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Sample records for assembly bottom nozzle

  1. Fuel nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  2. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  3. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  4. REACTOR NOZZLE ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Capuder, F.C.; Dearwater, J.R.

    1959-02-10

    An improved nozzle assembly useful in a process for the direct reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride by means of dissociated ammonia in a heated reaction vessel is descrlbed. The nozzle design provides for intimate mixing of the two reactants and at the same time furnishes a layer of dissociated ammonia adjacent to the interior wall of the reaction vessel, thus preventing build-up of the reaction product on the vessel wall.

  5. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  6. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  7. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  8. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  9. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  10. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  11. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, Leslie J.; Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Nielsen, Engward W.; Ridler, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion.

  12. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, L.J.; Frey, G.A.; Nielsen, E.W.; Ridler, K.J.

    1997-08-05

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion. 3 figs.

  13. Plumb nozzle for nuclear fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Silverblatt, B.L.

    1986-02-25

    An elongated nuclear reactor fuel assembly is described having an asymmetric weight distribution across a cross section, including a nozzle affixed to one end of the fuel assembly having lifting surfaces formed thereon on which the fuel assembly can be supported when suspended from the surfaces. At least one of the lifting surfaces is located at a first elevation relative to the longitudinal axis of the fuel assembly. A second of the lifting surfaces is located at a second elevation different from the first elevation wherein the difference in the first and second elevations is sized to offset the asymmetric weight distribution when the fuel assembly is supported from the first and second surface so that when so supported the fuel assembly will hang plumb.

  14. Interface ring for gas turbine fuel nozzle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy A.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-03-22

    A gas turbine combustor assembly including a combustor liner and a plurality of fuel nozzle assemblies arranged in an annular array extending within the combustor liner. The fuel nozzle assemblies each include fuel nozzle body integral with a swirler assembly, and the swirler assemblies each include a bellmouth structure to turn air radially inwardly for passage into the swirler assemblies. A radially outer removed portion of each of the bellmouth structures defines a periphery diameter spaced from an inner surface of the combustor liner, and an interface ring is provided extending between the combustor liner and the removed portions of the bellmouth structures at the periphery diameter.

  15. Mounting apparatus for a nozzle guide vane assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-09-12

    The present invention provides a ceramic nozzle guide assembly with an apparatus for mounting it to a metal nozzle case that includes an intermediate ceramic mounting ring. The mounting ring includes a plurality of projections that are received within a plurality of receptacles formed in the nozzle case. The projections of the mounting ring are secured within the receptacles by a ceramic retainer that allows contact between the two components only along arcuate surfaces thus eliminating sliding contact between the components. 8 figs.

  16. Mounting apparatus for a nozzle guide vane assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a ceramic nozzle guide assembly with an apparatus for mounting it to a metal nozzle case that includes an intermediate ceramic mounting ring. The mounting ring includes a plurality of projections that are received within a plurality of receptacles formed in the nozzle case. The projections of the mounting ring are secured within the receptacles by a ceramic retainer that allows contact between the two components only along arcuate surfaces thus eliminating sliding contact between the components.

  17. Downhole pump with retrievable nozzle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes improvement in a system for producing fluid from a wellbore wherein a downhole jet pump has a main body with there being a passageway extending therethrough and the passageway having an upper end opposed to a lower end; there being power fluid inlet means at the upper end of the passageway for connecting the pump to a source of power fluid, formation fluid inlet means at the lower end of the passageway for connecting the pump to a source of formation fluid; and a produced fluid outlet through which spent power fluid admixed with formation fluid can flow. The improvement comprises: the pump includes a nozzle and a throat affixed together in spaced relationship respective to one another and forming a unitary assembly for producing formation fluid in response to power fluid flowing therethrough; a seating cavity formed between the upper end and the lower end of the passageway; the seating cavity is axially aligned with the upper end of the passageway; the seating cavity having an upper cylindrical part spaced from a lower cylindrical part with there being a formation fluid working chamber formed therebetween and connected to the formation fluid inlet.

  18. Fabrication process for combustion chamber/nozzle assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its smaller end with a rocket body, and terminates at its larger end in a generally contact contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  19. Combustion Chamber/Nozzle Assembly and Fabrication Process Therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integral lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its larger end with a rocket body, and terminates at its smaller end in a tube of generally cylindrical contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  20. High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sparrow, James A.; Aleshin, Yuriy; Slyeptsov, Aleksey

    2004-05-18

    A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

  1. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair; Ballas, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  2. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  3. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium

    PubMed Central

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Yeoh, LaReine A.; Carter, Damien J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A.; Jaeger, David L.; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hamilton, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (1019 to 1020 cm−3) low-resistivity (10−4Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory. PMID:26256239

  4. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Yeoh, Lareine A.; Carter, Damien J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A.; Jaeger, David L.; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hamilton, Alexander R.

    2015-08-01

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (1019 to 1020 cm-3) low-resistivity (10-4Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory.

  5. Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Alexander G.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-16

    A fuel injector has a number of groups of nozzles. The groups are generally concentric with an injector axis. Each nozzle defines a gas flowpath having an outlet for discharging a fuel/air mixture jet. There are means for introducing the fuel to the air. One or more groups of the nozzles are oriented to direct the associated jets skew to the injector axis.

  6. 19. Detail of base of revolving lens assembly, showing bottom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of base of revolving lens assembly, showing bottom of lamp at center and brass tens framework at edges of circular platform. Mercury float bearing lies in circular well just beneath lens platform. (Blurred due to lens motion.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  7. Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Don Macune

    2008-06-30

    The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

  9. Bottom-Up Colloidal Crystal Assembly with a Twist.

    PubMed

    Mahynski, Nathan A; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Likos, Christos N; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-05-24

    Globally ordered colloidal crystal lattices have broad utility in a wide range of optical and catalytic devices, for example, as photonic band gap materials. However, the self-assembly of stereospecific structures is often confounded by polymorphism. Small free-energy differences often characterize ensembles of different structures, making it difficult to produce a single morphology at will. Current techniques to handle this problem adopt one of two approaches: that of the "top-down" or "bottom-up" methodology, whereby structures are engineered starting from the largest or smallest relevant length scales, respectively. However, recently, a third approach for directing high fidelity assembly of colloidal crystals has been suggested which relies on the introduction of polymer cosolutes into the crystal phase [Mahynski, N.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.; Meng, D.; Kumar, S. K. Nat. Commun. 2014, 5, 4472]. By tuning the polymer's morphology to interact uniquely with the void symmetry of a single desired crystal, the entropy loss associated with polymer confinement has been shown to strongly bias the formation of that phase. However, previously, this approach has only been demonstrated in the limiting case of close-packed crystals. Here, we show how this approach may be generalized and extended to complex open crystals, illustrating the utility of this "structure-directing agent" paradigm in engineering the nanoscale structure of ordered colloidal materials. The high degree of transferability of this paradigm's basic principles between relatively simple crystals and more complex ones suggests that this represents a valuable addition to presently known self-assembly techniques. PMID:27124487

  10. Bottom-Up Colloidal Crystal Assembly with a Twist

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally ordered colloidal crystal lattices have broad utility in a wide range of optical and catalytic devices, for example, as photonic band gap materials. However, the self-assembly of stereospecific structures is often confounded by polymorphism. Small free-energy differences often characterize ensembles of different structures, making it difficult to produce a single morphology at will. Current techniques to handle this problem adopt one of two approaches: that of the “top-down” or “bottom-up” methodology, whereby structures are engineered starting from the largest or smallest relevant length scales, respectively. However, recently, a third approach for directing high fidelity assembly of colloidal crystals has been suggested which relies on the introduction of polymer cosolutes into the crystal phase [Mahynski, N.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.; Meng, D.; Kumar, S. K. Nat. Commun.2014, 5, 4472]. By tuning the polymer’s morphology to interact uniquely with the void symmetry of a single desired crystal, the entropy loss associated with polymer confinement has been shown to strongly bias the formation of that phase. However, previously, this approach has only been demonstrated in the limiting case of close-packed crystals. Here, we show how this approach may be generalized and extended to complex open crystals, illustrating the utility of this “structure-directing agent” paradigm in engineering the nanoscale structure of ordered colloidal materials. The high degree of transferability of this paradigm’s basic principles between relatively simple crystals and more complex ones suggests that this represents a valuable addition to presently known self-assembly techniques. PMID:27124487

  11. Fuel nozzle assembly for use in turbine engines and methods of assembling same

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2015-02-03

    A fuel nozzle for use with a turbine engine is described herein. The fuel nozzle includes a housing that is coupled to a combustor liner defining a combustion chamber. The housing includes an endwall that at least partially defines the combustion chamber. A plurality of mixing tubes extends through the housing for channeling fuel to the combustion chamber. Each mixing tube of the plurality of mixing tubes includes an inner surface that extends between an inlet portion and an outlet portion. The outlet portion is oriented adjacent the housing endwall. At least one of the plurality of mixing tubes includes a plurality of projections that extend outwardly from the outlet portion. Adjacent projections are spaced a circumferential distance apart such that a groove is defined between each pair of circumferentially-apart projections to facilitate enhanced mixing of fuel in the combustion chamber.

  12. Device for gripping and detaching a top nozzle subassembly from a reconstitutable fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.F.; Gjersten, R.K.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a reconstitutable fuel assembly including a top nozzle subassembly and guide thimbles. The top nozzle subassembly has a lower adapter plate, hold-down springs and an upper hold-down plate with coolant flow openings defined therethrough. The guide thimbles have upper end portions slidably mounting the lower adapter plate and upper hold-down plate for movement therealong between lower and upper limits. A device is described for gripping and detaching the top nozzle subassembly from the guide thimble upper end portions, comprising: (a) a central spider disposable in overlying relation to the upper hold-down plate; (b) locating lugs disposed radially outwardly from the spider and arranged for alignment with and insertion into the plurality of coolant flow openings in the upper hold-down plate. Each of the locating lugs has an elongated central bore; (c) collars interconnected to the spider, each collar connected to one of the locating lugs and bearing on the hold-down plate when the locating lug is inserted in its respective flow opening; and (d) elongated members received through and rotatable within the respective central bores of the locating lugs.

  13. Fuel nozzle assembly for use as structural support for a duct structure in a combustor of a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-03-31

    A fuel nozzle assembly for use in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer housing of the fuel nozzle assembly includes an inner volume and provides a direct structural connection between a duct structure and a fuel manifold. The duct structure defines a flow passage for combustion gases flowing within the combustor apparatus. The fuel manifold defines a fuel supply channel therein in fluid communication with a source of fuel. A fuel injector of the fuel nozzle assembly is provided in the inner volume of the outer housing and defines a fuel passage therein. The fuel passage is in fluid communication with the fuel supply channel of the fuel manifold for distributing the fuel from the fuel supply channel into the flow passage of the duct structure.

  14. Hybrid Top-Down/Bottom-Up Strategy Using Superwettability for the Fabrication of Patterned Colloidal Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezhong; Wei, Cong; Cong, Hailin; Yang, Qiang; Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Zhao, Yongsheng; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Superwettability of substrates has had a profound influence on the production of novel and advanced colloidal assemblies in recent decades owing to its effect on the spreading area, evaporation rate, and the resultant assembly structure. In this paper, we investigated in detail the influence of the superwettability of a transfer/template substrate on the colloidal assembly from a hybrid top-down/bottom-up strategy. By taking advantage of a superhydrophilic flat transfer substrate and a superhydrophobic groove-structured silicon template, the patterned colloidal microsphere assembly was formed including linear and mesh-, cyclic-, and multistopband assembly arrays of microspheres, and the optic-waveguide of a circular colloidal structure was demonstrated. We believed this liquid top-down/bottom-up strategy would open an efficient avenue for assembling/integrating microspheres building blocks into device applications in a low-cost manner. PMID:26824430

  15. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition. PMID:26739122

  16. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition. PMID:26739122

  17. Bottom-up assembly of hydrophobic nanocrystals and graphene nanosheets into mesoporous nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jijiang; Liu, Wenxian; Wang, Li; Sun, Xiaoming; Huo, Fengwei; Liu, Junfeng

    2014-04-22

    A general strategy for constructing graphene-based nanocomposites is achieved by emulsion-based bottom-up self-assembly of hydrophobic nanocrystals (NCs) to positively charged colloidal spheres, followed by the electrostatic assembly of NC colloidal spheres with negatively charged graphene oxide in an acidulous aqueous solution. With a simple heat treatment, 3D mesoporous NC spheres/graphene composites are obtained. TiO2/graphene composites typically exhibit a better rate capability and cycle performance than do the corresponding isolated TiO2 spheres. PMID:24684553

  18. Scaling up self-assembly: bottom-up approaches to macroscopic particle organization.

    PubMed

    Lash, M H; Fedorchak, M V; McCarthy, J J; Little, S R

    2015-07-28

    This review presents an overview of recent work in the field of non-Brownian particle self-assembly. Compared to nanoparticles that naturally self-assemble due to Brownian motion, larger, non-Brownian particles (d > 6 μm) are less prone to autonomously organize into crystalline arrays. The tendency for particle systems to experience immobilization and kinetic arrest grows with particle radius. In order to overcome this kinetic limitation, some type of external driver must be applied to act as an artificial "thermalizing force" upon non-Brownian particles, inducing particle motion and subsequent crystallization. Many groups have explored the use of various agitation methods to overcome the natural barriers preventing self-assembly to which non-Brownian particles are susceptible. The ability to create materials from a bottom-up approach with these characteristics would allow for precise control over their pore structure (size and distribution) and surface properties (topography, functionalization and area), resulting in improved regulation of key characteristics such as mechanical strength, diffusive properties, and possibly even photonic properties. This review will highlight these approaches, as well as discuss the potential impact of bottom-up macroscale particle assembly. The applications of such technology range from customizable and autonomously self-assembled niche microenvironments for drug delivery and tissue engineering to new acoustic dampening, battery, and filtration materials, among others. Additionally, crystals made from non-Brownian particles resemble naturally derived materials such as opals, zeolites, and biological tissue (i.e. bone, cartilage and lung), due to their high surface area, pore distribution, and tunable (multilevel) hierarchy. PMID:25947543

  19. "Bottom-up" self-assembly and "cold crystallization" of butterfly shaped tetrabenzofluorene molecules.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Srinivasan; Boopathi, A A; Mandal, A B

    2016-08-01

    Butterfly-shaped tetrabenzo[a,c,g,i]fluorene (TBF)-based molecules (1 and 2) were designed, synthesized and well characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The single crystal X-ray structure of 1 shows the presence of intermolecular 3-D π-π stacking interaction and unprecedented "cold crystallization" in polycyclic aromatic molecules. We report for the first time, the "bottom-up" self-assembly of TBF based organic molecules. The supramolecular studies reveal the formation of vesicles and cuboid-shaped nanocrystals in THF-water and toluene solution, respectively. PMID:27211796

  20. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  1. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  2. MEMS-Based Spinning Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A nozzle body and assembly for delivering atomized fuel to a combustion chamber. The nozzle body is rotatably mounted onto a substrate. One or more curvilinear fuel delivery channels are in flow communication with an internal fuel distribution cavity formed in the nozzle body. Passage of pressurized fuel through the nozzle body causes the nozzle body to rotate. Components of the nozzle assembly are formed of silicon carbide having surfaces etched by deep reactive ion etching utilizing MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology. A fuel premix chamber is carried on the substrate in flow communication with a supply passage in the nozzle body.

  3. Biomimetic bottom-up assembly of nanomaterials and their applications as nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nueraji, Nuerxiati

    The design and fabrication of nanometer-sized functional materials have become a widely studied field in nanotechnology due to their potential use as building blocks in nanodevices. Various bottom-up methods have been developed to fabricate nano- and micro-scale devices in microelectronics, optic, actuators and sensors. Introduction of biological self-assembly of nanometer-sized building blocks is expected to accomplish the bottom-up fabrications in a more reproducible, efficient, and economic manner. The development of the next generation of electronic industry demands more advanced electronic circuits. The advanced electronic circuits can be achieved by increasing the packing density of nanometer-sized electronic elements. The application of bottom-up approaches has important potentials for the fabrication of advanced electronic circuits. In this dissertation, we mainly focused on the two main parts: (A) Synthesis of nano-sized building blocks. Furthermore, the synthesis of unique crystalline structures and shapes of the inorganic and organic nano-materials at room temperatures and study of their properties. For example, the results of Electric field Microscopy (EFM) showed the ferrolectric properties of Barium titanate nanocrystals formed at room temperature. Also, the semiconducting properties of needle shaped single crystalline structures of organic semiconductors, Polythiophenes, Polyaniline, and Polypyrolle was proved by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). (B) Bottom up approach for fabrication of nanodevice; we propose here a bionanotechnological approach for efficient fabrications of nanometer-scale electronic circuit geometries by anchoring functionalized bionanotubes on to a surface via a complementary bioconjugation mechanism. Nanoparticles with various functions can be coated onto the bionanotubes by "mineralizing peptides" and the electronic properties of the circuit can be tuned by controlling size and packing density of particles on the sidewall

  4. Towards Self-Assembled Hybrid Artificial Cells: Novel Bottom-Up Approaches to Functional Synthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Roberto J.; Hardy, Michael D.; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in utilizing bottom-up approaches to develop synthetic cells. A popular methodology is the integration of functionalized synthetic membranes with biological systems, producing “hybrid” artificial cells. This Concept article covers recent advances and the current state-of-the-art of such hybrid systems. Specifically, we describe minimal supramolecular constructs that faithfully mimic the structure and/or function of living cells, often by controlling the assembly of highly ordered membrane architectures with defined functionality. These studies give us a deeper understanding of the nature of living systems, bring new insights into the origin of cellular life, and provide novel synthetic chassis for advancing synthetic biology. PMID:26149747

  5. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  6. Bottom-up topography assembly into 3D porous scaffold to mediate cell activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Delin; Hou, Jie; Hao, Lijing; Cao, Xiaodong; Gao, Huichang; Fu, Xiaoling; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-08-01

    Native cells live in a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) capable of regulating cell activities through various physical and chemical factors. Designed topographies have been well proven to trigger significant difference in cell behaviours. However, present topographies are almost all constructed on two-dimensional (2D) substrates like discs and films, which are far from features like 3D and porosity required in application like bone repair. Here we bottom-up assembled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium carbonate (PLGA/CC) microspheres with superficial porous topography intactly into a 3D porous scaffold. Because the scaffold was obtained through a mild technique, the bioactivity of released BMP-2 was well retained. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) were cultured on produced scaffolds having different 3D topographies. It turned out that osteogenic differentiation of mMSCs did respond to the 3D topographies, while proliferation didn't. Gene expression of αv and β1 integrins revealed that adhesion was supposed to be the underlying mechanism for osteogenic response. The study provides insight into enhancing function of practical scaffolds by elaborate topography design. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1056-1063, 2016. PMID:26013977

  7. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  8. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  9. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  10. High thermoelectric figure of merit nanostructured pnictogen chalcogenides by bottom-up synthesis and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rutvik J.

    Thermoelectric materials offer promise for realizing transformative environmentallyfriendly solid-state refrigeration technologies that could replace current technologies based on ozone-depleting liquid coolants. The fruition of this vision requires factorial enhancements in the figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectric materials, necessitating high Seebeck coefficient (alpha), high electrical conductivity (sigma) and low thermal conductivity (kappa). This thesis reports a novel bottom-up approach to scalably sculpt large quantities (>10g/minute) of V 2VI3 nanocrystals with controllable shapes and sizes, and assemble them into bulk samples to obtain both high power factors alpha 2sigma as well as unprecedentedly low kappa through tunable doping and nanostructuring. The thesis demonstrates a surfactant-mediated microwave-solvothermal synthesis technique that selectively yields both n- and p-typed pnictogen chalcogenide (Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3, Bi2Se3) nanoplates and, nanowires and nanotubes (Sb 2Se3) that can be sintered to obtain 25-250 % increases in ZT>1 compared to their non-nanostructured and un-doped counterparts. A key result is that nanostructuring diminishes the lattice thermal conductivity kappa L to ultra-low values of 0.2-0.5 Wm-1K-1. Sub-atomic-percent sulfur doping and sulfurization of the pnictogen chalcogenides induced through mercaptan-terminated organic surfactants used in the synthesis result in large Seebeck coefficients between -240 < alpha < 298 muV/K and high sigma between 0.2-2.5 x 105 O -1m-1 as a consequence of high carrier mobilities 250-60 cm2/Vs, comparable to single-crystal values. The unique combination of properties results in the realization of a phonon-glass electron-crystal material, ideal for thermoelectric conversion and hence high ZT. The high power factors are shown to arise due to sulfur doping induced changes in the electronic structure and defect chemistries. These correlations are verified by detailed materials characterization, Hall

  11. Development of Radar Navigation and Radio Data Transmission for Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk; Gerald L. Stolarczyk; Larry Icerman; John Howard; Hooman Tehrani

    2007-03-25

    This Final Technical Report summarizes the research and development (R&D) work performed by Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract Number DE-FC26-04NT15477. This work involved the development of radar navigation and radio data transmission systems for integration with microhole coiled tubing bottom hole assemblies. Under this contract, Stolar designed, fabricated, and laboratory and field tested two advanced technologies of importance to the future growth of the U.S. oil and gas industry: (1) real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of coiled tubing drilling in hydrocarbon reservoirs and (2) two-way inductive radio data transmission on coiled tubing for real-time, subsurface-to-surface data transmission. The operating specifications for these technologies are compatible with 3.5-inch boreholes drilled to a true vertical depth (TVD) of 5,000 feet, which is typical of coiled tubing drilling applications. These two technologies (i.e., the Stolar Data Transmission System and Drill String Radar) were developed into pre-commercial prototypes and tested successfully in simulated coiled tubing drilling conditions. Integration of these two technologies provides a real-time geosteering capability with extremely quick response times. Stolar is conducting additional work required to transition the Drill String Radar into a true commercial product. The results of this advanced development work should be an important step in the expanded commercialization of advanced coiled tubing microhole drilling equipment for use in U.S. hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  12. A local bottom-gate structure with low parasitic capacitance for dielectrophoresis assembly and electrical characterization of suspended nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tun; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Shusen; Rong, Hao; Lu, Miao

    2014-05-01

    A device including a pair of top electrodes and a local gate in the bottom of an SU-8 trench was fabricated on a glass substrate for dielectrophoresis assembly and electrical characterization of suspended nanomaterials. The three terminals were made of gold electrodes and electrically isolated from each other by an air gap. Compared to the widely used global back-gate silicon device, the parasitic capacitance between the three terminals was significantly reduced and an individual gate was assigned to each device. In addition, the spacing from the bottom-gate to either the source or drain was larger than twice the source-drain gap, which guaranteed that the electric field between the source and drain in the dielectrophoresis assembly was not distinguished by the bottom-gate. To prove the feasibility and versatility of the device, a suspended carbon nanotube and graphene film were assembled by dielectrophoresis and characterized successfully. Accordingly, the proposed device holds promise for the electrical characterization of suspended nanomaterials, especially in a high frequency resonator or transistor configuration.

  13. Development, assembly, and validation of an SMA-actuated two-joint nozzle and six-channel power supply for use in a smart inhaler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen J.; Hangekar, Rohan; Seelecke, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    The Smart Inhaler design concept recently developed at NC State University has the potential to target the delivery of inhaled aerosol medication to specified locations within the lung system. This targeted delivery could help patients with pulmonary ailments by reducing the exposure of healthy lung tissue to potentially harmful medications. However, controlled delivery can only be accomplished if medication is injected at a precise location in an inhaled stream of properly conditioned laminar flow. In particular, the medication must be injected into the inhaled flow using a small nozzle that can be positioned without disturbing the flow. This paper outlines the procedure used to assemble and control a key component of the smart inhaler: a shape memory alloy (SMA) based dual-joint flexible nozzle that exploits the sensing and actuating capabilities of thermally activated SMA wires. A novel 6-channel power-supply is used to control input power and measure the resistance across the SMA. Since a practical fabrication process may result in SMA wires with different contact resistances, the power supply employs an initialization procedure to self-calibrate and provide normalized power distribution 6 SMA wires simultaneously. Furthermore, a robust control scheme is used to ensure that a constant current is provided to the wires. In validation tests, a LabVIEW-based video positioning system was used to measure the deflection of the nozzle tip and joint rotation. Results show that the carefully controlled assembly of a stream-lined nozzle can produce a practical smart structure, and joint rotation is predictable and repeatable when power input is also controlled. Future work will assess the use of the SMA-resistance measurement as position feedback and PID position control power as a measurement of the convective cooling that results from the moving airflow.

  14. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, G.P.

    1998-07-14

    An insert is described which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment. 5 figs.

  15. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, George P.

    1998-01-01

    An insert which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment.

  16. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  17. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  18. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-21

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed "bottom-up" approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical "bottom" bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the "top" product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a "bottom-up" mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na(3.12)Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries. PMID:27029436

  19. Injection nozzle for a turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2012-09-11

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

  20. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    An axial flow turbine's nozzle/nozzle support structure having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse.

  1. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-01

    An axial flow turbine's nozzle/nozzle support structure having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse.

  2. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1997-01-01

    An axial flow turbine's nozzle/nozzle support structure having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse.

  3. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1997-01-07

    An axial flow turbine`s nozzle/nozzle support structure is described having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse. 6 figs.

  4. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-08-15

    An axial flow turbine`s nozzle/nozzle support structure is described having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse. 6 figs.

  5. Turbine nozzle/nozzle support structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-09-10

    An axial flow turbine`s nozzle/nozzle support structure is described having a cantilevered nozzle outer structure including an outer shroud and airfoil vanes extending radially inwardly therefrom, an inner shroud radially adjacent the inner end of the airfoil vanes and cooperatively disposed relative to the outer shroud to provide an annular fluid flow path, an inner and an outer support ring respectively arranged radially inside the inner shroud and axially adjacent a portion of the outer shroud, and pins extending through such portion and into the outer support ring. The inner support ring or inner shroud has a groove therein bounded by end walls for receiving and being axially abuttable with a locating projection from the adjacent airfoil vane, inner shroud, or inner support ring. The nozzle outer structure may comprise segments each of which has a single protrusion which is axially engageable with the outer support ring or, alternatively, a first and second protrusion which are arcuately and axially separated and which include axial openings therein whereby first and second protrusions on respective, arcuately adjacent nozzle segments have axial openings therein which are alignable with connector openings in the outer support ring and within each of such aligned openings a pin is receivable. The inner shroud may, likewise, comprise segments which, when assembled in operating configuration, have a 360 degree expanse. 6 figs.

