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Sample records for aspartate mediates dopamine

  1. Single exposure to cocaine impairs aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex via dopamine D1-receptor dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Stutz, Bernardo; Martins, Robertta Silva; Dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Pecinalli, Ney Roner; Santos, Luis E; Taveira-da-Silva, Rosilane; Lowe, Jennifer; de Freitas, Isis Grigorio; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Manhães, Alex C; Kubrusly, Regina C C

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine and glutamate play critical roles in the reinforcing effects of cocaine. We demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal administration of cocaine induces a significant decrease in [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC). This decrease is associated with elevated dopamine levels, and requires dopamine D1-receptor signaling (D1R) and adenylyl cyclase activation. The effect was observed within 10min of cocaine administration and lasted for up to 30min. This rapid response is related to D1R-mediated cAMP-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3. We also demonstrated that cocaine exposure increases extracellular d-aspartate, l-glutamate and d-serine in the PFC. Our data suggest that cocaine activates dopamine D1 receptor signaling and PKA pathway to regulate EAATs function and extracellular EAA level in the PFC. PMID:27208619

  2. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  3. Galanin: A Role in Mesolimbic Dopamine-Mediated Instrumental Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, John K.; Brewer, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    ROBINSON, J.K. and Brewer, A. Galanin: A Role in Mesolimbic-Dopamine Mediated Instrumental Behavior? NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XX(X) XXX-XXX, 2008. The involvement of the neuropeptide galanin in the consumption of the primary “commodities” of food and water is well established. However, the present review describes anatomical and behavioral evidence that suggests that galanin may also modulate ascending mesolimbic dopamine function and thereby play an inhibitory role in the systems by which instrumental behavior is energized toward acquiring primary commodities. General anatomical frameworks for this interaction are presented and future studies that could evaluate it are discussed. PMID:18632153

  4. Pivotal role for aspartate-80 in the regulation of dopamine D2 receptor affinity for drugs and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Neve, K A; Cox, B A; Henningsen, R A; Spanoyannis, A; Neve, R L

    1991-06-01

    An aspartate residue corresponding to aspartate-80 of dopamine D2 receptors is strictly conserved among receptors that couple to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Mutation of this residue alters the function of several classes of neurotransmitter receptors. Dopamine D2 receptors couple to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gi to inhibit adenylyl cyclase (ATP-pyrophosphate-lyase, cyclizing; EC 4.6.1.1). Like other Gi-coupled receptors, the binding of agonists and some antagonists to D2 receptors is sensitive to pH and sodium. In the present report, we demonstrate that substitution of an alanine or glutamate residue for aspartate-80 severely impairs inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by D2 receptors and also abolishes or decreases the regulation of the affinity of D2 receptors for agonists and substituted benzamide antagonists by sodium and pH. Our data support the hypothesis that the conformation of D2 receptors is maintained by interactions of monovalent cations with aspartate-80. The regulation of D2 receptors by this interaction has important consequences for the affinity of D2 receptors for ligands and for signal transduction by D2 receptors. PMID:1828858

  5. A prolyl-isomerase mediates dopamine-dependent plasticity and cocaine motor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Min; Hu, Jia-Hua; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Moore, Chester G; Park, Sungjin; Datko, Michael C; Domingo, Racquel D; Reyes, Cindy M; Wang, Xiaodong J; Etzkorn, Felicia A; Xiao, Bo; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kern, Dorothee; Linden, David J; Worley, Paul F

    2013-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity induced by cocaine and other drugs underlies addiction. Here we elucidate molecular events at synapses that cause this plasticity and the resulting behavioral response to cocaine in mice. In response to D1-dopamine-receptor signaling that is induced by drug administration, the glutamate-receptor protein metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is phosphorylated by microtubule-associated protein kinase (MAPK), which we show potentiates Pin1-mediated prolyl-isomerization of mGluR5 in instances where the product of an activity-dependent gene, Homer1a, is present to enable Pin1-mGluR5 interaction. These biochemical events potentiate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents that underlie synaptic plasticity and cocaine-evoked motor sensitization as tested in mice with relevant mutations. The findings elucidate how a coincidence of signals from the nucleus and the synapse can render mGluR5 accessible to activation with consequences for drug-induced dopamine responses and point to depotentiation at corticostriatal synapses as a possible therapeutic target for treating addiction. PMID:23911326

  6. PSD-93 MEDIATES TYROSINE-PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuko; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Su, Qingning; Johns, Roger A

    2009-01-01

    Src family protein kinases (SFKs)-mediated tyrosine-phosphorylation regulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor synaptic function. Some members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins bind to both SFKs and NMDA receptors, but it is unclear whether the MAGUK family of proteins is required for SFKs-mediated tyrosine-phosphorylation of the NMDA receptors. Here, we showed by co-immunoprecipitation that PSD-93, a member of the MAGUK family of proteins, interacts with the NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as with Fyn, a member of the SFKs, in mouse cerebral cortex. Using a biochemical fractionation approach to isolate subcellular compartments revealed that the expression of Fyn, but not of other members of the SFKs (Lyn, Src, and Yes), was significantly decreased in synaptosomal membrane fractions derived from the cerebral cortex of PSD-93 knockout mice. Interestingly, we found that PSD-93 disruption causes reduction of tyrosine-phosphorylated NR2A and NR2B in the same fraction. Moreover, PSD-93 deletion markedly blocked the SFKs-mediated increase in tyrosine-phosphorylated NR2A and NR2B through the protein kinase C pathway after induction with 4β-PMA in cultured cortical neurons. Our findings indicate that PSD-93 appears to mediate tyrosine-phosphorylation of the NMDA receptors and synaptic localization of Fyn. PMID:18423999

  7. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:26162812

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis mediates loss of intrinsic activity measured by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Brier, Matthew R; Day, Gregory S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Ances, Beau M

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous brain activity is required for the development and maintenance of normal brain function. Many disease processes disrupt the organization of intrinsic brain activity, but few pervasively reduce the amplitude of resting state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI fluctuations. We report the case of a female with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, longitudinally studied during the course of her illness to determine the contribution of NMDAR signaling to spontaneous brain activity. Resting state BOLD fMRI was measured at the height of her illness and 18 weeks following discharge from hospital. Conventional resting state networks were defined using established methods. Correlation and covariance matrices were calculated by extracting the BOLD time series from regions of interest and calculating either the correlation or covariance quantity. The intrinsic activity was compared between visits, and to expected activity from 45 similarly aged healthy individuals. Near the height of the illness, the patient exhibited profound loss of consciousness, high-amplitude slowing of the electroencephalogram, and a severe reduction in the amplitude of spontaneous BOLD fMRI fluctuations. The patient's neurological status and measures of intrinsic activity improved following treatment. We conclude that NMDAR-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the mechanisms that give rise to organized spontaneous brain activity. Loss of intrinsic activity is associated with profound disruptions of consciousness and cognition. PMID:27025853

  9. Electrophysiological evidence that intrastriatally administered N-methyl-D-aspartate augments striatal dopamine tone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Overton, P; Clark, D

    1992-01-01

    The firing rate and terminal excitability of identified nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons was determined before, and over a 10-15 min period following, direct intrastriatal administration of the glutamate (GLU) agonist NMDA, or saline. NMDA (0.025 and 0.075 mumol) produced a short latency increase in DA cell firing rate. In 7/8 cases, this increase in firing rate was accompanied by a profound reduction in terminal excitability. The decrease in excitability usually outlasted the increase in firing rate (sometimes by more than 8 min), and was superseded at a later stage by a marked increase in excitability. None of these effects were seen with saline (n = 5), and they could all be blocked by preadministration of the competitive NMDA antagonist AP-7 (0.025 mumol; n = 6). The sequence of events leading to the observed results is argued to be as follows; NMDA initially excites striatal efferents to the DA cell, which through disinhibition and direct stimulation increase DA cell firing rate. Increased firing rate leads to enhanced striatal DA release. Dopamine's inhibitory influence pre-empts any effect NMDA itself may have on the terminals of nigrostriatal neurons, and counteracts NMDA's stimulatory effect on striatal output cells. Furthermore, the marked reduction in terminal excitability suggests that DA becomes the dominant influence in the striatum for a time. Hence, the net outcome of the injection is augmented striatal DA tone. Later, the effect of residual NMDA becomes predominant once more. PMID:1540303

  10. N-Linked Glycosyl Auxiliary-Mediated Native Chemical Ligation on Aspartic Acid: Application towards N-Glycopeptide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hua; Le Mai Hoang, Kim; Vu, Minh Duy; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2016-08-22

    A practical approach towards N-glycopeptide synthesis using an auxiliary-mediated dual native chemical ligation (NCL) has been developed. The first NCL connects an N-linked glycosyl auxiliary to the thioester side chain of an N-terminal aspartate oligopeptide. This intermediate undergoes a second NCL with a C-terminal thioester oligopeptide. Mild cleavage provides the desired N-glycopeptide. PMID:27444333

  11. Methylmercury-mediated inhibition of 3H-D-aspartate transport in cultured astrocytes is reversed by the antioxidant catalase.

    PubMed

    Allen, J W; Mutkus, L A; Aschner, M

    2001-05-25

    Astrocytes are essential for removal of glutamate from the extracellular space in the central nervous system. The neurotoxic heavy metal methylmercury potently and specifically inhibits the transport of glutamate in cultured astrocytes by an unknown mechanism. Glutamate transport in astrocytes is also inhibited by reactive oxygen species. A glutamate-induced transporter current is inhibited both by reactive oxygen species and thiol oxidizing agents. These observations suggest that oxidation of the transporter might mediate methylmercury-induced inhibition of glutamate transport. In the present study, we examined the ability of thiol reducing or oxidizing agents to inhibit transport of 3H-D-aspartate, a glutamate analog, in primary cultures of neonatal rat astrocytes. To assess if methylmercury-mediated inhibition of 3H-aspartate transport was due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species, we tested the ability of Trolox, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), or catalase to attenuate the methylmercury-induced inhibition of aspartate uptake. Neither the thiol reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), nor the thiol oxidizing agent 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) had any effect on 3H-aspartate transport suggesting that the thiol redox state does not alter transporter function. In contrast, the antioxidant catalase (1000 U/ml) significantly attenuated methylmercury-induced inhibition of 3H-aspartate uptake, suggesting that excess reactive oxygen species, specifically H2O2, inhibit the function of an astrocytic excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1). Prolonged exposure (6 h) to inhibitors of glutamate transport significantly decreased EAAT1 mRNA levels suggesting that transporter expression is related to function. This study suggests that methylmercury-induced overproduction of H2O2 is a mechanism for inhibition of glutamate transport and transporter expression in cultured astrocytes. PMID:11376598

  12. Estrogen mediated inhibition of dopamine transport in the striatum: regulation by G alpha i/o.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Tina L; Certain, Matthew E

    2005-03-28

    In the current study, the interaction between estrogen priming and dopamine D2 receptor activation on dopamine uptake in the striatum of ovariectomized female rats was investigated. Basal ADP-[(32)P(i)]ribosylation of G(i/o) was examined in synaptosomal membranes prepared from ovariectomized, estrogen primed or N-p-(isothiocyanatophenethyl) spiperone (NIPS) treated rats. [(32)P(i)]-incorporation was significantly increased (141%) in tissue from NIPS treated animals but attenuated (57%) in tissue from estrogen primed animals. Dopamine uptake kinetics were measured in vivo following manipulation of the heterotrimeric G-protein by pertussis toxin (0.5 microg, 48 h). Pertussis toxin significantly inhibited dopamine uptake at all concentrations of dopamine examined. Co-treatment with estrogen and pertussis toxin resulted in a further attenuation of dopamine transport at high but not low dopamine concentrations. These data are consistent with an estrogen mediated alteration of G-protein activity and support the hypothesis that estrogen may alter transporter activity through a modulation of dopamine D2 autoreceptor/G alpha(i/o) protein coupling. PMID:15792779

  13. Taste pathways that mediate accumbens dopamine release by sapid sucrose.

    PubMed

    Hajnal, Andras; Norgren, Ralph

    2005-03-16

    Although it has been associated with the release of dopamine in the forebrain, reward remains a conundrum in neuroscience. Sucrose is inherently rewarding and its sensory message reaches the brain via the gustatory system. In rodents, the central gustatory system bifurcates in the pontine parabrachial nuclei, one arm forming a standard thalamocortical axis, the other distributing widely in the limbic forebrain. We report here that lesions of the gustatory thalamus fail to affect dopamine overflow during sucrose licking (149+/-5% vs. 149+/-4% for controls). Similar damage to the parabrachial nuclei, which severs the limbic taste projection, substantially reduces dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens (121+/-4% vs. 168+/-9% for sham operated controls; p<0.02). This represents the first demonstration that the affective character of a sensory stimulus might separate from the thalamocortical system as early as the second central synapse. PMID:15763573

  14. Effect of Reactor Turbulence on the Binding-Protein-Mediated Aspartate Transport System in Thin Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T. Taylor; Bishop, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    This research documents an effect of reactor turbulence on the ability of gram-negative wastewater biofilm bacteria to actively transport l-aspartate via a binding-protein-mediated transport system. Biofilms which were not preadapted to turbulence and which possessed two separate and distinct aspartate transport systems (systems 1 and 2) were subjected to a turbulent flow condition in a hydrodynamically defined closed-loop reactor system. A shear stress treatment of 3.1 N · m−2 for 10 min at a turbulent Reynolds number (Re = 11,297) inactivated the low-affinity, high-capacity binding-protein-mediated transport system (system 2) and resolved the high-affinity, low-capacity membrane-bound proton symport system (system 1). The Kt and Vmax values for the resolved system were statistically similar to Kt and Vmax values for system 1 when system 2 was inactivated either by osmotic shock or arsenate, two treatments which are known to inactivate binding-protein-mediated transport systems. We hypothesize that shear stress disrupts system 2 by deforming the outer membranes of the firmly adhered gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16346830

  15. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  16. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  17. Dopamine D1 receptors within the basolateral amygdala mediate heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Szczytkowski, Jennifer L; Lysle, Donald T

    2010-09-14

    This study investigates the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) dopamine in heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation. Animals underwent conditioning in which heroin administration was repeatedly paired with placement into a conditioning chamber. Six days after the final conditioning session animals were returned to the chamber and received intra-BLA microinfusions of dopamine, D(1) or D(2), antagonist. Antagonism of D(1), but not D(2), receptors within the BLA blocked the suppressive effect of heroin-associated environmental stimuli on iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1β. This study is the first to demonstrate that the expression of heroin's conditioned effects on proinflammatory mediators require dopamine D(1) receptors within the BLA. PMID:20605224

  18. Electrophysiological actions of phenytoin on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated responses in rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Laffling, A. J.; Scherr, P.; McGivern, J. G.; Patmore, L.; Sheridan, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of the anticonvulsant, phenytoin, have been examined on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated population spikes in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus in vitro. 2. The 'conventional' (AMPA receptor-mediated) CA1 population spike, evoked by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway, was abolished by 5 min treatment with 5 x 10(-6) M 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), after which superfusion with a nominally Mg(2+)-free Krebs solution (containing 5 x 10(-6) M CNQX) led to the appearance of an epileptiform population spike which was fully developed by 30-40 min. 3. The epileptiform population spike was abolished by the non-competitive NMDA antagonist, dizocilpine (1 x 10(-6) M, 20-30 min) and inhibited by the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, D-CPP (IC50 for reducing the amplitude of the first spike in the train = 8.3 x 10(-7) M), demonstrating that the response was mediated by activation of NMDA receptors and validating its use as an assay for antagonists acting at the NMDA receptor/channel complex. 4. Phenytoin (0.1, 0.3 and 1 x 10(-4) M applied cumulatively for 30 min at each concentration) failed to inhibit the NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform population response (n = 7 slices).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647985

  19. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  20. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David S; Underhill, Suzanne M; Stolz, Donna B; Murdoch, Geoffrey H; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G

    2015-12-22

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH's effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  1. Sleep Facilitates Memory by Blocking Dopamine Neuron-Mediated Forgetting.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jacob A; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Chakraborty, Molee; Davis, Ronald L

    2015-06-18

    Early studies from psychology suggest that sleep facilitates memory retention by stopping ongoing retroactive interference caused by mental activity or external sensory stimuli. Neuroscience research with animal models, on the other hand, suggests that sleep facilitates retention by enhancing memory consolidation. Recently, in Drosophila, the ongoing activity of specific dopamine neurons was shown to regulate the forgetting of olfactory memories. Here, we show this ongoing dopaminergic activity is modulated with behavioral state, increasing robustly with locomotor activity and decreasing with rest. Increasing sleep-drive, with either the sleep-promoting agent Gaboxadol or by genetic stimulation of the neural circuit for sleep, decreases ongoing dopaminergic activity, while enhancing memory retention. Conversely, increasing arousal stimulates ongoing dopaminergic activity and accelerates dopaminergic-based forgetting. Therefore, forgetting is regulated by the behavioral state modulation of dopaminergic-based plasticity. Our findings integrate psychological and neuroscience research on sleep and forgetting. PMID:26073942

  2. The selective delta opioid agonist SNC80 enhances amphetamine-mediated efflux of dopamine from rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Gnegy, Margaret E; Traynor, John R

    2008-10-01

    The highly selective delta opioid agonist, SNC80, elicits dopamine-related behaviors including locomotor stimulation and conditioned place-preference. In contrast, it has been reported that SNC80 fails to promote dopamine efflux from the striatum of freely moving rats. However, SNC80 does enhance behavioral responses to the stimulants, amphetamine and cocaine, suggesting an interaction between delta opioids and psychostimulants. Since the increase in locomotor activity elicited by amphetamine and related stimulants acting at the dopamine transporter is associated with increases in extracellular concentrations of dopamine within the striatum, we hypothesized that SNC80 enhances this activity by potentiating the overflow of dopamine through the transporter. To test this hypothesis, striatal preparations from Sprague Dawley rats were assayed for dopamine efflux in response to amphetamine challenge. SNC80 was given either in vivo or in vitro directly to rat striatal tissue, prior to in vitro amphetamine challenge. Both in vivo and in vitro administration of SNC80 enhanced amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, SNC80 in either treatment paradigm produced no stimulation of dopamine efflux in the absence of amphetamine. The effect of SNC80 on amphetamine-mediated dopamine overflow, but not the effect of amphetamine alone, was blocked by the delta selective antagonist, naltrindole and was also observed with other delta agonists. The results of this study demonstrate that even though SNC80 does not stimulate dopamine efflux alone, it is able to augment amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux through a delta opioid receptor mediated action locally in the striatum. PMID:18602932

  3. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists, HU-210 and Δ9-THC, promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM251 with HU-210 prevents ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) KO animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling is greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, the HU-210 administration to NMDA receptor knockdown mice (NR1-Kd) was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors (D2R)s or βarrestin-1 or -2, did not affect HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and NMDA receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1R signal transduction. PMID:22034973

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate and non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate seizures and CA1 hippocampal damage induced by dendrotoxin-K in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, G; Iannone, M; Palma, E; Nisticò, G; Dolly, J O

    1996-04-01

    The epileptogenic and neurodegenerative effects of dendrotoxin K, from Dendroaspis polylepis, a specific blocker of a non-inactivating, voltage-sensitive K+ channel, were studied after focal injection into one dorsal hippocampus in rats. Administration of 35 pmol dendrotoxin K elicited motor seizures and bilateral electrocortical discharges after a latent period (5.3 +/- 2.1 min), in all of the treated animals (n = 6). At 24 h, histological examination of brain (n = 5) coronal sections (10 microns; n = 6 per brain) detected bilateral damage to the hippocampal formation which extended 300 microns rostral and caudal to the injection tract. Quantitation of the damage revealed significant bilateral neuronal cell loss in the CA1 and CA4 pyramidal cell layer relative to the corresponding brain regions of rats (n = 3) injected with bovine serum albumin (105 pmol), which per se was ineffective in all respects. Dendrotoxin K (35 pmol) also caused a significant loss of CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells ipsilateral to the site of toxin injection. In one out of six rats, a lower dose (3.5 pmol) of dendrotoxin K produced convulsive behaviour and electrocortical seizures but after a longer latency and these were accompanied by significant neuronal loss in the CA1, CA3 and CA4 pyramidal cell layer ipsilateral to the injected side. The lowest dose (0.35 pmol; n = 6 rats) of dendrotoxin K used failed to induce seizures and did not cause hippocampal damage (n = 6 rats). Systemic (i.p.) treatment with dizocilpine maleate (3 mg/kg) or LY 274614 (5 mg/kg i.p.), two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (given 15 min beforehand), prevented dendrotoxin K (35 pmol)-induced motor seizures and electrocortical epileptogenic discharges in 100% of the animals (n = 6 per group) treated. Similarly, these antagonists minimized the damage typically produced in the rat hippocampus, with no significant neuronal loss being observed. By contrast, NBQX (30 mg/kg, i.p. given 15

  5. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  6. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed patch-clamp electrophysiology and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices to determine the effects of NT on dopamine autoreceptor-mediated neurotransmission. Application of the active peptide fragment NT8–13 produced synaptic depression that exhibited short- and long-term components. Sustained depression of D2 autoreceptor signaling required activation of the type 2 NT receptor and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. NT application increased paired-pulse ratios and decreased extracellular levels of somatodendritic dopamine, consistent with a decrease in presynaptic dopamine release. Surprisingly, we observed that electrically induced long-term depression of dopaminergic neurotransmission that we reported previously was also dependent on type 2 NT receptors and calcineurin. Because electrically induced depression, but not NT-induced depression, was blocked by postsynaptic calcium chelation, our findings suggest that endogenous NT may act through a local circuit to decrease presynaptic dopamine release. The current research provides a mechanism through which augmented NT release can produce a long-lasting increase in membrane excitability of midbrain dopamine neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whereas plasticity of glutamate synapses in the brain has been studied extensively, demonstrations of plasticity at dopaminergic synapses have been more elusive. By quantifying inhibitory neurotransmission between midbrain dopaminergic neurons in brain slices from mice we have

  7. Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Mice Decreases GIRK Channel-Mediated Currents in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Amanda L.; Varela, Erika; Bettinger, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant with abuse liability and a substrate for catecholamine uptake transporters. Acute methamphetamine elevates extracellular dopamine, which in the midbrain can activate D2 autoreceptors to increase a G-protein gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) conductance that inhibits dopamine neuron firing. These studies examined the neurophysiological consequences of methamphetamine self-administration on GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Methods: Male DBA/2J mice were trained to self-administer intravenous methamphetamine. A dose response was conducted as well as extinction and cue-induced reinstatement. In a second study, after at least 2 weeks of stable self-administration of methamphetamine, electrophysiological brain slice recordings were conducted on dopamine neurons from self-administering and control mice. Results: In the first experiment, ad libitum-fed, nonfood-trained mice exhibited a significant increase in intake and locomotion following self-administration as the concentration of methamphetamine per infusion was increased (0.0015–0.15mg/kg/infusion). Mice exhibited extinction in responding and cue-induced reinstatement. In the second experiment, dopamine cells in both the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area from adult mice with a history of methamphetamine self-administration exhibited significantly smaller D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated currents compared with control mice, regardless of whether their daily self-administration sessions had been 1 or 4 hours. Interestingly, the effects of methamphetamine self-administration were not present when intracellular calcium was chelated by including BAPTA in the recording pipette. Conclusions: Our results suggest that methamphetamine self-administration decreases GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons and that this effect may be calcium dependent. PMID:25522412

  8. c-Fos expression mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors following anodal polarization in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Islam, N; Moriwaki, A; Hattori, Y; Hayashi, Y; Lu, Y F; Hori, Y

    1995-05-01

    c-Fos protein-like immunoreactivity (IR) was investigated in the rat brain following an application of weak anodal direct current to the surface of the unilateral sensorimotor cortex in an attempt to elucidate the cellular and molecular bases of central plasticity. Anodal polarization resulted in a massive increase in c-Fos protein-like IR in neurons of the cingulate, piriform, frontoparietal cortices, and hippocampus ipsilateral to the polarization. The effects were dependent upon the duration and intensity of currents applied. The time-dependent induction of c-Fos protein-like IR was maximal at 1 h, became weaker by 6 h, and almost returned to the baseline within 24 h following polarization. When MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-di-hydro-5H- dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate], a noncompetitive antagonist for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, was injected intraperitoneally, the induction of this nuclear protein was reduced or completely blocked in both hemispheres, except around the polarized point itself, as a function of the time and dosage. These results suggest that the proto-oncogene c-fos is rapidly and transiently activated in the brain following anodal polarization and this activation is mediated by NMDA receptors. PMID:7601260

  9. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediate Bilirubin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Maria A; Vaz, Ana R; Silva, Sandra L; Falcão, Ana S; Fernandes, Adelaide; Silva, Rui FM; Brites, Dora

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia may lead to neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Although the mechanisms of nerve cell damage by unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) appear to involve a disruption of the redox status and excitotoxicity, the contribution of nitric oxide (NO·) and of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors is unclear. We investigated the role of NO· and NMDA glutamate receptors in the pathways of nerve cell demise by UCB. Neurons were incubated with 100 μmol/L UCB, in the presence of 100 μmol/L human serum albumin for 4 h at 37ºC, alone or in combination with N-ω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) (an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase [nNOS]), hemoglobin (an NO· scavenger) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801) (an NMDA-receptor antagonist). Exposure to UCB led to increased expression of nNOS and production of both NO· and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), along with protein oxidation and depletion of glutathione. These events concurred for cell dysfunction and death and were counteracted by l-NAME. Moreover, the UCB-induced loss of neuronal viability was abolished by hemoglobin, whereas the activation of nNOS and production of both NO· and cGMP were counteracted by MK-801, resulting in significant protection from cell dysfunction and death. These results reinforce the involvement of oxidative stress by showing that nerve cell damage by UCB is mediated by NO· and therefore is counteracted by NO· inhibitors or scavengers. Our findings strongly suggest that the activation of nNOS and neurotoxicity occur through the engagement of NMDA receptors. These data reveal a role for overstimulation of glutamate receptors in mediating oxidative damage by UCB. PMID:20593111

  10. Iron Mediates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor-dependent Stimulation of Calcium-induced Pathways and Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodine-reduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP. PMID:21296883

  11. Thromboresistant and endothelialization effects of dopamine-mediated heparin coating on a stent material surface.

    PubMed

    Bae, In-Ho; Park, In-Kyu; Park, Dae Sung; Lee, Haeshin; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2012-05-01

    Heparinization of surfaces has proven a successful strategy to prevent thrombus formation. Inspired by the composition of adhesive proteins in mussels, the authors used dopamine to immobilize heparin on a stent surface. This study aimed to assess the thromboresistant and endothelialization effects of dopamine-mediated heparin (HPM) coating on a stent material surface. The HPM was synthesized by bonding dopamine and heparin chemically. Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disks were first placed in the HPM solution and applied to surface stability then underwent thromboresistant tests and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cytotoxicity assays. The results showed not only thromboresistant activity and a stable state of heparin on the surfaces after investigation with toluidine blue and thrombin activation assay but also proliferation of HUVEC in vitro. Studies on animals showed that the HPM-coated stent has no obvious inflammation response and increasing of restenosis rate compared to the bare metal stent (BMS) indicating good biocompatibility as well as safety in its in vivo application. Moreover, improving the endothelial cell (EC) proliferation resulted in a higher strut-covering rate (i.e., endothelialization) with shuttle-shaped EC in the HPM-coated stent group compared to that of the BMS group. These results suggest that this facile coating approach could significantly promote endothelialization and offer greater safety than the BMS for its much improved thromboresistant property. Moreover, it may offer a platform for conjugating secondary drugs such as anti-proliferative drugs. PMID:22389099

