifts, whereas LBNP will oppose these shifts. Controlled Mueller maneuvers will manipulate cardiovascular variables. Through interventions applied before, during, and after flight, we intend to fully evaluate the relationship between fluid shifts and the VIIP syndrome.

  18. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  19. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, D.L.; Corley, W.T.

    1983-12-27

    A clay-based or clay-free aqueous thixotropic wellbore fluid having improved fluid loss control, desirable flow characteristics and low shale sensitivity for use in drilling a well comprising water or a brine base including an effective amount of an additive comprising a crosslinked potato starch, a heteropolysaccharide derived from a carbohydrate by bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas, and hydroxyethylcellulose or carboxymethylcellulose, is disclosed. This drilling fluid has been found to be nondamaging to the formations through which the well is drilled.

  20. Harmonic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  1. Orbital Fluid Transfer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S., (Nick); Ryder, Mel; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    An automated fluid and power interface system needs to be developed for future space missions which require on orbit consumable replenishment. Current method of fluid transfer require manned vehicles and extravehicular activity. Currently the US does not have an automated capability for consumable transfer on-orbit. This technology would benefit both Space Station and long duration satellites. In order to provide this technology the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) was developed. The AFIS project was an advanced development program aimed at developing a prototype satellite servicer for future space operations. This mechanism could transfer propellants, cryogens, fluids, gasses, electrical power, and communications from a tanker unit to the orbiting satellite. The development of this unit was a cooperative effort between Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Moog, Inc. in East Aurora, New York. An engineering model was built and underwent substantial development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). While the AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit. The lessons learned from testing the AFIS provided the foundation for the next generation fluid transfer mechanism, the Orbital Fluid Transfer System (OFTS). The OFTS project was a study contract with MSFC and Moog, Inc. The OFTS was designed for the International Space Station (ISS), but its flexible design could used for long duration satellite missions and other applications. The OFTS was designed to be used after docking. The primary function was to transfer bipropellants and high pressure gases. The other items addressed by this task included propellant storage, hardware integration, safety and control system issues. A new concept for high pressure couplings was also developed. The results of the AFIS testing provided an excellent basis for the OFTS design. The OFTS meet the servicing requirements for ISS and could also provide the automated fluid and power interface system needed for on orbit consumable resupply of spacecraft into the new century.

  2. Amniotic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Morrow, Ardythe L.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to review the use of high-dimensional biology techniques, specifically transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, in amniotic fluid to elucidate the mechanisms behind preterm birth or assessment of fetal development. We performed a comprehensive MEDLINE literature search on the use of transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic technologies for amniotic fluid analysis. All abstracts were reviewed for pertinence to preterm birth or fetal maturation in human subjects. Nineteen articles qualified for inclusion. Most articles described the discovery of biomarker candidates, but few larger, multicenter replication or validation studies have been done. We conclude that the use of high-dimensional systems biology techniques to analyze amniotic fluid has significant potential to elucidate the mechanisms of preterm birth and fetal maturation. However, further multicenter collaborative efforts are needed to replicate and validate candidate biomarkers before they can become useful tools for clinical practice. Ideally, amniotic fluid biomarkers should be translated to a noninvasive test performed in maternal serum or urine. PMID:23599373

  3. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  4. Drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-01-10

    Polyethylene glycols in combination with at least one water-dispersible polymeric viscosifier comprising cellulose ethers, cellulose sulfate esters, polyacrylamides, guar gum, or heteropolysaccharides improve the water loss properties of water-based drilling fluids, particularly in hard brine environments.

  5. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described, including novel hardware and countermeasures.

  6. Fluid power

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrations and analysis are combined in this book that show the design and function of components and circuits in fluid power and pneumatic systems. Explanations are given for ASTM standards and conventional tests and step-by-step troubleshooting guidelines are provided. Other topics of discussion include friction losses in hydraulic systems, hydraulic fluids, pumps, hydraulic cylinders and cushioning devices, hydraulic motors, valves, seals and packing, system components, hydraulic circuit configurations, and controls.

  7. Impact of the A18.1 ASME Standard on platform lifts and stairway chairlifts on accessibility and usability.

    PubMed

    Balmer, David C

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article summarizes the effect of the ASME A18.1 Standard concerning accessibility and usability of Platform Lifts and their remaining technological challenges. While elevators are currently the most effective means of vertical transportation related to speed, capacity, rise and usability, their major drawbacks for accessibility are cost and space. Platform lifts and stairway chairlifts remain the "devices of choice" for small elevation changes in existing buildings. ADAAG limits them to very specific circumstances in new construction. The ASME A18.1 Standard addresses the safety requirements of inclined stairway chairlifts (which are not ADA compliant) and inclined and vertical platform lifts (which are ADA Compliant). Chairlifts do not provide access for wheeled mobility devices. Restricting access by means of keys is eliminated, inclined platform lift designs that do not interfere with stairway traffic, promoting new ideas for the design of vertical lifts, increasing the allowable vertical travel of a lift and strengthening lift ramps to improve their safety. Despite design advances inherent in the A18.1, significant platform lift usability issues continue to exist. Increased sizes and weights of powered mobility devices indicate that the permitted lift platform area be modified and that permitted weight capacities be codified as minimums instead of maximums. PMID:20402046

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility); (5) ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, 2-dimensional ultrasound including optic nerve sheath diameter, globe flattening, and retina-choroid thickness, Doppler ultrasound of ophthalmic and retinal arteries, and veins); (6) cardiac variables by ultrasound (inferior vena cava, tricuspid flow and tissue Doppler, pulmonic valve, stroke volume, right heart dimensions and function, four-chamber views); and (7) ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, and ICP calculated by MRI). On the ground, acute head-down tilt will induce cephalad fluid shifts, whereas LBNP will oppose these shifts. Controlled Mueller maneuvers will manipulate cardiovascular variables. Through interventions applied before, during, and after flight, we intend to fully evaluate the relationship between fluid shifts and the VIIP syndrome. This study has been selected for flight implementation and is one of the candidate investigations being considered for the one year mission.

  9. Fluid dynamic problems in space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slachmuylders, E.; Berry, W.; Soo, D. N.; Savage, C.

    1986-08-01

    Applications of fluid systems on spacecraft for propulsion, thermal control, and nutation damping are reviewed. Design problems posed by the high vacuum, microgravity environment of space and the dynamic interaction effects between the fluid systems and the spacecraft dynamic motion are discussed. Propellant management and tankage technology for operation in microgravity; liquid (propellants and cryogenic helium and hydrogen coolants) slosh interactions on spacecraft attitude control; control system rocket engine exhaust plume impingement effects; active thermal control systems using fluids; passive nutation damping using fluids; leak detection techniques for pressurized fluid systems operating in high vacuum; propellant contents gaging in microgravity; refuelling in orbit; and aerodynamic drag effects in low Earth orbits are considered.

  10. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  11. Flowmeter for Clear and Translucent Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Transducer with only three moving parts senses flow of clear or translucent fluid. Displacement of diaphragm by force of flow detected electrooptically and displayed by panel meter or other device. Transducer used to measure flow of gasoline to automobile engine.

  12. 14 CFR 27.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... isolating that tank, unless equivalent means are used to prevent heat transfer from each engine compartment... leak must be covered or treated to prevent the absorption of hazardous quantities of fluids....

  13. 14 CFR 27.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... isolating that tank, unless equivalent means are used to prevent heat transfer from each engine compartment... leak must be covered or treated to prevent the absorption of hazardous quantities of fluids....

  14. 14 CFR 27.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... isolating that tank, unless equivalent means are used to prevent heat transfer from each engine compartment... leak must be covered or treated to prevent the absorption of hazardous quantities of fluids....

  15. TECHNICAL BASIS AND APPLICATION OF NEW RULES ON FRACTURE CONTROL OF HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN VESSEL IN ASME SECTION VIII, DIVISION 3 CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G

    2007-04-30

    As a part of an ongoing activity to develop ASME Code rules for the hydrogen infrastructure, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved new fracture control rules for Section VIII, Division 3 vessels in 2006. These rules have been incorporated into new Article KD-10 in Division 3. The new rules require determining fatigue crack growth rate and fracture resistance properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen gas. Test methods have been specified to measure these fracture properties, which are required to be used in establishing the vessel fatigue life. An example has been given to demonstrate the application of these new rules.

  16. Structural cooling fluid tube for supporting a turbine component and supplying cooling fluid to transition section

    DOEpatents

    Charron, Richard; Pierce, Daniel

    2015-08-11

    A shaft cover support for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The shaft cover support not only provides enhanced support to a shaft cover of the gas turbine engine, but also includes a cooling fluid chamber for passing fluids from a rotor air cooling supply conduit to an inner ring cooling manifold. Furthermore, the shaft cover support may include a cooling shield supply extending from the cooling fluid chamber between the radially outward inlet and the radially inward outlet on the radially extending region and in fluid communication with the cooling fluid chamber for providing cooling fluids to a transition section. The shaft cover support may also provide additional stiffness and reduce interference of the flow from the compressor. In addition, the shaft cover support accommodates a transition section extending between compressor and turbine sections of the gas turbine engine.

  17. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 57.02-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING... qualifications for all types of welders and brazers, the qualification of welding procedures, and the production tests for all types of manual and machine arc and gas welding and brazing processes shall be...

  18. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 57.02-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING... qualifications for all types of welders and brazers, the qualification of welding procedures, and the production tests for all types of manual and machine arc and gas welding and brazing processes shall be...

  19. Push fluids!

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-03-01

    'Push fluids!' Back in the day, that was a constant refrain on the wards. We would be up to our eyes in trouble if those in our care were not offered drinks on a frequent and regular basis - and we kept charts as evidence. PMID:26932628

  20. Development of a Standard for Verification and Validation of Software Used to Calculate Nuclear System Thermal Fluids Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Richard R. Schultz; Edwin A. Harvego; Ryan L. Crane

    2010-05-01

    With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the responsibility of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus Standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, “Transient and Accident Analysis Methods” and NUREG-0800, “NRC Standard Review Plan”. In addition, the standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME Standard NQA-1 (“Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)”). This paper describes the general requirements for the V&V Standard, which includes; (a) the definition of the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to licensed, (b) the corresponding calculational domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

  1. Magnetic Fluids Deliver Better Speaker Sound Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, Glenn Research Center developed a magnetized fluid to draw rocket fuel into spacecraft engines while in space. Sony has incorporated the technology into its line of slim speakers by using the fluid as a liquid stand-in for the speaker's dampers, which prevent the speaker from blowing out while adding stability. The fluid helps to deliver more volume and hi-fidelity sound while reducing distortion.

  2. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2012-04-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  3. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2011-11-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  4. Computational experiments; Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, Honolulu, HI, July 23-27, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. K.; Smolinski, P.; Ohayon, R.; Navickas, J.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-06-01

    Papers applying FEM to engineering problems are presented, covering topics such as a numerical approach to software development for thermoforming simulations, flow three-dimensional analysis of pressure responses in an enclosed launching system, comparing flow three-dimensional calculations with very large amplitude slosh data, and the computational analysis of stress concentrations in pressure vessel cascades. Other topics include FEM studies of flow past an array of plates, stochastic finite elements for automotive impact, numerical simulation in the deployment of space structures, axial buckling of a thin cylindrical shell, applying FEM to the prediction of vibrations of liquid propelled launch vehicles, analysis of a large bore piping system supported with viscodampers, stochastic simulation of lubricant depletion on a magnetic storage disk, and two-dimensional crak inclusion interaction effects. Additional topics include analyzing damage mechanisms using the energy release rate, the suspension of solid particles in an aerospace plane's slush hydrogen tanks, modal methods for the analysis of vibrations of structures coupled with fluids, the elastic-plastic behavior of fibrous metal matrix composites, and stochastic finite element analysis of nonlinear media.