  6. A Bottom-up Route to a Chemically End-to-End Assembly of Nanocellulose Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2016-06-13

    In this work, we take advantage of the rod-like structure of electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC, with a width of about 7 nm and a length of about 130 nm), which has dicarboxylated cellulose (DCC) chains protruding from both ends, providing electrosterical stability for ENCC particles, to chemically end-to-end assemble these particles into nanocellulose fibers. ENCC with shorter DCC chains can be obtained by a mild hydrolysis of ENCC with HCl, and subsequently the hydrolyzed ENCC (HENCC, with a width of about 6 nm and a length of about 120 nm) is suitable to be assembled into high aspect ratio nanofibers by chemically cross-linking HENCC from one end to another. Two sets of HENCC were prepared by carbodiimide-mediated formation of an alkyne and an azide derivative, respectively. Cross-linking these two sets of HENCC was performed by a click reaction. HENCCs were also end-to-end cross-linked by a bioconjugation reaction, with a diamine. From atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, about ten HENCC nanoparticles were cross-linked and formed high aspect ratio nanofibers with a width of about 6 nm and a length of more than 1 μm. PMID:27211496

  7. Directed self-assembly of nanorod networks: bringing the top down to the bottom up.

    PubMed

    Einsle, Joshua F; Scheunert, Gunther; Murphy, Antony; McPhillips, John; Zayats, Anatoly V; Pollard, Robert; Bowman, Robert M

    2012-12-21

    Self-assembled electrodeposited nanorod materials have been shown to offer an exciting landscape for a wide array of research ranging from nanophotonics through to biosensing and magnetics. However, until now, the scope for site-specific preparation of the nanorods on wafers has been limited to local area definition. Further there is little or no lateral control of nanorod height. In this work we present a scalable method for controlling the growth of the nanorods in the vertical direction as well as their lateral position. A focused ion beam pre-patterns the Au cathode layer prior to the creation of the anodized aluminium oxide (AAO) template on top. When the pre-patterning is of the same dimension as the pore spacing of the AAO template, lines of single nanorods are successfully grown. Further, for sub-200 nm wide features, a relationship between the nanorod height and distance from the non-patterned cathode can be seen to follow a quadratic growth rate obeying Faraday's law of electrodeposition. This facilitates lateral control of nanorod height combined with localized growth of the nanorods. PMID:23183100

  8. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed ``bottom-up'' approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical ``bottom'' bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the ``top'' product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a ``bottom-up'' mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of

  9. Nanoparticle bioconjugates as "bottom-up" assemblies of artifical multienzyme complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keighron, Jacqueline D.

    2010-11-01

    The sequential enzymes of several metabolic pathways have been shown to exist in close proximity with each other in the living cell. Although not proven in all cases, colocalization may have several implications for the rate of metabolite formation. Proximity between the sequential enzymes of a metabolic pathway has been proposed to have several benefits for the overall rate of metabolite formation. These include reduced diffusion distance for intermediates, sequestering of intermediates from competing pathways and the cytoplasm. Restricted diffusion in the vicinity of an enzyme can also cause the pooling of metabolites, which can alter reaction equilibria to control the rate of reaction through inhibition. Associations of metabolic enzymes are difficult to isolate ex vivo due to the weak interactions believed to colocalize sequential enzymes within the cell. Therefore model systems in which the proximity and diffusion of intermediates within the experiment system are controlled are attractive alternatives to explore the effects of colocalization of sequential enzymes. To this end three model systems for multienzyme complexes have been constructed. Direct adsorption enzyme:gold nanoparticle bioconjugates functionalized with malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) allow for proximity between to the enzymes to be controlled from the nanometer to micron range. Results show that while the enzymes present in the colocalized and non-colocalized systems compared here behaved differently overall the sequential activity of the pathway was improved by (1) decreasing the diffusion distance between active sites, (2) decreasing the diffusion coefficient of the reaction intermediate to prevent escape into the bulk solution, and (3) decreasing the overall amount of bioconjugate in the solution to prevent the pathway from being inhibited by the buildup of metabolite over time. Layer-by-layer (LBL) assemblies of MDH and CS were used to examine the layering effect of

  10. Method for Forming MEMS-Based Spinning Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A nozzle body and assembly for delivering atomized fuel to a combustion chamber. The nozzle body is rotatably mounted onto a substrate. One or more curvilinear fuel delivery channels are in flow communication with an internal fuel distribution cavity formed in the nozzle body. Passage of pressurized fuel through the nozzle body causes the nozzle body to rotate. Components of the nozzle assembly are formed of silicon carbide having surfaces etched by deep reactive ion etching utilizing MEMS technology. A fuel premix chamber is carried on the substrate in flow communication with a supply passage in the nozzle body.

  11. Insert metering plates for gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven S.; Itzel, Gary; Chopra, Sanjay; Abuaf, Nesim; Correia, Victor H.

    2004-05-11

    The invention comprises a metering plate which is assembled to an impingement insert for use in the nozzle of a gas turbine. The metering plate can have one or more metering holes and is used to balance the cooling flow within the nozzle. A metering plate with multiple holes reduces static pressure variations which result from the cooling airflow through the metering plate. The metering plate can be assembled to the insert before or after the insert is inserted into the nozzle.

  12. Nozzle seal

    DOEpatents

    Herman, Richard Frederick

    1977-10-25

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and are connected by a leak restraining member establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel.

  13. Nozzle development

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Nozzle seal

    DOEpatents

    Groff, Russell Dennis; Vatovec, Richard John

    1978-06-11

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with annular sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop and partly within a retaining annulus formed in the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and one of the sealing members is provided with a piston type pressure ring sealing member which effectively closes the path between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle establishing a leak-proof condition. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel.

  15. Method and apparatus for setting precise nozzle/belt and nozzle/edge dam block gaps

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, Robert J.; Dykes, Charles D.; Woodrow, Ronald

    1989-05-16

    A pair of guide pins are mounted on sideplate extensions of the caster and mating roller pairs are mounted on the nozzle assembly. The nozzle is advanced toward the caster so that the roller pairs engage the guide pins. Both guide pins are remotely adjustable in the vertical direction by hydraulic cylinders acting through eccentrics. This moves the nozzle vertically. The guide pin on the inboard side of the caster is similarly horizontally adjustable. The nozzle roller pair which engage the inboard guide pin are flanged so that the nozzle moves horizontally with the inboard guide pin.

  16. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  17. Experimental characterization of spin motor nozzle flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Rocky J.; Peterson, Carl Williams; Henfling, John Francis

    2006-11-01

    The Mach number in the inviscid core of the flow exiting scarfed supersonic nozzles was measured using pitot probes. Nozzle characterization experiments were conducted in a modified section of an obsolete M = 7.3 test section/nozzle assembly on Sandia's Hypersonic Wind Tunnel. By capitalizing on existing hardware, the cost and time required for tunnel modifications were significantly reduced. Repeatability of pitot pressure measurements was excellent, and instrumentation errors were reduced by optimizing the pressure range of the transducers used for each test run. Bias errors in probe position prevented us from performing a successful in situ calibration of probe angle effects using pitot probes placed at an angle to the nozzle centerline. The abrupt throat geometry used in the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles modeled the throat geometry of the flight vehicle's spin motor nozzles. Survey data indicates that small (''unmeasurable'') differences in the nozzle throat geometries produced measurable flow asymmetries and differences in the flow fields generated by supposedly identical nozzles. Therefore, data from the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles cannot be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation. Configuration C and D nozzles replaced the abrupt throat geometry of Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles with a 0.500-inch streamwise radius of curvature in the throat region. This throat geometry eliminated the flow asymmetries, flow separation in the nozzle throat, and measurable differences between the flow fields from identical nozzles that were observed in Baseline/A/B nozzles. Data from Configuration C and D nozzles can be used for CFD code validation.

  18. Sandblasting nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.; Pawlik, E. V.; Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A nozzle for use with abrasive and/or corrosive materials is formed of sintered ceramic compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and corrosion resistance. The ceramic may be a binary solid solution of a ceramic oxide and silicon nitride, and preferably a ternary solid solution of a ceramic oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. The ceramic oxide is selected from a group consisting of Al2O3, Y2O3 and Cr2O3, or mixtures of those compounds. Titanium carbide particles are dispersed in the ceramic mixture before sintering. The nozzles are encased for protection from external forces while in use by a metal or plastic casing.

  19. Low thermal stress ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Bagheri, Hamid; Fierstein, Aaron R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of vanes therebetween. Each of the plurality of vanes have a device for heating and cooling a portion of each of the plurality of vanes. Furthermore, the inner shroud has a plurality of bosses attached thereto. A cylindrical member has a plurality of grooves formed therein and each of the plurality of bosses are positioned in corresponding ones of the plurality of grooves. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  20. Geologic nozzles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Kieffer S.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of the low characteristic velocities of geologic fluids has not been widely recognized, and as a result, the importance of supercritical and supersonic flow in geological processes has generally been underestimated. The lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, Washington, propelled a gas heavily laden with dust into the atmosphere. Because of the low sound speed in this gas (about 100 m/s), the flow was internally supersonic. Old Faithful Geyser, Wyoming, is a converging-diverging nozzle in which liquid water refilling the conduit during the recharge cycle changes during eruption into a two-phase liquid-vapor mixture with a very low sound velocity. The high sound speed of liquid water determines the characteristics of harmonic tremor observed at the geyser during the recharge interval, whereas the low sound speed of the liquid-vapor mixture influences the fluid flow characteristics of the eruption. At the rapids of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, the channel is constricted into the shape of a converging-diverging nozzle by the debris flows that enter from tributary canyons. Both subcritical and supercritical flow occur within the rapids. -from Author

  1. Gas only nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  2. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Taura, Joseph Charles; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Demiroglu, Mehmet; Predmore, Daniel Ross

    1999-01-01

    A seal assembly having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch therebetween which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal.

  3. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Taura, J.C.; Aksit, M.F.; Demiroglu, M.; Predmore, D.R.

    1999-06-29

    A seal assembly is described having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch there between which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal. 7 figs.

  4. A novel high-speed production process to create modular components for the bottom-up assembly of large-scale tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Omar F; Voice, Derek N; Leung, Brendan M; Sefton, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    To replace damaged or diseased tissues, large tissue-engineered constructs can be prepared by assembling modular components in a bottom-up approach. However, a high-speed method is needed to produce sufficient numbers of these modules for full-sized tissue substitutes. To this end, a novel production technique is devised, combining air shearing and a plug flow reactor-style design to rapidly produce large quantities of hydrogel-based (here type I collagen) cylindrical modular components with tunable diameters and length. Using this technique, modules containing NIH 3T3 cells show greater than 95% viability while endothelial cell surface attachment and confluent monolayer formation are demonstrated. Additionally, the rapidly produced modules are used to assemble large tissue constructs (>1 cm(3) ) in vitro. Module building blocks containing luciferase-expressing L929 cells are packed in full size adult rat-liver-shaped bioreactors and perfused with cell medium, to demonstrate the capacity to build organ-shaped constructs; bioluminescence demonstrates sustained viability over 3 d. Cardiomyocyte-embedded modules are also used to assemble electrically stimulatable contractile tissue. PMID:24895070

  5. A novel high-speed production process to create modular components for the bottom-up assembly of large scale tissue engineered constructs

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Omar F.; Voice, Derek N.; Leung, Brendan M.

    2014-01-01

    To replace damaged or diseased tissues, large tissue-engineered constructs can be prepared by assembling modular components in a bottom-up approach. However, a high speed method is needed to produce sufficient numbers of these modules for full-sized tissue substitutes. To this end, we have devised a novel production technique that combines air shearing and a plug flow reactor-style design to rapidly produce large quantities of hydrogel-based (here type I collagen) cylindrical modular components with tunable diameters and length. Using this technique, modules containing NIH 3T3 cells showed greater than 95% viability while endothelial cell surface attachment and confluent monolayer formation was demonstrated. Additionally, the rapidly-produced modules were used to assemble large tissue constructs (> 1 cm3) in vitro. Module building blocks containing luciferase-expressing L929 cells were packed in full size adult rat liver-shaped bioreactors and perfused with cell medium, to demonstrate the capacity to build organ-shaped constructs; bioluminescence demonstrated sustained viability over 3 days. Cardiomyocyte embedded modules were also used to assemble electrically stimulatable contractile tissue. PMID:24895070

  6. Segmented inlet nozzle for gas turbine, and methods of installation

    DOEpatents

    Klompas, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle guide vane assembly is formed of individual arcuate nozzle segments. The arcuate nozzle segments are elastically joined to each other to form a complete ring, with edges abutted to prevent leakage. The resultant nozzle ring is included within the overall gas turbine stationary structure and secured by a mounting arrangement which permits relative radial movement at both the inner and outer mountings. A spline-type outer mounting provides circumferential retention. A complete rigid nozzle ring with freedom to "float" radially results. Specific structures are disclosed for the inner and outer mounting arrangements. A specific tie-rod structure is also disclosed for elastically joining the individual nozzle segments. Also disclosed is a method of assembling the nozzle ring subassembly-by-subassembly into a gas turbine employing temporary jacks.

  7. Synthesis and characterizations of hierarchical biomorphic titania oxide by a bio-inspired bottom-up assembly solution technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Qun; Su Huilan Cao Wei; Zhang Di; Guo Qixin; Lai Yijian

    2007-03-15

    As a representative semiconductor metal oxide, hierarchical biomorphic mesoporous TiO{sub 2} with interwoven meshwork conformation was successfully prepared using eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate by an aqueous soakage technique followed by calcination treatment. The synthesis conditions were systematically investigated by controlling the concentration, the pH value of the precursor impregnant, and so on. The nucleation, growth, and assembly into ESM-biomorphic TiO{sub 2} in our work depended more on the functions of ESM biomacromolecules as well as the processing conditions. As-prepared TiO{sub 2} meshwork exhibiting hierarchical porous structure with the pore size from 2 nm up to 4 {mu}m, was composed of intersectant fibers assembled by nanocrystallites at three dimensions. Based on the researches into the N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isothermal and corresponding BJH pore-size distribution, the biomorphic TiO{sub 2} would arose interesting applications in some fields such as photocatalysis, gas sensors, antistatic coating, dye-sensitized solar cells, etc. This mild method and the relevant ideas offer a feasible path to synthesize a new family of functional materials by integrating material science, chemistry, and biotechnology. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical mesoporous TiO{sub 2} is assembled by nanoparticles from the nanoscale to the macroscale through a bio-inspired sol-gel approach with eggshell membrane used as the biotemplate. As-prepared hierarchical titania shows porous characters within the pore size range of 2 nm-4 {mu}m.

  8. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  9. Line drawing of anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Line drawing titled 'DM-9 Case-to-Nozzle Joint' shows anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle. The second full-duration test firing of NASA's redesigned Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM), designated DM-9, was conducted 12-23-87 at Morton Thiokol's Wasatch facility in Utah. A post-test examination of the motor has revealed an anomaly in one nozzle component. Material was discovered missing from the nozzle outer boot ring, a large carbon phenolic composite ring used to anchor one end of the flexible boot that allows the nozzle to move and 'steer' the vehicle. About one-third of the missing 160 degrees of missing ring material was found adjacent to the forward nozzle section inside the motor. This diagram shows the location of the nozzle joint on an assembled SRM, and points out the shaded location of the outer boot ring that circles the motor within the nozzle joint.

  10. Closeup view of the bottom area of Space Shuttle Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the bottom area of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) 2052 engine assembly mounted in a SSME Engine Handler in the Horizontal Processing area of the SSME Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The most prominent features in this view are the Low-Pressure Oxidizer Discharge Duct toward the bottom of the assembly, the SSME Engine Controller and the Main Fuel Valve Hydraulic Actuator are in the approximate center of the assembly in this view, the Low-Pressure Fuel Turbopump (LPFTP), the LPFTP Discharge Duct are to the left on the assembly in this view and the High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump is located toward the top of the engine assembly in this view. The ring of tabs in the right side of the image, at the approximate location of the Nozzle and the Coolant Outlet Manifold interface is the Heat Shield Support Ring. - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. Synthesis and characterizations of hierarchical biomorphic titania oxide by a bio-inspired bottom-up assembly solution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qun; Su, Huilan; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Di; Guo, Qixin; Lai, Yijian

    2007-03-01

    As a representative semiconductor metal oxide, hierarchical biomorphic mesoporous TiO 2 with interwoven meshwork conformation was successfully prepared using eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate by an aqueous soakage technique followed by calcination treatment. The synthesis conditions were systematically investigated by controlling the concentration, the pH value of the precursor impregnant, and so on. The nucleation, growth, and assembly into ESM-biomorphic TiO 2 in our work depended more on the functions of ESM biomacromolecules as well as the processing conditions. As-prepared TiO 2 meshwork exhibiting hierarchical porous structure with the pore size from 2 nm up to 4 μm, was composed of intersectant fibers assembled by nanocrystallites at three dimensions. Based on the researches into the N 2 adsorption-desorption isothermal and corresponding BJH pore-size distribution, the biomorphic TiO 2 would arose interesting applications in some fields such as photocatalysis, gas sensors, antistatic coating, dye-sensitized solar cells, etc. This mild method and the relevant ideas offer a feasible path to synthesize a new family of functional materials by integrating material science, chemistry, and biotechnology.

  12. Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordlund, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Two of the three Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) nozzles are exposed to significant reentry aeroheating loads. To ensure reusability of the Nozzle Assembly, the nozzle primary structure must not exceed specific temperature limits. Due to the thermal, pressure, and dynamic flexing of the nozzle during a mission cycle, an appropriate insulating system must have significant flexibility. Recent missions have demonstrated nozzle reentry aeroheating rates and heat loads much higher than predictions, higher than the capability of the original insulating system. A new insulating system has been developed using similar materials in an aerodynamically 'smooth' shape to both reduce the incoming heating and increase radiation cooling.

  13. Combining Bottom-Up Self-Assembly with Top-Down Microfabrication to Create Hierarchical Inverse Opals with High Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Manuel; England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal particles can assemble into ordered crystals, creating periodically structured materials at the nanoscale without relying on expensive equipment. The combination of small size and high order leads to strong interaction with visible light, which induces macroscopic, iridescent structural coloration. To increase the complexity and functionality, it is important to control the organization of such materials in hierarchical structures with high degrees of order spanning multiple length scales. Here, a bottom-up assembly of polystyrene particles in the presence of a silica sol-gel precursor material (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS), which creates crack-free inverse opal films with high positional order and uniform crystal alignment along the (110) crystal plane, is combined with top-down microfabrication techniques. Micrometer scale hierarchical superstructures having a highly regular internal nanostructure with precisely controlled crystal orientation and wall profiles are produced. The ability to combine structural order at the nano- and microscale enables the fabrication of materials with complex optical properties resulting from light-matter interactions at different length scales. As an example, a hierarchical diffraction grating, which combines Bragg reflection arising from the nanoscale periodicity of the inverse opal crystal with grating diffraction resulting from a micrometer scale periodicity, is demonstrated. PMID:26042571

  14. Prototype Morphing Fan Nozzle Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gang-Bing

    2004-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for aeropropulsion structural components has resulted in the design of the prototype morphing fan nozzle shown in the photograph. This prototype exploits the potential of smart materials to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines by introducing new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. The novel design employs two different smart materials, a shape-memory alloy and magnetorheological fluids, to reduce the nozzle area by up to 30 percent. The prototype of the variable-area fan nozzle implements an overlapping spring leaf assembly to simplify the initial design and to provide ease of structural control. A single bundle of shape memory alloy wire actuators is used to reduce the nozzle geometry. The nozzle is subsequently held in the reduced-area configuration by using magnetorheological fluid brakes. This prototype uses the inherent advantages of shape memory alloys in providing large induced strains and of magnetorheological fluids in generating large resistive forces. In addition, the spring leaf design also functions as a return spring, once the magnetorheological fluid brakes are released, to help force the shape memory alloy wires to return to their original position. A computerized real-time control system uses the derivative-gain and proportional-gain algorithms to operate the system. This design represents a novel approach to the active control of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Researchers have estimated that such engines will reduce thrust specific fuel consumption by 9 percent over that of fixed-geometry fan nozzles. This research was conducted under a cooperative agreement (NCC3-839) at the University of Akron.

  15. Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2013-12-24

    A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

  16. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  17. Spiral cooled fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy; Schilp, Reinhard

    2012-09-25

    A fuel nozzle for delivery of fuel to a gas turbine engine. The fuel nozzle includes an outer nozzle wall and a center body located centrally within the nozzle wall. A gap is defined between an inner wall surface of the nozzle wall and an outer body surface of the center body for providing fuel flow in a longitudinal direction from an inlet end to an outlet end of the fuel nozzle. A turbulating feature is defined on at least one of the central body and the inner wall for causing at least a portion of the fuel flow in the gap to flow transverse to the longitudinal direction. The gap is effective to provide a substantially uniform temperature distribution along the nozzle wall in the circumferential direction.

  18. Grit blasting nozzle fabricated from mild tool steel proves satisfactory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Farland, J. E.; Turbitt, B.

    1966-01-01

    Dry blasting with glass beads through a nozzle assembly descales both the outside and inside surfaces of tubes of Inconel 718 used for the distribution of gaseous oxygen. The inside of the nozzle is coated with polyurethane and the deflector with a commercially available liquid urethane rubber.

  19. Liquid rocket engine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The nozzle is a major component of a rocket engine, having a significant influence on the overall engine performance and representing a large fraction of the engine structure. The design of the nozzle consists of solving simultaneously two different problems: the definition of the shape of the wall that forms the expansion surface, and the delineation of the nozzle structure and hydraulic system. This monography addresses both of these problems. The shape of the wall is considered from immediately upstream of the throat to the nozzle exit for both bell and annular (or plug) nozzles. Important aspects of the methods used to generate nozzle wall shapes are covered for maximum-performance shapes and for nozzle contours based on criteria other than performance. The discussion of structure and hydraulics covers problem areas of regeneratively cooled tube-wall nozzles and extensions; it treats also nozzle extensions cooled by turbine exhaust gas, ablation-cooled extensions, and radiation-cooled extensions. The techniques that best enable the designer to develop the nozzle structure with as little difficulty as possible and at the lowest cost consistent with minimum weight and specified performance are described.

  20. Low thermal stress ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, B.; Bagheri, H.; Fierstein, A.R.

    1996-02-27

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components, the metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of vanes there between. Each of the plurality of vanes have a device for heating and cooling a portion of each of the plurality of vanes. Furthermore, the inner shroud has a plurality of bosses attached thereto. A cylindrical member has a plurality of grooves formed therein and each of the plurality of bosses are positioned in corresponding ones of the plurality of grooves. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  1. High speed nozzles task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, Awatef

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic cruise exhaust nozzles for advanced applications are optimized for a high nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) at design supersonic cruise Mach number and altitude. The performance of these nozzles with large expansion ratios are severely degraded for operations at subsonic speeds near sea level for NPR significantly less than the design values. The prediction of over-expanded 2DCD nozzles performance is critical to evaluating the internal losses and to the optimization of the integrated vehicle and propulsion system performance. The reported research work was aimed at validating and assessing existing computational methods and turbulence models for predicting the flow characteristics and nozzle performance at over-expanded conditions. Flow simulations in 2DCD nozzles were performed using five different turbulence models. The results are compared with the experimental data for the wall pressure distribution and thrust and flow coefficients at over-expanded static conditions.

  2. Development of inspection systems for alloy 600 nozzles of PWR reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Unate, K.; Ideo, M.; Sanagawa, T.; Shirai, T.; Araki, Y.

    1995-08-01

    PWR reactor vessels have alloy 600 nozzles at top and bottom heads. The former are head penetration nozzles for CRDM, and the latter are bottom mounted instrumentation nozzles. The authors have developed inspection systems of two types for each nozzle to confirm the soundness. ECT and UT Techniques are employed for both systems. These systems are controlled remotely and enable to reduce radiation exposure, inspection time and number of inspectors. Based on the functional tests using full scale mockups, the reliabilities and effectiveness of both systems were confirmed.

  3. Gas only nozzle fuel tip

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  4. Individual source positioning mechanism for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.F.; Gjertsen, R.K.; Cerni, S.

    1987-07-07

    A nuclear reactor is described including a fuel assembly, at lest one elongated neutron source rod and an upper core plate. The fuel assembly has top and bottom nozzles with a guide thimbles extending between and interconnecting the nozzles. The upper core plate is positioned adjacent to and above the top nozzle of the fuel assembly and having flow openings to allow passage of coolant from the fuel assembly. At least some of the openings is aligned over respective ones of the guide thimbles with seating means defined about the openings on a lower side of the core plate, a separate mechanism for positioning each individual neutron source rod in a respective guide thimble aligned with one of the openings defined through the upper core plate, comprising: (a) locating means registering against the core plate seating means; and (b) resilient holddown means extending partially into the guide thimble and coupling the source rod with the locating means in a manner which restrains the source rod in a lateral direction and positions the rod in a stationary axial relationship within the guide thimble.

  5. Arcjet Nozzle Design Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sovie, Amy J.; Haag, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of nozzle configuration on the operating characteristics of a low power dc arcjet thruster was determined. A conical nozzle with a 30 deg converging angle, a 20 deg diverging angle, and an area ratio of 225 served as the baseline case. Variations on the geometry included bell-shaped contours both up and downstream, and a downstream trumpet-shaped contour. The nozzles were operated over a range of specific power near that anticipated for on-orbit operation. Mass flow rate, thrust, current, and voltage were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between nozzles. The upstream contour was found to have minimal effect on arcjet operation. It was determined that the contour of the divergent section of the nozzle, that serves as the anode, was very important in determining the location of arc attachment, and thus had a significant impact on arcjet performance. The conical nozzle was judged to have the optimal current/voltage characteristics and produced the best performance of the nozzles tested.

  6. Nozzle for a turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2012-10-30

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, and an injection nozzle operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle includes a main body having a first end section that extends to a second end section to define an inner flow path. The injection nozzle further includes an outlet arranged at the second end section of the main body, at least one passage that extends within the main body and is fluidly connected to the outlet, and at least one conduit extending between the inner flow path and the at least one passage.

  7. Controlled overspray spray nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A spray system for a multi-ingredient ablative material wherein a nozzle A is utilized for suppressing overspray is described. The nozzle includes a cyclindrical inlet which converges to a restricted throat. A curved juncture between the cylindrical inlet and the convergent portion affords unrestricted and uninterrupted flow of the ablative material. A divergent bell-shaped chamber and adjustable nozzle exit B is utilized which provides a highly effective spray pattern in suppressing overspray to an acceptable level and producing a homogeneous jet of material that adheres well to the substrate.