  12. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  13. Dopamine Mediates the Vagal Modulation of the Immune System by Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rosas, Rafael; Yehia, Ghassan; Peña, Geber; Mishra, Priya; del Rocio Thompson-Bonilla, Maria; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes Andrea; Isibasi, Armando; Ulloa, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Previous anti-inflammatory strategies against sepsis, a leading cause of death in hospitals, had limited efficacy in clinical trials, in part because they targeted single cytokines and the experimental models failed to mimic clinical settings1-3. Neuronal networks represent physiological mechanisms selected by evolution to control inflammation that can be exploited for the treatment of inflammatory and infectious disorders3. Here, we report that sciatic nerve activation with electroacupuncture controls systemic inflammation and rescues mice from polymicrobial peritonitis. Electroacupuncture at the sciatic nerve controls systemic inflammation by inducing a vagal activation of DOPA decarboxylase leading to the production of dopamine in the adrenal medulla. Experimental models with adrenolectomized animals mimic clinical adrenal insufficiency4, increase the susceptibility to sepsis, and prevent the anti-inflammatory potential of electroacupuncture. Dopamine inhibits cytokine production via dopaminergic type-1 receptors. Dopaminergic D1-agonists suppress systemic inflammation and rescue mice from polymicrobial peritonitis in animals with adrenal insufficiency. Our results suggest a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism mediated by the sciatic and the vagus nerves modulating the production of catecholamines in the adrenal glands. From a pharmacological perspective, selective dopaminergic agonists mimic the anti-inflammatory potential of electroacupuncture and can provide therapeutic advantages to control inflammation in infectious and inflammatory disorders. PMID:24562381

  14. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  15. Roles of OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 dopamine receptor in mediating appetitive and aversive reinforcement revealed by RNAi studies

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Hiroko; Wakuda, Ryo; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Matsuoka, Yuji; Terao, Kanta; Katata, Satomi; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Revealing reinforcing mechanisms in associative learning is important for elucidation of brain mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcement signals. Studies using transgenic fruit-flies suggested that dopamine neurons mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcements, through the Dop1 dopamine receptor, but our studies using octopamine and dopamine receptor antagonists and using Dop1 knockout crickets suggested that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement and dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement in associative learning in crickets. To fully resolve this issue, we examined the effects of silencing of expression of genes that code the OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 and Dop2 dopamine receptors by RNAi in crickets. OA1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in appetitive learning with water but not in aversive learning with sodium chloride solution, while Dop1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in aversive learning but not in appetitive learning. Dop2-silenced crickets showed normal scores in both appetitive learning and aversive learning. The results indicate that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement via OA1 and that dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement via Dop1 in crickets, providing decisive evidence that neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate appetitive reinforcement indeed differ among different species of insects. PMID:27412401

  16. Roles of OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 dopamine receptor in mediating appetitive and aversive reinforcement revealed by RNAi studies.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Wakuda, Ryo; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Matsuoka, Yuji; Terao, Kanta; Katata, Satomi; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Revealing reinforcing mechanisms in associative learning is important for elucidation of brain mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcement signals. Studies using transgenic fruit-flies suggested that dopamine neurons mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcements, through the Dop1 dopamine receptor, but our studies using octopamine and dopamine receptor antagonists and using Dop1 knockout crickets suggested that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement and dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement in associative learning in crickets. To fully resolve this issue, we examined the effects of silencing of expression of genes that code the OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 and Dop2 dopamine receptors by RNAi in crickets. OA1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in appetitive learning with water but not in aversive learning with sodium chloride solution, while Dop1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in aversive learning but not in appetitive learning. Dop2-silenced crickets showed normal scores in both appetitive learning and aversive learning. The results indicate that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement via OA1 and that dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement via Dop1 in crickets, providing decisive evidence that neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate appetitive reinforcement indeed differ among different species of insects. PMID:27412401

  17. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas. PMID:27171680

  18. Dopamine-mediated oxidation of methionine 127 in α-synuclein causes cytotoxicity and oligomerization of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Naoko; Ito, Satoru; Teraoka, Mari; Yamashita, Atsushi; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Mochida, Shinsuke; Nakashima, Kenji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Many recent studies focused on the interaction between α-synuclein (α-syn) and dopamine in the pathogenesis of PD, and fluorescent anisotropy suggested that the C-terminal region of α-syn may be a target for modification by dopamine. However, it is not well understood why PD-related pathogenesis occurs selectively in dopaminergic neurons. We investigated the interaction between dopamine and α-syn with regard to cytotoxicity. A soluble oligomer was formed by co-incubating α-syn and dopamine in vitro. To clarify the effect of dopamine on α-syn in cells, we generated PC12 cells expressing human α-syn, as well as the α-syn mutants, M116A, Y125D, M127A, S129A, and M116A/M127A, in a tetracycline-inducible manner (PC12-TetOFF-α-syn). Overexpression of wildtype α-syn in catecholaminergic PC12 cells decreased cell viability in long-term cultures, while a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase blocked this vulnerability, suggesting that α-syn-related cytotoxicity is associated with dopamine metabolism. The vulnerabilities of all mutant cell lines were lower than that of wildtype α-syn-expressing cells. Moreover, α-syn containing dopamine-mediated oxidized methionine (Met(O)) was detected in PC12-TetOFF-α-syn. Met(O) was lower in methionine mutant cells, especially in the M127A or M116A/M127A mutants, but also in the Y125D and S129A mutants. Co-incubation of dopamine and the 125YEMPS129 peptide enhanced the production of H2O2, which may oxidize methionine residues and convert them to Met(O). Y125- or S129-lacking peptides did not enhance the dopamine-related production of H2O2. Our results suggest that M127 is the major target for oxidative modification by dopamine, and that Y125 and S129 may act as enhancers of this modification. These results may describe a mechanism of dopaminergic neuron

  19. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  20. Dopamine-Mediated Oxidation of Methionine 127 in α-Synuclein Causes Cytotoxicity and Oligomerization of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Naoko; Ito, Satoru; Teraoka, Mari; Yamashita, Atsushi; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Mochida, Shinsuke; Nakashima, Kenji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Many recent studies focused on the interaction between α-synuclein (α-syn) and dopamine in the pathogenesis of PD, and fluorescent anisotropy suggested that the C-terminal region of α-syn may be a target for modification by dopamine. However, it is not well understood why PD-related pathogenesis occurs selectively in dopaminergic neurons. We investigated the interaction between dopamine and α-syn with regard to cytotoxicity. A soluble oligomer was formed by co-incubating α-syn and dopamine in vitro. To clarify the effect of dopamine on α-syn in cells, we generated PC12 cells expressing human α-syn, as well as the α-syn mutants, M116A, Y125D, M127A, S129A, and M116A/M127A, in a tetracycline-inducible manner (PC12-TetOFF-α-syn). Overexpression of wildtype α-syn in catecholaminergic PC12 cells decreased cell viability in long-term cultures, while a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase blocked this vulnerability, suggesting that α-syn-related cytotoxicity is associated with dopamine metabolism. The vulnerabilities of all mutant cell lines were lower than that of wildtype α-syn-expressing cells. Moreover, α-syn containing dopamine-mediated oxidized methionine (Met(O)) was detected in PC12-TetOFF-α-syn. Met(O) was lower in methionine mutant cells, especially in the M127A or M116A/M127A mutants, but also in the Y125D and S129A mutants. Co-incubation of dopamine and the 125YEMPS129 peptide enhanced the production of H2O2, which may oxidize methionine residues and convert them to Met(O). Y125- or S129-lacking peptides did not enhance the dopamine-related production of H2O2. Our results suggest that M127 is the major target for oxidative modification by dopamine, and that Y125 and S129 may act as enhancers of this modification. These results may describe a mechanism of dopaminergic neuron

  1. Dopamine-dependent neurodegeneration in rats induced by viral vector-mediated overexpression of the parkin target protein, CDCrel-1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhizhong; Ferger, Boris; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Vogel, Denise; Furler, Sven; Osinde, Maribel; Feldon, Joram; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to autosomal-recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). Parkin functions as a ubiquitin protein ligase in the degradation of several proteins, including the neuron-specific septin CDCrel-1. AR-JP-associated parkin mutations inhibit ubiquitination and degradation of CDCrel-1 and other parkin target proteins. Here we show that recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated CDCrel-1 gene transfer to the substantia nigra of rats results in a rapid onset (6-10 days) of nigral and striatal CDCrel-1 expression that is followed by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a decline of the striatal dopamine levels. In contrast, neurons of the globus pallidus are spared from CDCrel-1 toxicity. Furthermore, CDCrel-1 inhibits the release of dopamine from stably-transfected PC12 cells, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine synthesis in rats prevents CDCrel-1-induced nigral neurodegeneration. These results show that CDCrel-1 overexpression exerts dopamine-dependent neurotoxicity and suggest that inhibition of dopamine secretion by CDCrel-1 may contribute to the development of AR-JP. PMID:14530399

  2. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current-voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 +/- 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 +/- 25 ms latency, holding potential (V(h)) =-73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABA(A), GABA(B), muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 microM), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near -10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  3. Novel neuroprotective mechanisms of pramipexole, an anti-Parkinson drug, against endogenous dopamine-mediated excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Sawada, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Shimohama, Shun; Akaike, Akinori

    2007-02-28

    Parkinson disease is characterized by selective degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons, and endogenous dopamine may play a pivotal role in the degenerative processes. Using primary cultured mesencephalic neurons, we found that glutamate, an excitotoxin, caused selective dopaminergic neuronal death depending on endogenous dopamine content. Pramipexole, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist used clinically in the treatment of Parkinson disease, did not affect glutamate-induced calcium influx but blocked dopaminergic neuronal death induced by glutamate. Pramipexole reduced dopamine content but did not change the levels of total or phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. The neuroprotective effect of pramipexole was independent of dopamine receptor stimulation because it was not abrogated by domperidone, a dopamine D2-type receptor antagonist. Moreover, both active S(-)- and inactive R(+)-enantiomers of pramipexole as a dopamine D2-like receptor agonist equally suppressed dopaminergic neuronal death. These results suggest that pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons from glutamate neurotoxicity by the reduction of intracellular dopamine content, independently of dopamine D2-like receptor activation. PMID:17161393

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wigmore, M A; Lacey, M G

    1998-02-01

    1. Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain. 2. The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01-30 microM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 microM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 microM) was reversed by the group III preferring mGlu receptor antagonist, alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG; 250 microM). 3. The group I and II mGlu agonist, 1S,3R-aminocyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (ACPD; 3-30 microM) also depressed the e.p.s.p. in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ACPD (10 microM) was reversed by (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 1 mM; 4 cells). This effect of ACPD was also partially antagonized (by 50.3+/-15.7%, 4 cells) by MPPG (250 microM). 4. The selective agonist at group I mGlu receptors, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 100 microM), decreased e.p.s.p. amplitude by 27.1+/-8.2% (7 cells), as did the group II mGlu receptor-selective agonist (1S,1R,2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV; 1 microM) by 26.7+/-4.3% (5 cells). 5. DHPG (10-100 microM) caused a depolarization of the recorded cell, as did ACPD (3-30 microM), whereas no such postsynaptic effect of either L-AP4 or DCG-IV was observed. 6. These results provide evidence for the presence of presynaptic inhibitory metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors from the mGlu receptor groups II and III on descending glutamatergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurones. Group I mGlu receptors mediate a postsynaptic depolarization, and can also depress glutamatergic transmission, but may not necessarily be localized presynaptically. These sites represent novel drug targets for treatment of schizophrenia and movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. PMID

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wigmore, Mark A; Lacey, Michael G

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain. The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01–30 μM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 μM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 μM) was reversed by the group III preferring mGlu receptor antagonist, α-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG; 250 μM). The group I and II mGlu agonist, 1S,3R-aminocyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (ACPD; 3–30 μM) also depressed the e.p.s.p. in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ACPD (10 μM) was reversed by (+)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 1 mM; 4 cells). This effect of ACPD was also partially antagonized (by 50.3±15.7%, 4 cells) by MPPG (250 μM). The selective agonist at group I mGlu receptors, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 100 μM), decreased e.p.s.p. amplitude by 27.1±8.2% (7 cells), as did the group II mGlu receptor-selective agonist (1S,1′R,2′R,3′R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV; 1 μM) by 26.7±4.3% (5 cells). DHPG (10–100 μM) caused a depolarization of the recorded cell, as did ACPD (3–30 μM), whereas no such postsynaptic effect of either L-AP4 or DCG-IV was observed. These results provide evidence for the presence of presynaptic inhibitory metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors from the mGlu receptor groups II and III on descending glutamatergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurones. Group I mGlu receptors mediate a postsynaptic depolarization, and can also depress glutamatergic transmission, but may not necessarily be localized presynaptically. These sites represent novel drug targets for treatment of schizophrenia and movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. PMID:9517386

  6. Roles of dopamine receptors in mediating acute modulation of immunological responses in Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhong-Wen; Ke, Zhi-Han; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) was found to influence the immunological responses and resistance to pathogen infection in invertebrates. To clarify the possible modulation of DA through dopamine receptors (DAR) against acute environmental stress, the levels of DA, glucose and lactate in the haemolymph of Macrobrachium rosenbergii under hypo- and hyperthermal stresses were measured. The changes in immune parameters such as total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and phagocytic activity (PA) were evaluated in prawns which received DAR antagonists (SCH23390, SCH, D1 antagonist; domperidone, DOM, D2 antagonist; chlorpromazine, CH, D1+2 antagonist) followed by hypo- (15 °C) and hyperthermal (34 °C) stresses. In addition, pharmacological analysis of the effect DA modulation was studied in haemocytes incubated with DA and DAR antagonists. The results revealed a significant increase in haemolymph DA accompanied with upregulated levels of glucose and lactate in prawns exposed to both hypo- and hyperthermal stresses in 2 h. In addition, a significant decrease in RBs per haemocyte was noted in prawns which received DAR antagonists when they exposed to hyperthermal stress for 30 min. In in vitro test, antagonism on RBs, SOD and GPx activity of haemocytes were further evidenced through D1, D1, D1+D2 DARs, respectively, in the meantime, no significant difference in PO activity and PA was observed among the treatment groups. These results suggest that the upregulation of DA, glucose and lactate in haemolymph might be the response to acute thermal stress for the demand of energy, and the DAR occupied by its antagonistic action impart no effect on immunological responses except RBs in vivo even though the modulation mediated through D1 DAR was further evidenced in RBs, SOD and GPx activities in vitro. It is therefore concluded that thermal

  7. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  8. PKA-mediated responses in females' estrous cycle affect cocaine-induced responses in dopamine-mediated intracellular cascades.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J; Sun, W Lun; Zhou, L; Kreiter, C M; Jenab, S; Quiñones-Jenab, V

    2009-07-01

    An extensive body of literature provides evidence for both sexual dimorphism and menstrual cycle effects in drug abuse patterns and behavioral responses. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying sexually dimorphic responses to and hormonal effects on cocaine use remain unclear. We hypothesized that endogenous hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle of rats modulate cocaine's effects on dopamine- and PKA-mediated intracellular responses. To test this hypothesis, intact female rats at different stages of their cycle received a single injection of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) and were sacrificed after 15 or 60 min. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CPu) were dissected and analyzed via Western blot for total and phosphorylated (p-thr34) dopamine- and 3'-5'-cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein with molecular weight 32 kDa (DARPP-32), PP1, PP2B (CNA1 and CNB1 subunits), PKA, CREB, cFOS, and Delta-FosB. Our results show that saline-treated rats had estrous cycle-related differences in protein levels of pCREB, DARPP-32, p-thr34-DARPP-32, PP1, and CNA1. Saline-treated female rats in the estrus stage had higher levels of pCREB in the NAc, but cocaine-treatment lowered pCREB levels. The estrous cycle also significantly affected the magnitude of change for p-thr34-DARPP-32 protein levels in both the NAc and CPu. Sixty minutes of cocaine administration increased p-thr34-DARPP-32 levels in the NAc of rats during estrus and proestrus and in the CPu of rats in diestrus. Furthermore, cocaine-induced changes in PP1 protein levels in the NAc were also affected by the stage of the cycle; 60 min of cocaine administration increased PP1 levels in the NAc of rats during diestrus, whereas PP-1 levels decreased in rats during estrus. Taken together, these novel findings suggest that hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle may contribute to the previously reported sex differences in the PKA pathway and in behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:19348873

  9. Oxytocin-Dopamine Interactions Mediate Variations in Maternal Behavior in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokh, Dara K.; Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Diorio, Josie; Gratton, Alain; Meaney, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in maternal behavior among lactating rats associate with differences in estrogen-oxytocin interactions in the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAcc). Thus, stable, individual differences in pup licking/grooming (LG) are abolished by oxytocin receptor blockade or treatments that eliminate differences in the nAcc dopamine signal. We provide novel evidence for a direct effect of oxytocin at the level of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the regulation of nAcc dopamine levels. Mothers that exhibit consistently increased pup LG (i.e. high LG mothers) by comparison with low LG mothers show increased oxytocin expression in the mPOA and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and increased projections of oxytocin-positive cells from both mPOA and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus to the VTA. Direct infusion of oxytocin into the VTA increased the dopamine signal in the nAcc. Finally, high compared with low LG mothers show greater increases in dopamine signal in the nAcc during bouts of pup LG, and this difference is abolished with infusions of an oxytocin receptor antagonist directly into the VTA. These studies reveal a direct effect of oxytocin on dopamine release within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system and are consistent with previous reports of oxytocin-dopamine interactions in the establishment and maintenance of social bonds. PMID:20228171

  10. Reversal of endogenous dopamine receptor silencing in pituitary cells augments receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Haneen; Yacqub-Usman, Kiren; Richardson, Alan; Hofland, Leo J; Clayton, Richard N; Farrell, William E

    2011-02-01

    Dopamine (DA)-agonist targeting of the DA D(2) receptor (D2R) in prolactinomas is the first-line treatment choice for suppression of prolactin and induction of tumor shrinkage. Resistance to DA agonists seems to be related to receptor number. Using the MMQ and GH3 pituitary cell lines, that either do or do not express D2R, respectively, we explored the epigenetic profile associated with the presence or absence of D2R in these cells lines. These studies led us to explore pharmacological strategies designed to restore receptor expression and thereby potentially augment DA agonist-mediated apoptosis. We show in GH3 cells that the D2R harbors increased CpG island-associated methylation and enrichment for histone H3K27me3. Conversely, MMQ cells and normal pituitaries show enrichment for H3K9Ac and barely detectable H3K27me3. Coculture of GH3 cells with the demethylating agent zebularine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A was responsible for a decrease in CpG island methylation and enrichment for the histone H3K9Ac mark. In addition, challenge of GH3 cells with zebularine alone or coculture with both agents led to expression of endogenous D2R in these cells. Induced expression D2R in GH3 cells was associated with a significant increase in apoptosis indices to challenge with either DA or bromocriptine. Specificity of a receptor-mediated response was established in coincubations with specific D2R antagonist and siRNA approaches in GH3 cell and D2R expressing MMQ cell lines. These studies point to the potential efficacy of combined treatment with epigenetic drugs and DA agonists for the medical management of different pituitary tumor subtypes, resistant to conventional therapies. PMID:21177832

  11. Effects of cysteamine on dopamine-mediated behaviors: evidence for dopamine-somatostatin interactions in the striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Iverson, M.T.; Radke, J.M.; Vincent, S.R.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of prior treatment with cysteamine, a drug which appears to deplete selectively the neuropeptide somatostatin, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and conditioned place preferences were investigated. Twelve hours following systemic cysteamine injections apomorphine-induced stereotypy was attenuated and striatal somatostatin levels were reduced by half. Systemic cysteamine also decreased the motor stimulant effects of amphetamine, without influencing the rewarding properties as determined by the conditioned place preference procedure. Direct injections of cysteamine into the nucleus accumbens also decreased the locomotor response to amphetamine, and produced a local reduction in somatostatin levels in the accumbens. Cysteamine did not appear to alter monoamine turnover in the striatum after either systemic or intra-accumbens injections. These results suggest that somatostatin in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen modulates the motor, but not the reinforcing properties of dopaminergic drugs, possibly via an action postsynaptic to dopamine-releasing terminals. Furthermore, it is evident from these results that cysteamine is an important tool with which to study the central actions of somatostatin.

  12. The Timing of Dopamine- and Noradrenaline-Mediated Transmission Reflects Underlying Differences in the Extent of Spillover and Pooling

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic transmission typically occurs through the spillover activation of extrasynaptic receptors. This study examined the mechanisms underlying somatodendritic dopamine and noradrenaline transmission and found that the extent of spillover and pooling varied dramatically between these two transmitters. In the mouse ventral tegmental area, the time course of D2-receptor-mediated IPSCs (D2-IPSCs) was consistent between cells and was unaffected by altering stimulation intensity, probability of release, or the extent of diffusion. Blocking dopamine reuptake with cocaine extended the time course of D2-IPSCs and suggested that transporters strongly limited spillover. As a result, individual release sites contributed independently to the duration of D2-IPSCs. In contrast, increasing the release of noradrenaline in the rat locus ceruleus prolonged the duration of α2-receptor-mediated IPSCs even when reuptake was intact. Spillover and subsequent pooling of noradrenaline activated distal α2-receptors, which prolonged the duration of α2-IPSCs when multiple release sites were activated synchronously. By using the rapid application of agonists onto large macropatches, we determined the concentration profile of agonists underlying the two IPSCs. Incorporating the results into a model simulating extracellular diffusion predicted that the functional range of noradrenaline diffusion was nearly fivefold greater in the locus ceruleus than dopamine in the midbrain. This study demonstrates that catecholamine synapses differentially regulate the extent of spillover and pooling to control the timing of local inhibition and suggests diversity in the roles of uptake and diffusion in governing metabotropic transmission. PMID:24872568

  13. Dopamine D3 Receptors Mediate the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Quinpirole in Free-Feeding Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baladi, Michelle G.; Newman, Amy H.

    2010-01-01

    The discriminative stimulus effects of dopamine (DA) D3/D2 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated by D2 receptors. To maintain responding, access to food is often restricted, which can alter neurochemical and behavioral effects of drugs acting on DA systems. This study established stimulus control with quinpirole in free-feeding rats and tested the ability of agonists to mimic and antagonists to attenuate the effects of quinpirole. The same antagonists were studied for their ability to attenuate quinpirole-induced yawning and hypothermia. DA receptor agonists apomorphine and lisuride, but not amphetamine and morphine, occasioned responding on the quinpirole lever. The discriminative stimulus effects of quinpirole were attenuated by the D3 receptor-selective antagonist N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide HCl (PG01037) and the nonselective D3/D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, but not by the D2 receptor-selective antagonist 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl]methyl-1H-indole (L-741,626); the potencies of PG01037 and raclopride to antagonize this effect of quinpirole paralleled their potencies to antagonize the ascending limb of the quinpirole yawning dose-response curve (thought to be mediated by D3 receptors). L-741,626 selectively antagonized the descending limb of the quinpirole yawning dose-response curve, and both L-741,626 and raclopride, but not PG01037, antagonized the hypothermic effects of quinpirole (thought to be mediated by D2 receptors). Food restriction (10 g/day/7 days) significantly decreased quinpirole-induced yawning without affecting the quinpirole discrimination. Many discrimination studies on DA receptor agonists use food-restricted rats; together with those studies, the current experiment using free-feeding rats suggests that feeding conditions affecting the behavioral effects of direct-acting DA receptor agonists might also have an impact on the effects of indirect

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  15. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  16. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  17. Preprodynorphin mediates locomotion and D2 dopamine and mu-opioid receptor changes induced by chronic 'binge' cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A; Yoo, J H; Racz, I; Zimmer, A; Kitchen, I

    2007-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the kappa-opioid receptor (KOP-r) system plays an important role in cocaine addiction. Indeed, cocaine induces endogenous KOP activity, which is a mechanism that opposes alterations in behaviour and brain function resulting from repeated cocaine use. In this study, we have examined the influence of deletion of preprodynorphin (ppDYN) on cocaine-induced behavioural effects and on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Furthermore, we have measured mu-opioid receptor (MOP-r) agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS, dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. Male wild-type (WT) and ppDYN knockout (KO) mice were injected with saline or cocaine (45 mg/kg/day) in a 'binge' administration paradigm for 14 days. Chronic cocaine produced an enhancement of locomotor sensitisation in KO. No genotype effect was found on stereotypy behaviour. Cocaine-enhanced MOP-r activation in WT but not in KO. There was an overall decrease in D(2) receptor binding in cocaine-treated KO but not in WT mice. No changes were observed in D(1) and DAT binding. Cocaine increased plasma corticosterone levels in WT but not in KO. The data confirms that the endogenous KOP system inhibits dopamine neurotransmission and that ppDYN may mediate the enhancement of MOP-r activity and the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after chronic cocaine treatment. PMID:17532787

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease: results of a UK-based surveillance study in children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sukhvir; Hacohen, Yael; Jacobson, Leslie; Agrawal, Shakti; Gupta, Rajat; Philip, Sunny; Smith, Martin; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody (NMDAR-Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognised clinico-immunological syndrome that presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms cognitive decline, movement disorder and seizures. This study reports the clinical features, management and neurological outcomes of paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease in the UK. Design A prospective surveillance study. Children with NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological diseases were voluntarily reported to the British Neurological Surveillance Unit (BPNSU) from November 2010 to December 2011. Initial and follow-up questionnaires were sent out to physicians. Results Thirty-one children fulfilled the criteria for the study. Eight presented during the study period giving an incidence of 0.85 per million children per year (95% CI 0.64 to 1.06); 23 cases were historical. Behavioural change and neuropsychiatric features were present in 90% of patients, and seizures and movement disorders both in 67%. Typical NMDAR-Ab encephalitis was reported in 24 children and partial phenotype without encephalopathy in seven, including predominantly psychiatric (four) and movement disorder (three). All patients received steroids, 22 (71%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, 9 (29%) received plasma exchange,and 10 (32%) received second-line immunotherapy. Of the 23 patients who were diagnosed early, 18 (78%) made a full recovery compared with only 1 of 8 (13%) of the late diagnosed patients (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Seven patients relapsed, with four needing additional second-line immunotherapy. Conclusions Paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease appears to be similar to adult NMDAR-Ab encephalitis, but some presented with a partial phenotype. Early treatment was associated with a quick and often full recovery. PMID:25637141

  19. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B.; Sima, Richard J.; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M.; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons. PMID:25548178

  20. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B; Sima, Richard J; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-13

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons. PMID:25548178

  1. Dopamine D2 Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Pancreatic β Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Choi, Sungik; Kataoka, Masateru; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Uesugi, Motonari; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate β cell mass and proliferation is important for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we identified domperidone (DPD), a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) antagonist that enhances β cell mass. Over time, islet β cell loss occurs in dissociation cultures, and this was inhibited by DPD. DPD increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of β cells through increasing intracellular cAMP. DPD prevented β cell dedifferentiation, which together highly contributed to the increased β cell mass. DRD2 knockdown phenocopied the effects of domperidone and increased the number of β cells. Drd2 overexpression sensitized the dopamine responsiveness of β cells and increased apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that the adenosine agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, a previously identified promoter of β cell proliferation, acted with DPD to increase the number of β cells. In humans, dopamine also modulates β cell mass through DRD2 and exerts an inhibitory effect on adenosine signaling. PMID:27373926

  2. Dopamine D-2 receptor mediation of response suppression learning of young rats.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S A; Nonneman, A J

    1989-04-01

    In three experiments, the effects of augmenting or blocking dopamine (DA) D-2 receptor activity on the ontogeny of response suppression learning of preweanling rat pups were determined. In the initial experiment, rat pups were trained to traverse a straight alley for nipple attachment to an anesthetized dam. When footshock (0.2 mA, 0.5 sec) was made contingent on responding, younger (11- and 13-day-olds) rat pups were deficient to older (17- and 19-day-olds) pups at withholding punished responding. In the subsequent experiments, response suppression learning was assessed after injecting 11- and 17-day-old rat pups with the specific DA D-2 agonist, LY 171555 (0.005-, 0.01-, and 0.1-mg/kg, i.p.), or the specific DA D-2 antagonist, sulpiride (5.0-, 15.0-, and 50.0-mg/kg, i.p.). LY 171555 enhanced the punished responding of both the 11- and 17-day-old rat pups; whereas, sulpiride increased the punished responding of the 17-, but not the 11-day-olds. In four additional experiments, the effects of LY 171555 and sulpiride on the locomotor activity, nociception, and reinforcement processes of 17-day-old rat pups was assessed. Rat pups given LY 171555 (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited enhanced locomotor activity and a trend towards hyperanalgesia using a hot plate task. Sulpiride (15.0 mg/kg, i.p.) completely antagonized LY 171555's activity enhancing effects and had hyperalgesic properties. In two experiments, sulpiride did not affect the nonpunished appetitive responding of the 17-day-olds; whereas, haloperidol-treated pups responded on fewer reinforced trials than did saline-treated pups. Therefore, these results indicate that the response suppression learning of 17-day-old rat pups is mediated, at least partially, by a DAD-2 receptor system, and that D-2 receptors are also involved in the locomotor activity and nociceptive responses of young rat pups. PMID:2523325

  3. Protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation and functional regulation of dopamine transporters in striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, R A; Huff, R A; Uhl, G R; Kuhar, M J

    1997-06-13

    Dopamine transporters (DATs) are members of a family of Na+- and Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters responsible for the rapid clearance of dopamine from synaptic clefts. The predicted primary sequence of DAT contains numerous consensus phosphorylation sites. In this report we demonstrate that DATs undergo endogenous phosphorylation in striatal synaptosomes that is regulated by activators of protein kinase C. Rat striatal synaptosomes were metabolically labeled with [32P]orthophosphate, and solubilized homogenates were subjected to immunoprecipitation with an antiserum specific for DAT. Basal phosphorylation occurred in the absence of exogenous treatments, and the phosphorylation level was rapidly increased when synaptosomes were treated with the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid or calyculin. Treatment of synaptosomes with the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also increased the level of phosphate incorporation. This occurred within 10 min and was dosedependent between 0.1 and 1 microM PMA. DAT phosphorylation was also significantly increased by two other protein kinase C activators, (-)-indolactam V and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. The inactive phorbol ester 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate at 10 microM was without effect, and PMA-induced phosphorylation was blocked by treatment of synaptosomes with the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and bisindoylmaleimide. These results indicate that DATs undergo rapid in vivo phosphorylation in response to protein kinase C activation and that a robust mechanism exists in synaptosomes for DAT dephosphorylation. Dopamine transport activity in synaptosomes was reduced by all treatments that promoted DAT phosphorylation, with comparable dose, time, and inhibitor characteristics. The change in transport activity was produced by a reduction in Vmax with no significant effect on the Km for dopamine. These results suggest that synaptosomal dopamine transport activity is regulated by

  4. Electrical release of dopamine and levodopa mediated by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins immobilized on polycrystalline gold.

