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Sample records for aspartic proteinases fourier

  1. Secreted Aspartic Proteinase Family of Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Christophe; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete; Reichard, Utz; Sanglard, Dominique; Monod, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Medically important yeasts of the genus Candida secrete aspartic proteinases (Saps), which are of particular interest as virulence factors. Like Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis secretes in vitro one dominant Sap (Sapt1p) in a medium containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the sole source of nitrogen. Using the gene SAPT1 as a probe and under low-stringency hybridization conditions, three new closely related gene sequences, SAPT2 to SAPT4, encoding secreted proteinases were cloned from a C. tropicalis λEMBL3 genomic library. All bands identified by Southern blotting of EcoRI-digested C. tropicalis genomic DNA with SAPT1 could be assigned to a specific SAP gene. Therefore, the SAPT gene family of C. tropicalis is likely to contain only four members. Interestingly, the SAPT2 and SAPT3 gene products, Sapt2p and Sapt3p, which have not yet been detected in C. tropicalis cultures in vitro, were produced as active recombinant enzymes with the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris as an expression system. As expected, reverse transcriptase PCR experiments revealed a strong SAPT1 signal with RNA extracted from cells grown in BSA medium. However, a weak signal was obtained with all other SAPT genes under several conditions tested, showing that these SAPT genes could be expressed at a basic level. Together, these experiments suggest that the gene products Sapt2p, Sapt3p, and Sapt4p could be produced under conditions yet to be described in vitro or during infection. PMID:11119531

  2. Isolation and characterization of recombinant Drosophila Copia aspartic proteinase.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Senarath B P; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2006-11-01

    The wild type Copia Gag precursor protein of Drosophila melanogaster expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to be processed autocatalytically to generate two daughter proteins with molecular masses of 33 and 23 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The active-site motif of aspartic proteinases, Asp-Ser-Gly, was present in the 23 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal half of the precursor protein. The coding region of this daughter protein (152 residues) in the copia gag gene was expressed in E. coli to produce the recombinant enzyme protein as inclusion bodies, which was then purified and refolded to create the active enzyme. Using the peptide substrate His-Gly-Ile-Ala-Phe-Met-Val-Lys-Glu-Val-Asn (cleavage site: Phe-Met) designed on the basis of the sequence of the cleavage-site region of the precursor protein, the enzymatic properties of the proteinase were investigated. The optimum pH and temperature of the proteinase toward the synthetic peptide were 4.0 and 70 degrees C respectively. The proteolytic activity was increased with increasing NaCl concentration in the reaction mixture, the optimum concentration being 2 M. Pepstatin A strongly inhibited the enzyme, with a Ki value of 15 nM at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the active-site residue mutant, in which the putative catalytic aspartic acid residue was mutated to an alanine residue, had no activity. These results show that the Copia proteinase belongs to the family of aspartic proteinases including HIV proteinase. The B-chain of oxidized bovine insulin was hydrolysed at the Leu15-Tyr16 bond fairly selectively. Thus the recombinant Copia proteinase partially resembles HIV proteinase, but is significantly different from it in certain aspects. PMID:16813567

  3. New aspartic proteinase of Ulysses retrotransposon from Drosophila virilis.

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2004-06-01

    This work is focused on the investigation of a proteinase of Ulysses mobile genetic element from Drosophila virilis. The primary structure of this proteinase is suggested based on comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of aspartic proteinases from retroviruses and retrotransposons. The corresponding cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein accumulated in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein (12 kD) was subjected to refolding and purified by affinity chromatography on pepstatin-agarose. Proteolytic activity of the protein was determined using oligopeptide substrates melittin and insulin B-chain. It was found that the maximum of the proteolytic activity is displayed at pH 5.5 as for the majority of aspartic proteinases. We observed that hydrolysis of B-chain of insulin was totally inhibited by pepstatin A in the micromolar concentration range. The molecular weight of the monomer of the Ulysses proteinase was determined by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry. PMID:15236611

  4. Synthesis and proteinase inhibitory properties of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Walker, B; Walker, B J

    1998-07-01

    The synthesis of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acid, and their inhibitory activity against S. aureus V8 protease and granzyme B, is described. The study has revealed difficulties with protecting group compatibility in the synthesis of these analogues. Two analogues, Acetyl. AspP (OPh)2 and Acetyl.GluP (OPh)2 were found to function as irreversible inactivators of V8 proteinase, yet exhibit no activity against granzyme B. PMID:9873408

  5. An aspartic proteinase gene family in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea contains members with novel features.

    PubMed

    ten Have, Arjen; Dekkers, Ester; Kay, John; Phylip, Lowri H; van Kan, Jan A L

    2004-07-01

    Botrytis cinerea, an important fungal plant pathogen, secretes aspartic proteinase (AP) activity in axenic cultures. No cysteine, serine or metalloproteinase activity could be detected. Proteinase activity was higher in culture medium containing BSA or wheat germ extract, as compared to minimal medium. A proportion of the enzyme activity remained in the extracellular glucan sheath. AP was also the only type of proteinase activity in fluid obtained from B. cinerea-infected tissue of apple, pepper, tomato and zucchini. Five B. cinerea genes encoding an AP were cloned and denoted Bcap1-5. Features of the encoded proteins are discussed. BcAP1, especially, has novel characteristics. A phylogenetic analysis was performed comprising sequences originating from different kingdoms. BcAP1 and BcAP5 did not cluster in a bootstrap-supported clade. BcAP2 clusters with vacuolar APs. BcAP3 and BcAP4 cluster with secreted APs in a clade that also contains glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteinases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. All five Bcap genes are expressed in liquid cultures. Transcript levels of Bcap1, Bcap2, Bcap3 and Bcap4 are subject to glucose and peptone repression. Transcripts from all five Bcap genes were detected in infected plant tissue, indicating that at least part of the AP activity in planta originates from the pathogen. PMID:15256589

  6. Key features determining the specificity of aspartic proteinase inhibition by the helix-forming IA3 polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Harrison, Rebecca J; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-03-01

    The 68-residue IA(3) polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essentially unstructured. It inhibits its target aspartic proteinase through an unprecedented mechanism whereby residues 2-32 of the polypeptide adopt an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation upon contact with the active site of the enzyme. This potent inhibitor (K(i) < 0.1 nm) appears to be specific for a single target proteinase, saccharopepsin. Mutagenesis of IA(3) from S. cerevisiae and its ortholog from Saccharomyces castellii was coupled with quantitation of the interaction for each mutant polypeptide with saccharopepsin and closely related aspartic proteinases from Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus fumigatus. This identified the charged K18/D22 residues on the otherwise hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix as key selectivity-determining residues within the inhibitor and implicated certain residues within saccharopepsin as being potentially crucial. Mutation of these amino acids established Ala-213 as the dominant specificity-governing feature in the proteinase. The side chain of Ala-213 in conjunction with valine 26 of the inhibitor marshals Tyr-189 of the enzyme precisely into a position in which its side-chain hydroxyl is interconnected via a series of water-mediated contacts to the key K18/D22 residues of the inhibitor. This extensive hydrogen bond network also connects K18/D22 directly to the catalytic Asp-32 and Tyr-75 residues of the enzyme, thus deadlocking the inhibitor in position. In most other aspartic proteinases, the amino acid at position 213 is a larger hydrophobic residue that prohibits this precise juxtaposition of residues and eliminates these enzymes as targets of IA(3). The exquisite specificity exhibited by this inhibitor in its interaction with its cognate folding partner proteinase can thus be readily explained. PMID:17145748

  7. Adaptation of the behaviour of an aspartic proteinase inhibitor by relocation of a lysine residue by one helical turn.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Berry, Colin; Bur, Daniel; Kay, John

    2006-08-01

    In addition to self-inhibition of aspartic proteinase zymogens by their intrinsic proparts, the activity of certain members of this enzyme family can be modulated through active-site occupation by extrinsic polypeptides such as the small IA3 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The unprecedented mechanism by which IA3 helicates to inhibit its sole target aspartic proteinase locates an i, i+4 pair of charged residues (Lys18+Asp22) on an otherwise-hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix. The nature of these residues is not crucial for effective inhibition, but re-location of the lysine residue by one turn (+4 residues) in the helical IA3 positions its side chain in the mutant IA3-proteinase complex in an orientation essentially identical to that of the key lysine residue in zymogen proparts. The binding of the extrinsic mutant IA3 shows pH dependence reminiscent of that required for the release of intrinsic zymogen proparts so that activation can occur. PMID:16895485

  8. N-terminal extension of the yeast IA3 aspartic proteinase inhibitor relaxes the strict intrinsic selectivity.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Wyatt, David M; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-07-01

    Yeast IA(3) aspartic proteinase inhibitor operates through an unprecedented mechanism and exhibits a remarkable specificity for one target enzyme, saccharopepsin. Even aspartic proteinases that are very closely similar to saccharopepsin (e.g. the vacuolar enzyme from Pichia pastoris) are not susceptible to significant inhibition. The Pichia proteinase was selected as the target for initial attempts to engineer IA(3) to re-design the specificity. The IA(3) polypeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii differ considerably in sequence. Alterations made by deletion or exchange of the residues in the C-terminal segment of these polypeptides had only minor effects. By contrast, extension of each of these wild-type and chimaeric polypeptides at its N-terminus by an MK(H)(7)MQ sequence generated inhibitors that displayed subnanomolar potency towards the Pichia enzyme. This gain-in-function was completely reversed upon removal of the extension sequence by exopeptidase trimming. Capture of the potentially positively charged aromatic histidine residues of the extension by remote, negatively charged side-chains, which were identified in the Pichia enzyme by modelling, may increase the local IA(3) concentration and create an anchor that enables the N-terminal segment residues to be harboured in closer proximity to the enzyme active site, thus promoting their interaction. In saccharopepsin, some of the counterpart residues are different and, consistent with this, the N-terminal extension of each IA(3) polypeptide was without major effect on the potency of interaction with saccharopepsin. In this way, it is possible to convert IA(3) polypeptides that display little affinity for the Pichia enzyme into potent inhibitors of this proteinase and thus broaden the target selectivity of this remarkable small protein. PMID:17608726

  9. A Novel Aspartic Proteinase-Like Gene Expressed in Stratified Epithelia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rhiemeier, Verena; Breitenbach, Ute; Richter, Karl Hartmut; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Vogt, Ingeborg; Hartenstein, Bettina; Fürstenberger, Gerhard; Mauch, Cornelia; Hess, Jochen; Angel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Homeostasis of stratified epithelia, such as the epidermis of the skin, is a sophisticated process that represents a tightly controlled balance between proliferation and differentiation. Alterations of this balance are associated with common human diseases including cancer. Here, we report the cloning of a novel cDNA sequence, from mouse back skin, that is induced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and codes for a hitherto unknown aspartic proteinase-like protein (Taps). Taps represents a potential AP-1 target gene because TPA-induced expression in epidermal keratinocytes critically depends on c-Fos, and co-treatment with dexamethasone, a potent inhibitor of AP-1-mediated gene regulation, resulted in impaired activation of Taps expression. Taps mRNA and protein are restricted to stratified epithelia in mouse embryos and adult tissues, implicating a crucial role for this aspartic proteinase-like gene in differentiation and homeostasis of multilayered epithelia. During chemically induced carcinogenesis, transient elevation of Taps mRNA and protein levels was detected in benign skin tumors. However, its expression is negatively associated with dedifferentiation and malignant progression in squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. Similar expression was observed in squamous skin tumors of patients, suggesting that detection of Taps levels represents a novel strategy to discriminate the progression state of squamous skin cancers. PMID:16565508

  10. Purification and molecular cloning of aspartic proteinases from the stomach of adult Japanese fire belly newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Sano, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Mari; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Yasumasu, Shigeki; Inokuchi, Tomofumi

    2016-04-01

    Six aspartic proteinase precursors, a pro-cathepsin E (ProCatE) and five pepsinogens (Pgs), were purified from the stomach of adult newts (Cynops pyrrhogaster). On sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weights of the Pgs and active enzymes were 37-38 kDa and 31-34 kDa, respectively. The purified ProCatE was a dimer whose subunits were connected by a disulphide bond. cDNA cloning by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that three of the purified Pgs were classified as PgA and the remaining two were classified as PgBC belonging to C-type Pg. Our results suggest that PgBC is one of the major constituents of acid protease in the urodele stomach. We hypothesize that PgBC is an amphibian-specific Pg that diverged during its evolutional lineage. PgBC was purified and characterized for the first time. The purified urodele pepsin A was completely inhibited by equal molar units of pepstatin A. Conversely, the urodele pepsin BC had low sensitivity to pepstatin A. In acidic condition, the activation rates of newt pepsin A and BC were similar to those of mammalian pepsin A and C1, respectively. Our results suggest that the enzymological characters that distinguish A- and C-type pepsins appear to be conserved in mammals and amphibians. PMID:26711235

  11. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    PubMed

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-10-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivity. In transient expression studies in protoplasts, the N-terminal domain of ORF V was able to free active CAT enzyme from a precursor containing an N-terminal fusion of a portion of ORF IV. The junction between the two domains of this artificial polyprotein comprised sequences from the ORF IV product that had previously been shown to include a proteolytic processing site. The protease mutants were not able to free active CAT enzyme from this precursor. Direct analysis of cleavage at the same site in the ORF IV product using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli revealed the expected products. In vitro translation of a synthetic transcript covering ORF V was used to study the autocatalytic cleavage of the ORF product. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the 80 kd initial translation product was processed to yield a N-terminal doublet of polypeptides of 22 and 20 kd apparent mol. wt, which cover the protease domain. The mutants in the active site were not processed. PMID:2684630

  12. The diversity and evolutionary relationships of the pregnancy-associated glycoproteins, an aspartic proteinase subfamily consisting of many trophoblast-expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Sancai; Green, Jonathan; Bixby, James B.; Szafranska, Bozena; DeMartini, James C.; Hecht, Steven; Roberts, R. Michael

    1997-01-01

    The pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are structurally related to the pepsins, thought to be restricted to the hooved (ungulate) mammals and characterized by being expressed specifically in the outer epithelial cell layer (chorion/trophectoderm) of the placenta. At least some PAGs are catalytically inactive as proteinases, although each appears to possess a cleft capable of binding peptides. By cloning expressed genes from ovine and bovine placental cDNA libraries, by Southern genomic blotting, by screening genomic libraries, and by using PCR to amplify portions of PAG genes from genomic DNA, we estimate that cattle, sheep, and most probably all ruminant Artiodactyla possess many, possibly 100 or more, PAG genes, many of which are placentally expressed. The PAGs are highly diverse in sequence, with regions of hypervariability confined largely to surface-exposed loops. Nonsynonymous (replacement) mutations in the regions of the genes coding for these hypervariable loop segments have accumulated at a higher rate than synonymous (silent) mutations. Construction of distance phylograms, based on comparisons of PAG and related aspartic proteinase amino acid sequences, suggests that much diversification of the PAG genes occurred after the divergence of the Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla, but that at least one gene is represented outside the hooved species. The results also suggest that positive selection of duplicated genes has acted to provide considerable functional diversity among the PAGs, whose presence at the interface between the placenta and endometrium and in the maternal circulation indicates involvement in fetal–maternal interactions. PMID:9371757

  13. Inactivation of α1-proteinase inhibitor by Candida albicans aspartic proteases favors the epithelial and endothelial cell colonization in the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Klaga, Kinga; Bochenska, Oliwia; Wolak, Natalia; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, a causative agent of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, uses ten secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs) to deregulate the homeostasis of the host organism on many levels. One of these deregulation mechanisms involves a SAP-dependent disturbance of the control over proteolytic enzymes of the host by a system of dedicated proteinase inhibitors, with one important example being the neutrophil elastase and alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). In this study, we found that soluble SAPs 1-4 and the cell membrane-anchored SAP9 efficiently cleaved A1PI, with the major cleavage points located at the C-terminal part of A1PI in a close vicinity to the reactive-site loop that plays a critical role in the inhibition mechanism. Elastase is released by neutrophils to the environment during fungal infection through two major processes, a degranulation or formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). Both, free and NET-embedded elastase forms, were found to be controlled by A1PI. A local acidosis, resulting from the neutrophil activity at the infection sites, favors A1PI degradation by SAPs. The deregulation of NET-connected elastase affected a NET-dependent damage of epithelial and endothelial cells, resulting in the increased susceptibility of these host cells to candidal colonization. Moreover, the SAP-catalyzed cleavage of A1PI was found to decrease its binding affinity to a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8. The findings presented here suggest a novel strategy used by C. albicans for the colonization of host tissues and overcoming the host defense. PMID:26641639

  14. Structures of aspartic acid-96 in the L and N intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, A.; Sasaki, J.; Shichida, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Chang, M.; Ni, B.; Needleman, R.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared spectrum between the L or N intermediate minus light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was measured in order to examine the protonated states and the changes in the interactions of carboxylic acids of Asp-96 and Asp-115 in these intermediates. Vibrational bands due to the protonated and unprotonated carboxylic acid were identified by isotope shift and band depletion upon substitution of Asp-96 or -115 by asparagine. While the signal due to the deprotonation of Asp-96 was clearly observed in the N intermediate, this residue remained protonated in L. Asp-115 was partially deprotonated in L. The C = O stretching vibration of protonated Asp-96 of L showed almost no shift upon 2H2O substitution, in contrast to the corresponding band of Asp-96 or Asp-115 of BR, which shifted by 9-12 cm-1 under the same conditions. In the model system of acetic acid in organic solvents, such an absence of the shift of the C = O stretching vibration of the protonated carboxylic acid upon 2H2O substitution was seen only when the O-H of acetic acid is hydrogen-bonded. The non-hydrogen-bonded monomer showed the 2H2O-dependent shift. Thus, the O-H bond of Asp-96 enters into hydrogen bonding upon conversion of BR to L. Its increased hydrogen bonding in L is consistent with the observed downshift of the O-H stretching vibration of the carboxylic acid of Asp-96.

  15. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  16. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  17. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. Isolation and complete amino acid sequence of two fibrinolytic proteinases from the toxic Saturnid caterpillar Lonomia achelous.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Burkhart, W; LeVine, H; Arocha-Pinango, C L; Parikh, I

    1991-08-30

    The major toxic and fibrinolytic activity of the saliva and hemolymph of the larval form of Lonomia achelous was purified to homogeneity by a combination of metal chelate and affinity chromatography. Two apparent isozymes, Achelase I (213 amino acids, pIcalc = 10.55) and Achelase II (214 amino acids, pIcalc = 8.51), were sequenced by automated Edman degradation, and their C-termini confirmed by Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. The calculated molecular weights (22,473 and 22,727) correspond well to Mr estimates of 24,000 by SDS-PAGE. No carbohydrate was detected during sequencing. The enzymes degraded all three chains of fibrin, alpha greater than beta much greater than gamma, yielding a fragmentation pattern indistinguishable from that produced by trypsin. Chromogenic peptides S-2222 (Factor Xa and trypsin), S-2251 (plasmin), S-2302 (kallikrein) and S-2444 (urokinase) were substrates while S-2288 (broad range of serine proteinases including thrombin) was not hydrolyzed. Among a range of inhibitors Hg+2, aminophenylmercuriacetate, leupeptin, antipain and E-64 but not N-ethylmaleimide or iodoacetate abolished the activity of the purified isozymes against S-2444. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor and aprotinin were less effective. The presence of the classic catalytic triad (histidine-41, aspartate-86 and serine-189) suggests that Achelases I and II may be serine proteinases, but with a potentially free cysteine-185 which could react with thiol proteinase-directed reagents. PMID:1911844

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of procirsin, an active aspartic protease precursor from Cirsium vulgare (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Lufrano, Daniela; Faro, Rosário; Castanheira, Pedro; Parisi, Gustavo; Veríssimo, Paula; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra; Simões, Isaura; Faro, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Typical aspartic proteinases from plants of the Astereaceae family like cardosins and cyprosins are well-known milk-clotting enzymes. Their effectiveness in cheesemaking has encouraged several studies on other Astereaceae plant species for identification of new vegetable rennets. Here we report on the cloning, expression and characterization of a novel aspartic proteinase precursor from the flowers of Cirsium vulgare (Savi) Ten. The isolated cDNA encoded a protein product with 509 amino acids, termed cirsin, with the characteristic primary structure organization of plant typical aspartic proteinases. The pro form of cirsin was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to be active without autocatalytically cleaving its pro domain. This contrasts with the acid-triggered autoactivation by pro-segment removal described for several recombinant plant typical aspartic proteinases. Recombinant procirsin displayed all typical proteolytic features of aspartic proteinases as optimum acidic pH, inhibition by pepstatin, cleavage between hydrophobic amino acids and strict dependence on two catalytic Asp residues for activity. Procirsin also displayed a high specificity towards κ-casein and milk-clotting activity, suggesting it might be an effective vegetable rennet. The findings herein described provide additional evidences for the existence of different structural arrangements among plant typical aspartic proteinases. PMID:22727116

  20. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  2. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  3. [Proteinase-proteinase inhibitor complex in rats under oxidative stress caused by administration of cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of proteinase-inhibitor proteinase system response was estimated following of cobalt chloride injection. The increase proteinase activity, which led to significant decrease of alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha-2-MG) level was established that indicated to the removal of the proteinase in complex with alpha-2-MG from the organism. Increase of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha-1-PI) trypsin-inhibitory activity in the kidneys testify about removal of oxidative alpha-1-PI. PMID:10979565

  4. Characterization of proteinases in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Branquinha, M H; Vermelho, A B; Goldenberg, S; Bonaldo, M C

    1994-02-01

    Proteinases are important factors in the pathogenicity of many parasitic diseases. In this study, the proteolytic activities of 10 trypanosomatids from five different genera (Crithidia, Phytomonas, Endotrypanum, Trypanosoma and Leishmania) were determined by SDS-PAGE containing copolymerized gelatin as substrate. In almost all species we could detect two proteolytic classes, cysteine- and metalloproteinases, based on the inhibition of their activities by E-64 and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively. In all cases, the metalloproteinase activities did not change over a broad pH range (from 5.5 to 10). E. schaudinni, T. mega, T. dionisii, C. luciliae, C. fasciculata, C. oncopelti and C. guilhermei expressed one or two metalloproteinases of 45-66 kDa, whereas in P. serpens and P. hyssopifolia a double band of this endopeptidase was detected at 94 kDa. In contrast, no metalloproteinase activity was observed in L. tarentolae. The optimal pH for the cysteine-proteinase activities was acidic (about 5.5). In E. schaudinni, T. mega and in Crithidia sp., these proteinases had an apparent molecular weight of 66-94 kDa, while L. tarentolae expressed a broad band from 29 to 45 kDa. In Phytomonas sp., this class of endopeptidase showed a unique feature, in that major cysteine-proteinases were found at 29-66 kDa, but multiple, low-activity bands were detected from 116 to 200 kDa. The most striking characteristic, however, was the very intense cysteine-proteinase activity expressed by T. dionisii (29-66 kDa). We conclude that these differences in the proteolytic profiles could be useful markers to characterize and compare trypanosomatids. PMID:8081271

  5. AN INACTIVE PRECURSOR OF STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stuart D.; Dole, Vincent P.

    1947-01-01

    1. Streptococcal proteinase is derived from an inactive precursor found in culture filtrates of proteinase-producing streptococci. 2. The precursor can be converted into the proteinase by low concentrations of trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. 3. In cultures grown in suitable media the conversion of precursor to proteinase is effected autocatalytically. This reaction occurs under reducing conditions and is initiated by active proteinase present in low concentrations with the precursor. 4. The autocatalytic reaction is suppressed or retarded by conditions which decrease the activity of the proteinase, e.g. by growing cultures at 22°C. instead of at 37°C. or by growing them under markedly aerobic conditions. It is also retarded in the presence of casein. PMID:19871616

  6. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  7. Structure of equine infectious anemia virus proteinase complexed with an inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, A.; Kervinen, J.; Powell, D. J.; Zdanov, A.; Kay, J.; Wlodawer, A.