  5. Systolic and diastolic assessment by 3D-ASM segmentation of gated-SPECT Studies: a comparison with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Bijnens, B. H.; Huguet, M.; Sukno, F.; Moragas, G.; Frangi, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    Gated single photon emission tomography (gSPECT) is a well-established technique used routinely in clinical practice. It can be employed to evaluate global left ventricular (LV) function of a patient. The purpose of this study is to assess LV systolic and diastolic function from gSPECT datasets in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) measurements. This is achieved by applying our recently implemented 3D active shape model (3D-ASM) segmentation approach for gSPECT studies. This methodology allows for generation of 3D LV meshes for all cardiac phases, providing volume time curves and filling rate curves. Both systolic and diastolic functional parameters can be derived from these curves for an assessment of patient condition even at early stages of LV dysfunction. Agreement of functional parameters, with respect to CMR measurements, were analyzed by means of Bland-Altman plots. The analysis included subjects presenting either LV hypertrophy, dilation or myocardial infarction.

  6. Comparisons of ANS, ASME, AWS, and NFPA standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800, and related documents

    SciTech Connect

    Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Spiesman, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ANS, ASME, AWS and NFPA standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

  7. Evaluation of the capacity of welded attachments to elbows as compared to the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.B. ); Wais, E.A. ); Rodabaugh, E.C. and Associates, Hilliard, OH )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of tests conducted to assess the capacity of various configurations of integral welded attachments. These tests are unique in that the attachments are welded to the outer radius of pipe elbows. The lug configurations tested include both rectangular and cross (cruciform) shapes. Both limit load and fatigue tests are performed on the lug-elbow configurations. The results of the limit load tests are presented as limit moments. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl's equation is then used, with the fatigue results, to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318. The level of conservatism in the Code Case methodology is then compared to the test results.

  8. Evaluation of the capacity of welded attachments to elbows as compared to the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.B.; Wais, E.A.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of tests conducted to assess the capacity of various configurations of integral welded attachments. These tests are unique in that the attachments are welded to the outer radius of pipe elbows. The lug configurations tested include both rectangular and cross (cruciform) shapes. Both limit load and fatigue tests are performed on the lug-elbow configurations. The results of the limit load tests are presented as limit moments. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl`s equation is then used, with the fatigue results, to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318. The level of conservatism in the Code Case methodology is then compared to the test results.

  9. Evaluation of the capacity of welded attachments to elbows as compared to the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, G. B.; Wais, E. A.; Rodabaugh, E. C.

    This paper presents the results of a series of tests conducted to assess the capacity of various configurations of integral welded attachments. These tests are unique in that the attachments are welded to the outer radius of pipe elbows. The lug configurations tested include both rectangular and cross (cruciform) shapes. Both limit load and fatigue tests are performed on the lug-elbow configurations. The results of the limit load tests are presented as limit moments. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl's equation is then used, with the fatigue results, to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318. The level of conservatism in the Code Case methodology is then compared to the test results.

  10. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  11. Structural diversity in gallium(III) complexes of the tripodal triarsine MeC(CH2AsMe2)3.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Hector, Andrew L; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Webster, Michael; Zhang, Wenjian

    2007-06-01

    The preparation and crystal structures of the first examples of gallium halide complexes with the tripodal arsine, MeC(CH(2)AsMe(2))3, reveal three distinctly different coordination modes for the ligand; the neutral [{micro(3)-MeC(CH(2)AsMe(2))3-kappaAs:kappaAs':kappaAs''}(GaI(3))3] with the triarsine coordinating to three GaI(3) units, [{Me(2)AsCH(2)C(Me)(CH(2)AsMe(2))2-kappa(2)AsAs'}GaCl(2)][GaCl(4)] involving bidentate chelation to a GaCl2+ cationic unit with the third As donor atom uncoordinated, and [{MeC(CH(2)AsMe(2))3-kappaAs:kappa(2)As'As''}(GaCl3)(GaCl2)][GaCl4] in which the triarsine forms a bidentate chelate to the GaCl2+ unit and the third As donor atom binds to a further GaCl3 unit. PMID:17514342

  12. Programming fluid flow with microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Masaeli, Mahdokht; di Carlo, Dino

    2011-11-01

    Flow control and fluid interface manipulation in microfluidic platforms are of great importance in a variety of applications. Current approaches to manipulate fluids generally rely on complex designs, difficult-to-fabricate 3D platforms or use of active methods. Here we show that in the presence of simple cylindrical obstacles (i.e. pillars) in a microchannel, at moderate to high flow rates, streamlines tend to turn and stretch in a manner that, unlike intuition for Stokes flow, does not precisely reverse after passing the pillar. The asymmetric flow behavior up- and down-stream of the pillar due to fluid inertia manifests itself as a total deformation of the topology of streamlines that effectively creates a net secondary flow which resembles the recirculating Dean flow in curving channels. Confocal images were taken to investigate the secondary flow for a variety of microstructure settings. We also developed a numerical technique to map the fluid motion in the channel which is utilized to characterize the secondary flow as well as to engineer the fluid patterns within the channel. This passive method creates the possibility of exceptional control of the 3D structure of the fluid within a microfluidic platform which can significantly advance applications requiring fluid interface control (e.g. optofluidics), ultrafast mixing and solution control around cells.

  13. The transformation of heat in an engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Kurt

    1929-01-01

    This report presents a thermodynamic basis for rating heat engines. The production of work by a heat engine rests on the operation of supplying heat, under favorable conditions, to a working fluid and then taking it away.

  14. TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 Signaling via Lysosome Fusion and Membrane Raft Clustering In Coronary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Evidence from ASM Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Han, Wei-Qing; Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor death receptor 4 (DR4) have been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the signaling mechanism mediating DR4 activation and leading to endothelial injury remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that ceramide production via hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) results in membrane raft (MRs) clustering and formation of important redox signaling platforms, which play a crucial role in amplifying redox signaling in endothelial cells leading to endothelial dysfunction. The present study aims to investigate whether TRAIL triggers MR clustering via lysosome fusion and ASM activation, thereby conducting transmembrane redox signaling and changing endothelial function. Using confocal microscopy, we found that TRAIL induced MR clustering and its co-localization with DR4 in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) isolated from wild-type (Smpd1+/+) mice. Further, TRAIL triggered ASM translocation, ceramide production and NADPH oxidase aggregation in MR clusters in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, whereas these observations were not found in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Moreover, ASM deficiency reduced TRAIL-induced O2−· production in CAECs and abolished TRAIL-induced impairment on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in small resistance arteries. By measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we found that Lamp-1 (lysosome membrane marker protein) and ganglioside GM1 (MR marker) were trafficking together in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, which was absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Consistently, fluorescence imaging of living cells with specific lysosome probes demonstrated that TRAIL-induced lysosome fusion with membrane was also absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that ASM is essential for TRAIL-induced lysosomal trafficking and fusion with membrane and formation of MR redox signaling platforms, which may play an important role in DR4-mediated redox signaling in CAECs and consequent endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23108456

  15. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  16. Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering has the objectives of supporting in Canada the following activities: improvement of vehicles, propulsion systems, and transportation-related facilities and services; improvements in the design and operation of maritime engineering works; protection of the environment; enhancement of energy flexibility; advancement of firms engaged in manufacturing and resource extraction; and related programs of other government departments and agencies. In 1990-91 the Institute, which had changed its name that year from the Division of Mechanical Engineering, consolidated its research activities from nine laboratories to six programs. Activities in these six programs are described: Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Coastal Zone Engineering, Cold Regions Engineering, Combustion and Fluids Engineering, Ground Transportation Technology, and Machinery and Engine Technology.

  17. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  18. Electrorheological fluids; Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference, Raleigh, NC, Aug. 7-9, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. D.; Sprecher, A. F.; Conrad, Hans

    The present conference on electrorheological fluids discusses ER fluid mechanisms and related fundamentals, ER fluid materials, characterization and property measurement, engineering with ER fluids, and ER fluid devices and applications. Attention is given to viscoelastic behavior of ER fluids, ER fluid modeling, possible phase transition in ERs, and measuring forces between particles in a model ER fluid. Topics addressed include miscellaneous ER phenomena, an overview of ER fluid design, tribological aspects of ER fluid behavior with respect to nonpolar base liquids, the role of water in ER fluids, and the electrorheology of the suspension of zeolite particles in silicone oil. Also discussed are applications of ER materials in vibration control, the control of damping in distributed systems using ER fluids, the fluid property and mechanical design considerations in ER-fluid clutches and brakes, devices using ER fluids, and a case study of tension control using ER fluids.

  19. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  20. Engineered Multifunctional Surfaces for Fluid Handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Chris; Ma, Yonghui; Weislogel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Designs incorporating variations in capillary geometry and hydrophilic and/or antibacterial surface properties have been developed that are capable of passive gas/liquid separation and passive water flow. These designs can incorporate capillary grooves and/or surfaces arranged to create linear and circumferential capillary geometry at the micro and macro scale, radial fin configurations, micro holes and patterns, and combinations of the above. The antibacterial property of this design inhibits the growth of bacteria or the development of biofilm. The hydrophilic property reduces the water contact angle with a treated substrate such that water spreads into a thin layer atop the treated surface. These antibacterial and hydrophilic properties applied to a thermally conductive surface, combined with capillary geometry, create a novel heat exchanger capable of condensing water from a humid, two-phase water and gas flow onto the treated heat exchanger surfaces, and passively separating the condensed water from the gas flow in a reduced gravity application. The overall process to generate the antibacterial and hydrophilic properties includes multiple steps to generate the two different surface properties, and can be divided into two major steps. Step 1 uses a magnetron-based sputtering technique to implant the silver atoms into the base material. A layer of silver is built up on top of the base material. Completion of this step provides the antibacterial property. Step 2 uses a cold-plasma technique to generate the hydrophilic surface property on top of the silver layer generated in Step 1. Completion of this step provides the hydrophilic property in addition to the antibacterial property. Thermally conductive materials are fabricated and then treated to create the antibacterial and hydrophilic surface properties. The individual parts are assembled to create a condensing heat exchanger with antibacterial and hydrophilic surface properties and capillary geometry, which is capable of passive phase separation in a reduced gravity application. The plasma processes for creating antibacterial and hydrophilic surface properties are suitable for applications where water is present on an exposed surface for an extended time, such that bacteria or biofilms could form, and where there is a need to manage the water on the surface. The processes are also suitable for applications where only the hydrophilic property is needed. In particular, the processes are applicable to condensing heat exchangers (CHXs), which benefit from the antibacterial properties as well as the hydrophilic properties. Water condensing onto the control surfaces of the CHX will provide the moist conditions necessary for the growth of bacteria and the formation of biofilms. The antibacterial properties of the base layer (silver) will mitigate and prevent the growth of bacteria and formation of biofilms that would otherwise reduce the CHX performance. In addition, the hydrophilic properties reduce the water contact angle and prevent water droplets from bridging between control surfaces. Overall, the hydrophilic properties reduce the pressure drop across the CHX.

  1. 46 CFR 58.30-10 - Hydraulic fluid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-10 Hydraulic fluid. (a) The requirements of this section are applicable to all fluid power transmission and control systems installed...

  2. Concept of planetary gear system to control fluid mixture ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgroarty, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanical device senses and corrects for fluid flow departures from the selected flow ratio of two fluids. This system has been considered for control of rocket engine propellant mixture control but could find use wherever control of the flow ratio of any two fluids is desired.

  3. 46 CFR 52.25-15 - Fired thermal fluid heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fired thermal fluid heaters. 52.25-15 Section 52.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-15 Fired thermal fluid heaters. (a) Fired thermal fluid heaters shall be...

  4. 46 CFR 52.25-15 - Fired thermal fluid heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fired thermal fluid heaters. 52.25-15 Section 52.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-15 Fired thermal fluid heaters. (a) Fired thermal fluid heaters shall be...

  5. 46 CFR 52.25-15 - Fired thermal fluid heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fired thermal fluid heaters. 52.25-15 Section 52.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-15 Fired thermal fluid heaters. (a) Fired thermal fluid heaters shall be...

  6. 46 CFR 52.25-15 - Fired thermal fluid heaters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fired thermal fluid heaters. 52.25-15 Section 52.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-15 Fired thermal fluid heaters. (a) Fired thermal fluid heaters shall be...