    PubMed

    Foschi, Giulia; Leonardi, Francesca; Scala, Angela; Biscarini, Fabio; Kovtun, Alessandro; Liscio, Andrea; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Casalini, Stefano

    2015-12-21

    Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution. PMID:26565988

  5. Electrical release of dopamine and levodopa mediated by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins immobilized on polycrystalline gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschi, Giulia; Leonardi, Francesca; Scala, Angela; Biscarini, Fabio; Kovtun, Alessandro; Liscio, Andrea; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Casalini, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution.Vesicles of cationic amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins have been immobilized on polycrystalline gold by exploiting the chemical affinity between their amino groups and Au atoms. The presence of cyclodextrins has been widely investigated by means of AFM, XPS, kelvin probe and electrochemical measurements. This multi-functional coating confers distinct electrochemical features such as pH-dependent behavior and partial/total blocking properties towards electro-active species. The host-guest properties of β-cyclodextrins have been successfully exploited in order to trap drugs, like dopamine and levodopa. The further release of these drugs was successfully achieved by providing specific electrical stimuli. This proof-of-concept led us to fabricate an electronic device (i.e. an organic transistor) capable of dispensing both dopamine and levodopa in aqueous solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Kelvin probe, AFM and electrochemical data are reported. Furthermore, the chemical backbone of both types of cyclodextrins are shown. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05405b

  6. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload in acute excitotoxic motor neuron death: a mechanism distinct from chronic neurotoxicity after Ca(2+) influx.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, M; Nakamizo, T; Inoue, R; Sawada, H; Kihara, T; Honda, K; Akaike, A; Shimohama, S

    2001-03-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of Ca(2+) has recently been found to play an important role in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity (GNT) as well as in the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent molecules, such as calmodulin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), in the cytoplasm. Prolonged exposure to glutamate injures motor neurons predominantly through the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-nNOS, as previously reported, and is, in part, associated with the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the present study, we investigated how mitochondrial uptake of Ca(2+) is involved in GNT in spinal motor neurons. Acute excitotoxicity induced by exposure to 0.5 mM glutamate for 5 min was found in both motor and nonmotor neurons in cultured spinal cords from rat embryos and was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. Mitochondrial uncouplers markedly blocked acute excitotoxicity, and membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimics attenuated acute excitotoxicity induced by glutamate and NMDA but not by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) or kainate. Fluorimetric analysis showed that mitochondrial Ca(2+) was elevated promptly with subsequent accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mitochondria. An NMDA receptor antagonist and a mitochondrial uncoupler eliminated the increase in fluorescence of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ROS indicators. These data indicate that acute excitotoxicity in spinal neurons is mediated by mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and ROS generation through the activation of NMDA receptors. This mechanism is different from that of chronic GNT. PMID:11223912

  7. Dopamine-mediated autocrine inhibitory circuit regulating human insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Norman; Maffei, Antonella; Freeby, Matthew; Burroughs, Steven; Freyberg, Zachary; Javitch, Jonathan; Leibel, Rudolph L; Harris, Paul E

    2012-10-01

    We describe a negative feedback autocrine regulatory circuit for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in purified human islets in vitro. Using chronoamperometry and in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion measurements, evidence is provided that dopamine (DA), which is loaded into insulin-containing secretory granules by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in human β-cells, is released in response to glucose stimulation. DA then acts as a negative regulator of insulin secretion via its action on D2R, which are also expressed on β-cells. We found that antagonism of receptors participating in islet DA signaling generally drive increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These in vitro observations may represent correlates of the in vivo metabolic changes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, such as increased adiposity. PMID:22915827

  8. Dopamine-Mediated Autocrine Inhibitory Circuit Regulating Human Insulin Secretion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norman; Maffei, Antonella; Freeby, Matthew; Burroughs, Steven; Freyberg, Zachary; Javitch, Jonathan; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a negative feedback autocrine regulatory circuit for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in purified human islets in vitro. Using chronoamperometry and in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion measurements, evidence is provided that dopamine (DA), which is loaded into insulin-containing secretory granules by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in human β-cells, is released in response to glucose stimulation. DA then acts as a negative regulator of insulin secretion via its action on D2R, which are also expressed on β-cells. We found that antagonism of receptors participating in islet DA signaling generally drive increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These in vitro observations may represent correlates of the in vivo metabolic changes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, such as increased adiposity. PMID:22915827

  9. Dopamine D3 Receptor Mediates Preadolescent Stress-Induced Adult Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joon H.; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that repeated stressful experiences during childhood increases the likelihood of developing depression- and anxiety-related disorders in adulthood; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We subjected drd3-EGFP and drd3-null mice to daily, two hour restraint stress episodes over a five day period during preadolescence (postnatal day 35 to 39), followed by social isolation. When these mice reached adulthood (post-natal day > 90), we assessed locomotor behavior in a novel environment, and assessed depression-related behavior in the Porsolt Forced Swim test. We also measured the expression and function of dopamine D3 receptor in limbic brain areas such as hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and amygdala in control and stressed drd3-EGFP mice in adulthood. Adult male mice subjected to restraint stress during preadolescence exhibited both anxiety- and depression-related behaviors; however, adult female mice subjected to preadolescent restraint stress exhibited only depression-related behaviors. The development of preadolescent stress-derived psychiatric disorders was blocked by D3 receptor selective antagonist, SB 277011-A, and absent in D3 receptor null mice. Adult male mice that experienced stress during preadolescence exhibited a loss of D3 receptor expression and function in the amygdala but not in hippocampus or nucleus accumbens. In contrast, adult female mice that experienced preadolescent stress exhibited increased D3 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens but not in amygdala or hippocampus. Our results suggest that the dopamine D3 receptor is centrally involved in the etiology of adult anxiety- and depression-related behaviors that arise from repeated stressful experiences during childhood. PMID:26619275

  10. Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Transmission Maintains Information Flow Through the Cortico-Striato-Entopeduncular Direct Pathway to Release Movements

    PubMed Central

    Chiken, Satomi; Sato, Asako; Ohta, Chikara; Kurokawa, Makoto; Arai, Satoshi; Maeshima, Jun; Sunayama-Morita, Tomoko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Nambu, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    In the basal ganglia (BG), dopamine plays a pivotal role in motor control, and dopamine deficiency results in severe motor dysfunctions as seen in Parkinson's disease. According to the well-accepted model of the BG, dopamine activates striatal direct pathway neurons that directly project to the output nuclei of the BG through D1 receptors (D1Rs), whereas dopamine inhibits striatal indirect pathway neurons that project to the external pallidum (GPe) through D2 receptors. To clarify the exact role of dopaminergic transmission via D1Rs in vivo, we developed novel D1R knockdown mice in which D1Rs can be conditionally and reversibly regulated. Suppression of D1R expression by doxycycline treatment decreased spontaneous motor activity and impaired motor ability in the mice. Neuronal activity in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), one of the output nuclei of the rodent BG, was recorded in awake conditions to examine the mechanism of motor deficits. Cortically evoked inhibition in the EPN mediated by the cortico-striato-EPN direct pathway was mostly lost during suppression of D1R expression, whereas spontaneous firing rates and patterns remained unchanged. On the other hand, GPe activity changed little. These results suggest that D1R-mediated dopaminergic transmission maintains the information flow through the direct pathway to appropriately release motor actions. PMID:26443442

  11. Role of Dopamine Type 1 Receptors and Dopamine- and cAMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein Mr 32 kDa in Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Mediated Induction of ΔFosB in the Mouse Forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lazenka, Matthew F; Tomarchio, Aaron J; Lichtman, Aron H; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc; Selley, Dana E; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2015-09-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of marijuana, produces motor and motivational effects via interactions with the dopaminergic system in the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. However, the molecular events that underlie these interactions after THC treatment are not well understood. Our study shows that pretreatment with dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists before repeated administration of THC attenuated induction of Δ FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (ΔFosB) in the nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. Anatomical studies showed that repeated THC administration induced ΔFosB in D1R-containing striatal neurons. Dopamine signaling in the striatum involves phosphorylation-specific effects of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein Mr 32 kDa (DARPP-32), which regulates protein kinase A signaling. Genetic deletion of DARPP-32 attenuated ΔFosB expression measured after acute, but not repeated, THC administration in both the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. THC was then acutely or repeatedly administered to wild-type (WT) and DARPP-32 knockout (KO) mice, and in vivo responses were measured. DARPP-32 KO mice exhibited enhanced acute THC-mediated hypolocomotion and developed greater tolerance to this response relative to the WT mice. Agonist-stimulated guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding showed that cannabinoid-stimulated G-protein activity did not differ between DARPP-32 KO and WT mice treated with vehicle or repeated THC. These results indicate that D1Rs play a major role in THC-mediated ΔFosB induction in the forebrain, whereas the role of DARPP-32 in THC-mediated ΔFosB induction and modulation of motor activity appears to be more complex. PMID:26099530

  12. Opioid-mediated regulation of A11 diencephalospinal dopamine neurons: pharmacological evidence of activation by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S.; Kennedy, Tom; Goudreau, John L.; Lookingland, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the A11 diencephalospinal system represent the sole source of DA innervation to the spinal cord in mice, serving neuromodulatory roles in the processing of nociceptive input and movement. These neurons originate in the dorsocaudal diencephalon and project axons unilaterally throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord, terminating predominantly in the dorsal horn. The density of A11 DA axon terminals in the lumbar region is greater in males compared to females, while in both sexes the activity of neurons terminating in the thoracic spinal cord is greater than those terminating in the lumbar region. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that A11 DA neurons are activated by opioids. To test this hypothesis, male and female mice were systemically treated with agonists or antagonists acting at the μ-opioid receptor, and spinal cord concentrations of DA and its metabolite DOPAC were determined in the thoracic and lumbar spinal cord using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection. Systemic administration of the μ-opioid agonist morphine led to a dose- and time-dependent increase in spinal cord DOPAC/DA ratio (an estimate of DA neuronal activity) in both male and female mice, with greater changes occurring in the lumbar segment. Blockade of opioid receptors with the opioid antagonist naloxone reversed the stimulatory effects of morphine on A11 DA neurons in both male and female mice, but had little to no effect on the activity of these neurons when administered alone. Present findings are consistent with the conclusion that spinal cord- projecting axon terminals of A11 DA neurons are activated by opioids in both male and female mice, most likely through a disinhibitory mechanism. PMID:21605572

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated the propofol self-administration by dopamine D1 receptor in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binbin; Liang, Yuyuan; Dong, Zhanglei; Chen, Zhichuan; Zhang, Gaolong; Lin, Wenxuan; Wang, Sicong; Wang, Benfu; Ge, Ren-Shan; Lian, Qingquan

    2016-07-22

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, can cause addictive behaviors in both human and experimental animals. In the present study, we examined the involvement of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in the molecular process by which propofol may cause addiction. The propofol self-administration model was established by a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforced dosing over successive 14days in rats. On day 15, the rats were treated with dexamethasone, a GR agonist (10-100μg/kg), or RU486, a GR antagonist (10-100μg/kg) at 1h prior to the last training. The animal behaviors were recorded automatically by the computer. The expression of dopamine D1 receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was examined by Western blot and the concentrations of plasma corticosterone were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To further examine the specificity of GR in the process, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, and dexamethasone plus MR agonist, aldosterone, were also tested. Administration of dexamethasone (100μg/kg) or RU486 (⩾10mg/kg) significantly attenuated the rate of propofol maintained active nose-poke responses and infusions, which were accompanied by reductions in both plasma corticosterone level and the expression of D1 receptor in the NAc. Neither spironolactone alone nor dexamethasone combined with aldosterone affected the propofol-maintaining self-administrative behavior, indicating GR, but not MR, modulates the propofol reward in rats. In addition, neither the food-maintaining sucrose responses under FR1 schedule nor the locomotor activity was affected by any doses of dexamethasone or RU486 tested. These findings provide evidence that GR signaling may play an important role in propofol reward. PMID:27126557

  14. The N-Terminal Residues 43 to 60 Form the Interface for Dopamine Mediated α-Synuclein Dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Su Ling; Hinds, Mark G.; Connor, Andrea R.; Smith, David P.; Illes-Toth, Eva; Pham, Chi L. L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is a major component of the intracellular inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are a key pathological feature in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) inhibits the fibrillisation of α-syn into amyloid, and promotes α-syn aggregation into SDS-stable soluble oligomers. While this inhibition of amyloid formation requires the oxidation of both DA and the methionines in α-syn, the molecular basis for these processes is still unclear. This study sought to define the protein sequences required for the generation of oligomers. We tested N- (α-syn residues 43–140) and C-terminally (1–95) truncated α-syn, and found that similar to full-length protein both truncated species formed soluble DA:α-syn oligomers, albeit 1–95 had a different profile. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and the N-terminally truncated α-syn 43–140 protein, we analysed the structural characteristics of the DA:α-syn 43–140 dimer and α-syn 43–140 monomer and found the dimerisation interface encompassed residues 43 to 60. Narrowing the interface to this small region will help define the mechanism by which DA mediates the formation of SDS-stable soluble DA:α-syn oligomers. PMID:25679387

  15. Neuroinflammation mediated by IL-1β increases susceptibility of dopamine neurons to degeneration in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Koprich, James B; Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Mithal, Prabhakar; Isacson, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive despite identification of several genetic mutations. It is more likely that multiple factors converge to give rise to PD than any single cause. Here we report that inflammation can trigger degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods We examined the effects of inflammation on the progressive 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease using immunohistochemistry, multiplex ELISA, and cell counting stereology. Results We show that a non-toxic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced secretion of cytokines and predisposed DA neurons to be more vulnerable to a subsequent low dose of 6-hydroxydopamine. Alterations in cytokines, prominently an increase in interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), were identified as being potential mediators of this effect that was associated with activation of microglia. Administration of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist resulted in significant reductions in tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ and attenuated the augmented loss of DA neurons caused by the LPS-induced sensitization to dopaminergic degeneration. Conclusion These data provide insight into the etiology of PD and support a role for inflammation as a risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:18304357

  16. D1 Dopamine Receptor-Mediated LTP at GABA Synapses Encodes Motivation to Self-Administer Cocaine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Michal; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Sharma, Robyn; Normandeau, Catherine P.; Hawken, Emily R.; Di Prospero, Cynthia; Chiang, Cindy; Martinez, Audrey; Jones, Andrea A.; Doudnikoff, Évelyne; Caille, Stephanie; Bézard, Erwan; Georges, François; Dumont, Éric C.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced motivation to take drugs is a central characteristic of addiction, yet the neural underpinning of this maladaptive behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we report a D1-like dopamine receptor (DRD1)-mediated long-term potentiation of GABAA-IPSCs (D1-LTPGABA) in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that was positively correlated with motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats. Likewise, in vivo intra-oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis DRD1 pharmacological blockade reduced lever pressing for cocaine more effectively in rats showing enhanced motivation toward cocaine. D1-LTPGABA resulted from enhanced function and expression of G-protein-independent DRD1 coupled to c-Src tyrosine kinases and required local release of neurotensin. There was no D1-LTPGABA in rats that self-administered sucrose, in those with limited cocaine self-administration experience, or in those that received cocaine passively (yoked). Therefore, our study reveals a novel neurophysiological mechanism contributing to individual motivation to self-administer cocaine, a critical psychobiological element of compulsive drug use and addiction. PMID:23864683

  17. D1 dopamine receptor-mediated LTP at GABA synapses encodes motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Michal; Mason, Xenos; DeBacker, Julian; Sharma, Robyn; Normandeau, Catherine P; Hawken, Emily R; Di Prospero, Cynthia; Chiang, Cindy; Martinez, Audrey; Jones, Andrea A; Doudnikoff, Évelyne; Caille, Stephanie; Bézard, Erwan; Georges, François; Dumont, Éric C

    2013-07-17

    Enhanced motivation to take drugs is a central characteristic of addiction, yet the neural underpinning of this maladaptive behavior is still largely unknown. Here, we report a D1-like dopamine receptor (DRD1)-mediated long-term potentiation of GABAA-IPSCs (D1-LTPGABA) in the oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that was positively correlated with motivation to self-administer cocaine in rats. Likewise, in vivo intra-oval bed nucleus of the stria terminalis DRD1 pharmacological blockade reduced lever pressing for cocaine more effectively in rats showing enhanced motivation toward cocaine. D1-LTPGABA resulted from enhanced function and expression of G-protein-independent DRD1 coupled to c-Src tyrosine kinases and required local release of neurotensin. There was no D1-LTPGABA in rats that self-administered sucrose, in those with limited cocaine self-administration experience, or in those that received cocaine passively (yoked). Therefore, our study reveals a novel neurophysiological mechanism contributing to individual motivation to self-administer cocaine, a critical psychobiological element of compulsive drug use and addiction. PMID:23864683

  18. Dopamine inhibition of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase is mediated through the high-affinity state of the D/sub 2/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Borgundvaag, B.; George, S.R.

    1985-07-29

    The diterpinoid forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (/sup 3/H)-ATP to (/sup 3/H)-cAMP) in anterior pituitary from male and female rats. Inhibition of stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by potent dopaminergic agonists was demonstrable only in female anterior pituitary. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity displayed a typically dopaminergic rank order of agonist potencies and could be completely reversed by a specific dopamine receptor antagonist. The IC/sub 50/ values of dopamine agonist inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity correlated with equal molarity with the dissociation constant of the high-affinity dopamine agonist-detected receptor binding site and with the IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition of prolactin secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the high-affinity form of the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor in anterior pituitary which is responsible for mediating the dopaminergic function of attenuating adenylate cyclase activity. 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Estrogen protects against dopamine neuron toxicity in primary mesencephalic cultures through an indirect P13K/Akt mediated astrocyte pathway.

    PubMed

    Bains, Mona; Roberts, James L

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes regulate neuronal homeostasis and have been implicated in affecting the viability and functioning of surrounding neurons under stressed and injured conditions. Previous data from our lab suggests indirect actions of estrogen through ERα in neighboring astroglia to protect dopamine neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity in mouse mesencephalic cultures. We further evaluate estrogen signaling in astrocytes and the mechanism of estrogen's indirect neuroprotective effects on dopamine neurons. Primary mesencephalic cultures pre-treated with 17β-estradiol and the membrane impermeable estrogen, E2-BSA, were both neuroprotective against MPP(+) -induced dopamine neuron toxicity, suggesting membrane-initiated neuroprotection. ERα was found in the plasma membrane of astrocyte cultures and colocalized with the lipid raft marker, flotillin-1. A 17β-estradiol time course revealed a significant increase in Akt, which was inhibited by the PI3 kinase inhibitor, LY294004. Estrogen conditioned media collected from pure astrocyte cultures rescued glial deficient mesencephalic cultures from MPP(+). This indirect estrogen-mediated neuroprotective effect in mesencephalic cultures was significantly reduced when PI3 kinase signaling in astrocytes was blocked prior to collecting estrogen-conditioned media using the irreversible PI3 kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin. Estrogen signaling via astrocytes is rapidly initiated at the membrane level and requires PI3 kinase signaling in order to protect primary mesencephalic dopamine neurons from MPP(+) neurotoxicity. PMID:26520464

  20. Dopamine Receptor D3 Signaling on CD4+ T Cells Favors Th1- and Th17-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Francisco; Prado, Carolina; González, Hugo; Franz, Dafne; Osorio-Barrios, Francisco; Osorio, Fabiola; Ugalde, Valentina; Lopez, Ernesto; Elgueta, Daniela; Figueroa, Alicia; Lladser, Alvaro; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2016-05-15

    Dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) expressed on CD4(+) T cells is required to promote neuroinflammation in a murine model of Parkinson's disease. However, how DRD3 signaling affects T cell-mediated immunity remains unknown. In this study, we report that TCR stimulation on mouse CD4(+) T cells induces DRD3 expression, regardless of the lineage specification. Importantly, functional analyses performed in vivo using adoptive transfer of OVA-specific OT-II cells into wild-type recipients show that DRD3 deficiency in CD4(+) T cells results in attenuated differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells toward the Th1 phenotype, exacerbated generation of Th2 cells, and unaltered Th17 differentiation. The reciprocal regulatory effect of DRD3 signaling in CD4(+) T cells favoring Th1 generation and impairing the acquisition of Th2 phenotype was also reproduced using in vitro approaches. Mechanistic analysis indicates that DRD3 signaling evokes suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 expression, a negative regulator of Th2 development, which indirectly favors acquisition of Th1 phenotype. Accordingly, DRD3 deficiency results in exacerbated eosinophil infiltration into the airways of mice undergoing house dust mite-induced allergic response. Interestingly, our results show that, upon chronic inflammatory colitis induced by transfer of naive CD4(+) T cells into lymphopenic recipients, DRD3 deficiency not only affects Th1 response, but also the frequency of Th17 cells, suggesting that DRD3 signaling also contributes to Th17 expansion under chronic inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our findings indicate that DRD3-mediated signaling in CD4(+) T cells plays a crucial role in the balance of effector lineages, favoring the inflammatory potential of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:27183640

  1. Nitrite-Mediated Antagonism of Cyanide Inhibition of Cytochrome c Oxidase in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Leavesley, Heather B.; Li, Li; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Borowitz, Joseph L.; Isom, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits aerobic metabolism by binding to the binuclear heme center of cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX). Amyl nitrite and sodium nitrite (NaNO2) antagonize cyanide toxicity in part by oxidizing hemoglobin to methemoglobin (mHb), which then scavenges cyanide. mHb generation is thought to be a primary mechanism by which the NO2− ion antagonizes cyanide. On the other hand, NO2− can undergo biotransformation to generate nitric oxide (NO), which may then directly antagonize cyanide inhibition of CcOX. In this study, nitrite-mediated antagonism of cyanide inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation was examined in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. NaNO2 produced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in whole-cell and mitochondrial levels of NO. The NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy 3-oxide (PTIO) reversed this increase in cellular and mitochondrial NO. NO generated from NaNO2 decreased cellular oxygen consumption and inhibited CcOX activity. PTIO reversed the NO-mediated inhibition, thus providing strong evidence that NO mediates the action of NaNO2. Under similar conditions, KCN (20μM) inhibited cellular state-3 oxygen consumption and CcOX activity. Pretreatment with NaNO2 reversed KCN-mediated inhibition of both oxygen consumption and CcOX activity. The NaNO2 antagonism of cyanide was blocked by pretreatment with the NO scavenger PTIO. It was concluded that NaNO2 antagonizes cyanide inhibition of CcOX by generating of NO, which then interacts directly with the binding of KCN × CcOX to reverse the toxicity. In vivo antagonism of cyanide by NO2− appears to be due to both generation of mHb and direct displacement of cyanide from CcOX by NO. PMID:20335280

  2. Reduced insulin-receptor mediated modulation of striatal dopamine release by basal insulin as a possible contributing factor to hyperdopaminergia in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Hahn, Margaret; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic neuropsychiatric disorder which affects 1% of the world population. Using the brain imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) it has been demonstrated that persons with schizophrenia have greater dopamine transmission in the striatum compared to healthy controls. However, little progress has been made as to elucidating other biological mechanisms which may account for this hyperdopaminergic state in this disease. Studies in animals have demonstrated that insulin receptors are expressed on midbrain dopamine neurons, and that insulin from the periphery acts on these receptors to modify dopamine transmission in the striatum. This is pertinent given that several lines of evidence suggest that insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in the brains of persons with schizophrenia. Post-mortem studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have less than half the number of cortical insulin receptors compared to healthy persons. Moreover, these post-mortem findings are unlikely due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment; studies in cell lines and animals suggest antipsychotics enhance insulin receptor functioning. Further, hyperinsulinemia - even prior to antipsychotic use - seems to be related to less psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Collectively, these data suggest that midbrain insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in persons with schizophrenia, resulting in reduced insulin-mediated regulation of dopamine transmission in the striatum. Such a deficit may account for the hyperdopaminergic state observed in these patients and would help guide the development of novel treatment strategies. We hypothesize that, (i) insulin receptor expression and/or function is reduced in midbrain dopamine neurons in persons with schizophrenia, (ii) basal insulin should reduce dopaminergic transmission in the striatum via these receptors, and (iii) this modulation of dopaminergic transmission by basal insulin

  3. Activation of Phosphatidylinositol-Linked Dopamine Receptors Induces a Facilitation of Glutamate-Mediated Synaptic Transmission in the Lateral Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Glovaci, Iulia; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The lateral entorhinal cortex receives strong inputs from midbrain dopamine neurons that can modulate its sensory and mnemonic function. We have previously demonstrated that 1 µM dopamine facilitates synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal cortex cells via activation of D1-like receptors, increased cAMP-PKA activity, and a resulting enhancement of AMPA-receptor mediated currents. The present study assessed the contribution of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked D1 receptors to the dopaminergic facilitation of transmission in layer II of the rat entorhinal cortex, and the involvement of phospholipase C activity and release of calcium from internal stores. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of glutamate-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents were obtained from pyramidal and fan cells. Activation of D1-like receptors using SKF38393, SKF83959, or 1 µM dopamine induced a reversible facilitation of EPSCs which was abolished by loading cells with either the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 or the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Neither the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, nor the L/N-type channel blocker cilnidipine, blocked the facilitation of synaptic currents. However, the facilitation was blocked by blocking Ca2+ release from internal stores via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors or ryanodine receptors. Follow-up studies demonstrated that inhibiting CaMKII activity with KN-93 failed to block the facilitation, but that application of the protein kinase C inhibitor PKC(19-36) completely blocked the dopamine-induced facilitation. Overall, in addition to our previous report indicating a role for the cAMP-PKA pathway in dopamine-induced facilitation of synaptic transmission, we demonstrate here that the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II entorhinal neurons also relies on a signaling cascade dependent on PI-linked D1 receptors, PLC, release of Ca2+ from internal stores, and PKC activation which is likely dependent