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the causative agent of infectious anemia in horses, is a member of the lentiviral family. The virus-encoded proteinase (PR) processes viral polyproteins into functional molecules during replication and it also cleaves viral nucleocapsid protein during infection. The X-ray structure of a complex of the 154G mutant of EIAV PR with the inhibitor HBY-793 was solved at 1.8 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.136. The molecule is a dimer in which the monomers are related by a crystallographic twofold axis. Although both the enzyme and the inhibitor are symmetric, the interactions between the central part of the inhibitor and the active site aspartates are asymmetric, and the inhibitor and the two flaps are partially disordered. The overall fold of EIAV PR is very similar to that of other retroviral proteinases. However, a novel feature of the EIAV PR structure is the appearance of the second alpha-helix in the monomer in a position predicted by the structural template for the family of aspartic proteinases. The parts of the EIAV PR with the highest resemblance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 PR include the substrate-binding sites; thus, the differences in the specificity of both enzymes have to be explained by enzyme-ligand interactions at the periphery of the active site as well. PMID:8844837

  8. Reactive oxygen species and anti-proteinases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Tooba; Zia, Mohammad Khalid; Ali, Syed Saqib; Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause damage to macromolecules such as proteins, lipids and DNA and alters their structure and function. When generated outside the cell, ROS can induce damage to anti-proteinases. Anti-proteinases are proteins that are involved in the control and regulation of proteolytic enzymes. The damage caused to anti-proteinase barrier disturbs the proteinase-anti-proteinases balance and uncontrolled proteolysis at the site of injury promotes tissue damage. Studies have shown that ROS damages anti-proteinase shield of the body by inactivating key members such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-antitrypsin. Hypochlorous acid inactivates α-1-antitrypsin by oxidizing a critical reactive methionine residue. Superoxide and hypochlorous acid are physiological inactivators of alpha-2-macroglobulin. The damage to anti-proteinase barrier induced by ROS is a hallmark of diseases such as atherosclerosis, emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, understanding the behaviour of ROS-induced damage to anti-proteinases may helps us in development of strategies that could control these inflammatory reactions and diseases. PMID:26699123

  9. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  10. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. PMID:2327970

  11. Characterization and cloning of metallo-proteinase in the excretory/secretory products of the infective-stage larva of Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Lun, H M; Mak, C H; Ko, R C

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitor sensitivity assays using azocaesin and FTC-caesin as substrates showed that the excretory/secretory (E/S) products of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis contained serine, metallo-, cysteine and aspartic proteinases. The activity of the metallo-proteinase was zinc ion dependent (within a range of ZnSO(4) concentrations). Gelatin-substrate gel electrophoresis revealed two bands of molecular mass 48 and 58 kDa which were sensitive to the metallo-proteinase inhibitor EDTA. The former peptide was probably a cleavage product of the latter. The authenticity of the 58 kDa metallo-proteinase as an E/S product was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Using PCR and RACE reactions, a complete nucleotide sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene was obtained. It comprised 2,223 bp with an open reading frame encoding 604 amino acid residues. The 3' untranslated region consisted of 352 bp, including a polyadenylation signal AATAA. A consensus catalytic zinc-binding motif was present. The conserved domains suggest that the cloned metallo-proteinase belongs to the astacin family and occurs as a single copy gene with 11 introns and 10 exons. Cluster analysis showed that the sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene of T. spiralis resembles those of Caenorhabdites elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:12743801

  12. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen). PMID:17205798

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to the two most basic papaya proteinases.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, P W; Kilshaw, P J; McEwan, F; Owen, A J

    1986-08-01

    The proteinases from Carica papaya include papain, isoenzymes of chymopapain and two proteinases A and B distinguished by their unusually high pI. The identity of one of the most basic proteinases has been questioned. The present report describes the preparation and characterisation of two monoclonal antibodies that react specifically with papaya proteinases A and B respectively and a third that identifies a common structural feature found in papain and proteinase A. PMID:3545314

  14. Rapid kinetic studies and structural determination of a cysteine proteinase mutant imply that residue 158 in caricain has a major effect upon the ability of the active site histidine to protonate a dipyridyl probe.

    PubMed

    Katerelos, N A; Goodenough, P W

    1996-11-26

    Cysteine proteinases are endopeptidases whose catalytic activity depends upon the nucleophilicity of the active site cysteine thiol group. An ion pair forms with an active site histidine. The presence in some cysteine proteinases of an aspartic acid close to the ion pair has been used as evidence of a "catalytic triad" as found in the serine proteinases. In these enzymes, the correct alignment of serine, histidine, and aspartate residues controls catalysis. However, the absence of the homologous aspartate residue in the mammalian cysteine proteinases cathepsins B and H argues against this pivotal role for aspartic acid. Instead, an Asn, physically close to the histidine in cysteine proteinases, has been proposed as a member of the catalytic triad. Protein engineering is being used to investigate these questions. In this study, the Asp158Glu mutant of the plant cysteine proteinase caricain was analyzed by stopped-flow rapid kinetics. The probe that was used was 2,2'-dipyridyl disulfide (2 PDS), and the profile of k versus pH gave results more closely allied to a small molecule active site model than the normal profile with cysteine proteinases. Multiple pKa's identified in the profile are as follows: pK1 = 3.4 (Cys 25), pK2 = 3.6, pK3 = 7.0, and pK4 = 8.6 (His 158). The structure of the enzyme with the bound inhibitor E64 was solved (R factor of 19.3%). Although the distance between the imadazolium and the surrounding charged amino acids is only slightly changed in the mutant, the reduced steady state activity and narrower pH range can be related to changes in the hydrogen-bonding capacity of the imadazolium. PMID:8942638

  15. Molecular-Scale Study of Aspartate Adsorption on Goethite and Competition with Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Wang, Shengrui; Xu, Yisheng; Zheng, Binghui; Liu, Jingyang

    2016-03-15

    Knowledge of the interfacial interactions between aspartate and minerals, especially its competition with phosphate, is critical to understanding the fate and transport of amino acids in the environment. Adsorption reactions play important roles in the mobility, bioavailability, and degradation of aspartate and phosphate. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the interfacial structures and their relative contributions in single-adsorbate and competition systems. Our results suggest three dominant mechanisms for aspartate: bidentate inner-sphere coordination involving both α- and γ-COO(-), outer-sphere complexation via electrostatic attraction and H-bonding between aspartate NH2 and goethite surface hydroxyls. The interfacial aspartate is mainly governed by pH and is less sensitive to changes of ionic strength and aspartate concentration. The phosphate competition significantly reduces the adsorption capacity of aspartate on goethite. Whereas phosphate adsorption is less affected by the presence of aspartate, including the relative contributions of diprotonated monodentate, monoprotonated bidentate, and nonprotonated bidentate structures. The adsorption process facilitates the removal of bioavailable aspartate and phosphate from the soil solution as well as from the sediment pore water and the overlying water. PMID:26870876

  16. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  17. [Character of changes in indicators of proteinase and proteinase inhibitor activity in gastroenterological pathology in children].

    PubMed

    Dovgun, O B; Tebloeva, L T; Shumeĭko, N K; Rudenskaia, G N

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine trypsin-lake proteinase activity, chymotrypsin-like proteinase activity, trypsin, alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels in blood serum at the children with gastroenterological pathology. These parameters did not chang at the children with functional disorder of stomach and duodenum. The stable balance between proteinases and inhibitors was determined only at the duration of the disease not more 5 years. The absence of normal levels these enzymes after traditional treatment was explain the necessity to continue the therapy at home with control of enzymes' levels. PMID:9703629

  18. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    PubMed

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  19. Inhibition of proteinase K by phosphorylated sugars.

    PubMed

    Orstan, A; Gafni, A

    1991-11-01

    Proteolysis of lactate dehydrogenase, aldolase and the synthetic substrate N-succinylalanylalanylalanyl-p-nitroanilide by proteinase K is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-1,6-biphosphate. Analysis of the kinetic data obtained with the synthetic substrate indicates that the inhibition is a mixed-type and that more than one inhibitor molecule binds to proteinase K. Glucose and fructose are ineffective as inhibitors. In the presence of 0.2-4 mM fructose-1,6-biphosphate, aldolase becomes more susceptible to proteolysis, probably as a result of a conformational change induced by the substrate. PMID:1815500

  20. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5017 - Aspartic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartic acid. 582.5017 Section 582.5017 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5017 Aspartic acid. (a) Product. Aspartic acid (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of antithrombin-heparin regulation of blood clotting proteinases. a paradigm for understanding proteinase regulation by serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Steven T.; Richard, Benjamin; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Gettins, Peter G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Serpin family protein proteinase inhibitors regulate the activity of serine and cysteine proteinases by a novel conformational trapping mechanism that may itself be regulated by cofactors to provide a finely-tuned time and location-dependent control of proteinase activity. The serpin, antithrombin, together with its cofactors, heparin and heparan sulfate, perform a critical anticoagulant function by preventing the activation of blood clotting proteinases except when needed at the site of a vascular injury. Here, we review the detailed molecular understanding of this regulatory mechanism that has emerged from numerous X-ray crystal structures of antithrombin and its complexes with heparin and target proteinases together with mutagenesis and functional studies of heparin-antithrombin-proteinase interactions in solution. Like other serpins, antithrombin achieves specificity for its target blood clotting proteinases by presenting recognition determinants in an exposed reactive center loop as well as in exosites outside the loop. Antithrombin reactivity is repressed in the absence of its activator because of unfavorable interactions that diminish the favorable RCL and exosite interactions with proteinases. Binding of a specific heparin or heparan sulfate pentasaccharide to antithrombin induces allosteric activating changes that mitigate the unfavorable interactions and promote template bridging of the serpin and proteinase. Antithrombin has thus evolved a sophisticated means of regulating the activity of blood clotting proteinases in a time and location-dependent manner that exploits the multiple conformational states of the serpin and their differential stabilization by glycosaminoglycan cofactors. PMID:20685328

  6. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops. PMID:23813339

  7. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  8. Aspartate protects Lactobacillus casei against acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aspartate on the acid tolerance of L. casei. Acid stress induced the accumulation of intracellular aspartate in L. casei, and the acid-resistant mutant exhibited 32.5 % higher amount of aspartate than that of the parental strain at pH 4.3. Exogenous aspartate improved the growth performance and acid tolerance of Lactobacillus casei during acid stress. When cultivated in the presence of 50 mM aspartate, the biomass of cells increased 65.8 % compared with the control (without aspartate addition). In addition, cells grown at pH 4.3 with aspartate addition were challenged at pH 3.3 for 3 h, and the survival rate increased 42.26-fold. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the aspartate-supplemented cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. In addition, higher contents of intermediates involved in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle were observed in cells in the presence of aspartate. The increased contents of many amino acids including aspartate, arginine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine in aspartate-added cells may contribute to the regulation of pHi. Transcriptional analysis showed that the expression of argG and argH increased during acid stress, and the addition of aspartate induced 1.46- and 3.06-fold higher expressions of argG and argH, respectively, compared with the control. Results presented in this manuscript suggested that aspartate may protect L. casei against acid stress, and it may be used as a potential protectant during the production of probiotics. PMID:23292549

  9. Predicting proteinase specificities from free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Seble Merid; Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2006-10-01

    The role of the primary binding residue (P1) in complexes between three different subtilases (subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and proteinase K) and their canonical protein inhibitor eglin c have been studied by free energy calculations. Based on the crystal structures of eglin c in complex with subtilisin Carlsberg and thermitase, and a homology model of the eglin c-proteinase K complex, a total of 57 mutants have been constructed and docked into their host proteins. The binding free energy was then calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for all complexes differing only in the nature of the amino acid at the P1 position. LIE calculations for 19 different complexes for each subtilase were thus carried out excluding proline. The effects of substitutions at the P1 position on the binding free energies are found to be very large, and positively charged residues (Arg, Lys and His) are particularly deleterious for all three enzymes. The charged variants of the acidic side chains are found to bind more favorably as compared to their protonated states in all three subtilases. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids are accommodated most favorably at the S1-site in all three enzymes. Comparison of the three series of binding free energies shows only minor differences in the 19 computed relative binding free energies among these subtilases. This is further reflected in the correlation coefficient between the 23 relative binding free energies obtained, including the possible protonation states of ionizable side chains, but excluding the P1 Pro, for subtilisin Carlsberg versus thermitase (0.95), subtilisin versus proteinase K (0.94) and thermitase versus proteinase K (0.96). PMID:16386933

  10. Role for different cell proteinases in cancer invasion and cytolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, S.; Beck, G.; DiStefano, J. F.; Lysik, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The crucial role of non-plasminogen dependent serine proteinases is tissue invasive and cytolytic functions of Walker 256 cancer cells has been documented using a rat urinary bladder invasion and a 125I-labelled fibroblast cytolysis assay. The invasive capacity of these cancer cells was abrogated by non toxic concentrations of the serine proteinase inhibitors, diisopropylfluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, but not by metallo or cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Although tumour cell collagenase activity and plasminogen activator were demonstrated, these proteolytic enzymes were not essential in these in vitro assays. These results suggest that different categories of proteinases play specific roles in the complicated process of cancer invasion. PMID:2992566

  11. [Effect of pentoxyphylline on certain indicators of the proteinase-proteinase inhibitor system in rats upon administration of cycloheximide].

    PubMed

    Samokhin, A A; Kaliman, P A; Samokhinka, L M

    2001-01-01

    The pentoxifylline influence on neutral proteinase, alpha-2-macroglobulin, trypsin-alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and elastaseinhibitory activity under cycloheximide injection has been investigated. Two hours after cycloheximide injection the activity of neutral proteinases increases in rats serum, lungs, heart, liver and kidneys. The preliminary injection of pentoxifylline prevents increase of neutral proteinases activity. Cycloheximide also decreases alpha-2-macroglobulin activity in serum and liver and trypsin-, elastaseinhibitory activity of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in all investigated organs. At using pentoxifylline the alpha-2-macroglobulin activity doesn't change in liver and increases in serum in comparison with only cycloheximide and there are no observed any alpha-1 inhibitor proteinase activity changes in rats serum and organs. PMID:12035527

  12. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  13. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  14. Nitrification of Aspartate by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, H. J.; Schmidt, E. L.

    1971-01-01

    Heterotrophic conversion of l-aspartic acid to nitrification products by Aspergillus flavus was studied in a replacement incubation system. Numerous amino acids supported nitrification; aspartate and glutamate were about equivalent as the best sources of nitrate. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to the incubation system substantially enhanced nitrate formation for all nitrifiable amino acids except aspartic acid, but the basis for the bicarbonate effect is obscure. The yield of nitrate from l-aspartate was not approached by forms of aspartic acid resulting from substitution on the beta carbon, the amino nitrogen, or the gamma carboxyl group or by aspartate presented as the d-configuration. There was no relationship between nitrate formation and the occurrence of such possible intermediates as nitrite, bound hydroxylamine, ammonia, aspergillic acid, and beta-nitropropionic acid. Uniformly labeled 14C-l-aspartate that was nitrified in replacement incubation led to no accumulation of label in possible nitrification products in the culture filtrate. Label was found in components of the mycelium after acid hydrolysis, with heaviest accumulation in what appeared to be glucosamine and an unidentified compound, possibly acetylglucosamine. Detectable label was redistributed into serine, glycine, and threonine. Images PMID:5549699

  15. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to inject subcutaneously ( ... it is colored, cloudy, thickened, or contains solid particles. If you are using insulin aspart suspension, the ...

  16. Leukocyte Cell Surface Proteinases: Regulation of Expression, Functions, and Mechanisms of Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: 1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinase by cells; 2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or 3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: 1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; 2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; 3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; 4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and 5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes. PMID:18329945

  17. The synthesis of peptidylfluoromethanes and their properties as inhibitors of serine proteinases and cysteine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Rauber, P; Angliker, H; Walker, B; Shaw, E

    1986-01-01

    A synthesis of peptidylfluoromethanes is described that utilizes the conversion of phthaloyl amino acids into their fluoromethane derivatives. These can be deblocked and elongated. The inactivation of chymotrypsin by Cbz-Phe-CH2F (benzyloxycarbonylphenylalanylfluoromethane) was found to be considerably slower than that of the analogous chloromethane. The fluoromethane analogue inactivates chymotrypsin with an overall rate constant that is 2% of that observed for the inactivation of the enzyme with the chloromethane. However, the result is the same. The reagent complexes in a substrate-like manner, with Ki = 1.4 X 10(-4) M, and alkylates the active-centre histidine residue. Cbz-Phe-Phe-CH2F and Cbz-Phe-Ala-CH2F were investigated as inactivators of the cysteine proteinase cathepsin B. The difference in reactivity between fluoromethyl ketones and chloromethyl ketones is less pronounced in the case of the cysteine proteinase than for the serine proteinase. Covalent bond formation takes place in this case also, as demonstrated by the use of a radiolabelled reagent. PMID:3827817

  18. Fractionation and purification of the thiol proteinases from papaya latex.

    PubMed

    Dekeyser, P M; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Lauwers, A

    1994-06-01

    Three cysteine proteinases, i.e. chymopapain, papaya proteinase IV and proteinase III, were purified to homogeneity from papaya latex using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. During the purification procedure, the thiol-groups of the active center were reversibly blocked as mixed disulfides with 2-thiopyridone. Homogeneity was proved electrophoretically by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE and rechromatography on a Mono S 5/5 column at pH 5.0. PMID:7952030

  19. Kinetic analysis of papaya proteinase omega.

    PubMed

    Sumner, I G; Vaughan, A; Eisenthal, R; Pickersgill, R W; Owen, A J; Goodenough, P W

    1993-08-01

    Papaya proteinase omega (pp omega) has been purified from dried latex both by immunoaffinity and traditional methods. Kinetic analysis revealed that (1), the pp omega-catalysed hydrolysis of N-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (BApNA) has a lower specificity (kcat/Km) than the same reaction catalysed by papain; (2), the pp omega-catalysed hydrolysis of a tripeptide substrate having phenylalanine at the second position (S2-site) showed a more similar specificity to that catalysed by papain; (3), the significant difference between the two enzymes is that steady state kinetics with both L-BApNA and a tripeptide enables the identification in pp omega of other ionizations affecting binding. The active sites of papain and pp omega can therefore be distinguished by pH-dependence of kcat/Km. PMID:8393709

  20. [Ammonia release and binding processes and the activity of acid proteinase and glycolysis enzymes in the dynamics of experimental toxic adrenal encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, V M; Trapezontseva, R A; Vilkov, G A

    1988-01-01

    The content of ammonium, glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and GABA, glutamine synthetase activity, acid proteinase, hexonase, phosphohexoisomerase and dehydrogenase glucose-6-phosphate were studied in dog brain homogenates after individual injections of Bacillus coli endotoxin (10 micrograms/kg) and adrenaline (75 micrograms/kg) into veins and their combined injections into the carotid artery. Isolated injections of endotoxin and adrenaline were shown to cause transient metabolic compensatory changes. Combined injections caused stable progressing brain metabolic disorders. It is suggested that neurochemical changes influence endogenous development of toxic adrenal encephalopathy. PMID:3276357

  1. Isolation and preliminary characterization of the cysteine-proteinases from the latex of Carica candamarcensis Hook.

    PubMed

    Walreavens, V; Jaziri, M; van Beeumen, J; Schnek, A G; Kleinschmidt, T; Looze, Y

    1993-07-01

    The cysteine-proteinase chymopapain from Carica papaya L. is used for chemonucleolysis of damaged human intervertebral spinal discs. The purification of this enzyme is difficult. To overcome these problems, we were looking for a substitute among the cysteine-proteinases of Carica candamarcensis Hook. The latex from unripe fruits was collected in an aqueous solution of methylethanethiolsulfonate to prevent proteolytic activities. The soluble fraction of the lypophilized product provided four enzymatically active peaks (CC-I-CC-IV) during chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50 in sodium acetate buffer, pH5.0. They could be further purified by rechromatography under similar conditions. The isolated enzymes have been characterized by PAGE, analysis of the Fourier transform infrared spectra, preliminary studies of their specificities as well as a comparison of the N-terminal amino-acid sequences up to position 43. CC-III proved to be glycosylated. CC-I and CC-III from Carica candamarcensis Hook are suggested to correspond to papain and chymopapain from Carica papaya L., respectively. PMID:8216902

  2. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  3. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  4. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying )

    1989-04-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with {sup 3}H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia.

  5. An electroblotting, two-step procedure for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor complexes in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Visal-Shah, S; Vrain, T C; Yelle, T C; Nguyen-Quoc, B; Michaud, D

    2001-08-01

    A two-step gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin/PAGE) procedure was devised for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor interactions in complex biological extracts. The proteins are first resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE under reducing or nonreducing conditions, and electrotransferred into a 0.75 mm-thick accompanying polyacrylamide slab gel containing 0.1% w/v porcine gelatin. The active proteinase bands are developed by a gelatin proteolysis step in the accompanying gel in the presence or absence of diagnostic proteinase inhibitors, allowing the assessment of proteinase classes and the visual discrimination of inhibitor-'sensitive' and -'insensitive' proteinases in complex extracts. Alternatively, protein extracts are preincubated with specific reversible inhibitors before electrophoresis, allowing a rapid discrimination of strong and weak interactions implicating proteinases and reversible inhibitors. In comparison with the standard gelatin/PAGE procedure, that involves copolymerization of gelatin with acrylamide in the resolving gel, this new procedure simplifies proteinase patterns, avoids overestimation of proteinase numbers in complex extracts, and allows in certain conditions the estimation of proteinase molecular weights. Stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32), bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4), papain (EC 3.4.22.2), and the extracellular (digestive) cysteine proteinases of five herbivorous pests are used as model enzymes to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in detecting proteinases and in studying their interactions with specific proteinaceous inhibitors potentially useful in biotechnology. PMID:11545387

  6. [Effect of quercetin on some indicators of the proteinase-proteinase inhibitor system in rats upon administration of cobalt chloride to them].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2001-01-01

    The results of quercetin effect on some changes of proteinase--proteinase inhibitor system parameters in rats under cobalt chloride injection are shown. It was established that preliminary quercetin administration prevened neutral proteinase activation and alpha-2-macroglobulin activity decreasing after 2 h of cobalt chloride influence. PMID:12199071

  7. Fourier Series Operating Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnow, Milton L.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a computer program for multiplying, adding, differentiating, integrating, "barring" and scalarly multiplying "literal" Fourier series as such, and for extracting the coefficients of specified terms.