  7. GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Theiss, Timothy J; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

  8. Experimental investigation of gasoline compression ignition combustion in a light-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeper, C. Paul

    Due to increased ignition delay and volatility, low temperature combustion (LTC) research utilizing gasoline fuel has experienced recent interest [1-3]. These characteristics improve air-fuel mixing prior to ignition allowing for reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot (or particulate matter, PM). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Engine Research Center (Ra et al. [4, 5]) have validated these attributes and established baseline operating parameters for a gasoline compression ignition (GCI) concept in a light-duty diesel engine over a large load range (3-16 bar net IMEP). In addition to validating these computational results, subsequent experiments at the Engine Research Center utilizing a single cylinder research engine based on a GM 1.9-liter diesel engine have progressed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition processes, and established the capability of critical controlling input parameters to better control GCI operation. The focus of this thesis can be divided into three segments: 1) establishment of operating requirements in the low-load operating limit, including operation sensitivities with respect to inlet temperature, and the capabilities of injection strategy to minimize NOx emissions while maintaining good cycle-to-cycle combustion stability; 2) development of novel three-injection strategies to extend the high load limit; and 3) having developed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition kinetics, and how changes in physical processes (e.g. engine speed effects, inlet pressure variation, and air-fuel mixture processes) affects operation, develop operating strategies to maintain robust engine operation. Collectively, experimental results have demonstrated the ability of GCI strategies to operate over a large load-speed range (3 bar to 17.8 bar net IMEP and 1300-2500 RPM, respectively) with low emissions (NOx and PM less than 1 g/kg-FI and 0.2 g/kg-FI, respectively), and low fuel consumption (gross indicated fuel consumption <200 g/kWh). [1] Dec, J. E., Yang, Y., and Dronniou, N., 2011, "Boosted HCCI - Controlling Pressure- Rise Rates for Performance Improvements using Partial Fuel Stratification with Conventional Gasoline," SAE Int. J. Engines, 4(1), pp. 1169-1189. [2] Kalghatgi, G., Hildingsson, L., and Johansson, B., 2010, "Low NO(x) and Low Smoke Operation of a Diesel Engine Using Gasolinelike Fuels," Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-Transactions of the Asme, 132(9), p. 9. [3] Manente, V., Zander, C.-G., Johansson, B., Tunestal, P., and Cannella, W., 2010, "An Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Concept for Low Emissions and High Efficiency from Idle to Max Load Using Gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion," SAE International, 2010-01-2198. [4] Ra, Y., Loeper, P., Reitz, R., Andrie, M., Krieger, R., Foster, D., Durrett, R., Gopalakrishnan, V., Plazas, A., Peterson, R., and Szymkowicz, P., 2011, "Study of High Speed Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI) Engine Operation in the LTC Regime," SAE Int. J. Engines, 4(1), pp. 1412-1430. [5] Ra, Y., Loeper, P., Andrie, M., Krieger, R., Foster, D., Reitz, R., and Durrett, R., 2012, "Gasoline DICI Engine Operation in the LTC Regime Using Triple- Pulse Injection," SAE Int. J. Engines, 5(3), pp. 1109-1132.

  9. Gyroelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  10. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  11. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  12. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  13. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  14. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  15. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  16. Advanced working fluids: Thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Gering, Kevin L.

    1990-10-01

    Electrolytes are used as working fluids in gas fired heat pump chiller engine cycles. To find out which molecular parameters of the electrolytes impact on cycle performance, a molecular theory is developed for calculating solution properties, enthalpies, vapor-liquid equilibria, and engine cycle performance. Aqueous and ammoniac single and mixed salt solutions in single and multisolvent systems are investigated. An accurate correlation is developed to evaluate properties for concentrated electrolyte solutions. Sensitivity analysis is used to determine the impact of molecular parameters on the thermodynamic properties and cycle performance. The preferred electrolytes are of 1-1 valence type, small ion size, high molecular weight, and in strongly colligative cosolvent. The operating windows are determined for a number of absorption fluids of industrial importance.

  17. ASME proceedings of the 32nd national heat transfer conference (HTD-Vol. 350). Volume 12: Fundamental experiment techniques in heat transfer; Thermal hydraulics of advanced nuclear reactors; Heat and mass transfer in supercritical liquid systems; Heat transfer in energy conversion; Heat transfer equipment; Heat transfer in gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, D.E.; Hassan, Y.A.; Cheung, F.B.; Yang, B.; Presser, C.; Olsen, D.A.; Tong, W.; Phelan, P.; Swanson, L.W.; McEligot, D.W.; Bogard, D.G.

    1997-07-01

    This volume contains a portion of the over 240 ASME papers which were presented at the conference. For over 40 years, the National Heat Transfer Conference has been the premiere forum for the presentation and dissemination of the latest advances in heat transfer. The work contained in these volumes range from studies of fundamental phenomena to applications in the latest heat transfer equipment. Topics covered in this volume are: Fundamental experiment techniques in heat transfer; thermal hydraulics of advanced nuclear reactors; heat and mass transfer in supercritical fluid systems; heat transfer in energy conversion; heat transfer equipment; and heat transfer in gas turbine systems. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  18. Propulsion/ASME Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Activities in the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Turner, James

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Office Of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) has establish three major coals. "The Three Pillars for Success". The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) Project, part of ASTP, focuses on the reusable technologies beyond those being pursued by X-33. The main activity over the past two and a half years has been on advancing the rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. In June of last year, activities for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe and propulsion technologies were initiated. These activities focus primarily on those technologies that support the year 2000 decision to determine the path this country will take for Space Shuttle and RLV. In February of this year, additional technology efforts in the reusable technologies were awarded. The RBCC effort that was completed early this year was the initial step leading to flight demonstrations of the technology for space launch vehicle propulsion. Aerojet, Boeing-Rocketdyne and Pratt & Whitney were selected for a two-year period to design, build and ground test their RBCC engine concepts. In addition, ASTROX, Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and University of Alabama in Huntsville also conducted supporting activities. The activity included ground testing of components (e.g., injectors, thrusters, ejectors and inlets) and integrated flowpaths. An area that has caused a large amount of difficulty in the testing efforts is the means of initiating the rocket combustion process. All three of the prime contractors above were using silane (SiH4) for ignition of the thrusters. This follows from the successful use of silane in the NASP program for scramjet ignition. However, difficulties were immediately encountered when silane (an 80/20 mixture of hydrogen/silane) was used for rocket ignition.

  19. Acoustic energy-driven fluid pump and method

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, Michael C.; Richards, George A.; Robey, Edward H.

    1997-12-01

    Bulk fluid motion is promoted in a gaseous fluid contained within a conduit system provided with a diffuser without the need for a mean pressure differential across the conduit system. The contacting of the gaseous fluid with unsteady energy at a selected frequency and pressure amplitude induces fluid flow through the conical diffuser. The unsteady energy can be provided by pulse combustors, thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic energy generators such as acoustic speakers.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

    2010-04-13

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

  1. Implementation of ANSI/ASME NQA-1 for development of GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel casks

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, M.G.

    1989-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has awarded General Atomics (GA) a contract to develop a legal weight truck (LWT) transportation system to transport boiling-water-reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuels. DOE's contract requires GA to establish, maintain, and implement an NRC-approved Quality Assurance Program in accordance with ANSI/ASME NQA-1, ''Quality Assurance Program Requirements'' 1986 Edition (basic requirements and supplements), and the 1986 la Addenda. GA's Quality Assurance Program is a company-wide system described in GA's Quality Assurance Manual (QAM). General Atomics' Quality Assurance Program is implemented for a specific project by means of a Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD). The QAPD is the document used by GA to invoke and document selected quality and project-applicable requirements. The QAPD is a tailored technical quality plan for a specific contract which can add to, revise, or delete certain portions of the basic GA QA Manual. The QAPD then becomes the controlling QA document for a specific project, and the provisions of the QAPD are followed by all project team members as though it were the QA Manual. For the legal weight truck (LWT) transportation project, GA has developed a QAPD that invokes the NRC-approved QA Program and also addresses the additional requirements that are included in the NQA-1 1986 Edition and la Addenda and the additional DOE/ID imposed requirements. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor and GT-48 γ-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, V. V.

    2011-06-01

    The observational data concerning variations of light curves of supernovae remnants—the Crab Nebula, Cassiopeia A, Tycho Brahe, and pulsar Vela—over 14 days scale that may be attributed to systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor are presented. The experimental systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope in the mono mode of operation were also determined. For this the observational data of TeV J2032 + 4130 (Cyg γ-2, according to the Crimean version) were used and the stationary nature of its γ-ray emission was confirmed by long-term observations performed with HEGRA and MAGIC. The results of research allow us to draw the following conclusions: (1) light curves of supernovae remnants averaged for long observing periods have false statistically significant flux variations, (2) the level of systematic errors is proportional to the registered flux and decreases with increasing temporal scale of averaging, (3) the light curves of sources may be modulated by the year period, and (4) the systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope, in the amount caused by observations in the mono mode and data processing with the stereo-algorithm come to 0.12 min-1.

  3. Elastic-plastic analysis of the PVRC burst disk tests with comparison to the ASME code -- Primary stress limits

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    1999-02-01

    This paper provides a comparison between finite element analysis results and test data from the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) burst disk program. Testing sponsored by the PVRC over 20 years ago was done by pressurizing circular flat disks made from three different materials until failure by bursting. The purpose of this re-analysis is to investigate the use of finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the primary stress limits of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (1998) and to qualify the use of elastic-plastic (EP-FEA) for limit load calculations. The three materials tested represent the range of strength and ductility found in modern pressure vessel construction and include a low strength high ductility material, a medium strength medium ductility material, and a high strength low ductility low alloy material. Results of elastic and EP-FEA are compared to test data. Stresses from the elastic analyses are linearized for comparison of Code primary stress limits to test results. Elastic-plastic analyses are done using both best-estimate and elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) stress-strain curves. Both large strain-large displacement (LSLD) and small strain-small displacement (SSSD) assumptions are used with the EP-FEA. Analysis results are compared to test results to evaluate the various analysis methods, models, and assumptions as applied to the bursting of thin disks.

  4. Fluid-bed HGD PDU

    SciTech Connect

    Bissett, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    METC is constructing an on-site, fluid-bed, hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process development unit (PDU) to support the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power systems program. Once operational, this PDU will be used to develop process scale-up and performance data for a number of configurations and to demonstrate fully coupled sulfidation-regeneration operations. Its size and gas throughput should also enable the PDU to address some of the actual engineering design and control issues associated with fluid-bed, HGD processes. Fluid beds and transport reactors, either alone or in combination, are conceptually attractive for HGD processes for a number of reasons, including: Continuous steady-state operation, which simplifies system control strategies; good temperature control, which reduces the potential for sorbent sintering during regeneration; and potentially wide range of regeneration gas SO{sub 2} concentrations, which adds to process flexibility for sulfur recovery options. The METC Office of Technology Base Development has been providing lab- and bench-scale experimental support to DOE`s fluid-bed, HGD development efforts since 1988. This continuous-flow PDU will enable further technology development and testing to proceed at a much larger engineering scale.

  5. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  6. Verification strategies for fluid-based plasma simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Verification is an essential aspect of computational code development for models based on partial differential equations. However, verification of plasma models is often conducted internally by authors of these programs and not openly discussed. Several professional research bodies including the IEEE, AIAA, ASME and others have formulated standards for verification and validation (V&V) of computational software. This work focuses on verification, defined succinctly as determining whether the mathematical model is solved correctly. As plasma fluid models share several aspects with the Navier-Stokes equations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the CFD verification process is used as a guide. Steps in the verification process: consistency checks, examination of iterative, spatial and temporal convergence, and comparison with exact solutions, are described with examples from plasma modeling. The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS), which has been used to verify complex systems of PDEs in solid and fluid mechanics, is introduced. An example of the application of MMS to a self-consistent plasma fluid model using the local mean energy approximation is presented. The strengths and weaknesses of the techniques presented in this work are discussed.

  7. Pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Felling, David Kenton; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2012-04-03

    A pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine includes a main body having an inlet portion, an outlet portion and an exterior wall that collectively establish at least one fluid delivery plenum, and a plurality of fluid delivery tubes extending through at least a portion of the at least one fluid delivery plenum. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes at least one fluid delivery opening fluidly connected to the at least one fluid delivery plenum. With this arrangement, a first fluid is selectively delivered to the at least one fluid delivery plenum, passed through the at least one fluid delivery opening and mixed with a second fluid flowing through the plurality of fluid delivery tubes prior to being combusted in a combustion chamber of a turbine engine.