  8. SCOUT Nozzle Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieds, S.

    1976-01-01

    Available analyses and material property information are summarized relevant to the design of four rocket motor nozzles currently incorporated in the four solid propellant rocket stages of the NASA SCOUT launch vehicle. The nozzles discussed include those for the following motors: (1) first stage - Algol IIIA; (2) second stage - Castor IIA; (3) third stage - Antares IIA; and (4) fourth stage - Altair IIIA. Separate sections for each nozzle provide complete data packages. Information on the Antares IIB motor which had limited usage as an alternate motor for the third stage is included.

  9. 49 CFR 179.103-5 - Bottom outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... welded to the outside bottom of the tank or mounted on a pad or nozzle with a tongue and groove or male and female flange attachment, but in no case shall the breakage groove or equivalent extend below the... the outside bottom of the tank or mounted with a tongue and groove or male and female...

  10. Reduced coking of fuel nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, A.A.; Sager, J.W.; Kobish, T.R.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a fuel nozzle useful for a gas turbine engine and having a nozzle face, the combination of fuel supply means on the nozzle, the fuel supply means including an annular fuel discharge body converging in a downstream direction toward a longitudinal central axis of the nozzle and terminating in a downstream fuel discharge orifice substantially on the central axis for discharging fuel from the orifice for mixing with air downstream of the nozzle face, air supply means on the nozzle for discharging air from the nozzle face, and means on the nozzle around the fuel discharge body cooperating with the air supply means for controllably discharging sufficient air flow with locally reduced swirl strength over the fuel discharge body to establish a recirculation zone spaced away from the nozzle face downstream thereof a sufficient distance to substantially reduce coking on the nozzle face.

  11. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Ramos, T.J.

    1982-09-30

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece.

  12. Laser cutting nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Ramos, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    A laser cutting nozzle for use with a laser cutting apparatus directing a focused beam to a spot on a work piece. The nozzle has a cylindrical body with a conical tip which together have a conically shaped hollow interior with the apex at a small aperture through the tip. The conical hollow interior is shaped to match the profile of the laser beam, at full beamwidth, which passes through the nozzle to the work piece. A plurality of gas inlet holes extend through the body to the hollow interior and are oriented to produce a swirling flow of gas coaxially through the nozzle and out the aperture, aligned with the laser beam, to the work piece. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  13. Development of a Enhanced Thermal Barrier for RSRM Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope is being considered as replacement for the RTV thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in RSRM nozzle joints, Performance requirements include its ability to cool propellant gases filter slag and particulates, and conform to various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Testing has shown its superior heat resistance, even in oxidative and corrosive environments. Testing has also demonstrated excellent performance of this system in sub-scale motors. Cold flow testing, has demonstrated its ability to conform to motor dynamics. Manufacture and assembly testing have demonstrated the ease of gland machining as well as assembly in a full-scale nozzle.

  14. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  15. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  16. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  17. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  18. Transonic swirling nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Pawlas, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model of viscous transonic swirling flow in axisymmetric nozzles is developed. MacCormack's implicit Gauss-Seidel method is applied to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in transformed coordinates. Numerical results are compared with experimental data to validate the method. The effect of swirl and viscosity on nozzle performance are demonstrated by examining wall pressures, Mach contours, and integral parameters.

  19. ASRM nozzle thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, Forrest; King, Belinda

    1993-01-01

    This report describes results from the nozzle thermal analysis contract which has been performed to support NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center in the development of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The emphasis of this study has been directed to four potential problem areas of the nozzle. These areas are the submerged nozzle region containing the flex seal, the nozzle entrance region, the material interface region in the nozzle exit cone, and the aft region of the exit cone. This study was limited throughout by inadequate material response models, especially for the polyisoprene flex seal and the low density carbon phenolic used in the exit cone. Thermal response and particle erosion calculations were performed for each of the potential problem areas. Results from these studies showed excessive erosion (large negative safety margins) to occur in the flex seal and nozzle entrance regions. The exit cone was found to be marginally adequate (near zero safety margins) and the material interface region was found not to be a problem.

  20. ASRM nozzle thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Forrest; King, Belinda

    1993-11-01

    This report describes results from the nozzle thermal analysis contract which has been performed to support NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center in the development of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The emphasis of this study has been directed to four potential problem areas of the nozzle. These areas are the submerged nozzle region containing the flex seal, the nozzle entrance region, the material interface region in the nozzle exit cone, and the aft region of the exit cone. This study was limited throughout by inadequate material response models, especially for the polyisoprene flex seal and the low density carbon phenolic used in the exit cone. Thermal response and particle erosion calculations were performed for each of the potential problem areas. Results from these studies showed excessive erosion (large negative safety margins) to occur in the flex seal and nozzle entrance regions. The exit cone was found to be marginally adequate (near zero safety margins) and the material interface region was found not to be a problem.

  1. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

  2. General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center, being prepared to be mated with the Aft Skirt. In this view you can see the attach brackets where the Thrust Vector Control System actuators connect to the nozzle which can swivel the nozzle up to 3.5 degrees to redirect the thrust to steer and maintain the Shuttle's programmed trajectory. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. System and method for controlling a combustor assembly

    DOEpatents

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2013-03-05

    A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

  4. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  5. Flight motor set 360L002 (STS-27R). Volume 5: Nozzle component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the performance and post-flight condition of the STS-27 Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzles is presented. Thermal/Structural instrumentation data is reviewed, and applicable Discrepancy Reports (DRs) and Process Departures (PDs) are presented. The Nozzle Component Program Team (NCPT) performance evaluation and the Redesign Program Review Board (RPRB) assessment is included. The STS-27 nozzle assemblies were flown on the RSRM Second Flight (Space Shuttle Atlantis) on 2 December 1988. The nozzles were a partially submerged convergent and/or divergent movable design with an aft pivot point flexible bearing. The nozzle assemblies incorporated the following features: RSRM forward exit cone with snubber assembly, RSRM fixed housing, Structural backup Outer Boot Ring (OBR), RSRM cowl ring, RSRM nose inlet assembly, RSRM throat assembly, RSRM aft exit cone assembly with Linear-Shaped Charge (LSC), RTV backfill in Joints 1, 3, and 4, Use of EA913 NA adhesive in place of EA913 adhesive, Redesigned nozzle plug, and Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) with 750 ppm sodium content. The CCP material usage for the STS-27 forward nozzle and aft exit cone assemblies is shown.

  6. Oil burner nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Donald G.

    1982-01-01

    An oil burner nozzle for use with liquid fuels and solid-containing liquid fuels. The nozzle comprises a fuel-carrying pipe, a barrel concentrically disposed about the pipe, and an outer sleeve retaining member for the barrel. An atomizing vapor passes along an axial passageway in the barrel, through a bore in the barrel and then along the outer surface of the front portion of the barrel. The atomizing vapor is directed by the outer sleeve across the path of the fuel as it emerges from the barrel. The fuel is atomized and may then be ignited.

  7. Bottom production

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, J.; Baranov, S.P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bouhova, E.; Cacciari, M.; Caner, A.; Coadou, Y.; Corti, G.; Damet, J.; Dell-Orso, R.; De Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Domenech, J.L.; Drollinger, V.; Eerola, P.; Ellis, N.; Epp, B.; Frixione, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gavrilenko, I.; Gennai, S.; George, S.; Ghete, V.M.; Guy, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iengo, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jones, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kneringer, E.; Koppenburg, P.; Korsmo, H.; Kramer, M.; Labanca, N.; Lehto, M.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Mele, S.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakada, T.; Nikitin, N.; Nisati, A.; Norrbin, E.; Palla, F.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robins, S.; Rousseau, D.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Shapiro, M.; Sherwood, P.; Smirnova, L.; Smizanska, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stepanov, N.; Vogt, R.

    2000-03-15

    In the context of the LHC experiments, the physics of bottom flavoured hadrons enters in different contexts. It can be used for QCD tests, it affects the possibilities of B decays studies, and it is an important source of background for several processes of interest. The physics of b production at hadron colliders has a rather long story, dating back to its first observation in the UA1 experiment. Subsequently, b production has been studied at the Tevatron. Besides the transverse momentum spectrum of a single b, it has also become possible, in recent time, to study correlations in the production characteristics of the b and the b. At the LHC new opportunities will be offered by the high statistics and the high energy reach. One expects to be able to study the transverse momentum spectrum at higher transverse momenta, and also to exploit the large statistics to perform more accurate studies of correlations.

  8. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  9. Nozzles of insecticide sprayers

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Fred W.

    1955-01-01

    Certain performance characteristics of the insecticide-sprayer nozzle tip and its relationship to the pressure regulator are discussed. After analysing the effectiveness of residual spraying at various pressures, the author concludes that low-pressure application would best attain the pattern and rate of insecticide discharge laid down by the WHO Expert Committee on Insecticides. PMID:14364190

  10. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Gutow, David A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.

  11. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions with Uniquely Tailored Chevrons. 1.; Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Elkroby, Ronen; Brunsniak, Leon; Thomas, Russ H.

    2006-01-01

    The flow/acoustic environment surrounding an engine nozzle installed on an airplane, say, under the wing, is asymmetric due to the pylon, the wing and the interaction of the exhaust jet with flaps on the wing. However, the conventional chevrons, which are azimuthally uniform serrations on the nozzle lip, do not exploit the asymmetry due to these propulsion airframe aeroacoustic interactions to reduce jet noise. In this pioneering study we use this non-axisymmetry to our advantage and examine if the total jet-related noise radiated to the ground can be reduced by using different types of azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) which vary the mixing around the nozzle periphery. Several scale models of the isolated nozzle, representative of high bypass ratio engine nozzles, were made with a pylon and azimuthally varying chevrons on both fan and core nozzles to enhance mixing at the top (near the pylon) with less mixing at the bottom (away from the pylon) or vice versa. Various combinations of fan and core AVC nozzles were systematically tested at typical take-off conditions inside a free jet wind-tunnel and, here, in Part 1 we analyze the acoustics results for the isolated nozzle with a pylon, with installation effects reported in Parts 2 and 3. Several interesting results are discovered: amongst the fan AVCs the top-enhanced mixing T-fan chevron nozzle is quieter in combination with any core AVC nozzle when compared to conventional chevrons; however, the bottom-mixing B-fan chevrons, as well as the core AVC nozzles, by themselves, are noisier. Further, the low-frequency source strengths in the jet plume, obtained via phased microphone arrays, also corroborate the far field sound, and for the T-fan chevrons such sources move further downstream than those for baseline or conventional chevron nozzles.

  12. Flight motor set 36OH005 (STS-28R). Volume 5: (Nozzle component)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the performance and post flight condition of the STS-28 redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzles is presented in this document. Applicable discrepancy reports (DR's) and process departures (PD's) are presented in section 5.0. The nozzle component program team (NCPT) performance evaluation and the redesign program review board (RPRB) assessment is included in section 6.0. The STS-28 nozzle assemblies were flown on the RSRM fifth flight (Space Shuttle Columbia). The nozzles were a partially submerged convergent/divergent movable design with an aft pivot point flexible bearing. The nozzle assemblies incorporated the following features: (1) RSRM forward exit cone with snubber assembly; (2) RSRM fixed housing; (3) structural backup outer boot ring (OBR); (4) RSRM cowl ring; (5) RSRM nose inlet assembly; (6) RSRM throat assembly; (7) RSRM forward nose and aft inlet ring; (8) RSRM aft exit cone assembly with linear-shaped charge (LSC); (9) RTV backfill in joints 1, 3, and 4; (10) use of EA913 NA adhesive in place of EA913; (11) redesigned nozzle plug; and (12) carbon cloth phenolic (CCP) with 750 ppm sodium content. The RSRM fifth flight test objectives are as follows: (1) verify that flexible bearing seals operate within the specified temperature range; (2) verify that flexible bearing maintained a positive gas seal between its internal components; (3) inspect flexible bearing for damage due to water impact; (4) verify performance of the nozzle liner; (5) verify that nozzle parts are reusable; (6) verify through flight demonstration and a postflight inspection that the flexible bearing is reusable; (7) verify by inspection the remaining nozzle ablative thicknesses; and (8) verify the nozzle performance margins of safety.

  13. Coefficients of discharge of fuel-injection nozzles for compression-ignition engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the coefficients of discharge of nozzles with small, round orifices of the size used with high-speed compression-ignition engines. The injection pressures and chamber back pressures employed were comparable to those existing in compression-ignition engines during injection. The construction of the nozzles was varied to determine the effect of the nozzle design on the coefficient. Tests were also made with nozzles assembled in an automatic injection valve, both with a plain and with a helically grooved stem. It was found that a smooth passage before the orifice is requisite for high flow efficiency. A beveled leading edge before the orifice gave a higher coefficient of discharge than a rounded edge. The results with the nozzles assembled in an automatic injection valve having a plain stem duplicated those with the nozzles assembled at the end of a straight tube of constant diameter. Lower coefficients were obtained with the nozzles assembled in an injection valve having a helically grooved stem. When the coefficients of nozzles of any one geometrical shape were plotted against values of corresponding Reynold's numbers for the orifice diameters and rates of flow tested, it was found that experimental points were distributed along a single curve.

  14. Forced Mixer Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheoran, Yogi; Hoover, Robert; Schuster, William; Anderson, Morris; Weir, Donald S.

    1999-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and computational acoustic analyses (CAA) were performed for a TFE731-40 compound nozzle, a TFE731-60 mixer nozzle and an Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) mixer nozzle for comparison with available data. The CFD analyses were performed with a three dimensional, Navier-Stokes solution of the flowfield on an unstructured grid using the RAMPANT program. The CAA analyses were performed with the NASA Glenn MGB program using a structured grid. A successful aerodynamic solution for the TFE731-40 compound nozzle operating statically was obtained, simulating an engine operating on a test stand. Analysis of the CFD results of the TFE731-40 with the MGB program produced predicted sound power levels that agree quite well with the measured data front full-scale static engine tests. Comparison of the predicted sound pressure with the data show good agreement near the jet axis, but the noise levels are overpredicted at angles closer to the inlet. The predicted sound power level for the TFE731-60 did not agree as well with measured static engine data as the TFE731-40. Although a reduction in the predicted noise level due to the mixed flow was observed, the reduction was not as significant as the measured data. The analysis of the V2 mixer from the E(sup 3) study showed that peak temperatures predicted in the mixer exit flowfield were within 5 percent of the values measured by the exit probes. The noise predictions of the V2 mixer nozzle tended to be 3-5 dB higher in peak noise level than the measurements. In addition, the maximum frequency of the noise was also overpredicted. An analysis of the 3 candidate mixer nozzle configurations demonstrated the feasibility of using centerbody lobes and porosity to improve mixing efficiency. A final configuration was designed with a predicted thermal mixing efficiency that was 5 percent higher than the 3 candidate mixers. The results of the MGB noise calculations show that the final design will exceed the

  15. Controlling Structure from the Bottom-Up: Structural and Optical Properties of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Palladium Coordination-Based Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Altman,M.; Shukla, A.; Zubkov, T.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; van der Boom, M.

    2006-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly of two palladium coordination-based multilayers on silicon and glass substrates is presented. The new assemblies consist of rigid-rod chromophores connected by terminal pyridine moieties to palladium centers. Both colloidal palladium and PdCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2} were used in order to determine the effect of the metal complex precursor on multilayer structure and optical properties. The multilayers were formed by an iterative wet-chemical deposition process at room temperature in air on a siloxane-based template layer. Twelve consecutive deposition steps have been demonstrated resulting in structurally regular assemblies with an equal amount of chromophore and palladium added in each molecular bilayer. The optical intensity characteristics of the metal-organic films are clearly a function of the palladium precursor employed. The colloid-based system has a UV-vis absorption maximum an order of magnitude stronger than that of the PdCl{sub 2}-based multilayer. The absorption maximum of the PdCl{sub 2}-based film exhibits a significant red shift of 23 nm with the addition of 12 layers. Remarkably, the structure and physiochemical properties of the submicron scale PdCl{sub 2}-based structures are determined by the configuration of the {approx}15 Angstrom thick template layer. The refractive index of the PdCl2-based film was determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Well-defined three-dimensional structures, with a dimension of 5 m, were obtained using photopatterned template monolayers. The properties and microstructure of the films were studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and aqueous contact angle measurements (CA).

  16. Premixed direct injection nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2011-02-15

    An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

  17. Variable area exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, E. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle for a gas turbine engine comprises a number of arcuate flaps pivotally connected to the trailing edge of a cylindrical casing which houses the engine. Seals disposed within the flaps are spring biased and extensible beyond the side edges of the flaps. The seals of adjacent flaps are maintained in sealing engagement with each other when the flaps are adjusted between positions defining minimum nozzle flow area and the cruise position. Extensible, spring biased seals are also disposed within the flaps adjacent to a supporting pylon to thereby engage the pylon in a sealing arrangement. The flaps are hinged to the casing at the central portion of the flaps' leading edges and are connected to actuators at opposed outer portions of the leading edges to thereby maximize the mechanical advantage in the actuation of the flaps.

  18. The whistler nozzle phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.; Hasan, M. A. Z.

    1982-01-01

    The whistler nozzle is a simple device which can induce jet self-excitations of controllable amplitudes and frequencies and appears highly promising for many applications involving turbulent transport, combustion and aerodynamic noise. The characteristics of this curious phenomenon are documented for different values of the controlling parameters and attempts to explain the phenomenon. It is shown that the whistler excitation results from the coupling of two independent resonance mechanisms: shear-layer tone resulting from the impingement of the pipe-exit shear layer on the collar lip, and organ-pipe resonance of the pipe-nozzle. The crucial role of the shear-layer tone in driving the organ-pipe resonance is proven by reproducing the event in pipe-ring and pipe-hole configurations in the absence of the collar. It is also shown that this phenomenon is the strongest when the self-excitation frequency matches the preferred mode of the jet.

  19. Atomizing nozzle and method

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  20. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint 5 Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, R. C.; Stratton, T. C.; LaMont, D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Torque tension testing of a newly designed Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle bolted assembly was successfully completed. Test results showed that the 3-sigma preload variation was as expected at the required input torque level and the preload relaxation were within the engineering limits. A shim installation technique was demonstrated as a simple process to fill a shear lip gap between nozzle housings in the joint region. A new automated torque system was successfully demonstrated in this test. This torque control tool was found to be very precise and accurate. The bolted assembly performance was further evaluated using the Nozzle Structural Test Bed. Both current socket head cap screw and proposed multiphase alloy bolt configurations were tested. Results indicated that joint skip and bolt bending were significantly reduced with the new multiphase alloy bolt design. This paper summarizes all the test results completed to date.

  1. Bottom-Up Self-Assembly of the Sphere-Shaped Icosametallic Oxo Clusters {Cu20} and {Cu12Zn8}.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Zhou, Hulan; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-16

    A discrete nanospheric icosametallic cluster comprised of 20 Cu ions (1) was self-assembled from facile synthesis. Adjustment of the synthesis by the choice of ligands gave rise to another cluster (2) with an intact icosacupric core and improved stability. Referring to the synthesis of 1 and 2, a heterometallic cluster (3), which contains 12 Cu(II) and 8 Zn(II), was designed and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, combined with elemental analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and element mapping. The magnetic measurements of 2 and 3 and the scanning electron microscopy images and UV-visible diffuse-reflectance measurements of metal oxides from 2 and 3 indicate that isolation of {Cu12M8} is a new synthetic route to materials with engineered properties. PMID:27116596

  2. Bundled multi-tube nozzle for a turbomachine

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Zuo, Baifang; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2015-09-22

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a cap member having a first surface that extends to a second surface. The cap member further includes a plurality of openings. A plurality of bundled mini-tube assemblies are detachably mounted in the plurality of openings in the cap member. Each of the plurality of bundled mini-tube assemblies includes a main body section having a first end section and a second end section. A fluid plenum is arranged within the main body section. A plurality of tubes extend between the first and second end sections. Each of the plurality of tubes is fluidly connected to the fluid plenum.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Canted Nozzle and Scarfed Nozzle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used for the analysis of issues concerning non-conventional (canted and scarfed) nozzle flow fields. Numerical simulations are carried out for the quality of flow in terms of axisymmetric nature at the inlet of canted nozzles of a rocket motor. Two different nozzle geometries are examined. The analysis of these simulation results shows that the flow field at the entry of the nozzles is non axisymmetric at the start of the motor. With time this asymmetry diminishes, also the flow becomes symmetric before the nozzle throat, indicating no misalignment of thrust vector with the nozzle axis. The qualitative flow fields at the inlet of the nozzles are used in selecting the geometry with lesser flow asymmetry. Further CFD methodology is used to analyse flow field of a scarfed nozzle for the evaluation of thrust developed and its direction. This work demonstrates the capability of the CFD based methods for the nozzle analysis problems which were earlier solved only approximately by making simplifying assumptions and semi empirical methods.

  4. Fundamental Study of Extendible Nozzle and Dual-Bell Nozzle for Reusable Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Keiichi; Kumakawa, Akinaga; Kusaka, Kazuo; Sato, Masahiro; Tadano, Makoto; Konno, Akira; Aoki, Hiroshi; Namura, Eijiro; Atsumi, Masahiro

    An extendible nozzle and a dual-bell nozzle are considered to be feasible devices to improve performance of booster engines for near future reusable launch vehicles. Hot firing tests were conducted at a high altitude test stand, using four kinds of nozzles as follows: a standard bell nozzle, a fixed step nozzle simulating the transient nozzle position during nozzle extension, a dual-bell nozzle and a movable extendible nozzle. Measured nozzle performance, pressure distribution and heat transfer characteristics were compared with those of CFD analysis. The dual-bell nozzle performance was shown to be lower than those of the standard bell nozzle and the step nozzle. Reverse flow of combustion gas through the gap between fixed nozzle and movable extendible nozzle was not observed during nozzle extension.

  5. Selective modification of nanoparticle arrays by laser-induced self assembly (MONA-LISA): putting control into bottom-up plasmonic nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfagiannis, Nikolaos; Siozios, Anastasios; Bellas, Dimitris V.; Toliopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bowen, Leon; Pliatsikas, Nikolaos; Cranton, Wayne M.; Kosmidis, Constantinos; Koutsogeorgis, Demosthenes C.; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Patsalas, Panos

    2016-04-01

    Nano-structuring of metals is one of the greatest challenges for the future of plasmonic and photonic devices. Such a technological challenge calls for the development of ultra-fast, high-throughput and low-cost fabrication techniques. Laser processing, accounts for the aforementioned properties, representing an unrivalled tool towards the anticipated arrival of modules based in metallic nanostructures, with an extra advantage: the ease of scalability. In the present work we take advantage of the ability to tune the laser wavelength to either match the absorption spectral profile of the metal or to be resonant with the plasma oscillation frequency, and demonstrate the utilization of different optical absorption mechanisms that are size-selective and enable the fabrication of pre-determined patterns of metal nanostructures. Thus, we overcome the greatest challenge of Laser Induced Self Assembly by combining simultaneously large-scale character with atomic-scale precision. The proposed process can serve as a platform that will stimulate further progress towards the engineering of plasmonic devices.Nano-structuring of metals is one of the greatest challenges for the future of plasmonic and photonic devices. Such a technological challenge calls for the development of ultra-fast, high-throughput and low-cost fabrication techniques. Laser processing, accounts for the aforementioned properties, representing an unrivalled tool towards the anticipated arrival of modules based in metallic nanostructures, with an extra advantage: the ease of scalability. In the present work we take advantage of the ability to tune the laser wavelength to either match the absorption spectral profile of the metal or to be resonant with the plasma oscillation frequency, and demonstrate the utilization of different optical absorption mechanisms that are size-selective and enable the fabrication of pre-determined patterns of metal nanostructures. Thus, we overcome the greatest challenge of Laser

  6. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  7. Selective modification of nanoparticle arrays by laser-induced self assembly (MONA-LISA): putting control into bottom-up plasmonic nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Kalfagiannis, Nikolaos; Siozios, Anastasios; Bellas, Dimitris V; Toliopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bowen, Leon; Pliatsikas, Nikolaos; Cranton, Wayne M; Kosmidis, Constantinos; Koutsogeorgis, Demosthenes C; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Patsalas, Panos

    2016-04-14

    Nano-structuring of metals is one of the greatest challenges for the future of plasmonic and photonic devices. Such a technological challenge calls for the development of ultra-fast, high-throughput and low-cost fabrication techniques. Laser processing, accounts for the aforementioned properties, representing an unrivalled tool towards the anticipated arrival of modules based in metallic nanostructures, with an extra advantage: the ease of scalability. In the present work we take advantage of the ability to tune the laser wavelength to either match the absorption spectral profile of the metal or to be resonant with the plasma oscillation frequency, and demonstrate the utilization of different optical absorption mechanisms that are size-selective and enable the fabrication of pre-determined patterns of metal nanostructures. Thus, we overcome the greatest challenge of Laser Induced Self Assembly by combining simultaneously large-scale character with atomic-scale precision. The proposed process can serve as a platform that will stimulate further progress towards the engineering of plasmonic devices. PMID:27031573

  8. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  9. Erosion-Resistant Water-And-Grit-Blasting Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Nozzle assembly adds abrasive particles to high-pressure water jet. Abrasive nozzle combined with high-pressure tapered stripping nozzle and standard connector. Partial vacuum in relatively large chamber of abrasive-injector housing entrains grit particles from abrasive supply.

  10. Industrial jet noise: Coanda nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Halliwell, N. A.

    1985-04-01

    Within the U.K. manufacturing industries noise from industrial jets ranks third as a major contributor to industrial deafness. Noise control is hindered because use is made of the air once it has exuded from the nozzle exit. Important tasks include swarf removal, paint spreading, cooling, etc. Nozzles which employ the Coanda effect appear to offer the possibility of significant noise reduction whilst maintaining high thrust efficiency when compared with the commonly used simple open pipe or ordinary convergent nozzle. In this paper the performance of Coanda-type nozzles is examined in detail and an index rating for nozzle performance is introduced. Results show that far field stagnation pressure distributions are Gaussian and similar in all cases with a dispersion coefficient σ = 0·64. Noise reduction and thrust efficiency are shown to be closely related to the design geometry of the central body of the nozzle. Performance is based on four fundamental characteristics, these being the noise level at 1 m from the exit and at a 90° station to the nozzle axis, and the thrust on a chosen profile, the noise reduction and the thrust efficiency. Physically, performance is attributed to flow near field effects where, although all nozzles are choked, shock cell associated noise is absent.

  11. Nozzle insert for mixed mode fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith E.

    2006-11-21

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. The homogeneous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by a nozzle insert that is attached to an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The nozzle insert is a one piece metallic component with a large diameter segment separated from a small diameter segment by an annular engagement surface. One of the needle valve members is guided on an outer surface of the nozzle insert, and the nozzle insert has an interference fit attachment to the injector body.