  4. Proerectile effects of dopamine D2-like agonists are mediated by the D3 receptor in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Truccone, Andrew; Haji-Abdi, Faiza; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Rice, Kenner C; Husbands, Stephen M; Greedy, Benjamin M; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cecile; Gueiffier, Alain; Chen, Jianyong; Wang, Shaomeng; Katz, Jonathan L; Grandy, David K; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H

    2009-04-01

    Dopamine D(2)-like agonists induce penile erection (PE) and yawning in a variety of species, effects that have been suggested recently to be specifically mediated by the D(4) and D(3) receptors, respectively. The current studies were aimed at characterizing a series of D(2), D(3), and D(4) agonists with respect to their capacity to induce PE and yawning in the rat and the proerectile effects of apomorphine [(R)-(-)-5,6,6a,7-tetrahydro-6-methyl-4H-dibenzo-[de,g]quinoline-10,11-diol hydrochloride] in wild-type and D(4) receptor (R) knockout (KO) mice. All D(3) agonists induced dose-dependent increases in PE and yawning over a similar range of doses, whereas significant increases in PE or yawning were not observed with any of the D(4) agonists. Likewise, D(2), D(3), and D(4) antagonists were assessed for their capacity to alter apomorphine- and pramipexole (N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride)-induced PE and yawning. The D(3) antagonist, PG01037 [N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide hydrochloride], inhibited the induction of PE and yawning, whereas the D(2) antagonist, L-741,626 [3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl]methyl-1H-indole], reversed the inhibition of PE and yawning observed at higher doses. The D(4) antagonist, L-745,870 [3-(4-[4-chlorophenyl]piperazin-1-yl)-methyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine trihydrochloride], did not alter apomorphine- or pramipexole-induced PE or yawning. A role for the D(3) receptor was further supported because apomorphine was equipotent at inducing PE in wild-type and D(4)RKO mice, effects that were inhibited by the D(3) antagonist, PG01037, in both wild-type and D(4)R KO mice. Together, these studies provide strong support that D(2)-like agonist-induced PE and yawning are differentially mediated by the D(3) (induction) and D(2) (inhibition) receptors. These studies fail to support a role for the D(4) receptor in the regulation of PE or

  5. Antioxidant-Mediated Modulation of Protein Reactivity for 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a Toxic Dopamine Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David G; Florang, Virginia R; Schamp, Josephine H; Buettner, Garry R; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2016-07-18

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) is an endogenously produced toxic aldehyde. It is a bifunctional electrophile implicated in the loss of dopaminergic cells concomitant with Parkinson's disease and neurodegeneration. DOPAL is known to react with proteins and amino acids such as N-acetyl lysine (NAL); oxidation of the catechol moiety to the quinone of DOPAL increases this reactivity. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and ascorbic acid to mitigate the reactivity of DOPAL with proteins and amino acids in a dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, Trolox did not lessen the observed reactivity with proteins. Interestingly, use of tricine, a buffer and reducing agent, in these systems also decreased the reactivity of DOPAL with amines, yielding tricine-derived free radical species. Modification of amines with aldehydes typically involves Schiff base chemistry; however, the observance of free radicals suggests that an oxidative step is involved in the reaction of DOPAL with lysine. Furthermore, while Schiff base formation is usually optimal at pH 5, the reaction rate of DOPAL with NAL is negligible at pH 5 and is enhanced under basic conditions (e.g., pH 9). Conditions of high pH are also favorable for catechol auto-oxidation, known to occur for DOPAL. The antioxidant-mediated protection demonstrated here suggests that oxidative stress may impart cellular vulnerability to protein modification by DOPAL. Therefore, depleted antioxidants and increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, known to prevent the detoxifying metabolism of DOPAL, may present a survival challenge to dopaminergic cells targeted in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27268734

  6. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  7. Visual Attention in Flies-Dopamine in the Mushroom Bodies Mediates the After-Effect of Cueing.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Visual environments may simultaneously comprise stimuli of different significance. Often such stimuli require incompatible responses. Selective visual attention allows an animal to respond exclusively to the stimuli at a certain location in the visual field. In the process of establishing its focus of attention the animal can be influenced by external cues. Here we characterize the behavioral properties and neural mechanism of cueing in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. A cue can be attractive, repulsive or ineffective depending upon (e.g.) its visual properties and location in the visual field. Dopamine signaling in the brain is required to maintain the effect of cueing once the cue has disappeared. Raising or lowering dopamine at the synapse abolishes this after-effect. Specifically, dopamine is necessary and sufficient in the αβ-lobes of the mushroom bodies. Evidence is provided for an involvement of the αβposterior Kenyon cells. PMID:27571359

  8. Visual Attention in Flies—Dopamine in the Mushroom Bodies Mediates the After-Effect of Cueing

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Visual environments may simultaneously comprise stimuli of different significance. Often such stimuli require incompatible responses. Selective visual attention allows an animal to respond exclusively to the stimuli at a certain location in the visual field. In the process of establishing its focus of attention the animal can be influenced by external cues. Here we characterize the behavioral properties and neural mechanism of cueing in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. A cue can be attractive, repulsive or ineffective depending upon (e.g.) its visual properties and location in the visual field. Dopamine signaling in the brain is required to maintain the effect of cueing once the cue has disappeared. Raising or lowering dopamine at the synapse abolishes this after-effect. Specifically, dopamine is necessary and sufficient in the αβ-lobes of the mushroom bodies. Evidence is provided for an involvement of the αβposterior Kenyon cells. PMID:27571359

  9. D2 and D3 dopamine receptor cell surface localization mediated by interaction with protein 4.1N.

    PubMed

    Binda, Alicia V; Kabbani, Nadine; Lin, Ridwan; Levenson, Robert

    2002-09-01

    We identified protein 4.1N as a D2-like dopamine receptor-interacting protein in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Protein 4.1N is a neuronally enriched member of the 4.1 family of cytoskeletal proteins, which also includes protein 4.1R of erythrocytes and the 4.1G and 4.1B isoforms. The interaction of protein 4.1N was specific for the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and was independently confirmed in pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Deletion mapping localized the site of dopamine receptor/protein 4.1N interaction to the N-terminal segment of the third intracellular domain of D2 and D3 receptors and the carboxyl-terminal domain of protein 4.1N. D2 and D3 receptors were also found to interact with the highly conserved carboxyl-terminal domain of proteins 4.1R, 4.1G, and 4.1B. Immunofluorescence studies show that protein 4.1N and D2 and D3 dopamine receptors are expressed at the plasma membrane of transfected human embryonic kidney 293 and mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells. However, expression of D2 or D3 receptors with a protein 4.1N truncation fragment reduces the level of D2 and D3 receptor expression at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that protein 4.1N/dopamine receptor interaction is required for localization or stability of dopamine receptors at the neuronal plasma membrane. PMID:12181426

  10. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  11. Dopamine D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptor currents mediated by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptor trafficking in neonatal rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Huaxia; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptors are of particular importance in the control of synaptic strength and integration of synaptic activity. Dopamine receptor modulation of NMDA receptors in neonatal striatum may influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission in the cortico-striatal pathway and if so, this modulation will affect the behaviour of the basal ganglia network. Here, we show that in acute brain slices of neonatal (P7) rat striatum the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 significantly decreases NMDA receptor currents in patch-clamp whole-cell recordings. This inhibition is not abolished by application of a G protein inhibitor (GDP-β-S) or irreversible G protein activator (GTP-γ-S) suggesting a G protein-independent mechanism. In addition, intracellular application of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lavendustin A or PP2) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA currents. In contrast, in older animals (P28) D1 receptor activation produces a potentiation of the NMDA response which suggests there is a developmental switch in D1 modulation of striatal NMDA receptors. Single-channel recordings show that direct D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptors cannot be observed in isolated membrane patches. We hypothesize that D1 inhibition in whole-cell recordings from neonatal rats may be mediated by a change in NMDA receptor trafficking. Consistent with this hypothesis, intracellular application of a dynamin inhibitory peptide (QVPSRPNRAP) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA receptor currents. We therefore conclude that a tyrosine kinase-dependent alteration of NMDA receptor trafficking underlies D1 dopamine receptor-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptor currents in medium spiny neurons of neonatal rat striatum. PMID:18703578

  12. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated. PMID:22886112

  13. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  14. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  15. D2-like dopamine receptor mediation of social-emotional reactivity in a mouse model of anxiety: strain and experience effects.

    PubMed

    Gendreau, P L; Petitto, J M; Gariépy, J L; Lewis, M H

    1998-03-01

    We examined the effects of the D2-like dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole on social-emotional reactivity in two inbred mouse strains. An important objective of this study was to determine whether these effects could be modulated by differential housing conditions (i.e., isolation versus group housing). Moreover, as motor activity is an important control for the assessment of drug effects on emotional behavior, the effects of quinpirole were tested in two inbred mouse strains (A/J and C57BL/6J) low and high in motor activity, respectively. Levels of emotional reactivity were assessed in response to mild social stimulation provided by a nonaggressive conspecific. Quinpirole increased stationary forms of reactivity (i.e., startle, kicking, defensive posture, vocalization) in both isolated and group-housed A/J mice. This effect was more pronounced and observed at lower doses in isolated than in group-housed A/J mice. Quinpirole also induced jump behavior in isolated but not group-housed A/J mice. The shift to the left in the dose-response curve of quinpirole in isolated A/J mice indicated that D2-like dopamine receptor functions can be altered by social experience. Quinpirole only marginally increased stationary and locomotor reactivity (i.e., jump) in isolated C57BL/6J mice, whereas it markedly reduced motor activity in group-housed mice of this strain. The investigation of emotional reactivity within a social context and using strains that differ in motor activity permitted the effects of drugs on emotional reactivity to be dissociated from the effects on motor activity. Given that social-emotional reactivity was elicited by what typically should have been mild and nonthreatening stimuli, this model may be highly relevant to understanding the neurobiology of anxiety. Finally, these data support an important role for dopamine in the mediation of social-emotional reactivity. PMID:9471118

  16. Ring Substituents on Substituted Benzamide Ligands Indirectly Mediate Interactions with Position 7.39 of Transmembrane Helix 7 of the D4 Dopamine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Spencer S.; Cummings, David F.; Teer, Michael E.; Amdani, Shahnawaz

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how specific molecular interactions of dopamine receptor ligand classes vary between D2-like dopamine receptor subtypes, a conserved threonine in transmembrane (TM) helix 7 (Thr7.39), implicated as a key ligand interaction site with biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors, was substituted with alanine in D2 and D4 receptors. Interrogation of different ligand chemotypes for sensitivity to this substitution revealed enhanced affinity in the D4, but not the D2 receptor, specifically for substituted benzamides (SBAs) having polar 4- (para) and/or 5- (meta) benzamide ring substituents. D4-T7.39A was fully functional, and the mutation did not alter the sodium-mediated positive and negative allostery observed with SBAs and agonists, respectively. With the exception of the non-SBA ligand (+)-butaclamol, which, in contrast to certain SBAs, had decreased affinity for the D4-T7.39A mutant, the interactions of numerous other ligands were unaffected by this mutation. SBAs were docked into D4 models in the same mode as observed for eticlopride in the D3 crystal structure. In this mode, interactions with TM5 and TM6 residues constrain the SBA ring position that produces distal steric crowding between pyrrolidinyl/diethylamine moieties and D4-Thr7.39. Ligand-residue interaction energy profiles suggest this crowding is mitigated by substitution with a smaller alanine. The profiles indicate sites that contribute to the SBA binding interaction and site-specific energy changes imparted by the D4-T7.39A mutation. Substantial interaction energy changes are observed at only a few positions, some of which are not conserved among the dopamine receptor subtypes and thus seem to account for this D4 subtype-specific structure-activity relationship. PMID:22588261

  17. Ghrelin receptor activity amplifies hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents and increases phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit at Ser896 and Ser897.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Brandon G; Isokawa, Masako

    2015-12-01

    Although ghrelin and its cognate receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) are highly localized in the hypothalamic nuclei for the regulation of metabolic states and feeding, GHSR1a is also highly localized in the hippocampus, suggesting its involvement in extra-hypothalamic functions. Indeed, exogenous application of ghrelin has been reported to improve hippocampal learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanism of ghrelin regulation of hippocampal functions is poorly understood. Here, we report ghrelin-promoted phosphorylation of GluN1 and amplified N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in the CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in slice preparations. The ghrelin-induced responses were sensitive to a GHSR1a antagonist and inverse agonist, and were absent in GHSR1a homozygous knock-out mice. These results indicated that activation of GHSR1a was critical in the ghrelin-induced enhancement of the NMDAR function. Interestingly, heterozygous mouse hippocampi were also insensitive to ghrelin treatment, suggesting that a slight reduction in the availability of GHSR1a may be sufficient to negate the effect of ghrelin on GluN1 phosphorylation and NMDAR channel activities. In addition, NMDAR-mediated spike currents, which are of dendritic origin, were blocked by the GHSR1a antagonist, suggesting the presence of GHSR1a on the pyramidal cell dendrites in physical proximity to NMDAR. Together with our findings on the localization of GHSR1a in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, which was shown by fluorescent ghrelin binding, immunoreactivity, and enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression, we conclude that the activation of GHSR1a favours rapid modulation of the NMDAR-mediated glutamatergic synaptic transmission by phosphorylating GluN1 in the hippocampus. PMID:26490687

  18. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and spine formation by GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Sehyoun; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyun; Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2015-01-23

    Dopamine (DA) signaling via DA receptors is known to control hippocampal activity that contributes to learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. In primary hippocampal neuronal culture, we observed that dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) co-localized with certain subtypes of GABAA receptors, namely α1, β3, and γ2 subunits, as revealed by double immunofluorocytochemical analysis. Treatment with the D2R agonist, quinpirole, was shown to elicit an increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampal neurons. This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. Furthermore, treatment of hippocampal neurons with quinpirole increased the dendritic spine density and this regulation was totally blocked by pretreatment with a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), D2R antagonist (haloperidol), or by the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. These results suggest that D2R-mediated ERK phosphorylation can control spine formation and that the GABAA receptor negatively regulates the D2R-induced spine formation through ERK signaling in hippocampal neurons, thus indicating a potential role of D2R in the control of hippocampal neuronal excitability. PMID:25483619

  19. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice. PMID:27233827

  20. Influence of sildenafil on copulatory behaviour in sluggish or normal ejaculator male rats: a central dopamine mediated effect?

    PubMed

    Giuliani, D; Ottani, A; Ferrari, F

    2002-03-01

    The present study investigates the effects induced by sildenafil (1 mg/kg, p.o.) and the dopamine agonist, SND 919 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) on copulatory behaviour of male rats, categorized, on the basis of seven consecutive mating pre-tests, as sluggish and normal ejaculators (SE and NE, respectively). The data obtained show that sildenafil modifies both sexual arousal and ejaculatory mechanisms of copulation. It appears that, although it induced a facilitatory effect on ejaculation of all rats, similarly to SND 919, the lowering of ejaculatory threshold was achieved by means of a reduction of mount frequency and intromission frequency in SE and NE groups, respectively. Differently from SND 919, sildenafil increased sexual arousal, diminishing post ejaculatory interval in SE animals and inter-intromission interval in both SE and NE rats. As the dopamine antagonist, (-)eticlopride (0.02 mg/kg, s.c.), significantly inhibited sildenafil-induced enhancement of sexual arousal in SE rats, it is suggested that the drug acts both peripherally and centrally. PMID:11955526

  1. Exposure and characterization of the action of noradrenaline at dopamine receptors mediating endothelium-independent relaxation of rat isolated small mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Saxena, P. R.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Previously, we reported that noradrenaline (NA), in addition to its alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile effect, may relax the rat small mesenteric artery (SMA) in order to account for steep Schild plots obtained with compounds classified as alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists. In this study, a relaxant action of NA has been exposed in the rat isolated, endothelium-denuded SMA precontracted by the thromboxane A2-mimetic, U46619. 2. NA, but not the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14304, produced concentration-dependent contraction of the SMA (pEC50 = 5.7 +/- 0.1). After precontraction with 0.1 microM U46619, 10 nM-30 microM NA produced a further contraction (pEC50 = 6.1 +/- 0.2), while higher concentrations of NA produced small, but significant, relaxant responses. 3. In the presence of 1 microM prazosin, 0.1-30 microM NA produced concentration dependent relaxation (pIC50 = 5.9 +/- 0.1) after precontraction with 0.1 microM U46619. The NA relaxation concentration-effect curve was completely inhibited by 1 microM of the beta 1/beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, timolol. However, when the concentration of prazosin was increased by 10 fold (10 microM), NA once again produced concentration-dependent relaxation (pIC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.2). This relaxation concentration-effect curve was not blocked by a 10 fold higher concentration of timolol (10 microM), nor by the presence of idazoxan (10 microM), cyanopindolol (10 microM), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM), indomethacin (10 microM) or sulpiride (1 microM). However, haloperidol (10 microM) and (+/-)-SCH-23390 (10 nM) produced significant inhibition of the relaxation, suggesting the involvement of dopamine D1 receptors. 4. Dopamine also produced concentration-dependent relaxation following U46619 precontraction (pIC50 = 5.4 +/- 0.1) which was significantly inhibited by haloperidol and (+)-SCH-23390. Pretreatment with 10 microM phenoxybenzamine for 60 min produced a significant inhibition of the

  2. Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced cellular response during chronic hypoxia in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic hypoxia on N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated cellular responses in differentiated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were differentiated by treatment with nerve growth factor. Patch-clamp analysis in differentiated PC12 cells showed that extracellularly applied N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an inward current that was abolished by the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Results from Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) which was also abolished by MK-801. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced current in nerve growth factor-treated cells. We found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced inward current and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) were markedly attenuated by chronic hypoxia. We next examined the possibility that the reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate responsiveness was due to down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels. Northern blot and immunoblot analyses showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 were markedly decreased during hypoxia. However, the messenger RNA for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2C was increased, whereas the protein level for subunit 2C did not change. Our results indicate that differentiated PC12 cells express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and that chronic exposure to hypoxia attenuates the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced Ca(2+) accumulation in these cells via down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1. This mechanism may play an important role in protecting PC12 cells against hypoxic stress. PMID:11113364

  3. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  4. Time-dependent effects of repeated THC treatment on dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated signalling in midbrain and striatum.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Benjamin B; Tsartsalis, Stergios; Dimiziani, Andrea; Millet, Philippe; Ginovart, Nathalie

    2016-09-15

    This study examined the time-course of alterations in levels and functional sensitivities of dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3R) during the course and up to 6 weeks following cessation of chronic treatment with Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats. THC treatment led to an increase in D2/3R levels in striatum, as assessed using [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO, that was readily observable after one week of treatment, remained stably elevated during the subsequent 2 weeks of treatment, but fully reversed within 2 weeks of THC discontinuation. THC-induced D2/3R alterations were more pronounced and longer lasting in the dopamine cell body regions of the midbrain, wherein [(3)H]-(+)-PHNO binding was still elevated at 2 weeks but back to control values at 6 weeks after THC cessation. Parallel analyses of the psychomotor effects of pre- and post-synaptic doses of quinpirole also showed a pattern of D2/3R functional supersensitivity indicative of more rapid subsidence in striatum than in midbrain following drug cessation. These results indicate that chronic THC is associated with a biochemical and functional sensitization of D2/3R signaling, that these responses show a region-specific temporal pattern and are fully reversible following drug discontinuation. These results suggest that an increased post-synaptic D2/3R function and a decreased DA presynaptic signaling, mediated by increased D2/3R autoinhibition, may predominate during distinct phases of withdrawal and may contribute both to the mechanisms leading to relapse and to cannabinoid withdrawal symptoms. The different rates of normalization of D2/3R function in striatum and midbrain may be critical information for the development of new pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence. PMID:27233824

  5. Selective reduction by isolation rearing of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dopamine release in vivo in the frontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Ago, Y; Sakaue, M; Baba, A; Matsuda, T

    2002-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors modulate in vivo release of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters which may be involved in isolation-induced aggressive behavior. The present study examined the effect of isolation rearing on the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine (DA), 5-HT and noradrenaline (NA) release in the frontal cortex of mice. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist (S)-5-[-[(1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]propoxy]-1,3-benzodioxole HCl (MKC-242) increased the release of DA and NA and decreased the release of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of MKC-242 on DA release was significantly less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, while effects of the drug on NA and 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. The effect of the other 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin on cortical DA release was also less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, and that of the drug on cortical 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. In contrast to MKC-242-induced DA release, amphetamine-induced increase in cortical DA release in vivo was greater in isolation-reared mice. The present findings suggest that isolation rearing enhances the activity of cortical dopaminergic neurons and reduces selectively the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated release of DA in the cortex. PMID:12423245

  6. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6–8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  7. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jenny J; Ray, Russell

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  8. The GPCR membrane receptor, DopEcR, mediates the actions of both dopamine and ecdysone to control sex pheromone perception in an insect

    PubMed Central

    Abrieux, Antoine; Duportets, Line; Debernard, Stéphane; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory information mediating sexual behavior is crucial for reproduction in many animals, including insects. In male moths, the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL) is specialized in the treatment of information on the female-emitted sex pheromone. Evidence is accumulating that modulation of behavioral pheromone responses occurs through neuronal plasticity via the action of hormones and/or catecholamines. We recently showed that a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), AipsDopEcR, with its homologue known in Drosophila for its double affinity to the main insect steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), and dopamine (DA), present in the ALs, is involved in the behavioral response to pheromone in the moth, Agrotis ipsilon. Here we tested the role of AipsDopEcR as compared to nuclear 20E receptors in central pheromone processing combining receptor inhibition with intracellular recordings of AL neurons. We show that the sensitivity of AL neurons for the pheromone in males decreases strongly after AipsDopEcR-dsRNA injection but also after inhibition of nuclear 20E receptors. Moreover we tested the involvement of 20E and DA in the receptor-mediated behavioral modulation in wind tunnel experiments, using ligand applications and receptor inhibition treatments. We show that both ligands are necessary and act on AipsDopEcR-mediated behavior. Altogether these results indicate that the GPCR membrane receptor, AipsDopEcR, controls sex pheromone perception through the action of both 20E and DA in the central nervous system, probably in concert with 20E action through nuclear receptors. PMID:25309365

  9. Interactions of MK-801 with glutamate-, glutamine- and methamphetamine-evoked release of ( sup 3 H)dopamine from striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Scallet, A.C.; Holson, R.R.; Lipe, G.W.; Slikker, W. Jr.; Ali, S.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The interactions of MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d) cyclohepten-5,10-imine), glutamate and glutamine with methamphetamine (METH)-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were assessed in vitro to determine whether MK-801 inhibition of METH neurotoxicity might be mediated presynaptically, and to evaluate the effects of glutamatergic stimulation on METH-evoked dopamine release. MK-801 inhibition of glutamate- or METH-evoked dopamine release might reduce synaptic dopamine levels during METH exposure and decrease the formation of 6-hydroxydopamine or other related neurotoxins. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 40 microM and 1 mM glutamate evoked a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated ({sup 3}H)dopamine and ({sup 3}H)metabolite (tritium) release of 3 to 6 and 12 to 16% of total tritium stores, respectively, from striatal slices. With 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 10 mM glutamate alone or in combination with the dopamine uptake blocker nomifensine released only 2.1 or 4.2%, respectively, of total tritium stores, and release was only partially dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors. With or without 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 0.5 or 5 microM METH evoked a substantial release of tritium (5-8 or 12-21% of total stores, respectively). METH-evoked dopamine release was not affected by 5 microM MK-801 but METH-evoked release was additive with glutamate-evoked release. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 1 mM glutamine increased glutamate release and induced the release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine and metabolites. Both 0.5 and 5 microM METH also increased tritium release with 1 mM glutamine present. When striatal slices were exposed to 5 microM METH this glutamine-evoked release of glutamate was increased more than 50%.