  8. Automatic fluid dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  9. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  10. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  11. Evaluating the structural identifiability of the parameters of the EBPR sub-model in ASM2d by the differential algebra method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Zhenliang; Cai, Qing

    2010-05-01

    The calibration of ASMs is a prerequisite for their application to simulation of a wastewater treatment plant. This work should be made based on the evaluation of structural identifiability of model parameters. An EBPR sub-model including denitrification phosphorus removal has been incorporated in ASM2d. Yet no report is presented on the structural identifiability of the parameters in the EBPR sub-model. In this paper, the differential algebra approach was used to address this issue. The results showed that the structural identifiability of parameters in the EBPR sub-model could be improved by increasing the measured variables. The reduction factor eta(NO)(3) was identifiable when combined data of aerobic process and anoxic process were assumed. For K(PP), X(PAO) and q(PHA) of the anaerobic process to be uniquely identifiable, one of them is needed to be determined by other ways. Likewise, if prior information on one of the parameters, K(PHA), X(PAO) and q(PP) of the aerobic process, is known, all the parameters are identifiable. The above results could be of interest to the parameter estimation of the EBPR sub-model. The algorithm proposed in the paper is also suitable for other sub-models of ASMs. PMID:20226493

  12. Implementation of ASME Code, Section XI, Code Case N-770, on Alternative Examination Requirements for Class 1 Butt Welds Fabricated with Alloy 82/182

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-17

    In May 2010, the NRC issued a proposed notice of rulemaking that includes a provision to add a new section to its rules to require licensees to implement ASME Code Case N-770, ‘‘Alternative Examination Requirements and Acceptance Standards for Class 1 PWR Piping and Vessel Nozzle Butt Welds Fabricated with UNS N06082 or UNS W86182 Weld Filler Material With or Without the Application of Listed Mitigation Activities, Section XI, Division 1,’’ with 15 conditions. Code Case N-770 contains baseline and inservice inspection (ISI) requirements for unmitigated butt welds fabricated with Alloy 82/182 material and preservice and ISI requirements for mitigated butt welds. The NRC stated that application of ASME Code Case N-770 is necessary because the inspections currently required by the ASME Code, Section XI, were not written to address stress corrosion cracking Alloy 82/182 butt welds, and the safety consequences of inadequate inspections can be significant. The NRC expects to issue the final rule incorporating this code case into its regulations in the spring 2011 time frame. This paper discusses the new examination requirements, the conditions that NRC is imposing , and the major concerns with implementation of the new Code Case.

  13. A Retrospective Look at 20 Years of ASM Education Programs (1990–2010) and a Prospective Look at the Next 20 Years (2011–2030)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Professional societies provide visibility and legitimacy to the work of their post secondary educator members, advocate best practices in courses and sponsored student research, and establish deep networks and communities that catalyze members to collectively engage in undergraduate teaching and learning scholarship. Within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the Education Board, established in the mid-1970s, assumes this role. I have been fortunate enough to watch several pivotal programs support our growth and change the status quo by providing opportunities for biology educators to flourish. In this retrospective review, the background and details I offer about each initiative help explain ASM Education offerings, how our growth has been supported and how the status quo has changed. In this prospective look, I offer my vision of the future in post secondary education where classroom learning is student-centered and focused on global problems affecting our health and environment. For the profession to proliferate, the ASM must provide members as many opportunities in learning biology as they do with advancing biology to new frontiers. PMID:23653733

  14. Ciliary fluid transport enhanced by viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Motile cilia encounter complex, non-Newtonian fluids as they beat to gain self-propulsion of cells, transport fluids, and mix particles. Recently there have been many studies on swimming in complex fluids, both experimentally and theoretically. However the role of the non-Newtonian fluid in the ciliary transport system remains largely unknown. Here we use a one-way-coupled immersed boundary method to evaluate the impacts of viscoelastic fluid (Oldroyd-B fluid) on the fluid transport generated by an array of rabbit tracheal cilia beating in a channel at low Reynolds number. Our results show that the viscoelasticity could enhance the fluid transport generated by the rabbit tracheal cilia beating pattern and the flow is sensitive to the Deborah number in the range we investigate.

  15. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  16. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  17. Fluid valve with wide temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kast, Howard Berdolt (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A fluid valve suitable for either metering or pressure regulating fluids at various temperatures is provided for a fuel system as may be utilized in an aircraft gas turbine engine. The valve includes a ceramic or carbon pad which cooperates with a window in a valve plate to provide a variable area orifice which remains operational during large and sometimes rapid variations in temperature incurred from the use of different fuels.

  18. Holographic heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that in theories of gravity where the cosmological constant is considered a thermodynamic variable, it is natural to use black holes as heat engines. Two examples are presented in detail using AdS charged black holes as the working substance. We notice that for static black holes, the maximally efficient traditional Carnot engine is also a Stirling engine. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. We first propose a precise picture of how the traditional thermodynamic dictionary of holography is extended when the cosmological constant is dynamical and then conjecture that the engine cycles can be performed by using renormalization group flow. We speculate about the existence of a natural dual field theory counterpart to the gravitational thermodynamic volume.

  19. Indicators of Student Engagement in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Goodman, Katherine

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering programs require a fluids course. Standards such as ABET ensure that it is technically accurate. To keep students engaged, however, we need to ask: does this course present our discipline in its most salient and meaningful form? As part of an ongoing investigation of a technical elective called Flow Visualization, we compare student surveys from both Flow Vis and a required Fluid Mechanics course. Surveys going back to 2008-2012 found that Fluid Mechanics students in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder tended to have a negative shift in affect. That is, they were less likely to believe studying fluids was important to them as engineers and to society in general by the end of the course. More recent surveys find that this has become neutral among our students: from the beginning to the end of the course, they do not report any change in the importance of fluids. The recent survey also reveals that they are now noticing fluids in everyday life significantly more often. This expanded perception is a hallmark of the Deweyan transformative experience, a framework to evaluate the motivational and affective aspects of a course. Suggestions of why these changes have taken place are drawn from open-response survey items and student interviews. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. EC-1240294.

  20. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  1. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  2. Engineering approach for elastic-plastic fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V; German, M D; Shih, C F

    1981-07-01

    This report for RP1237-1 presents formulas, charts, and background material that allow calculation of safety margins in ductile structures containing flaws. It is intended as a reference book for engineers who are concerned with design and analysis of flawed structures. The work extends the analysis procedures already available for brittle elastic materials to the tough and ductile steels used in the construction of pressure-boundary components. These new elastic-plastic methods more accurately describe the behavior of ductile materials and show more tolerance to flaws than the elastic methods contained in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the Code of Federal Regulations.

  3. Double-reed exhaust valve engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2015-06-30

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a double reed outlet valve for controlling the flow of low-pressure working fluid out of the engine. The double reed provides a stronger force resisting closure of the outlet valve than the force tending to open the outlet valve. The double reed valve enables engine operation at relatively higher torque and lower efficiency at low speed, with lower torque, but higher efficiency at high speed.

  4. A heat engine with unique characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baranescu, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    A heat engine which operates with one heat reservoir is described. The engine transforms the heat input completely into work by using a compressed fluid from a resource of the environment. For this reason the engine is not a perpetual motion machine of the second kind. The characteristics of the engine are analyzed, and the ways for achieving the most economic use of the compressed fluid are described. The principle of operation of the engine shows that the concepts of phenomenological thermodynamics regarding heat and its transformation in other forms of energy are not true.

  5. Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

  6. Quartz resonator fluid monitors for vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.; Martin, S.J.; Wessendorf, K.O.; Terry, M.D.; Rumpf, A.N.

    1994-09-01

    Thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonators operating in a new {open_quotes}Lever oscillator{close_quotes} circuit are used as monitors for critical automotive fluids. These monitors respond to the density and viscosity of liquids contacting the quartz surface. Sensors have been developed for determining the viscosity characteristics of engine lubricating oil, the state-of-charge of lead-acid storage batteries, and the concentration variations in engine coolant.

  7. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases. PMID:23005525

  8. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  9. Principles of Fluid Management.

    PubMed

    Rewa, Oleksa; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2015-10-01

    Fluid therapy is the most common intervention received by acutely ill hospitalized patients; however, important questions on its optimal use remain. Its prescription should be patient and context specific, with clear indications and contradictions, and have the type, dose, and rate specified. Any fluid therapy, if provided inappropriately, can contribute unnecessary harm to patients. The quantitative toxicity of fluid therapy contributes to worse outcomes; this should prompt greater bedside attention to fluid prescription, fluid balance, development of avoidable complications attributable to fluid overload, and for the timely deresuscitation of patients whose clinical status and physiology allow active fluid mobilization. PMID:26410145

  10. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  11. Fluid transport container

    SciTech Connect

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  12. Algorithmic trends in computational fluid dynamics; The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)/LaRC Workshop, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, US, Sep. 15-17, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Kumar, A. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose here is to assess the state of the art in the areas of numerical analysis that are particularly relevant to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to identify promising new developments in various areas of numerical analysis that will impact CFD, and to establish a long-term perspective focusing on opportunities and needs. Overviews are given of discretization schemes, computational fluid dynamics, algorithmic trends in CFD for aerospace flow field calculations, simulation of compressible viscous flow, and massively parallel computation. Also discussed are accerelation methods, spectral and high-order methods, multi-resolution and subcell resolution schemes, and inherently multidimensional schemes.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics: complex flows requiring supercomputers. January 1975-July 1988 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a new method in computational science to perform complex flow simulations in three dimensions. Applications include aerodynamic design and analysis for aircraft, rockets, and missiles, and automobiles; heat-transfer studies; and combustion processes. Included are references to supercomputers, array processors, and parallel processors where needed for complete, integrated design. Also included are software packages and grid-generation techniques required to apply CFD numerical solutions. Numerical methods for fluid dynamics, not requiring supercomputers, are found in a separate published search. (Contains 83 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics: Complex flows requiring supercomputers. January 1975-December 1989 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a new method in computational science to perform complex flow simulations in three dimensions. Applications include aerodynamic design and analysis for aircraft, rockets and missiles, and automobiles; heat-transfer studies; and combustion processes. Included are references to supercomputers, array processors, and parallel processors where needed for complete, integrated design. Also included are software packages and grid-generation techniques required to apply CFD numerical solutions. Numerical methods for fluid dynamics, not requiring supercomputers, are found in a separate Published Search. (This updated bibliography contains 132 citations, 49 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Fluid Flow in Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Cheng, Eric; Ahmadi, Ali; Cheung, Karen; Stoeber, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Inkjet drop-on-demand (DOD) dispensing of cells has numerous applications including cell-based assays and tissue engineering. In our experiments, using a transparent inkjet nozzle, high speed camera, and a shadowgraphy technique, we have observed three different characteristic cell behaviors during droplet ejection: 1) traveling toward the nozzle tip, 2) ejection from the nozzle, and 3) reflection away from the nozzle tip, where the reflection is an unwanted effect which contributes to the unpredictability of current cell printing systems. To understand the reflection mechanisms, we use numerical simulation to resolve the fluid motion inside the nozzle in presence of a cell during drop formation. For this purpose an adaptive finite volume method is employed. To track the interfaces (cell-liquid, gas-liquid) a volume of fluid (VOF) method is used, where the cell is modeled as an immiscible fluid droplet with different physical properties from the suspending fluid. It is shown that after a short period of time, a recirculation zone close to the nozzle tip is generated due to droplet pinch-off. This causes a reverse flow (velocity away from the nozzle) in the center of the nozzle. This dynamic flow field inside the nozzle causes a cell to show one of the three behaviors described above depending on its initial position. Moreover, it is shown that, depending on the size, deformability, and location of the cell, the drop formation process may be influenced.

  16. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  17. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  18. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  19. Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines: A Workshop to Identify the Challenges and Set Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris; Pinkus, Oscar

    2000-01-01

    The following report represents a compendium of selected speaker presentation materials and observations made by Prof O. Pinkus at the NASA/ASME/Industry sponsored workshop entitled "Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines" held on September 15-17, 1999 in Albany, New York. The impetus for the workshop came from the ASME's Research Committee on Tribology whose goal is to explore new tribological research topics which may become future research opportunities. Since this subject is of current interest to other industrial and government entities the conference received cosponsorship as noted above. The conference was well attended by government, industrial and academic participants. Topics discussed included current tribological issues in gas turbines as well as the potential impact (drawbacks and advantages) of future tribological technologies especially foil air bearings and magnetic beatings. It is hoped that this workshop report may serve as a starting point for continued discussions and activities in oil-free turbomachinery systems.