  12. Progress toward synergistic hypermixing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    Mean flow measurements were obtained for air-to-air mixing downstream of swept and unswept ramp wall mounted hypermixing nozzle configurations. Aside from the sweep of the ramps, the two nozzle configurations studied are identical. The nozzles inject three parallel supersonic jets at a 15 deg angle (relative to the wind tunnel wall) into a supersonic freestream. Mach number and volume fraction distributions in a transverse plane 11.1 nozzle heights downstream from the nozzle exit plane were measured. Data are presented for a freestream Mach number of three at a matched static pressure condition and also at underexpanded static pressure condition (pressure ratio = 5). Surface oil flow visualization was used to study the near wall flow behavior. The results indicate that the swept ramp injectors produce stronger and larger vortex pairs than the unswept ramp injectors. The increased interaction between the swept ramp model's larger vortex pairs yields better mixing characteristics for this model.

  13. Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Snell, George J.; Kydd, Paul H.

    1983-01-01

    Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

  14. Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head

    SciTech Connect

    Shiga, S.; Mori, H.; Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T.

    1995-08-01

    The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

  15. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  16. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  17. NERVA nozzle design status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. J.; Pickering, J. L.; Ackerman, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the design analyses are presented along with the status of the attained design maturity of the structural elements of the nozzle jacket and various aspects of the coolant passages. The design analyses relating to the nozzle shell were based on design allowables as supported by cursory values obtained from ARMCO 22-13-5 nozzle forgings. The major aspects of the coolant passages considered include: low cycle thermal fatigue, ability to operate at 4500 R gas temperature, tube buckling, and susceptibility to erosion. The scope of the analysis is limited to processes leading to reliability assessments of failure mechanisms.

  18. Design of multiple-shell gas nozzles for refurbished Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Velikovich, Aleksandr Lazarevich; Madden, R.; Thornhill, W.; Ampleford, David J.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Coleman, P. L.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Wilson Elliott, Kristi; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Clark, R.; Jones, Brent Manley

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents initial designs of multiple-shell gas puff imploding loads for the refurbished Z generator. The nozzle has three independent drivers for three independent plena. The outer and middle plena may be charged to 250psia whilst the central jet can be charged to 1000psia. 8-cm and 12-cm outer diameter nozzles have been built and tested on the bench. The unique valve design provides a very fast opening, hence the amount of stray gas outside the core nozzle flow is minimized. A similar 8-cm nozzle was characterized earlier using a fiber optic interferometer, but at lower pressures and without the central jet. Those data have been scaled to the higher pressures required for refurbished Z and used to estimate performance. The use of three independent plena allows variation of the pressure (hence mass distribution) in the nozzle flow, allowing optimization of implosion stability and the on-axis mass that most contributes to K-shell emission. Varying the outer/middle mass ratios influences the implosion time and should affect the details of the assembly on axis as well as the radiation physics. Varying the central jet pressure will have a minor effect on implosion dynamics, but a strong effect on pinch conditions and radiation physics. Optimum mass distributions for planned initial Ar shots on refurbished Z are described. Additional interferometer data including the central jet and at higher pressures will also be presented.

  19. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-02-20

    A gas turbine engine`s nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic. 8 figs.

  20. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  1. Remtech SSME nozzle design TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancroft, Steven A.; Engel, Carl D.; Pond, John E.

    1990-09-01

    Thermal damage to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) aft manifold Thermal Protection System (TPS) has been observed for flights STS-8 through STS-13. This damaged area is located on the ME2 and ME3 and extends over a region of approximately one square foot. Total failure or burn-through of the TPS could lead to severe thermal damage of the SSME manifold and loss of an engine nozzle necessitating nozzle replacement causing significant schedule delays and cost increases. Thermal damage to the manifold can be defined as a situation where the manifold temperature becomes greater than 1300 F; thereby causing loss of heat treatment in the nozzle. Results of Orbiter/nozzle wind tunnel tests and Hot Gas Facility tests of the TPS are presented. Aerothermal and thermal analysis models for the SSME aft manifold are discussed along with the flight predictions, design trajectory and design environment. Finally, the TPS design concept and TPS thermal response are addressed.

  2. Fact Program - distributed exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Futuristic Airframe Concepts & Technology (FACT): Distributed exhaust nozzle mounted in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. Angle is zero degrees with respect to microphones. Photographed in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel, Jet Noise Lab, building 1221-A.

  3. Ultrasonic flow nozzle cleaning apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fridsma, D.E.; Silvestri, G.J. Jr.; Twerdochlib, M.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes an ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for a venturi flow measuring nozzle mounted in a pipe of a steam power plant and having an inlet, venturi throat, and an outlet, the pipe and nozzle having fluid flowing therethrough, the cleaning occurring while the fluid is flowing. It comprises first ultrasonic transducer means mounted to connect to the inside of the pipe, disposed adjacent the inlet of the venturi flow nozzle and the means being in direct contact with the fluid flowing through the pipe for transmitting ultrasonic waves directly into and thereby exciting the fluid flowing through the venturi flow nozzle; and control means coupled to the first ultrasonic transducer means for activating the first ultrasonic transducer means.

  4. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  5. Remtech SSME nozzle design TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Steven A.; Engel, Carl D.; Pond, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal damage to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) aft manifold Thermal Protection System (TPS) has been observed for flights STS-8 through STS-13. This damaged area is located on the ME2 and ME3 and extends over a region of approximately one square foot. Total failure or burn-through of the TPS could lead to severe thermal damage of the SSME manifold and loss of an engine nozzle necessitating nozzle replacement causing significant schedule delays and cost increases. Thermal damage to the manifold can be defined as a situation where the manifold temperature becomes greater than 1300 F; thereby causing loss of heat treatment in the nozzle. Results of Orbiter/nozzle wind tunnel tests and Hot Gas Facility tests of the TPS are presented. Aerothermal and thermal analysis models for the SSME aft manifold are discussed along with the flight predictions, design trajectory and design environment. Finally, the TPS design concept and TPS thermal response are addressed.

  6. Powder Layer Preparation Using Vibration-controlled Capillary Steel Nozzles for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, Thomas; Laumer, Tobias; Baumüller, Tobias; Amend, Philipp; Roth, Stephan

    In this report, the dry delivery of polyamide 12 powders by vibrating capillary steel nozzles is investigated and discussed regarding its potential for powder layer preparation in Laser Beam Melting. Therefore, a setup including a steel nozzle assembled on a piezoelectric actuator is presented, which enables the precise control over very small powder quantities by vibration excitation. An analysis reveals that the mass flow through the nozzle can be adjusted by the vibration modes in a certain range depending on the nozzle's specifications, whereas the vibration modes themselves show a complicated behaviour. Using a positioning system in combination with the vibrating nozzle, single-layer patterns consisting of polyamide 12 are produced and characterized regarding surface homogeneity and selectivity using a laser stripe sensor.

  7. The Design of a High-Q, MACH-5 Nozzle for the Langley 8-Foot HTT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Richard L., Jr.; Stewart, Brian K.; Harvin, Stephen F.

    2006-01-01

    A new nozzle has ben designed for the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel. The new nozzle was designed with a Mach-5 exit flow at a Mach-5 flight-enthalpy test condition and has a smaller throat area than the existing Mach-5 nozzle which significantly increases the range of dynamic pressures that can be achieved in the facility. The nozzle was designed using the NASA Langley IMOCND computer program which solves the potential equation using the classical method of characteristics. Several axisymmetric nozzle contours were generated and evaluated using viscous computational fluid dynamics. A number of items were considered in the evaluation, including flow uniformity, thermal and structural design, manufacturing schedule and cost. Once the final contour was selected, studies were done to determine the effects of manufacturing irregularities (steps and cavities at joints). These studies were done to develop manufacturing specifications and assembly tolerances.

  8. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  10. Flux Compression Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In pulsed fusion propulsion schemes in which the fusion energy creates a radially expanding plasma, a magnetic nozzle is required to redirect the radially diverging flow of the expanding fusion plasma into a rearward axial flow, thereby producing a forward axial impulse to the vehicle. In a highly electrically conducting plasma, the presence of a magnetic field B in the plasma creates a pressure B(exp 2)/2(mu) in the plasma, the magnetic pressure. A gradient in the magnetic pressure can be used to decelerate the plasma traveling in the direction of increasing magnetic field, or to accelerate a plasma from rest in the direction of decreasing magnetic pressure. In principle, ignoring dissipative processes, it is possible to design magnetic configurations to produce an 'elastic' deflection of a plasma beam. In particular, it is conceivable that, by an appropriate arrangement of a set of coils, a good approximation to a parabolic 'magnetic mirror' may be formed, such that a beam of charged particles emanating from the focal point of the parabolic mirror would be reflected by the mirror to travel axially away from the mirror. The degree to which this may be accomplished depends on the degree of control one has over the flux surface of the magnetic field, which changes as a result of its interaction with a moving plasma.

  11. "Bottom-up" transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Morag, Ahiud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-11-15

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) have attracted significant scientific, technological, and commercial interest in recent years due to the broad and growing use of such devices in electro-optics, consumer products (touch-screens for example), solar cells, and others. Currently, almost all commercial TEs are fabricated through "top-down" approaches (primarily lithography-based techniques), with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the most common material employed. Several problems are encountered, however, in this field, including the cost and complexity of TE production using top-down technologies, the limited structural flexibility, high-cost of indium, and brittle nature and low transparency in the far-IR spectral region of ITO. Alternative routes based upon bottom-up processes, have recently emerged as viable alternatives for production of TEs. Bottom up technologies are based upon self-assembly of building blocks - atoms, molecules, or nanoparticles - generating thin patterned films that exhibit both electrical conductivity and optical transparency. In this Feature Article we discuss the recent progress in this active and exciting field, including bottom-up TE systems produced from carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene-oxide), silver, gold, and other metals. The current hurdles encountered for broader use of bottom-up strategies along with their significant potential are analyzed. PMID:27545510

  12. Carbon/Carbon extendible Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, M.; Lacombe, A.; Joyez, P.; Ellis, R. A.; Lee, J. C.; Payne, F. M.

    2002-03-01

    For many years, SEP has developed C-C composite materials to lighten architectures of propulsion systems, thanks to their high specific mechanical properties kept up to about 2500°C. The 3D carbon reinforcement the so-called Novoltex ® has emerged, and today more than 150 tons per year of C-C is produced by SEP using it. The advent of these thermostructural composite materials have blazed a trail for innovative solutions applicable to the extreme operating conditions of large rocket engines, to improve their performances. The extendible nozzle concept has been developed to optimize the expansion ratio with regard to size restriction required particularly for the upper stages of launchers. The first two tests of a SEP extendible nozzle extension were carried out in 1979, one on a ring design and one on a panel design. Today, nearly all possible configurations have been tested, from the simple scenario of extending a ring from a fixed nozzle prior to ignition, to the most complex one: nozzle deployment while the motor is operating and when the nozzle is being vectored. In August 1995, Pratt & Whitney have entrusted SEP with the development of the C-C exit cone dedicated to the RL10 B-2 cryotechnic engine, propulsion system of the DELTA III upper stage. One year later, in August 1996, SEP delivered the first development item which is currently under testing. When the entire C-C nozzle is attached to the RL10 B-2 engine and deployed, the nozzle diameter increases from 1.1 to 2.1 m and translates to 2.5 m in length, providing an expansion ratio of 285:1 and 30 s of specific impulse increase to the engine. Finally, the paper will describe the design and manufacturing of this huge exit cone and will report the latest test results.

  13. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  14. Variable length three-cone rock bit nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, K.S.

    1987-05-19

    A three-cone sealed bearing rock bit is described of the type that utilizes drilling fluid during operation of the rock bit in an earth formation comprising: a rock bit body having a first pin end and a second cutting end. The cutting end consists of rotary cones mounted to journals that are cantilevered radially inwardly from legs extending from the rock bit body; a fluid chamber formed by the body. The fluid chamber is opened at the first pin end of the body; and at least three variable length nozzle bodies positioned about 120/sup 0/ one from the other, extend from a dome portion formed at a base of the bit body toward a bottom of a borehole in the earth formation. Each of the nozzle bodies communicates with the fluid chamber in the body and extends a different length from the dome portion.

  15. RSRM Nozzle-to-Case Joint J-leg Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrechtsen, Kevin U.; Eddy, Norman F.; Ewing, Mark E.; McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program, nozzle-to-case joint polysulfide adhesive gas paths have occurred on several flight motors. These gas paths have allowed hot motor gases to reach the wiper O-ring. Even though these motors continue to fly safely with this condition, a desire was to reduce such occurrences. The RSRM currently uses a J-leg joint configuration on case field joints and igniter inner and outer joints. The J-leg joint configuration has been successfully demonstrated on numerous RSRM flight and static test motors, eliminating hot gas intrusion to the critical O-ring seals on these joints. Using the proven technology demonstrated on the case field joints and igniter joints, a nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design was developed for implementation on RSRM flight motors. This configuration provides an interference fit with nozzle fixed housing phenolics at assembly, with a series of pressurization gaps incorporated outboard of the joint mating surface to aid in joint pressurization and to eliminate any circumferential flow in this region. The joint insulation is bonded to the nozzle phenolics using the same pressure sensitive adhesive used in the case field joints and igniter joints. An enhancement to the nozzle-to-case joint J-leg configuration is the implementation of a carbon rope thermal barrier. The thermal barrier is located downstream of the joint bondline and is positioned within the joint in a manner where any hot gas intrusion into the joint passes through the thermal barrier, reducing gas temperatures to a level that would not affect O-rings downstream of the thermal barrier. This paper discusses the processes used in reaching a final nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design, provides structural and thermal results in support of the design, and identifies fabrication techniques and demonstrations used in arriving at the final configuration.

  16. Nozzle geometry for organic vapor jet printing

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-13

    A first device is provided. The device includes a print head. The print head further includes a first nozzle hermetically sealed to a first source of gas. The first nozzle has an aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns in a direction perpendicular to a flow direction of the first nozzle. At a distance from the aperture into the first nozzle that is 5 times the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle, the smallest dimension perpendicular to the flow direction is at least twice the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle.

  17. Advanced high area ratio nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Farhad; Collins, Frank G.; Orr, Joseph L., Jr.; Myruski, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop computational techniques for the design of high-area-ratio nozzles and to validate these models by comparison with experiments and computations using other codes. Progress was made in two areas during the past year. First, performance computations were added to the PARC2D code and the performance of the SSME nozzle was computed for inviscid, laminar and turbulent flow assuming a perfect gas with gamma = 1.2. Second, the PARC2D code was modified in a non-CASP project to compute equilibrium flow about hypersonic blunt bodies. Progress has been made toward modifying this code to compute equilibrium H2/O2 flow through the SSME and related nozzles.

  18. Advanced high area ratio nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Farhad; Collins, Frank G.; Orr, Joseph L., Jr.; Myruski, Brian

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop computational techniques for the design of high-area-ratio nozzles and to validate these models by comparison with experiments and computations using other codes. Performance computations were added to the PARC2D code and the performance of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) nozzle was computed for inviscid, laminar and turbulent flow assuming a perfect gas with gamma = 1.2. The PARC2D code was modified in a non-CASP (Center for Advanced Space Propulsion) project to compute equilibrium flow about hypersonic blunt bodies. Progress has been made toward modifying this code to compute equilibrium H2/O2 flow through the SSME and related nozzles.

  19. Flame tolerant secondary fuel nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Wu, Chunyang; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2015-02-24

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of primary nozzles configured to diffuse or premix fuel into an air flow through the combustor; and a secondary nozzle configured to premix fuel with the air flow. Each premixing nozzle includes a center body, at least one vane, a burner tube provided around the center body, at least two cooling passages, a fuel cooling passage to cool surfaces of the center body and the at least one vane, and an air cooling passage to cool a wall of the burner tube. The cooling passages prevent the walls of the center body, the vane(s), and the burner tube from overheating during flame holding events.

  20. Bottom-up substitution assembly of AuF4-n0,-+nPO3 (n = 1-4): a theoretical study of novel oxyfluoride hyperhalogen molecules and anions AuF4-n(PO3)n0,-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-fan; Cui, Zhong-hua; Ding, Yi-hong

    2014-06-01

    Compounds with high electron affinity, i.e. superhalogens, have continued to attract chemists' attention, due to their potential importance in fundamental chemistry and materials science. It has now proven very effective to build up novel superhalogens with multi-positively charged centres, which are usually called 'hyperhalogens'. Herein, using AuF4- and PO3 as the model building blocks, we made the first attempt to design the Au,P-based hyperhalogen anions AuF4-n(PO3)n- (n = 1-4) at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d)&SDD and CCSD(T)/6-311+G(d)&SDD (single-point) levels (6-311+G(d) for O, F, P and SDD for Au). Notably, for all the considered Au,P systems, the ground state bears a dioxo-bonded structure with n ≤ 3, which is significantly more stable than the usually presumed mono-oxo-bonded one. Moreover, the clustering of the -PO3 moieties becomes energetically favoured for n ≥ 3. The ground states of AuP4O120,- are the first reported cage-like oxide hyperhalogens. Thus, the -PO3 moiety cannot be retained during the 'bottom-up' assembly. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) value of the most stable AuF4-n(PO3)n- (n = 1-4) ranges from 7.16 to 8.20 eV, higher than the VDE values of the corresponding building blocks AuF4- (7.08 eV) and PO3- (4.69 eV). The adiabatic detachment energy values of these four hyperhalogens exceed 6.00 eV. Possible generation routes for AuF4-n(PO3)n- (n = 1-4) were discussed. The presently designed oxyfluorides not only enriches the family of hyperhalogens, but also demonstrates the great importance of considering the structural transformation during the superhalogen → hyperhalogen design such as for the present Au-P based systems.

  1. Development of Air Speed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the development of a suitable speed nozzle for the first few thousand airplanes made by the United States during the recent war in Europe, and to furnish a basis for more mature instruments in the future. Requirements for the project were to provide a suitable pressure collector for aircraft speed meters and to develop a speed nozzle which would be waterproof, powerful, unaffected by slight pitch and yaw, rugged and easy to manufacture, and uniform in structure and reading, so as not to require individual calibration.

  2. Cavitation Inside High-Pressure Optically Transparent Fuel Injector Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nozzle-orifice flow and cavitation have an important effect on primary breakup of sprays. For this reason, a number of studies in recent years have used injectors with optically transparent nozzles so that orifice flow cavitation can be examined directly. Many of these studies use injection pressures scaled down from realistic injection pressures used in modern fuel injectors, and so the geometry must be scaled up so that the Reynolds number can be matched with the industrial applications of interest. A relatively small number of studies have shown results at or near the injection pressures used in real systems. Unfortunately, neither the specifics of the design of the optical nozzle nor the design methodology used is explained in detail in these papers. Here, a methodology demonstrating how to prevent failure of a finished design made from commonly used optically transparent materials will be explained in detail, and a description of a new design for transparent nozzles which minimizes size and cost will be shown. The design methodology combines Finite Element Analysis with relevant materials science to evaluate the potential for failure of the finished assembly. Finally, test results imaging a cavitating flow at elevated pressures are presented.

  3. Linear nozzle with tailored gas plumes

    DOEpatents

    Kozarek, Robert L.; Straub, William D.; Fischer, Joern E.; Leon, David D.

    2003-01-01

    There is claimed a method for depositing fluid material from a linear nozzle in a substantially uniform manner across and along a surface. The method includes directing gaseous medium through said nozzle to provide a gaseous stream at the nozzle exit that entrains fluid material supplied to the nozzle, said gaseous stream being provided with a velocity profile across the nozzle width that compensates for the gaseous medium's tendency to assume an axisymmetric configuration after leaving the nozzle and before reaching the surface. There is also claimed a nozzle divided into respective side-by-side zones, or preferably chambers, through which a gaseous stream can be delivered in various velocity profiles across the width of said nozzle to compensate for the tendency of this gaseous medium to assume an axisymmetric configuration.

  4. Linear nozzle with tailored gas plumes

    DOEpatents

    Leon, David D.; Kozarek, Robert L.; Mansour, Adel; Chigier, Norman

    2001-01-01

    There is claimed a method for depositing fluid material from a linear nozzle in a substantially uniform manner across and along a surface. The method includes directing gaseous medium through said nozzle to provide a gaseous stream at the nozzle exit that entrains fluid material supplied to the nozzle, said gaseous stream being provided with a velocity profile across the nozzle width that compensates for the gaseous medium's tendency to assume an axisymmetric configuration after leaving the nozzle and before reaching the surface. There is also claimed a nozzle divided into respective side-by-side zones, or preferably chambers, through which a gaseous stream can be delivered in various velocity profiles across the width of said nozzle to compensate for the tendency of this gaseous medium to assume an axisymmetric configuration.

  5. Design of supersonic Coanda jet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilaqua, Paul M.; Lee, John D.

    1987-01-01

    The thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets was improved by designing a nozzle to skew the initial jet velocity profile. A new nozzle design procedure, based on the method of characteristics, was developed to design a nozzle which produces a specified exit velocity profile. The thrust vectoring of a simple convergent nozzle, a convergent-divergent nozzle, and a nozzle which produces a skewed velocity profile matched to the curvature of the Coanda surface were expermentially compared over a range of pressure ratios from 1.5 to 3.5. Elimination of the expansion shocks with the C-D nozzle is shown to greatly improve the thrust vectoring; elimination of turning shocks with the skewed profile nozzle further improves the vectoring.

  6. 46 CFR 154.1120 - Nozzles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Nozzles. (a) Nozzles for the water spray system must be spaced to provide the minimum discharge density under § 154.1115 in each part of the protected area. (b) The vertical distance between water...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1120 - Nozzles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Nozzles. (a) Nozzles for the water spray system must be spaced to provide the minimum discharge density under § 154.1115 in each part of the protected area. (b) The vertical distance between water...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1120 - Nozzles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Nozzles. (a) Nozzles for the water spray system must be spaced to provide the minimum discharge density under § 154.1115 in each part of the protected area. (b) The vertical distance between water...

  9. Computer aided design study of hypermixing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mefferd, L. A.; Bevilacqua, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a nozzle which combines the hypermixing and lobe mechanisms to achieve further increases in jet entrainment and ejector performance is investigated. A computer program which incorporates a two equation turbulence model and is used to predict and compare the evolution of jets from various nozzle designs is discussed. Increasing the length of the nozzle lobes and an alternating lobe nozzle are a methods examined for increasing the entrainment rate.

  10. Nozzle Extension for Safety Air Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbrun, H. N.; Croom, Delwin R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    New nozzle-extension design overcomes problems and incorporates original commercial nozzle, retaining intrinsic safety features. Components include extension tube, length of which made to suit application; adaptor fitting, and nozzle adaptor repinned to maintain original safety features. Design moves conical airstream to end of extension to blow machine chips away from operator. Nozzle-extension modification allows safe and efficient operation of machine tools while maintaining integrity of orginial safety-air-gun design.

  11. Perfect bell nozzle parametric and optimization curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, J. L.; Blount, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Nozzle contour data for untruncated Bell nozzles with expansion area ratios to 6100 and a specific heat ratio of 1.2 are provided. Curves for optimization of nozzles for maximum thrust coefficient within a given length, surface area, or area ratio are included. The nozzles are two dimensional axisymmetric and calculations were performed using the method of characteristics. Drag due to wall friction was included in the final thrust coefficient.

  12. Turbomachine combustor nozzle including a monolithic nozzle component and method of forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Stoia, Lucas John; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Vanselow, John Drake; Westmoreland, James Harold

    2016-02-23

    A turbomachine combustor nozzle includes a monolithic nozzle component having a plate element and a plurality of nozzle elements. Each of the plurality of nozzle elements includes a first end extending from the plate element to a second end. The plate element and plurality of nozzle elements are formed as a unitary component. A plate member is joined with the nozzle component. The plate member includes an outer edge that defines first and second surfaces and a plurality of openings extending between the first and second surfaces. The plurality of openings are configured and disposed to register with and receive the second end of corresponding ones of the plurality of nozzle elements.

  13. Kinetic energy of rainfall simulation nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different spray nozzles are used frequently to simulate natural rain for soil erosion and chemical transport, particularly phosphorous (P), studies. Oscillating VeeJet nozzles are used mostly in soil erosion research while constant spray FullJet nozzles are commonly used for P transport. Several ch...

  14. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  15. Methods and systems to thermally protect fuel nozzles in combustion systems

    DOEpatents

    Helmick, David Andrew; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-17

    A method of assembling a gas turbine engine is provided. The method includes coupling a combustor in flow communication with a compressor such that the combustor receives at least some of the air discharged by the compressor. A fuel nozzle assembly is coupled to the combustor and includes at least one fuel nozzle that includes a plurality of interior surfaces, wherein a thermal barrier coating is applied across at least one of the plurality of interior surfaces to facilitate shielding the interior surfaces from combustion gases.

  16. Leaf seal for gas turbine stator shrouds and a nozzle band

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Sexton, Brendan Francis

    2002-01-01

    A leaf seal assembly is secured to the trailing edge of a shroud segment for sealing between the shroud segment and the leading edge side wall of a nozzle outer band. The leaf seal includes a circumferentially elongated seal plate biased by a pair of spring clips disposed in a groove along the trailing edge of the shroud segment to maintain the seal plate in engagement with the flange on the leading edge side wall of the nozzle outer band. The leaf seal plate and spring clips receive pins tack-welded to the shroud segment to secure the leaf seal assembly in place.

  17. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  20. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  1. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  2. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  3. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  4. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  5. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Concepts Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soni, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the summary of work accomplished during summer of 2000 by Mr. Chad Hammons, undergraduate senior student, Mississippi State University/ERC in support of NASA/MSFC mission pertinent to Altitude compensating nozzle concepts evaluations. In particular, the development of automatic grid generator applicable in conducting sensitivity analysis involving Aerospike engine is described.

  6. Distributed Exhaust Nozzles for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J.; Hellman, B.; Schein, D. B.; Solomon, W. D., Jr.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to validate the jet noise reduction potential of a concept associated with distributed exhaust nozzles. Under this concept the propulsive thrust is generated by a larger number of discrete plumes issuing from an array of small or mini-nozzles. The potential of noise reduction of this concept stems from the fact that a large number of small jets will produce very high frequency noise and also, if spaced suitably, they will coalesce at a smaller velocity to produce low amplitude, low frequency noise. This is accomplished through detailed acoustic and fluid measurements along with a Computational Fluidic Dynamic (CFD) solution of the mean (DE) Distributed Exhaust nozzle flowfield performed by Northrop-Grumman. The acoustic performance is quantified in an anechoic chamber. Farfield acoustic data is acquired for a DE nozzle as well as a round nozzle of the same area. Both these types of nozzles are assessed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. The CFD analysis ensures that both nozzles issued the same amount of airflow for a given nozzle pressure ratio. Data at a variety of nozzle pressure ratios are acquired at a range of polar and azimuthal angles. Flow visualization of the DE nozzle is used to assess the fluid dynamics of the small jet interactions. Results show that at high subsonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle shifts its frequency of peak amplitude to a higher frequency relative to a round nozzle of equivalent area (from a S(sub tD) = 0.24 to 1. 3). Furthermore, the DE nozzle shows reduced sound pressure levels (as much as 4 - 8 dB) in the low frequency part of the spectrum (less than S(sub tD) = 0.24 ) compared to the round nozzle. At supersonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle does not exhibit the jet screech and the shock-associated broadband noise is reduced by as much as 12 dB.