  8. Proteinases in the joint: clinical relevance of proteinases in joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, Yvonne; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Proteinases are involved in essential steps in cartilage and bone homeostasis. Consequently, efforts have been made to establish their potential role in the pathology of rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are sensitive markers of disease severity and response to treatment, and therefore they have potential in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Despite disappointing early results with synthetic inhibitors of MMPs, there is still much scope for developing effective and safe MMPs inhibitors, and consequently to deliver new options to inhibit joint destruction. PMID:18001502

  9. Evolutionary patterns of proteinase activity in attine ant fungus gardens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Attine ants live in symbiosis with a basidiomycetous fungus that they rear on a substrate of plant material. This indirect herbivory implies that the symbiosis is likely to be nitrogen deprived, so that specific mechanisms may have evolved to enhance protein availability. We therefore hypothesized that fungal proteinase activity may have been under selection for efficiency and that different classes of proteinases might be involved. Results We determined proteinase activity profiles across a wide pH range for fungus gardens of 14 Panamanian species of fungus-growing ants, representing eight genera. We mapped these activity profiles on an independently obtained molecular phylogeny of the symbionts and show that total proteinase activity in lower attine symbionts peaks at ca. pH 6. The higher attine symbionts that have no known free-living relatives had much higher proteinase activities than the lower attine symbionts. Their total in vitro proteinase activity peaked at pH values around 5, which is close to the pH that the ants maintain in their fungus gardens, suggesting that the pH optimum of fungal proteinases may have changed after the irreversible domestication of evolutionary more derived fungal symbionts. This notion is also supported by buffering capacities of fungus gardens at pH 5.2 being remarkably high, and suggests that the fungal symbiont actively helps to maintain garden acidity at this specific level. Metalloproteinases dominated the activity profiles of lower attine gardens and may thus represent the ancestral type of proteinase production, whereas serine proteinase activity dominated the activity profiles of the higher attine gardens reared by Trachymyrmex and Sericomyrmex, suggesting that there may be trade-offs in the production of these enzyme classes. Remarkably, the single symbiont that is shared by species of the crown group of Atta and Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants mostly showed metalloproteinase activity, suggesting that recurrent

  10. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  11. Fourier Series Optimization Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the introduction of Fourier series as an immediate application of optimization of a function of more than one variable. Specifically, it is shown how the study of Fourier series can be motivated to enrich a multivariable calculus class. This is done through discovery learning and use of technology wherein students build the…

  12. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  13. The primary structure and characterization of carbohydrate chains of the extracellular glycoprotein proteinase inhibitor from latex of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Odani, S; Yokokawa, Y; Takeda, H; Abe, S; Odani, S

    1996-10-01

    A secretory proteinase inhibitor was isolated from the latex of green fruits of papaya (Carica papaya). The protein exhibited stoichiometric inhibition of bovine trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin by the same site or overlapping binding sites. The complete covalent structure consisting of 184 amino acids and two disulfide bonds was determined by protein analysis. During the structural analysis, a procedure was established to separate very hydrophilic peptides by reverse-phase HPLC. The result revealed that the latex protein belongs to an extensively diverse plant protein family that includes inhibitors of serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases, a taste-modifying protein, wound responsive proteins, storage proteins, amylase inhibitors and even an oxidoreductase. In this superfamily, the latex proteinase inhibitor is most similar to the curious protein, miraculin, which makes sour food taste sweet. Two carbohydrate chains, each probably composed of (mannose)5, (xylose)1, (fucose)0-2, and (N-acetylglucosamine)2 residues, were attached to asparagine 84 and 90. Mass-spectrometric and compositional analysis suggested that they may represent a new class of plant xylose-containing carbohydrate chains with five mannose residues. PMID:8898891

  14. Digestive Duet: Midgut Digestive Proteinases of Manduca sexta Ingesting Nicotiana attenuata with Manipulated Trypsin Proteinase Inhibitor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Jorge A.; Giri, Ashok P.; Jongsma, Maarten A.; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    Background The defensive effect of endogenous trypsin proteinase inhibitors (NaTPIs) on the herbivore Manduca sexta was demonstrated by genetically altering NaTPI production in M. sexta's host plant, Nicotiana attenuata. To understand how this defense works, we studied the effects of NaTPI on M. sexta gut proteinase activity levels in different larval instars of caterpillars feeding freely on untransformed and transformed plants. Methodology/ Principal Findings Second and third instars larvae that fed on NaTPI-producing (WT) genotypes were lighter and had less gut proteinase activity compared to those that fed on genotypes with either little or no NaTPI activity. Unexpectedly, NaTPI activity in vitro assays not only inhibited the trypsin sensitive fraction of gut proteinase activity but also halved the NaTPI-insensitive fraction in third-instar larvae. Unable to degrade NaTPI, larvae apparently lacked the means to adapt to NaTPI in their diet. However, caterpillars recovered at least part of their gut proteinase activity when they were transferred from NaTPI-producing host plants to NaTPI-free host plants. In addition extracts of basal leaves inhibited more gut proteinase activity than did extracts of middle stem leaves with the same protein content. Conclusions/ Significance Although larvae can minimize the effects of high NaTPI levels by feeding on leaves with high protein and low NaTPI activity, the host plant's endogenous NaTPIs remain an effective defense against M. sexta, inhibiting gut proteinase and affecting larval performance. PMID:18431489

  15. Two wound-inducible soybean cysteine proteinase inhibitors have greater insect digestive proteinase inhibitory activities than a constitutive homolog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Botella, M A; Subramanian, L; Niu, X; Nielsen, S S; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1996-08-01

    Diverse functions for three soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CysPIs) are inferred from unique characteristics of differential regulation of gene expression and inhibitory activities against specific Cys proteinases. Based on northern blot analyses, we found that the expression in leaves of one soybean CysPI gene (L1) was constitutive and the other two (N2 and R1) were induced by wounding or methyl jasmonate treatment. Induction of N2 and R1 transcript levels in leaves occurred coincidentally with increased papain inhibitory activity. Analyses of kinetic data from bacterial recombinant CysPI proteins indicated that soybean CysPIs are noncompetitive inhibitors of papain. The inhibition constants against papain of the CysPIs encoded by the wound and methyl jasmonate-inducible genes (57 and 21 nM for N2 and R1, respectively) were 500 to 1000 times lower than the inhibition constant of L1 (19,000 nM). N2 and R1 had substantially greater inhibitory activities than L1 against gut cysteine proteinases of the third-instar larvae of western corn rootworm and Colorado potato beetle. Cysteine proteinases were the predominant digestive proteolytic enzymes in the guts of these insects at this developmental stage. N2 and R1 were more inhibitory than the epoxide trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamide-(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) against western corn rootworm gut proteinases (50% inhibition concentration = 50, 200, and 7000 nM for N2, R1, and E-64, respectively). However, N2 and R1 were less effective than E-64 against the gut proteinases of Colorado potato beetle. These results indicate that the wound-inducible soybean CysPIs, N2 and R1, function in host plant defense against insect predation, and that substantial variation in CysPI activity against insect digestive proteinases exists among plant CysPI proteins. PMID:8756506

  16. Two wound-inducible soybean cysteine proteinase inhibitors have greater insect digestive proteinase inhibitory activities than a constitutive homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Y; Botella, M A; Subramanian, L; Niu, X; Nielsen, S S; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1996-01-01

    Diverse functions for three soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CysPIs) are inferred from unique characteristics of differential regulation of gene expression and inhibitory activities against specific Cys proteinases. Based on northern blot analyses, we found that the expression in leaves of one soybean CysPI gene (L1) was constitutive and the other two (N2 and R1) were induced by wounding or methyl jasmonate treatment. Induction of N2 and R1 transcript levels in leaves occurred coincidentally with increased papain inhibitory activity. Analyses of kinetic data from bacterial recombinant CysPI proteins indicated that soybean CysPIs are noncompetitive inhibitors of papain. The inhibition constants against papain of the CysPIs encoded by the wound and methyl jasmonate-inducible genes (57 and 21 nM for N2 and R1, respectively) were 500 to 1000 times lower than the inhibition constant of L1 (19,000 nM). N2 and R1 had substantially greater inhibitory activities than L1 against gut cysteine proteinases of the third-instar larvae of western corn rootworm and Colorado potato beetle. Cysteine proteinases were the predominant digestive proteolytic enzymes in the guts of these insects at this developmental stage. N2 and R1 were more inhibitory than the epoxide trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamide-(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) against western corn rootworm gut proteinases (50% inhibition concentration = 50, 200, and 7000 nM for N2, R1, and E-64, respectively). However, N2 and R1 were less effective than E-64 against the gut proteinases of Colorado potato beetle. These results indicate that the wound-inducible soybean CysPIs, N2 and R1, function in host plant defense against insect predation, and that substantial variation in CysPI activity against insect digestive proteinases exists among plant CysPI proteins. PMID:8756506

  17. The synthesis of inhibitors for processing proteinases and their action on the Kex2 proteinase of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Angliker, H; Wikstrom, P; Shaw, E; Brenner, C; Fuller, R S

    1993-01-01

    Peptidyl chloromethane and sulphonium salts containing multiple Arg and Lys residues were synthesized as potential inhibitors of prohormone and pro-protein processing proteinases. The potencies of these compounds were assayed by measuring the kinetics of inactivation of the yeast Kex2 proteinase, the prototype of a growing family of eukaryotic precursor processing proteinases. The most potent inhibitor, Pro-Nvl-Tyr-Lys-Arg-chloromethane, was based on cleavage sites in the natural Kex2 substrate pro-alpha-factor. This inhibitor exhibited a Ki of 3.7 nM and a second-order inactivation rate constant (k2/Ki) of 1.3 x 10(7) M-1.s-1 comparable with the value of kcat./Km obtained with Kex2 for the corresponding peptidyl methylcoumarinylamide substrate. The enzyme exhibited sensitivity to the other peptidyl chloromethanes over a range of concentrations, depending on peptide sequence and alpha-amino decanoylation, but was completely resistant to peptidyl sulphonium salts. Kinetics of inactivation by these new inhibitors of a set of 'control' proteinases, including members of both the trypsin and subtilisin families, underscored the apparent specificity of the compounds most active against Kex2 proteinase. PMID:8328974

  18. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  19. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  20. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloid-storage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  1. Generalized fiber Fourier optics.

    PubMed

    Cincotti, Gabriella

    2011-06-15

    A twofold generalization of the optical schemes that perform the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is given: new passive planar architectures are presented where the 2 × 2 3 dB couplers are replaced by M × M hybrids, reducing the number of required connections and phase shifters. Furthermore, the planar implementation of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) is also described, with a waveguide grating router (WGR) configuration and a properly modified slab coupler. PMID:21686007

  2. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  3. Antidepressant activity of aspartic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Petrov, V I; Sergeev, V S; Onishchenko, N V; Piotrovskii, L B

    2001-04-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-phenyl(benzyl)amino derivatives of aspartic acid was studied on various experimental models of depression. IEM-1770 (30 mg/kg) and IEM-1944 (20 mg/kg) exhibited antidepressant activity after single injection in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Antidepressant effect of 14-day administration of these compounds and reference drugs maprotiline (10 mg/kg) and citalopram (10 mg/kg) was confirmed on the model of learned helplessness. PMID:11550022

  4. The thiol proteinases from the latex of Carica papaya L. II. The primary structure of proteinase omega.

    PubMed

    Dubois, T; Kleinschmidt, T; Schnek, A G; Looze, Y; Braunitzer, G

    1988-08-01

    The complete primary structure of the proteinase omega isolated from the latex of the Carica papaya fruits is given. The polypeptide chain contains 216 amino-acid residues, the alignment of which was deduced from sequence analyses of the native enzyme, the tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and thermolysinolytic peptides and facilitated due to the considerable degree of homology with papain and actinidin. The location of the three disulfide bridges could be established with the help of peptic and thermolysinolytic fragments. Proteinase omega shares 148 identical amino-acid residues (68.5%) with papain and 108 ones (50%) with actinidin, including the three disulfide bridges and the free cysteine residue required for activity, as well as most of the other amino-acid residues involved in the catalytic mechanism and two thirds of the glycine residues which are of structural significance. The homology with other cysteine proteinases of different origin is discussed. PMID:3063283

  5. Phase diagram of crystallization of Aspergillus niger acid proteinase A, a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Norio; Ataka, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Katsura, Tatsuo; Tanokura, Masaru

    1996-10-01

    Proteinase A from Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus is a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase with an extremely low isoelectric point (pI 3.3). The protein is crystallized from ammonium sulfate solutions of pH lower than 4. The crystallization is affected by the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). We have studied the phase diagram of the crystallization of proteinase A in the absence and presence of DMSO, to clarify crystallization at such an extremely low pH and to study the effects of DMSO. The results indicate that the logarithm of protein solubility is a rectilinear function of ammonium sulfate concentration in both the absence and presence of DMSO. DMSO definitely lowers the solubility at relatively low concentrations of ammonium sulfate, but had little effect on protein solubility at higher concentrations of ammonium sulfate.

  6. Characterization of the hepatitis C virus-encoded serine proteinase: determination of proteinase-dependent polyprotein cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; McCourt, D W; Wychowski, C; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-01-01

    Processing of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) H strain polyprotein yields at least nine distinct cleavage products: NH2-C-E1-E2-NS2-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5A-NS5B-CO OH. As described in this report, site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression analyses were used to study the role of a putative serine proteinase domain, located in the N-terminal one-third of the NS3 protein, in proteolytic processing of HCV polyproteins. All four cleavages which occur C terminal to the proteinase domain (3/4A, 4A/4B, 4B/5A, and 5A/5B) were abolished by substitution of alanine for either of two predicted residues (His-1083 and Ser-1165) in the proteinase catalytic triad. However, such substitutions have no observable effect on cleavages in the structural region or at the 2/3 site. Deletion analyses suggest that the structural and NS2 regions of the polyprotein are not required for the HCV NS3 proteinase activity. NS3 proteinase-dependent cleavage sites were localized by N-terminal sequence analysis of NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B. Sequence comparison of the residues flanking these cleavage sites for all sequenced HCV strains reveals conserved residues which may play a role in determining HCV NS3 proteinase substrate specificity. These features include an acidic residue (Asp or Glu) at the P6 position, a Cys or Thr residue at the P1 position, and a Ser or Ala residue at the P1' position. Images PMID:8386278

  7. Cloning, expression and characterization of the proteinase from human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Tigue, N J; Matharu, P J; Roberts, N A; Mills, J S; Kay, J; Jupp, R

    1996-01-01

    After the U53 gene encoding the proteinase from human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) was sequenced, it was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the activity of the purified, recombinant HHV-6 proteinase was characterized quantitatively by using synthetic peptide substrates mimicking the release and maturation cleavage sites in the polyprotein precursors of HHV-6, human cytomegalovirus (CMV), murine CMV, and Epstein-Barr virus. Despite sharing 40% identity with other betaherpesvirus proteinases such as human CMV proteinase, the one-chain HHV-6 enzyme was distinguished from these two-chain proteinases by the absence of an internal autocatalytic cleavage site. PMID:8648756

  8. Serine proteinases from barley malt may degrade beta-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley seed proteinases are critically important to seed germination and malting in that they generate amino acids from seed N reserves, supporting embryo growth during germination and yeast fermentation during brewing. However, relatively little is known regarding the endogenous protein substrate ...

  9. FUSARIUM SPECIES SYNTHESIZE ALKALINE PROTEINASES IN INFESTED BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that is infested with Fusarium head blight (FHB, `scab') is unsuitable for malting and brewing because it may contain mycotoxins and has unacceptable malting quality. Fungal proteinases are apparently involved in plant-microbe interactions, because they degrade the storag...

  10. Identification and characterization of cysteine proteinases of Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S C; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Tatu, U; Singh, R K; Gupta, A K

    2011-09-01

    Trypanosoma evansi is a causative agent of 'surra', a common haemoprotozoan disease of livestock in India causing high morbidity and mortality in disease endemic areas. The proteinases released by live and dead trypanosomes entail immunosuppression in the infected host, which immensely contribute in disease pathogenesis. Cysteine proteinases are identified in the infectious cycle of trypanosomes such as cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi, rhodesain or brucipain from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and congopain from Trypanosoma congelense. These enzymes localised in lysosome-like organelles, flagellar pocket and on cell surface, which play a critical role in the life cycle of protozoan parasites, viz. in host invasion, nutrition and alteration of the host immune response. The paper describes the identification of cysteine proteinases of T. evansi lysate, activity profile at different pH optima and inhibition pattern using a specific inhibitor, besides the polypeptide profile of an antigen. Eight proteinases of T. evansi were identified in the molecular weight (MW) ranges of 28-170 kDa using gelatin substrate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (GS-PAGE), and of these proteinases, six were cysteine proteinases, as they were inhibited by L-3-carboxy-2,3-transepoxypropionyl-lecuylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64), a specific inhibitor. These proteolytic enzymes were most reactive in acidic pH between 3.0 and 5.5 in the presence of dithiothreitol and completely inactive at alkaline pH 10.0. Similarly, the GS-PAGE profile of the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi revealed strong proteolytic activity only at the 28-kDa zone at pH 5.5, while no proteolytic activity was observed in serum samples of uninfected rats. Further, the other zones of clearance, which were evident in T. evansi antigen zymogram, could not be observed in the serum samples of rats infected with T. evansi. The polypeptide pattern of the whole cell lysate antigen revealed 12-15 polypeptide bands

  11. Purification and characterization of a novel cysteine proteinase (periodontain) from Porphyromonas gingivalis. Evidence for a role in the inactivation of human alpha1-proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D; Potempa, J; Kordula, T; Travis, J

    1999-04-30

    Periodontal disease is characterized by inflammation of the periodontium manifested by recruitment of neutrophils, which can degranulate, releasing powerful proteinases responsible for destruction of connective tissues, and eventual loss of tooth attachment. Although the presence of host proteinase inhibitors (serpins) should minimize tissue damage by endogenous proteinases, this is not seen clinically, and it has been speculated that proteolytic inactivation of serpins may contribute to progression of the disease. A major pathogen associated with periodontal disease is the Gram-negative anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis, and in this report, we describe a novel proteinase that has been isolated from culture supernatants of this organism that is capable of inactivating the human serpin, alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, the primary endogenous regulator of human neutrophil elastase. This new enzyme, referred to as periodontain, belongs to the cysteine proteinase family based on inhibition studies and exists as a 75-kDa heterodimer. Furthermore, periodontain shares significant homology to streptopain, a proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes, and prtT, a putative proteinase from P. gingivalis. Clearly, the presence of this enzyme, which rapidly inactivates alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, could result in elevated levels of human neutrophil elastase clinically detected in periodontal disease and should be considered as a potential virulence factor for P. gingivalis. PMID:10212191

  12. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  13. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  14. Introduction to Fourier Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2007-01-01

    Much like a physical prism, which displays the frequency components of a light wave, Fourier analysis can be thought of as a mathematical prism that can tell us what harmonics or frequency components are contained in a recording of a sound wave. We wrote the MacScope II program so that the user could not only see a plot of the harmonic amplitudes…

  15. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  16. The NS3 proteinase domain of hepatitis C virus is a zinc-containing enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Stempniak, M; Hostomska, Z; Nodes, B R; Hostomsky, Z

    1997-01-01

    NS3 proteinase of hepatitis C virus (HCV), contained within the N-terminal domain of the NS3 protein, is a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase responsible for processing of the nonstructural region of the HCV polyprotein. In this study, we examined the sensitivity of the NS3 proteinase to divalent metal ions, which is unusual behavior for this proteinase class. By using a cell-free coupled transcription-translation system, we found that HCV polyprotein processing can be activated by Zn2+ (and, to a lesser degree, by Cd2+, Pb2+, and Co2+) and inhibited by Cu2+ and Hg2+ ions. Elemental analysis of the purified NS3 proteinase domain revealed the presence of zinc in an equimolar ratio. The zinc content was unchanged in a mutated NS3 proteinase in which active-site residues His-57 and Ser-139 were replaced with Ala, suggesting that the zinc atom is not directly involved in catalysis but rather may have a structural role. Based on data from site-directed mutagenesis combined with zinc content determination, we propose that Cys-97, Cys-99, Cys-145, and His-149 coordinate the structural zinc in the HCV NS3 proteinase. A similar metal binding motif is found in 2A proteinases of enteroviruses and rhinoviruses, suggesting that these 2A proteinases and HCV NS3 proteinase are structurally related. PMID:9060645

  17. MOLECULAR CLONING OF TRYPSIN-LIKE CDNAS AND COMPARISON OF PROTEINASE ACTIVITIES IN THE SALIVARY GLANDS AND GUT OF THE TARNISHED PLANT BUG LYGUS LINEOLARIS (HEMIPTERA: MIRIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using specific proteinase inhibitors, we demonstrated that serine proteinases in the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, are major proteinases in both salivary glands and gut tissues. Gut proteinases were less sensitive to inhibition than proteinases from the salivary glands. Up to 80% azocaseina...

  18. Independent task Fourier filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2001-11-01

    Since the early 1960s, a major part of optical computing systems has been Fourier pattern recognition, which takes advantage of high speed filter changes to enable powerful nonlinear discrimination in `real time.' Because filter has a task quite independent of the tasks of the other filters, they can be applied and evaluated in parallel or, in a simple approach I describe, in sequence very rapidly. Thus I use the name ITFF (independent task Fourier filter). These filters can also break very complex discrimination tasks into easily handled parts, so the wonderful space invariance properties of Fourier filtering need not be sacrificed to achieve high discrimination and good generalizability even for ultracomplex discrimination problems. The training procedure proceeds sequentially, as the task for a given filter is defined a posteriori by declaring it to be the discrimination of particular members of set A from all members of set B with sufficient margin. That is, we set the threshold to achieve the desired margin and note the A members discriminated by that threshold. Discriminating those A members from all members of B becomes the task of that filter. Those A members are then removed from the set A, so no other filter will be asked to perform that already accomplished task.

  19. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  20. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  1. Structural characterization of the papaya cysteine proteinases at low pH.

    PubMed

    Huet, Joëlle; Looze, Yvan; Bartik, Kristin; Raussens, Vincent; Wintjens, René; Boussard, Paule

    2006-03-10

    Current control of gastrointestinal nematodes relies primarily on the use of synthetic drugs and encounters serious problems of resistance. Oral administration of plant cysteine proteinases, known to be capable of damaging nematode cuticles, has recently been recommended to overcome these problems. This prompted us to examine if plant cysteine proteinases like the four papaya proteinases papain, caricain, chymopapain, and glycine endopeptidase that have been investigated here can survive acidic pH conditions and pepsin degradation. The four papaya proteinases have been found to undergo, at low pH, a conformational transition that instantaneously converts their native forms into molten globules that are quite unstable and rapidly degraded by pepsin. As shown by activity measurements, the denatured state of these proteinases which finally results from acid treatment is completely irreversible. It is concluded that cysteine proteinases from plant origin may require to be protected against both acid denaturation and proteolysis to be effective in the gut after oral administration. PMID:16434027

  2. Neutrophil-derived Oxidants and Proteinases as Immunomodulatory Mediators in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Witko-Sarsat, V.

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophils generate potent microbicidal molecules via the oxygen-dependent pathway, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), and via the non-oxygen dependent pathway, consisting in the release of serine proteinases and metalloproteinases stored in granules. Over the past years, the concept has emerged that both ROI and proteinases can be viewed as mediators able to modulate neutrophil responses as well as the whole inflammatory process. This is well illustrated by the oxidative regulation of proteinase activity showing that oxidants and proteinases acts is concert to optimize the microbicidal activity and to damage host tissues. ROI and proteinases can modify the activity of several proteins involved in the control of inflammatory process. Among them, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8, are elective targets for such a modulation. Moreover, ROI and proteinases are also able to modulate the adhesion process of neutrophils to endothelial cells, which is a critical step in the inflammatory process. PMID:18472951

  3. Submicromolar Phosphinic Inhibitors of E. coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Laëtitia; Kantrowitz, Evan R.; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The design, syntheses, and enzymatic activity of two submicromolar competitive inhibitors of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) are described. The phosphinate inhibitors are analogs of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA) but have a reduced charge at the phosphorus moiety. The mechanistic implications are discussed in terms of a possible cyclic transition-state during enzymatic catalysis. PMID:19097895

  4. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  5. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  6. Fourier Domain Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldkhun, Daniel (Inventor); Wagner, Kelvin H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and systems are disclosed of sensing an object. A first radiation is spatially modulated to generate a structured second radiation. The object is illuminated with the structured second radiation such that the object produces a third radiation in response. Apart from any spatially dependent delay, a time variation of the third radiation is spatially independent. With a single-element detector, a portion of the third radiation is detected from locations on the object simultaneously. At least one characteristic of a sinusoidal spatial Fourier-transform component of the object is estimated from a time-varying signal from the detected portion of the third radiation.

  7. Astronomical Fourier spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Connes, P; Michel, G

    1975-09-01

    A high resolution near ir Fourier spectrometer with the same general design as previously described laboratory instruments has been built for astronomical observations at a coudé focus. Present spectral range is 0.8-3.5 microm with PbS and Ge detectors and maximum path difference 1 m. The servo system can accommodate various recording modes: stepping or continuous scan, path difference modulation, sky chopping. A real time computer is incorporated into the system, which has been set up at the Hale 500-cm telescope on Mount Palomar. Samples of the results are given. PMID:20154966

  8. [Occurrence and function of a proteinase inhibitor in the hemolymph of insects].