  20. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  1. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  2. Computer assistant test and consultive system for aircraft fluid element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Ru

    The fluid bearing elements of an aircraft's control system are discussed in the context of aviation maintenance engineering. This paper explores the development of an artificially intelligent assistant to aid in the maintenance of hydraulic control systems.

  3. Occupational exposure to metalworking fluid mist and sump fluid contaminants.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A T; Stear, M; Groves, J A; Piney, M; Bradley, S D; Stagg, S; Crook, B

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the analytical and occupational hygiene findings from a recent survey of occupational exposure to metalworking fluids (MWFs) in the engineering industry. The aim of the survey was to link MWF mist exposure measurements with particular engineering processes and controls, and utilize the data obtained to develop exposure standards. At the same time the opportunity was taken to assess fluid management and control, including bacterial and fines contamination in the machine sumps. In general, occupational exposure to mineral oil MWF mist was controlled to <3 mg/m(3) (8 h time-weighted average) and to <1 mg/m(3) for water-mix MWF mist (in terms of the concentrate). These exposure values do not necessarily represent best practice, but are believed to be achievable and representative of industry as a whole. Gravimetric analysis of the total inhalable particulate was found to be a good predictor of mineral oil MWF mist but not for water-mix MWF mist. Grinding and drilling operations produced higher exposures than turning and milling for water-mix fluids. There were insufficient data to compare machining operations for mineral oil MWFs. On the whole, fluid management was found to be poor, with most sites failing to meet industry good practice or Health & Safety Executive (HSE) standards. Some of the operating procedures utilized were deficient or unsatisfactory. Poor standards of fluid management were found at all sizes of company. High levels of bacteria, endotoxin and fines were found in sumps, and control of other factors, such as water-mix fluid concentration, was often poor. Mineral oils had higher levels of fines than water-mix fluids (medians of 395 and 18 mg/l, respectively), and grinding produced high levels of fines in both types of MWF. Many water-mix sumps contained bacterial levels of >1 x 10(6) CFU/ml, and endotoxin levels of >100 000 EU/ml were not uncommon. The median values were 109 000 CFU/ml and 8039 EU/ml, respectively. Mists could potentially contain extensive contamination from bacteria and endotoxin. Analysis of the data suggests that sumps operating under typical conditions for machining (a temperature of 20 degrees C, a pH of 9 and a fluid strength below 10%), also appear to provide optimum conditions for the proliferation of bacteria. Low levels of benzo[a]pyrene (median 0.03 micro g/g) were found in the mineral oils, and low levels of N-nitrosodiethanolamine (median 0.4 micro g/ml) were found in the water-mix MWFs. The results of this work will contribute to guidance from the HSE, setting out accepted industry good practice, including guide values for MWF mist and sump fluid contaminants, with significant emphasis on sump fluid management (maintenance and monitoring), as well as control issues. PMID:12505903

  4. Hydrogen-fueled engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laumann, E. A.; Reynolds, R. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen fueled internal combustion engine is described, which utilizes an inert gas, such as argon, as a working fluid to increase the efficiency of the engine, eliminate pollution, and facilitate operation of a closed cycle energy system. In a system where sunlight or other intermittent energy source is available to separate hydrogen and oxygen from water, the oxygen and inert gas are taken into a diesel engine into which hydrogen is injected and ignited. The exhaust is cooled so that it contains only water and the inert gas. The inert gas in the exhaust is returned to the engine for use with fresh oxygen, while the water in the exhaust is returned to the intermittent energy source for reconversion to hydrogen and oxygen.

  5. Comprehensive Mathematical Model Of Real Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Peter G.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of thermodynamic properties of water, steam, and liquid and gaseous hydrogen and oxygen developed for use in computational simulations of flows of mass and heat in main engine of space shuttle. Similar models developed for other fluids and applications. Based on HBMS equation of state.

  6. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  7. Stirling cycle engine and refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A Stirling cycle heat engine is disclosed in which displacer motion is controlled as a function of the working fluid pressure P sub 1 and a substantially constant pressure P sub 0. The heat engine includes an auxiliary chamber at the constant pressure P sub 0. An end surface of a displacer piston is disposed in the auxiliary chamber. During the compression portion of the engine cycle when P sub 1 rises above P sub 0 the displacer forces the working fluid to pass from the cold chamber to the hot chamber of the engine. During the expansion portion of the engine cycle the heated working fluid in the hot chamber does work by pushing down on the engine's drive piston. As the working fluid pressure P sub 1 drops below P sub 0 the displacer forces most of the working fluid in the hot chamber to pass through the regenerator to the cold chamber. The engine is easily combinable with a refrigeration section to provide a refrigeration system in which the engine's single drive piston serves both the engine and the refrigeration section.

  8. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  9. Rocket propellant reorientation and fluid management used in space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellant transfer. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior main engine restart possess a microgravity fluid behavior problem. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellant resettling have been carried out.

  10. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  11. Adaptive and active materials: selected papers from the ASME 2013 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 13) (Snowbird, UT, USA, 16-18 September 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nancy; Naguib, Hani; Turner, Travis; Anderson, Iain; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin; Daqaq, Mohammed; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu; Sarles, Andy

    2014-10-01

    The sixth annual meeting of the ASME Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) was held in the beautiful mountain encircled Snowbird Resort and Conference Center in Little Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake City, Utah. It is the conference's objective to provide an up-to-date overview of research trends in the entire field of smart materials systems in a friendly casual forum conducive to the exchange of ideas and latest results. As each year we strive to grow and offer new experiences, this year we included special focused topic tracks on nanoscale multiferroic materials and origami engineering. The cross-disciplinary emphasis was reflected in keynote speeches by Professor Kaushik Bhattacharya (California Institute of Technology) on 'Cyclic Deformation and the Interplay between Phase Transformation and Plasticity in Shape Memory Alloys', by Professor Alison Flatau (University of Maryland at College Park) on 'Structural Magnetostrictive Alloys: The Other Smart Material', and by Dr Leslie Momoda (Director of the Sensors and Materials Laboratories, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA) on 'Architecturing New Functional Materials: An Industrial Perspective'. SMASIS 2013 was divided into seven symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. SYMP 1. Development and Characterization of Multifunctional Materials. SYMP 2. Mechanics and Behavior of Active Materials. SYMP 3. Modeling, Simulation and Control of Adaptive Systems. SYMP 4. Integrated System Design and Implementation. SYMP 5. Structural Health Monitoring. SYMP 6. Bioinspired Smart Materials and Systems. SYMP 7. Energy Harvesting. Authors of selected papers in the materials areas (symposia 1, 2, and 6) as well as energy harvesting (symposium 7) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this special issue of Smart Materials and Structures. This collection of papers demonstrates the exceptional quality and originality of the conference presentations. We are very appreciative of their efforts to produce this collection of highly relevant articles on smart materials.

  12. XYLITOL ACTIVATED INNATE IMMUNITY SUPPRESSES PULMONARY MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA INFECTIONS IN SHEEP (POSTER PRESENTATION FOR THE 2003 ASM MEETING)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmolytes with low transepithelial permeability administered to mucosal surfaces, (e.g., the respiratory tract) during experimental challenge may lower the ionic strength of the interstitial fluids and increase the activity of endogenous antimicrobial proteins and peptides. To test this hypothesis,...

  13. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  14. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, Anil W.

    2005-08-01

    This is a textbook for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate students in mechanical, aerospace, and chemical engineering. The book emphasizes understanding CFD through physical principles and examples. The author follows a consistent philosophy of control volume formulation of the fundamental laws of fluid motion and energy transfer, and introduces a novel notion of 'smoothing pressure correction' for solution of flow equations on collocated grids within the framework of the well-known SIMPLE algorithm. The subject matter is developed by considering pure conduction/diffusion, convective transport in 2-dimensional boundary layers and in fully elliptic flow situations and phase-change problems in succession. The book includes chapters on discretization of equations for transport of mass, momentum and energy on Cartesian, structured curvilinear and unstructured meshes, solution of discretised equations, numerical grid generation and convergence enhancement. Practicing engineers will find this particularly useful for reference and for continuing education.

  15. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elovic, E. (Editor); O'Brien, J. E. (Editor); Pepper, D. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  16. WATER MIST IMPINGEMENT ONTO A HEATED SURFACE. PROCEEDING OF THE ASME/JSME JOINT THERMAL ENGINEERING CONFERENCE (5TH) 1999, HELD IN SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental study on the interaction of a water mist with a heated surface is described. The long term objective is to produce experimental data that can be used to validate submodels for four key physical phenomena involved in the interaction of sprays with burning surfaces:...

  17. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  18. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental equations of fluid mechanics are specific expressions of the principles of motion which are ascribed to Isaac Newton. Thus, the equations which form the framework of applied fluid mechanics or hydraulics are, in addition to the equation of continuity, the Newtonian equations of energy and momentum. These basic relationships are also the foundations of river hydraulics. The fundamental equations are developed in this report with sufficient rigor to support critical examinations of their applicability to most problems met by hydraulic engineers of the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. Physical concepts are emphasized, and mathematical procedures are the simplest consistent with the specific requirements of the derivations. In lieu of numerical examples, analogies, and alternative procedures, this treatment stresses a brief methodical exposition of the essential principles. An important objective of this report is to prepare the user to read the literature of the science. Thus, it begins With a basic vocabulary of technical symbols, terms, and concepts. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the language of modern fluid mechanics as it pertains to hydraulic engineering. The basic differential and integral equations of simple fluid motion are derived, and these equations are, in turn, used to describe the essential characteristics of hydrostatics and piezometry. The one-dimensional equations of continuity and motion are defined and are used to derive the general discharge equation. The flow net is described as a means of demonstrating significant characteristics of two-dimensional irrotational flow patterns. A typical flow net is examined in detail. The influence of fluid viscosity is described as an obstacle to the derivation of general, integral equations of motion. It is observed that the part played by viscosity is one which is usually dependent on experimental evaluation. It follows that the dimensionless ratios known as the Euler, Froude, Reynolds, Weber, and Cauchy numbers are defined as essential tools for interpreting and using experimental data. The derivations of the energy and momentum equations are treated in detail. One-dimensional equations for steady nonuniform flow are developed, and the restrictions applicable to the equations are emphasized. Conditions of uniform and gradually varied flow are discussed, and the origin of the Chezy equation is examined in relation to both the energy and the momentum equations. The inadequacy of all uniform-flow equations as a means of describing gradually varied flow is explained. Thus, one of the definitive problems of river hydraulics is analyzed in the light of present knowledge. This report is the outgrowth of a series of short schools conducted during the spring and summer of 1953 for engineers of the Surface Water Branch, Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey. The topics considered are essentially the same as the topics selected for inclusion in the schools. However, in order that they might serve better as a guide and outline for informal study, the arrangement of the writer's original lecture notes has been considerably altered. The purpose of the report, like the purpose of the schools which inspired it, is to build a simple but strong framework of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. It is believed that this framework is capable of supporting a detailed analysis of most of the practical problems met by the engineers of the Geological Survey. It is hoped that the least accomplishment of this work will be to inspire the reader with the confidence and desire to read more of the recent and current technical literature of modern fluid mechanics.

  19. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  20. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  1. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  2. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , Glucose , Albumin , WBC Count , RBC Count , AFB Testing At a ... accumulation, and an initial set of tests (fluid albumin level, cell count and differential, and appearance) is ...

  3. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluid Analysis , Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , Total Protein , Albumin , Glucose Tests , LD , CEA , Fungal Tests , AFB Testing , ... an initial set of tests, including fluid protein, albumin, or LD level, cell count, and appearance, is ...

  4. Pericardial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluid Analysis , Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , Total Protein , Albumin , Glucose , AFB Testing At a Glance Test Sample ... an initial set of tests (fluid protein or albumin level, cell count, and appearance) is used to ...

  5. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be done on the fluid to measure: Albumin Protein Red and white blood cell counts Tests ... the abdomen. Large differences between the amount of albumin in the peritoneal fluid and in your blood ...