  7. Combustor assembly for use in a turbine engine and methods of assembling same

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2013-05-14

    A fuel nozzle assembly for use with a turbine engine is described herein. The fuel nozzle assembly includes a plurality of fuel nozzles positioned within an air plenum defined by a casing. Each of the plurality of fuel nozzles is coupled to a combustion liner defining a combustion chamber. Each of the plurality of fuel nozzles includes a housing that includes an inner surface that defines a cooling fluid plenum and a fuel plenum therein, and a plurality of mixing tubes extending through the housing. Each of the mixing tubes includes an inner surface defining a flow channel extending between the air plenum and the combustion chamber. At least one mixing tube of the plurality of mixing tubes including at least one cooling fluid aperture for channeling a flow of cooling fluid from the cooling fluid plenum to the flow channel.

  8. Peak axial-velocity decay with single- and multi-element nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Jet peak-velocity decay data were obtained for a variety of circular and noncircular single-element and multi-element nozzles for application to externally-blown-flap (EBF) STOL aircraft. These data permit a rational approach, in terms of element type and element spacing, to nozzles designed to promote mixing of the jet exhaust with the surrounding air. Rapid mixing and the resulting lower axial jet velocity decreases the noise caused by the interaction of jet impingement on the flap assembly of EBF STOL aircraft. Empirical relationships are presented that permit the prediction of peak axial-velocity decay curves for a wide spectrum of mixer-type nozzles. The data are useful also in the design of ejector-type noise suppressors and for the suppression of VTOL downwash velocities caused by vertically oriented exhaust nozzles.

  9. Peak axial-velocity decay with single- and multi-element nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U. H.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Jet peak-velocity decay data were obtained for a variety of circular and noncircular single-element and multi-element nozzles for application to externally-blown-flap STOL aircraft. These data permit a rational approach, in terms of element type and element spacing, to nozzles designed to promote mixing of the jet exhaust with the surrounding air. Rapid mixing and the resulting lower axial jet velocity decreases the noise caused by the interaction of jet impingement on the flap assembly of EBF STOL aircraft. Empirical relationships are presented that permit the prediction of peak axial-velocity decay curves for a wide spectrum of mixer-type nozzles. The data are useful also in the design of ejector-type noise suppressors and for the suppression of VTOL downwash velocities caused by vertically oriented exhaust nozzles.

  10. Aeroacoustic Improvements to Fluidic Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Whitmire, Julia; Abeysinghe, Amal

    2006-01-01

    Fluidic chevrons use injected air near the trailing edge of a nozzle to emulate mixing and jet noise reduction characteristics of mechanical chevrons. While previous investigations of "first generation" fluidic chevron nozzles showed only marginal improvements in effective perceived noise levels when compared to nozzles without injection, significant improvements in noise reduction characteristics were achieved through redesigned "second generation" nozzles on a bypass ratio 5 model system. The second-generation core nozzles had improved injection passage contours, external nozzle contour lines, and nozzle trailing edges. The new fluidic chevrons resulted in reduced overall sound pressure levels over that of the baseline nozzle for all observation angles. Injection ports with steep injection angles produced lower overall sound pressure levels than those produced by shallow injection angles. The reductions in overall sound pressure levels were the result of noise reductions at low frequencies. In contrast to the first-generation nozzles, only marginal increases in high frequency noise over that of the baseline nozzle were observed for the second-generation nozzles. The effective perceived noise levels of the new fluidic chevrons are shown to approach those of the core mechanical chevrons.

  11. Optimized profiles for incompressible flow metering nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, R.; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Lou, D. Y. S.; Spindler, M.

    1988-04-01

    The Euler-Lagrange equation was used to minimize shear stress in designing a flow-metering nozzle. The flow field in the nozzle was computed by solving the momentum equation in integral form. The profile of the nozzle was obtained by minimizing the shear losses in the converging section of the nozzle. Following computation of the profile, a metering nozzle was designed, constructed, and subsequently tested to evaluate the validity of the analysis. The nozzle was designed for a pipe diameter of 15.24 cm (6 in.) and a throat diameter of 9.266 cm (3.648 in.). The test results indicated a marked increase in the value of the discharge coefficient when it is compared with that for the ASME standard nozzle. The computed pressure distribution is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Modifications to the nozzle test chamber to extend nozzle static-test capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The nozzle test chamber was modified to provide a high-pressure-ratio nozzle static-test capability. Experiments were conducted to determine the range of the ratio of nozzle total pressure to chamber pressure and to make direct nozzle thrust measurements using a three-component strain-gage force balance. Pressure ratios from 3 to 285 were measured with several axisymmetric nozzles at a nozzle total pressure of 15 to 190 psia. Devices for measuring system mass flow were calibrated using standard axisymmetric convergent choked nozzles. System mass-flow rates up to 10 lbm/sec are measured. The measured thrust results of these nozzles are in good agreement with one-dimensional theoretical predictions for convergent nozzles.

  13. Single expansion ramp nozzle simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffin, Stephen M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Lee, Seung-Ho; Keener, Earl R.; Spaid, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    The single-expansion-ramp-nozzle (SERN) experiment underway at NASA Ames Research Center simulates the National Aerospace Plane propulsive jet-plume flow. Recently, limited experimental data has become available from an experiment with a generic nozzle/afterbody model in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The present paper presents full three-dimensional solutions obtained with the implicit Navier-Stokes solver, FL3D, for the baseline model and a version of the model with side extensions. Analysis of the computed flow clearly shows the complex 3-D nature of the flow, critical flow features, and the effect of side extensions on the plume flow development. Flow schematics appropriate for the conditions tested are presented for the baseline model and the model with side extensions. The computed results show excellent agreement with experimental shadowgraph and with surface pressure measurements. The computed and experimental surface oil-flows show the same features but may be improved by appropriate turbulence modeling.

  14. Spray nozzle for fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papavergos, Panayiotis G.

    1990-09-01

    The design of a spray nozzle for fire control is described. It produces a spray of gas and liquid having an oval transverse cross section and it comprises a mixing chamber with an oval transverse cross section adapted to induce a toroidal mixing pattern in pressurized gas and liquid introduced to the mixing chamber through a plurality of inlets. In a preferred embodiment the mixing chamber is toroidal. The spray nozzle produces an oval spray pattern for more efficient wetting of narrow passages and is suitable for fire control systems in vehicles or other confined spaces. Vehicles to which this invention may be applied include trains, armoured vehicles, ships, hovercraft, submarines, oil rigs, and most preferably, aircraft.

  15. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  16. Small drops from large nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Said Mohamed, Ahmed; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Herrada, Miguel Angel

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental and numerical results of the generation of drops which are significantly smaller than the nozzle from which they are generated. The system consists of a cylindrical reservoir and two endplates. One plate is a thin metal sheet with a small orifice in its centre which acts as the nozzle. The other end consists of a piston which moves by the action of an elecromechanical actuator which in turn is driven by sine-shape pull-mode pulses. The meniscus (formed at the nozzle) is thus first overturned, forming a cavity. This cavity collapses and a thin and fast jet emerges from its centre. Under appropriate conditions the tip of this jet breaks up and produces a single diminutive drop. A good agreement between the experimental and numerical results was found. Also, a series of experiments were performed in order to study the effects that the pulse amplitude and width, together with variations in the liquid properties, have over the final size of the droplet. Based on these experiments, a predictive law for the droplet size has been derived. This work was funded by the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship and Research Grant), the John Fell Fund (Oxford University Press), the Ministry of Science and Education (DPI2013-46485 Spain), and the Junta de Andalucia (P08-TEP-31704128 Spain).

  17. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  18. Frozen Chemistry Effects on Nozzle Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; O'Gara, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of exhaust nozzle flows are typically conducted assuming the gas is calorically perfect, and typically modeled as air. However the gas inside a real nozzle is generally composed of combustion products whose thermodynamic properties may differ. In this study, the effect of gas model assumption on exhaust nozzle simulations is examined. The three methods considered model the nozzle exhaust gas as calorically perfect air, a calorically perfect exhaust gas mixture, and a frozen exhaust gas mixture. In the latter case the individual non-reacting species are tracked and modeled as a gas which is only thermally perfect. Performance parameters such as mass flow rate, gross thrust, and thrust coefficient are compared as are mean flow and turbulence profiles in the jet plume region. Nozzles which operate at low temperatures or have low subsonic exit Mach numbers experience relatively minor temperature variations inside the nozzle, and may be modeled as a calorically perfect gas. In those which operate at the opposite extreme conditions, variations in the thermodynamic properties can lead to different expansion behavior within the nozzle. Modeling these cases as a perfect exhaust gas flow rather than air captures much of the flow features of the frozen chemistry simulations. Use of the exhaust gas reduces the nozzle mass flow rate, but has little effect on the gross thrust. When reporting nozzle thrust coefficient results, however, it is important to use the appropriate gas model assumptions to compute the ideal exit velocity. Otherwise the values obtained may be an overly optimistic estimate of nozzle performance.

  19. Experimental evaluation of expendable supersonic nozzle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V.; Kwon, O.; Vittal, B.; Berrier, B.; Re, R.

    1990-01-01

    Exhaust nozzles for expendable supersonic turbojet engine missile propulsion systems are required to be simple, short and compact, in addition to having good broad-range thrust-minus-drag performance. A series of convergent-divergent nozzle scale model configurations were designed and wind tunnel tested for a wide range of free stream Mach numbers and nozzle pressure ratios. The models included fixed geometry and simple variable exit area concepts. The experimental and analytical results show that the fixed geometry configurations tested have inferior off-design thrust-minus-drag performance in the transonic Mach range. A simple variable exit area configuration called the Axi-Quad nozzle, combining features of both axisymmetric and two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles, performed well over a broad range of operating conditions. Analytical predictions of the flow pattern as well as overall performance of the nozzles, using a fully viscous, compressible CFD code, compared very well with the test data.

  20. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  1. LTA measurements on shuttle cleaning nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer was used to make flow field velocity measurements on a supersonic air/water cleaning nozzle used to clean liquid oxygen shuttle components at Kennedy Space Center. The velocity along the centerline of the nozzle was characterized by the LTA system and compared with CFD calculations to ascertain the optimum distance the nozzle should be placed from the liquid oxygen part for maximum cleaning..

  2. Wire Whip Keeps Spray Nozzle Clean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Air-turbine-driven wire whip is clamped near spray-gun mount. When spray gun is installed, wire whip is in position to remove foam buildup from nozzle face. Two lengths of wire 1 to 2 inches long and about 0.03 inch in thickness are used. Foam spray would be prevented from accumulating on nozzle face by increasing purge flow and cutting vortex-generating grooves inside cap and on nozzle flats.

  3. Welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D. B.; Nicolay, R. C.

    The most prominent feature of the nozzle extension conponent of Ariane launch vehicle Vulcan engines is the welding together of numerous spirally arranged rectangular tubes with constant cross section. Accounts are presently given of these nozzles' fabrication method and the results of destructive and NDE investigations of these gas-shielded tungsten-arc weldments. Attention is given to the character and consequences of geometric irregularities imparted by the welding process and to the complexity of the nozzle inlet and outlet manifolds.

  4. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  5. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  6. Supersonic jets from bevelled rectangular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Raman, Ganesh

    1993-01-01

    The influence of nozzle exit geometry on jet mixing and noise production was studied experimentally for a series of rectangular nozzles operating at supersonic jet velocities. Both converging (C) and converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles were built with asymmetrical (single bevel) and symmetrical (double bevel) exit chambers and with conventional straight exits for comparison. About a four decibel reduction of peak mixing noise was observed for the double bevelled C-D nozzle operated at design pressure ratio. All bevelled geometries provided screech noise reduction for under-expanded jets and an upstream mixing noise directivity shift which would be beneficial for improved acoustic treatment performance of a shrouded system.

  7. Experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Smith, Tamara A.; Saltz, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    High-performance electrothermal thrusters operate in a low nozzle-throat Reynolds number regime. Under these conditions, the flow boundary layer occupies a large volume inside the nozzle, contributing to large viscous losses. Four nozzles (conical, bell, trumpet, and modified trumpet) and a sharp-edged orifice were evaluated over a Reynolds number range of 500 to 9000 with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The nozzles showed significant decreases in specific impulse efficiency with decreasing Reynolds number. At Reynolds numbers less than 1000, all four nozzles were probably filled with a large boundary layer. The discharge coefficient decreased with Reynolds number in the same manner as the specific impulse efficiency. The bell and modified trumpet nozzles had discharge coefficients 4 to 8 percent higher than those of the cone or trumpet nozzles. The Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle analysis computer program was used to predict nozzle performance. The results were then compared to the experimental results in order to determine the accuracy of the program within this flow regime.

  8. NPAC-Nozzle Performance Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    A simple and accurate nozzle performance analysis methodology has been developed. The geometry modeling requirements are minimal and very flexible, thus allowing rapid design evaluations. The solution techniques accurately couple: continuity, momentum, energy, state, and other relations which permit fast and accurate calculations of nozzle gross thrust. The control volume and internal flow analyses are capable of accounting for the effects of: over/under expansion, flow divergence, wall friction, heat transfer, and mass addition/loss across surfaces. The results from the nozzle performance methodology are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental data for a variety of nozzle designs over a range of operating conditions.

  9. Crossflow in two-dimensional asymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Lee, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the crossflow effects in three contoured, two-dimensional asymmetric nozzles is described. The data were compared with theoretical predictions of nozzle flow by using an inviscid method of characteristics solution and two-dimensional turbulent boundary-layer calculations. The effect of crossflow as a function of the nozzle maximum expansion angle was studied by use of oil-flow techniques, static wall-pressure measurements, and impact-pressure surveys at the nozzle exit. Reynolds number effects on crossflow were investigated.

  10. Turbulence Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers particle image velocimetry measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratios 2, 4, and 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously, showed that increasing aspect ratios increased the high frequency noise, especially directed in the polar plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. The measurements presented here have important implications in the modeling of turbulent sources for acoustic analogy theories. While the nonaxisymmetric mean flow from the rectangular nozzles can be studied reliably using computational solutions, the nonaxisymmetry of the turbulent fluctuations, particularly at the level of velocity components, cannot; only measurements such as these can determine the impact of nozzle geometry on acoustic source anisotropy. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. The paper first documents the velocity fields, mean and variance, from the round, rectangular, and beveled rectangular nozzles at high subsonic speeds. A second section introduces measures of the isotropy of the turbulence, such as component ratios and lengthscales, first by showing them for a round jet and then for the rectangular nozzles. From these measures the source models of acoustic analogy codes can be judged or modified to account for these anisotropies.

  11. Application of Optical Measurement Techniques During Fabrication and Testing of Liquid Rocket Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a series of optical measurement techniques that were developed for use during large-scale fabrication and testing of nozzle components. A thorough understanding of hardware throughout the fabrication cycle and hotfire testing is critical to meet component design intent. Regeneratively cooled nozzles and associated tooling require tight control of tolerances during the fabrication process to ensure optimal performance. Additionally, changes in geometry during testing can affect performance of the nozzle and mating components. Structured light scanning and digital image correlation techniques were used to collect data during the fabrication and test of nozzles, in addition to other engine components. This data was used to analyze deformations data during machining, heat treatment, assembly and testing operations. A series of feasibility experiments were conducted for these techniques that led to use on full scale nozzles during the J-2X upper stage engine program in addition to other engine development programs. This paper discusses the methods and results of these measurement techniques throughout the nozzle life cycle and application to other components.

  12. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  13. Making Nozzles From Hard Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed method of electrical-discharge machining (EDM) cuts hard materials like silicon carbide into smoothly contoured parts. Concept developed for fabrication of interior and exterior surfaces and internal cooling channels of convergent/divergent nozzles. EDM wire at skew angle theta creates hyperboloidal cavity in tube. Wire offset from axis of tube and from axis of rotation by distance equal to throat radius. Maintaining same skew angle as that used to cut hyperboloidal inner surface but using larger offset, cooling channel cut in material near inner hyperboloidal surface.

  14. Nozzle flow with vibrational nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Landry, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    This research concerns the modeling and numerical solutions of the coupled system of compressible Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates under conditions of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The problem considered was the modeling of a high temperature diatomic gas N2 flowing through a converging-diverging high expansion nozzle. The problem was modeled in two ways. The first model uses a single temperature with variable specific heats as functions of this temperature. For the second model we assume that the various degrees of freedom all have a Boltzmann distribution and that there is a continuous redistribution of energy among the various degrees of freedom as the gas passes through the nozzle. Each degree of freedom is assumed to have its own temperature and, consequently, each system state can be characterized by these temperatures. This suggests that formulation of a second model with a vibrational degree of freedom along with a rotational-translation degree of freedom, each degree of freedom having its own temperature. Initially the vibrational degree of freedom is excited by heating the gas to a high temperature. As the high temperature gas passes through the nozzle throat there is a sudden drop in temperature along with a relaxation time for the vibrational degree of freedom to achieve equilibrium with the rotational-translation degree of freedom. That is, we assume that the temperature change upon passing through the throat is so great that the changes in the vibrational degree of freedom occur at a much slower pace and consequently lags behind the rotational-translational energy changes. This lag results in a finite relaxation time. In this context the term nonequilibrium is used to denote the fact that the energy content of the various degrees of freedom are characterized by two temperatures. We neglect any chemical reactions which could also add nonequilibrium effects. We develop the energy equations for the nonequilibrium model

  15. Creation of Functional Micro/Nano Systems through Top-down and Bottom-up Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tak-Sing; Brough, Branden; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Mimicking nature’s approach in creating devices with similar functional complexity is one of the ultimate goals of scientists and engineers. The remarkable elegance of these naturally evolved structures originates from bottom-up self-assembly processes. The seamless integration of top-down fabrication and bottom-up synthesis is the challenge for achieving intricate artificial systems. In this paper, technologies necessary for guided bottom-up assembly such as molecular manipulation, molecular binding, and the self assembling of molecules will be reviewed. In addition, the current progress of synthesizing mechanical devices through top-down and bottom-up approaches will be discussed. PMID:19382535

  16. Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Alexander G.; Fotache, Catalin G.

    2008-04-01

    The fuel injector has a first means defining a number of flowpaths each having an inlet for receiving air and an outlet for discharging a fuel/air mixture. One or more arrays of vanes are each positioned to impart swirl to an associated one or more of the flowpaths. Second means are provided for introducing the fuel to the air.

  17. Numerical study of steady turbulent flow through bifurcated nozzles in continuous casting

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, F.M.; Thomas, B.G.; Hershey, D.E.

    1995-08-01

    Bifurcated nozzles are used in continuous casting of molten steel, where they influence the quality of the cast steel slabs. The present study performs two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) simulations of steady turbulent (K-{epsilon}) flow in bifurcated nozzles, using a finite-element (FIDAP) model, which has been verified previously with water model experiments. The effects of nozzle design and casting process operating variables on the jet characteristics exiting the nozzle are investigated. The nozzle design parameters studied include the shape, angle, height, width, and thickness of the ports and the bottom geometry. The process operating practices include inlet velocity profile and angle as well as port curvature caused by erosion or inclusion buildup. Results show that the jet angle is controlled mainly by the port angle but is steeper with larger port area and thinner walls. The degree of swirl is increased by larger or rounder ports. The effective port area, where there is no recirculation, is increased by smaller or curved ports. Flow asymmetry is more severe with skewed or angled inlet conditions or unequal port sizes. Turbulence levels in the jet are higher with higher casting speed and small ports.

  18. Nozzle extension design status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Classen, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty possible concepts of a possible nozzle/nozzle extension interface were originated. Not all of the concepts were considered worthy of analysis time. Six of them were thermally analyzed and three were stress analyzed. These analyses were done to determine which of the concepts would have the best chance of succeeding, that is, they were a screening process which was to allow rating of one concept against another. This was done because adequate material properties to determine absolute stress levels were not available at the time of the analyses. Through all of the concepts still exhibit some areas of negative margin of safety, concept no. 1 shows good promise that, with slight modifications, it could have all positive margins of safety. Another significant question, regarding these designs, has to do with the Grafoil seals and insulators. Some additional data was just recently received on Grafoil properties, but it was too late to incorporate in the analyses. The new data were not significantly different from the properties which were used.

  19. The 'whistler-nozzle' phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.; Hasan, M. A. Z.

    1983-01-01

    The whistler nozzle is a simple device which can induce jet self-excitations of controllable amplitudes and frequencies and appears highly promising for many applications involving turbulent transport, combustion and aerodynamic noise. The characteristics of this curious phenomenon are documented for different values of the controlling parameters and attempts to explain the phenomenon. It is shown that the whistler excitation results from the coupling of two independent resonance mechanisms: shear-layer tone resulting from the impingement of the pipe-exit shear layer on the collar lip, and organ-pipe resonance of the pipe-nozzle. The crucial role of the shear-layer tone in driving the organ-pipe resonance is proven by reproducing the event in pipe-ring and pipe-hole configurations in the absence of the collar. It is also shown that this phenomenon is the strongest when the self-excitation frequency matches the preferred mode of the jet. Previously announced in STAR as N83-20706

  20. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2015-06-09

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  1. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y.H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2004-07-20

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  2. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2009-03-03

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  3. Nitrous oxide cooling in hybrid rocket nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, has developed an innovative program of experimental research and development on hybrid rocket motors (where the fuel and the oxidizer are in different phases prior to combustion). One project currently underway involves the development of aerospike nozzles for such motors. These nozzles, however, are even more susceptible to throat ablation than regular converging-diverging nozzles, due the nature of their flow expansion mechanism. This paper presents the result of a recent development project focused on reducing throat ablation in hybrid rocket motor nozzles. Although the method is specifically targeted at increasing the life and operating range of aerospike nozzles, this paper describes its proof-of-concept implementation on conventional nozzles. The method is based on a regenerative cooling mechanism that differs in practice from that used in liquid propellant motors. A series of experimental tests demonstrate that this new method is not only effective at reducing damage in the most ablative region of the nozzle, but that the nozzle can survive multiple test runs.

  4. Erosion-Resistant Water-Blast Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Design of nozzle reduces erosion of orifice by turbulent high-pressure water flowing through it. Improved performance and resistance to erosion achieved by giving interior nozzle surface long, gradual convergence before exit orifice abrupt divergence after orifice and by machining surface to smooth finish.

  5. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center to validate the computational study. Results demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion, causing a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. Experimental results were presented for comparison to the CFD results. The strong nozzle lip shock at high values of NPR intersected the nozzle boat-tail expansion and suppressed the expansion wave. Based on these results, it may be feasible to reduce the boat-tail expansion for a future supersonic aircraft with under-expanded nozzle exhaust flow by modifying nozzle pressure or nozzle divergent section geometry.

  6. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  7. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  8. Unconventional nozzle tradeoff study. [space tug propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Plug cluster engine design, performance, weight, envelope, operational characteristics, development cost, and payload capability, were evaluated and comparisons were made with other space tug engine candidates using oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Parametric performance data were generated for existing developed or high technology thrust chambers clustered around a plug nozzle of very large diameter. The uncertainties in the performance prediction of plug cluster engines with large gaps between the modules (thrust chambers) were evaluated. The major uncertainty involves, the aerodynamics of the flow from discrete nozzles, and the lack of this flow to achieve the pressure ratio corresponding to the defined area ratio for a plug cluster. This uncertainty was reduced through a cluster design that consists of a plug contour that is formed from the cluster of high area ratio bell nozzles that have been scarfed. Light-weight, high area ratio, bell nozzles were achieved through the use of AGCarb (carbon-carbon cloth) nozzle extensions.

  9. Jet noise modification by the 'whistler nozzle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. A. Z.; Islam, O.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The farfield noise characteristics of a subsonic whistler nozzle jet are measured as a function of Mach number (0.25, 0.37, and, 0.51), emission angle, and excitation mode. It is shown that a whistler nozzle has greater total and broadband acoustic power than an excited contraction nozzle; and that the intensity of far-field noise is a function of emission angle, Mach number, and whistler excitation stage. The whistler nozzle excitation produces broadband noise amplification with constant spectral shape; the broadband noise amplification (without associated whistler tones and harmonics) increases omnidirectionally with emission angle at all Mach numbers; and the broadband amplification factor decreases as Mach number and emission angle increase. Finally the whistler nozzle is described as a very efficient but inexpensive siren with applications in not only jet excitation but also acoustics.

  10. Design, fabrication and test of the RL10 derivative II chamber/primary nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marable, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication and test of the RL10-II chamber/primary nozzle was accomplished as part of the RL10 Product Improvement Program (PIP). The overall goal of the RL10 PIP was to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to develop new cryogenic upper stage engines to fulfill future NASA requirements. The goal would be reached by producing an RL10 engine designed to be reusable, operate at several thrust levels, and have increased performance. The goals for the chamber/primary nozzle task were: (1) to design a reusable assembly capable of operation at increased mixture ratio and low thrust; (2) to fabricate three assemblies using new or updated techniques where possible; and (3) to test one assembly to verify the design and construction. The design and fabrication phases produced an assembly having improved features such as single piece reinforcing band segments (i.e., Mae West segments) and relocated tube exit braze joints (i.e., hooked tube exit). In addition, a computer program was developed to design the chamber tubes to meet both performance and heat transfer requirements. The test phase showed the specific impulse of the test bed engine system to be as predicted. These results, along with the heat transfer data obtained, sufficiently proved the overall design of the RL10-II recontoured and shortened chamber/primary nozzle assembly.

  11. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  12. Sludge mobilization with submerged nozzles in horizontal cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Cummins, R.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Perona, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and the evaporator service tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are used for the collection and storage of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). Wastes collected in these tanks are typically acidic when generated and are neutralized with sodium hydroxide to protect the tanks from corrosion; however, the high pH of the solution causes the formation of insoluble compounds that precipitate. These precipitates formed a sludge layer approximately 0.6 to 1.2 m (2 to 4 ft) deep in the bottom of the tanks. The sludge in the MVSTs and the evaporator service tanks will eventually need to be removed from the tanks and treated for final disposal or transferred to another storage facility. The primary options for removing the sludge include single-point sluicing, use of a floating pump, robotic sluicing, and submerged-nozzle sluicing. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of submerged-nozzle sluicing in horizontal cylindrical tanks and (2) obtain experimental data to validate the TEMPEST (time-dependent, energy, momentun, pressure, equation solution in three dimensions) computer code.