    PubMed

    Hanschke, R; Hanschke, M

    1975-01-01

    The presence of proteinase inhibitor has been proved in the hemolymph of a number of insect species from seven different insect orders. The amount of proteinase inhibitor in the hemolymph significantly increases after injection of inactivated bacteria into the hemocoelom of Galleria mellonella-larvae. Moreover the larvae show an increased resistance against normally lethal concentrations of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase P and extracellular proteinase produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is discussed that the proteinase inhibitor is one of the factors acting in the antibacterial defense system in the hemolymph of Galleria mellonella-larvae. PMID:811027

  9. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  10. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  11. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  12. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  13. Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-04-14

    The operating principles of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of such instruments with respect to alternative imaging spectrometers are discussed. The primary advantages of the IFTS are the capacity to acquire more than an order of magnitude more spectral channels than alternative systems with more than an order of magnitude greater etendue than for alternative systems. The primary disadvantage of IFTS, or FTS in general, is the sensitivity to temporal fluctuations, either random or periodic. Data from the IRIFTS (ir IFTS) prototype instrument, sensitive in the infrared, are presented having a spectral sensitivity of 0.01 absorbance units, a spectral resolution of 6 cm{sup {minus}1} over the range 0 to 7899 cm{sup {minus}1}, and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mr.

  14. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  15. Astronomical Fourier spectropolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, F. F.; Fymat, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectra of the Stokes polarization parameters of Venus (resolution 0.5 per cm) are presented. They were obtained at the Cassegrain focus of the 154-cm telescope of the National Mexican Observatory, Baja California, Mexico, July 12 and 13, 1972, with the Fourier Interferometer Polarimeter (FIP). A preliminary, limited analysis of four spectral features and of the CO2 rotational band structures at 6080 and 6200 per cm has demonstrated that spectral polarization is indeed present. These experimental results, confirmed by two series of observations, provide substantiation for this theoretically predicted phenomenon. They also tend to show that the FIP represents a novel astronomical tool for variable spectral resolution studies of both the intensity and the state of polarization of astronomical light sources.

  16. Rainbow Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions. Polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg exhibit a sharply defined rainbow structure, the shape of which is determined mostly by single scattering properties of cloud particles, and therefore, can be modeled using the Mie theory. Fitting the observed rainbow with such a model (computed for a parameterized family of particle size distributions) has been used for cloud droplet size retrievals. We discovered that the relationship between the rainbow structures and the corresponding particle size distributions is deeper than it had been commonly understood. In fact, the Mie theory-derived polarized reflectance as a function of reduced scattering angle (in the rainbow angular range) and the (monodisperse) particle radius appears to be a proxy to a kernel of an integral transform (similar to the sine Fourier transform on the positive semi-axis). This approach, called the rainbow Fourier transform (RFT), allows us to accurately retrieve the shape of the droplet size distribution by the application of the corresponding inverse transform to the observed polarized rainbow. While the basis functions of the proxy-transform are not exactly orthogonal in the finite angular range, this procedure needs to be complemented by a simple regression technique, which removes the retrieval artifacts. This non-parametric approach does not require any a priori knowledge of the droplet size distribution functional shape and is computationally fast (no look-up tables, no fitting, computations are the same as for the forward modeling).

  17. Link between allergic asthma and airway mucosal infection suggested by proteinase-secreting household fungi.

    PubMed

    Porter, P; Susarla, S C; Polikepahad, S; Qian, Y; Hampton, J; Kiss, A; Vaidya, S; Sur, S; Ongeri, V; Yang, T; Delclos, G L; Abramson, S; Kheradmand, F; Corry, D B

    2009-11-01

    Active fungal proteinases are powerful allergens that induce experimental allergic lung disease strongly resembling atopic asthma, but the precise relationship between proteinases and asthma remains unknown. Here, we analyzed dust collected from the homes of asthmatic children for the presence and sources of active proteinases to further explore the relationship between active proteinases, atopy, and asthma. Active proteinases were present in all houses and many were derived from fungi, especially Aspergillus niger. Proteinase-active dust extracts were alone insufficient to initiate asthma-like disease in mice, but conidia of A. niger readily established a contained airway mucosal infection, allergic lung disease, and atopy to an innocuous bystander antigen. Proteinase produced by A. niger enhanced fungal clearance from lung and was required for robust allergic disease. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-5 were required for optimal clearance of lung fungal infection and eosinophils showed potent anti-fungal activity in vitro. Thus, asthma and atopy may both represent a protective response against contained airway infection due to ubiquitous proteinase-producing fungi. PMID:19710638

  18. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PROTEINASE ACTIVITIES OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS-RESISTANT AND -SUSCEPTIBLE OSTRINIA NUBILALIS (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteinase activities were compared in soluble and membrane fractions of gut tissues of Bacillus thuringiensis-resistant and -susceptible Ostrinia nubilalis larvae. The soluble trypsin-like proteinase activity of the resistant strain was reduced 56%, significantly lower than that of the susceptibl...

  19. Roles for proteinases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated to show that proteinases play critical roles in airspace enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, until recently the causative enzymes and their exact roles in pathologic processes in COPD have not been clear. Recent studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of COPD have confirmed roles for proteinases not only in airspace enlargement, but also in airway pathologies in COPD. These studies have also shed light on the specific proteinases involved in COPD pathogenesis, and the mechanisms by which these proteinases injure the lung. They have also identified important interactions between different classes of proteinases, and between proteinases and other molecules that amplify lung inflammation and injury. This review will discuss the biology of proteinases and the mechanisms by which they contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition, I will discuss the potential of proteinase inhibitors and anti-inflammatory drugs as new treatment strategies for COPD patients. PMID:18686734

  20. ANALYSIS OF MIDGUT PROTEINASES FROM BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS-SUSCEPTIBLE AND -RESISTANT HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (LEPIDOPTERA: NOCTUIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects with altered proteinases can avoid intoxication by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Therefore, proteinase activities from gut extracts of Bt-susceptible (YDK) and -resistant (YHD2-B, CXC and KCBhyb) H. virescens strains were compared. The overall pH of gut extracts from YDK and CXC were...

  1. [Activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rat organs under cobalt and mercury chloride injection].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rats under cobalt and mercury chloride injection was investigated. The calpains activity increase in the lungs, heart, liver and kidneys was revealed after 2 h cobalt chloride action. The mercury chloride gives a reliable increase of calcium-dependent neutral proteinases only in the kidneys. PMID:14574747

  2. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives.

  3. Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Mark W.; Griffith, Stephen M.; Miller, Susan S.; Vance, Carroll P.

    1990-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in all plants and is particularly important in the assimilation of fixed N derived from the legume-Rhizoblum symbiosis. Two isozymes of AAT (AAT-1 and AAT-2) occur in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Antibodies against alfalfa nodule AAT-2 do not recognize AAT-1, and these antibodies were used to study AAT-2 expression in different tissues and genotypes of alfalfa and also in other legume and nonlegume species. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicated that nodules of 38-day-old alfalfa plants contained about eight times more AAT-2 than did nodules of 7-day-old plants, confirming the nodule-enhanced nature of this isozyme. AAT-2 was estimated to make up 16, 15, 5, and 8 milligrams per gram of total soluble protein in mature nodules, roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, of effective N2-fixing alfalfa. The concentration of AAT-2 in nodules of ineffective non-N2-fixing alafalfa genotypes was about 70% less than that of effective nodules. Western blots of soluble protein from nodules of nine legume species indicated that a 40-kilodalton polypeptide that reacts strongly with AAT-2 antibodies is conserved in legumes. Nodule AAT-2 immunoprecipitation data suggested that amide- and ureide-type legumes may differ in expression and regulation of the enzyme. In addition, Western blotting and immunoprecipitations of AAT activity demonstrated that antibodies against alfalfa AAT-2 are highly cross-reactive with AAT enzyme protein in leaves of soybean (Glycine max L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) and in roots of maize, but not with AAT in soybean and wheat roots. Results from this study indicate that AAT-2 is structurally conserved and localized in similar tissues among diverse species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667896

  4. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  5. The thiol proteinases from the latex of Carica papaya L. I. Fractionation, purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Dubois, T; Jacquet, A; Schnek, A G; Looze, Y

    1988-08-01

    Three thiol proteinases, namely papain, chymopapain and proteinase omega were purified to homogeneity from the latex of Carica papaya L. During the purification procedure, the thiol function of the cysteinyl residues were protected either as mixed disulfides with cysteamine or 2-thiopyridone or as S-sulphenylthiosulfate derivative or after blocking with p-chloromercuribenzoic acid. In marked contrast with earlier publications, chymopapain also was found to be a monothiol proteinase as papain and proteinase omega. The active sites of chymopapain and proteinase omega could not be distinguished from that of papain neither by the analysis of the pH dependence of kcat/Km nor by the examination of the pH dependence of the fluorescence emission spectra. PMID:3214554

  6. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  7. An Emerging Role of Degrading Proteinases in Hypertension and the Metabolic Syndrome: Autodigestion and Receptor Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for hypertension research is to identify the mechanisms that cause the comorbidities encountered in many hypertensive patients, as seen in the metabolic syndrome. An emerging body of evidence suggests that human and experimental hypertensives may exhibit uncontrolled activity of proteinases, including the family of matrix metalloproteinases, recognized for their ability to restructure the extracellular matrix proteins and to play a role in hypertrophy. We propose a new hypothesis that provides a molecular framework for the comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes, capillary rarefaction, immune suppression, and other cell and organ dysfunctions due to early and uncontrolled extracellular receptor cleavage by active proteinases. The proteinase and signaling activity in hypertensives requires further detailed analysis of the proteinase expression, the mechanisms causing proenzyme activation, and identification of the proteinase substrate. This work may open the opportunity for reassessment of old interventions and development of new interventions to manage hypertension and its comorbidities. PMID:22081429

  8. Fourier Ellipsometry -- An Ellipsometric Approach to Fourier Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, P.; Kumar, N.; Fried, M.; Fodor, B.; Juhasz, G.; Pereira, S. F.; Burger, S.; Urbach, H. P.

    2015-01-01

    An extension of Fourier scatterometry is presented, aiming at increasing the sensitivity by measuring the phase difference between the reflections polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The ellipsometric approach requires no additional hardware elements compared with conventional Fourier scatterometry. Furthermore, incoherent illumination is also sufficient, which enables spectroscopy using standard low-cost light sources.

  9. Crystallographic studies of aspartate racemase from Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomomi; Yamauchi, Takae; Ishiyama, Makoto; Gogami, Yoshitaka; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Aspartate racemase catalyzes the interconversion between L-aspartate and D-aspartate and belongs to the PLP-independent racemases. The enzyme from the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893, isolated from kimoto, is considered to be involved in D-aspartate synthesis during the brewing process of Japanese sake at low temperatures. The enzyme was crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 25%(v/v) PEG MME 550, 5%(v/v) 2-propanol. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.68, c = 97.29 Å, and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. Structure determination is under way. PMID:26249691

  10. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  11. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  12. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF A STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE AND ITS PRECURSOR

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, Theodore; Elliott, S. D.

    1951-01-01

    An electrophoretic study of crystalline preparations of a streptococcal proteinase and its precursor established their isoelectric points at pH values of 8.42 and 7.35 respectively (ionic strength 0.10). Preparations of the proteinase appeared to be electrophoretically homogeneous over a pH range of 5 to 8.5. Precursor preparations contained a relatively low concentration of the active enzyme visible as a separate peak in electrophoretic patterns of sufficiently concentrated solutions. Autocatalytic conversion of precursor to active enzyme was complete and resulted in a corresponding change in the electrophoretic pattern. Treatment of precursor preparations with trypsin produced incomplete conversion to the active enzyme and resulted in the formation of a modified precursor protein. This differed from the parent substance in electrophoretic mobility and in susceptibility to trypsin, but resembled it in immunological specificity and, as previously shown, in susceptibility to conversion to active enzyme by autocatalysis. Serological reactions of precursor and active enzyme components withdrawn from the cell after electrophoresis are described. It appears that the precursor protein may have two antigenic groups, one specific, the other shared by the active enzyme which behaves as a single antigen. PMID:14888818

  13. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  14. Reflective Fourier ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Shaun; Zheng, Guoan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-02-01

    The Fourier ptychography technique in reflection mode has great potential applications in tissue imaging and optical inspection, but the current configuration either has a limitation on cut-off frequency or is not practical. By placing the imaging aperture stop outside the illumination path, the illumination numerical aperture (NA) can be greater than the imaging NA of the objective lens. Thus, the cut-off frequency achieved in the proposed optical system is greater than twice the objective's NA divided by the wavelength (2NAobj/λ), which is the diffraction limit for the cut-off frequency in an incoherent epi-illumination configuration. We experimentally demonstrated that the synthesized NA is increased by a factor of 4.5 using the proposed optical concept. The key advantage of the proposed system is that it can achieve high-resolution imaging over a large field of view with a simple objective. It will have a great potential for applications in endoscopy, biomedical imaging, surface metrology, and industrial inspection.

  15. Reconstruction in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, A.; Percival, W. J.; Howlett, C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a fast iterative fast Fourier transform (FFT) based reconstruction algorithm that allows for non-parallel redshift-space distortions (RSDs). We test our algorithm on both N-body dark matter simulations and mock distributions of galaxies designed to replicate galaxy survey conditions. We compare solenoidal and irrotational components of the redshift distortion and show that an approximation of this distortion leads to a better estimate of the real-space potential (and therefore faster convergence) than ignoring the RSD when estimating the displacement field. Our iterative reconstruction scheme converges in two iterations for the mock samples corresponding to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS Data Release 11 when we start with an approximation of the RSD. The scheme takes six iterations when the initial estimate, measured from the redshift-space overdensity, has no RSD correction. Slower convergence would be expected for surveys covering a larger angle on the sky. We show that this FFT based method provides a better estimate of the real-space displacement field than a configuration space method that uses finite difference routines to compute the potential for the same grid resolution. Finally, we show that a lognormal transform of the overdensity, used as a proxy for the linear overdensity, is beneficial in estimating the full displacement field from a dense sample of tracers. However, the lognormal transform of the overdensity does not perform well when estimating the displacements from sparser simulations with a more realistic galaxy density.

  16. Reflective Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Shaun; Zheng, Guoan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-02-01

    The Fourier ptychography technique in reflection mode has great potential applications in tissue imaging and optical inspection, but the current configuration either has a limitation on cut-off frequency or is not practical. By placing the imaging aperture stop outside the illumination path, the illumination numerical aperture (NA) can be greater than the imaging NA of the objective lens. Thus, the cut-off frequency achieved in the proposed optical system is greater than twice the objective's NA divided by the wavelength (2NAobj/λ ), which is the diffraction limit for the cut-off frequency in an incoherent epi-illumination configuration. We experimentally demonstrated that the synthesized NA is increased by a factor of 4.5 using the proposed optical concept. The key advantage of the proposed system is that it can achieve high-resolution imaging over a large field of view with a simple objective. It will have a great potential for applications in endoscopy, biomedical imaging, surface metrology, and industrial inspection. PMID:26891601

  17. Isolation and characterization of human plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and a conformational study of its interaction with proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Saklatvala, J; Wood, G C; White, D D

    1976-01-01

    1. alpha 1-Proteinase inhibitor was isolated from human plasma by a five-step procedure. Isoelectric focusing showed that six components focused between pH4.85 and 4.95. 2. The mol.wt. of the inhibitor was 52000 by sedimentation equilibrium and sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of the inhibitor were also determined. 3. The far-u.v.c.d. (circular-dichroism) spectrum indicated that the inhibitor had about 36% alpha-helical content. 4. The loss of proteinase-inhibitory activity when the inhibitor was exposed to pH values less than 5.0 or greater than 10.5 was accompanied by small changes in the far-u.v.c.d. spectrum and large changes in the near-u.v.c.d. spectrum. The change at alkaline pH was associated with ionization of tyrosine residues. 5. Interaction of inhibitor with chymotrypsin caused perturbation of the c.d. spectrum and this was used to follow the interaction and show a 1:1 stoicheiometry. 6. C.d., electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing showed that the inhibitor-enzyme complex is degraded by free enzyme. 7. Parallel studies with trypsin indicated that it too forms a 1:1 complex with inhibitor and is degraded by excess of enzyme. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PLATE 4 PLATE 5 PLATE 6 PLATE 1 PMID:9069

  18. Explicit Fourier wavefield operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. J.; Margrave, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    Explicit wavefield extrapolators are based on direct analytic mathematical formulae that express the output as an extrapolation operator acting on the input, while implicit methods usually require the calculation of the numerical inverse of a matrix to obtain the output. Typically, explicit methods are faster than implicit methods, and they often give more insight into the physics of the wave propagation, but they often suffer from instability. Four different explicit extrapolators based on Fourier theory are presented and analysed. They are: PS (ordinary phase shift), GPSPI (generalized phase shift plus interpolation), NSPS (non-stationary phase shift) and SNPS (symmetric non-stationary phase shift). A formal proof is given that NSPS in a direction orthogonal to the velocity gradient is the mathematical adjoint process to GPSPI in the opposite direction. This motivates the construction of SNPS that combines NSPS and GPSPI in a symmetric fashion. This symmetry (under interchange of input and output lateral coordinates) is required by reciprocity arguments. PS and SNPS are symmetric while NSPS and GPSPI are not. A numerical stability study using SVD (singular value decomposition) shows that all of these extrapolators can become unstable for strong lateral velocity gradients. Unstable operators allow amplitudes to grow non-physically in a recursion. Stability is enhanced by introducing a small (~3 per cent) imaginary component to the velocities. This causes a numerical attenuation that tends to stabilize the operators but does not address the cause of the instability. For the velocity model studied (a very challenging case) GPSPI and NSPS have exactly the same instability while SNPS is always more stable. Instability manifests in a complicated way as a function of extrapolation step size, frequency, velocity gradient, and strength of numerical attenuation. The SNPS operator can be stabilized over a wide range of conditions with considerably less attenuation than is

  19. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    PubMed

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs. PMID:27117097

  20. In situ properties of Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Burns, B P; Mendz, G L; Hazell, S L

    1997-11-01

    The kinetic and regulatory properties of aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ACTase) of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori were studied in situ in cell-free extracts. The presence of enzyme activity was established by identifying the end product as carbamoylaspartate using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Activity was measured in all strains studied, including recent clinical isolates. Substrate saturation curves determined employing radioactive tracer analysis or a microtiter colorimetric assay were hyperbolic for both carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate, and there was no evidence for substrate inhibition at higher concentrations of either substrate. The apparent Km were 0.6 and 11.6 mm for carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate, respectively. Optimal pH and temperature were determined as 8.0 and 45 degrees C. Activity was observed with the l- but not the d-isomer of aspartate. Succinate and maleate inhibited enzyme activity competitively with respect to aspartate. The carbamoyl phosphate analogues acetyl phosphate and phosphonoacetic acid inhibited activity in a competitive manner with respect to carbamoyl phosphate. With limiting carbamoyl phosphate purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, tripolyphosphate, pyrophosphate, and orthophosphate inhibited competitively at millimolar concentrations. Ribose and ribose 5-phosphate at 10 mm concentration showed 20 and 35% inhibition of enzyme activity, respectively. N-Phosphonoacetyl-l-aspartate (PALA) was the most potent inhibitor studied, with 50% inhibition of enzyme activity observed at 0.1 microM concentration. Inhibition by PALA was competitive with carbamoyl phosphate (Ki = 0.245 microM) and noncompetitive with aspartate. The kinetic and regulatory data on the activity of the H. pylori enzyme suggest it is a Class A ACTase, but with some interesting characteristics distinct from this class. PMID:9344472

  1. Sensitive, hydrosoluble, macromolecular fluorogenic substrates for human immunodeficiency virus 1 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Anjuère, F; Monsigny, M; Lelièvre, Y; Mayer, R

    1993-01-01

    Hydrosoluble macromolecular fluorogenic substrates specific for the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) proteinase have been prepared. The fluoresceinyl peptide Ftc-epsilon-Ahx-Ser-Phe-Asn-Phe-Pro-Gln-Ile-Thr-(Gly)n, corresponding to the first cleavage site of HIV-1 gag-pol native precursor was linked to a water-soluble neutral (Lys)n derivative. The epsilon-aminohexanoyl residue (epsilon-Ahx) and the glycyl sequence were added in order to improve the stability of the substrate and the accessibility of the cleavage site to the HIV-1 proteinase respectively. This macro-molecular peptidic-substrate conjugate is significantly more water-soluble than the free peptide itself on a substrate molar concentration basis. The assay is based on the quantitative precipitation of the polymeric material by adding propan-2-ol whereas the fluorescent peptide moiety released upon proteolysis remains soluble in the supernatant. The proteinase activity is assessed by measuring the fluorescence of the supernatant. This assay allows the detection of a few fmol of HIV-1 proteinase, even in the presence of cell culture media, plasma or cell lysate and it gives accurate results within a large proteinase concentration range. The hydrosoluble macromolecular substrate is also suitable for determining the HIV-1 proteinase activity using 96-well microplates, allowing us to test accurately and rapidly numerous enzyme samples and/or the potency of new proteinase inhibitors. PMID:8489513

  2. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivities human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, M.J.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Ever since the initial description of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor (..cap alpha../sub 1/PI), the role of this plasma glycoprotein and its allelic polymorphism in disease and in healthy physiology has been the subject of much investigation, ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI inactivates a number of serine proteinases, including granulocyte elastase, and thus affords protection from the connective tissue degradation mediated by this class of proteinases. Because an imbalance in the ratio between ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI and proteinase may contribute to the development of destructive lung diseases, proteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been implicated in disruption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance. In this report, a new mechanism for alteration of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance is demonstrated. It was found that the purified form of macrophage elastase catalytically degrades and inactivates ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI so that it no longer inhibits the elastinolytic activity of granulocyte elastase.

  3. α-1-Antitrypsin variants and the proteinase/antiproteinase imbalance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinden, Nicola J.; Baker, Michael J.; Smith, David J.; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; Dafforn, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The excessive activities of the serine proteinases neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 are associated with tissue damage in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Reduced concentrations and/or inhibitory efficiency of the main circulating serine proteinase inhibitor α-1-antitrypsin result from point mutations in its gene. In addition, α-2-macroglobulin competes with α-1-antitrypsin for proteinases, and the α-2-macroglobulin-sequestered enzyme can retain its catalytic activity. We have studied how serine proteinases partition between these inhibitors and the effects of α-1-antitrypsin mutations on this partitioning. Subsequently, we have developed a three-dimensional reaction-diffusion model to describe events occurring in the lung interstitium when serine proteinases diffuse from the neutrophil azurophil granule following degranulation and subsequently bind to either α-1-antitrypsin or α-2-macroglobulin. We found that the proteinases remained uninhibited on the order of 0.1 s after release and diffused on the order of 10 μm into the tissue before becoming sequestered. We have shown that proteinases sequestered to α-2-macroglobulin retain their proteolytic activity and that neutrophil elastase complexes with α-2-macroglobulin are able to degrade elastin. Although neutrophil elastase is implicated in the pathophysiology of emphysema, our results highlight a potentially important role for proteinase 3 because of its greater concentration in azurophil granules, its reduced association rate constant with all α-1-antitrypsin variants studied here, its greater diffusion distance, time spent uninhibited following degranulation, and its greater propensity to partition to α-2-macroglobulin where it retains proteolytic activity. PMID:25416382

  4. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  5. Triacontanol negatively modulates the jasmonic acid-stimulated proteinase inhibitors in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Ramanarayan, Krishnamurthy; Swamy, Gangadharamurthy Sivakumar

    2004-04-01

    Triacontanol (TRIA), a long chain aliphatic alcohol (C30H61OH) reverses the effect of jasmonic acid (JA) in inducing proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in tomato leaves. Porcine pancreas trypsin and Spodoptera litura gut proteinases were inhibited in the presence of leaf proteins treated with JA, and TRIA partially reverses this effect. Spodoptera litura larvae fed with tomato leaves treated with JA were reduced in body weight and TRIA is able to partially reverse this JA-induced effect. These results reflect the partial reversal effect of TRIA in down regulating the JA-induced production of proteinase inhibitors. PMID:15128037

  6. Ozone effects on inhibitors of human neutrophil proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.E.; Stack, M.S.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-02-15

    The effects of ozone on human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A-1-PI), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (A-1-Achy), bronchial leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (BLPI), and Eglin C were studied using in vitro exposures in phosphate-buffered solutions. Following ozone exposure, inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and/or cathepsin G (Cat G) were measured. Exposure of A-1-PI to 50 mol O3/mol protein resulted in a complete loss of HNE inhibitory activity, whereas A-1-Achy lost only 50% of its Cat G inhibitory activity and remained half active even after exposure to 250 mol of O3. At 40 mol O3/mol protein, BLPI lost 79% of its activity against HNE and 87% of its Cat G inhibitory activity. Eglin C, a leech-derived inhibitor, lost 81% of its HNE inhibitory activity and 92% of its ability to inhibit Cat G when exposed to 40 mol O3/mol. Amino acid analyses of ozone-exposed inhibitors showed destruction of Trp, Met, Tyr, and His with as little as 10 mol O3/mol protein, and higher levels of O3 resulted in more extensive oxidation of susceptible residues. The variable ozone susceptibility of the different amino acid residues in the four proteins indicated that oxidation was a function of protein structure, as well as the inherent susceptibility of particular amino acids. Exposure of A-1-PI and BLPI in the presence of the antioxidants, Trolox C (water soluble vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C), showed that antioxidant vitamins may protect proteins from oxidative inactivation by ozone. Methionine-specific modification of BLPI reduced its HNE and Cat G inhibitory activities. Two moles of N-chlorosuccinimide per mole of BLPI methionine caused an 80% reduction in activity against Cat G, but only a 40% reduction in HNE inhibitory activity.