  6. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  7. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  8. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  9. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  10. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sample of fluid taken from the sac surrounding the heart to diagnose a bacterial infection. The ... of fluid will be taken from the sac surrounding the heart. Before this is done, some people ...

  11. Selective Guide to Literature on Chemical Engineering. Engineering Literature Guides, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Rosemary, Comp.

    The material in this guide covers areas important to the chemical industries. Topics such as heat and mass transfer, plastics, polymers, fluid flow, and process engineering are included. This document is a survey of information sources in chemical engineering and is intended to identify those core resources which can help engineers and librarians…

  12. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    SciTech Connect

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  13. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  14. Therapeutic potential of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzak, Hassan; De Coppi, Paolo; Guillot, Pascale V

    2013-03-01

    Human amniotic fluid cells have been used traditionally as a diagnostic tool for genetic anomalies. More recently it has been recognized that amniotic fluid contains populations of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC) were first to be described. These cells are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages. More recently cells with broader potential, defined as amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC), were also isolated. They have intermediate characteristics between embryonic and adult stem cells and are able to differentiate into lineages representative of all three germ layers but unlike ES cells they do not form tumours in vivo. Furthermore, AFSC have been reverted to functional pluripotency in a transgene-free approach using an epigenetics modifier. These characteristics, together with absence of ethical issues concerning their employment, have made stem cells from amniotic fluid a promising candidate for cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:23157178

  15. Practical approach to parameter estimation for ASM3+ bio-P module applied to five-stage step-feed EBPR process.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Ko, J H; Poo, K M; Lee, T H; Woo, H J; Kim, C W

    2006-01-01

    Various parameter optimization approaches to a five-stage step-feed EBPR process modeled using the ASM3+bio-P module were examined. Five stoichiometric (Y(STO,NO), Y(H,O2, Y(H,NO,) Y(PAO,O2), Y(PO4)) and seven kinetic parameters (k(STO), eta(NO), b(H), mu(max),PAO, q(PHA), q(PP), mu(max),A) were estimated. The optimization approaches could be classified based on the data sources (batch experiments or CSTR operation data) and the number of target variables used in calculating the objective function. Optimized parameter values obtained by each approach were validated with CSTR operation data that were not used for parameter optimization. The results showed that the parameter optimization only with batch experimental results could not be directly applied to CSTR operation data. ASM3 + bio-P module parameters could be finely optimized only with CSTR operation data when sufficient target variables for objective function calculation were applied. When the number of target variables was increased, prediction performance was significantly improved. Once optimized, the model was able to predict the characteristic features of the five-stage step-feed process; namely, a high PAO yield, fast PAO growth, fast X(pp) storage, slow X(STO) and X(PHA) storage. PMID:16532744

  16. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  17. Structural cooling fluid tube for supporting a turbine component and supplying cooling fluid

    DOEpatents

    Charron, Richard; Pierce, Daniel

    2015-02-24

    A shaft cover support for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The shaft cover support not only provides enhanced support to a shaft cover of the gas turbine engine, but also includes a cooling fluid chamber for passing fluids from a rotor air cooling supply conduit to an inner ring cooling manifold. As such, the shaft cover support accomplishes in a single component what was only partially accomplished in two components in conventional configurations. The shaft cover support may also provide additional stiffness and reduce interference of the flow from the compressor. In addition, the shaft cover support accommodates a transition section extending between compressor and turbine sections of the engine. The shaft cover support has a radially extending region that is offset from the inlet and outlet that enables the shaft cover support to surround the transition, thereby reducing the overall length of this section of the engine.

  18. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  19. Multi-cylinder hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A multi-cylinder hot gas engine having an equal angle, V-shaped engine block in which two banks of parallel, equal length, equally sized cylinders are formed together with annular regenerator/cooler units surrounding each cylinder, and wherein the pistons are connected to a single crankshaft. The hot gas engine further includes an annular heater head disposed around a central circular combustor volume having a new balanced-flow hot-working-fluid manifold assembly that provides optimum balanced flow of the working fluid through the heater head working fluid passageways which are connected between each of the cylinders and their respective associated annular regenerator units. This balanced flow provides even heater head temperatures and, therefore, maximum average working fluid temperature for best operating efficiency with the use of a single crankshaft V-shaped engine block.

  20. Magnelok technology: a complement to magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. David

    2004-07-01

    Magnetorheological or MR fluids have been successfully used to enable highly effective semi-active control systems in automobile primary suspensions to control unwanted motions in civil engineering structures and to provide force-feedback in steer-by-wire systems. A key to the successful use of MR fluids is an appreciation and understanding of the balance and trade-off between the magnetically controlled on-state force and the ever-present off-state viscous force. In all MR fluid applications, one must deal with the fact that MR fluids never fully decouple or go to zero force in their off-state. Magnelok devices are a magnetically controlled compliment to traditional MR fluid devices that have been developed to enable a true force decoupling in the off-state. Magnelok devices may be embodied as linear or rotary dampers, brakes, lockable struts or position holding devices. They are particularly suitable for lock/un-lock applications. Unlike MR fluid devices they contain no fluid yet they do provide a variable level of friction damping that is controlled by the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. Magnelok devices are low cost as they easily accommodate relatively loose mechanical tolerances and require no seals or accumulator. A variety of controllable Magnelok devices and applications are described.

  1. Thermal fluids in low temperature systems. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lynde, P.G.; Yonkers, E.D.

    1996-02-01

    This article focuses on the lifeblood of these systems, the thermal transfer fluid itself. Low-temperature heat-transfer fluids are used to condition engine fluids, test chambers, cooling fluids, or a combination of these in environmental test facilities. To meet the specific test criteria, these fluids may be required to maintain pumpability and function with thermal efficiency at temperatures as low as {minus}120 F. This article presents information related to heat-transfer fluids used in low-temperature cooling applications. Three general groups of fluids are discussed: water-based antifreezes (ethylene and propylene glycol solutions); chlorinated solvents (methylene chloride and trichloroethylene); organic and synthetic coolants (diethylbenzene, two forms of dimethylpolysiloxane, heavy naphtha hydrotreated, and citrus terpene).

  2. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  3. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  4. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  5. Recent trends in biocatalysis engineering.

    PubMed

    Illanes, Andrés; Cauerhff, Ana; Wilson, Lorena; Castro, Guillermo R

    2012-07-01

    During the last 30 years the scope of biocatalysis has been expanding due to the advances in several technological fields. Diverse techniques as structural enzyme improvement (e.g. protein engineering, direct evolution), engineering approaches (e.g. ionic liquids, supercritical fluids) and physical stabilization (e.g. immobilization, CLEAS) have been developed, which in combination are powerful tools to improve biotransformation and to synthesize new products. In the present work, recent advances in biocatalysis are reviewed. PMID:22424920

  6. Engineering developments for sodium heat engine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, T. K.; Pantolin, J.; Sievers, R. K.; Kummer, J. T.; Novak, Robert F.

    The authors report preliminary results of testing and analysis of the stresses induced in tubular beta-double prime-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) membranes as used in sodium heat engine (SHE) cells due to thermal gradients, neutral sodium absorption in the surfaces and bulk material and residual stresses remaining from tube manufacture. The authors report results from experiments conducted on a recirculating single tube vapor-fed cell module operated continuously under load for 850. The electromagnetic pump system used to recirculate the sodium working fluid for this test cell was redesigned and its performance is also discussed.

  7. 78 FR 79363 - Hazardous Materials: Adoption of ASME Code Section XII and the National Board Inspection Code

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477... mechanics allows an engineer to establish the minimum toughness required in a material based on the stress....5.1(a)(1)(b) of Section XII standardize the allowable peak secondary stress levels resulting...

  8. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Povitsky, Alex; Schkolnikov, Natalia; Njoroge, Norman; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory at Hampton University (HU/FM&AL) jointly with the NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted four connected subprojects under the reporting project. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of theoretical explanation of experimental facts and creation of accurate numerical simulation techniques and prediction theory for solution of current problems in propulsion systems of interest to the NAVY and NASA agencies. This work is also supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. The fundamental idea uniting these subprojects is to use nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle and inlet designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. These subprojects are: (1) Aeroperformance and acoustics of Bluebell-shaped and Telescope-shaped designs; (2) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round, diamond-round and other nozzles; (3) Measurement technique improvement for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel; a new course in the field of aerodynamics, teaching and training of HU students; experimental tests of Mobius-shaped screws: research and training; (4) Supersonic inlet shape optimization. The main outcomes during this reporting period are: (l) Publications: The AIAA Paper #00-3170 was presented at the 36th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 17-19 June, 2000, Huntsville, AL. The AIAA Paper #01-1893 has been accepted for the AIAA/NAL-NASDA-ISAS 10th International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference, 24-27 April 2001, Kyoto, Japan. The AIAA Paper #01 -3204 has been accepted for presentation at the 37th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, being held on 08-11 July, in Salt Lake City, UT; (2) A U.S. patent #6,082,635 was granted on July 4, 2000; (3) Grants and proposals: The H U/ FM&AL was awarded the NASA grant NAG-3-2495 in October 2000 and the laboratory is a primary U.S. research team in a joint project under the CRDF award granted to the NASA GRC and IM/MSU (Russia) in July 2000; (4) Theory and numerical simulations: Analytical theory, numerical simulation, comparison of theoretical with experimental results, and modification of theoretical approaches, models, grids, etc., have been conducted for several complicated 2D and 3D nozzle and inlet designs using NASA, ICASE, and IM/MSU codes based on full Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers: CFL3D, FLUENT, and GODUNOV, and others; (5) Experimental Tests: (a) A new course: "Advanced Aerodynamics and Aircraft Performance" presented in spring semester, 2001; training and experimental test research using the HU LSWT. (b) Small-scale M6bius-shaped screws were tested in different conditions and their application has shown essential benefits by comparison with traditional designs; (6) Installation in the FM&AL computer system: second software TECPLOT 8.0 for the UNIX SGI workstation and free TECPLOT 7.5 for the PC Dell computer, and 2D and 3D GRIDGEN (version 9) for the UNIX SGI as well as installation of two free NASA codes, 3D MAG and VULCAN; (7) Student Research Activity: Involvement of two undergraduate students as research assistants in the current research project.

  9. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  10. Metalworking fluids: oil mist and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Stephen L

    2003-11-01

    This article is based upon my own experiences with metalworking fluids and the adverse health effects and medical conditions associated with exposure to metalworking fluids. I have researched and witnessed the benefits that can be achieved when metalworking fluids are properly maintained and managed. My experiences have provided insight into how a shop operates, including comprehension of the equipment used, processes, mist generating points, engineering controls currently being adopted, and procedures that are used to maintain metalworking fluids. I have been able to share my personal experiences with the country's leading experts in the field of metalworking fluids. I have presented my insights on the topic in Washington, D.C., to the Standard Advisory Committee of OSHA, as well as at many other conferences nationwide. I have provided awareness training for a number of union and nonunion workers. Being a part of developing successful metal removal fluid programs, I realize the importance of transferring and sharing information. Many times an organization is not fully aware of certain conditions and how to combat them. My mission and intent is to properly educate those who are exposed to the harm that metalworking fluids can invoke and to inform those involved of the possible methods of reducing long- and short-term risk. One thing that must be kept in mind is the way we view these fluids. Many shops categorize the fluids as a type of "operating expense" when they should actually be seen as a sort of investment. Just as performing a scheduled maintenance on a machine promises the best possible longevity of that machine, the upkeep of metalworking fluid also provides longer "tool life." Monitoring and maintaining the fluids also provides for more effective and efficient productivity. If we fail to consider that proper management of the fluids can cut cost dramatically, then we will miss out on the financial impact they can have on a company. Try looking at the fluids as a liquid tool. Doing so I believe will bring a better understanding of the value of a successful metalworking fluids program. With this new understanding, it can be seen just who must play a role in the management of metalworking fluids. The employees who deal with the daily tasks involving the coolant play a major part. They are on the floor where these metalworking fluids are being used. In many shops, it is assumed that the environmental health & safety departments are responsible for standard operating procedures and management of fluids. The EH&S department should only be responsible for the protection from exposure and the transfer of information regarding policy and procedure to their employees. Not all shops have the resources required to develop and implement the proper standard operating procedure. Therefore, we must understand that what is feasible for one may not be for another. Companies that lack the sufficient resources should not be neglected. It is crucial that awareness of proper standard operating procedure is shared with everyone involved with the fluids in order to provide proper metalworking fluids management. Fluids are as dynamic as the formulations themselves (complex & dynamic). These fluids can quickly become contaminated with foreign materials and chemicals, thereby become aerosolized into mist. With proper education and training, one will be able to control what gets aerosolized. PMID:14555433

  11. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  12. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  13. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    PubMed Central

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  14. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Hardal, Ali Ü C; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  15. Harmonic uniflow engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-03-22

    A reciprocating-piston uniflow engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. When released, the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium position to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. In other embodiments, the harmonic oscillator arrangement of the inlet valve enables the uniflow engine to be reversibly operated as a uniflow compressor.