  10. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  11. Modulation of dopamine-mediated facilitation at the neuromuscular junction of Wistar rats: A role for adenosine A1/A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Elnozahi, Neveen A; AlQot, Hadir E; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Bistawroos, Azza E; Abou Zeit-Har, Mohamed S

    2016-06-21

    This study aims to understand how dopamine and the neuromodulators, adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) modulate neuromuscular transmission. Adenosine and ATP are well-recognized for their regulatory effects on dopamine in the central nervous system. However, if similar interactions occur at the neuromuscular junction is unknown. We hypothesize that the activation of adenosine A1/A2A and/or P2 purinoceptors may influence the action of dopamine on neuromuscular transmission. Using the rat phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm, we assessed the influence of dopamine, adenosine and ATP on the height of nerve-evoked muscle twitches. We investigated how the selective blockade of adenosine A1 receptors (2.5nM DPCPX), adenosine A2A receptors (50nM CSC) and P2 purinoceptors (100μM suramin) modified the effects of dopamine. Dopamine alone increased indirect muscle contractions while adenosine and ATP either enhanced or depressed nerve-evoked muscle twitches in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory effects of 256μM dopamine were significantly reduced to 29.62±2.79% or 53.69±5.45% in the presence of DPCPX or CSC, respectively, relative to 70.03±1.57% with dopamine alone. Alternatively, the action of 256μM dopamine was potentiated from 70.03±1.57, in the absence of suramin, to 86.83±4.36%, in the presence of suramin. It can be concluded that the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors potentially play a central role in the regulation of dopamine effects at the neuromuscular junction. Clinically this study offers new insights for the indirect manipulation of neuromuscular transmission for the treatment of disorders characterized by motor dysfunction. PMID:27060487

  12. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  13. Inhibition by dizocilpine (MK-801) of striatal dopamine release induced by MPTP and MPP+: possible action at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P B; Reuben, M

    1995-01-01

    1. The NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine (MK-801) can protect against neurotoxicity associated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its principal metabolite, the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+). It has been suggested that these neurotoxic effects may be mediated by release of excitatory amino acids, but possible alternative mechanisms have been little investigated. 2. MPTP and MPP+ (0.1-1000 microM) were tested in superfused rat striatal synaptosomes preloaded with [3H]-dopamine. Both MPTP (10 microM and higher) and MPP+ (1 microM and higher) evoked an immediate and concentration-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine. The maximal effect exceeded that achievable with nicotine. For subsequent experiments, submaximal concentrations of MPTP (50 microM) and MPP+ (10 microM) were tested. 3. MK-801 (0.1-100 microM) inhibited responses to MPTP (50 microM) and MPP+ (10 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, further tests of NMDA-type glutamate receptor involvement proved negative. Responses to MPTP or MPP+ were unaffected by the omission of Mg2+ or Ca2+ and were not reduced by the NMDA receptor antagonists, AP-7 (200 microM) and kynurenic acid (300 microM). In this assay, N-methyl-D-aspartate (even in the absence of Mg2+ and with added glycine and strychnine) did not evoked [3H]-dopamine release. 4. In crude membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex, MPTP and MPP+ inhibited high-affinity [3H]-nicotine binding to nicotinic cholinoceptors (IC50 1.8 microM and 26 microM, respectively). 5. [3H]-dopamine release evoked by nicotine (1 microM) was blocked by the nicotinic antagonists,mecamylamine and chlorisondamine, and by MK-801 (all at 100 micro M); K+-evoked release was not affected. Release evoked by MPTP and MPP+ was significantly attenuated by MK-801 but not by mecamylamine or chlorisondamine.6. At a high concentration (1O I1M), the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, completely blocked [3HJ-dopamine

  14. Unifying mechanism for addiction and toxicity of abused drugs with application to dopamine and glutamate mediators: electron transfer and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2005-01-01

    There are many unknown aspects concerning the mode of action of abused drugs. Recently, a unifying theme for toxicity and addiction was reported based on electron transfer (ET), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and oxidative stress (OS). The main drugs involved are nicotine, cocaine, alcohol, phencyclidine, ecstasy, amphetamines, morphine-heroin, tetrahydrocannabinol, and therapeutic drugs (benzodiazepines, phenytoin, phenobarbital, aspirin, and acetaminophen). A major source of ROS is ET functionalities, of which the main ones found in abused drug metabolites are quinones and imines (or iminiums). Minor types are the nitroxide metabolite from cocaine, and alpha-dicarbonyl from alcohol. The theoretical approach enjoys support from reports on formation of ET metabolites, generation of ROS, protection by antioxidants (AOs), electrochemical studies, and cell signaling. Dopamine (DA) mediation of drug abuse has been the focus of much attention during the past decades. Recently, a similar role for glutamate (Glu) has come under study. Superficially, from a mechanistic vantage point, these findings might be regarded as in conflict with the ET-ROS-OS scheme. Many investigators believe that each drug or mediator operates by its own distinct mechanism. The present report provides evidence that a commonality in mode of action exists for both abused drugs and the DA-Glu operators. In the case of DA, oxidative metabolism yields o-quinones and semiquinones which can redox cycle with oxygen to provide various ROS. Electrochemical studies support the possibility of ET transformations by these quinones in the biological domain. In relation to cell signaling, DA is involved in formation of cAMP followed by a cascade of other events. A similar scenario exists in the case of Glu, in which an iminocarboxylic acid metabolite is hypothesized to play an ET role. The various phenomena are rationalized within the context of ET-ROS-OS, as was done earlier for abused drugs. Thus, a common mode

  15. Food restriction alters N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole)-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Calinski, Diane M; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H

    2008-05-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists, including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-induced yawning. Behavioral and molecular studies suggest that augmented dopaminergic responses observed in food-restricted animals result from a sensitization of the dopamine D2 receptor; however, little is known about how food restriction affects dopamine D3 receptor function. The current studies were aimed at better defining the effects of food restriction on D2 and D3 receptor function by assessing the capacity of N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole) to induce yawning, penile erection (PE), hypothermia, and locomotor activity in free-fed and food-restricted rats. Food restriction resulted in a suppression of pramipexole-induced yawning, a sensitized hypothermic response, and an enhanced locomotor response to pramipexole, effects that are suggestive of an enhanced D2 receptor activity; no effect on pramipexole-induced PE was observed. Antagonist studies further supported a food restriction-induced enhancement of the D2 receptor activity because the D2 antagonist 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl]methyl-1H-indole (L741,626) recovered pramipexole-induced yawning to free-fed levels, whereas yawning and PE were suppressed following pretreatment with the D3 antagonist N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide hydrochloride (PG01037). The results of the current studies suggest that food restriction sensitized rats to the D2-mediated effects of pramipexole while having no effect

  16. CB2 receptor activation prevents glial-derived neurotoxic mediator production, BBB leakage and peripheral immune cell infiltration and rescues dopamine neurons in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young C; Shin, Won-Ho; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Baik, Hyung H; Kim, Sang R; Won, So-Yoon; Jin, Byung K

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid (CB2) receptor type 2 has been proposed to prevent the degeneration of dopamine neurons in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice. However, the mechanisms underlying CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotection in MPTP mice have not been elucidated. The mechanisms underlying CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotection of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) were evaluated in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by immunohistochemical staining (tyrosine hydroxylase, macrophage Ag complex-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and CD3 and CD68), real-time PCR and a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled albumin assay. Treatment with the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 (10 μg kg−1, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) prevented MPTP-induced degeneration of dopamine neurons in the SN and of their fibers in the striatum. This JWH-133-mediated neuroprotection was associated with the suppression of blood–brain barrier (BBB) damage, astroglial MPO expression, infiltration of peripheral immune cells and production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by activated microglia. The effects of JWH-133 were mimicked by the non-selective cannabinoid receptor WIN55,212 (10 μg kg−1, i.p.). The observed neuroprotection and inhibition of glial-mediated neurotoxic events were reversed upon treatment with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630, confirming the involvement of the CB2 receptor. Our results suggest that targeting the cannabinoid system may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, that are associated with glial activation, BBB disruption and peripheral immune cell infiltration.

  17. Inhibition of A9 and A10 dopamine cells by the cholecystokinin-B antagonist LY262691: mediation through feedback pathways from forebrain sites.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, K; Howbert, J J; Stockton, M E

    1993-10-01

    The diphenylpyrazolidinone cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) antagonist LY262691 has been shown to decrease the number of spontaneously active dopamine (DA) cells in the ventral tegmental area (A10) and substantia nigra (A9) of the anesthetized rat. In the present study, we examined the localization of the receptors mediating these effects of LY262691 on A9 and A10 DA cells. In one group of anesthetized rats, the effects of systemic administration of LY262691 on the number of spontaneously active A9 or A10 DA cells was determined using extracellular, single-unit recordings after radio frequency lesions were placed in the nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, or medial prefrontal cortex. Lesions of the caudate-putamen blocked the effects of systemically administered LY262691 on the number of spontaneously active A9, but not A10, DA cells. Conversely, lesions of the n. accumbens blocked the effects of systemically administered LY262691 on A10, but not A9, DA cells. Lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex blocked the effects of systemically administered LY262691 on both A9 and A10 DA cells. In a separate group of anesthetized rats, the number of spontaneously active A9 or A10 DA cells was determined after LY262691 was microinjected into the n. accumbens, caudate-putamen, or medial prefrontal cortex. Microinjection of LY262691 into the caudate-putamen led to a significant decrease in the number of spontaneously active A9, but not A10, DA cells. Conversely, microinjection of LY262691 into the n. accumbens or medial prefrontal cortex led to a significant decrease in the number of spontaneously active A10, but not A9, DA cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8259526

  18. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  4. Cav 1.3 L-type Ca ( 2+) channels mediate long-term adaptation in dopamine D2L-mediated GluA1 trafficking in the dorsal striatum following cocaine exposure.

    PubMed

    Schierberl, Kathryn; Giordano, Thomas; Satpute, Shirish; Hao, Jin; Kaur, Gagandeep; Hofmann, Franz; Moosmang, Sven; Striessnig, Joerg; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptor (AMPAR) plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the mesostriatal dopaminergic pathway has been implicated in persistent cocaine-induced behavioral responses; however, the precise mechanism underlying these changes remains unknown. Utilizing cocaine psychomotor sensitization in mice we find that repeated cocaine results in a basal reduction of Ser 845 GluA1 and cell surface GluA1 levels in the dorsal striatum (dStr) following a protracted withdrawal period, an adaptation that is dependent on Cav 1.3 channels but not those expressed in the VTA. We find that the basally-induced decrease in this phosphoprotein is the result of recruitment of the striatal dopamine D2 pathway, as evidenced by enhanced levels of D2 receptor (D2R) mRNA expression and D2R function as examined using the D2R antagonist, eticlopride, as well as alterations in the phosphorylation status of several downstream molecular targets of D2R's, including CREB, DARPP-32, Akt and GSK3β. Taken together with our recently published findings examining similar phenomena in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), these results underscore the utilization of divergent molecular mechanisms in the dStr, in mediating cocaine-induced persistent behavioral changes. PMID:22419037

  5. AAV2-mediated gene transfer of GDNF to the striatum of MPTP monkeys enhances the survival and outgrowth of co-implanted fetal dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, JD; Redmond, DE; Leranth, C; Bjugstad, KB; Sladek, JR; Collier, TJ; Foti, SB; Samulski, RJ; Vives, KP; Roth, RH

    2009-01-01

    Neural transplantation offers the potential of treating Parkinson’s disease by grafting fetal dopamine neurons to depleted regions of the brain. However, clinical studies of neural grafting in Parkinson’s disease have produced only modest improvements. One of the main reasons for this is the low survival rate of transplanted neurons. The inadequate supply of critical neurotrophic factors in the adult brain is likely to be a major cause of early cell death and restricted outgrowth of fetal grafts placed into the mature striatum. Glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that is crucial to the survival, outgrowth and maintenance of dopamine neurons, and so is a candidate for protecting grafted fetal dopamine neurons in the adult brain. We found that implantation of adeno-associated virus type 2 encoding GDNF (AAV2-GDNF) in the normal monkey caudate nucleus induced over-expression of GDNF that persisted for at least 6 months after injection. In a 6-month within-animal controlled study, AAV2-GDNF enhanced the survival of fetal dopamine neurons by 4-fold, and increased the outgrowth of grafted fetal dopamine neurons by almost 3-fold in the caudate nucleus of MPTP-treated monkeys, compared with control grafts in the other caudate nucleus. Thus, the addition of GDNF gene therapy to neural transplantation may be a useful strategy to improve treatment for Parkinson’s disease. PMID:18346734

  6. Effect of dopamine-related drugs on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine or propionitrile: prevention and aggravation may not be mediated by gastrointestinal secretory changes in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, G.; Brown, A.; Szabo, S.

    1987-03-01

    Dose- and time-response studies have been performed with dopamine agonists and antagonists using the cysteamine and propionitrile duodenal ulcer models in the rat. The experiments demonstrate that the chemically induced duodenal ulcer is prevented by bromocriptine, lergotrile and reduced by apomorphine or L-dopa. Aggravation of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was seen especially after (-)-butaclamol, (-)-sulpiride, haloperidol and, less effectively, after other dopaminergic antagonists. The duodenal antiulcerogenic action of dopamine agonists was more prominent after chronic administration than after a single dose, whereas the opposite was found concerning the proulcerogenic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the chronic gastric fistula rat, both the antiulcerogens bromocriptine or lergotrile and the proulcerogens haloperidol, pimozide or (-)-N-(2-chlorethyl)-norapomorphine decreased the cysteamine- or propionitrile-induced gastric secretion. No correlation was apparent between the influence of these drugs on duodenal ulcer development and gastric and duodenal (pancreatic/biliary) secretions. In the chronic duodenal fistula rat, decreased acid content was measured in the proximal duodenum after haloperidol, and diminished duodenal pepsin exposure was recorded after bromocriptine. Furthermore, the aggravation by dopamine antagonists of experimental duodenal ulcer probably involves a peripheral component. The site of dopamine receptors and physiologic effects which modulate experimental duodenal ulcer remain to be identified, but their elucidation may prove to be an important element in the pathogenesis and treatment of duodenal ulcer.

  7. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  8. The lateral mesopontine tegmentum regulates both tonic and phasic activity of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic studies have demonstrated that the mesolimbic dopamine system receives a substantial afferent input from a variety of regions ranging from the prefrontal cortex through to the brain stem. However, how these afferents regulate dopamine neuron activity is still largely unknown. The mesopontine tegmentum provides a significant input to ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons, and it has been demonstrated that discrete subdivisions within this region differentially alter dopamine neuron activity. Thus the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus provides a tonic input essential for maintaining burst firing of dopamine neurons, whereas the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPTg) nucleus regulates a transition from single-spike firing to burst firing. In contrast, the recently identified rostromedial tegmental nucleus provides an inhibitory input to the VTA and decreases spontaneous dopamine neuron activity. Here, we demonstrate that an area adjacent to the PPTg regulates both population activity as well as burst firing of VTA dopamine neurons. Specifically, N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) activation of the lateral mesopontine tegmentum produces an increase in the number of spontaneously active dopamine neurons and an increase in the average percentage of burst firing of dopamine neurons. This increase in neuronal activity was correlated with extracellular dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Taken together, we provide further evidence that the mesopontine tegmentum regulates discrete dopamine neuron activity states that are relevant for the understanding of dopamine system function in both normal and disease states. PMID:24004527

  9. Aspartate protects Lactobacillus casei against acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aspartate on the acid tolerance of L. casei. Acid stress induced the accumulation of intracellular aspartate in L. casei, and the acid-resistant mutant exhibited 32.5 % higher amount of aspartate than that of the parental strain at pH 4.3. Exogenous aspartate improved the growth performance and acid tolerance of Lactobacillus casei during acid stress. When cultivated in the presence of 50 mM aspartate, the biomass of cells increased 65.8 % compared with the control (without aspartate addition). In addition, cells grown at pH 4.3 with aspartate addition were challenged at pH 3.3 for 3 h, and the survival rate increased 42.26-fold. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the aspartate-supplemented cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. In addition, higher contents of intermediates involved in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle were observed in cells in the presence of aspartate. The increased contents of many amino acids including aspartate, arginine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine in aspartate-added cells may contribute to the regulation of pHi. Transcriptional analysis showed that the expression of argG and argH increased during acid stress, and the addition of aspartate induced 1.46- and 3.06-fold higher expressions of argG and argH, respectively, compared with the control. Results presented in this manuscript suggested that aspartate may protect L. casei against acid stress, and it may be used as a potential protectant during the production of probiotics. PMID:23292549

  10. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  11. ARF6 and GASP-1 are post-endocytic sorting proteins selectively involved in the intracellular trafficking of dopamine D2 receptors mediated by GRK and PKC in transfected cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, DI; Zheng, M; Min, C; Kwon, KJ; Shin, CY; Choi, HK; Kim, KM

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose GPCRs undergo both homologous and heterologous regulatory processes in which receptor phosphorylation plays a critical role. The protein kinases responsible for each pathway are well established; however, other molecular details that characterize each pathway remain unclear. In this study, the molecular mechanisms that determine the differences in the functional roles and intracellular trafficking between homologous and PKC-mediated heterologous internalization pathways for the dopamine D2 receptor were investigated. Experimental Approach All of the S/T residues located within the intracellular loops of D2 receptor were mutated, and the residues responsible for GRK- and PKC-mediated internalization were determined in HEK-293 cells and SH-SY5Y cells. The functional role of receptor internalization and the cellular components that determine the post-endocytic fate of internalized D2 receptors were investigated in the transfected cells. Key Results T134, T225/S228/S229 and S325 were involved in PKC-mediated D2 receptor desensitization. S229 and adjacent S/T residues mediated the PKC-dependent internalization of D2 receptors, which induced down-regulation and desensitization. S/T residues within the second intracellular loop and T225 were the major residues involved in GRK-mediated internalization of D2 receptors, which induced receptor resensitization. ARF6 mediated the recycling of D2 receptors internalized in response to agonist stimulation. In contrast, GASP-1 mediated the down-regulation of D2 receptors internalized in a PKC-dependent manner. Conclusions and Implications GRK- and PKC-mediated internalizations of D2 receptors occur through different intracellular trafficking pathways and mediate distinct functional roles. Distinct S/T residues within D2 receptors and different sorting proteins are involved in the dissimilar regulation of D2 receptors by GRK2 and PKC. PMID:23082996

  12. Direct dopamine D2-receptor-mediated modulation of arachidonic acid release in transfected CHO cells without the concomitant administration of a Ca2+-mobilizing agent

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christer L; Hellstrand, Monika; Ekman, Agneta; Eriksson, Elias

    1998-01-01

    In CHO cells transfected with the rat dopamine D2 receptor (long isoform), administration of dopamine per se elicited a concentration-dependent increase in arachidonic acid (AA) release. The maximal effect was 197% of controls (EC50=25 nM). The partial D2 receptor agonist, (−)-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propylpiperidine [(−)-3-PPP], also induced AA release, but with somewhat lower efficacy (maximal effect: 165%; EC50=91 nM). The AA-releasing effect of dopamine was counteracted by pertussis toxin, by the inhibitor of intracellular Ca2+ release, 8-(N N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), by excluding calcium from the medium, by the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, quinacrine, and by long-term pretreatment with the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). In addition, it was antagonized by the D2 antagonists, raclopride and (−)-sulpiride–but not by (+)-sulpiride–and absent in sham-transfected CHO cells devoid of D2 receptors. The results obtained contrast to the previous notion that dopamine and other D2 receptor agonists require the concomitant administration of calcium-mobilizing agents such as ATP, ionophore A-23187 (calcimycin), thrombin, and TRH, to influence AA release from various cell lines. PMID:9756380

  13. Dopamine autoreceptors and the effects of drugs on locomotion and dopamine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F.; Campbell, W.; Mitchell, P. J.; Randall, K.

    1985-01-01

    Criteria for distinguishing dopamine autoreceptor agonism from other mechanisms of inhibiting locomotion were examined, together with the relationship between inhibition of locomotion and dopamine synthesis. ED50 potencies to inhibit locomotion of mice were established for drugs from a number of categories. Spiperone 0.02 mg kg-1 significantly (P less than 0.05) reversed inhibition of locomotion by known dopamine agonists but not that by the other types of drug. Idazoxan antagonized inhibition of locomotion due to alpha 2-agonists but not dopamine agonists. RU 24926 (N-propyl-N,N-di[2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]amine) was antagonized by both spiperone and idazoxan. Only for dopamine agonists was there good correlation (r = 0.97) between potencies to inhibit locomotion in mice and L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) accumulation in the nucleus accumbens of rats treated with gamma-butyrolactone and 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine. The specific dopamine D1-agonist, SK&F 38393 (2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine), was inactive in both tests at doses up to 10 mg kg-1. The mixed dopamine agonist/antagonist, (-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine, commonly known as (-)-3-PPP, acted as a dopamine agonist in both tests but inhibited locomotion more potently than L-DOPA accumulation. The inhibitory effects of dopamine agonists on locomotion were not prevented by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine pretreatment. The data suggest that spiperone-reversible inhibition of locomotion in mice is a good criterion for dopamine autoreceptor agonists. The receptors involved are affected by low doses of both dopamine agonists and antagonists and seem similar to those involved in the autoreceptor mediated inhibition of dopamine synthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4005487

  14. The initial step in the archaeal aspartate biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by a monofunctional aspartokinase

    PubMed Central

    Faehnle, Christopher R.; Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Viola, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    The activation of the β-carboxyl group of aspartate catalyzed by aspartokinase is the commitment step to amino-acid biosynthesis in the aspartate pathway. The first structure of a microbial aspartokinase, that from Methanococcus jannaschii, has been determined in the presence of the amino-acid substrate l-­aspartic acid and the nucleotide product MgADP. The enzyme assembles into a dimer of dimers, with the interfaces mediated by both the N- and C-terminal domains. The active-site functional groups responsible for substrate binding and specificity have been identified and roles have been proposed for putative catalytic functional groups. PMID:17012784

  15. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bannon, Michael J. . E-mail: mbannon@med.wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  16. Comparison between the pharmacology of dopamine receptors mediating the inhibition of cell firing in rat brain slices through the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, B.; Rothwell, L. A.; Seabrook, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological recordings were made from presumed dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area of rat brain slices. The ability of selective dopamine receptor agonists to hyperpolarize neurones and inhibit cell firing, as well as the ability of dopamine receptor antagonists to block responses to quinpirole were compared. 2. Six dopamine receptor agonists were examined for their ability to hyperpolarize neurones within the substantia nigra pars compacta. Of these, the most potent ligand tested was naxagolide with an EC50 value of 20 nM and estimated maximum of 10 mV. The rank order of agonist potency was naxagolide > quinpirole > apomorphine > dopamine. 3. Quinpirole was more potent at inhibiting cell firing in the substantia nigra pars compacta (pIC50 = 7.65 +/ 0.06, n = 35) than in the ventral tegmental area (pIC50 = 7.24 +/- 0.06, n = 32; P < 0.01, Student's t test). 7-Hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), a putative D3 selective agonist, had a comparable potency to quinpirole in both the ventral tegmental area (pIC50 = 7.39 +/- 0.26, n = 4), and substantia nigra pars compacta (pIC50 = 7.71 +/- 0.20; n = 4). 4. The inhibition of cell firing by quinpirole was antagonized by haloperidol, S(-)-sulpiride, clozapine, and ritanserin. S(-)-sulpiride and haloperidol had the highest estimated affinities in the substantia nigra, with pA2 values of 8.97 (slope = 0.85) and 8.20 (slope = 2.09) respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921615

  17. Transition-metal-ion-mediated polymerization of dopamine: mussel-inspired approach for the facile synthesis of robust transition-metal nanoparticle-graphene hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Kong, Junhua; Zhou, Dan; Ang, Jia Ming; Phua, Si Lei; Yee, Wu Aik; Liu, Hai; Huang, Yizhong; Lu, Xuehong

    2014-06-16

    Inspired by the high transition-metal-ion content in mussel glues, and the cross-linking and mechanical reinforcement effects of some transition-metal ions in mussel threads, high concentrations of nickel(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions have been purposely introduced into the reaction system for dopamine polymerization. Kinetics studies were conducted for the Ni(2+)-dopamine system to investigate the polymerization mechanism. The results show that the Ni(2+) ions could accelerate the assembly of dopamine oligomers in the polymerization process. Spectroscopic and electron microscopic studies reveal that the Ni(2+) ions are chelated with polydopamine (PDA) units, forming homogeneous Ni(2+)-PDA complexes. This facile one-pot approach is utilized to construct transition-metal-ion-PDA complex thin coatings on graphene oxide, which can be carbonized to produce robust hybrid nanosheets with well-dispersed metallic nickel/metallic cobalt/manganese(II) oxide nanoparticles embedded in PDA-derived thin graphitic carbon layers. The nickel-graphene hybrid prepared by using this approach shows good catalytic properties and recyclability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol. PMID:24862644

  18. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  19. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  20. MicroRNA-9 and MicroRNA-326 Regulate Human Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression, and the MicroRNA-mediated Expression Regulation Is Altered by a Genetic Variant*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Sandra; Leites, Catherine; He, Deli; Schwartz, Daniel; Moy, Winton; Shi, Jianxin; Duan, Jubao

    2014-01-01

    The human dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Most antipsychotic drugs influence dopaminergic transmission through blocking dopamine receptors, primarily DRD2. We report here the post-transcriptional regulation of DRD2 expression by two brain-expressed microRNAs (miRs), miR-326 and miR-9, in an ex vivo mode, and show the relevance of miR-mediated DRD2 expression regulation in human dopaminergic neurons and in developing human brains. Both miRs targeted the 3′-UTR (untranslated region) of DRD2 in NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma, which endogenously expresses DRD2) and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cell lines, decreasing luciferase activity measured by a luciferase reporter gene assay. miR-326 overexpression reduced DRD2 mRNA and DRD2 receptor synthesis. Both antisense miR-326 and antisense miR-9 increased DRD2 protein abundance, suggesting an endogenous repression of DRD2 expression by both miRs. Furthermore, a genetic variant (rs1130354) within the DRD2 3′-UTR miR-targeting site interferes with miR-326-mediated repression of DRD2 expression. Finally, co-expression analysis identified an inverse correlation of DRD2 expression with both miR-326 and miR-9 in differentiating dopaminergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and in developing human brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. Our study provides empirical evidence suggesting that miR-326 and miR-9 may regulate dopaminergic signaling, and miR-326 and miR-9 may be considered as potential drug targets for the treatment of disorders involving abnormal DRD2 function, such as schizophrenia. PMID:24675081

  1. Nitrification of Aspartate by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, H. J.; Schmidt, E. L.

    1971-01-01

    Heterotrophic conversion of l-aspartic acid to nitrification products by Aspergillus flavus was studied in a replacement incubation system. Numerous amino acids supported nitrification; aspartate and glutamate were about equivalent as the best sources of nitrate. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to the incubation system substantially enhanced nitrate formation for all nitrifiable amino acids except aspartic acid, but the basis for the bicarbonate effect is obscure. The yield of nitrate from l-aspartate was not approached by forms of aspartic acid resulting from substitution on the beta carbon, the amino nitrogen, or the gamma carboxyl group or by aspartate presented as the d-configuration. There was no relationship between nitrate formation and the occurrence of such possible intermediates as nitrite, bound hydroxylamine, ammonia, aspergillic acid, and beta-nitropropionic acid. Uniformly labeled 14C-l-aspartate that was nitrified in replacement incubation led to no accumulation of label in possible nitrification products in the culture filtrate. Label was found in components of the mycelium after acid hydrolysis, with heaviest accumulation in what appeared to be glucosamine and an unidentified compound, possibly acetylglucosamine. Detectable label was redistributed into serine, glycine, and threonine. Images PMID:5549699

  2. Responses of in vivo renal microvessels to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Weis, S; Fleming, J; Dussel, R; Parekh, N

    1986-09-01

    The split hydronephrotic kidney preparation was used to directly observe the effects of locally applied dopamine on the in vivo diameters of renal vessels. Dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 3 X 10(-5) M) produced a concentration-dependent dilation of the arcuate and interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles. Efferent arterioles near the glomeruli also dilated to dopamine but the dilation was less than that of the preglomerular vessels. Higher dopamine concentrations (3 X 10(-4) and 1 X 10(-3) M) produced more variable effects, with a tendency for the arcuate and interlobular arteries and the afferent and efferent arterioles away from the glomeruli to decrease in diameter. After pretreatment with haloperidol, dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 1 X 10(-4) M) did not dilate any pre- or postglomerular vascular segment, but the tendency for pre- and postglomerular constrictions with higher dopamine concentrations were not abolished. Pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol enhanced the dilator response of the pre- and postglomerular vessels (except the afferent arterioles near glomeruli and efferent arterioles near welling points) to dopamine (3 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M), and abolished the reductions in diameter produced by the high dopamine levels. These data indicate that the dilator effect of dopamine is mediated by interactions with specific dopaminergic receptors, while alpha and beta adrenergic receptors appear to mediate a constrictor influence observed with high dopamine concentrations. The overall effect of dopamine on the renal vessel diameters thus appears to depend on the balance of dilator and constrictor stimuli mediated by multiple receptors. PMID:3023735

  3. Dopamine: the rewarding years

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has moved from being an insignificant intermediary in the formation of noradrenaline in 1957 to its present-day position as a major neurotransmitter in the brain. This neurotransmitter is involved in the control of movement and Parkinson's disease, the neurobiology and symptoms of schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is also considered an essential element in the brain reward system and in the action of many drugs of abuse. This evolution reflects the ability of several famous names in neuropharmacology, neurology and psychiatry to apply new techniques to ask and answer the right questions. There is now excellent knowledge about the metabolism of dopamine, dopamine receptor systems and the structural organisation of dopamine pathways in the brain. Less is known about the function of the different receptors and how the various dopamine pathways are organised to produce normal behaviour, which exhibits disruption in the disease states mentioned. In particular, we have very limited information as to why and how the dopamine system dies or becomes abnormal in Parkinson's disease or a neurodevelopmental disorder such as schizophrenia. Dopamine neurones account for less than 1% of the total neuronal population of the brain, but have a profound effect on function. The future challenge is to understand how dopamine is involved in the integration of information to produce a relevant response rather than to study dopamine in isolation from other transmission systems. This integrated approach should lead to greater understanding and improved treatment of diseases involving dopamine. PMID:16402097

  4. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to inject subcutaneously ( ... it is colored, cloudy, thickened, or contains solid particles. If you are using insulin aspart suspension, the ...