  13. Flight motor set 360L001 (STS-26R). Volume 5: Nozzle component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Russell J.

    1989-01-01

    A review of the performance and post-flight condition of the STS-26 Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzles is presented. The nozzle assemblies, flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery on 29 September 1988, were tested to demonstrate flex bearing system reusability. The evaluation indicated no condition that would adversely affect the reusability of the flex bearing system. Inspection showed that the flex bearings did not leak, were not damaged by water impact, had the expected erosion profiles, and that the remaining ablative liner thicknesses met the performance margin of safety. Applicable Discrepancy Reports and Process Departures, the Nozzle Component Program Team performance evaluation, and the Redesign Program Review Board assessment are included.

  14. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  15. 48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda bottle liter at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  16. Vortex dynamics in jets from inclined nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Longmire, E. K.

    1997-03-01

    Experimental tests were performed on round jets exiting inclined nozzles at a Reynolds number of 9000. Both natural jets and jets forced with single frequencies corresponding to StD=0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 were examined. In the natural case, the nozzle incline caused a mild increase in the radial spreading in the plane of azimuthal symmetry. The forcing amplified the asymmetric radial spreading by altering the vortex structure. In general, the inclined vortex rings rolled up at an angle slightly smaller than the nozzle incline angle. As the rings moved downstream, they migrated away from the jet centerline and their incline angle increased. Vortex rings generated at StD=0.5 did not pair because that Strouhal number was near the "preferred" mode. For nozzles with slight inclines, forcing at larger Strouhal numbers led to pairing near x/D=2 in order to achieve the "preferred" mode. For nozzles with larger inclines, the vortex cores broke down before pairing could occur. Forcing at a lower Strouhal number (StD=0.25) yielded ring formation at StD=0.5 and subsequent pairing. Increasing the incline angle moved the pairing location closer to the nozzle lip. Also, the pairing process was found to depend on the nozzle incline angle.

  17. Transient, hypervelocity flow in an axisymmetric nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an axisymmetric nozzle was examined which was designed to produce uniform, parallel flow with a nominal Mach number of 8. A free-piston driven shock tube was used to supply the nozzle with high-temperature, high-pressure test gas. Performance was assessed by measuring Pitot pressures across the exit plane of the nozzle and, over the range of operating conditions examined, the nozzle produced satisfactory test flows. However, there were flow disturbances that persisted for significant times after flow initiation. The detailed starting process of the nozzle was also investigated by performing numerical simulations at several nominal test conditions. The classical description of the starting process, based on a quasi-one-dimensional model, provided a reasonable approximation and was used to demonstrate that the starting process could consume a significant fraction of the otherwise usable test gas. This was especially important at high operating enthalpies where nozzle supply conditions were maintained for shorter times. Multidimensional simulations illustrated a mechanism by which the starting process in the actual nozzle could take longer than that predicted by the quasi-one-dimensional analysis. However, the cause of the persistent disturbances observed in the experimental calibration was not identified.

  18. Throat Flow Modelling of Expansion Deflection Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Hempsell, C. M.

    Modelling of the supersonic flow within a rocket nozzle of both conventional and expansion deflection (ED) design is well handled by Method of Characteristics based algorithms. This approach provides both a predic- tion of the flowfield, and allows efficient optimisation of nozzle shape with respect to length. However, the Method of Characteristics requires a solution of the transonic flow through the nozzle throat to provide initial conditions, and the accuracy of the description of the transonic flow will clearly affect the overall accuracy of the complete nozzle flow calculation. However, it is relatively simple to show that conventional analytical methods for this process break down when applied to the more complex throat geometry of ED nozzles. This requires the use of a time marching solution method, which allows the analysis of the flow within this region even on such advanced configurations. This paper demonstrates this capability, outlines a general method for ED nozzle throat geometric definition, and examines the effect of various throat parameters on the permissible range of ED contours. It is found that the design of length optimised ED nozzles is highly sensitive to small changes in these parameters, and hence they must be selected with care.

  19. Fastrac Nozzle Design, Performance and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Warren; Rogers, Pat; Lawrence, Tim; Davis, Darrell; DAgostino, Mark; Brown, Andy

    2000-01-01

    With the goal of lowering the cost of payload to orbit, NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) researched ways to decrease the complexity and cost of an engine system and its components for a small two-stage booster vehicle. The composite nozzle for this Fastrac Engine was designed, built and tested by MSFC with fabrication support and engineering from Thiokol-SEHO (Science and Engineering Huntsville Operation). The Fastrac nozzle uses materials, fabrication processes and design features that are inexpensive, simple and easily manufactured. As the low cost nozzle (and injector) design matured through the subscale tests and into full scale hot fire testing, X-34 chose the Fastrac engine for the propulsion plant for the X-34. Modifications were made to nozzle design in order to meet the new flight requirements. The nozzle design has evolved through subscale testing and manufacturing demonstrations to full CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), thermal, thermomechanical and dynamic analysis and the required component and engine system tests to validate the design. The Fastrac nozzle is now in final development hot fire testing and has successfully accumulated 66 hot fire tests and 1804 seconds on 18 different nozzles.

  20. Jet noise suppression by porous plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A. B.; Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Jet noise suppression data presented earlier by Maestrello for porous plug nozzles were supplemented by the testing of a family of nozzles having an equivalent throat diameter of 11.77 cm. Two circular reference nozzles and eight plug nozzles having radius ratios of either 0.53 or 0.80 were tested at total pressure ratios of 1.60 to 4.00. Data were taken both with and without a forward motion or coannular flow jet, and some tests were made with a heated jet. Jet thrust was measured. The data were analyzed to show the effects of suppressor geometry on nozzle propulsive efficiency and jet noise. Aerodynamic testing of the nozzles was carried out in order to study the physical features that lead to the noise suppression. The aerodynamic flow phenomena were examined by the use of high speed shadowgraph cinematography, still shadowgraphs, extensive static pressure probe measurements, and two component laser Doppler velocimeter studies. The different measurement techniques correlated well with each other and demonstrated that the porous plug changes the shock cell structure of a standard nozzle into a series of smaller, periodic cell structures without strong shock waves. These structures become smaller in dimension and have reduced pressure variations as either the plug diameter or the porosity is increased, changes that also reduce the jet noise and decrease thrust efficiency.

  1. Hot streak characterization in serpentine exhaust nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Darrell S.

    Modern aircraft of the United States Air Force face increasingly demanding cost, weight, and survivability requirements. Serpentine exhaust nozzles within an embedded engine allow a weapon system to fulfill mission survivability requirements by providing denial of direct line-of-sight into the high-temperature components of the engine. Recently, aircraft have experienced material degradation and failure along the aft deck due to extreme thermal loading. Failure has occurred in specific regions along the aft deck where concentrations of hot gas have come in contact with the surface causing hot streaks. The prevention of these failures will be aided by the accurate prediction of hot streaks. Additionally, hot streak prediction will improve future designs by identifying areas of the nozzle and aft deck surfaces that require thermal management. To this end, the goal of this research is to observe and characterize the underlying flow physics of hot streak phenomena. The goal is accomplished by applying computational fluid dynamics to determine how hot streak phenomena is affected by changes in nozzle geometry. The present research first validates the computational methods using serpentine inlet experimental and computational studies. A design methodology is then established for creating six serpentine exhaust nozzles investigated in this research. A grid independent solution is obtained on a nozzle using several figures of merit and the grid-convergence index method. An investigation into the application of a second-order closure turbulence model is accomplished. Simulations are performed for all serpentine nozzles at two flow conditions. The research introduces a set of characterization and performance parameters based on the temperature distribution and flow conditions at the nozzle throat and exit. Examination of the temperature distribution on the upper and lower nozzle surfaces reveals critical information concerning changes in hot streak phenomena due to changes

  2. Turbine nozzle stage having thermocouple guide tube

    DOEpatents

    Schotsch, Margaret Jones; Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence; Lapine, Eric Michael

    2002-01-01

    A guide tube is fixed adjacent opposite ends in outer and inner covers of a nozzle stage segment. The guide tube is serpentine in shape between the outer and inner covers and extends through a nozzle vane. An insert is disposed in the nozzle vane and has apertures to accommodate serpentine portions of the guide tube. Cooling steam is also supplied through chambers of the insert on opposite sides of a central insert chamber containing the guide tube. The opposite ends of the guide tube are fixed to sleeves, in turn fixed to the outer and inner covers.

  3. Dual nozzle aerodynamic and cooling analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical models to predict performance and operating characteristics of dual nozzle concepts were developed and improved. Aerodynamic models are available to define flow characteristics and bleed requirements for both the dual throat and dual expander concepts. Advanced analytical techniques were utilized to provide quantitative estimates of the bleed flow, boundary layer, and shock effects within dual nozzle engines. Thermal analyses were performed to define cooling requirements for baseline configurations, and special studies of unique dual nozzle cooling problems defined feasible means of achieving adequate cooling.

  4. Measuring concentricity and coaxial tolerance of nozzle and cavity with tool microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xizhao; Jiang, Feng; Ye, Ruifang; Lei, Tingping

    2016-01-01

    While the equipment of Micro-jet wave-guided laser was assembled, high-precision of concentricity and coaxiality between nozzle and cavity are required, which directly or indirectly influent the laser coupling precision of nozzle, the micro-jet stability and the steady length of micro-jet as well. As a result, the measurement of concentricity and coaxiality is important to improve the processing quality of Micro-jet wave-guided laser Through the new digital universal tool microscope measuring both ends of micro nozzle and diameter of nozzle, more resolution the other hand, the backlight detection the edge of nozzle is utilized. When the position of the center of a circle is indirect measured and then find out the concentricity through the uncertainty of the measurement and calculation method. V shaped groove is utilized to make certain its position. Otherwise, digital imaging through setting fixture and the use of new digital universal tool microscope and processed by software, which will cause to reduce measurement human error in tradition, after that, error theory analysis will be carried out, uncertainty theory will be utilized to make the experiment more sure at the same time. Above all, the reliability of data is obtained, compared with the traditional measurement methods are more accurate. Therefore, the processing quality of laser drilling will be enhanced significantly.

  5. Subscale solid motor nozzle tests, phase 4 and nozzle materials screening and thermal characterization, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J.; Dodson, J.; Laub, B.

    1979-01-01

    Subscale solid motor nozzles containing a baseline material or low cost materials to be considered as potential replacements for the baseline material are designed and tested. Data are presented from tests of four identically designed 2.5 inch throat diameter nozzles and one 7 inch throat diameter nozzle. The screening of new candidate low cost materials, as well as their thermophysical and thermochemical characterization is also discussed.

  6. Method of cooling gas only nozzle fuel tip

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  7. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within + or - 1.17 pct.

  8. A performance comparison of two small rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.; Rivera, Angel, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on two small rockets (110 N thrust class) to directly compare a standard conical nozzle with a bell nozzle optimized for maximum thrust using the Rao method. In large rockets, with throat Reynolds numbers of greater than 1 x 10(exp 5), bell nozzles outperform conical nozzles. In rockets with throat Reynolds numbers below 1 x 10(exp 5), however, test results have been ambiguous. An experimental program was conducted to test two small nozzles at two different fuel film cooling percentages and three different chamber pressures. Test results showed that for the throat Reynolds number range from 2 x 10(exp 4) to 4 x 10(exp 4), the bell nozzle outperformed the conical nozzle. Thrust coefficients for the bell nozzle were approximately 4 to 12 percent higher than those obtained with the conical nozzle. As expected, testing showed that lowering the fuel film cooling increased performance for both nozzle types.

  9. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Vectored Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Results show how the shock generated at the nozzle lip affects the near field pressure signature, and thereby the potential sonic boom contribution for a nozzle at vector angles from 3 to 8 . The experiment was based on the NASA F-15 nozzle used in the Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock experiment, which possessed a large external boat-tail angle. In this case, the large boat-tail angle caused a dramatic expansion, which dominated the near field pressure signature. The impact of nozzle vector angle and nozzle pressure ratio are summarized.

  10. Practical Comparison of Cylindrical Nozzle and De Laval Nozzle for Wire Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, Marc-Manuel; Aumiller, Markus

    2014-12-01

    In this article, two different nozzle designs (cylindrical nozzle and de Laval nozzle) are compared for use in wire arc spraying. The choice of nozzle is of particular importance because its geometry has a significant influence on the spraying result. The materials used for spraying are steel and copper. By using the de Laval atomizing gas nozzle, the aim is to improve adhesion on the one hand while reducing cost on the other. These objectives have been achieved for the most part, indicating that continued research and development in this area would be useful. Significant potential exists to optimize the efficiency of both the free gas jet and nozzle which have considerable impact on the gas velocity and thus, ultimately, on the spraying result. The measurements carried out have shown that there is a close correlation between the velocity of the gas flow and atomization of the droplets. An explanatory model for varying spraying results with different wire materials using open nozzle systems with de Laval orifice is given and confirmed. For new burner head constructions, an interaction of the atomizing gas nozzle, the contact tips, and wire materials must be considered to achieve all benefits of a de Laval nozzle.

  11. Practical Comparison of Cylindrical Nozzle and De Laval Nozzle for Wire Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, Marc-Manuel; Aumiller, Markus

    2014-09-01

    In this article, two different nozzle designs (cylindrical nozzle and de Laval nozzle) are compared for use in wire arc spraying. The choice of nozzle is of particular importance because its geometry has a significant influence on the spraying result. The materials used for spraying are steel and copper. By using the de Laval atomizing gas nozzle, the aim is to improve adhesion on the one hand while reducing cost on the other. These objectives have been achieved for the most part, indicating that continued research and development in this area would be useful. Significant potential exists to optimize the efficiency of both the free gas jet and nozzle which have considerable impact on the gas velocity and thus, ultimately, on the spraying result. The measurements carried out have shown that there is a close correlation between the velocity of the gas flow and atomization of the droplets. An explanatory model for varying spraying results with different wire materials using open nozzle systems with de Laval orifice is given and confirmed. For new burner head constructions, an interaction of the atomizing gas nozzle, the contact tips, and wire materials must be considered to achieve all benefits of a de Laval nozzle.

  12. Natural gas flow through critical nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical method for calculating both the mass flow rate and upstream volume flow rate through critical flow nozzles is determined. Method requires knowledge of the composition of natural gas, and of the upstream pressure and temperature.

  13. On plasma detachment in propulsive magnetic nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Merino, Mario

    2011-05-15

    Three detachment mechanisms proposed in the literature (via resistivity, via electron inertia, and via induced magnetic field) are analyzed with an axisymmetric model of the expansion of a small-beta, weakly collisional, near-sonic plasma in a diverging magnetic nozzle. The model assumes cold, partially magnetized ions and hot, isothermal, fully magnetized electrons. Different conditions of the plasma beam at the nozzle throat are considered. A central feature is that a positive thrust gain in the nozzle of a plasma thruster is intimately related to the azimuthal current in the plasma being diamagnetic. Then, and contrary to existing expectations, the three aforementioned detachment mechanisms are divergent, that is, the plasma beam diverges outwards of the guide nozzle, further hindering its axial expansion and the thrust efficiency. The rate of divergent detachment is quantified for the small-parameter range of the three mechanisms. Alternative mechanisms for a convergent detachment of the plasma beam are suggested.

  14. One- and two-phase nozzle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, I.S.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent technique, in conjunction with the boundary-fitted coordinates system, is applied to solve a gas-only one-phase flow and a fully-coupled, gas-particle two-phase flow inside nozzles with small throat radii of curvature, steep wall gradients, and submerged configurations. The emphasis of the study has been placed on one- and two-phase flow in the transonic region. Various particle sizes and particle mass fractions have been investigated in the two-phase flow. The salient features associated with the two-phase nozzle flow compared with those of the one-phase flow are illustrated through the calculations of the JPL nozzle, the Titan III solid rocket motor, and the submerged nozzle configuration found in the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) solid rocket motor.

  15. Experiments and Analyses of Distributed Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Schein, David B.; Solomon, W. David, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical aeroacoustic properties of several distributed exhaust nozzle (DEN) designs are presented. Significant differences between the designs are observed and correlated back to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flowfield predictions. Up to 20 dB of noise reduction on a spectral basis and 10 dB on an overall sound pressure level basis are demonstrated from the DEN designs compared to a round reference nozzle. The most successful DEN designs acoustically show a predicted thrust loss of approximately 10% compared to the reference nozzle. Characteristics of the individual mini-jet nozzles that comprise the DEN such as jet-jet shielding and coalescence are shown to play a major role in the noise signature.

  16. Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    Development Of Submerged Entry Nozzles (SENs) Can Incrase Yields, Improve Product Quality, And Increase Productivity In Continuous Casting Of Steel, A Process Used For The Production Of 95% Of Steel In The U.S.

  17. Self-Adjusting Choke For Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1991-01-01

    Self-adjusting choke for nozzle enables issuing stream of liquid to remain coherent, despite fluctuations in flow, along greater distance than possible with same nozzle without choke. Flexible membrane with slanted orifices deforms according to upstream pressure in flowing liquid. Advantageous for firefighting, making it possible to direct more concentrated flow of water at flame or hotspot. Also used in mining and for transferring liquids.

  18. Aeroacoustic Resonance with Convergent-Divergent Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Dahl, M. D.

    1999-01-01

    Convergent-divergent nozzles, when run at off-design conditions, often undergo flow resonance accompanied by the emission of a tone. Apart from screech occurring at higher operating pressures, resonance is also common at lower Mach numbers near transonic as well as subsonic conditions. With data from six nozzles of different size and design Mach number, the present paper documents the characteristics of the latter phenomenon that is morphologically quite different from conventional screech. The resonance is due to a feedback loop internal to the nozzle and is apparently driven by unsteady laminar boundary layer separation near the throat of the nozzle. Appropriate boundary layer tripping prior to the throat is found to eliminate or alter most of the tones. The Helmholtz number of the resonance, based on the throat-to-exit length, is found to attain a value of approximately 0.15 at M(sub j)=1 for all nozzles. However, its variation with M(sub j) may be different and depend on the nozzle geometry. With nozzles having larger throat-to-exit angle of divergence, the frequency is found to increase, in some cases having stage jumps to lower frequencies, with increasing operating pressure. With nozzles having smaller angle of divergence, the frequency variation exhibits an increase followed by a decrease involving one prominent stage occurring around transonic (M(sub j)= 1) condition. While the mechanisms remain far from completely clear, a model involving downstream propagating aerodynamic disturbance together with acoustic feedback explains the overall frequency characteristics for most cases.

  19. Exhaust Nozzles for Supersonic Flight with Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, Thomas B.; Hearth, Donald P.; Cortright, Edgar M.

    1956-01-01

    Good internal performance over a wide range of flight conditions can be obtained with either a plug nozzle or a variable ejector nozzle that can provide a divergent shroud at high pressure ratios. For both the ejector and the plug nozzle, external flow can sometimes cause serious drag losses and, for some plug-nozzle installations, external flow can cause serious internal performance losses. Plug-nozzle cooling and design of the secondary-air-flow systems for ejectors were also considered .

  20. Design of a new type vapor recovery system nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S. H.; Cao, G. J.; Zhang, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    To settle the problem of low-efficiency recovery for Vapor recovery system nozzle, this paper advances a purely mechanical structure of the self-sealing refueling VRS nozzle. The structure, operating principle and controlled process of the nozzle is given. And an application of the nozzle is discussed. All indicated that the nozzle has a reasonable structure, can fuel and vapor recovery simultaneous start and stop. And thus improve the recovery efficiency and reduce oil leakage.

  1. Aircraft Engine Exhaust Nozzle System for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J. (Inventor); Elkoby, Ronen (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft exhaust engine nozzle system includes a fan nozzle to receive a fan flow from a fan disposed adjacent to an engine disposed above an airframe surface of the aircraft, a core nozzle disposed within the fan nozzle and receiving an engine core flow, and a pylon structure connected to the core nozzle and structurally attached with the airframe surface to secure the engine to the aircraft.

  2. TLP tendon bottom connector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, H.S.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a bottom connector for connecting a tendon segment of a tension leg platform to a subsea template which includes a receptacle for the connector comprising: a first body member adapted to be received within an anchor receptacle, a second body member connected to the first body member through a flexible joint for universally pivotal movement and adapted to be connected to the tendon segment, a latch carrier movable with respect to the first body member and having latch segments pivotally connected to the latch carrier, the latch segments being such that in one position of the latch carrier, the latch segments engage both a recess in the receptacle and the first body member when the connector is inserted into the receptacle a sufficient distance so that the latch segments and carrier will react to the recess and such that when the latch carrier is in another position, the latch segments are clear of the recess to enable the connector to move further into the receptacle or to allow the bottom connector to be removed from the receptacle, and release means operative to maintain the carrier in the other position if a decision is made to remove the connector from the receptacle.

  3. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  4. Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

  5. Jet-diffuser Ejector - Attached Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M.; Wu, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Attached primary nozzles were developed to replace the detached nozzles of jet-diffuser ejectors. Slotted primary nozzles located at the inlet lip and injecting fluid normal to the thrust axis, and rotating the fluid into the thrust direction using the Coanda Effect were investigated. Experiments indicated excessive skin friction or momentum cancellation due to impingement of opposing jets resulted in performance degradation. This indicated a desirability for location and orientation of the injection point at positions removed from the immediate vicinity of the inlet surface, and at an acute angle with respect to the thrust axis. Various nozzle designs were tested over a range of positions and orientations. The problems of aircraft integration of the ejector, and internal and external nozzle losses were also considered and a geometry for the attached nozzles was selected. The effect of leaks, protrusions, and asymmetries in the ejector surfaces was examined. The results indicated a relative insensitivity to all surface irregularities, except for large protrusions at the throat of the ejector.

  6. Decomposing Solid Micropropulsion Nozzle Performance Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Micropropulsion technology is essential to the success of miniaturized spacecraft and can provide ultra-precise propulsion for small spacecraft. NASA Glenn Research Center has envisioned a micropropulsion concept that utilizes decomposing solid propellants for a valveless, leak-free propulsion system. Among the technical challenges of this decomposing solid micropropulsion concept is optimization of miniature, rectangular nozzles. A number of flat micronozzles were tested with ambient-temperature nitrogen and helium gas in a vacuum facility. The thrusters were etched out of silicon and had throat widths on the order of 350 microns and throat depths on the order of 250 microns. While these were half-sections of thrusters (two would be bonded together before firing), testing provided the performance trend for nozzles of this scale and geometry. Area ratios from 1 to 25 were tested, with thrust measured using an inverted pendulum thrust stand for nitrogen flows and a torsional thrust stand for helium. In the nitrogen testing, peak nozzle performance was achieved around area ratio of 5. In the helium series, nozzle performance peaked for the smallest nozzle tested area ratio 1.5. For both gases, there was a secondary performance peak above area ratio 15. At low chamber pressures (< 1.6 atm), nitrogen provided higher nozzle performance than helium. The performance curve for helium was steeper, however, and it appeared that helium would provide better performance than nitrogen at higher chamber pressures.

  7. F-1 Engine Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A complete F-1 engine assembly is shown in this photograph. Designed and developed by Rocketdye under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the engine measured 19-feet tall by 12.5 feet at the nozzle exit, and each engine produced a 1,500,000-pound thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene as the propellant. A cluster of five F-1 engines was mounted on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage and burned 15 tons of liquid oxygen and kerosene each second to produce 7,500,000 pounds of thrust.

  8. Aerospike nozzle contour design and its performance validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang-Hui; Liu, Yu; Qin, Li-Zi

    2009-06-01

    A simplified design and optimization method of aerospike nozzle contour and the results of tests and numerical simulation of aerospike nozzles are presented. The primary nozzle contour is approximated by two circular arcs and a parabola; the plug contour is approximated by a parabola and a third-order polynomial. The maximum total impulse from sea level to design altitude is adopted as objective to optimize the aerospike nozzle contour. Experimental studies were performed on a 6-cell tile-shaped aerospike nozzle, a 1-cell linear aerospike nozzle and a 3-cell aerospike nozzle with round-to-rectangle (RTR) primary nozzles designed by method proposed in present paper. Three aerospike nozzles achieved good altitude compensation capacities in the tests and still had better performance at off-design altitudes compared with that of the bell-shaped nozzle. In cold-flow tests, 6-cell tile-shaped aerospike nozzle and 1-cell linear aerospike nozzle obtained high thrust efficiency at design altitude. Employing gas H 2/gas O 2 (GH 2/GO 2) as propellants, hot-firing tests were carried out on a 3-cell aerospike nozzle engine with RTR primary nozzles. The performance was obtained under two nozzle pressure ratios (NPR) lower than design altitude. Efficiency reached 92.0-93.5% and 95.0-96.0%, respectively. Pressure distribution along plug ramp was measured and the effects of variation in the amount of base bleed on performance were also examined in the tests.

  9. Wall Angle Effects on Nozzle Separation Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaie, A.; Taylor, N.

    The presence of asymmetric side loads due to unstable separation within over-expanded rocket nozzles is well documented. Although progress has been made in developing understanding of this phenomenon through numerical and experimental means, the causes of these side loads have yet to be fully explained. The hypothesis examined within this paper is that there is a relationship between nozzle wall angle at the point of separation, and the stability of the flow separation. This was achieved through an experimental investigation of a series of subscale over-expanded conical nozzles with half-angles of 8.3°, 10.4°, 12.6° and 14.8°. All had overall area ratios of 16:1, with separation occurring at approximately half the nozzle length (i.e. area ration of 4:1) under an overall pressure ratio of approximately 7:1 using air as the working fluid. The structure of exhaust flow was observed and analysed by use of an optimised Schlieren visualisation system, coupled with a high speed digital camera. The 12.6° and 14.8° nozzles exhaust flow were seen to be stable throughout the recorded test period of 10 seconds. However, a small number of large fluctuations in the jet angle were seen to be present within the flowfield of the 10.4° nozzle, occurring at apparently random intervals through the test period. The flowfield of the 8.3° nozzle demonstrated near continuous, large angle deviations in the jet, with flow patterns containing thickened shear layers and apparent reattachment to the wall, something not previously identified in conical nozzles. These results were used to design a truncated ideal contour with an exit angle of over 10 degrees, in order to assess the possibility of designing conventional nozzles that separate stably over a wide range of pressure ratios. These tests were successful, potentially providing a simpler, cheaper alternative to altitude compensating nozzle devices. However, more work determining the nature of the separation and its causes is

  10. Installation and assembly device and method of using

    DOEpatents

    Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    An installation and assembly device for aligning a first member such as a pump impeller with a second member such as an inlet nozzle of an impeller pump. The installation and assembly device includes a sleeve slideable within the inlet nozzle and a vertical positioning assembly which has a contact member that is extendable out away from the sleeve so as to vertically position the sleeve on a shoulder of the inlet nozzle and to present an upper contact surface spaced a certain distance from the shoulder to provide the desired vertical spacing with respect to the impeller contacting the upper contact surface. The vertical positioning assembly is retractable so as to allow for removal of the sleeve through the nozzle when installation and assembly are completed. The alignment device also includes a radial alignment assembly supported by the sleeve and adjustable to an expanded state for contacting and spacing the interior surface of the impeller a certain distance from the sleeve and hence a certain distance from the inlet nozzle. The radial alignment device being adjustable from a retracted removal state to an expanded state and also being adjustable to fine tune the spacing of the impeller from the sleeve. The radial alignment device also preferably includes members that can be used to releasably secure the sleeve to the impeller.