  16. Suizong 36-1 offshore oilfield, Liaodong Bay, the People's Republic of China. Reservoir engineering report, Part 2 of 4. Formation temperature analysis, fluid study analysis and temperature-viscosity relationships. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The study was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Bohai Oil Corporation in the People's Republic of China. The report presents the results of an integrated reservoir study of the Suizhong 36-1 Offshore Oilfield in Liaodong Bay. Included in the project are geological, geophysical, and petrophysical studies, as well as analyses of the reservoir engineering and production engineering aspects of the field. This is the eleventh of seventeen volumes. It contains the results of an analysis of the formation temperature and viscosity relationships of the field. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Introduction, (3) Discussion, (4) References, (5) Appendices.

  17. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  18. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  19. Computational fluid dynamics in a marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Arthur D.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of the supercomputer and recent advances in both Reynolds averaged, and large eddy simulation fluid flow approximation techniques to the Navier-Stokes equations, have created a robust environment for the exploration of problems of interest to the Navy in general, and the Naval Underwater Systems Center in particular. The nature of problems that are of interest, and the type of resources needed for their solution are addressed. The goal is to achieve a good engineering solution to the fluid-structure interaction problem. It is appropriate to indicate that a paper by D. Champman played a major role in developing the interest in the approach discussed.

  20. Development of a computational aero/fluids analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    The Computational Aero/Fluids Analysis System (AFAS) provides the analytical capability to perform state-of-the-art computational analyses in two difficult fluid dynamics disciplines associated with the Space Shuttle program. This system provides the analysis tools and techniques for rapidly and efficiently accessing, analyzing, and reformulating the large and expanding external aerodynamic data base while also providing tools for complex fluid flow analyses of the SSME engine components. Both of these fluid flow disciplines, external aerodynamics and internal gasdynamics, required this capability to ensure that MSFC can respond in a timely manner as problems are encountered and operational changes are made in the Space Shuttle.

  1. 46 CFR 58.30-20 - Fluid power hose and fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fluid power hose and fittings. 58.30-20 Section 58.30-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-20 Fluid power hose and fittings....

  2. 46 CFR 58.30-20 - Fluid power hose and fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fluid power hose and fittings. 58.30-20 Section 58.30-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-20 Fluid power hose and fittings....

  3. 46 CFR 61.30-5 - Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and... ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-5 Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test. For visual inspection, access plates and...

  4. 46 CFR 61.30-5 - Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and... ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-5 Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test. For visual inspection, access plates and...

  5. 46 CFR 61.30-5 - Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and... ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-5 Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test. For visual inspection, access plates and...

  6. 46 CFR 61.30-5 - Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and... ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-5 Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test. For visual inspection, access plates and...

  7. 46 CFR 61.30-5 - Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and... ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-5 Preparation of thermal fluid heater for inspection and test. For visual inspection, access plates and...

  8. 46 CFR 58.30-50 - Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... systems. 58.30-50 Section 58.30-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-50 Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems. (a) All fluid power and...

  9. 46 CFR 58.30-50 - Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... systems. 58.30-50 Section 58.30-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-50 Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems. (a) All fluid power and...

  10. 46 CFR 58.30-50 - Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... systems. 58.30-50 Section 58.30-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-50 Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems. (a) All fluid power and...

  11. 46 CFR 58.30-50 - Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... systems. 58.30-50 Section 58.30-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-50 Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems. (a) All fluid power and...

  12. 46 CFR 58.30-50 - Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... systems. 58.30-50 Section 58.30-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-50 Requirements for miscellaneous fluid power and control systems. (a) All fluid power and...

  13. Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines: A Workshop to Identify the Challenges and Set Future Directions. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris; Pinkus, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The following report represents a compendium of selected speaker presentation materials and observations made by Prof. O. Pinkus at the NASA/ASME/Industry sponsored workshop entitled "Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines" held on September 15-17, 1999 in Albany, New York. The impetus for the workshop came from the ASME's Research Committee on tribology whose goal is to explore new tribological research topics which may become future research opportunities. Since this subject is of current interest to other industrial and government entities the conference received cosponsorship as noted above. The conference was well attended by government, industrial, and academic participants. Topics discussed included current tribological issues in gas turbines as well as the potential impact (drawbacks and advantages) of future tribological technologies especially foil air bearings and magnetic bearings. It is hoped that this workshop report may serve as a starting point for continued discussions and activities in oil-free turbomachinery systems.

  14. Fluid Dynamic Verification Experiments on STS-70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments were flown on STS-70 as phase two of the engineering evaluation of the first bioreactor Engineering Development Unit (EDU#1). The phase one experiments were comparative cell cultures in identical units on earth and onboard STS-70. In phase two, two types of fluid dynamic experiments were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the basic flow patterns were evaluated with the use of 'dye' streaklines formed from alternate injections of either a mild acid or base solution into the external flow loop that was then perfused into the vessel. The presence of Bromothymol Blue in the fluid then caused color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa, indicating the basic fluid motions. This reversible change could be repeated as desired. In the absence of significant density differences in the fluid, the flow patterns in space should be the same as on earth. Video tape records of the flow patterns for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. The second type of fluid dynamic experiment was the quantitative evaluation of the trajectories of solid beads of various densities and sizes. The beads were introduced into the vessel and the paths recorded on video tape, with the vessel operated at various rotation rates and flow perfusion rates. Because of space limitations, the video camera was placed as close as possible to the vessel, resulting in significant optical distortion. This report describes the analysis methods to obtain comparisons between the in-flight fluid dynamics and numerical models of the flow field. The methods include optical corrections to the video images and calculation of the bead trajectories for given operating conditions and initial bead locations.

  15. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  16. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  17. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  18. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  19. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made on the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is reported. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered under the contract. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  20. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid. PMID:18655997

  1. Review of ASME code criteria for control of primary loads on nuclear piping system branch connections and recommendations for additional development work

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report collects and uses available data to reexamine the criteria for controlling primary loads in nuclear piping branch connections as expressed in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In particular, the primary load stress indices given in NB-3650 and NB-3683 are reexamined. The report concludes that the present usage of the stress indices in the criteria equations should be continued. However, the complex treatment of combined branch and run moments is not supported by available information. Therefore, it is recommended that this combined loading evaluation procedure be replaced for primary loads by the separate leg evaluation procedure specified in NC/ND-3653.3(c) and NC/ND-3653.3(d). No recommendation is made for fatigue or secondary load evaluations for Class 1 piping. Further work should be done on the development of better criteria for treatment of combined branch and run moment effects.

  2. First-principles study of energetic and electronic properties of A2Ti2O7 (A=Sm, Gd, Er) pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2008-10-01

    First-principles calculations have been carried out to study the electronic properties of A2Ti2O7 (A=Sm, Gd, Er) pyrochlores. It was found that f electrons have negligible effect on the structural and energetic properties, but have significant effect on the electronic properties. Density of state analysis shows that A-site 4f electrons do take part in the chemical bonding. Also, we found that bond is less covalent than and bonds, while bond in Gd2Ti2O7 is more covalent. It was proposed that for A2Ti2O7 (A = Sm, Gd, Er) pyrochlores, bonds may play more significant role in determining their radiation resistance to amorphization.

  3. Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics and Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Xu, BX; Liu, L

    2014-05-29

    Under nanoconfinement, fluid molecules and ions exhibit radically different configurations, properties, and energetics from those of their bulk counterparts. These unique characteristics of nanoconfined fluids, along with the unconventional interactions with solids at the nanoscale, have provided many opportunities for engineering innovation. With properly designed nanoconfinement, several nanofluidic systems have been devised in our group in the past several years to achieve energy conversion functions with high efficiencies. This review is dedicated to elucidating the unique characteristics of nanofluidics, introducing several novel nanofluidic systems combining nanoporous materials with functional fluids, and to unveiling their working mechanisms. In all these systems, the ultra-large surface area available in nanoporous materials provides an ideal platform for seamlessly interfacing with nanoconfined fluids, and efficiently converting energy between the mechanical, thermal, and electrical forms. These systems have been demonstrated to have great potentials for applications including energy dissipation/absorption, energy trapping, actuation, and energy harvesting. Their efficiencies can be further enhanced by designing efforts based upon improved understanding of nanofluidics, which represents an important addition to classical fluid mechanics. Through the few systems exemplified in this review, the emerging research field of nanoscale fluid mechanics may promote more exciting nanofluidic phenomena and mechanisms, with increasing applications by encompassing aspects of mechanics, materials, physics, chemistry, biology, etc.

  4. Solar-thermal engine testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat

    2002-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle, collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (Isp). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemically vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine ``module'' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine Isp. In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational aspects of the engine and associated subsystems, and will include independent variation of both steady state heat-exchanger temperature prior to thrust operation and nitrogen inlet pressure (flow rate) during thrust operation. Although the Shooting Star engines were designed as thermal-storage engines to accommodate mission parameters, they are fully capable of operating as scalable, direct-gain engines. Tests are conducted in both operational modes. Engine thrust and propellant flow rate will be measured and thereby Isp. The objective of these tests is to investigate the effectiveness of the solar engine as a heat exchanger and a rocket. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of the support structure as a thermal insulator, the integrity of both the insulation system and the insulation containment system, the overall temperature distribution throughout the engine module, and the thermal power required to sustain steady state fluid temperatures at various flow rates. .

  5. Thermogelling magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrivar, Keshvad; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach is proposed for the formulation of kinetically stable magnetorheological (MR) fluids exhibiting an MR effect. Thermoresponsive carrier fluids are used which develop a sol-gel transition on increasing the temperature. Turbidity measurements, multiwave rheology and steady shear flow tests are carried out on model conventional MR fluids prepared by dispersion of carbonyl iron microparticles in triblock copolymer solutions of type PEOx-PPOy-PEOx with x = 100 and y = 65. Experiments demonstrate that the MR fluids remain stable against sedimentation in the gel phase and exhibit a very large (relative) MR effect (up to 1000%) in the sol phase.

  6. A Coupled Thermal, Fluid Flow, and Solidification Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a new laser-based additive manufacturing technology under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology. SLE is aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal deposits of nickel-based superalloys through the melting of alloy powders onto superalloy substrates using a fast scanning Nd:YAG laser beam. The fast galvanometer control movement of the laser (0.2 to 2 m/s) and high-resolution raster scanning (20 to 200 µm line spacing) enables superior thermal control over the solidification process and allows the production of porosity-free, crack-free deposits of more than 1000 µm thickness. Here, we present a combined thermal and fluid flow model of the SLE process applied to alloy CMSX-4 with temperature-dependent thermo-physical properties. With the scanning beam described as a moving line source, the instantaneous melt pool assumes a convex hull shape with distinct leading edge and trailing edge characteristics. Temperature gradients at the leading and trailing edges are of order 2 × 105 and 104 K/m, respectively. Detailed flow analysis provides insights on the flow characteristics of the powder incorporating into the melt pool, showing velocities of order 1 × 10-4 m/s. The Marangoni effect drives this velocity from 10 to 15 times higher depending on the operating parameters. Prediction of the solidification microstructure is based on conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool. Time tracking of solidification history is incorporated into the model to couple the microstructure prediction model to the thermal-fluid flow model, and to predict the probability of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. Qualitative agreement is obtained between simulation and experimental result.