  5. Dopamine-oxytocin interactions in penile erection.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, T A; Allard, J; Wayman, C; Douglas, A J

    2009-12-01

    Dopamine and oxytocin have established roles in the central regulation of penile erection in rats; however, the neural circuitries involved in a specific erectile context and the interaction between dopamine and oxytocin mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The medial preoptic area (MPOA), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus may serve as candidate sites because they contain oxytocin cells, receive dopaminergic inputs and have been implicated in mediating masculine sexual behavior. Double immunofluorescence revealed that substantial numbers of oxytocin cells in the MPOA, SON and PVN possess dopamine D(2), D(3) and D(4) receptors. In anaesthetized rats, using intracavernous pressure as a physiological indicator of erection, blockade of lumbosacral oxytocin receptors (UK, 427843) reduced erectile responses to a nonselective dopamine agonist (apomorphine), suggesting that dopamine recruits a paraventriculospinal oxytocin pathway. In conscious males in the absence of a female, penile erection elicited by a D(2)/D(3) (Quinelorane) but not D(4) (PD168077) agonist was associated with activation of medial parvocellular PVN oxytocin cells. In another experiment where males were given full access to a receptive female, a D(4) (L-745870) but not D(2) or D(3) antagonist (L-741626; nafadotride) inhibited penile erection (intromission), and this was correlated with SON magnocellular oxytocin neuron activation. Together, the data suggest dopamine's effects on hypothalamic oxytocin cells during penile erection are context-specific. Dopamine may act via different parvocellular and magnocellular oxytocin subpopulations to elicit erectile responses, depending upon whether intromission is performed. This study demonstrates the potential existence of interaction between central dopamine and oxytocin pathways during penile erection, with the SON and PVN serving as integrative sites. PMID:20128851

  6. Differential Roles for Dopamine D1-Like and D2-Like Receptors in Mediating the Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine: Convergent Evidence from Pharmacological and Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Collins, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies by Drs. Barak Caine, James Woods, Gregory Collins, Jonathan Katz and Takato Hiranita demonstrated a novel and unique reinforcing effect using dopamine (DA) D2-like receptor [D2-like R: D2, D3, and D4 receptor subtypes (respectively, D2R, D3R, and D4R)] agonists in rats and genetically modified mice. In order to understand how important their findings are, a comparison was made regarding the reinforcing effects of DA D2-like R full agonists with those of DA uptake inhibitors and of a DA D1-like receptor [D1-like R, D1 and D5 receptor subtypes (D1R and D5R)] full agonist (±)-SKF 82958. PMID:27390753

  7. A pivotal role of FOS-mediated BECN1/Beclin 1 upregulation in dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist-induced autophagy activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Da; Cao, Yu-Lan; Li, Qian; Yang, Ya-Ping; Jin, Mengmeng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Fen; Wang, Guang-Hui; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). BECN1/Beclin 1 acts as a critical regulator of autophagy and other cellular processes; yet, little is known about the function and regulation of BECN1 in PD. In this study, we report that dopamine D2 and D3 receptor (DRD2 and DRD3) activation by pramipexole and quinpirole could enhance BECN1 transcription and promote autophagy activation in several cell lines, including PC12, MES23.5 and differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, and also in tyrosine hydroxylase positive primary midbrain neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) binding sequence (5′-TGCCTCA-3′) in the rat and human Becn1/BECN1 promoter and uncovered an essential role of FOS binding in the enhancement of Becn1 transcription in PC12 cells in response to the dopamine agonist(s). In addition, we demonstrated a critical role of intracellular Ca2+ elevation, followed by the enhanced phosphorylation of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) and CREB (cAMP responsive element binding protein) in the increases of FOS expression and autophagy activity. More importantly, pramipexole treatment ameliorated the SNCA/α-synuclein accumulation in rotenone-treated PC12 cells that overexpress wild-type or A53T mutant SNCA by promoting autophagy flux. This effect was also demonstrated in the substantia nigra and the striatum of SNCAA53T transgenic mice. The inhibition of SNCA accumulation by pramipexole was attenuated by cotreatment with the DRD2 and DRD3 antagonists and Becn1 siRNAs. Thus, our findings suggest that DRD2 and DRD3 agonist(s) may induce autophagy activation via a BECN1-dependent pathway and have the potential to reduce SNCA accumulation in PD. PMID:26649942

  8. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  9. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D/sub 1/ class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D/sub 1/ class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D/sub 1/ receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D/sub 1/ receptors and (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated.

  10. Identification of a dopamine pathway that regulates sleep and arousal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Endo, Keita; Ito, Kei; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2012-11-01

    Sleep is required to maintain physiological functions, including memory, and is regulated by monoamines across species. Enhancement of dopamine signals by a mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) decreases sleep, but the underlying dopamine circuit responsible for this remains unknown. We found that the D1 dopamine receptor (DA1) in the dorsal fan-shaped body (dFSB) mediates the arousal effect of dopamine in Drosophila. The short sleep phenotype of the DAT mutant was completely rescued by an additional mutation in the DA1 (also known as DopR) gene, but expression of wild-type DA1 in the dFSB restored the short sleep phenotype. We found anatomical and physiological connections between dopamine neurons and the dFSB neuron. Finally, we used mosaic analysis with a repressive marker and found that a single dopamine neuron projecting to the FSB activated arousal. These results suggest that a local dopamine pathway regulates sleep. PMID:23064381

  11. Induced synthesis of P450 aromatase and 17β-estradiol by D-aspartate in frog brain.

    PubMed

    Burrone, Lavinia; Santillo, Alessandra; Pinelli, Claudia; Baccari, Gabriella Chieffi; Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena

    2012-10-15

    D-Aspartic acid is an endogenous amino acid occurring in the endocrine glands as well as in the nervous system of various animal phyla. Our previous studies have provided evidence that D-aspartate plays a role in the induction of estradiol synthesis in gonads. Recently, we have also demonstrated that D-aspartic acid induces P450 aromatase mRNA expression in the frog (Pelophylax esculentus) testis. P450 aromatase is the key enzyme in the estrogen synthetic pathway and irreversibly converts testosterone into 17β-estradiol. In this study, we firstly investigated the immunolocalisation of P450 aromatase in the brain of P. esculentus, which has never previously been described in amphibians. Therefore, to test the hypothesis that d-aspartate mediates a local synthesis of P450 aromatase in the frog brain, we administered D-aspartate in vivo to male frogs and then assessed brain aromatase expression, sex hormone levels and sex hormone receptor expression. We found that D-aspartate enhances brain aromatase expression (mRNA and protein) through the CREB pathway. Then, P450 aromatase induces 17β-estradiol production from testosterone, with a consequent increase of its receptor. Therefore, the regulation of d-aspartate-mediated P450 aromatase expression could be an important step in the control of neuroendocrine regulation of the reproductive axis. Accordingly, we found that the sites of P450 aromatase immunoreactivity in the frog brain correspond to the areas known to be involved in neurosteroid synthesis. PMID:22771744

  12. Involvement of estrogen receptors in the resveratrol-mediated increase in dopamine transporter in human dopaminergic neurons and in striatum of female mice.

    PubMed

    Di Liberto, Valentina; Mäkelä, Johanna; Korhonen, Laura; Olivieri, Melania; Tselykh, Timofey; Mälkiä, Annika; Do Thi, Hai; Belluardo, Natale; Lindholm, Dan; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with resveratrol (RSV) has been shown to protect vulnerable neurons after various brain injuries and in neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanisms for the effects of RSV in brain are not fully understood, but RSV may affect the expression of various gene products. RSV is structurally related to the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol so the effects of RSV may be gender-specific. Here we studied the role of RSV in the regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum using male and female mice. The basic levels of DAT in the striatum showed no sex difference, but the levels increased significantly by RSV (20 mg/kg i.p.) in female but not in male mice. Pretreatment of mice with the selective estrogen receptor (ER), ERα- and ERβ antagonist ICI 182,780, led to a complete block of RSV effect on DAT protein levels, suggesting that ERs are involved in the up-regulation of DAT by RSV. Similar data was also obtained in culture using human MESC2.10 and mouse SN4741 dopaminergic cells after treatment with RSV. Data further showed that RSV specifically induced gene transcription of DAT in the dopaminergic cells. These results show that estrogen receptors are involved in the up-regulation of DAT by RSV in the dopaminergic neurons, demonstrating a sex-dependent effect of RSV in the brain that may be of clinical importance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'. PMID:22041555

  13. Acute and Long-Term Response of Dopamine Nigrostriatal Synapses to a Single Low Dose Episode of 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Mediated Chemical Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cynthia A.; Akopian, Garnik; Ring, Justin; Jakowec, Michael W.; Petzinger, Giselle M.; Andersen, Julie K.; Vittozzi-Wong, Philip; Wang, Kristie; Farley, Cristal M.; Charntikov, Sergios; Mitroi, Danut; Beal, M. Flint; Chow, Robert; Walsh, John P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation was to determine the persistence of striatal dopaminergic dysfunction after a mild chemically-induced hypoxic event in Fisher 344 rats. To this end, we gave a single injection of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 16.5 mg/kg, i.p.) to 2 month old male F344 rats and measured various indices of striatal dopaminergic functioning and lipid peroxidation over a 3 month span. Separate groups of rats were used to measure rod walking, evoked dopamine (DA) release, DA content, MDA accumulation, DA receptor binding, and tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The results showed that 3-NP exposure reduced most measures of DA functioning including motoric ability, DA release, and D2 receptor densities for 1 to 3 months post drug administration. Interestingly, DA content was reduced 1 week after 3-NP exposure, but rose to 147% of control values 1 month after 3-NP treatment. MDA accumulation, a measure of lipid peroxidation activity, was increased 24 hr and 1 month after 3-NP treatment. 3-NP did not affect tyrosine hydroxylase activity, suggesting that alterations in DA functioning were not the result of nigrostriatal terminal loss. These data demonstrate that a brief mild hypoxic episode caused by 3-NP exposure has long-term detrimental effects on the functioning of the nigrostriatal DA system. PMID:20730800

  14. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  15. Stimulants as Specific Inducers of Dopamine-Independent σ Agonist Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    A previous study showed that cocaine self-administration induced dopamine-independent reinforcing effects of σ agonists mediated by their selective actions at σ1 receptors (σ1Rs), which are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in abuse-related effects of stimulants. The present study assessed whether the induction was specific to self-administration of cocaine. Rats were trained to self-administer the dopamine releaser, d-methamphetamine (0.01–0.32 mg/kg per injection), the μ-opioid receptor agonist, heroin (0.001–0.032 mg/kg per injection), and the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/channel antagonist ketamine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection). As with cocaine, self-administration of d-methamphetamine induced reinforcing effects of the selective σ1R agonists PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride] and (+)-pentazocine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection, each). In contrast, neither self-administration of heroin nor ketamine induced PRE-084 or (+)-pentazocine (0.032–10 mg/kg per injection, each) self-administration. Although the σ1R agonists did not maintain responding in subjects with histories of heroin or ketamine self-administration, substitution for those drugs was obtained with appropriate agonists (e.g., remifentanil, 0.1–3.2 µg/kg per injection, for heroin and (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ((+)-MK 801; dizocilpine), 0.32–10.0 µg/kg per injection, for ketamine). The σR antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008; 1.0–10 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. In contrast, PRE-084 self-administration was affected neither by the dopamine receptor antagonist (+)-butaclamol (10–100 μg/kg) nor by the opioid antagonist (−)-naltrexone (1.0–10 mg/kg), whereas these antagonists were active

  16. The Role of De Novo Catecholamine Synthesis in Mediating Methylmercury-Induced Vesicular Dopamine Release From Rat Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, William D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize methylmercury (MeHg)–induced dopamine (DA) release from undifferentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and to examine the potential role for DA synthesis in this process. MeHg caused a significant increase in DA release that was both concentration- and time-dependent. DA release was significantly increased by 2µM MeHg at 60min and by 5µM MeHg at 30min; 1µM MeHg was without effect. Because DA release induced by 5µM MeHg was associated with a significant percentage of cell death at 60 and 120min, 2µM MeHg was chosen for further characterization of release mechanisms. MeHg-induced DA release was attenuated but not abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium, whereas the vesicular content depleting drug reserpine (50nM) abolished release. Thus, MeHg-induced DA release requires vesicular exocytosis but not extracellular calcium. MeHg also increased intracellular DA and the rate of DA storage utilization, suggesting a role for DA synthesis in MeHg-induced DA release. The tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor α-methyltyrosine (300µM, 24h) completely abolished MeHg-induced DA release. MeHg significantly increased DA precursor accumulation in cells treated with 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (10µM), revealing that MeHg increases tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Overall, these data demonstrate that MeHg facilitates DA synthesis, increases intracellular DA, and augments vesicular exocytosis. PMID:23425605

  17. The NOP (ORL1) receptor antagonist Compound B stimulates mesolimbic dopamine release and is rewarding in mice by a non-NOP-receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Miwako; Sakoori, Kazuto; Midorikawa, Naoko; Murphy, Niall P

    2004-09-01

    1. Compound B (1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one, CompB) is a nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antagonist showing high selectivity for the NOP (ORL1) receptor over classical opioid receptors. We studied the effect of subcutaneous CompB administration on the release of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) and the expression of hedonia in mice. 2. CompB (0.3-30 mg kg(-1)) dose dependently stimulated mesolimbic DA release as measured by in vivo freely moving microdialysis, without any change in locomotor activity. However, intracerebroventricular administered N/OFQ (endogenous agonist of the NOP receptor, 6 nmol) did not influence CompB- (10 mg kg(-1)) induced DA release, despite clearly suppressing release when administered alone. 3. Studies using NOP receptor knockout mice and no-net-flux microdialysis revealed mildly, but not statistically significantly higher endogenous DA levels in mice lacking the NOP receptor compared to wild-type mice. Administration of CompB (10 mg kg(-1)) induced identical increases in mesolimbic DA release in wild-type and NOP receptor knockout mice. 4. CompB was rewarding in approximately the same dose range in which CompB induced major increases in mesolimbic DA release when assayed using a conditioned place preference paradigm. The rewarding effect of CompB (30 mg kg(-1)) was maintained in NOP receptor knockout mice. 5. These results show that CompB stimulates mesolimbic DA release and is rewarding by an action independent of the NOP receptor, the precise site of which is unclear. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of studies using this drug, particularly when administered by a peripheral route. PMID:15289286

  18. Catecholamines up Integrates Dopamine Synthesis and Synaptic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ferdousy, Faiza; Lawal, Hakeem; Huang, Zhinong; Daigle, J. Gavin; Izevbaye, Iyare; Doherty, Olugbenga; Thomas, Jerrad; Stathakis, Dean G; O’Donnell, Janis M.

    2011-01-01

    The highly reactive nature of dopamine renders dopaminergic neurons vulnerable to oxidative damage. We recently demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila gene Catecholamines up (Catsup) elevate dopamine pools but, paradoxically, also confer resistance to paraquat, an herbicide that induces oxidative stress-mediated toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. We now report a novel association of the membrane protein, Catsup, with GTP cyclohydrolase rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase, rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis, which requires BH4 as a cofactor. Loss-of-function Catsup mutations cause dominant hyperactivation of both enzymes. Elevated dopamine levels in Catsup mutants coincide with several distinct characteristics, including hypermobility, minimal basal levels of 3,4-Dihydroxy-Phenylacetic Acid, an oxidative metabolite of dopamine, and resistance to the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter inhibitor, reserpine, suggesting that excess dopamine is synaptically active and that Catsup functions in the regulation of synaptic vesicle loading and release of dopamine. We conclude that Catsup regulates and links the dopamine synthesis and transport networks. PMID:21985068

  19. Functional characterization of dopamine transporter in vivo using Drosophila melanogaster behavioral assays.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Taro; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine mediates diverse functions such as motivation, reward, attention, learning/memory and sleep/arousal. Recent studies using model organisms including the fruit fly, have elucidated various physiological functions of dopamine, and identified specific neural circuits for these functions. Flies with mutations in the Drosophila dopamine transporter (dDAT) gene show enhanced dopamine signaling, and short sleep and memory impairment phenotypes. However, understanding the mechanism by which dopamine signaling causes these phenotypes requires an understanding of the dynamics of dopamine release. Here we report the effects of dDAT expression on behavioral traits. We show that dDAT expression in a subset of dopaminergic neurons is sufficient for normal sleep. dDAT expression in other cell types such as Kenyon cells and glial cells can also rescue the short sleep phenotype of dDAT mutants. dDAT mutants also show a down-regulation of the D1-like dopamine receptor dDA1, and this phenotype is rescued when dDAT is expressed in the same cell types in which it rescues sleep. On the other hand, dDAT overexpression in mushroom bodies, which are the target of memory forming dopamine neurons, abolishes olfactory aversive memory. Our data demonstrate that expression of extrasynaptic dopamine transporters can rescue some aspects of dopamine signaling in dopamine transporter mutants. These results provide novel insights into regulatory systems that modulate dopamine signaling. PMID:25232310

  20. Action of aspartate on the /sup 32/Pi incorporation into phospholipids of cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    de Scarnati, O.C.; Sato, M.; De Robertis, E.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of L-aspartate on the /sup 32/Pi incorporation of phospholipids, was studied on slices of rat cerebral cortex. This amino acid produced an inhibitory effect in concentrations 0.01-10 mM, which was more evident at 120 min. This effect was not stereospecific and did not imply a change in Pi uptake and in nucleotides approximating P precursors. The inhibition was present in PS, PC, PE and to a lesser extent in Pi. On liver slices 1 mM L-aspartate had the opposite effect, stimulating the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into total phospholipids. Our results suggest that the effect of L-aspartate is by a non-specific mechanism, probably not mediated by a receptor.

  1. RalA employs GRK2 and β-arrestins for the filamin A-mediated regulation of trafficking and signaling of dopamine D2 and D3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaohan; Sun, NingNing; Min, Chengchun; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-08-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is known to act as platform for the signaling and intracellular trafficking of various GPCRs including dopamine D2 and D3 receptors (D2R, D3R). To understand molecular mechanisms involved in the FLNA-mediated regulation of D2R and D3R, comparative studies were conducted on the signaling and intracellular trafficking of the D2R and D3R in FLNA-knockdown cells, with a specific focus on the roles of the proteins that interact with FLNA and the D2R and D3R. Lowering the level of cellular FLNA caused an elevation in RalA activity and resulted in selective interference with the normal intracellular trafficking and signaling of the D2R and D3R, through GRK2 and β-arrestins, respectively. Knockdown of FLNA or coexpression of active RalA interfered with the recycling of the internalized D2R and resulted in the development of receptor tolerance. Active RalA was found to interact with GRK2 to sequester it from D2R. Knockdown of FLNA or coexpression of active RalA prevented D3R from coupling with G protein. The selective involvement of GRK2- and β-arrestins in the RalA-mediated cellular processes of the D2R and D3R was achieved via their different modes of interactions with the receptor and their distinct functional roles in receptor regulation. Our results show that FLNA is a multi-functional protein that acts as a platform on which D2R and D3R can interact with various proteins, through which selective regulation of these receptors occurs in combination with GRK2 and β-arrestins. PMID:27188791

  2. Highly sensitive isotope-dilution liquid-chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem-mass spectrometry approach to study the drug-mediated modulation of dopamine and serotonin levels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fabian; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kleuser, Burkhard; Gulbins, Erich; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Aschner, Michael; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (SRT) are monoamine neurotransmitters that play a key role in regulating the central and peripheral nervous system. Their impaired metabolism has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Consequently, it is imperative to monitor changes in levels of these low-abundant neurotransmitters and their role in mediating disease. For the first time, a rapid, specific and sensitive isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of DA and SRT in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This model organism offers a unique approach for studying the effect of various drugs and environmental conditions on neurotransmitter levels, given by the conserved DA and SRT biology, including synaptic release, trafficking and formation. We introduce a novel sample preparation protocol incorporating the usage of sodium thiosulfate in perchloric acid as extraction medium that assures high recovery of the relatively unstable neurotransmitters monitored. Moreover, the use of both deuterated internal standards and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique allows for unequivocal quantification. Thereby, to the best of our knowledge, we achieve a detection sensitivity that clearly exceeds those of published DA and SRT quantification methods in various matrices. We are the first to show that exposure of C. elegans to the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor selegiline or the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone, in order to block DA and SRT degradation, resulted in accumulation of the respective neurotransmitter. Assessment of a behavioral output of the dopaminergic system (basal slowing response) corroborated the analytical LC-MS/MS data. Thus, utilization of the C. elegans model system in conjunction with our analytical method is well-suited to investigate drug-mediated modulation of the DA and

  3. A Single Aspartate Coordinates Two Catalytic Steps in Hedgehog Autoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-08-31

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is driven by the cholesterol-modified Hh ligand, generated by autoprocessing of Hh precursor protein. Two steps in Hh autoprocessing, N-S acyl shift and transesterification, must be coupled for efficient Hh cholesteroylation and downstream signal transduction. In the present study, we show that a conserved aspartate residue, D46 of the Hh autoprocessing domain, coordinates these two catalytic steps. Mutagenesis demonstrated that D46 suppresses non-native Hh precursor autoprocessing and is indispensable for transesterification with cholesterol. NMR measurements indicated that D46 has a pKa of 5.6, ∼2 units above the expected pKa of aspartate, due to a hydrogen-bond between protonated D46 and a catalytic cysteine residue. However, the deprotonated form of D46 side chain is also essential, because a D46N mutation cannot mediate cholesteroylation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the proton shuttling of D46 side chain mechanistically couples the two steps of Hh cholesteroylation. PMID:27529645

  4. Efficient aspartic acid production by a psychrophile-based simple biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Takahisa; Hamada, Mai; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2015-10-01

    We previously constructed a Psychrophile-based Simple bioCatalyst (PSCat) reaction system, in which psychrophilic metabolic enzymes are inactivated by heat treatment, and used it here to study the conversion of aspartic acid from fumaric acid mediated by the activity of aspartate ammonia-lyase (aspartase). In Escherichia coli, the biosynthesis of aspartic acid competes with that of L-malic acid produced from fumaric acid by fumarase. In this study, E. coli aspartase was expressed in psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 heat treated at 50 °C for 15 min. The resultant PSCat could convert fumaric acid to aspartic acid without the formation of L-malic acid because of heat inactivation of psychrophilic fumarase activity. Furthermore, alginate-immobilized PSCat produced high yields of aspartic acid and could be re-used nine times. The results of our study suggest that PSCat can be applied in biotechnological production as a new approach to increase the yield of target compounds. PMID:26254042

  5. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms. PMID:25509166

  6. Aspartate aminotransferase activity in human healthy and inflamed dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C; Tripodi, D; Perinetti, G; Piattelli, A

    2001-06-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) seems to be an important mediator of inflammatory processes. Its role in the progression and detection of inflammatory periodontal disease has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In the present study AST activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis, and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic AST activity showed that the control values for the healthy pulps were 4.8 +/- 0.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. In reversible pulpitis specimens the AST activity increased to 7.98 +/- 2.1 units/mg of pulp tissue. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values decreased to 2.28 +/- 1.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. Differences between the groups (control versus reversible pulpitis and reversible pulpitis versus irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant (p = 0.0015). These results could point to a role of AST in the early events that lead to development of pulpal inflammation. PMID:11487132

  7. Dopamine agonists rescue Aβ-induced LTP impairment by Src-family tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Yuan Xiang, PingAn; Janc, Oliwia; Grochowska, Katarzyna M; Kreutz, Michael R; Reymann, Klaus G

    2016-04-01

    Soluble forms of oligomeric amyloid beta (AβO) are involved in the loss of synaptic plasticity and memory, especially in early phases of Alzheimer's disease. Stimulation of dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1R/D5R) is known to increase surface expression of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate subtype glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype glutamate receptors and facilitates the induction of the late phase of long-term potentiation (LTP), probably via a related mechanism. In this study, we show that the D1/D5R agonist SKF38393 protects LTP of hippocampal CA1 synapses from the deleterious action of oligomeric amyloid beta. Unexpectedly, the D1R/D5R-mediated recovery of LTP is independent of protein kinase A or phospholipase C pathways. Instead, we found that the inhibition of Src-family tyrosine kinases completely abolished the protective effects of D1R/D5R stimulation in a cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:26973108

  8. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C.; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J.; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N.; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P.; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca2+-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2−/− mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2−/− mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the IA potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive–delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  9. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L W; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-12-18

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the I(A) potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive-delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  10. Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) and dopamine DA1 agonist-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase in renal tubule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meister, B; Fryckstedt, J; Schalling, M; Cortés, R; Hökfelt, T; Aperia, A; Hemmings, H C; Nairn, A C; Ehrlich, M; Greengard, P

    1989-01-01

    The cellular localization of DARPP-32, a dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000 that appears to mediate certain actions of dopamine in the mammalian brain by acting as an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1, was studied in the kidney of several species. DARPP-32 mRNA and DARPP-32-like immunoreactivity were found in the cytoplasm of cells in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The specific dopamine DA1 agonist SKF 82526 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase activity, which could be blocked by SCH 23390, a specific DA1 antagonist, and by PKI-(5-24) amide, a specific inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The results indicate that DA1 dopamine receptors and DARPP-32, an intracellular third messenger for dopamine, are part of the signal-transduction process for dopamine acting on renal tubule cells. Images PMID:2573060

  11. Antidepressant activity of aspartic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Petrov, V I; Sergeev, V S; Onishchenko, N V; Piotrovskii, L B

    2001-04-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-phenyl(benzyl)amino derivatives of aspartic acid was studied on various experimental models of depression. IEM-1770 (30 mg/kg) and IEM-1944 (20 mg/kg) exhibited antidepressant activity after single injection in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Antidepressant effect of 14-day administration of these compounds and reference drugs maprotiline (10 mg/kg) and citalopram (10 mg/kg) was confirmed on the model of learned helplessness. PMID:11550022

  12. Discriminative stimulus properties of 1.25mg/kg clozapine in rats: Mediation by serotonin 5-HT2 and dopamine D4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Prus, Adam J; Wise, Laura E; Pehrson, Alan L; Philibin, Scott D; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Arnt, Jørn; Porter, Joseph H

    2016-10-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine remains one of most effective treatments for schizophrenia, given a lack of extrapyramidal side effects, improvements in negative symptoms, cognitive impairment, and in symptoms in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The adverse effects of clozapine, including agranulocytosis, make finding a safe clozapine-like a drug a goal for drug developers. The drug discrimination paradigm is a model of interoceptive stimulus that has been used in an effort to screen experimental drugs for clozapine-like atypical antipsychotic effects. The present study was conducted to elucidate the receptor-mediated stimulus properties that form this clozapine discriminative cue by testing selective receptor ligands in rats trained to discriminate a 1.25mg/kg dose of clozapine from vehicle in a two choice drug discrimination task. Full substitution occurred with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist M100907 and the two preferential D4/5-HT2/α1 receptor antagonists Lu 37-114 ((S)-1-(3-(2-(4-(1H-indol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)indolin-1-yl)ethan-1-one) and Lu 37-254 (1-(3-(4-(1H-indol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one). Partial substitution occurred with the D4 receptor antagonist Lu 38-012 and the α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Drugs selective for 5-HT2C, 5-HT6 muscarinic, histamine H1, and benzodiazepine receptors did not substitute for clozapine. The present findings suggest that 5-HT2A inverse agonism and D4 receptor antagonism mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of 1.25mg/kg clozapine in rats, and further confirm that clozapine produces a complex compound discriminative stimulus. PMID:27502027

  13. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    modulate the activity and/or Dopamine synthesis of substantial numbers of tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons at the somatic and terminal level. The immunohistochemical work also gives support to the view that dopamine D1 receptors and/or dopamine D2 receptors in the lateral palisade zone by mediating dopamine volume transmission may contribute to the inhibition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone release from nerve terminals in this region. PMID:25308843

  14. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  15. Maternal Immune Activation Disrupts Dopamine System in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Lecca, Salvatore; Melis, Miriam; De Felice, Marta; Cadeddu, Francesca; Frau, Roberto; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Fadda, Paola; Devoto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background: In utero exposure to maternal viral infections is associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a supposed neurodevelopmental origin, including schizophrenia. Hence, immune response factors exert a negative impact on brain maturation that predisposes the offspring to the emergence of pathological phenotypes later in life. Although ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons and their target regions play essential roles in the pathophysiology of psychoses, it remains to be fully elucidated how dopamine activity and functionality are disrupted in maternal immune activation models of schizophrenia. Methods: Here, we used an immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disruption model based on prenatal administration of the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid in rats, which mimics a viral infection and recapitulates behavioral abnormalities relevant to psychiatric disorders in the offspring. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by brain microdialysis in both the nucleus accumbens shell and the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area were studied by in vivo electrophysiology. Results: Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid-treated animals, at adulthood, displayed deficits in sensorimotor gating, memory, and social interaction and increased baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the prefrontal cortex. In polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid rats, dopamine neurons showed reduced spontaneously firing rate and population activity. Conclusions: These results confirm that maternal immune activation severely impairs dopamine system and that the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid model can be considered a proper animal model of a psychiatric condition that fulfills a multidimensional set of validity criteria predictive of a human pathology. PMID:26819283