  7. Altered Expression of Brain Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2, Trypsin-2 and Serpin Proteinase Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael J; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gentleman, Steve M; Walls, Andrew F; Dexter, David T

    2015-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cell death in neurodegenerative disorders, but the factors involved in the inflammatory process are not completely understood. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) expression in brain is increased in Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, but the status of PAR2 in Parkinson's disease is unknown. This study examined expression of PAR2 and endogenous proteinase activators (trypsin-2, mast cell tryptase) and proteinase inhibitors (serpin-A5, serpin-A13) in areas vulnerable and resistant to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease at different Braak α-synuclein stages of the disease in post-mortem brain. In normal aged brain, expression of PAR-2, trypsin-2, and serpin-A5 and serpin-A13 was found in neurons and microglia, and alterations in the amount of immunoreactivity for these proteins were found in some brain regions. Namely, there was a decrease in neurons positive for serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus, and serpin-A13 expression was reduced in the locus coeruleus and primary motor cortex, while expression of PAR2, trypsin-2 and both serpins was reduced in neurons within the substantia nigra. There was an increased number of microglia that expressed serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and elevated numbers of microglia that expressed serpin-A13 in the substantia nigra of late Parkinson's disease cases. The number of microglia that expressed trypsin-2 increased in primary motor cortex of incidental Lewy body disease cases. Analysis of Parkinson's disease cases alone indicated that serpin-A5 and serpin-A13, and trypsin-2 expression in midbrain and cerebral cortex was different in cases with a high incidence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and psychosis compared to those with low levels of these treatment-induced side effects. This study showed that there was altered expression in brain of PAR2 and some proteins that can control its function in Parkinson's disease. Given the role of PAR2 in

  8. Successive Use of Non-Host Plant Proteinase Inhibitors Required for Effective Inhibition of Helicoverpa armigera Gut Proteinases and Larval Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Harsulkar, Abhay M.; Giri, Ashok P.; Patankar, Aparna G.; Gupta, Vidya S.; Sainani, Mohini N.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar K.; Deshpande, Vasanti V.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the efficacy of proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from three host plants (chickpea [Cicer arietinum], pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan], and cotton [Gossypium arboreum]) and three non-host (groundnut [Arachis hypogea], winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus], and potato [Solanum tuberosum]) in retarding the growth of Helicoverpa armigera larvae, a devastating pest of important crop plants. Enzyme assays and electrophoretic analysis of interaction of H. armigera gut proteinases (HGPs) with PIs revealed that non-host PIs inhibited HGP activity efficiently whereas host PIs were ineffective. In the electrophoretic assay, trypsin inhibitor activity bands were detected in all of the host and non-host plants, but HGP inhibitor activity bands were present only in non-host plants (except cotton in the host plant group). H. armigera larvae reared on a diet containing non-host PIs showed growth retardation, a reduction in total and trypsin-like proteinase activity, and the production of inhibitor-insensitive proteinases. Electrophoretic analysis of PI-induced HGP showed differential regulation of proteinase isoforms. Interestingly, HGP activity induced in response to dietary potato PI-II was inhibited by winged bean PIs. The optimized combination of potato PI-II and winged bean PIs identified in the present study and their proposed successive use has potential in developing H. armigera-resistant transgenic plants. PMID:10517841

  9. Comparative cleavage sites within the reactive-site loop of native and oxidized alpha1-proteinase inhibitor by selected bacterial proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, M; Potempa, J; Nelson, D; Kozik, A; Travis, J

    1999-10-01

    Human alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) is responsible for the tight control of neutrophil elastase activity which, if down regulated, may cause local excessive tissue degradation. Many bacterial proteinases can inactivate alpha1-PI by hydrolytic cleavage within its reactive site, resulting in the down regulation of elastase, and this mechanism is likely to contribute to the connective tissue damage often associated with bacterial infections. Another pathway of the inactivation of alpha1-PI is reversible and involves oxidation of a critical active-site methionine residue that may influence inhibitor susceptibility to proteolytic inactivation. Hence, the aim of this work was to determine whether this oxidation event might affectthe rate and pattern of the cleavage of the alpha1-PI reactive-site loop by selected bacterial proteinases, including thermolysin, aureolysin, serralysin, pseudolysin, Staphylococcus aureus serine proteinase, streptopain, and periodontain. A shift of cleavage specificity was observed after alpha1-PI oxidation, with a preference for the Glu354-Ala355 bond by most of the proteinases tested. Only aureolysin and serralysin cleave the oxidized form of alpha1-PI faster than the native inhibitor, suggesting that bacteria which secrete these metalloproteinases may specifically take advantage of the host defense oxidative mechanism to accelerate elimination of alpha1-PI and, consequently, tissue degradation by neutrophil elastase. PMID:10595584

  10. Fourier Analysis of Musical Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2008-11-01

    Use of a microphone attached to a computer to capture musical sounds and software to display their waveforms and harmonic spectra has become somewhat commonplace. A recent article in The Physics Teacher aptly demonstrated the use of MacScope2 in just such a manner as a way to teach Fourier analysis.3 A logical continuation of this project is to use MacScope not just to analyze the Fourier composition of musical tones but also musical intervals.

  11. A systematic and mechanistic evaluation of aspartic acid as filler for directly compressed tablets containing trimethoprim and trimethoprim aspartate.

    PubMed

    ElShaer, Amr; Hanson, Peter; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2013-04-01

    The generally accepted paradigm of 'inert' and 'mono functional' excipient in dosage form has been recently challenged with the development of individual excipients capable of exhibiting multiple functions (e.g. binder-disintegrants, surfactant which affect P-gp function). The proposed study has been designed within the realm of multifunctionality and is the first and novel investigation towards evaluation of aspartic acid as a filler and disintegration enhancing agent for the delivery of biopharmaceutical class IV model drug trimethoprim. The study investigated powder characteristics using angle of repose, laser diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared tablets were characterised using Heckel analysis, disintegration time and tensile strength measurements. Although Heckel analysis revealed that both TMP and TMP aspartate salt have high elasticity, the salt form produced a stronger compact which was attributed to the formation of agglomerates. Aspartic acid was found to have high plasticity, but its incorporation into the formulations was found to have a negative impact on the compaction properties of TMP and its salt. Surface morphology investigations showed that mechanical interlocking plays a vital role in binding TMP crystals together during compaction, while the small particle size of TMP aspartate agglomerates was found to have significant impact on the tensile strength of the tablets. The study concluded that aspartic acid can be employed as filler and disintegrant and that compactability within tablets was independent of the surface charge of the excipients. PMID:23207325

  12. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Laëtitia; Pennebaker, Anne F.; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of novel inhibitors of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) are reported. Several submicromolar phosphorus-containing inhibitors are described, but all-carboxylate compounds are inactive. Compounds were synthesized to probe the postulated cyclic transition-state of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. In addition, the associated role of the protonation state at the phosphorus acid moiety was evaluated using phosphinic and carboxylic acids. Although none of the synthesized inhibitors is more potent than N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), the compounds provide useful mechanistic information, as well as the basis for the design of future inhibitors and/or prodrugs. PMID:19828320

  13. Isolation of two plant proteinases in latex from Carica candamarcensis acting as mitogens for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio R; Mello, Vanessa J; Rodrigues, Kelly C; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Lopes, Miriam T P; Faça, Vitor M; Salas, Carlos E

    2005-03-01

    In a prior study we showed evidence that latex from Carica candamarcensis contains a protein fraction that stimulates mammalian cell proliferation. In this report we describe the isolation of two proteinases responsible for this effect. Both proteinases (P1, P2) display a relative mass of 23 kDa and following chromatographic purification stimulate proliferation of fibroblastic and epithelial cells. P2 added to L929 fibroblasts at 2.5 nM enhances proliferation by 60 %. We further demonstrate that its cellular effect is linked to an increase in activity of Erk2, a component of the MAP kinase pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first known plant proteinase to exert a proliferative effect in mammalian cells. This novel mitogenic property attributed to a purified cysteine proteinase may explain some of the therapeutic actions attributed to these enzymes. PMID:15770545

  14. Characterization of cathepsin B proteinase (AcCP-2) in eggs and larvae stages of hookworm Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yurong; Qin, Weiwen; Wei, Hua; Ying, Jianxi; Zhen, Jing

    2011-11-01

    Cathepsin B proteinase constitutes a large multigenes family in parasitic and non-parasitic nematodes. The localization of cathepsin B proteinases (AcCP-1 and AcCP-2) in adult worm of Ancylostoma caninum has been characterized (Harrop et al., 1995), but the localization and function in eggs and larval stages remained undiscovered. Here we described the expressing of cathepsin B proteinase (AcCP-2) in Escherichia coli, and immuno-localization of cathepsin B proteinase in eggs and larvae stages of A. caninum. A cDNA fragment encoding a cathepsin B proteinase (AcCP-2) was cloned from A. caninum and expressed in E. coli. Gelatin digestion showed that recombinant cathepsin B proteinase (AcCP-2) has protease activity. The protein level of cathepsin B proteinase in larval and adult worm was detected by western blot. The immuno-localization of cathepsin B proteinase in eggs and larval stages was characterized. The expression of cathepsin B proteinase was more abundant in eggs and larvae stages of A. caninum. It implied that cathepsin B proteinase might play roles in the early development of A. caninum. PMID:21925175

  15. Multiple cysteine proteinase forms during the life cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum revealed by electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    North, M J; Scott, K I; Lockwood, B C

    1988-01-01

    Proteinases of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum have been analysed using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin (gelatin/PAGE). Multiple proteinase forms were apparent in vegetative myxamoebae, but the presence of individual enzyme forms depended on the manner in which the cells were grown. Axenic cells had a characteristic A-pattern of proteinases consisting of six bands, the most active enzymes having apparent Mr values of 51,000 and 45,000 (these have been named ddCP51 and ddCP45, respectively). Some of the proteinases were also present in the medium, the major extracellular form was ddCP42, a 42,000-Mr enzyme. Cells grown in association with bacteria had a distinct B-pattern with three main enzymes that had apparent Mr values of 48,000, 43,000 and 38,000. All of the A- and B-pattern proteinases were most active at acid pH in the presence of dithiothreitol and were inhibited by various agents such as trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane (E64), leupeptin and chymostatin, which inactivate cysteine proteinases. One of the enzymes, ddCP30, was identified as cysteine proteinase B which had been purified and characterized previously [North, M.J. & Whyte, A. (1984) J. Gen. Microbiol. 130, 123-134]. During starvation of axenic cells in shaken suspensions some of the vegetative proteinases disappeared, ddCP42 was released from the cells and one new enzyme with an apparent Mr of 48,000 appeared. Addition of cyclic AMP had little effect on these changes. When the axenically grown myxamoebae underwent development on filters, similar changes in band pattern were observed and the aggregation stage was characterized by the presence of three cysteine proteinase bands (apparent Mr values of 48,000, 45,000 and 43,000). Proteinases, especially ddCP42, were released from the cells and could be collected from the buffer-saturated pads which supported the filters. The results demonstrate that cysteine proteinases are present

  16. Characterization of a Cell Envelope-Associated Proteinase Activity from Streptococcus thermophilus H-Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shahbal, Samaha; Hemme, Denis; Renault, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The production and biochemical properties of cell envelope-associated proteinases from two strains of Streptococcus thermophilus (strains CNRZ 385 and CNRZ 703) were compared. No significant difference in proteinase activity was found for strain CNRZ 385 when cells were grown in skim milk medium and M17 broth. Strain CNRZ 703 exhibited a threefold-higher proteinase activity when cells were grown in low-heat skim milk medium than when grown in M17 broth. Forty-one percent of the total activity of CNRZ 385 was localized on the cell wall. The optimum pH for enzymatic activity at 37°C was around 7.0. Serine proteinase inhibitors, such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropylfluorophosphate, inhibited the enzyme activity in both strains. The divalents cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ were activators, while Zn2+ and Cu2+ were inhibitors. β-Casein was hydrolyzed more rapidly than αs1-casein. The results of DNA hybridization and immunoblot studies suggested that the S. thermophilus cell wall proteinase and the lactococcal proteinase are not closely related. Images PMID:16348841

  17. Specific inhibition of mature fungal serine proteinases and metalloproteinases by their propeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Markaryan, A; Lee, J D; Sirakova, T D; Kolattukudy, P E

    1996-01-01

    The function of the long propeptides of fungal proteinases is not known. Aspergillus fumigatus produces a 33-kDa serine proteinase of the subtilisin family and a 42-kDa metalloproteinase of the thermolysin family. These extracellular enzymes are synthesized as preproenzymes containing large amino-terminal propeptides. Recombinant propeptides were produced in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase or thioredoxin and purified by affinity chromatography. A. fumigatus serine proteinase propeptide competitively inhibited serine proteinase, with a Ki of 5.3 x 10(-6) M, whereas a homologous serine proteinase from A. flavus was less strongly inhibited and subtilisin was not inhibited. Binding of metalloproteinase propeptide from A. fumigatus to the mature metalloenzyme was demonstrated. This propeptide strongly inhibited its mature enzyme, with a Ki of 3 x 10(-9) M, whereas thermolysin and a metalloproteinase from A. flavus were not inhibited by this propeptide. Enzymatically inactive metalloproteinase propeptide complex could be completely activated by trypsin treatment. These results demonstrate that the propeptides of the fungal proteinases bind specifically and inhibit the respective mature enzymes, probably reflecting a biological role of keeping these extracellular enzymes inactive until secretion. PMID:8636020

  18. Gel Electrophoretic Profiles of Proteinases in Dark-Germinated Flax Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Shahid; Reddy, V. Manoranjan; Rhodes, W. Gale; McFadden, Bruce A.

    1984-01-01

    The proteinases present in dark-germinated flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum) were studied as a function of germination at 25°C. A majority of activity was present in basic proteinases with an acidic pH optimum and a temperature optimum of 45°C in the digestion of hemoglobin. Electrophoresis in a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide mixture which had been polymerized with gelatin was used to separate proteins in extracts of seedlings. Subsequent activation of proteinases with Triton X-100 and resultant digestion of gelatin proved to be very reproducible and afforded detection and good quantification of various proteinase zones. An ethylenediaminetetraacetate-sensitive proteinase zone, P4 (about 60,000 daltons), appeared at day 3 after imbibition and attained maximum activity at day 4. This correlates with a rapid loss in vivo of the glyoxysomal enzyme, isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1). Ethylenediaminetetraacetate also slowed the loss of isocitrate lyase activity in extracts of 4-day seedlings in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of leupeptin, α-tolylsulfonyl fluoride, Pepstatin A, p-chloromercuribenzoate, or 1,10-phenanthroline prior to, during, or after exchange of Triton X-100 for sodium dodecyl sulfate had almost no inhibitory effect upon proteinases in 4-day seedlings. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16663914

  19. THE CRYSTALLIZATION AND SEROLOGICAL DIFFERENTIATION OF A STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE AND ITS PRECURSOR

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, S. D.

    1950-01-01

    Grown in dialysate broth at a pH between 5.5 and 6.5, some strains of group A streptococci elaborate the precursor of a proteolytic enzyme. Within this range of hydrogen concentration the precursor is also produced when the streptococci are suspended in a peptone dialysate containing glucose and incubated at 37°C. The precursor does not appear to be produced at a neutral or alkaline reaction. Methods are described whereby the precursor and proteinase have been isolated in crystalline form. The precursor crystallizes from half-saturated ammonium sulfate at pH 8.0 and a temperature of 22°C. or higher; the proteinase crystallizes from 0.15 saturated ammonium sulfate at pH 8.0 but does so most readily at refrigerator temperature. The degree of purification achieved by these procedures is discussed. The activity of purified preparations of the precursor and of proteinase has been tested against α-benzoyl-l-arginineamide and, with this as a substrate, the conversion of precursor to proteinase by autocatalysis or by trypsin has been confirmed. Immunological experiments are described, the results of which provide evidence of the distinct antigenic specificity of the precursor and proteinase; the conversion of precursor to proteinase has been followed by means of serological tests. PMID:15436931

  20. Modulation of the electrostatic charge at the active site of foot-and-mouth-disease-virus leader proteinase, an unusual papain-like enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Petra; Kronovetr, Jakub; Hampoelz, Bernhard; Skern, Tim

    2002-01-01

    The leader proteinase (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth-disease virus is an unusual papain-like cysteine proteinase. Synthesized without an N-terminal pro precursor region, it frees itself from the growing polypeptide chain by cleavage at its own C-terminus. It also possesses a unique electrostatic environment around the active site, essentially due to Asp(163), which orients the catalytic histidine residue, and Asp(164); the equivalent residues in papain are Asn(175) and Ser(176). The importance of these residues for L(pro) activity was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of Asp(163) with asparagine reduced activity by five-fold towards a hexapeptide substrate and slightly delayed self-processing when expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. However, no effect on the cleavage of the only known cellular substrate of L(pro), eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI), was observed. In contrast, replacement of Asp(164) by either alanine, asparagine or lysine abrogated activity towards the hexapeptide. Furthermore, in all cases, the onset of both self-processing and eIF4GI cleavage were significantly delayed; the reaction rates were also diminished compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. The alanine-substituted enzyme was least affected, followed by those substituted with asparagine and lysine. The double mutant protein in which both aspartate residues were replaced by asparagine was most severely affected; it failed to complete either self-processing or eIF4GI cleavage within 3 h, compared with the 8 min required by the wild-type enzyme. Hence, we propose that the electrostatic charge of Asp(164), and to a lesser extent that of Asp(163), is extremely important for L(pro) to attain full activity upon synthesis. PMID:11964149

  1. A short biography of Joseph Fourier and historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-07-01

    The profound study of nature is the most fertile source of mathematical discoveries. Not only does this study, by offering a definite goal to research, have the advantage of excluding vague questions and futile calculations, but it is also a sure means of moulding analysis itself, and discerning those elements in it which it is still essential to know and which science ought to conserve. These fundamental elements are those which recur in all natural phenomena. Joseph Fourier pure mathematics enables us to discover the concepts and laws connecting them, which gives us the key to the understanding of the phenomena of nature. Albert Einstein This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made to his splendid research contributions to mathematical physics, pure and applied mathematics and his unprecedented public service accomplishments in the history of France. This is followed by historical comments about the significant and major impact of Fourier analysis on mathematical physics, probability and mathematical statistics, mathematical economics and many areas of pure and applied mathematics including geometry, harmonic analysis, signal analysis, wave propagation and wavelet analysis. Special attention is also given to the Fourier integral formula, Brownian motion and stochastic processes and many examples of applications including isoparametric inequality, everywhere continuous but nowhere differentiable functions, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Dirichlets' theorem on primes in

  2. Challenges in pKa Predictions for Proteins: The case of Asp213 in Human Proteinase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjar, Eric; Dejaegere, Annick; Reuter, Nathalie

    2009-09-01

    Knowledge of the protonation states of the ionizable residues in an enzyme is a prerequisite to an accurate description of its structure and mechanism. In practice, the use of the inappropriate protonation state for an amino acid in a molecular modeling computation (e.g., molecular dynamics simulation) is likely to lead to unrealistic results. Although methods using solvers of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation have proven to yield accurate pKa predictions, they bear a number of limitations. They are quite demanding in terms of computational power and are sensitive to representation of the charges and their position (force field and protein conformation). Moreover they depend on the choice of a dielectric constant for the protein interior. In this manuscript, we describe the difficulties met when trying to predict the protonation state of a buried amino acid, located in a protein for which very little biochemical data is available. Such a case is highly representative of the challenges faced in theoretical biology studies. Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an enzyme involved in proteolytic events associated with inflammation. It is a potential target in the development of new anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies. We report the results of pKa predictions of the aspartic acid 213 of PR3 with a FDPB solver. We probed the influence of the choice of the dielectric constant for the protein interior ɛp and the benefits of conformational sampling by molecular dynamics (MD) on the pKa prediction of this carboxylate group. Using only the FDPB calculations, we could not conclude on the protonation state of Asp213. MD simulations confronted to knowledge of the ligand-binding and reaction mechanism led us to decide on a protonated form of this aspartic acid. We also demonstrate that the use of the wrong protonation state leads to an unreliable structural model for PR3. pKa prediction with a fast empirical method yielded a pKa of 8.4 for Asp213, which is in agreement with our

  3. Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced cellular response during chronic hypoxia in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic hypoxia on N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated cellular responses in differentiated PC12 cells. PC12 cells were differentiated by treatment with nerve growth factor. Patch-clamp analysis in differentiated PC12 cells showed that extracellularly applied N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an inward current that was abolished by the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Results from Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate induced an elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) which was also abolished by MK-801. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced current in nerve growth factor-treated cells. We found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced inward current and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced elevation in intracellular free Ca(2+) were markedly attenuated by chronic hypoxia. We next examined the possibility that the reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate responsiveness was due to down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels. Northern blot and immunoblot analyses showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 were markedly decreased during hypoxia. However, the messenger RNA for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2C was increased, whereas the protein level for subunit 2C did not change. Our results indicate that differentiated PC12 cells express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and that chronic exposure to hypoxia attenuates the N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced Ca(2+) accumulation in these cells via down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1. This mechanism may play an important role in protecting PC12 cells against hypoxic stress. PMID:11113364

  4. Radiochemical microassay for aspartate aminotransferase activity in the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, D.; Beattie, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    A radiochemical procedure for measuring aspartate aminotransferase activity in the nervous system is described. The method is based on the exchange of tritium atoms at positions 2 and 3 of L-2,3-(/sup 3/H)aspartate with water when this amino acid is transaminated in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate to form oxaloacetate. The tritiated water is separated from the radiolabeled aspartate by passing the reaction mixture over a cation exchange column. Confirmation that the radioactivity in the product is associated with water was obtained by separating it by anion exchange HPLC and by evaporation. The product formation is linear with time up to 120 min and with tissue in the 0.05- to 10-micrograms range. The apparent Km for aspartate in the rat brain homogenate is found to be 0.83 mM and that for alpha-ketoglutarate to be 0.12 mM. Methods that further improve the sensitivity of the assay are also discussed.