  11. Analysis and design of three dimensional supersonic nozzles. Volume 4: Similarity laws for nozzle flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.; Roffe, G.

    1972-01-01

    The development of nozzles for hypersonic aircraft is discussed. The simulation of actual nozzle flows with low temperature nonreactive gases is described. Mathematical models of the flow equations nd thermodynamic relations are developed. Cold flow simulation tests were conducted and the results are included.

  12. 14. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS AT THE BOTTOM OF A POST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS AT THE BOTTOM OF A POST IN THE WEST TRUSS, SHOWING THE ASSEMBLY OF LOWER CHORD AND DIAGONAL EYE BOLTS AND THE SUSPENSION OF A FLOOR BEAM FROM THE POST BY A U-BOLT; VIEW FROM SOUTH BANK. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  13. General view of the "bottom" side of the Orbiter Discovery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the "bottom" side of the Orbiter Discovery as it is being hoisted in a vertical position in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. Parametric study of solar thermal rocket nozzle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Landrum, D. Brian; Hawk, Clark W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper details a numerical investigation of performance losses in low-thrust solar thermal rocket nozzles. The effects of nozzle geometry on three types of losses were studied; finite rate dissociation-recombination kinetic losses, two dimensional axisymmetric divergence losses, and compressible viscous boundary layer losses. Short nozzle lengths and supersonic flow produce short residence times in the nozzle and a nearly frozen flow, resulting in large kinetic losses. Variations in geometry have a minimal effect on kinetic losses. Divergence losses are relatively small, and careful shaping of the nozzle can nearly eliminate them. The boundary layer in these small nozzles can grow to a major fraction of nozzle radius, and cause large losses. These losses are attributed to viscous drag on the nozzle walls and flow blockage by the boundary layer, especially in the throat region. Careful shaping of the nozzle can produce a significant reduction in viscous losses.

  15. Ground test of the D shaped vented thrust vectoring nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Static ground tests of a large scale lift/cruise thrust vectoring nozzle were conducted to establish: (1) vectoring performance 'in' and 'out' of ground effect; (2) thrust spoilage capability; (3) compatibility of the nozzle with a turbotip fan; and (4) the nozzle structural temperature distribution. Vectoring performance of a short coupled, vented nozzle design on a large scale, (60%) basis was compared with small scale (4.5%) test nozzle results. The test nozzle was a "boilerplate" model of the MCAIR "D" vented nozzle configured for operation with the LF336/J85 turbotip lift fan system. Calibration of the LF336/J85 test fan with a simple convergent nozzle was performed with four different nozzle exit areas to establish reference thrust, nozzle pressure ratio, and nozzle corrected flow characteristics for comparison with the thrust vectoring nozzle data. Thrust vectoring tests with the 'D' vented nozzle were conducted over the range of vector angles between 0 and 117 deg for several different nozzle exit areas.

  16. Aerodynamic performance of flared fan nozzles used as inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.; Keith, T. G.; Kelm, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic performance of several flared fan nozzles. Each of the flared nozzles was a downstream-facing inlet to a model fan that was used to simulate a variable pitch fan during reverse thrust operation. The total pressure recovery of each of the flared nozzles as well as that of an unflared nozzle and a serrated flare nozzle was obtained for comparison. The aerodynamic performance of a selected flared nozzle was considered in further detail. The nozzle surface pressures for a flared nozzle were also determined. Results indicated that the differences in aerodynamic performance among the nozzles were most apparent at the wind-tunnel-off condition. A nonzero free stream velocity significantly reduced the perforamnce of all the nozzles, and crosswind flow (free stream flow perpendicular to the model axis) further reduced the performance of the nozzles. The unflared nozzle and the serrated flare nozzle had reduced aerodynamic performance compared to a solid surface flared nozzle.

  17. Nozzle diffuser for use with an open test section of a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. Stephen (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The nozzle diffuser has an inlet in fluid communication with the narrowed inlet of an open test chamber in a conventional wind tunnel. The nozzle diffuser has a passageway extending from its inlet to an outlet in communication with the open test section. The passageway has an internal cross sectional area which increases from its inlet to its outlet and which may be defined by top and bottom isosceles trapezoid walls of a particular flare angle and by isosceles trapezoid side walls of a different flare angle. In addition, a collector having a decreasing internal cross sectional area from inlet to outlet may be provided at the opposite end of the test chamber such that its outlet is in communication with a diffuser located at this outlet.

  18. Fluidized bed combustor and coal gun-tube assembly therefor

    DOEpatents

    Hosek, William S.; Garruto, Edward J.

    1984-01-01

    A coal supply gun assembly for a fluidized bed combustor which includes heat exchange elements extending above the bed's distributor plate assembly and in which the gun's nozzles are disposed relative to the heat exchange elements to only discharge granular coal material between adjacent heat exchange elements and in a path which is substantially equidistant from adjacent heat exchange elements.

  19. Upper Stage Engine Composite Nozzle Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Allen, Lee R.; Gradl, Paul R.; Greene, Sandra E.; Sullivan, Brian J.; Weller, Leslie J.; Koenig, John R.; Cuneo, Jacques C.; Thompson, James; Brown, Aaron; Shigley, John K.; Dovey, Henry N.; Roberts, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-carbon (C-C) composite nozzle extensions are of interest for use on a variety of launch vehicle upper stage engines and in-space propulsion systems. The C-C nozzle extension technology and test capabilities being developed are intended to support National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and United States Air Force (USAF) requirements, as well as broader industry needs. Recent and on-going efforts at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are aimed at both (a) further developing the technology and databases for nozzle extensions fabricated from specific CC materials, and (b) developing and demonstrating low-cost capabilities for testing composite nozzle extensions. At present, materials development work is concentrating on developing a database for lyocell-based C-C that can be used for upper stage engine nozzle extension design, modeling, and analysis efforts. Lyocell-based C-C behaves in a manner similar to rayon-based CC, but does not have the environmental issues associated with the use of rayon. Future work will also further investigate technology and database gaps and needs for more-established polyacrylonitrile- (PAN-) based C-C's. As a low-cost means of being able to rapidly test and screen nozzle extension materials and structures, MSFC has recently established and demonstrated a test rig at MSFC's Test Stand (TS) 115 for testing subscale nozzle extensions with 3.5-inch inside diameters at the attachment plane. Test durations of up to 120 seconds have been demonstrated using oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Other propellant combinations, including the use of hydrocarbon fuels, can be used if desired. Another test capability being developed will allow the testing of larger nozzle extensions (13.5- inch inside diameters at the attachment plane) in environments more similar to those of actual oxygen/hydrogen upper stage engines. Two C-C nozzle extensions (one lyocell-based, one PAN-based) have been fabricated for testing with the larger

  20. Integrity of the Plasma Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerwin, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the physics governing certain aspects of plasma propellant flow through a magnetic nozzle, specifically the integrity of the interface between the plasma and the nozzle s magnetic field. The injection of 100s of eV plasma into a magnetic flux nozzle that converts thermal energy into directed thrust is fundamental to enabling 10 000s of seconds specific impulse and 10s of kW/kg specific power piloted interplanetary propulsion. An expression for the initial thickness of the interface is derived and found to be approx.10(exp -2) m. An algorithm is reviewed and applied to compare classical resistivity to gradient-driven microturbulent (anomalous) resistivity, in terms of the spatial rate and time integral of resistive interface broadening, which can then be related to the geometry of the nozzle. An algorithm characterizing plasma temperature, density, and velocity dependencies is derived and found to be comparable to classical resistivity at local plasma temperatures of approx. 200 eV. Macroscopic flute-mode instabilities in regions of "adverse magnetic curvature" are discussed; a growth rate formula is derived and found to be one to two e-foldings of the most unstable Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mode. After establishing the necessity of incorporating the Hall effect into Ohm s law (allowing full Hall current to flow and concomitant plasma rotation), a critical nozzle length expression is derived in which the interface thickness is limited to about 1 ion gyroradius.

  1. Nozzle dam having a unitary plug

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, L.; Wepfer, R.M.

    1992-12-15

    Apparatus for sealing the primary-side coolant flow nozzles of a nuclear steam generator is disclosed. The steam generator has relatively small diameter manway openings for providing access to the interior of the steam generator including the inside surface of each nozzle, the manway openings having a diameter substantially less than the inside diameter of each nozzle. The apparatus includes a bracket having an outside surface for matingly sealingly engaging the inside surface of the nozzle. The bracket also has a plurality of openings longitudinally therethrough and a plurality of slots transversely therein in communication with each opening. A plurality of unitary plugs sized to pass through the manway opening are matingly sealingly disposed in each opening of the bracket for sealingly plugging each opening. Each plug includes a plurality of arms operable to engage the slots of the bracket for connecting each plug to the bracket, so that the nozzle is sealed as the plugs seal the openings and are connected to the bracket. 16 figs.

  2. Nozzle dam having a unitary plug

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, Luciano; Wepfer, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for sealing the primary-side coolant flow nozzles of a nuclear steam generator. The steam generator has relatively small diameter manway openings for providing access to the interior of the steam generator including the inside surface of each nozzle, the manway openings having a diameter substantially less than the inside diameter of each nozzle. The apparatus includes a bracket having an outside surface for matingly sealingly engaging the inside surface of the nozzle. The bracket also has a plurality of openings longitudinally therethrough and a plurality of slots transversely therein in communication with each opening. A plurality of unitary plugs sized to pass through the manway opening are matingly sealingly disposed in each opening of the bracket for sealingly plugging each opening. Each plug includes a plurality of arms operable to engage the slots of the bracket for connecting each plug to the bracket, so that the nozzle is sealed as the plugs seal the openings and are connected to the bracket.

  3. RSRM nozzle fixed housing cooldown test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolieau, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight 5 aft segments with nozzles were exposed to -17 F temperatures while awaiting shipment to KSC in February, 1989. No records were found which show that any previous nozzles were exposed to air temperatures as low as those seen by the Flight 5 nozzles. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of the fixed housing, and forward and aft exit cone components dropped as low as -10 F. Structural analysis of the nozzles at these low temperatures show the forward and aft exit cone adhesive bonds to have a positive margin of safety, based on a 2.0 safety factor. These analyses show the normal and shear stresses in the fixed housing bond as low values. However, the hoop and meridinal stresses were predicted to be in the 4000 psi range; the failure stress allowable of EA913NA adhesive at -7 F. If the bonds did break in directions perpendicular to the surfaces, called bond crazing, no normal bond strength would be lost. Testing was conducted in two phases, showing that no degradation to the adhesive bonds occurred while the Flight 5 nozzles were subjected to subzero temperatures. The results of these tests are documented. Phase 1 testing cooled a full-scale RSRM insulated fixed housing to -13 F, with extensive bondline inspections. Phase 2 testing cooled the witness panel adhesive tensile buttions to -13 F, with failure strengths recorded before, during, and after the cooldown.

  4. Aeroelastic Modeling of a Nozzle Startup Transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a tightly coupled aeroelastic modeling algorithm by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed under the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses at sea level were performed, and the computed transient nozzle fluid-structure interaction physics presented,

  5. Low Noise Exhaust Nozzle Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Balan, C.; Mengle, V.; Brausch, J. F.; Shin, H.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry have been assessing the economic viability and environmental acceptability of a second-generation supersonic civil transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Development of a propulsion system that satisfies strict airport noise regulations and provides high levels of cruise and transonic performance with adequate takeoff performance, at an acceptable weight, is critical to the success of any HSCT program. The principal objectives were to: 1. Develop a preliminary design of an innovative 2-D exhaust nozzle with the goal of meeting FAR36 Stage III noise levels and providing high levels of cruise performance with a high specific thrust for Mach 2.4 HSCT with a range of 5000 nmi and a payload of 51,900 lbm, 2. Employ advanced acoustic and aerodynamic codes during preliminary design, 3. Develop a comprehensive acoustic and aerodynamic database through scale-model testing of low-noise, high-performance, 2-D nozzle configurations, based on the preliminary design, and 4. Verify acoustic and aerodynamic predictions by means of scale-model testing. The results were: 1. The preliminary design of a 2-D, convergent/divergent suppressor ejector nozzle for a variable-cycle engine powered, Mach 2.4 HSCT was evolved, 2. Noise goals were predicted to be achievable for three takeoff scenarios, and 3. Impact of noise suppression, nozzle aerodynamic performance, and nozzle weight on HSCT takeoff gross weight were assessed.

  6. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1987-01-01

    An existing Navier-Stokes code (PARC2D) was used to compute the nozzle flow field. Grids were generated by the interactive grid generator codes TBGG and GENIE. All computations were made on the NASA/MSFC CRAY X-MP computer. Comparisons were made between the computations and MSFC in-house wall pressure measurements for CO2 flow through a conical nozzle having an area ratio of 40. Satisfactory agreements exist between the computations and measurements for different stagnation pressures of 29.4, 14.7, and 7.4 psia, at stagnation temperature of 1060 R. However, agreements did not match precisely near the nozzle exit. Several reasons for the lack of agreement are possible. The computational code assumes a constant gas gamma, whereas the gamma i.e. the specific heat ratio for CO2 varied from 1.22 in the plenum chamber to 1.38 at the nozzle exit. The computations also assumes adiabatic and no-slip walls. Both assumptions may not be correct. Finally, it is possible that condensation occurs during the nozzle expansion at the low stagnation pressure. The next phase of the work will incorporate variable gamma and slip wall boundary conditions in the computational code and develop a more accurate computer code.

  7. Experimental study of coaxial nozzle exhaust noise. [acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Stone, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for static acoustic model tests of various geometrical configurations of coaxial nozzles operating over a range of flow conditions. The geometrical configurations consisted of nozzles with coplanar and non-coplanar exit planes and various exhaust area ratios. Primary and secondary nozzle flows were varied independently over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.4 to 3.0 and gas temperatures from 280 to 1100 K. Acoustic data are presented for the conventional mode of coaxial nozzle operation as well as for the inverted velocity profile mode. Comparisons are presented to show the effect of configuration and flow changes on the acoustic characteristics of the nozzles.

  8. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  9. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts.

  10. Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, Christopher A.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C.; Schuettpelz, Branwen M.

    2009-03-15

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Design of high pressure waterjet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    1994-01-01

    The Hydroblast Research Cell at Marshall Space Flight Center is used to investigate the use of high pressure waterjets to strip paint, grease, adhesive and thermal spray coatings from various substrates. Current methods of cleaning often use ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as chlorinated solvents. High pressure waterjet cleaning has proven to be a viable alternative to the use of solvents. A popular method of waterjet cleaning involves the use of a rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzle which is robotically controlled. This method enables rapid cleaning of a large area, but problems such as incomplete coverage and damage to the substrate from the waterjet have been observed. This report summarizes research consisting of identifying and investigating the basic properties of rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzles, and how particular designs and modes of operation affect such things as stripping rate, standoff distance and completeness of coverage. The study involved computer simulations, an extensive literature review, and experimental studies of different nozzle designs.

  12. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor nozzle development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, W. J.; Moss, J. D.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a status update of the design and development of an improved nozzle for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The ASRM nozzle incorporates advanced state-of-the-art design features and materials which contribute to enhanced safety, reliability, performance, and producibility for the space shuttle boosters. During 1992 the nozzle design progressed through a successful Preliminary Design Review (PDR). An improved ablative material development program also culminated in the selection of new standard and low density carbon cloth phenolic prepreg offering reduced variability and improved process attributes. A subscale motor test series to evaluate new materials and design features was also completed. An overview update of the matured design characteristics, supporting analysis, key development-program results and program status and plans is reported.

  13. Gas turbine exhaust nozzle. [for noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, D. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An elongated hollow string is disposed in an exhaust nozzle combustion chamber and communicates with an air source through hollow struts at one end. The other end of the string is bell-mouth shaped and extends over the front portion of a nozzle plug. The bell-mouth may be formed by pivotally mounted flaps or leaves which are used to vary the exhaust throat area and the area between the plug and the leaves. Air from the engine inlet flows into the string and also between the combustion chamber and a housing disposed around the chamber. The air cools the plug and serves as a low velocity inner core of secondary gas to provide noise reduction for the primary exhaust gas while the other air, when it exits from the nozzle, forms an outer low velocity layer to further reduce noise. The structure produces increased thrust in a turbojet or turbofan engine.

  14. Aging problems in graphite phenolic nozzle liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccorkle, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Age related cracks in the graphite phenolic linear and/or ATJ insert in several nine year old Altair IIA solid rocket nozzles were investigated and determined to be limited to a single lot of nozzles. Test results and photomicrographs of fracture surfaces are presented which establish that in the discrepant nozzles the bond between the graphite fibers and the phenolic resin was tenacious, resulting in a nearly homogenous behavior. These materials are shown to have a relatively weak resin - fiber bond and behave more like a released fiber composite. Lot qualification fiber directional tensile strength and the chemical composition of the two materials were comparable, indicating that standard acceptance testing could not have differentiated between the desirable and undesirable material. Review of processing records failed to reveal any cause for the difference in the aging characteristics.

  15. Computer Tomography Analysis of Fastrac Composite Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection has been integrated into the production process for NASA's Fastrac composite thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs). CT has been proven to be uniquely qualified to detect the known critical flaw for these nozzles, liner cracks that are adjacent to debonds between the liner and overwrap. CT is also being used as a process monitoring tool through analysis of low density indications in the nozzle overwraps. 3d reconstruction of CT images to produce models of flawed areas is being used to give program engineers better insight into the location and nature of nozzle flaws.

  16. Performance comparison of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle with a convergent nozzle at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance, in terms of thrust minus nozzle axial force, of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle has been conducted in a 16-foot transonic tunnel at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.90 at angles of attack from 4 minus to 8. Jet-total-pressure ratio was varied from about 1.2 to 2.0. The performance of a reference convergent nozzle with a similar nozzle throat area and length was used as a base line to evaluate the performance of the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle. The results of this investigation indicate that with no external airflow (Mach number M of 0), and at values of jet-total-pressure ratio between 1.2 and 2.0, the static thrust exerted by the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle is less than that of the convergent nozzle by about 10 percent of ideal gross thrust. About 3.4 percent of the thrust loss was attributed to an unintentional internal area expansion in the fan passage.

  17. Biannular Airbreathing Nozzle Rig (BANR) facility checkout and plug nozzle performance test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Chase B.

    2010-09-01

    The motivation for development of a supersonic business jet (SSBJ) platform lies in its ability to create a paradigm shift in the speed and reach of commercial, private, and government travel. A full understanding of the performance capabilities of exhaust nozzle configurations intended for use in potential SSBJ propulsion systems is critical to the design of an aircraft of this type. Purdue University's newly operational Biannular Airbreathing Nozzle Rig (BANR) is a highly capable facility devoted to the testing of subscale nozzles of this type. The high accuracy, six-axis force measurement system and complementary mass flowrate measurement capabilities of the BANR facility make it rather ideally suited for exhaust nozzle performance appraisal. Detailed accounts pertaining to methods utilized in the proper checkout of these diagnostic capabilities are contained herein. Efforts to quantify uncertainties associated with critical BANR test measurements are recounted, as well. Results of a second hot-fire test campaign of a subscale Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) axisymmetric, shrouded plug nozzle are presented. Determined test article performance parameters (nozzle thrust efficiencies and discharge coefficients) are compared to those of a previous test campaign and numerical simulations of the experimental set-up. Recently acquired data is compared to published findings pertaining to plug nozzle experiments of similar scale and operating range. Suggestions relating to the future advancement and improvement of the BANR facility are provided. Lessons learned with regards to test operations and calibration procedures are divulged in an attempt to aid future facility users, as well.

  18. Measurement of gas distributions from PRS nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Commisso, R.J.; Fisher, A. Peterson, G.G.

    1997-05-01

    A high-sensitivity laser interferometer has been used to measure gas distributions from nozzles used in high-power plasma radiation source experiments. These measurements are important for determining experimental parameters and for modeling implosions. The integral of the gas density along the laser beam line of sight is measured as a function of time at one axial distance, z, and one radial displacement, r. The nozzle is moved to scan the (r,z) cross section. The measurements are Abel-inverted to compute the local density n(r,z,t). Several examples are shown to illustrate the technique. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Measurement of gas distributions from PRS nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Fisher, A.; Peterson, G. G.

    1997-05-05

    A high-sensitivity laser interferometer has been used to measure gas distributions from nozzles used in high-power plasma radiation source experiments. These measurements are important for determining experimental parameters and for modeling implosions. The integral of the gas density along the laser beam line of sight is measured as a function of time at one axial distance, z, and one radial displacement, r. The nozzle is moved to scan the (r,z) cross section. The measurements are Abel-inverted to compute the local density n(r,z,t). Several examples are shown to illustrate the technique.

  20. Prototype Variable-Area Exhaust Nozzle Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gangbring

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center s Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for adaptive aeropropulsion components has resulted in the design of a prototype variable-area exhaust nozzle (see the preceding photograph). The novel design exploits the potential of smart materials to improve the performance of existing fixed-area exhaust nozzles by introducing new capabilities for adaptive shape control, vibration damping, and flow manipulation. The design utilizes two different smart materials: shape memory alloy wires as actuators and magnetorheological fluids as damper locks.

  1. Flow visualization experiments in a porous nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cielak, Z.; Kinney, R. B.; Perkins, H. C.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental approach is described for the study of nozzle flows with large wall-transpiration rates. Emphasizing a qualitative understanding of the flow, the technique uses the hydraulic analogy, whereby a compressible gas flow is simulated by a water flow having a free surface. For simplicity, the simulated gas flow is taken to be two-dimensional. A nozzle with porous walls in the throat region has been developed for use on a water table. A technique for visualizing the transpired fluid has also been devised. These are discussed, and preliminary results are presented which illustrate the success of the experimental approach.

  2. Separate Flow Nozzle Test Status Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn, in partnership with US industry, completed an exhaustive experimental study on jet noise reduction from separate flow nozzle exhaust systems. The study developed a data base on various bypass ratio nozzles, screened quietest configurations and acquired pertinent data for predicting the plume behavior and ultimately its corresponding jet noise. Several exhaust system configurations provided over 2.5 EPNdB jet noise reduction at take-off power. These data were disseminated to US aerospace industry in a conference hosted by NASA GRC whose proceedings are shown in this report.

  3. Turbocharger with variable nozzle having vane sealing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Philippe; Petitjean, Dominique; Ruquart, Anthony; Dupont, Guillaume; Jeckel, Denis

    2011-11-15

    A variable nozzle for a turbocharger includes a plurality of vanes rotatably mounted on a nozzle ring and disposed in a nozzle flow path defined between the nozzle ring and an opposite nozzle wall. Either or both of the faces of the nozzle ring and nozzle wall include(s) at least one step that defines sealing surfaces positioned to be substantially abutted by airfoil surfaces of the vanes in the closed position of the vanes and to be spaced from the airfoil surfaces in positions other than the closed position. This substantial abutment between the airfoil surfaces and the sealing surfaces serves to substantially prevent exhaust gas from leaking past the ends of the airfoil portions. At the same time, clearances between the nozzle ring face and the end faces of the airfoil portions can be sufficiently large to prevent binding of the vanes under all operating conditions.

  4. Linear nozzle with tailored gas plumes and method

    DOEpatents

    Leon, David D.; Kozarek, Robert L.; Mansour, Adel; Chigier, Norman

    1999-01-01

    There is claimed a method for depositing fluid material from a linear nozzle in a substantially uniform manner across and along a surface. The method includes directing gaseous medium through said nozzle to provide a gaseous stream at the nozzle exit that entrains fluid material supplied to the nozzle, said gaseous stream being provided with a velocity profile across the nozzle width that compensates for the gaseous medium's tendency to assume an axisymmetric configuration after leaving the nozzle and before reaching the surface. There is also claimed a nozzle divided into respective side-by-side zones, or preferably chambers, through which a gaseous stream can be delivered in various velocity profiles across the width of said nozzle to compensate for the tendency of this gaseous medium to assume an axisymmetric configuration.

  5. Turbulent-flow separation criteria for overexpanded supersonic nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrisette, E. L.; Goldberg, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive compilation of available turbulent flow separation data for overexpanded supersonic nozzles is presented with a discussion of correlation techniques, and prediction methods. Data are grouped by nozzle types: conical, contoured, and two dimensional wedge. Correlation of conical nozzle separation is found to be independent of nozzle divergence half-angle above the 9 deg, whereas the contoured nozzle data follow a different correlation curve. Zero pressure gradient prediction techniques are shown to predict adequately the higher divergence angle conical separation data, and an empirical equation is given for the contoured nozzle data correlation. Flow conditions for which the correlations are invalid are discussed and bounded. A nozzle boundary layer transition criterion is presented which can be used to show that much of the noncorrelating data in the literature are concerned with nonturbulent separation and which explains the previously reported external flow effects on nozzle separation.

  6. Behavior of liquid metal droplets in an aspirating nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Mason, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of particle size, velocity, and relative mass flux were made on spray field produced by aspirating liquid tin into 350{degrees}C argon flowing through a venturi nozzle via a small orifice in the throat of the nozzle. Details of the aspiration and droplet formation process were observed through windows in the nozzle. The spatial distribution of droplet size, velocity, and relative number density were measured at a location 10 mm from the nozzle exit. Due to the presence of separated flow in the nozzle, changes in nozzle inlet pressure did not significantly effect resulting droplet size and velocity. This suggests that good aerodynamic nozzle design is required if spray characteristics are to be controlled by nozzle flow. 5 refs.

  7. Behavior of liquid metal droplets in an aspirating nozzle. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Mason, T.A.