  16. VPS35 in Dopamine Neurons Is Required for Endosome-to-Golgi Retrieval of Lamp2a, a Receptor of Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy That Is Critical for α-Synuclein Degradation and Prevention of Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fu-Lei; Erion, Joanna R.; Tian, Yun; Liu, Wei; Yin, Dong-Min; Ye, Jian; Tang, Baisha; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting-35 (VPS35) is essential for endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Mutations in the VPS35 gene have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant PD. However, it remains poorly understood if and how VPS35 deficiency or mutation contributes to PD pathogenesis. Here we provide evidence that links VPS35 deficiency to PD-like neuropathology. VPS35 was expressed in mouse dopamine (DA) neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and STR (striatum)—regions that are PD vulnerable. VPS35-deficient mice exhibited PD-relevant deficits including accumulation of α-synuclein in SNpc-DA neurons, loss of DA transmitter and DA neurons in SNpc and STR, and impairment of locomotor behavior. Further mechanical studies showed that VPS35-deficient DA neurons or DA neurons expressing PD-linked VPS35 mutant (D620N) had impaired endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 2a (Lamp2a) and accelerated Lamp2a degradation. Expression of Lamp2a in VPS35-deficient DA neurons reduced α-synuclein, supporting the view for Lamp2a as a receptor of chaperone-mediated autophagy to be critical for α-synuclein degradation. These results suggest that VPS35 deficiency or mutation promotes PD pathogenesis and reveals a crucial pathway, VPS35-Lamp2a-α-synuclein, to prevent PD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT VPS35 is a key component of the retromer complex that is essential for endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Mutations in the VPS35 gene have been identified in patients with PD. However, if and how VPS35 deficiency or mutation contributes to PD pathogenesis remains unclear. We demonstrated that VPS35 deficiency or mutation (D620N) in mice leads to α-synuclein accumulation and aggregation in the substantia nigra, accompanied with DA neurodegeneration. VPS35-deficient DA neurons exhibit impaired endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of Lamp2a, which may contribute to the reduced α-synuclein degradation through

  17. Moderate Alcohol Exposure during the Rat Equivalent to the Third Trimester of Human Pregnancy Alters Regulation of GABAA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Dopamine in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Marvin Rafael; Jotty, Karick; Locke, Jason L; Jones, Sara R; Valenzuela, Carlos Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Fetal ethanol (EtOH) exposure leads to a range of neurobehavioral alterations, including deficits in emotional processing. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a critical role in modulating emotional processing, in part, via dopamine (DA) regulation of GABA transmission. This BLA modulatory system is acquired during the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy) and we hypothesized that it could be altered by EtOH exposure during this period. We found that exposure of rats to moderate levels of EtOH vapor during the third trimester-equivalent [postnatal days (P) 2-12] alters DA modulation of GABAergic transmission in BLA pyramidal neurons during periadolescence. Specifically, D1R-mediated potentiation of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) was significantly attenuated in EtOH-exposed animals. However, this was associated with a compensatory decrease in D3R-mediated suppression of miniature IPSCs. Western blot analysis revealed that these effects were not a result of altered D1R or D3R levels. BLA samples from EtOH-exposed animals also had significantly lower levels of the DA precursor (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) but DA levels were not affected. This is likely a consequence of reduced catabolism of DA, as indicated by reduced levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the BLA samples. Anxiety-like behavior was not altered in EtOH-exposed animals. This is the first study to demonstrate that the modulatory actions of DA in the BLA are altered by developmental EtOH exposure. Although compensatory adaptations were engaged in our moderate EtOH exposure paradigm, it is possible that these are not able to restore homeostasis and correct anxiety-like behaviors under conditions of heavier EtOH exposure. Therefore, future studies should investigate the potential role of alterations in the modulatory actions of DA in the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID

  18. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  19. Regulation of bat echolocation pulse acoustics by striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Tressler, Jedediah; Schwartz, Christine; Wellman, Paul; Hughes, Samuel; Smotherman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to control the bandwidth, amplitude and duration of echolocation pulses is a crucial aspect of echolocation performance but few details are known about the neural mechanisms underlying the control of these voice parameters in any mammal. The basal ganglia (BG) are a suite of forebrain nuclei centrally involved in sensory-motor control and are characterized by their dependence on dopamine. We hypothesized that pharmacological manipulation of brain dopamine levels could reveal how BG circuits might influence the acoustic structure of bat echolocation pulses. A single intraperitoneal injection of a low dose (5 mg kg–1) of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPTP), which selectively targets dopamine-producing cells of the substantia nigra, produced a rapid degradation in pulse acoustic structure and eliminated the bat's ability to make compensatory changes in pulse amplitude in response to background noise, i.e. the Lombard response. However, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of striatal dopamine concentrations revealed that the main effect of MPTP was a fourfold increase rather than the predicted decrease in striatal dopamine levels. After first using autoradiographic methods to confirm the presence and location of D1- and D2-type dopamine receptors in the bat striatum, systemic injections of receptor subtype-specific agonists showed that MPTP's effects on pulse acoustics were mimicked by a D2-type dopamine receptor agonist (Quinpirole) but not by a D1-type dopamine receptor agonist (SKF82958). The results suggest that BG circuits have the capacity to influence echolocation pulse acoustics, particularly via D2-type dopamine receptor-mediated pathways, and may therefore represent an important mechanism for vocal control in bats. PMID:21900471

  20. An Aspartic Protease of the Scabies Mite Sarcoptes scabiei Is Involved in the Digestion of Host Skin and Blood Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Wajahat; Viberg, Linda T.; Fischer, Katja; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Scabies is a disease of worldwide significance, causing considerable morbidity in both humans and other animals. The scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrows into the skin of its host, obtaining nutrition from host skin and blood. Aspartic proteases mediate a range of diverse and essential physiological functions such as tissue invasion and migration, digestion, moulting and reproduction in a number of parasitic organisms. We investigated whether aspartic proteases may play role in scabies mite digestive processes. Methodology/Principle Findings We demonstrated the presence of aspartic protease activity in whole scabies mite extract. We then identified a scabies mite aspartic protease gene sequence and produced recombinant active enzyme. The recombinant scabies mite aspartic protease was capable of digesting human haemoglobin, serum albumin, fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not collagen III or laminin. This is consistent with the location of the scabies mites in the upper epidermis of human skin. Conclusions/Significance The development of novel therapeutics for scabies is of increasing importance given the evidence of emerging resistance to current treatments. We have shown that a scabies mite aspartic protease plays a role in the digestion of host skin and serum molecules, raising the possibility that interference with the function of the enzyme may impact on mite survival. PMID:24244770

  1. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, F Gregory; Valentin, Vivian V; von Meer, Stella S

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. PMID:26251602

  2. AGC1/2, the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carriers.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Punzi, G; Obre, E; Lacombe, D; De Grassi, A; Pierri, C L; Rossignol, R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we discuss the structure and functions of the aspartate/glutamate carriers (AGC1-aralar and AGC2-citrin). Those proteins supply the aspartate synthesized within mitochondrial matrix to the cytosol in exchange for glutamate and a proton. A structure of an AGC carrier is not available yet but comparative 3D models were proposed. Moreover, transport assays performed by using the recombinant AGC1 and AGC2, reconstituted into liposome vesicles, allowed to explore the kinetics of those carriers and to reveal their specific transport properties. AGCs participate to a wide range of cellular functions, as the control of mitochondrial respiration, calcium signaling and antioxydant defenses. AGC1 might also play peculiar tissue-specific functions, as it was found to participate to cell-to-cell metabolic symbiosis in the retina. On the other hand, AGC1 is involved in the glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in neurons and AGC gene or protein alterations were discovered in rare human diseases. Accordingly, a mice model of AGC1 gene knock-out presented with growth delay and generalized tremor, with myelinisation defects. More recently, AGC was proposed to play a crucial role in tumor metabolism as observed from metabolomic studies showing that the asparate exported from the mitochondrion by AGC1 is employed in the regeneration of cytosolic glutathione. Therefore, given the central role of AGCs in cell metabolism and human pathology, drug screening are now being developed to identify pharmacological modulators of those carriers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27132995

  3. Chemotactic responses of Escherichia coli to small jumps of photoreleased L-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Jasuja, R; Keyoung, J; Reid, G P; Trentham, D R; Khan, S

    1999-03-01

    Computer-assisted motion analysis coupled to flash photolysis of caged chemoeffectors provides a means for time-resolved analysis of bacterial chemotaxis. Escherichia coli taxis toward the amino acid attractant L-aspartate is mediated by the Tar receptor. The physiology of this response, as well as Tar structure and biochemistry, has been studied extensively. The beta-2, 6-dinitrobenzyl ester of L-aspartic acid and the 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl ether of 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-tris-sulfonic acid were synthesized. These compounds liberated L-aspartate and the fluorophore 8-hydroxypyrene 1,3,6-tris-sulfonic acid (pyranine) upon irradiation with near-UV light. Photorelease of the fluorophore was used to define the amplitude and temporal stability of the aspartate jumps employed in chemotaxis experiments. The dependence of chemotactic adaptation times on aspartate concentration, determined in mixing experiments, was best fit by two Tar aspartate-binding sites. Signal processing (excitation) times, amplitudes, and adaptive recovery of responses elicited by aspartate jumps producing less than 20% change in receptor occupancy were characterized in photorelease assays. Aspartate concentration jumps in the nanomolar range elicited measurable responses. The response threshold and sensitivity of swimming bacteria matched those of bacteria tethered to glass by a single flagellum. Stimuli of similar magnitude, delivered either by rapid mixing or photorelease, evoked responses of similar strength, as assessed by recovery time measurements. These times remained proportional to change in receptor occupancy close to threshold, irrespective of prior occupancy. Motor excitation responses decayed exponentially with time. Rates of excitation responses near threshold ranged from 2 to 7 s-1. These values are consistent with control of excitation signaling by decay of phosphorylated pools of the response regulator protein, CheY. Excitation response rates increased slightly with stimulus size

  4. Amphetamine paradoxically augments exocytotic dopamine release and phasic dopamine signals.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Brown, H D; Bunner, K D; Kraniotis, S A; Doellman, M A; Ragozzino, M E; Garris, P A; Roitman, M F

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain-reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting nonexocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties, which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to 2 h. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration, and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, nonelectrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sugar reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sugar-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify upregulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  5. What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience?

    PubMed

    Berridge, K C; Robinson, T E

    1998-12-01

    What roles do mesolimbic and neostriatal dopamine systems play in reward? Do they mediate the hedonic impact of rewarding stimuli? Do they mediate hedonic reward learning and associative prediction? Our review of the literature, together with results of a new study of residual reward capacity after dopamine depletion, indicates the answer to both questions is 'no'. Rather, dopamine systems may mediate the incentive salience of rewards, modulating their motivational value in a manner separable from hedonia and reward learning. In a study of the consequences of dopamine loss, rats were depleted of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and neostriatum by up to 99% using 6-hydroxydopamine. In a series of experiments, we applied the 'taste reactivity' measure of affective reactions (gapes, etc.) to assess the capacity of dopamine-depleted rats for: 1) normal affect (hedonic and aversive reactions), 2) modulation of hedonic affect by associative learning (taste aversion conditioning), and 3) hedonic enhancement of affect by non-dopaminergic pharmacological manipulation of palatability (benzodiazepine administration). We found normal hedonic reaction patterns to sucrose vs. quinine, normal learning of new hedonic stimulus values (a change in palatability based on predictive relations), and normal pharmacological hedonic enhancement of palatability. We discuss these results in the context of hypotheses and data concerning the role of dopamine in reward. We review neurochemical, electrophysiological, and other behavioral evidence. We conclude that dopamine systems are not needed either to mediate the hedonic pleasure of reinforcers or to mediate predictive associations involved in hedonic reward learning. We conclude instead that dopamine may be more important to incentive salience attributions to the neural representations of reward-related stimuli. Incentive salience, we suggest, is a distinct component of motivation and reward. In other words, dopamine systems are necessary

  6. Nicotine increases dopamine transporter function in rat striatum through a trafficking-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Lisa S.; Apparsundaram, Subbu; King-Pospisil, Kelley A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2007-01-01

    In previous in vivo voltammetry studies, acute nicotine administration increased striatal dopamine clearance. The current study aimed to determine whether nicotine also increases [3H]dopamine uptake across the time course of the previous voltammetry studies and whether dopamine transporter trafficking to the cell surface mediates the nicotine-induced augmentation of dopamine clearance in striatum. Rats were administered nicotine (0.32 mg/kg, s.c.); striatal synaptosomes were obtained 5, 10, 40 or 60 min later. Nicotine increased (25%) the Vmax of [3H]dopamine uptake at 10 and 40 min. To determine whether the increase in Vmax was due to an increase in dopamine transporter density, [3H]GBR 12935 (1-(2-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy]ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride) binding was performed using rat striatal membranes; no differences were found between nicotine and saline control groups at 5, 10 or 40 min post-injection, indicating that nicotine did not increase striatal dopamine transporter density; however, [3H]GBR 12935 binding assays determine both cell surface and intracellular dopamine transporter. Changes in cellular dopamine transporter localization in striatum were determined using biotinylation and subfractionation approaches; no differences between nicotine and saline control groups were observed at 10 and 40 min post-injection. These results suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in dopamine uptake and clearance in striatum may occur via a trafficking-independent mechanism. PMID:17141211

  7. Optogenetically-induced tonic dopamine release from VTA-nucleus accumbens projections inhibits reward consummatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Chappell, Ann M; Deal, Alex L; Bonin, Keith D; Weiner, Jeff L; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2016-10-01

    Recent optogenetic studies demonstrated that phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens may play a causal role in multiple aspects of natural and drug reward-related behaviors. The role of tonic dopamine release in reward consummatory behavior remains unclear. The current study used a combinatorial viral-mediated gene delivery approach to express ChR2 on mesolimbic dopamine neurons in rats. We used optical activation of this dopamine circuit to mimic tonic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and to explore the causal relationship between this form of dopamine signaling within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens projection and consumption of a natural reward. Using a two bottle choice paradigm (sucrose vs. water), the experiments revealed that tonic optogenetic stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission significantly decreased reward consummatory behaviors. Specifically, there was a significant decrease in the number of bouts, licks and amount of sucrose obtained during the drinking session. Notably, activation of VTA dopamine cell bodies or dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens resulted in identical behavioral consequences. No changes in water intake were evident under the same experimental conditions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that tonic optogenetic stimulation of VTA-nucleus accumbens dopamine release is sufficient to inhibit reward consummatory behavior, possibly by preventing this circuit from engaging in phasic activity that is thought to be essential for reward-based behaviors. PMID:27421228

  8. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. PMID:26608248

  9. Effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade on breathing pattern in newborn cat.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, P; Pierrefiche, O; Foutz, A S; Denavit-Saubié, M

    1990-11-01

    We gave newborn kittens the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker MK-801 systemically while recording their breathing patterns by the barometric method. Unlike pentobarbital, MK-801 at an anaesthetic dose increased the relative length of inspiration within the respiratory cycle. The section of both vagus nerves under MK-801 produced apneustic breathing, whereas vagotomy under pentobarbital had no such effect. We conclude that the central inspiratory-termination mechanism mediated through NMDA receptors and the vagally-mediated mechanism that independently 'switches off' inspiration are both functional at birth. PMID:2148125

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    SciTech Connect

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  11. Dopamine and binge eating behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Hajnal, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Central dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the motivational aspects of eating and food choices. This review focuses on human and animal data examining the importance of dopamine on binge eating behaviors. Early works examining dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of bulimic individuals suggested decreased dopamine turnover during the active phase of the illness. While neuroimaging studies of dopamine mechanisms in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are limited, genetic studies in humans have implicated an increased frequency of dopamine transporter and associated D2 receptor polymorphisms with binge pathology. Recent examinations of rodent models of dietary-induced binge eating (DIBE) have investigated plausible dopamine mechanisms involved in sustaining binge eating behaviors. In DIBE models, highly palatable foods (fats, sugars and their combination), as well as restricted access conditions appear to promote ingestive responses and result in sustained dopamine stimulation within the nucleus accumbens. Taken together with studies examining the comorbidity of illicit drug use and eating disorders, the data reviewed here support a role for dopamine in perpetuating the compulsive feeding patterns of BN and BED. As such, we propose that sustained stimulation of the dopamine systems by bingeing promoted by preexisting conditions (e.g., genetic traits, dietary restraint, stress, etc.) results in progressive impairments of dopamine signaling. To disrupt this vicious cycle, novel research-based treatment options aiming at the neural substrates of compulsive eating patterns are necessary. PMID:20417658

  12. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  13. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera. PMID:26077025

  14. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera. PMID:26077025

  15. Dopamine Function and the Efficiency of Human Movement

    PubMed Central

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Li, Xiaoyan; Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard

    2016-01-01

    To sustain successful behavior in dynamic environments, active organisms must be able to learn from the consequences of their actions and predict action outcomes. One of the most important discoveries in systems neuroscience over the last 15 years has been about the key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in mediating such active behavior. Dopamine cell firing was found to encode differences between the expected and obtained outcomes of actions. Although activity of dopamine cells does not specify movements themselves, a recent study in humans has suggested that tonic levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may in part enable normal movement by encoding sensitivity to the energy cost of a movement, providing an implicit “motor motivational” signal for movement. We investigated the motivational hypothesis of dopamine by studying motor performance of patients with Parkinson disease who have marked dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum and compared their performance with that of elderly healthy adults. All participants performed rapid sequential movements to visual targets associated with different risk and different energy costs, countered or assisted by gravity. In conditions of low energy cost, patients performed surprisingly well, similar to prescriptions of an ideal planner and healthy participants. As energy costs increased, however, performance of patients with Parkinson disease dropped markedly below the prescriptions for action by an ideal planner and below performance of healthy elderly participants. The results indicate that the ability for efficient planning depends on the energy cost of action and that the effect of energy cost on action is mediated by dopamine. PMID:24144250

  16. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  17. DOPAMINE AND FOOD ADDICTION: LEXICON BADLY NEEDED

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term “addiction” to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates “reward”, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present paper provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors, and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  18. Dopamine and food addiction: lexicon badly needed.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2013-05-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term addiction to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates reward, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present article provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  19. Linking unfounded beliefs to genetic dopamine availability

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Katharina; Rössler, Hannes; Sekutowicz, Maria; Brandl, Eva J.; Müller, Daniel J.; Petrovic, Predrag; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Unfounded convictions involving beliefs in the paranormal, grandiosity ideas or suspicious thoughts are endorsed at varying degrees among the general population. Here, we investigated the neurobiopsychological basis of the observed inter-individual variability in the propensity toward unfounded beliefs. One hundred two healthy individuals were genotyped for four polymorphisms in the COMT gene (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, also known as val158met) that define common functional haplotypes with substantial impact on synaptic dopamine degradation, completed a questionnaire measuring unfounded beliefs, and took part in a behavioral experiment assessing perceptual inference. We found that greater dopamine availability was associated with a stronger propensity toward unfounded beliefs, and that this effect was statistically mediated by an enhanced influence of expectations on perceptual inference. Our results indicate that genetic differences in dopaminergic neurotransmission account for inter-individual differences in perceptual inference linked to the formation and maintenance of unfounded beliefs. Thus, dopamine might be critically involved in the processes underlying one's interpretation of the relationship between the self and the world. PMID:26483654

  20. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H+/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [3H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity. PMID:27483254

  1. Submicromolar Phosphinic Inhibitors of E. coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Laëtitia; Kantrowitz, Evan R.; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The design, syntheses, and enzymatic activity of two submicromolar competitive inhibitors of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) are described. The phosphinate inhibitors are analogs of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA) but have a reduced charge at the phosphorus moiety. The mechanistic implications are discussed in terms of a possible cyclic transition-state during enzymatic catalysis. PMID:19097895

  2. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  3. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  4. Pramipexole inhibits MPTP toxicity in mice by dopamine D3 receptor dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Andres D; Wong, Stephen K-F; Menniti, Frank S

    2003-08-15

    The role of dopamine D3 receptors was investigated in mediating the neuroprotective effect of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist (S)-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-6-propylamine-benzothiazole (pramipexole) in vivo. Pramipexole retained the ability to inhibit 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopamine depletion in mice in which the dopamine D3 receptor had been deleted. However, the neuroprotective efficacy was reduced in the dopamine D3 receptor-deleted mice compared to that in littermates expressing the wildtype receptor. Furthermore, the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist 2-(3-[4-(2-tert-butyl-6-trifluoromethyl-4-pyrimidinyl)-1-piperazinyl]propylthio)-4-pyrimidinol (A-437203) partially inhibited the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole in dopamine D3 receptor expressing mice but not in receptor-deleted mice. These results indicate that pramipexole protects dopamine neurons from MPTP-induced toxicity by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of an interaction with dopamine D3 receptors. PMID:12954356

  5. Depression of Serotonin Synaptic Transmission by the Dopamine Precursor L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Gantz, Stephanie C; Levitt, Erica S; Llamosas, Nerea; Neve, Kim A; Williams, John T

    2015-08-11

    Imbalance between the dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter systems has been implicated in the comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and psychiatric disorders. L-DOPA, the leading treatment of PD, facilitates the production and release of dopamine. This study assessed the action of L-DOPA on monoamine synaptic transmission in mouse brain slices. Application of L-DOPA augmented the D2-receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra. This augmentation was largely due to dopamine release from 5-HT terminals. Selective optogenetic stimulation of 5-HT terminals evoked dopamine release, producing D2-receptor-mediated IPSCs following treatment with L-DOPA. In the dorsal raphe, L-DOPA produced a long-lasting depression of the 5-HT1A-receptor-mediated IPSC in 5-HT neurons. When D2 receptors were expressed in the dorsal raphe, application of L-DOPA resulted in a D2-receptor-mediated IPSC. Thus, treatment with L-DOPA caused ectopic dopamine release from 5-HT terminals and a loss of 5-HT-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:26235617

  6. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  7. Requirement of Dopamine Signaling in the Amygdala and Striatum for Learning and Maintenance of a Conditioned Avoidance Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darvas, Martin; Fadok, Jonathan P.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-way active avoidance (2WAA) involves learning Pavlovian (association of a sound cue with a foot shock) and instrumental (shock avoidance) contingencies. To identify regions where dopamine (DA) is involved in mediating 2WAA, we restored DA signaling in specific brain areas of dopamine-deficient (DD) mice by local reactivation of conditionally…

  8. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  9. Secreted Aspartic Proteinase Family of Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Christophe; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete; Reichard, Utz; Sanglard, Dominique; Monod, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Medically important yeasts of the genus Candida secrete aspartic proteinases (Saps), which are of particular interest as virulence factors. Like Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis secretes in vitro one dominant Sap (Sapt1p) in a medium containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the sole source of nitrogen. Using the gene SAPT1 as a probe and under low-stringency hybridization conditions, three new closely related gene sequences, SAPT2 to SAPT4, encoding secreted proteinases were cloned from a C. tropicalis λEMBL3 genomic library. All bands identified by Southern blotting of EcoRI-digested C. tropicalis genomic DNA with SAPT1 could be assigned to a specific SAP gene. Therefore, the SAPT gene family of C. tropicalis is likely to contain only four members. Interestingly, the SAPT2 and SAPT3 gene products, Sapt2p and Sapt3p, which have not yet been detected in C. tropicalis cultures in vitro, were produced as active recombinant enzymes with the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris as an expression system. As expected, reverse transcriptase PCR experiments revealed a strong SAPT1 signal with RNA extracted from cells grown in BSA medium. However, a weak signal was obtained with all other SAPT genes under several conditions tested, showing that these SAPT genes could be expressed at a basic level. Together, these experiments suggest that the gene products Sapt2p, Sapt3p, and Sapt4p could be produced under conditions yet to be described in vitro or during infection. PMID:11119531

  10. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  11. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  12. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM–100 μM) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 μM) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 μM) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD. PMID:16005927

  13. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  14. Trans-blood brain barrier delivery of dopamine-loaded nanoparticles reverses functional deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Richa; Seth, Kavita; Shukla, Anshi; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Saxena, Prem Narain; Arun, Jharna; Chaudhari, Bhushan Pradosh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Shukla, Rakesh; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-05-26

    Sustained and safe delivery of dopamine across the blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major hurdle for successful therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, in the present study we designed neurotransmitter dopamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (DA NPs) to deliver dopamine to the brain. These nanoparticles slowly and constantly released dopamine, showed reduced clearance of dopamine in plasma, reduced quinone adduct formation, and decreased dopamine autoxidation. DA NPs were internalized in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum, regions affected in PD. Treatment with DA NPs did not cause reduction in cell viability and morphological deterioration in SH-SY5Y, as compared to bulk dopamine-treated cells, which showed reduced viability. Herein, we report that these NPs were able to cross the BBB and capillary endothelium in the striatum and substantia nigra in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD. Systemic intravenous administration of DA NPs caused significantly increased levels of dopamine and its metabolites and reduced dopamine-D2 receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. Further, DA NPs significantly recovered neurobehavioral abnormalities in 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian rats. Dopamine delivered through NPs did not cause additional generation of ROS, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, and ultrastructural changes in the striatum and substantia nigra as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, dopamine delivery through nanoformulation neither caused alterations in the heart rate and blood pressure nor showed any abrupt pathological change in the brain and other peripheral organs. These results suggest that NPs delivered dopamine into the brain, reduced dopamine autoxidation-mediated toxicity, and ultimately reversed neurochemical and neurobehavioral deficits in parkinsonian rats. PMID:25825926

  15. Muscarinic receptor stimulation of D-aspartate uptake into human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells is attenuated by hypoosmolarity.