  5. Gamma irradiation or hydrocortisone treatment of rats increases the proteinase activity associated with histones of thymus nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsyi, M.P.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1994-11-01

    An increase in the activity of histone-associated rat thymus nucleus proteinases specific for histones H2A, H2B and H1 was shown after {gamma} irradiation or hydrocortisone treatment of animals. Histone H1-specific proteinase activity is dependent on DNA and increases in the presence of denatured DNA, whereas proteinases specific for core histones are inhibited in the presence of denatured DNA. The increase in the activity of histone-associated proteinases depends on the radiation dose and the time after irradiation or hydrocortisone injection. In the presence of dithiothreitol and sodium dodecyl sulfate, these proteinases dissociate from histones. It was found by gel electrophoresis that several proteinases of various molecular masses are closely associated with histones obtained from thymus nuclei of irradiated or hydrocortisone-treated rats. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Resistance of horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor to perchloric acid denaturation and a simplified purification procedure resulting therefrom.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, A; Hägeli, G; von Fellenberg, R

    1986-11-21

    Addition of perchloric acid (6.4% w/v final concentration) to horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or to horse plasma neither precipitated nor inactivated alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor. None of the isoinhibitors of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was altered by dilute perchloric acid. This unexpected behavior led to a simplified procedure for the purification of horse alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, consisting of removal of the bulk of plasma proteins, by perchloric acid precipitation and by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and G-200. The resulting preparations of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor were immunogenically pure. The simplified purification procedure permitted the immunochemical comparison of the isoinhibitors of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, which proved to be immunologically identical. PMID:3022814

  7. Fourier transform interferometer alignment method.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Naulleau, Patrick; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to facilitate the alignment of the image-plane components of point-diffraction interferometers, including the phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer. In real time, the Fourier transform of the detected image is used to calculate a pseudoimage of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where thecritical alignment o f variousoptical components is performed. Reconstruction of the pseudoimage is similar to off-axis, Fourier transform holography. Intermediate steps in the alignment procedure are described. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global-contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier transform. Additional applications include the alignment of image-plane apertures in general optical systems, the rapid identification of patterned image-plane alignment marks, and the probing of important image-plane field properties. PMID:12153074

  8. New perspectives on basic mechanisms in lung disease. 6. Proteinase imbalance: its role in lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tetley, T D

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis, some 30 years ago, that NE was the sole proteolytic agent responsible for the development of emphysema seems naive in retrospect. The availability of technology to measure NE facilitated the early research into the relationship between NE and lung disease. Despite an abundance of information on the activity of NE in the lung, it will probably require prospective studies in man with specific NE inhibitors or control at the gene level to establish a causal relationship between NE and lung disease. Parallel research has resulted in the isolation and characterisation of NE inhibitors other than PI and, indeed, alternative proteolytic enzymes that might contribute to lung disease. It is perhaps impossible now to think that a single proteinase, however omnipotent it may be, causes lung diseases as diverse as emphysema and fibrosis. An important aspect that is emerging is the interrelationship between proteolytic enzymes produced by different, or sometimes the same, cells that could potentiate tissue proteolysis. The evidence suggests that there is likely to be coordinated action between neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mesenchymal proteinases which can activate or inactivate each other. In addition, one class of proteinases often appears able to proteolytically inactivate inhibitors of the opposite class, which presumably could amplify proteolysis if it occurred in vivo. Although the work on this aspect of proteinase activity is in its infancy, one suspects that part of the normal regulation of proteinase activity might include compartmentalisation. For example, the neutrophil stores proteinases before appropriate release and can inactivate PI to enable proteolytic action pericellularly, whereas degradation of extracellular matrix by macrophages requires interaction between the cell and matrix which is facilitated by cell receptor bound uPA. Disintegration of these "compartments" due to oedema, proteolysis, or for mechanical reasons could, firstly

  9. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared. PMID:27137061

  10. Role of saliva proteinase 3 in dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Teng-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Du, Yue; Wu, Song-Tao; Yuan, Wen-Wen; Yu, Yu; Su, Lin; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Jie-Hua; Lu, Wan-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Jiao; Feng, Yun; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Salivary analysis can be used to assess the severity of caries. Of the known salivary proteins, a paucity of information exists concerning the role of proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease of the chymotrypsin family, in dental caries. Whole, unstimulated saliva was collected from children with varying degrees of active caries and tested using a Human Protease Array Kit and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A significantly decreased concentration of salivary PR3 was noted with increasing severity of dental caries (P<0.01); a positive correlation (r=0.87; P<0.01; Pearson's correlation analysis) was also observed between salivary pH and PR3 concentration. In an antibacterial test, a PR3 concentration of 250 ng·mL−1 or higher significantly inhibited Streptococcus mutans UA159 growth after 12 h of incubation (P<0.05). These studies indicate that PR3 is a salivary factor associated with the severity of dental caries, as suggested by the negative relationship between salivary PR3 concentration and the severity of caries as well as the susceptibility of S. mutans to PR3. PMID:26756046

  11. Potent and selective nonpeptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase.

    PubMed

    Fish, Paul V; Allan, Gillian A; Bailey, Simon; Blagg, Julian; Butt, Richard; Collis, Michael G; Greiling, Doris; James, Kim; Kendall, Jackie; McElroy, Andrew; McCleverty, Dawn; Reed, Charlotte; Webster, Robert; Whitlock, Gavin A

    2007-07-26

    6-Cyclohexyl-N-hydroxy-3-(1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)hexanamides were previously disclosed as inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) culminating in the identification of amide 1. Our objective was to discover a second inhibitor that would have improved affinity for PCP and to optimize properties for transepidermal delivery (TED) to intact skin. Further investigation of this template identified a number of potent PCP inhibitors (IC50 values of 2-6 nM) with improved TED flux. Sulfonamide 56 had excellent PCP enzyme activity when measured with a peptide substrate (Ki 8.7 nM) or with the endogenous substrate procollagen (IC50 3.4 nM) and demonstrates excellent selectivity over MMPs involved in wound healing (>10 000-fold). In the fibroplasia model, 56 inhibited deposition of insoluble collagen by 76 +/- 2% at 10 microM and was very effective at penetrating human skin in vitro with a TED flux of 1.5 microg/cm2/h, which compares favorably with values for agents that are known to penetrate skin well in vivo. Based on this profile, 56 (UK-421,045) was selected as a candidate for further preclinical evaluation as a topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agent. PMID:17591762

  12. Manduca sexta prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation requires proPO-activating proteinase (PAP) and serine proteinase homologs (SPHs) simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Snehalata; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2005-03-01

    In the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta, proteolytic activation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) is mediated by three proPO-activating proteinases (PAPs) and two serine proteinase homologs (SPHs) (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 95 (1998) 12220-12225; J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003a) 3552-3561; Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 33 (2003b) 1049-1060). While our current data are consistent with the hypothesis that the SPHs serve as a cofactor/anchor for PAPs (Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 33 (2003) 197-208; Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 34 (2004) 731-742), roles of these clip-domain proteins (i.e. PAPs and SPHs) in proPO activation are poorly defined. To better understand this process, we further characterized the activation reaction using proPO, PAP-1 and SPHs. PAP-1 itself cleaved nearly 1/3 of proPO at Arg51 without generating much phenoloxidase (PO) activity. In the presence of SPHs, the cleavage of proPO became more complete while the increase in PO activity was over 20-fold, indicating that the extent of cleavage does not directly correlate with PO activity. Since SPHs and p-amidinophenyl methanesulfonyl fluoride (APMSF)-treated PAP-1 did not generate active PO by interacting with proPO, proteolytic cleavage is critical for proPO activation. After 1/5 of proPO was processed by PAP-1 alone which was then inactivated by M. sexta serpin-1J or APMSF, further incubation of the reaction mixture with SPHs failed to generate active PO either. Thus, SPHs cannot generate PO activity by simply binding to cleaved proPO. M. sexta proPO activation requires active PAP-1 and SPHs at the same time-one for limited proteolysis and the other as a cofactor, perhaps. Gel filtration chromatography and native gel electrophoresis revealed the PAP-SPH, proPO-PAP, and SPH-proPO associations, essential for generating high Mr, active PO at the site of infection. PMID:15705503

  13. Isolation and characterization of a serine proteinase specific to human C3b from human erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Charriaut, C.; Krikorian, L.; Barel, M.; Frade, R.

    1986-03-05

    In a previous report, they have shown that human C3b bound through CR1 to human erythrocytes is cleaved by a membrane proteinase activity. Following the molecular analysis of this proteinase activity, they have purified it by a four step procedure: ammonium sulfate precipitation, biogel filtration, fluid phase electrophoresis and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The highly purified proteinase was labeled by /sup 125/I iodine or /sup 3/H-DFP and analyzed by gel electrophoresis: a single band membrane component was characterized by its apparent molecular weight of 57 K or 60 K, under non reducing or reducing conditions respectively and was called p 57. Its reactivity with /sup 3/H-DFP and the inhibition by PMSF of the proteinase activity indicate that p 57 is a serine proteinase. Moreover, it is sensitive to aprotinin and ..gamma..1-antitrypsin. This membrane proteinase presents a higher activity in the presence of detergent and cleaves both alpha and beta chains of human C3b. Polyclonal antibody prepared against this purified proteinase inhibits its activity. On the basis of its structure and its functions, i.e. molecular weight, antigenic properties, proteinase properties and proteinases inhibitors sensitivity, p57 is not related to CR1 or DAF, two others membrane components which react with human C3b and identified by others on human erythrocytes. These specific antibodies allow to analyze the presence of p57 on human cells.

  14. Mutation of the Myxoma virus SERP2 P1-site to prevent proteinase inhibition causes apoptosis in cultured RK-13 cells and attenuates disease in rabbits, but mutation to alter specificity causes apoptosis without reducing virulence.

    PubMed

    MacNeill, Amy L; Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    Myxoma virus (MYX) prevents apoptosis in RK-13 cells and forms thick dermal lesions with 100% mortality in rabbits. MYX encodes the virulence factor SERP2, a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin). SERP2 was mutated to evaluate SERP2 function during MYX infection. MYXDeltaSERP2::lacZ (deleted for SERP2) did not inhibit apoptosis in RK-13 cells; infected rabbits had thin dermal lesions and <10% mortality. MYX-SERP2-D294A, a P1-site aspartate to alanine mutant, inactivated the serpin; infection was indistinguishable from MYXDeltaSERP2::lacZ. SERP2-D294E prevented inhibition of caspase-8, caspase-10 and granzyme-B; and MYX-SERP2-D294E failed to block apoptosis in RK-13 cells, but was fully virulent in rabbits. MYXDeltaSERP2::crmA expressed crmA instead of SERP2 and inhibited apoptosis in cell culture, but caused thin lesions and only 70% mortality in rabbits, hence crmA cannot fully substitute for SERP2. Control of apoptosis in culture does not correlate with virulence in rabbits. Virulence may instead depend on inhibition of proinflammatory proteinases by SERP2. PMID:16959285

  15. Fourier spectroscopy and planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.; Kunde, V. G.

    1974-01-01

    The application of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) to planetary research is reviewed. The survey includes FTS observations of the sun, all the planets except Uranus and Pluto, the Galilean satellites and Saturn's rings. Instrumentation and scientific results are considered and the prospects and limitations of FTS for planetary research in the forthcoming years are discussed.

  16. Fourier Analysis of Musical Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Use of a microphone attached to a computer to capture musical sounds and software to display their waveforms and harmonic spectra has become somewhat commonplace. A recent article in "The Physics Teacher" aptly demonstrated the use of MacScope in just such a manner as a way to teach Fourier analysis. A logical continuation of this project is to…

  17. Fourier Lucas-Kanade algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Simon; Navarathna, Rajitha; Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Sridharan, Sridha

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for both gradient descent image and object alignment in the Fourier domain. Our method centers upon the classical Lucas & Kanade (LK) algorithm where we represent the source and template/model in the complex 2D Fourier domain rather than in the spatial 2D domain. We refer to our approach as the Fourier LK (FLK) algorithm. The FLK formulation is advantageous when one preprocesses the source image and template/model with a bank of filters (e.g., oriented edges, Gabor, etc.) as 1) it can handle substantial illumination variations, 2) the inefficient preprocessing filter bank step can be subsumed within the FLK algorithm as a sparse diagonal weighting matrix, 3) unlike traditional LK, the computational cost is invariant to the number of filters and as a result is far more efficient, and 4) this approach can be extended to the Inverse Compositional (IC) form of the LK algorithm where nearly all steps (including Fourier transform and filter bank preprocessing) can be precomputed, leading to an extremely efficient and robust approach to gradient descent image matching. Further, these computational savings translate to nonrigid object alignment tasks that are considered extensions of the LK algorithm, such as those found in Active Appearance Models (AAMs). PMID:23599053

  18. Fourier Series and Elliptic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2003-01-01

    Non-linear second-order differential equations whose solutions are the elliptic functions "sn"("t, k"), "cn"("t, k") and "dn"("t, k") are investigated. Using "Mathematica", high precision numerical solutions are generated. From these data, Fourier coefficients are determined yielding approximate formulas for these non-elementary functions that are…

  19. 40 CFR 721.10348 - Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi-alkanediyl)bis, tetraalkane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aspartic acid, N,Nâ²-(iminodi... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10348 Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi... reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as aspartic acid,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10348 - Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi-alkanediyl)bis, tetraalkane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aspartic acid, N,Nâ²-(iminodi... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10348 Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi... reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as aspartic acid,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10348 - Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi-alkanediyl)bis, tetraalkane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aspartic acid, N,Nâ²-(iminodi... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10348 Aspartic acid, N,N′-(iminodi... reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as aspartic acid,...

  2. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  3. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi.

    PubMed

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-09-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  4. An alkaline serine-proteinase from a bacterium isolated from bat feces: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tanskul, Somporn; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takada, Katsumi; Rungratchote, Suchart; Suntinanalert, Prasert; Oda, Kohei

    2009-11-01

    An alkaline serine-proteinase from Bacillus sp. PN51 isolated from bat feces collected in Phang Nga, Thailand, was purified and characterized. The molecular mass was estimated to be 35.0 kDa. The N-terminal 25 amino acid sequence was about 70% identical with that of Natrialba magadii halolysin-like extracellular serine protease. The enzyme showed the highest proteinase activity at 60 degrees C at pH 10.0. The activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF and chymostatin. The proteinase activity was not affected by the presence of 2% urea, 2% H(2)O(2), 12% SDS, 15% triton X-100, or 15% tween 80. The proteinase preferred Met, Leu, Phe, and Tyr residues at the P(1) position, in descending order. The k(cat), K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) values for Z-Val-Lys-Met-MCA were 16.8+/-0.14 min(-1), 5.1+/-0.28 microM, and 3.3+/-0.28 microM(-1) min(-1) respectively. This is the first report of an alkaline serine-proteinase with extremely high stability against detergents such as SDS. PMID:19897920

  5. Purification and characterization of a digestive cysteine proteinase from the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    PubMed

    Laycock, M V; Hirama, T; Hasnain, S; Watson, D; Storer, A C

    1989-10-15

    A new cysteine proteinase was isolated from the digestive juice of the American lobster (Homarus americanus). The enzyme was purified by a combination of affinity and ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The cysteine proteinase accounted for 80% of the proteolytic activity in the lumen of the hepatopancreas. The most potent heavy-metal inhibitors were Hg, Cu, and Ag ions. Inhibition by organic proteinase inhibitors, including E-64 [L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane] and activation of the enzyme by 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol are characteristic of cysteine proteinases. Several similarities to papain are noted and include the N-terminal sequence, of which 22 of the first 28 amino acids are identical. Some notable differences are the higher Mr of 28,000 compared with 23,350 for papain, and the low isoelectric point (pI 4.5) of the lobster enzyme. The effects of pH and temperature on catalytic activity of the lobster proteinase were studied with benzyloxycarbonylalanine p-nitrophenyl ester as the substrate. The kcat./Km value was effectively temperature-independent between 10 and 60 degrees C. The pH-activity profile for the lobster enzyme revealed four apparent protonation states, of which only two are active. PMID:2597115

  6. Characterization of a keratinolytic serine proteinase from Streptomyces pactum DSM 40530.

    PubMed Central

    Böckle, B; Galunsky, B; Müller, R

    1995-01-01

    A serine protease from the keratin-degrading Streptomyces pactum DSM 40530 was purified by casein agarose affinity chromatography. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 30,000 and an isoelectric point of 8.5. The proteinase was optimally active in the pH range from 7 to 10 and at temperatures from 40 to 75 degrees C. The enzyme was specific for arginine and lysine at the P1 site and for phenylalanine and arginine at the P1' site. It showed a high stereoselectivity and secondary specificity with different synthetic substrates. The keratinolytic activity of the purified proteinase was examined by incubation with the insoluble substrates keratin azure, feather meal, and native and autoclaved chicken feather downs. The S. pactum proteinase was significantly more active than the various commercially available proteinases. After incubation with the purified proteinase, a rapid disintegration of whole feathers was observed. But even after several days of incubation with repeated addition of enzymes, less than 10% of the native keratin substrate was solubilized. In the presence of dithiothreitol, degradation was more than 70%. PMID:7487006

  7. Proteinase-antiproteinase balance in tracheal aspirates from neonates.

    PubMed

    Sluis, K B; Darlow, B A; Vissers, M C; Winterbourn, C C

    1994-02-01

    We wanted to identify the inhibitors of neutrophil elastase, quantify their activities in the upper airways of neonates, and relate these to the presence of active elastase and the likelihood of elastolytic injury occurring due to inhibitory capacity being overwhelmed. Activities of neutrophil elastase and its inhibitors were measured in tracheal aspirates from 17 infants, 10 of whom subsequently developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia. All aspirates contained immunologically detectable alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI), but their inhibitory capacity against neutrophil elastase ranged from being undetectable to being in excess of the amount of alpha 1-PI detected immunologically. When the alpha 1-PI was removed from each of the aspirates, using a specific antibody, from 0-50% of the original activity remained, indicating the presence of another elastase inhibitor. Its properties were consistent with it being the low molecular mass, secretory leucoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI), also known as bronchial antileucoproteinase. The alpha 1-PI was from 0-100% active. Most of the inactive inhibitor was shown by western blotting to be complexed with elastase, with a small amount of cleaved material. There was no evidence of major oxidative inactivation. Free elastase was detected in only three of the aspirates; these had little or no detectable elastase inhibitory capacity, and most of their alpha 1-PI was complexed. Elastase load, comprising the sum of free and complexed elastase, correlated closely with myeloperoxidase activity, a recognized marker of inflammatory activity. Active SLPI levels showed a positive correlation with gestational age (r = 0.66). We conclude that most neutrophil elastase in the upper airways of ventilated infants is complexed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7909297

  8. Neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 trafficking routes in myelomonocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaellquist, Linda; Rosen, Hanna; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Calafat, Jero; Janssen, Hans; Persson, Ann-Maj; Hansson, Markus; Olsson, Inge

    2010-11-15

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (PR3) differ in intracellular localization, which may reflect different trafficking mechanisms of the precursor forms when synthesized at immature stages of neutrophils. To shed further light on these mechanisms, we compared the trafficking of precursor NE (proNE) and precursor PR3 (proPR3). Like proNE [1], proPR3 interacted with CD63 upon heterologous co-expression in COS cells but endogenous interaction was not detected although cell surface proNE/proPR3/CD63 were co-endocytosed in myelomonocytic cells. Cell surface proNE/proPR3 turned over more rapidly than cell surface CD63 consistent with processing/degradation of the pro-proteases but recycling of CD63. Colocalization of proNE/proPR3/CD63 with clathrin and Rab 7 suggested trafficking through coated vesicles and late endosomes. Partial caveolar trafficking of proNE/CD63 but not proPR3 was suggested by colocalization with caveolin-1. Blocking the C-terminus of proNE/proPR3 by creating a fusion with FK506 binding protein inhibited endosomal re-uptake of proNE but not proPR3 indicating 'pro{sub C}'-peptide-dependent structural/conformational requirements for proNE but not for proPR3 endocytosis. The NE aminoacid residue Y199 of a proposed NE sorting motif that interacts with AP-3 [2] was not required for proNE processing, sorting or endocytosis in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells expressing heterologous Y199-deleted proNE; this suggests operation of another AP-3-link for proNE targeting. Our results show intracellular multi-step trafficking to be different between proNE and proPR3 consistent with their differential subcellular NE/PR3 localization in neutrophils.

  9. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  10. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  11. Fourier analysis of blazar variability

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Becker, Peter A.

    2014-08-10

    Blazars display strong variability on multiple timescales and in multiple radiation bands. Their variability is often characterized by power spectral densities (PSDs) and time lags plotted as functions of the Fourier frequency. We develop a new theoretical model based on the analysis of the electron transport (continuity) equation, carried out in the Fourier domain. The continuity equation includes electron cooling and escape, and a derivation of the emission properties includes light travel time effects associated with a radiating blob in a relativistic jet. The model successfully reproduces the general shapes of the observed PSDs and predicts specific PSD and time lag behaviors associated with variability in the synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton, and external Compton emission components, from submillimeter to γ-rays. We discuss applications to BL Lacertae objects and to flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), where there are hints that some of the predicted features have already been observed. We also find that FSRQs should have steeper γ-ray PSD power-law indices than BL Lac objects at Fourier frequencies ≲ 10{sup –4} Hz, in qualitative agreement with previously reported observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  12. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated. PMID:19282912

  13. Cleavage of fibrinogen by proteinases elicits allergic responses through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Shaw, Joanne; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Mak, Garbo; Roberts, Luz; Song, Li-Zhen; Knight, J Morgan; Creighton, Chad J; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2013-08-16

    Proteinases and the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are essential for expression of allergic inflammation and diseases such as asthma. A mechanism that links these inflammatory mediators is essential for explaining the fundamental basis of allergic disease but has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TLR4 is activated by airway proteinase activity to initiate both allergic airway disease and antifungal immunity. These outcomes were induced by proteinase cleavage of the clotting protein fibrinogen, yielding fibrinogen cleavage products that acted as TLR4 ligands on airway epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, allergic airway inflammation represents an antifungal defensive strategy that is driven by fibrinogen cleavage and TLR4 activation. These findings clarify the molecular basis of allergic disease and suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23950537

  14. Thiol-activated serine proteinases from nymphal hemolymph of the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides.

    PubMed

    Hanzon, Jacob; Smirnoff, Patricia; Applebaum, Shalom W; Mattoo, Autar K; Birk, Yehudith

    2003-02-01

    Two unique serine proteinase isoenzymes (LmHP-1 and LmHP-2) were isolated from the hemolymph of African migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) nymphs. Both have a molecular mass of about 23 kDa and are activated by thiol-reducing agents. PMSF abolishes enzymes activity only after thiol activation, while the cysteine proteinase inhibitors E-64, iodoacetamide, and heavy metals fail to inhibit the thiol-activated enzymes. The N-terminal sequence was determined for the more-abundant LmHP-2 isoenzyme. It exhibits partial homology to that of other insect serine proteinases and similar substrate specificity and inhibition by the synthetic and protein trypsin inhibitors pABA, TLCK, BBI, and STI. The locust trypsins LmHP-1 and LmHP-2 constitute a new category of serine proteases wherein the active site of the enzyme is exposed by thiol activation without cleavage of peptide bonds. PMID:12559979

  15. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against Hymenolepis microstoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of cysteine proteinases (CP) as anthelmintics for cestode infections in vivo. Hymenolepis microstoma is a natural parasite of house mice, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of novel drugs for anthelmintic activity against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of H. microstoma infections in mice with the supernatant of papaya latex (PLS), containing active cysteine proteinases, is only minimally efficacious. The statistically significant effects seen on worm burden and biomass showed little evidence of dose dependency, were temporary and the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in PLS was not confirmed by specific inhibition with E-64. Worm fecundity was not affected by treatment at the doses used. We conclude also that this in vivo host-parasite system is not sensitive enough to be used reliably for the detection of cestocidal activity of compounds being screened as potential, novel anthelmintics. PMID:25226116

  16. [Proteolytic enzymes from Streptomyces fradiae: a metalloendopeptidase, subtilisin-like, and trypsin-like proteinases].