  7. Probing the mysteries of the X-ray binary 4U 1210-64 with ASM, PCA, MAXI, BAT, and Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Coley, Joel B.; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Mukai, Koji; Pottschmidt, Katja

    2014-10-01

    4U 1210-64 has been postulated to be a high-mass X-ray binary powered by the Be mechanism. X-ray observations with Suzaku, the ISS Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and All Sky Monitor (ASM) provide detailed temporal and spectral information on this poorly understood source. Long-term ASM and MAXI observations show distinct high and low states and the presence of a 6.7101 ± 0.0005 day modulation, interpreted as the orbital period. Folded light curves reveal a sharp dip, interpreted as an eclipse. To determine the nature of the mass donor, the predicted eclipse half-angle was calculated as a function of inclination angle for several stellar spectral types. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with a mass donor of spectral type B5 V; however, stars with spectral types B0 V or B0-5 III are possible. The best-fit spectral model consists of a power law with index Γ = 1.85{sub −0.05}{sup +0.04} and a high-energy cutoff at 5.5 ± 0.2 keV modified by an absorber that fully covers the source as well as partially covering absorption. Emission lines from S XVI Kα, Fe Kα, Fe XXV Kα, and Fe XXVI Kα were observed in the Suzaku spectra. Out of eclipse, the Fe Kα line flux was strongly correlated with unabsorbed continuum flux, indicating that the Fe I emission is the result of fluorescence of cold dense material near the compact object. The Fe I feature is not detected during eclipse, further supporting an origin close to the compact object.

  8. Probing the Mysteries of the X-Ray Binary 4U 1210-64 with ASM, PCA, MAXI, BAT, and Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coley, Joel B.; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Mukai, Koji; Pottschmidt, Katja

    2014-01-01

    4U 1210-64 has been postulated to be a high-mass X-ray binary powered by the Be mechanism. X-ray observations with Suzaku, the ISS Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and All Sky Monitor (ASM) provide detailed temporal and spectral information on this poorly understood source. Long-term ASM and MAXI observations show distinct high and low states and the presence of a 6.7101 +/- 0.0005 day modulation, interpreted as the orbital period. Folded light curves reveal a sharp dip, interpreted as an eclipse. To determine the nature of the mass donor, the predicted eclipse half-angle was calculated as a function of inclination angle for several stellar spectral types. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with a mass donor of spectral type B5 V; however, stars with spectral types B0 V or B0-5 III are possible. The best-fit spectral model consists of a power law with index gamma = 1.85(+0.04/-0.05) and a high-energy cutoff at 5.5 +/- 0.2 keV modified by an absorber that fully covers the source as well as partially covering absorption. Emission lines from S XVI K alpha, Fe K alpha, Fe XXV K alpha, and Fe XXVI K alpha were observed in the Suzaku spectra. Out of eclipse, the Fe K alpha line flux was strongly correlated with unabsorbed continuum flux, indicating that the Fe I emission is the result of fluorescence of cold dense material near the compact object. The Fe I feature is not detected during eclipse, further supporting an origin close to the compact object.

  9. Probing the Mysteries of the X-Ray Binary 4U 1210-64 with ASM, PCA, MAXI, BAT, and Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel B.; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Mukai, Koji; Pottschmidt, Katja

    2014-10-01

    4U 1210-64 has been postulated to be a high-mass X-ray binary powered by the Be mechanism. X-ray observations with Suzaku, the ISS Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and All Sky Monitor (ASM) provide detailed temporal and spectral information on this poorly understood source. Long-term ASM and MAXI observations show distinct high and low states and the presence of a 6.7101 ± 0.0005 day modulation, interpreted as the orbital period. Folded light curves reveal a sharp dip, interpreted as an eclipse. To determine the nature of the mass donor, the predicted eclipse half-angle was calculated as a function of inclination angle for several stellar spectral types. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with a mass donor of spectral type B5 V however, stars with spectral types B0 V or B0-5 III are possible. The best-fit spectral model consists of a power law with index Γ = 1.85^{+0.04}_{-0.05} and a high-energy cutoff at 5.5 ± 0.2 keV modified by an absorber that fully covers the source as well as partially covering absorption. Emission lines from S XVI Kα, Fe Kα, Fe XXV Kα, and Fe XXVI Kα were observed in the Suzaku spectra. Out of eclipse, the Fe Kα line flux was strongly correlated with unabsorbed continuum flux, indicating that the Fe I emission is the result of fluorescence of cold dense material near the compact object. The Fe I feature is not detected during eclipse, further supporting an origin close to the compact object.

  10. Simulation Of The Internal-Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1987-01-01

    Program adapts to available information about particular engine. Mathematical model of internal-combustion engine constructed and implemented as computer program suitable for use on large digital computer systems. ZMOTTO program calculates Otto-cycle performance parameters as well as working-fluid compositions and properties throughout cycle for number of consecutive cycles and for variety of input parameters. Written in standard FORTRAN IV.

  11. Principles of liquids working in heat engines

    PubMed Central

    Allen, P. C.; Knight, W. R.; Paulson, D. N.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of liquids suggest that they should be powerful working fluids in heat engines. Their use requires heat engines based conceptually on the Stirling and Malone principles. The principles are explained, and then experiments on propylene are presented that demonstrate the principles and confirm the thermodynamic analysis. PMID:16592756

  12. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual designed to be used by technical institute students in Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs. The experiments are introductory in nature and embrace the fields of applied thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, refrigeration, heat transfer and basic instrumentation. There are 20…

  13. Nitrous Oxide/Paraffin Hybrid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Snyder, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide/paraffin (N2OP) hybrid rocket engines have been invented as alternatives to other rocket engines especially those that burn granular, rubbery solid fuels consisting largely of hydroxyl- terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Originally intended for use in launching spacecraft, these engines would also be suitable for terrestrial use in rocket-assisted takeoff of small airplanes. The main novel features of these engines are (1) the use of reinforced paraffin as the fuel and (2) the use of nitrous oxide as the oxidizer. Hybrid (solid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket engines offer advantages of safety and simplicity over fluid-bipropellant (fluid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket en - gines, but the thrusts of HTPB-based hybrid rocket engines are limited by the low regression rates of the fuel grains. Paraffin used as a solid fuel has a regression rate about 4 times that of HTPB, but pure paraffin fuel grains soften when heated; hence, paraffin fuel grains can, potentially, slump during firing. In a hybrid engine of the present type, the paraffin is molded into a 3-volume-percent graphite sponge or similar carbon matrix, which supports the paraffin against slumping during firing. In addition, because the carbon matrix material burns along with the paraffin, engine performance is not appreciably degraded by use of the matrix.

  14. Nonclinical safety assessment of recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM) for the treatment of acid sphingomyelinase deficiency:the utility of animal models of disease in the toxicological evaluation of potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Murray, James M; Thompson, Anne Marie; Vitsky, Allison; Hawes, Michael; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Pacheco, Joshua; Wilson, Stephen; McPherson, John M; Thurberg, Beth L; Karey, Kenneth P; Andrews, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM) is being developed as an enzyme replacement therapy for patients with acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (Niemann-Pick disease types A and B), which causes sphingomyelin to accumulate in lysosomes. In the acid sphingomyelinase knock-out (ASMKO) mouse, intravenously administered rhASM reduced tissue sphingomyelin levels in a dose-dependent manner. When rhASM was administered to normal rats, mice, and dogs, no toxicity was observed up to a dose of 30mg/kg. However, high doses of rhASM≥10mg/kg administered to ASMKO mice resulted in unexpected toxicity characterized by cardiovascular shock, hepatic inflammation, adrenal hemorrhage, elevations in ceramide and cytokines (especially IL-6, G-CSF, and keratinocyte chemoattractant [KC]), and death. The toxicity could be completely prevented by the administration of several low doses (3mg/kg) of rhASM prior to single or repeated high doses (≥20mg/kg). These results suggest that the observed toxicity involves the rapid breakdown of large amounts of sphingomyelin into ceramide and/or other toxic downstream metabolites, which are known signaling molecules with cardiovascular and pro-inflammatory effects. Our results suggest that the nonclinical safety assessment of novel therapeutics should include the use of specific animal models of disease whenever feasible. PMID:25092414

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  16. Some connections between fluid mechanics and the solving of industrial and environmental fluid-flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    1981-05-01

    The ways in which advances in fluid mechanics have led to improvements in engineering design are discussed, with attention to the stimulation of fluid mechanics research by industrial and environmental problems. The development of many practical uses of fluid flow without the benefit of scientific study is also emphasized. Among the topics discussed are vortices and coherent structures in turbulent flows, lubrication, jet and multiphase flows, the control and exploitation of waves, the effect of unsteady forces on structures, and dispersion phenomena. Among the practical achievements covered are the use of bluff shields to control separated flow over truck bodies and reduce aerodynamic drag, ink-jet printing, hovercraft stability, fluidized-bed combustion, the fluid/solid instabilities caused by air flow around a computer memory floppy disc, and various wind turbines.

  17. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, William R.; Fusaro, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

  18. Material transport of a magnetizable fluid by surface perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, V.; Naletova, V. A.; Popp, J.; Zeidis, I.; Zimmermann, K.

    2015-12-01

    Within the research for apedal, contour variable locomotion systems, the influence of an alternating magnetic field on the shape of the free surface of a magnetizable fluid (magnetic fluid) is studied. In the framework of the Stokes approximation, for the case where the amplitude of the alternating component of the applied magnetic field is much less than the magnitude of the permanent component, it is shown analytically that a periodical traveling applied magnetic field can generate a transport of the fluid in a prescribed direction. Numerical computations are performed to calculate and analyze the flow rate of the fluid as a function of the parameters of the field and the fluid. This effect can be used in fluid transporting engineering mini- and microsystems.

  19. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Hardin, Jay C.; Mosiane, Lotlamoreng; Kaushal, Patel; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2000-01-01

    In this project, we continue to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). The FM&AL was established at Hampton University in June of 1996 and has conducted research under two NASA grants: NAG-1-1835 (1996-99), and NAG-1-1936 (1997-00). In addition, the FM&AL has jointly conducted research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant #RE2-136 (1996-99). The goals of the FM&AL programs are twofold: (1) to improve the working efficiency of the FM&AUs team in generating new innovative ideas and in conducting research in the field of fluid dynamics and acoustics, basically for improvement of supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines, and (2) to attract promising minority students to this research and training and, in cooperation with other HU departments, to teach them basic knowledge in Aerodynamics, Gas Dynamics, and Theoretical and Experimental Methods in Aeroacoustics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The research at the HU FM&AL supports reduction schemes associated with the emission of engine pollutants for commercial aircraft and concepts for reduction of observables for military aircraft. These research endeavors relate to the goals of the NASA Strategic Enterprise in Aeronautics concerning the development of environmentally acceptable aircraft. It is in this precise area, where the US aircraft industry, academia, and Government are in great need of trained professionals and which is a high priority goal of the Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) Program, that the HU FM&AL can make its most important contribution. The main achievements for the reporting period in the development of concepts for noise reduction and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles and inlets for aircraft engines are as follows: (1) Publications- The AIAA Paper #99-1924 has been presented at the 5th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, May 10-12, 1999, Seattle, WA; the AIAA Paper #00-3315 has been accepted for the 36th AIAA/ASME/ SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 17-19 July, 2000, Huntsville, AL; and another paper has been accepted for the International Environmental Congress, 14-16 June, 2000, St.-Petersburg, Russia. (2) Two patents were granted on July 20, 1999, and January 12, 2000. (3) Three reports/presentations at the NASA LaRC and GRC (06/22199, 09/26/ 99, and 06/25/00). (4) Grants and Proposals: Four proposals were submitted to the NASA and CRDF; a NASA Faculty Award was granted on January, 2000. A CRDF Young Investigator Program Award was granted for a 3 months visit of the Russian scientist to the HU FM&AL (03/99-05/99). (5) Theory and Numerical Simulations- Analytical theory, numerical simulation, comparison of theoretical with experimental results, and modification of theoretical approaches, models, grids etc. have been conducted for several complicated 2D and 3D nozzle and inlet designs using NASA codes based on full Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers: CFL3D, CRAFT, GODUNOV, and others. New approach for environmental monitoring via infrasound. (6) Experimental Tests: Experimental acoustic tests at the TsAGI, Moscow, with nozzles having Screwdriver or Axisymmetric Plug and Permeable Shells. A small scale working model of the NASA Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) has been installed in the Experimental Hall of the HU FM&AL (June, 1999). Preliminary preparations for experimental tests were made. (7) Students Research Activity: Involvement of the two graduate students as research assistants in the current research project.

  20. Engineering Cartilage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...