    PubMed

    Foster, Daniel J; Heacock, Anne M; Fisher, Stephen K

    2010-04-01

    In addition to its function as an excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate plays a major role as an osmolyte within the central nervous system (CNS). Accordingly, mechanisms that regulate glutamate release and uptake are of physiological importance not only during conditions in which cell volume remains constant but also when cells are subjected to hypoosmotic stress. In the present study, the ability of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) to regulate the uptake of glutamate (monitored as D-aspartate) into human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells under isotonic or hypotonic conditions has been examined. In isotonic media, agonist activation of mAChRs resulted in a significant increase (250-300% of control) in the uptake of D-aspartate and, concurrently, a cellular redistribution of the excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) to the plasma membrane. mAChR-mediated increases in d-aspartate uptake were potently blocked by the EAAT3 inhibitor l-beta-threo-benzyl-aspartate. In hypotonic media, the ability of mAChR activation to facilitate D-aspartate uptake was significantly attenuated (40-50%), and the cellular distribution of EAAT3 was disrupted. Reduction of mAChR-stimulated D-aspartate uptake under hypoosmotic conditions could be fully reversed upon re-exposure of the cells to isotonic media. Under both isotonic and hypotonic conditions, mAChR-mediated increases in D-aspartate uptake depended on cytoskeletal integrity, protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activities, and the availability of intracellular Ca2+. In contrast, dependence on extracellular Ca2+ was observed only under isotonic conditions. The results suggest that, although the uptake of D-aspartate into SH-SY5Y cells is enhanced after mAChR activation, this process is markedly attenuated by hypoosmolarity. PMID:20080957

  16. Occurrence of the malate-aspartate shuttle in various tumor types.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1976-04-01

    The activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by mitochondria was assessed in six lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, Krebs II carcinoma, Novikoff hepatoma, AS-30D hepatoma, and L1210 mouse leukemia). All the tumor cells examined showed mitochondrial reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH, as evidenced by the accumulation of pyruvate when the cells were incubated aerobically with L-lactate. Reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH thus generated was completely inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate. The involvement of the respiratory chain in the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH was demonstrated by the action of cyanide, rotenone, and antimycin A, which strongly inhibited the formation of pyruvate from added L-lactate. Compounds that inhibit the carrier-mediated entry of malate into mitochondria, such as butylmalonate, benzenetricarboxylate, and iodobenzylmalonate, also inhibited the accumulation of pyruvate from added L-lactate by the tumor cells. The maximal rate of the malate-aspartate shuttle was established by addtion of arsenite to inhibit the mitochondrial oxidation of the pyruvate formed from added lactate. The capacity of the various tumor lines for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle approaches 20% of the total respiratory rate of the cells and thus appears to be sufficient to account for the mitochondrial reoxidation of that fraction of glycolytic NADH not reoxidized by pyruvate and lactate dehydrognenase in the cytoplasm. PMID:177206

  17. Dopamine and oxytocin interactions underlying behaviors: potential contributions to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Douglas, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator that exerts widespread effects on the central nervous system (CNS) function. Disruption in dopaminergic neurotransmission can have profound effects on mood and behavior and as such is known to be implicated in various neuropsychiatric behavioral disorders including autism and depression. The subsequent effects on other neurocircuitries due to dysregulated dopamine function have yet to be fully explored. Due to the marked social deficits observed in psychiatric patients, the neuropeptide, oxytocin is emerging as one particular neural substrate that may be influenced by the altered dopamine levels subserving neuropathologic-related behavioral diseases. Oxytocin has a substantial role in social attachment, affiliation and sexual behavior. More recently, it has emerged that disturbances in peripheral and central oxytocin levels have been detected in some patients with dopamine-dependent disorders. Thus, oxytocin is proposed to be a key neural substrate that interacts with central dopamine systems. In addition to psychosocial improvement, oxytocin has recently been implicated in mediating mesolimbic dopamine pathways during drug addiction and withdrawal. This bi-directional role of dopamine has also been implicated during some components of sexual behavior. This review will discuss evidence for the existence dopamine/oxytocin positive interaction in social behavioral paradigms and associated disorders such as sexual dysfunction, autism, addiction, anorexia/bulimia, and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that whilst further rigorous testing has to be conducted to establish a dopamine/oxytocin link in human disorders, animal models seem to indicate the existence of broad and integrated brain circuits where dopamine and oxytocin interactions at least in part mediate socio-affiliative behaviors. A profound disruption to these pathways is likely to underpin associated behavioral disorders. Central oxytocin pathways may serve as a

  18. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  19. Neurosteroid Agonist at GABAA Receptor Induces Persistent Neuroplasticity in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vashchinkina, Elena; Manner, Aino K; Vekovischeva, Olga; Hollander, Bjørnar den; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Korpi, Esa R

    2014-01-01

    The main fast-acting inhibitory receptors in the mammalian brain are γ-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) receptors for which neurosteroids, a subclass of steroids synthesized de novo in the brain, constitute a group of endogenous ligands with the most potent positive modulatory actions known. Neurosteroids can act on all subtypes of GABAA receptors, with a preference for δ-subunit-containing receptors that mediate extrasynaptic tonic inhibition. Pathological conditions characterized by emotional and motivational disturbances are often associated with perturbation in the levels of endogenous neurosteroids. We studied the effects of ganaxolone (GAN)—a synthetic analog of endogenous allopregnanolone that lacks activity on nuclear steroid receptors—on the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system involved in emotions and motivation. A single dose of GAN in young mice induced a dose-dependent, long-lasting neuroplasticity of glutamate synapses of DA neurons ex vivo in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/N-methyl-D-aspartate ratio and rectification of AMPA receptor responses even at 6 days after GAN administration suggested persistent synaptic targeting of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. This glutamate neuroplasticity was not observed in GABAA receptor δ-subunit-knockout (δ-KO) mice. GAN (500 nM) applied locally to VTA selectively increased tonic inhibition of GABA interneurons and triggered potentiation of DA neurons within 4 h in vitro. Place-conditioning experiments in adult wild-type C57BL/6J and δ-KO mice revealed aversive properties of repeated GAN administration that were dependent on the δ-subunits. Prolonged neuroadaptation to neurosteroids in the VTA might contribute to both the physiology and pathophysiology underlying processes and changes in motivation, mood, cognition, and drug addiction. PMID:24077066

  20. Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Mark W.; Griffith, Stephen M.; Miller, Susan S.; Vance, Carroll P.

    1990-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in all plants and is particularly important in the assimilation of fixed N derived from the legume-Rhizoblum symbiosis. Two isozymes of AAT (AAT-1 and AAT-2) occur in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Antibodies against alfalfa nodule AAT-2 do not recognize AAT-1, and these antibodies were used to study AAT-2 expression in different tissues and genotypes of alfalfa and also in other legume and nonlegume species. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicated that nodules of 38-day-old alfalfa plants contained about eight times more AAT-2 than did nodules of 7-day-old plants, confirming the nodule-enhanced nature of this isozyme. AAT-2 was estimated to make up 16, 15, 5, and 8 milligrams per gram of total soluble protein in mature nodules, roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, of effective N2-fixing alfalfa. The concentration of AAT-2 in nodules of ineffective non-N2-fixing alafalfa genotypes was about 70% less than that of effective nodules. Western blots of soluble protein from nodules of nine legume species indicated that a 40-kilodalton polypeptide that reacts strongly with AAT-2 antibodies is conserved in legumes. Nodule AAT-2 immunoprecipitation data suggested that amide- and ureide-type legumes may differ in expression and regulation of the enzyme. In addition, Western blotting and immunoprecipitations of AAT activity demonstrated that antibodies against alfalfa AAT-2 are highly cross-reactive with AAT enzyme protein in leaves of soybean (Glycine max L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) and in roots of maize, but not with AAT in soybean and wheat roots. Results from this study indicate that AAT-2 is structurally conserved and localized in similar tissues among diverse species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667896

  1. Crystallographic studies of aspartate racemase from Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomomi; Yamauchi, Takae; Ishiyama, Makoto; Gogami, Yoshitaka; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Aspartate racemase catalyzes the interconversion between L-aspartate and D-aspartate and belongs to the PLP-independent racemases. The enzyme from the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893, isolated from kimoto, is considered to be involved in D-aspartate synthesis during the brewing process of Japanese sake at low temperatures. The enzyme was crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 25%(v/v) PEG MME 550, 5%(v/v) 2-propanol. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.68, c = 97.29 Å, and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. Structure determination is under way. PMID:26249691

  2. Differential Dopamine Regulation of Ca2+ Signaling and Its Timing Dependence in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Swapna, Immani; Bondy, Brian; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Dopamine action in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is thought to drive appetitive behavior and Pavlovian reward learning. However, it remains controversial how dopamine achieves these behavioral effects by regulating medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) of the NAc, especially on a behaviorally relevant timescale. Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced Ca2+ signaling dependent on the Ca2+- releasing messenger inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) plays a critical role in controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that transient dopamine application facilitates mGluR/IP3-induced Ca2+ signals within a time window of ~2–10 s in a subpopulation of MSNs in the NAc core. Dopamine facilitation of IP3-induced Ca2+ signaling is mediated by D1 dopamine receptors. In dopamine-insensitive MSNs, activation of A2A adenosine receptors causes enhancement of IP3-evoked Ca2+ signals, which is reversed by D2 dopamine receptor activation. These results show that dopamine differentially regulates Ca2+ signaling on the order of seconds in two distinct MSN subpopulations. PMID:27068462

  3. The involvement of nucleus accumbens dopamine in appetitive and aversive motivation.

    PubMed

    Salamone, J D

    1994-04-18

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed upon the putative role of nucleus accumbens dopamine systems in appetitive motivation and positive reinforcement. However, considerable evidence indicates that brain dopamine in general, and nucleus accumbens dopamine in particular, is involved in aspects of aversive motivation. Administration of dopamine antagonists or localized interference with nucleus accumbens dopamine systems has been shown to disrupt active avoidance behavior. In addition, accumbens dopamine release and metabolism is activated by a wide variety of stressful conditions. A review of the literature indicates that there are substantial similarities between the characteristics of dopaminergic involvement in appetitive and aversive motivation. There is conflicting evidence about the role of dopamine in emotion, and little evidence to suggest that the profound and consistent changes in instrumental behavior produced by interference with DA systems are due to direct dopaminergic mediation of positive affective responses such as hedonia. It is suggested that nucleus accumbens dopamine is involved in aspects of sensorimotor functions that are involved in both appetitive and aversive motivation. PMID:8037860

  4. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  5. Characterization of D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an association of central nervous system dopaminergic systems in the etiology of the schizophrenia. Interest in the role of D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors has revived with the advent of selective drugs for this dopamine receptor, particularly the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor antagonists, SCH23390. (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 represents a superior radioligand for labeling the two-state striatal D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor in that its high percent specific binding makes it especially suitable for detailed mechanistic studies of this receptor. Striatal D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors have been shown to mediate the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity via a guanine nucleotide regulatory subunit. Forskolin acts in a synergistic manner with dopamine agonists, guanine nucleotides or sodium fluoride to potentiate the stimulation of rat striatal adenylate cyclase activity mediated by these reagents. By using the aforementioned reagents and the irreversible receptor modifying reagent N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2,-dihydroquinoline, we demonstrated that the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor population in rat striatum is not a stoichiometrically-limiting factor in agonist stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity.

  6. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26876136

  7. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  8. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior. PMID:22629462

  9. Neuropharmacology of dopamine receptors:

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Frank I.

    2001-01-01

    There has been an extraordinary recent accumulation of information concerning the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of dopamine (DA) receptors in the mammalian central nervous system. Many new DA molecular entities have been cloned, their gene, peptide sequences and structures have been identified, their anatomical distributions in the mammalian brain described, and their pharmacology characterized. Progress has been made toward developing selective ligands and drug-candidates for different DA receptors. The new discoveries have greatly stimulated preclinical and clinical studies to explore the neuropharmacology of DA receptors and their implications in the neuropathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Accordingly, it seems timely to review the salient aspects of this specialized area of preclinical neuropharmacology and its relevance to clinical neuropsychiatry. PMID:24019715

  10. Dopamine-deficient mice are hypersensitive to dopamine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Szczypka, M S; Palmiter, R D

    2000-06-15

    Dopamine-deficient (DA-/-) mice were created by targeted inactivation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in dopaminergic neurons. The locomotor activity response of these mutants to dopamine D1 or D2 receptor agonists and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) was 3- to 13-fold greater than the response elicited from wild-type mice. The enhanced sensitivity of DA-/- mice to agonists was independent of changes in steady-state levels of dopamine receptors and the presynaptic dopamine transporter as measured by ligand binding. The acute behavioral response of DA-/- mice to a dopamine D1 receptor agonist was correlated with c-fos induction in the striatum, a brain nucleus that receives dense dopaminergic input. Chronic replacement of dopamine to DA-/- mice by repeated l-DOPA administration over 4 d relieved the hypersensitivity of DA-/- mutants in terms of induction of both locomotion and striatal c-fos expression. The results suggest that the chronic presence of dopaminergic neurotransmission is required to dampen the intracellular signaling response of striatal neurons. PMID:10844009

  11. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  12. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  13. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  14. Dopamine-dependent responses to morphine depend on glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Michela; Aouizerate, Bruno; Barrot, Michel; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid hormones facilitate the behavioral and dopaminergic effects of morphine. In this study we examined the possible role in these effects of the two central corticosteroid receptor types: mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). To accomplish this, specific antagonists of these receptors were infused intracerebroventricularly and 2 hr later we measured: (i) locomotor activity induced by a systemic injection of morphine (2 mg/kg); (ii) locomotor activity induced by an infusion of morphine (1 μg per side) into the ventral tegmental area, which is a dopamine-dependent behavioral response to morphine; (iii) morphine-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, a dopaminergic projection site mediating the locomotor and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Blockade of MRs by spironolactone had no significant effects on locomotion induced by systemic morphine. In contrast, blockade of GRs by either RU38486 or RU39305, which is devoid of antiprogesterone effects, reduced the locomotor response to morphine, and this effect was dose dependent. GR antagonists also reduced the locomotor response to intraventral tegmental area morphine as well as the basal and morphine-induced increase in accumbens dopamine, as measured by microdialysis in freely moving rats. In contrast, spironolactone did not modify dopamine release. In conclusion, glucocorticoids, via GRs, facilitate the dopamine-dependent behavioral effects of morphine, probably by facilitating dopamine release. The possibility of decreasing the behavioral and dopaminergic effects of opioids by an acute administration of GR antagonists may open new therapeutic strategies for treatment of drug addiction. PMID:9636221

  15. Mesolimbic dopamine signals the value of work.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Arif A; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Mabrouk, Omar S; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Kennedy, Robert T; Aragona, Brandon J; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (phasic) dopamine fluctuations support learning, whereas much slower (tonic) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We found that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covaried with reward rate and motivational vigor. Second-by-second dopamine release encoded an estimate of temporally discounted future reward (a value function). Changing dopamine immediately altered willingness to work and reinforced preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, which is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  16. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    PubMed

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs. PMID:27117097

  17. In situ properties of Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Burns, B P; Mendz, G L; Hazell, S L

    1997-11-01

    The kinetic and regulatory properties of aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ACTase) of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori were studied in situ in cell-free extracts. The presence of enzyme activity was established by identifying the end product as carbamoylaspartate using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Activity was measured in all strains studied, including recent clinical isolates. Substrate saturation curves determined employing radioactive tracer analysis or a microtiter colorimetric assay were hyperbolic for both carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate, and there was no evidence for substrate inhibition at higher concentrations of either substrate. The apparent Km were 0.6 and 11.6 mm for carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate, respectively. Optimal pH and temperature were determined as 8.0 and 45 degrees C. Activity was observed with the l- but not the d-isomer of aspartate. Succinate and maleate inhibited enzyme activity competitively with respect to aspartate. The carbamoyl phosphate analogues acetyl phosphate and phosphonoacetic acid inhibited activity in a competitive manner with respect to carbamoyl phosphate. With limiting carbamoyl phosphate purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, tripolyphosphate, pyrophosphate, and orthophosphate inhibited competitively at millimolar concentrations. Ribose and ribose 5-phosphate at 10 mm concentration showed 20 and 35% inhibition of enzyme activity, respectively. N-Phosphonoacetyl-l-aspartate (PALA) was the most potent inhibitor studied, with 50% inhibition of enzyme activity observed at 0.1 microM concentration. Inhibition by PALA was competitive with carbamoyl phosphate (Ki = 0.245 microM) and noncompetitive with aspartate. The kinetic and regulatory data on the activity of the H. pylori enzyme suggest it is a Class A ACTase, but with some interesting characteristics distinct from this class. PMID:9344472

  18. Individual differences in psychostimulant responses of female rats are associated with ovarian hormones and dopamine neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Q. David; Johnson, Misha L.; Van Swearingen, Amanda E.D.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Caster, Joseph M.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian hormones modulate the pharmacological effects of psychostimulants and may enhance vulnerability to drug addiction. Female rats have more midbrain dopamine neurons than males and greater dopamine uptake and release rates. Cocaine stimulates motor behavior and dopamine efflux more in female than male rats, but the mediating mechanisms are unknown. This study investigated individual differences in anatomic, neurochemical, and behavioral measures in female rats to understand how ovarian hormones affect the relatedness of these endpoints. Ovarian hormone effects were assessed by comparing individual responses in ovariectomized (OVX) and sham adult female rats. Locomotion was determined before and following 10 mg/kg cocaine. Electrically-stimulated dopamine efflux was assessed using fast cyclic voltammetry in vivo. Dopamine neuron number and density in substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) were determined in the same animals using tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and unbiased stereology. Locomotor behavior and dopamine efflux did not differ at baseline but were greater in sham than OVX following cocaine. Cocaine increased dopamine release rates in both groups but uptake inhibition (Km) was greater in sham than OVX. Dopamine neuron number and density in SN and VTA were greater in shams. Sham females with the largest uterine weights exhibited the highest density of dopamine neurons in the SN, and the most cocaine-stimulated behavior and dopamine efflux. Ovariectomy eliminated these relationships. We postulate that SN density could link ovarian hormones and high-psychostimulant responses in females. Similar mechanisms may be involved in individual differences in the addiction vulnerability of women. PMID:22342988

  19. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C. )

    1989-11-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine continuously synthesized from ({sup 3}H)tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10{sup {minus}6} M tetrodotoxin, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M acetylcholine stimulated ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of ({sup 3}H) dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of ({sup 3}H)dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively.

  20. Effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists in mice trained to discriminate cocaine from saline: influence of feeding condition

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Jackson, Jonathan A.; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    In rats, the discriminative stimulus effects of direct- and indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists are mediated by multiple dopamine receptor subtypes and the relative contribution of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors to these effects varies as a function of feeding condition. In these studies, free-fed and food-restricted mice were trained to discriminate 10.0 mg/kg cocaine using a two-lever discrimination procedure in which responding was maintained by food. Both groups of mice acquired the discrimination; however, free-fed mice responded at lower rates than food-restricted mice. Dopamine D3 receptor agonists, pramipexole and quinpirole, increased cocaine-appropriate responding (>85%) in food-restricted, but not in free-fed mice. The dopamine D2 receptor agonist, sumanirole, and the nonselective dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, failed to increase cocaine-appropriate responding in either group. Free-fed mice were more sensitive than food-restricted mice to the rate-decreasing effects of dopamine receptor agonists and these effects could not be overcome by increasing the magnitude of reinforcement. Because feeding condition did not alter quinpirole-induced hypothermia, it is unlikely that differences in the discriminative stimulus or rate-decreasing effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists were due to differences in the pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs. Although these results suggest that the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine are mediated by both dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in food-restricted mice, the increased sensitivity of free-fed mice to the rate-decreasing effects of dopamine D2-like receptor agonists limited conclusions about the impact of feeding conditions on the relative contribution of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors to the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. PMID:24561049

  1. Dopamine determines the vulnerability of striatal neurons to the N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin through the regulation of mitochondrial complex II

    PubMed Central

    Benchoua, Alexandra; Trioulier, Yaël; Diguet, Elsa; Malgorn, Carole; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Dufour, Noelle; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; Krajewski, Stan; Hantraye, Philippe; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders associated with primary or secondary mitochondrial defects such as Huntington's disease (HD), cells of the striatum are particularly vulnerable to cell death, although the mechanisms by which this cell death is induced are unclear. Dopamine, found in high concentrations in the striatum, may play a role in striatal cell death. We show that in primary striatal cultures, dopamine increases the toxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt-171-82Q). Mitochondrial complex II protein (mCII) levels are reduced in HD striatum, indicating that this protein may be important for dopamine-mediated striatal cell death. We found that dopamine enhances the toxicity of the selective mCII inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid. We also demonstrated that dopamine doses that are insufficient to produce cell loss regulate mCII expression at the mRNA, protein and catalytic activity level. We also show that dopamine-induced down-regulation of mCII levels can be blocked by several dopamine D2 receptor antagonists. Sustained overexpression of mCII subunits using lentiviral vectors abrogated the effects of dopamine, both by high dopamine concentrations alone and neuronal death induced by low dopamine concentrations together with Htt-171-82Q. This novel pathway links dopamine signaling and regulation of mCII activity and could play a key role in oxidative energy metabolism and explain the vulnerability of the striatum in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18267960

  2. Noradrenergic mediation of the positive reinforcing properties of ethanol: II. Extinction of ethanol-drinking behavior in laboratory rats by inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Implications for treatment procedures in human alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Z W; Amit, Z; Levitan, D E; Ogren, S O; Sutherland, E A

    1977-11-01

    Following stabilization of consumption of a 15% (v/v) ethanol solution in a free-choice with water, rats were presented with a forced-choice of ethanol for 10 consecutive alternate days. Prior to each forced-choice presentation experimental animals were injected with the non-toxic dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor FLA-57 (30 mg/kg i.p.) while control animals received only vehicle injections. At the termination of the injection phase when ethanol was again made available in a free-choice with water, ethanol consumption for the FLA-57 treated animals was markedly suppressed. These data are interpreted in terms of extinction resulting from the procedure whereby performance of the ethanol drinking response was perpetuated by force with the pharmacological reinforcing properties being blocked by FLA-57-induced depletions of norepinephrine. Applications of these procedures in the treatment of human alcoholics are discussed. PMID:603311

  3. D1 dopamine receptor activity of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

    PubMed

    Fici, G J; Wu, H; VonVoigtlander, P F; Sethy, V H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical investigations suggest that stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors may be responsible for dyskinesias induced by dopamine agonist treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), and that these dyskinesias may be decreased by treatment with a D1 antagonist (clozapine). Therefore, the effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists have been investigated in a primary cerebellar granule cell model of cAMP formation that seems to be highly responsive to the D1 receptors. SKF 38393, lisuride, apomorphine, pergolide, dopamine, bromocriptine and 7-OH-DPAT showed concentration-dependent increases in cAMP formation, with EC50s (in microM) of 0.013, 0.053, 0.25, 1.04, 2.18, 50.9 and 54.4, respectively. SKF 38393, apomorphine, dopamine and pergolide had similar intrinsic activity (100%), while the intrinsic activities of 7-OH-DPAT, bromocriptine and lisuride were 28.0%, 20.7% and 17.2%, respectively. SCH 23390, a selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist, blocked an increase in cAMP formation produced by EC50 concentrations of all of the dopamine agonists investigated in this study. Clozapine concentration-dependently blocked pergolide-induced increases in cAMP and was approximately 1700-fold less potent than SCH 23390 (IC50: 0.97 microM and 0.56 nM, respectively). U-95666A (1-1000 microM), selective for the D2 receptors, showed no significant effect on cAMP, while pramipexole (0.1-100 microM), a D3 preferring agonist, did not elevate cAMP. These data suggest that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures are an excellent model for measuring D1 dopamine receptor-mediated changes in cellular cAMP. The results are discussed with reference to the relationship between the D1 receptor-stimulated increase in cAMP formation and the induction of dyskinesia in humans by these anti-parkinsonian drugs. PMID:9126882

  4. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  5. Glutamate-evoked release of endogenous brain dopamine: inhibition by an excitatory amino acid antagonist and an enkephalin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Marien, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADL) on the spontaneous and the L-glutamic acid (L-Glu)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from superfused slices of rat caudate-putamen. The amount of dopamine in slice superfusates was measured by a sensitive method employing high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (h.p.l.c.-e.d.) after a two-step separation procedure. The spontaneous release of endogenous dopamine was partially dependent on Ca2+, enhanced in Mg2+-free superfusion medium, partially reduced by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), partially reduced by the putative excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (DL-APH, 1 mM), and increased 10 fold by the dopamine uptake blocker, nomifensine (10 microM). DADL (5 and 50 nM) did not significantly affect spontaneous dopamine release. L-Glu (0.1-10 mM) produced a concentration-dependent release of endogenous dopamine from slices of caudate-putamen. This effect was Ca2+-dependent, strongly inhibited by 1.2 mM Mg2+, attenuated by DL-APH (1 mM), attenuated by TTX (0.3 microM), and enhanced by nomifensine (10 microM). In the presence of nomifensine DADL (50 nM) reduced significantly the L-Glu-evoked release of endogenous dopamine by 20%. The inhibitory effect of DADL was blocked by 10 microM naloxone. These results indicate that L-Glu stimulates the Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous dopamine in the caudate-putamen by activation of N-methy-D-aspartate-type of excitatory amino acid receptors. This release can be selectively modified by the delta-opioid agonist DADL in a naloxone-sensitive manner. PMID:2884003

  6. An updated view on the role of dopamine in myopia.

    PubMed

    Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2013-09-01

    A large body of data is available to support the hypothesis that dopamine (DA) is one of the retinal neurotransmitters involved in the signaling cascade that controls eye growth by vision. Initially, reduced retinal DA levels were observed in eyes deprived of sharp vision by either diffusers ("deprivation myopia", DM) or negative lenses ("lens induced myopia", LIM). Simulating high retinal DA levels by intravitreal application of a DA agonist can suppress the development of both DM and LIM. Also more recent studies using knock-out mouse models of DA receptors support the idea of an association between decreased DA levels and DM. There seem to be differences in the magnitude of the effects of DA on DM and LIM, with larger changes in DM but the degrees of image degradation by both treatments need to be matched to support this conclusion. Although a number of studies have shown that the inhibitory effects of dopamine agonists on DM and LIM are mediated through stimulation of the D2-receptor, there is also recent evidence that the balance of D2- and D1-receptor activation is important. Inhibition of D2-receptors can also slow the development of spontaneous myopia in albino guinea pigs. Retinal DA content displays a distinct endogenous diurnal, and partially circadian rhythm. In addition, retinal DA is regulated by a number of visual stimuli like retinal illuminance, spatial frequency content of the image, temporal contrast and, in chicks, by the light input from the pineal organ. A close interaction was found between muscarinergic and dopaminergic systems, and between nitric oxide and dopaminergic pathways, and there is evidence for crosstalk between the different pathways, perhaps multiple binding of the ligands to different receptors. It was shown that DA agonists interact with the immediate early signaling molecule ZENK which triggers the first steps in eye growth regulation. However, since long treatment periods were often needed to induce significant changes in

  7. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  8. BMI Modulates Calorie-Dependent Dopamine Changes in Accumbens from Glucose Intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Tomasi, Dardo; Convit, Antonio; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher T.; Shumay, Elena; Fowler, Joanna S.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dopamine mediates the rewarding effects of food that can lead to overeating and obesity, which then trigger metabolic neuroadaptations that further perpetuate excessive food consumption. We tested the hypothesis that the dopamine response to calorie intake (independent of palatability) in striatal brain regions is attenuated with increases in weight. Method We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine changes triggered by calorie intake by contrasting the effects of an artificial sweetener (sucralose) devoid of calories to that of glucose to assess their association with body mass index (BMI) in nineteen healthy participants (BMI range 21–35). Results Neither the measured blood glucose concentrations prior to the sucralose and the glucose challenge days, nor the glucose concentrations following the glucose challenge vary as a function of BMI. In contrast the dopamine changes in ventral striatum (assessed as changes in non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]raclopride) triggered by calorie intake (contrast glucose – sucralose) were significantly correlated with BMI (r = 0.68) indicating opposite responses in lean than in obese individuals. Specifically whereas in normal weight individuals (BMI <25) consumption of calories was associated with increases in dopamine in the ventral striatum in obese individuals it was associated with decreases in dopamine. Conclusion These findings show reduced dopamine release in ventral striatum with calorie consumption in obese subjects, which might contribute to their excessive food intake to compensate for the deficit between the expected and the actual response to food consumption. PMID:25000285

  9. Evaluation of animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: correlation with phasic dopamine neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Thibaut; Bizup, Brandon; Grace, Anthony A

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition defined by intrusive thoughts (obsessions) associated with compensatory and repetitive behaviour (compulsions). However, advancement in our understanding of this disorder has been hampered by the absence of effective animal models and correspondingly analysis of the physiological changes that may be present in these models. To address this, we have evaluated two current rodent models of OCD; repeated injection of dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole and repeated adolescent injection of the tricyclic agent clomipramine in combination with a behavioural paradigm designed to produce compulsive lever pressing. These results were then compared with their relative impact on the state of activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system using extracellular recoding of spontaneously active dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The clomipramine model failed to exacerbate compulsive lever pressing and VTA dopamine neurons in clomipramine-treated rats had mildly diminished bursting activity. In contrast, quinpirole-treated animals showed significant increases in compulsive lever pressing, which was concurrent with a substantial diminution of bursting activity of VTA dopamine neurons. Therefore, VTA dopamine activity correlated with the behavioural response in these models. Taken together, these data support the view that compulsive behaviours likely reflect, at least in part, a disruption of the dopaminergic system, more specifically by a decrease in baseline phasic dopamine signalling mediated by burst firing of dopamine neurons. PMID:23360787

  10. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780