    PubMed

    Bormatova, M E; Ivanova, N M; Iusupova, M P; Voiushina, T L; Surova, I A; Chestukhina, G G; Stepanov, V M

    1996-02-01

    Three proteolytic enzymes-the metalloproteinase, SFMP, and two serine proteinases, SFSP and SFTP-have been isolated and purified from the culture fluid of Streptomyces fradiae using chromatography on bacitracin-silochrome, bacitracin-Sepharose, DEAE-cellulose and fractionation by ammonium sulfate. Study of physico-chemical and functional properties of the enzymes and structural analysis revealed that SFMP is a cysteine-containing metalloendopeptidase with M(r) of 36 kDa, has a peak activity for synthetic substrates at pH 7.0-7.5 and at 60-65 degrees C and is stable at pH 7.0-9.0. The serine proteinase SFSP is related to subtilisin-like enzymes, has a M(r) of 29 kDa and a pH optimum at 7.5-8.5 at temperature up to 50 degrees C. The proteinase is stable at pH 4.0-9.0 and retains 30% of its activity at 70 degrees C. The other serine proteinase, SFTP, has a M(r) of 26 kDa and is related to trypsin-like enzymes. Its activity for synthetic substrates of trypsin is maximal at pH 6.8-8.8 at 50 degrees C. The enzyme is stable at pH 4.5-8.5 and at temperature below 50 degrees C. It has been shown that Streptomyces fradiae, like Streptomyces griseus and other Streptomycetes, possesses an ability to secrete serine proteinases (SFSP and SFTP) related to two evolutionally distinct families of serine proteinases, i.e., subtilisin and chymotrypsin families. SFMP and SFSP have been isolated and characterized for the first time. PMID:8717499

  17. Digestive proteinase activity of the Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae).

    PubMed

    Naveh, V Hosseini; Bandani, A R; Azmayeshfard, P; Hosseinkhani, S

    2005-01-01

    The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium, is one of the most important stored product pests worldwide. A study of digestive proteinases in T. granarium was performed to identify potential targets for proteinaceous biopesticides, such as proteinase inhibitors. The pH of guts was determined by addition of pH indicator solutions to broken open gut regions. The last instar larvae were dissected in cold distilled water and the whole guts were cleaned from adhering unwanted tissues. The pooled gut homogenates were centrifuged and the supernatants were used in the subsequent enzyme assay. Total proteinases activity of the gut homogenates was determined using the protein substrate azocasein. Optimal azocasein hydrolysis by luminal proteinases of the larvae of T. granarium was highly alkaline in pH 10-10.5, although the pH of luminal contents was slightly acidic (pH 6.5). The extract showed the highest activity at 55 degrees C (pH 6.5), 45 degrees C (pH 8) and 30 degrees C (pH 10). The proteolytic activity was strongly inhibited in the presence of phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (82.33+/-4.37% inhibition). This inhibition was decreased with increasing of the pH of assay incubating medium. N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (51.6+/-3.3% inhibition) and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (27.23+/-4.37 % inhibition) showed inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Addition of thiol activators dithiothreitol and L-cysteine had not enhanced azocaseinolytic activity. The data suggest that protein digestion in the larvae of T. granarium is primarily dependent on serine proteinases; trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteinases. PMID:16628932

  18. Carboxy-terminal truncation of oryzacystatin II by oryzacystatin-insensitive insect digestive proteinases.

    PubMed

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Vrain, T C

    1995-10-01

    The biochemical interactions between digestive proteinases of the Coleoptera pest black vine weevil (Otiorynchus sulcatus) and two plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors, oryzacystatin I (OCI) and oryzacystatin II (OCII), were assessed using gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, OCI-affinity chromatography, and recombinant forms of the two plant inhibitors. The insect proteinases were resolved in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels as five major bands, only three of them being totally or partially inactivated by OCI and OCII. The maximal inhibitory effect of both OCs at pH 5.0 was estimated at 40% and the inhibition was stable with time despite the presence of OC-insensitive proteases, indicating the stability of the OCI and OCII effects. After removing OC-sensitive proteinases from the insect crude extract by OCI-affinity chromatography, the effects of the insect cystatin-insensitive proteases on the structural integrity of the free OCs were analyzed. While OCI remained stable, OCII was subjected to limited proteolysis leading to its gradual transformation into a approximately 10.5-kDa unstable intermediate, OCIIi. As shown by the degradation pattern of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)/OCII fusion protein, the appearance of OCIIi resulted from the C-terminal truncation of OCII. Either free or linked to GST, OCIIi was as active against papain and human cathepsin H as OCII, and the initial specificities of the inhibitor for these two cysteine proteinases were conserved after cleavage. Although these observations indicate the high conformational stability of OCII near its active (inhibitory) site, they also suggest a general conformational destabilization of this inhibitor following its initial cleavage, subsequently leading to its complete hydrolysis. This apparent susceptibility of OCII to proteolytic cleavage by the insect proteinases could have major implications when planning the use of this plant cystatin for insect pest control. PMID:7574723

  19. Salicylic Acid Inhibits Synthesis of Proteinase Inhibitors in Tomato Leaves Induced by Systemin and Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Doares, S. H.; Narvaez-Vasquez, J.; Conconi, A.; Ryan, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), previously shown to inhibit proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by wounding, oligouronides (H.M. Doherty, R.R. Selvendran, D.J. Bowles [1988] Physiol Mol Plant Pathol 33: 377-384), and linolenic acid (H. Pena-Cortes, T. Albrecht, S. Prat, E.W. Weiler, L. Willmitzer [1993] Planta 191: 123-128), are shown here to be potent inhibitors of systemin-induced and jasmonic acid (JA)-induced synthesis of proteinase inhibitor mRNAs and proteins. The inhibition by SA and ASA of proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by systemin and JA, as well as by wounding and oligosaccharide elicitors, provides further evidence that both oligosaccharide and polypeptide inducer molecules utilize the octadecanoid pathway to signal the activation of proteinase inhibitor genes. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) leaves were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the inhibitory effects of SA are shown to be specific for the synthesis of a small number of JA-inducible proteins that includes the proteinase inhibitors. Previous results have shown that SA inhibits the conversion of 13S-hydroperoxy linolenic acid to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway by blocking synthesis of JA. Here we report that the inhibition of synthesis of proteinase inhibitor proteins and mRNAs by SA in both light and darkness also occurs at a step in the signal transduction pathway, after JA synthesis but preceding transcription of the inhibitor genes. PMID:12228577

  20. Occurrence of Free d-Amino Acids and Aspartate Racemases in Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Homma, Hiroshi; Long, Zhiqun; Imai, Kazuhiro; Iida, Toshii; Maruyama, Tadashi; Aikawa, Yuko; Endo, Isao; Yohda, Masafumi

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of free d-amino acids and aspartate racemases in several hyperthermophilic archaea was investigated. Aspartic acid in all the hyperthermophilic archaea was highly racemized. The ratio of d-aspartic acid to total aspartic acid was in the range of 43.0 to 49.1%. The crude extracts of the hyperthermophiles exhibited aspartate racemase activity at 70°C, and aspartate racemase homologous genes in them were identified by PCR. d-Enantiomers of other amino acids (alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, and lysine) in Thermococcus strains were also detected. Some of them might be by-products of aspartate racemase. It is proven that d-amino acids are produced in some hyperthermophilic archaea, although their function is unknown. PMID:10515953

  1. Understanding and targeting a novel plant viral proteinase/substrate interaction. Final report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, W.

    1995-10-01

    The past 3 years of funding have focused our efforts on trying to understand the molecular basis of a unique substrate interaction displayed by a viral proteinase. We have made good progress and during this funding period we have made four contributions to the scientific literature and have developed the application of the proteinase in the expression and purification of recombinant fusion proteins. A comprehensive review of virus-encoded proteinases, written during the funding period, emphazing the tremendous similarity of viral proteinases with their cellular counterparts and at the same time detail the unique characteristics which permit them to function in a cellular environment. The focus of the research effort was the tobacco etch virus (TEV) 27kDa NIa proteinase.

  2. Purification and Characterization of an Endophytic Fungal Proteinase That Is Abundantly Expressed in the Infected Host Grass.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, J. T.; Belanger, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    A novel Acremonium typhinum proteinase that is expressed during endophytic infection of the grass Poa ampla Merr. was purified from endophyte-infected leaf sheath tissue. It is a thiol-containing serine alkaline endoproteinase with bound carbohydrate. In the infected host tissue, this proteinase is an abundant protein localized within fungal membrane vesicles and in the plant and/or fungal cell walls. This proteinase was not expressed constitutively during fungus culture. Rather, its expression appeared to be induced by nutrient depletion. Expression of an antigenically similar proteinase was detected in five other endophyte-infected Poa species. The regulated expression of the proteinase in culture and its abundance in infected plant tissue suggest that its expression may be involved in the symbiotic interaction of the plant and the fungus. PMID:12232300

  3. Unusual chromatographic behaviour and one-step purification of a novel membrane proteinase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Fricke, B; Buchmann, T; Friebe, S

    1995-11-01

    Cell envelopes of Bacillus cereus contain a casein-cleaving membrane proteinase (CCMP) and an insulin-cleaving membrane proteinase (ICMP), which differ in their substrate and inhibitor specificity from all Bacillus proteinases described previously. They remained localized in the cytoplasmic membrane after treatment with lysozyme and mutanolysin and they are strongly attached to the membrane compared with other known membrane proteinases. Only high a concentration of the Zwitterionic detergent sulfobetain SB-12 enabled an effective solubilization of both membrane proteinases. The usual conventional purification methods, such as chromatofocusing, ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography in the presence of detergent concentrations beyond their critical micelle concentration, could not be applied to the purification, because the solubilized membrane proteinases bound strongly and irreversibly to the chromatographic matrix. In the search for other purification methods, we used a tentacle ion-exchanger (EMD trimethylaminoethyl-Fractogel) to reduce the hydrophobic interactions between the proteinases and the matrix. All contaminating proteins could be removed by a first gradient of sodium chloride without elution of CCMP; a second gradient with isopropanol and a decreasing salt concentration resulted in an efficiently purified CCMP. The ICMP was irreversibly denaturated. Purified CCMP is a member of the metalloproteinase family with a pH optimum in the neutral range and a temperature optimum of 40 degrees C, whose properties differ from the serine-type membrane proteinase of Bacillus subtilis described by Shimizu et al. [Agric. Biol. Chem., 47 (1983) 1775]. It consists of two subunits in sodiumdodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions (Mr 53,000 and 65,000); however, the molecular mass of the purified enzyme could not be determined by size exclusion or SDS-PAGE, because the purified enzyme

  4. Effects of E-64, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor, on cowpea weevil growth, development, and fecundity

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, L.L.; Shade, R.E.; Pomeroy, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    E-64, a specific inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, was incorporated into artificial seeds at low levels (0.01-0.25% by weight). It prolonged developmental time and increased mortality of the larval cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), in direct proportion to its concentration in the artificial seeds. The fecundity of females emerging from the artificial seeds was significantly decreased by E-64 concentrations of 0.06% and higher. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the midgut cysteine proteinase in C. maculatus is essential for normal growth and development.

  5. IdeS and SpeB: immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Björck, Lars

    2003-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is a major human pathogen causing substantial morbidity and mortality in society. S. pyogenes has evolved numerous molecular mechanisms to avoid the various actions of the human immune system and has established means to modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. S. pyogenes produces and secretes proteolytic enzymes, which have an important impact on the ability of the bacteria to survive in the human host. Prominent among these are two immunoglobulin-degrading enzymes: the newly discovered streptococcal cysteine proteinase, IdeS, and the classical cysteine proteinase of S. pyogenes, SpeB. PMID:12615219

  6. Proteinase, phospholipase, hyaluronidase and chondroitin-sulphatase production by Malassezia pachydermatis.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, S D; Paula, C R

    2000-02-01

    The production of four functional enzyme categories was investigated in 30 strains of Malassezia pachydermatis isolated from dogs with otitis or dermatitis. The most appropriate reading intervals for these assays were determined with the aid of statistical comparisons. All strains produced proteinase and chondroitin-sulphatase; hyaluronidase and phospholipase were produced by all skin isolates (15/15) and 14 out of 15 ear canal isolates. Strains from ear canals did not differ significantly as a group from skin strains in quantitative production of any of the four enzymes; production of proteinase and chondroitin-sulphatase in particular was markedly uniform. PMID:10746230

  7. A Simple Approach to Fourier Aliasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foadi, James

    2007-01-01

    In the context of discrete Fourier transforms the idea of aliasing as due to approximation errors in the integral defining Fourier coefficients is introduced and explained. This has the positive pedagogical effect of getting to the heart of sampling and the discrete Fourier transform without having to delve into effective, but otherwise long and…

  8. Expression of human α1-proteinase inhibitor in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Karnaukhova, Elena; Ophir, Yakir; Trinh, Loc; Dalal, Nimish; Punt, Peter J; Golding, Basil; Shiloach, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background Human α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), also known as antitrypsin, is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor (serpin) in plasma. Its deficiency is associated with development of progressive, ultimately fatal emphysema. Currently in the United States, α1-PI is available for replacement therapy as an FDA licensed plasma-derived (pd) product. However, the plasma source itself is limited; moreover, even with efficient viral inactivation steps used in manufacture of plasma products, the risk of contamination from emerging viruses may still exist. Therefore, recombinant α1-PI (r-α1-PI) could provide an attractive alternative. Although r-α1-PI has been produced in several hosts, protein stability in vitro and rapid clearance from the circulation have been major issues, primarily due to absent or altered glycosylation. Results We have explored the possibility of expressing the gene for human α1-PI in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger (A. niger), a system reported to be capable of providing more "mammalian-like" glycosylation patterns to secretable proteins than commonly used yeast hosts. Our expression strategy was based on fusion of α1-PI with a strongly expressed, secreted leader protein (glucoamylase G2), separated by dibasic processing site (N-V-I-S-K-R) that provides in vivo cleavage. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, ELISA, and α1-PI activity assays enabled us to select the transformant(s) secreting a biologically active glycosylated r-α1-PI with yields of up to 12 mg/L. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) analysis further confirmed that molecular mass of the r-α1-PI was similar to that of the pd-α1-PI. In vitro stability of the r-α1-PI from A. niger was tested in comparison with pd-α1-PI reference and non-glycosylated human r-α1-PI from E. coli. Conclusion We examined the suitability of the filamentous fungus A. niger for the expression of the human gene for α1-PI, a medium size glycoprotein of high

  9. Fourier-transform optical microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. D.; Smith, R. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Stewart, K. P.; Hagopian, J. G.; Sirota, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial characterization of a miniature single-pass Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) that has an optical bench that measures 1 cm x 5 cm x 10 cm is presented. The FTS is predicated on the classic Michelson interferometer design with a moving mirror. Precision translation of the mirror is accomplished by microfabrication of dovetailed bearing surfaces along single-crystal planes in silicon. Although it is miniaturized, the FTS maintains a relatively high spectral resolution, 0.1 cm-1, with adequate optical throughput.

  10. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  11. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier-transform spectrometer provides approximately hundredfold increase in luminosity at detector plane over that achievable with older instruments of this type. Used to analyze such weak sources as pollutants and other low-concentration substances in atmosphere. Interferometer creates fringe patterns on two distinct arrays of light detectors, which observe different wavelength bands. Objective lens focuses scene on image plane, which contains optical chopper. To make instrument less susceptible to variations in scene under observation, field and detector lenses focus entrance aperture, rather that image, onto detector array.

  12. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  13. Improved Fourier-transform profilometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Xianfu; Chen Wenjing; Su Xianyu

    2007-02-10

    An improved optical geometry of the projected-fringe profilometry technique, in which the exit pupil of the projecting lens and the entrance pupil of the imaging lens are neither at the same height above the reference plane nor coplanar, is discussed and used in Fourier-transform profilometry. Furthermore, an improved fringe-pattern description and phase-height mapping formula based on the improved geometrical generalization is deduced. Employing the new optical geometry, it is easier for us to obtain the full-field fringe by moving either the projector or the imaging device. Therefore the new method offers a flexible way to obtain reliable height distribution of a measured object.

  14. Crystal structure of truncated aspartate transcarbamoylase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Lunev, Sergey; Bosch, Soraya S; Batista, Fernando de Assis; Wrenger, Carsten; Groves, Matthew R

    2016-07-01

    The de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis pathway of Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for antimalarial drug discovery. The parasite requires a supply of purines and pyrimidines for growth and proliferation and is unable to take up pyrimidines from the host. Direct (or indirect) inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis via dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH), the fourth enzyme of the pathway, has already been shown to be lethal to the parasite. In the second step of the plasmodial pyrimidine-synthesis pathway, aspartate and carbamoyl phosphate are condensed to N-carbamoyl-L-aspartate and inorganic phosphate by aspartate transcarbamoylase (PfATC). In this paper, the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of PfATC is reported. The space group of the PfATC crystals was determined to be monoclinic P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 87.0, b = 103.8, c = 87.1 Å, α = 90.0, β = 117.7, γ = 90.0°. The presented PfATC model shares a high degree of homology with the catalytic domain of Escherichia coli ATC. There is as yet no evidence of the existence of a regulatory domain in PfATC. Similarly to E. coli ATC, PfATC was modelled as a homotrimer in which each of the three active sites is formed at the oligomeric interface. Each active site comprises residues from two adjacent subunits in the trimer with a high degree of evolutional conservation. Here, the activity loss owing to mutagenesis of the key active-site residues is also described. PMID:27380369

  15. FFTLog: Fast Fourier or Hankel transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    2015-12-01

    FFTLog is a set of Fortran subroutines that compute the fast Fourier or Hankel (= Fourier-Bessel) transform of a periodic sequence of logarithmically spaced points. FFTLog can be regarded as a natural analogue to the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), in the sense that, just as the normal FFT gives the exact (to machine precision) Fourier transform of a linearly spaced periodic sequence, so also FFTLog gives the exact Fourier or Hankel transform, of arbitrary order m, of a logarithmically spaced periodic sequence.

  16. Pediatric anti-N methyl D aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Suri, Vinit; Sharma, Sushma; Gupta, Rohan; Sogani, S K; Mediratta, Sunit; Jadhao, Nilesh

    2013-05-01

    Anti-N Methyl D Aspartate Receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDARE) is a recently defined disease, which is probably more under-recognized than rare. We report a case of anti-NMDARE in a 13-years-old girl, who presented with intractable seizures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of pediatric anti-NMDARE being reported from India. The need for a greater awareness of this disease and the subtle differences in clinical presentation between pediatric and adult patients are highlighted. PMID:24082929

  17. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  18. Structural and functional characterization of aspartate racemase from the acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Takayuki; Ito, Toshiya; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Sekine, Masae; Homma, Hiroshi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Functional and structural characterizations of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-independent aspartate racemase of the acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus were performed. Picrophilus aspartate racemase exhibited high substrate specificity to aspartic acid. The optimal reaction temperature was 60 °C, which is almost the same as the optimal growth temperature. Reflecting the low pH in the cytosol, the optimal reaction pH of Picrophilus aspartate racemase was approximately 5.5. However, the activity at the putative cytosolic pH of 4.6 was approximately 6 times lower than that at the optimal pH of 5.5. The crystal structure of Picrophilus aspartate racemase was almost the same as that of other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate -independent aspartate racemases. In two molecules of the dimer, one molecule contained a tartaric acid molecule in the catalytic site; the structure of the other molecule was relatively flexible. Finally, we examined the intracellular existence of D-amino acids. Unexpectedly, the proportion of D-aspartate to total aspartate was not very high. In contrast, both D-proline and D-alanine were observed. Because Picrophilus aspartate racemase is highly specific to aspartate, other amino acid racemases might exist in Picrophilus torridus. PMID:27094682

  19. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date. PMID:6385962

  20. Nitric oxide inhibits cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Salvati, L; Muolo, M; Colasanti, M; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-04-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule showing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. Moreover, NO inhibits cysteine proteinase action by nitrosylating the Cys catalytic residue. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of the substrate N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methyl coumarin) and of NO on the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi (the hemoflagellate protozoan parasite which causes the American trypanosomiasis), is reported. In particular, NO-donors S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-4-ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenamide (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) dose-dependently inhibited cruzipain, this effect being likely attributable to the S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. These results were analyzed in parallel with those concerning the inhibitory effect of the substrate and of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the cruzipain-homologous cysteine proteinase from Plasmodium falciparum. The modulation of the cruzipain and falcipain activity by NO may be relevant in developing new strategies against T. cruzi and P. falciparum in human host. As a whole, the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation of pathogenic viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic cysteine proteinases may represent a general mechanism of antimicrobial and antiparasitic host defences. PMID:10753643

  1. OZONE EFFECTS ON ALPHA-1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR IN VIVO: BLOOD PLASMA INHIBITORY ACTIVITY IS UNCHANGED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possible oxidative inactivation of human blood plasma alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) by inhaled ozone was assessed. Eleven male volunteers (non-smokers) were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for four hours on two consecutive days and ten control subjects were exposed to air under ...

  2. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  3. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. PMID:25462979

  4. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  5. Proteinase K and the structure of PrPse: the good, the bad, and the ugly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious proteins (prions) are, ironically, defined by their resistance to proteolytic digestion. A defining characteristic of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunod...

  6. LEKTI domain 15 is a functional Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vitzithum, Klaus; Lauber, Thomas; Kreutzmann, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Rösch, Paul; Marx, Ute C

    2008-01-01

    The multidomain proteinase inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor) consists of 15 potential serine proteinase inhibitory domains. In various diseases such as the severe skin disorder Netherton syndrome as well as atopy, defects in the gene encoding LEKTI have been identified that generate premature termination codons of translation, suggesting a specific role of the COOH-terminal part of LEKTI in healthy individuals. We overexpressed and purified a sequence comprising the 15th domain of LEKTI for further characterisation. Here, we present a high yield expression system for recombinant production and efficient purification of LEKTI domain 15 as a highly soluble protein with a uniform disulfide pattern that is identical to that of other known Kazal-type inhibitors. Also, the expected P1P1' site was confirmed. LEKTI domain 15 is a well-structured protein as verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a tight-binding and stable inhibitor of the serine proteinase trypsin. These findings confirm the designation of domain 15 as a proteinase inhibitor of the Kazal family. PMID:17936012

  7. Nutritional requirements and nitrogen-dependent regulation of proteinase activity of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062.

    PubMed

    Hebert, E M; Raya, R R; De Giori, G S

    2000-12-01

    The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062 were determined with a simplified chemically defined medium (SCDM) and compared with those of L. helveticus CRL 974 (ATCC 15009). Both strains were found to be prototrophic for alanine, glycine, asparagine, glutamine, and cysteine. In addition, CRL 1062 also showed prototrophy for lysine and serine. The microorganisms also required riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and uracil for growth in liquid SCDM. The growth rate and the synthesis of their cell membrane-bound serine proteinases, but not of their intracellular leucyl-aminopeptidases, were influenced by the peptide content of the medium. The highest proteinase levels were found during cell growth in basal SCDM, while the synthesis of this enzyme was inhibited in SCDM supplemented with Casitone, Casamino Acids, or beta-casein. Low-molecular-mass peptides (<3,000 Da), extracted from Casitone, and the dipeptide leucylproline (final concentration, 5 mM) play important roles in the medium-dependent regulation of proteinase activity. The addition of the dipeptide leucylproline (5 mM) to SCDM reduced proteinase activity by 25%. PMID:11097908

  8. MYOCARDIAL NECROSIS PRODUCED IN ANIMALS BY MEANS OF CRYSTALLINE STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Aaron; Robertson, Theodore

    1954-01-01

    Focal myocardial necrosis that was often extensive was found in a high percentage of rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice given a single intravenous injection of crystalline streptococcal proteinase. The findings are discussed in relation to their possible implications for the pathogenesis of the cardiac lesions of rheumatic fever. PMID:13163324

  9. Serine proteinase of Renibacterium salmoninarum digests a major autologous extracellular and cell-surface protein.

    PubMed

    Rockey, D D; Turaga, P S; Wiens, G D; Cook, B A; Kaattari, S L

    1991-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a pathogen of salmonid fish that produces large amounts of extracellular protein (ECP) during growth. A proteolytic activity present in ECP at elevated temperatures digested the majority of the proteins in ECP. This digestion was also associated with the loss of ECP immunosuppressive function. In vitro activity of the proteinase in ECP was temperature dependent: it was not detected in an 18-h digest at 4 and 17 degrees C but became readily apparent at 37 degrees C. Proteinase activity was detected at bacterial physiological temperatures (17 degrees C) in reactions incubated for several days. Under these conditions, digestion of partially purified p57, a major constituent of ECP and a major cell-surface protein, yielded a spectrum of breakdown products similar in molecular weight and antigenicity to those in ECP. This pattern of digestion suggests that most of the immunologically related constituents of ECP are p57 and its breakdown products. The proteolytic activity was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, methanol, and ethanol and to 10-min incubation at temperatures above 65 degrees C. Electrophoretic analysis of the proteinase on polyacrylamide gels containing proteinase substrates indicated the native form to be 100 kDa or greater. The enzyme was active against selected unrelated substrates only when coincubated with a denaturant (0.1% lauryl sulfate) and (or) a reducing agent (20 mM dithiothreitol). PMID:1777853

  10. Dependence of vascular permeability enhancement on cysteine proteinases in vesicles of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Potempa, J; Pike, R N; Travis, J

    1995-01-01

    Infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis is strongly associated with adult periodontitis, and proteinases are considered to be important virulent factors of the bacterium. In order to investigate the function of proteinases in disease development we examined vesicles, a biological carrier of these enzymes, for the generation of vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity, believed to correlate with the exudation of gingival crevicular fluid. The vesicles generated VPE activity from human plasma in a dose-dependent manner which could be inhibited 90% by antipain, a specific inhibitor of the Arg-specific cysteine proteinases (Arg-gingipains [RGPs] from P. gingivalis. Incubation of vesicles with high-molecular-weight-kininogen (HMWK)-deficient plasma did not result in VPE activity. On this basis, RGPs associated with vesicles were assumed to be responsible for most of the VPE activity generation via plasma prekallikrein activation and subsequent bradykinin production. The secondary pathway for VPE activity production was dependent on the direct release of bradykinin from HMWK by the concerted action of RGP and a Lys-specific cysteine proteinase (Lys-gingipain [KGP]), also associated with vesicles. These results indicate that RGP and KGP are biologically important VPE factors acting either via prekallikrein activation (RGP) and/or HMWK cleavage (RGP and KGP) to release BK and, thereby, contributing to the production of gingival crevicular fluid at periodontal sites infected with P. gingivalis. PMID:7729914

  11. Isolation and characterization of a proteinase K sensitive PrPSc fraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown that a sizeable fraction of PrPSc present in prion-infected tissues is,contrary to previous conceptions, sensitive to digestion by proteinase K (PK). This finding has important implications in the context of diagnosis of prion disease, as PK has been extensively used in att...

  12. Structural and functional aspects of papain-like cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turk, B; Turk, V; Turk, D

    1997-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are widely distributed among living organisms. According to the most recent classifications (Rawlings and Barrett, 1993, 1994), they can be subdivided on the basis of sequence homology into 14 or even 20 different families, the most important being the papain and the calpain families. The papain-like cysteine proteinases are the most abundant among the cysteine proteinases. The family consists of papain and related plant proteinases such as chymopapain, caricain, bromelain, actinidin, ficin, and aleurain, and the lysosomal cathepsins B, H, L, S, C and K. Most of these enzymes are relatively small proteins with Mr values in the range 20000-35000 (reviewed in Brocklehurst et al., 1987; Polgar, 1989; Rawlings and Barrett, 1994; Berti and Storer, 1995), with the exception of cathepsin C, which is an oligomeric enzyme with Mr approximately 200000 (Metrione et al., 1970; Dolenc et al., 1995). A number of cysteine proteinases are located within lysosomes. Four of them, cathepsins B, C, H and L, are ubiquitous in lysosomes of animals, whereas cathepsin S has a more restricted localisation (Barrett and Kirschke, 1981; Kirschke and Wiederanders, 1994). The enzymes, except cathepsin C, are endopeptidases (reviewed in Kirschke et al., 1995), although cathepsin B was found also to be a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (Aronson and Barrett, 1978) and cathepsin H also an aminopeptidase (Koga et al., 1992). Cathepsin C is a dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, but at higher pH it exhibits also dipeptidyl transferase activity (reviewed in Kirschke et al., 1995). Among the lysosomal cysteine proteinases, cathepsin L was found to be the most active in degradation of protein substrates, such as collagen, elastin and azocasein (Barrett and Kirschke, 1981; Maciewicz et al., 1987; Mason et al., 1989), arid cathepsin B the most abundant (Kirschke and Barrett, 1981). All the enzymes are optimally active at slightly acidic pH, although their pH optima for degradation of synthetic

  13. Proteolytic inactivation of the leukocyte C5a receptor by proteinases derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Jagels, M A; Travis, J; Potempa, J; Pike, R; Hugli, T E

    1996-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as a primary causative agent in adult periodontitis. Several proteinases are produced by this bacterium, and it is suggested that they contribute to virulence and to local tissue injury resulting from infection by P. gingivalis. Cysteine proteinases with specificities to cleave either Arg-X or Lys-X peptide bonds (i.e., gingipains) have been characterized as predominant enzymes associated with vesicles shed from the surface of this bacterium. It has recently been demonstrated that these proteinases are capable of degrading the blood complement component C5, resulting in the generation of biologically active C5a. By using an affinity-purified rabbit antibody raised against residues 9 to 29 of the C5a receptor (C5aR; CD88), we demonstrate that noncysteinyl proteinases associated with vesicles obtained from P. gingivalis cleave the C5aR on human neutrophils. Proteolytic attack of the C5aR by enzymes from the P. gingivalis vesicles was inhibited by TPCK (tolylsullonyl phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride), and dichloroisocoumarin, suggesting that serine proteinases are primarily responsible for this degradative activity. The purified vesicle proteinase Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain also cleaved the N-terminal region of the C5aR on the human neutrophils. Lys-gingipain activity was essentially resistant to these inhibitors but was inhibited by TLCK (Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone) and iodoacetamide. A synthetic peptide that mimics the N-terminal region of C5aR (residues 9 to 29; PDYGHY DDKDTLDLNTPVDKT) was readily cleaved by chymotrypsin but not by trypsin, despite the presence of two potential trypsin (i.e., lysyl-X) cleavage sites. The specific sites of cleavage in the C5aR 9-29 peptide were determined by mass spectroscopy for both chymotrypsin and Lys-gingipain digests. This analysis demonstrated that the C5aR peptide is susceptible to cleavage at

  14. Enzymatic response of the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) to a bis-benzamidine proteinase Inhibitor. i.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Lourenção, A L; Guedes, R N C; Pallini, A; Oliveira, J A; Oliveira, M G A

    2012-10-01

    Ingestion of proteinase inhibitors leads to hyperproduction of digestive proteinases, limiting the bioavailability of essential amino acids for protein synthesis, which affects insect growth and development. However, the effects of proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzymes can lead to an adaptive response by the insect. In here, we assessed the biochemical response of midgut proteinases from the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) to different concentrations of berenil, a bis-benzamidine proteinase inhibitor, on eucalyptus. Eucalyptus leaves were immersed in berenil solutions at different concentrations and fed to larvae of T. arnobia. Mortality was assessed daily. The proteolytic activity in the midgut of T. arnobia was assessed after feeding on plants sprayed with aqueous solutions of berenil, fed to fifth instars of T. arnobia for 48 h before midgut removal for enzymatic assays. Larvae of T. arnobia were able to overcome the effects of the lowest berenil concentrations by increasing their trypsin-like activity, but not as berenil concentration increased, despite the fact that the highest berenil concentration resulted in overproduction of trypsin-like proteinases. Berenil also prevented the increase of the cysteine proteinases activity in response to trypsin inhibition. PMID:23950094

  15. A Single Aspartate Coordinates Two Catalytic Steps in Hedgehog Autoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-08-31

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is driven by the cholesterol-modified Hh ligand, generated by autoprocessing of Hh precursor protein. Two steps in Hh autoprocessing, N-S acyl shift and transesterification, must be coupled for efficient Hh cholesteroylation and downstream signal transduction. In the present study, we show that a conserved aspartate residue, D46 of the Hh autoprocessing domain, coordinates these two catalytic steps. Mutagenesis demonstrated that D46 suppresses non-native Hh precursor autoprocessing and is indispensable for transesterification with cholesterol. NMR measurements indicated that D46 has a pKa of 5.6, ∼2 units above the expected pKa of aspartate, due to a hydrogen-bond between protonated D46 and a catalytic cysteine residue. However, the deprotonated form of D46 side chain is also essential, because a D46N mutation cannot mediate cholesteroylation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the proton shuttling of D46 side chain mechanistically couples the two steps of Hh cholesteroylation. PMID:27529645

  16. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin. PMID:27108177

  17. Hormonal regulation, processing, and secretion of cysteine proteinases in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, S M; Ho, T H

    1990-01-01

    Barley aleurone layers synthesize and secrete several proteases in response to gibberellic acid (GA3). Two major cysteine proteinases designated EP-A (37,000 M(r)) and EP-B (30,000 M(r)) have been described [Koehler and Ho (1988). Plant Physiol. 87, 95-103]. We now report the cDNA cloning of EP-B and describe the post-translational processing and hormonal regulation of both cysteine proteinases. Three cDNAs for cysteine proteinases were cloned from GA3-induced barley aleurone layers. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that these are members of a small gene family with no more than four to five different genes. The proteins encoded by two of these clones, pHVEP1 and 4, are 98% similar to each other and are isozymes of EP-B. The proteins contain large preprosequences followed by the amino acid sequence described as the mature N terminus of purified EP-B, and are antigenic to EP-B antiserum. The results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that the post-translational processing of large prosequences proceeds in a multistep fashion to produce the mature enzymes. Processing intermediates for EP-B are observed both in the aleurone layers and surrounding incubation medium, but only mature EP-A is secreted. The regulation of synthesis of EP-A, EP-B, and other aleurone cysteine proteinases was compared at the protein and mRNA levels. We conclude that barley aleurone cysteine proteinases are differentially regulated with respect to their temporal and hormonally induced expression. PMID:2152126

  18. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  19. Digital pathology with Fourier ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Willems, Phil; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a recently introduced method of acquiring high-resolution, wide field of view (FOV) giga-pixel histology images. The FPM procedure first acquires a sequence of low-resolution images of a sample under variable-angle illumination. It then combines these images using a novel phase retrieval algorithm to improve the employed microscope’s resolution beyond its conventional limit. Here, we first describe how FPM’s resolution improvement can enhance wide FOV histology imaging. Second, we show that FPM also records a thin sample’s optical phase, which can help pathologists digitally extract as much information as possible from a given histology slide. PMID:25481664

  20. Biosynthesis of D-aspartate in mammals: the rat and human homologs of mouse aspartate racemase are not responsible for the biosynthesis of D-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Satsuki; Katane, Masumi; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Yuusuke; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Homma, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) has important physiological functions, and recent studies have shown that substantial amounts of free D-Asp are present in a wide variety of mammalian tissues and cells. Biosynthesis of D-Asp has been observed in several cultured rat cell lines, and a murine gene (glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase 1-like 1, Got1l1) that encodes Asp racemase, a synthetic enzyme that produces D-Asp from L-Asp, was proposed recently. The product of this gene is homologous to mammalian glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT). Here, we tested the hypothesis that rat and human homologs of mouse GOT1L1 are involved in Asp synthesis. The following two approaches were applied, since the numbers of attempts were unsuccessful to prepare soluble GOT1L1 recombinant proteins. First, the relationship between the D-Asp content and the expression levels of the mRNAs encoding GOT1L1 and D-Asp oxidase, a primary degradative enzyme of D-Asp, was examined in several rat and human cell lines. Second, the effect of knockdown of the Got1l1 gene on D-Asp biosynthesis during culture of the cells was determined. The results presented here suggest that the rat and human homologs of mouse GOT1L1 are not involved in D-Asp biosynthesis. Therefore, D-Asp biosynthetic pathway in mammals is still an urgent issue to be resolved. PMID:25646960

  1. Hybridization of glutamate aspartate transaminase. Investigation of subunit interaction.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B; Martinez-Carrion, M

    1975-10-01

    Glutamate aspartate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1) is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits with each active site containing pyridoxal 5'-phosphate linked via an internal Shiff's base to a lysine residue. It is not known if these sites interact during catalysis but negative cooperativity has been reported for binding of the coenzyme (Arrio-Dupont, M. (1972), Eur. J. Biochem. 30, 307). Also nonequivalence of its subunits in binding 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (Harris, H.E., and Bayley, P. M. (1975), Biochem. J. 145, 125), in modification of only a single tyrosine with full loss of activity (Christen, P., and Riordan, J.F. (1970), Biochemistry 9, 3025), and following modification with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (Cournil, I., and Arrio-Dupont, M. (1973), Biochemie 55, 103) has been reported. However, steady-state and transient kinetic methods as well as direct titration of the active site chromophore with substrates and substrate analogs have not revealed any cooperative phenomena (Braunstein, A. E. (1973), Enzymes, 3rd Ed. 9, 379). It was therefore decided that a more direct approach should be used to clarify the quistion of subunit interaction during the covalent phase of catalysis. To this end a hybrid method was devised in which a hybrid transaminase was prepared which contained one subunit with a functional active site while the other subunit has the internal Shiff's base reduced with NaBH4. The specific activities and amount of "actively bound" pyridoxal 5'-phosphate are both in a 2:1 ratio for the native and hybrid forms. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of the hybrid and native enzyme forms shows that both forms gave parallel double reciprocal plots which is characteristic of the Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism of transamination. The Km values for the substrates L-aspartic acid and alpha-ketoglutaric acid are nearly identical while the Vmax value for the hybrid is one-half the value of the native transaminase. It therefore appears that

  2. Fourier's law: insight from a simple derivation.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Y; Di Ventra, M

    2009-04-01

    The onset of Fourier's law in a one-dimensional quantum system is addressed via a simple model of weakly coupled quantum systems in contact with thermal baths at their edges. Using analytical arguments we show that the crossover from the ballistic (invalid Fourier's law) to diffusive (valid Fourier's law) regimes is characterized by a thermal length scale, which is directly related to the profile of the local temperature. In the same vein, dephasing is shown to give rise to classical Fourier's law, similarly to the onset of Ohm's law in mesoscopic conductors. PMID:19518279

  3. Aspartate aminotransferase activity in human healthy and inflamed dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C; Tripodi, D; Perinetti, G; Piattelli, A

    2001-06-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) seems to be an important mediator of inflammatory processes. Its role in the progression and detection of inflammatory periodontal disease has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In the present study AST activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis, and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic AST activity showed that the control values for the healthy pulps were 4.8 +/- 0.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. In reversible pulpitis specimens the AST activity increased to 7.98 +/- 2.1 units/mg of pulp tissue. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values decreased to 2.28 +/- 1.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. Differences between the groups (control versus reversible pulpitis and reversible pulpitis versus irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant (p = 0.0015). These results could point to a role of AST in the early events that lead to development of pulpal inflammation. PMID:11487132

  4. Divergent allosteric patterns verify the regulatory paradigm for aspartate transcarbamylase.

    PubMed

    Wales, M E; Madison, L L; Glaser, S S; Wild, J R

    1999-12-17

    The native Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, E.C. 2.1.3.2) provides a classic allosteric model for the feedback inhibition of a biosynthetic pathway by its end products. Both E. coli and Erwinia herbicola possess ATCase holoenzymes which are dodecameric (2(c3):3(r2)) with 311 amino acid residues per catalytic monomer and 153 and 154 amino acid residues per regulatory (r) monomer, respectively. While the quaternary structures of the two enzymes are identical, the primary amino acid sequences have diverged by 14 % in the catalytic polypeptide and 20 % in the regulatory polypeptide. The amino acids proposed to be directly involved in the active site and nucleotide binding site are strictly conserved between the two enzymes; nonetheless, the two enzymes differ in their catalytic and regulatory characteristics. The E. coli enzyme has sigmoidal substrate binding with activation by ATP, and inhibition by CTP, while the E. herbicola enzyme has apparent first order kinetics at low substrate concentrations in the absence of allosteric ligands, no ATP activation and only slight CTP inhibition. In an apparently important and highly conserved characteristic, CTP and UTP impose strong synergistic inhibition on both enzymes. The co-operative binding of aspartate in the E. coli enzyme is correlated with a T-to-R conformational transition which appears to be greatly reduced in the E. herbicola enzyme, although the addition of inhibitory heterotropic ligands (CTP or CTP+UTP) re-establishes co-operative saturation kinetics. Hybrid holoenzymes assembled in vivo with catalytic subunits from E. herbicola and regulatory subunits from E. coli mimick the allosteric response of the native E. coli holoenzyme and exhibit ATP activation. The reverse hybrid, regulatory subunits from E. herbicola and catalytic subunits from E. coli, exhibited no response to ATP. The conserved structure and diverged functional characteristics of the E. herbicola enzyme provides an opportunity

  5. AGC1/2, the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carriers.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Punzi, G; Obre, E; Lacombe, D; De Grassi, A; Pierri, C L; Rossignol, R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we discuss the structure and functions of the aspartate/glutamate carriers (AGC1-aralar and AGC2-citrin). Those proteins supply the aspartate synthesized within mitochondrial matrix to the cytosol in exchange for glutamate and a proton. A structure of an AGC carrier is not available yet but comparative 3D models were proposed. Moreover, transport assays performed by using the recombinant AGC1 and AGC2, reconstituted into liposome vesicles, allowed to explore the kinetics of those carriers and to reveal their specific transport properties. AGCs participate to a wide range of cellular functions, as the control of mitochondrial respiration, calcium signaling and antioxydant defenses. AGC1 might also play peculiar tissue-specific functions, as it was found to participate to cell-to-cell metabolic symbiosis in the retina. On the other hand, AGC1 is involved in the glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in neurons and AGC gene or protein alterations were discovered in rare human diseases. Accordingly, a mice model of AGC1 gene knock-out presented with growth delay and generalized tremor, with myelinisation defects. More recently, AGC was proposed to play a crucial role in tumor metabolism as observed from metabolomic studies showing that the asparate exported from the mitochondrion by AGC1 is employed in the regeneration of cytosolic glutathione. Therefore, given the central role of AGCs in cell metabolism and human pathology, drug screening are now being developed to identify pharmacological modulators of those carriers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27132995

  6. Modification of cystatin C activity by bacterial proteinases and neutrophil elastase in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Wikström, M; Potempa, J; Renvert, S; Hall, A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the interaction between the human cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, and proteinases of periodontitis associated bacteria. METHODS: Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from discrete periodontitis sites and their cystatin C content was estimated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The interaction between cystatin C and proteolytic enzymes from cultured strains of the gingival bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was studied by measuring inhibition of enzyme activity against peptidyl substrates, by detection of break down patterns of solid phase coupled and soluble cystatin C, and by N-terminal sequence analysis of cystatin C products resulting from the interactions. RESULTS: Gingival crevicular fluid contained cystatin C at a concentration of approximately 15 nM. Cystatin C did not inhibit the principal thiol stimulated proteinase activity of P gingivalis. Instead, strains of P gingivalis and P intermedia, but not A actinomycetemcomitans, released cystatin C modifying proteinases. Extracts of five P gingivalis and five P intermedia strains all hydrolysed bonds in the N-terminal region of cystatin C at physiological pH values. The modified cystatin C resulting from incubation with one P gingivalis strain was isolated and found to lack the eight most N-terminal residues. The affinity of the modified inhibitor for cathepsin B was 20-fold lower (Ki 5 nM) than that of full length cystatin C. A 50 kDa thiol stimulated proteinase, gingipain R, was isolated from P gingivalis and shown to be responsible for the Arg8-bond hydrolysis in cystatin C. The cathepsin B inhibitory activity of cystatin C incubated with gingival crevicular fluid was rapidly abolished after Val10-bond cleavage by elastase from exudate neutrophils, but cleavage at the gingipain specific Arg8-bond was also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The physiological control of cathepsin B activity is impeded in

  7. Flavivirus premembrane protein cleavage and spike heterodimer secretion require the function of the viral proteinase NS3.

    PubMed Central

    Lobigs, M

    1993-01-01

    Flavivirus protein biosynthesis involves the proteolytic processing of a single polyprotein precursor by host- and virus-encoded proteinases. In this study, the requirement for the proteolytic function of the viral proteinase NS3 for correct processing of a polyprotein segment encompassing the Murray Valley encephalitis virus structural proteins is shown. The NS3-mediated cleavage in the structural polyprotein region presumably releases the capsid protein from its membrane anchor and triggers the appearance of the premembrane (prM) protein. This suggests that cleavage of prM by signal peptidase in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum is under control of a cytoplasmic cleavage catalyzed by a viral proteinase. The function of the viral proteinase is also essential for secretion of flaviviral spike proteins when expressed from cDNA via vaccinia virus recombinants or in COS cell transfections. This has important implications for the design of flavivirus subunit vaccines. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8392191

  8. Identification of stable plant cystatin/nematode proteinase complexes using mildly denaturing gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Bonadé-Bottino, M; Jouanin, L; Vrain, T C

    1996-08-01

    The biochemical interactions between two cystatins from rice seeds, oryzacystatin I (OCI) and oryzacystatin II (OCII), and the cysteine proteinases from three plant parasitic nematodes, Meloidogyne hapla, M. incognita and M. javanica, were assessed using standard protease assays and mildly denaturing gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin/PAGE). Activity detected in extracts of preparasitic second-stage larvae (J2) from M. hapla was optimal at pH 5.5 and was inhibited in vitro by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane, hen egg cystatin, OCI, and OCII. As demonstrated by class-specific activity staining, all the activity measured between pH 3.5 and pH 7.5 was accounted for by a major proteinase form, Mhp1, and two minor forms, Mhp2 and Mhp3. Mhps were also detected in extracts and excretions of parasitic J2 and adult females, indicating their continuous expression throughout development of M. hapla, and their possible involvement in the extracellular degradation of proteins. Interestingly, the two plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors OCI and OCII showed different degrees of affinity for the major proteinase form, Mhp1. Both inhibitors almost completely inactivated this proteinase in native conditions but, unlike OCII, OCI conserved a high affinity for Mhp1 during mildly denaturing gelatin/PAGE, showing the differential stabilities of the OCI/Mhp1 and OCII/Mhp1 complexes. In contrast to Mhp1, the major cysteine proteinases detected in the two closely related species M. incognita and M. javanica were strongly inhibited by OCII, while the inhibition of OCI was partly prevented during electrophoresis. This species-related efficiency of plant cystatins against nematode cysteine proteinases could have practical implications when planning their use to control nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. PMID:8874065

  9. Fourier analysis and synthesis tomography.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Kelvin H.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Feldkuhn, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Most far-field optical imaging systems rely on a lens and spatially-resolved detection to probe distinct locations on the object. We describe and demonstrate a novel high-speed wide-field approach to imaging that instead measures the complex spatial Fourier transform of the object by detecting its spatially-integrated response to dynamic acousto-optically synthesized structured illumination. Tomographic filtered backprojection is applied to reconstruct the object in two or three dimensions. This technique decouples depth-of-field and working-distance from resolution, in contrast to conventional imaging, and can be used to image biological and synthetic structures in fluoresced or scattered light employing coherent or broadband illumination. We discuss the electronically programmable transfer function of the optical system and its implications for imaging dynamic processes. Finally, we present for the first time two-dimensional high-resolution image reconstructions demonstrating a three-orders-of-magnitude improvement in depth-of-field over conventional lens-based microscopy.

  10. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berthomieu, Catherine; Hienerwadel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy probes the vibrational properties of amino acids and cofactors, which are sensitive to minute structural changes. The lack of specificity of this technique, on the one hand, permits us to probe directly the vibrational properties of almost all the cofactors, amino acid side chains, and of water molecules. On the other hand, we can use reaction-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy to select vibrations corresponding to single chemical groups involved in a specific reaction. Various strategies are used to identify the IR signatures of each residue of interest in the resulting reaction-induced FTIR difference spectra. (Specific) Isotope labeling, site-directed mutagenesis, hydrogen/deuterium exchange are often used to identify the chemical groups. Studies on model compounds and the increasing use of theoretical chemistry for normal modes calculations allow us to interpret the IR frequencies in terms of specific structural characteristics of the chemical group or molecule of interest. This review presents basics of FTIR spectroscopy technique and provides specific important structural and functional information obtained from the analysis of the data from the photosystems, using this method. PMID:19513810