    1990-12-31

    Measurements of particle size, velocity, and relative mass flux were made on spray field produced by aspirating liquid tin into 350{degrees}C argon flowing through a venturi nozzle via a small orifice in the throat of the nozzle. Details of the aspiration and droplet formation process were observed through windows in the nozzle. The spatial distribution of droplet size, velocity, and relative number density were measured at a location 10 mm from the nozzle exit. Due to the presence of separated flow in the nozzle, changes in nozzle inlet pressure did not significantly effect resulting droplet size and velocity. This suggests that good aerodynamic nozzle design is required if spray characteristics are to be controlled by nozzle flow. 5 refs.

  8. Experience in the repair of steam generator auxiliary feedwater nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.K.N.

    1996-12-01

    The auxiliary feedwater nozzle is quite often subjected to more thermal stress cycles and other loading mechanisms during their service life than the material was designed and fabricated for at the nozzle of the earlier steam generators in many nuclear plants. During plant operation, the auxiliary feedwater nozzle outlet is exposed to the hot steam from the generator side, while the auxiliary feedwater piping which contains subcooled water from the inlet often induces water hammer as a result of the steam-water mixing phenomena. The thermal cycles and the steam bubble collapse at the nozzle may cause cracking in the nozzle liner and interior surface of the nozzle, and subsequently results in structural damage to the steam generator. This presentation is intended to share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the nozzle condition and the subsequent modification and repair made to the auxiliary feedwater nozzle at the Palisades Nuclear Plant. Other nuclear plant owners may benefit from this experience.

  9. F-15/nonaxisymmetric nozzle system integration study support program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, H. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nozzle and cooling methods were defined and analyzed to provide a viable system for demonstration 2-D nozzle technology on the F-15 aircraft. Two candidate cooling systems applied to each nozzle were evaluated. The F-100 engine mount and case modifications requirements were analyzed and the actuation and control system requirements for two dimensional nozzles were defined. Nozzle performance changes relative to the axisymmetric baseline nozzle were evaluated and performance and weight characteristics for axisymmetric reference configurations were estimated. The infrared radiation characteristics of these nozzles installed on the F-100 engine were predicted. A full scale development plan with associated costs to carry the F100 engine/two-dimensional (2-D) nozzle through flight tests was defined.

  10. Noise of Embedded High Aspect Ratio Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2011-01-01

    A family of high aspect ratio nozzles were designed to provide a parametric database of canonical embedded propulsion concepts. Nozzle throat geometries with aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were chosen, all with convergent nozzle areas. The transition from the typical round duct to the rectangular nozzle was designed very carefully to produce a flow at the nozzle exit that was uniform and free from swirl. Once the basic rectangular nozzles were designed, external features common to embedded propulsion systems were added: extended lower lip (a.k.a. bevel, aft deck), differing sidewalls, and chevrons. For the latter detailed Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were made to predict the thrust performance and to optimize parameters such as bevel length, and chevron penetration and azimuthal curvature. Seventeen of these nozzles were fabricated at a scale providing a 2.13 inch diameter equivalent area throat." ! The seventeen nozzles were tested for far-field noise and a few data were presented here on the effect of aspect ratio, bevel length, and chevron count and penetration. The sound field of the 2:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet was very nearly axisymmetric, but the 4:1 and 8:1 were not, the noise on their minor axes being louder than the major axes. Adding bevel length increased the noise of these nozzles, especially on their minor axes, both toward the long and short sides of the beveled nozzle. Chevrons were only added to the 2:1 rectangular jet. Adding 4 chevrons per wide side produced some decrease at aft angles, but increased the high frequency noise at right angles to the jet flow. This trend increased with increasing chevron penetration. Doubling the number of chevrons while maintaining their penetration decreased these effects. Empirical models of the parametric effect of these nozzles were constructed and quantify the trends stated above." Because it is the objective of the Supersonics Project that

  11. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  12. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  13. Seal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salt, Jonathan G.; Korzun, Ronald W.; Abbott, David R.

    1993-01-01

    A unitary annular seal structure is provided for attachment to a turbine nozzle in a gas turbine engine. The nozzle includes an annular platform disposed about a longitudinal axis of the engine. An annular array of vanes is secured to the platform. The seal structure includes an abradable annular seal member, a seal backing member, and a seal attachment ring. The ring includes an annular, radially extending, axially acting spring member positioned to cooperate with a plurality of radially extending tabs on the backing member. In use, the seal structure is positioned within a circular opening within the turbine nozzle. The nozzle includes a radially depending appendage formed as part of the nozzle platform. The spring member abuts one side of the appendage and the tabs are positioned to abut another side of the appendage for holding the annular spring member in gas sealing engagement with the appendage to thus provide a seal against gas leakage and to restrain the seal structure axially. The spring member and tabs comprise a radially slideable joint for the seal structure. To restrict circumferential motion of the structure, slots are formed in the appendage for receiving the tabs. The seal is easily replaced by bending the tabs and sliding the seal structure axially out of the nozzle. Differential thermal expansion is accommodated by the slideable seal arrangement.

  14. SRM nozzle design breakthroughs with advanced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdoyes, Michel

    1993-06-01

    The weight reduction-related performance and cost of the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) units' critical nozzle components are undergoing revolutionary improvements through the use of 3D-woven carbon/carbon and carbon/alumina composite materials. These can be used to fabricate the SRM's nozzle throat nondegradable insulators, thermostructural insulator, and exit cones. Additional developments are noted among nozzle-related structural components for additional rocket propulsion systems, including a three-piece extendible nozzle.

  15. JANNAF Rocket Nozzle Technology Subcommittee Executive Committee Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Timothy W.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the structure and activities of the panels of the Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force (JANNAF) Rocket Nozzle Technology Subcommittee. The panels profiled are the Processing Science and Materials Panel, the Nozzle Design, Test, and Evaluation Panel, the Nozzle Analysis and Modeling Panel, and the Nozzle Control Systems Panel. The presentation also lists meetings, workshops, and publications in which the subcommittee participated during the reporting period.

  16. Characterization of hydraulic nozzles for droplet size and spray coverage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray coverage specifications for commercially available nozzles could help applicators determine the optimal nozzles for effective control of insects, diseases and weeds. Spray coverage and deposit density from seven types of nozzles at three different flow rates (0.76, 1.14 and 2.27 l min-1) and t...

  17. Jet Nozzle Having Centerbody for Enhanced Exit Area Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M. (Inventor); Gilinsky, Mikhail M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A nozzle arrangement includes a nozzle and a centerbody. The longitudinal axis of the centerbody is coaxially aligned with the nozzle. The centerbody has a free end portion shaped to create vortices in exhaust exiting the exit area. The vortices enhance mixing action in the exhaust and reduce exhaust noise while augmenting thrust.

  18. F100 exhaust nozzle area control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlin, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The details of the F100 nozzle mechanism design are highlighted, placing particular emphasis upon the evolution of design constraints or drivers from initial concept through current operational deployment. A kinematic description of the area control mechanism is given, and several environmental constraints which complicate the normal mechanism design process are discussed.

  19. Sluicing nozzle test report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsower, D.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-08

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company is exploring various options for retrieving waste materials from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. One option under investigation is the use of a commercially available sluicing nozzle manufactured by Bristol Equipment Company.

  20. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  1. Binary condensation in a supersonic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Wyslouzil, B.E.; Beals, M.G.; Wilemski, G.

    1986-12-31

    Experiments in nozzles are extremely important because they provide higher rates of cooling, higher supersaturations and higher nucleation rates than any of the other techniques. Their operating conditions are more typical of the important industrial conditions such as aerodynamic and turbomechanical flows where homogeneous nucleation can have serious consequences. Because the fluid mechanics of nozzles are well defined and understood, nucleation experiments in the nozzle are amenable to sophisticated modeling efforts and much useful insight can be gained regarding the nucleation and droplet growth processes under these severe cooling conditions. This paper summarizes recent experimental work using a gently diverging supersonic Laval nozzle to investigate all three binary pairs in the water-propanol-ethanol ternary system. Of these three binary systems, ethanol-water and propanol-water are both non-ideal and strongly influenced by surface enrichment, while ethanol-propanol should be almost ideal. The authors briefly describe the experimental apparatus and their method for preparing the binary gas mixtures. They present their experimental results and compare them to relevant experimental data and nucleation rate calculations available in the literature.

  2. Discharge Coefficients for Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to compute effective nozzle discharge coefficients for subscale sharp-edged converging/diverging nozzles, with a variety of convergence half-angles, motor operating conditions, and two propellants with different ballistics. Convergence half-angles ranged from 0 to 80 deg. Analysis was conducted at total temperatures from 2946K (5303R) to 3346K (6023R) and over total pressures ranged from 2.72 MPa (395 psia) to 20.68 MPa (3000 psia). Area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) ranged from 7.43 to 9.39. Ratio of specific heats (gamma) ranged from 1.13 to 1.18. Throat and exit Reynolds numbers were calculated to be 8.26 x 10(exp 5) and 5.51 x 10(exp 5), respectively. Present results of nozzle discharge coefficients are reported and correlated as a function of nozzle convergence half-angle (theta(sub c)) and area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) for a constant divergence half-angle (theta(sub d)) of 15 deg. Computed discharge coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.97. They are compared with theory and experimental data available in literature. Available turbulence models with respect to grid refinements and heat transfer are discussed.

  3. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breizman, Boris

    2007-11-01

    Some plasma propulsion concepts rely on a strong magnetic field to guide the plasma flow through the thruster nozzle. The question then arises of how the magnetically controlled plasma can detach from the spacecraft. This talk presents a magnetohydrodynamic detachment scenario in which the plasma stretches the magnetic field lines to infinity [1]. Such a scenario is of particular interest for high-power thrusters. As plasma flows along the magnetic field lines, the originally sub-Alfv'enic flow becomes super-Alfv'enic: this transition is similar to what occurs in the solar wind [2]. In order to describe the detachment quantitatively, the ideal MHD equations have been solved analytically for a plasma flow in a slowly diverging nozzle. The solution exhibits a well-behaved transition from sub- to super- Alfv'enic flow inside the nozzle and a rarefaction wave at the edge of the outgoing flow. The magnetic field in the detached plume is almost entirely due to the plasma currents. It is shown that efficient detachment is feasible if the nozzle is sufficiently long. In order to extend the detachment model beyond the idealizations of analytical theory, a Lagrangian fluid code has been developed to solve steady-stated MHD equations and to optimize nozzle efficiency by adjusting the magnetic coil configuration. This numerical tool enables broad parameter scan with modest computational requirements (single workstation). The code has been benchmarked against the idealized analytical picture of plasma detachment and then used to investigate more realistic nozzle configurations that are not analytically tractable. Most recently, the code has been used to interpret experimental data from the Detachment Demonstration Experiment (DDEX) [3] facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. In collabotation with: M. Tushentsov, A. Arefiev, R. Bengtson, J.Meyers (University of Texas at Austin), D. Chavers, C. Dobson, J. Jones (Marshall Space Flight Center), B.Schuettpelz, (University of

  4. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F

  5. Computational Studies of Magnetic Nozzle Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Sheehan, John P.; Shebalin, John B.; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2013-01-01

    An extensive literature review of magnetic nozzle research has been performed, examining previous work, as well as a review of fundamental principles. This has allow us to catalog all basic physical mechanisms which we believe underlie the thrust generation process. Energy conversion mechanisms include the approximate conservation of the magnetic moment adiabatic invariant, generalized hall and thermoelectric acceleration, swirl acceleration, thermal energy transformation into directed kinetic energy, and Joule heating. Momentum transfer results from the interaction of the applied magnetic field with currents induced in the plasma plume., while plasma detachment mechanisms include resistive diffusion, recombination and charge exchange collisions, magnetic reconnection, loss of adiabaticity, inertial forces, current closure, and self-field detachment. We have performed a preliminary study of Hall effects on magnetic nozzle jets with weak guiding magnetic fields and weak expansions (p(sub jet) approx. = P(sub background)). The conclusion from this study is that the Hall effect creates an azimuthal rotation of the plasma jet and, more generally, creates helical structures in the induced current, velocity field, and magnetic fields. We have studied plasma jet expansion to near vacuum without a guiding magnetic field, and are presently including a guiding magnetic field using a resistive MHD solver. This research is progressing toward the implementation of a full generalized Ohm's law solver. In our paper, we will summarize the basic principle, as well as the literature survey and briefly review our previous results. Our most recent results at the time of submittal will also be included. Efforts are currently underway to construct an experiment at the University of Michigan Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory (PEPL) to study magnetic nozzle physics for a RF-thruster. Our computational study will work directly with this experiment to validate the numerical

  6. Comparison of heat transfer characteristics of a slot jet reattachment nozzle and a conventional slot jet nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, V.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Page, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    A new type of nozzle, the Slot Jet Reattachment Nozzle (SJR), was designed and built with a zero degree exit angle. The heat transfer characteristics of the submerged SJR nozzle were compared to a conventional submerged slot jet nozzle. The comparisons were made under identical air flow power at each nozzle`s favorable height from the impinging surface. Infrared imaging techniques were used to obtain the temperature distributions on the impinging surface. The results indicate that comparable local heat transfer coefficients are obtained by the SJR nozzle while the exerted force on the impinging surface is significantly reduced. The peak local heat transfer coefficient for the SJR nozzle is approximately 8.4% higher than the peak local heat transfer coefficient for the slot jet nozzle under the same flow power. Additional experiments were conducted under matching local peak pressure for the SJR and slot jet nozzles. The results showed significant enhancements, of the order of 1.5 times, in the peak local heat transfer coefficient for the SJR nozzle over the slot jet nozzle.

  7. Nozzle and wing geometry effects on OTW aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nozzle geometry and wing size on the aerodynamic performance of several 5:1 aspect ratio slot nozzles are presented for over-the-wing (OTW) configurations. Nozzle geometry variables include roof angle, sidewall cutback, and nozzle chordwise location. Wing variables include chord size, and flap deflection. Several external deflectors also were included for comparison. The data indicate that good flow turning may not necessarily provide the best aerodynamic performance. The results suggest that a variable exhaust nozzle geometry offers the best solution for a viable OTW configuration.

  8. Modeling of Supersonic Film Cooling on the J-2X Nozzle Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Morris, Christopher I.

    2011-01-01

    Supersonic film cooling (SSFC) of nozzles has been used in several liquid rocket engine designs, and is being applied to the nozzle extension (NE) of the J-2X upper stage engine currently under development. Turbine exhaust gas (TEG) is injected tangentially from a manifold along the NE, and provides a thermal barrier from the core nozzle flow for the NE. As the TEG stream mixes with the nozzle flow, the effectiveness of the thermal barrier is reduced. This paper documents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis work performed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to model the flow of the TEG through the manifold, into the nozzle, and the subsequent mixing of the TEG stream with the core flow. The geometry and grid of the TEG manifold, structural support ribs, and the NE wall will be shown, and the CFD boundary conditions described. The Loci-CHEM CFD code used in this work will also be briefly described. A unique approach to modeling the combined TEG manifold/thrust chamber assembly (TCA) was employed, as it was not practical to model the entire 360 circumferential range in one simulation. Prior CFD validation work modeling Calspan SSFC experiments in the early 1990s, documented in a previous AIAA paper, will also be briefly discussed. The fluid dynamics of the TEG flow through the manifold, into and between the structural support ribs, and into the nozzlette that feeds the TCA will be described. Significant swirl and non-uniformities are present, which along with the wakes from the ribs, act to degrade the film cooling effectiveness compared to idealized injection of TEG gas. The effect of these flow characteristics on the adiabatic wall temperature profile on the NE will be discussed.

  9. Experimental Study of a Nozzle Using Fluidic Counterflow for Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    A static experimental investigation of a counterflow thrust vectoring nozzle concept was performed. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal performance characteristics were defined over a nozzle pressure ratio (jet total to ambient) range of 3.5 to 10.0. The effects of suction collar geometry and suction slot height on nozzle performance were examined. In the counterflow concept, thrust vectoring is achieved by applying a vacuum to a slot adjacent to a primary jet that is shrouded by a suction collar. Two flow phenomena work to vector the primary jet depending upon the test conditions and configuration. In one case, the vacuum source creates a secondary reverse flowing stream near the primary jet. The shear layers between the two counterflowing streams mix and entrain mass from the surrounding fluid. The presence of the collar inhibits mass entrainment and the flow near the collar accelerates, causing a drop in pressure on the collar. The second case works similarly except that the vacuum is not powerful enough to create a counterflowing stream and instead a coflowing stream is present. The primary jet is vectored if suction is applied asymmetrically on the top or bottom of the jet.

  10. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - V(RSRMV)Nozzle Forward Nose Ring Thermo-Structural Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2012-01-01

    During the developmental static fire program for NASAs Reusable Solid Rocket Motor-V (RSRMV), an anomalous erosion condition appeared on the nozzle Carbon Cloth Phenolic nose ring that had not been observed in the space shuttle RSRM program. There were regions of augmented erosion located on the bottom of the forward nose ring (FNR) that measured nine tenths of an inch deeper than the surrounding material. Estimates of heating conditions for the RSRMV nozzle based on limited char and erosion data indicate that the total heat loading into the FNR, for the new five segment motor, is about 40-50% higher than the baseline shuttle RSRM nozzle FNR. Fault tree analysis of the augmented erosion condition has lead to a focus on a thermomechanical response of the material that is outside the existing experience base of shuttle CCP materials for this application. This paper provides a sensitivity study of the CCP material thermo-structural response subject to the design constraints and heating conditions unique to the RSRMV Forward Nose Ring application. Modeling techniques are based on 1-D thermal and porous media calculations where in-depth interlaminar loading conditions are calculated and compared to known capabilities at elevated temperatures. Parameters such as heat rate, in-depth pressures and temperature, degree of char, associated with initiation of the mechanical removal process are quantified and compared to a baseline thermo-chemical material removal mode. Conclusions regarding postulated material loss mechanisms are offered.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of false bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtseva, Irina; Alexandrov, Dmitri; Ryashko, Lev

    2014-05-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water to the arctic salt water is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. A false bottom represents a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Details of how this process occurs in nature are now emerging from different laboratory and field experiments. The false bottoms appearing at the interface between the fresh and salt water as a result of double-diffusive convection normally lie below surface and under-ice melt ponds. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the ice coverage by the false bottom is approximately half of the ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for different physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics. This study addressed to a broad community of readers is concerned with non-linear behavior of false bottoms including their stochastic dynamics due to possible fluctuations of the main process parameters in the ocean and the atmosphere.

  12. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  13. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays from Open Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1930-01-01

    The penetration and cone-angle of fuel sprays from open nozzles were recorded with the NACA Spray Photography Equipment. The results show that for injection systems in which the rate of pressure rise at the discharge orifice is high, open nozzles give spray-tip velocities and penetrations which compare favorably with those of closed nozzles. The spray cone-angle was the same for all tests, although open nozzles having different orifice diameters were used, and one nozzle was used both as an open and as a closed nozzle. In designing a fuel system using open nozzles, particular care must be taken to avoid air pockets. The check valve should be placed close to the discharge orifice.

  14. Turbulence Measurements of Separate Flow Nozzles with Mixing Enhancement Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of turbulence data taken in three separate flow nozzles, two with mixing enhancement features on their core nozzle, shows how the mixing enhancement features modify turbulence to reduce jet noise. The three nozzles measured were the baseline axisymmetric nozzle 3BB, the alternating chevron nozzle, 3A12B, with 6-fold symmetry, and the flipper tab nozzle 3T24B also with 6-fold symmetry. The data presented show the differences in turbulence characteristics produced by the geometric differences in the nozzles, with emphasis on those characteristics of interest in jet noise. Among the significant findings: the enhanced mixing devices reduce turbulence in the jet mixing region while increasing it in the fan/core shear layer, the ratios of turbulence components are significantly altered by the mixing devices, and the integral lengthscales do not conform to any turbulence model yet proposed. These findings should provide guidance for modeling the statistical properties of turbulence to improve jet noise prediction.

  15. Low Reynolds Number Nozzle Flow Study. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Margaret V.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzle flow was performed. A brief comparison was made between some of the experimental performance data and performance predicted by a viscous flow code. The performance of 15, 20, and 25 deg conical nozzles, bell nozzles, and trumpet nozzles was evaluated with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The numerical analysis was applied to the conical nozzles only, using an existing viscous flow code that was based on a slender-channel approximation. Although the trumpet and 25 deg conical nozzles had slightly better performance at lower Reynolds numbers, it is unclear which nozzle is superior as all fell within the experimental error band. The numerical rssults were found to agree with experimental results for nitrogen and for some of the hydrogen data. Some code modification is recommended to improve confidence in the performance prediction.

  16. Conceptual Design Method Developed for Advanced Propulsion Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth; Barnhart, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, a simple, accurate method of predicting the performance characteristics of a nozzle design has been developed for use in conceptual design studies. The Nozzle Performance Analysis Code (NPAC) can predict the on- and off-design performance of axisymmetric or two-dimensional convergent and convergent-divergent nozzle geometries. NPAC accounts for the effects of overexpansion or underexpansion, flow divergence, wall friction, heat transfer, and small mass addition or loss across surfaces when the nozzle gross thrust and gross thrust coefficient are being computed. NPAC can be used to predict the performance of a given nozzle design or to develop a preliminary nozzle system design for subsequent analysis. The input required by NPAC consists of a simple geometry definition of the nozzle surfaces, the location of key nozzle stations (entrance, throat, exit), and the nozzle entrance flow properties. NPAC performs three analysis "passes" on the nozzle geometry. First, an isentropic control volume analysis is performed to determine the gross thrust and gross thrust coefficient of the nozzle. During the second analysis pass, the skin friction and heat transfer losses are computed. The third analysis pass couples the effects of wall shear and heat transfer with the initial internal nozzle flow solutions to produce a system of equations that is solved at steps along the nozzle geometry. Small mass additions or losses, such as those resulting from leakage or bleed flow, can be included in the model at specified geometric sections. A final correction is made to account for divergence losses that are incurred if the nozzle exit flow is not purely axial.

  17. Energy saving opportunities of energy efficient air nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootmaekers, Tim; Slaets, Peter; Bartsoen, Tom; Malfait, Lieven; Vanierschot, Maarten

    2015-12-01

    Compressed air is a common energy medium. The production of compressed air itself is not a very efficient process. Avoiding any unnecessary losses of air can lead to large reductions in electricity consumption. Since blowing applications are one of the main domains were compressed-air is used, any reduction in the mass flow needed for operation can lead to significant energy savings. In this paper the normal volumetric flow rate and generated impact force are compared between a stepped nozzle and a so called energy saving nozzle which allows extra air from the surroundings to be entrained. These two different nozzle geometries are used in industrial blowing applications. Until now there was no study available which compares the impact forces and volumetric flow rates for these types of nozzles. The flow field of the two nozzles was calculated by CFD simulations. The impact forces and volumetric flow rates are calculated out of this flow field. Each nozzle was simulated with three different input pressures. The nozzles were simulated with an input pressure of 3, 4 and 5 barg. The energy saving nozzle consumes only 1 % less volumetric flow rate then the stepped nozzle at the same inlet pressure. The replacement of a stepped nozzle with an energy saving nozzle will not immediately result in a decrease in input volumetric flow rate. The pressure at the inlet of the energy saving nozzle has to be reduced as well. After reducing the input pressure the energy saving nozzle generates the same impact force than the stepped nozzle. Hereby a decrease of 4.5 % in input volumetric flow rate was possible. The energy cost will decrease with 4.5 % as well because the normal volumetric flow rate is directly proportional to the energy cost. The replacement of a stepped nozzle with an energy saving nozzle while maintaining the same inlet pressure is only useful when the impact force from the stepped nozzle is not sufficient. The energy saving nozzle can generate 5.6 % more impact

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) are working together to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the dual bell nozzle concept. Dual bell nozzles are a form of altitude compensating nozzle that consists of two connecting bell contours. At low altitude the nozzle flows fully in the first, relatively lower area ratio, nozzle. The nozzle flow separates from the wall at the inflection point which joins the two bell contours. This relatively low expansion results in higher nozzle efficiency during the low altitude portion of the launch. As ambient pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the nozzle flow will expand to fill the relatively large area ratio second nozzle. The larger area ratio of the second bell enables higher Isp during the high altitude and vacuum portions of the launch. Despite a long history of theoretical consideration and promise towards improving rocket performance, dual bell nozzles have yet to be developed for practical use and have seen only limited testing. One barrier to use of dual bell nozzles is the lack of control over the nozzle flow transition from the first bell to the second bell during operation. A method that this team is pursuing to enhance the controllability of the nozzle flow transition is manipulation of the film coolant that is injected near the inflection between the two bell contours. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is being run to assess the degree of control over nozzle flow transition generated via manipulation of the film injection. A cold flow dual bell nozzle, without film coolant, was tested over a range of simulated altitudes in 2004 in MSFC's nozzle test facility. Both NASA centers have performed a series of simulations of that dual bell to validate their computational models. Those CFD results are compared to the experimental results within this paper. MSFC then proceeded to add film injection to the CFD grid of the dual bell nozzle. A series of

  19. Jet-Surface Interaction: High Aspect Ratio Nozzle Test, Nozzle Design and Preliminary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Dippold, Vance

    2015-01-01

    The Jet-Surface Interaction High Aspect Ratio (JSI-HAR) nozzle test is part of an ongoing effort to measure and predict the noise created when an aircraft engine exhausts close to an airframe surface. The JSI-HAR test is focused on parameters derived from the Turbo-electric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) concept aircraft which include a high-aspect ratio mailslot exhaust nozzle, internal septa, and an aft deck. The size and mass flow rate limits of the test rig also limited the test nozzle to a 16:1 aspect ratio, half the approximately 32:1 on the TeDP concept. Also, unlike the aircraft, the test nozzle must transition from a single round duct on the High Flow Jet Exit Rig, located in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, to the rectangular shape at the nozzle exit. A parametric nozzle design method was developed to design three low noise round-to-rectangular transitions, with 8:1, 12:1, and 16: aspect ratios, that minimizes flow separations and shocks while providing a flat flow profile at the nozzle exit. These designs validated using the WIND-US CFD code. A preliminary analysis of the test data shows that the actual flow profile is close to that predicted and that the noise results appear consistent with data from previous, smaller scale, tests. The JSI-HAR test is ongoing through October 2015. The results shown in the presentation are intended to provide an overview of the test and a first look at the preliminary results.

  20. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1990-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, a swivel assembly for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and a tubular end section for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  1. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  2. A nozzle internal performance prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A prediction method was written and incorporated into a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (PAB3D) for the calculation of nozzle internal performance. The following quantities are calculated: (1) discharge coefficient; (2) normal, side, and axial thrust ratios; (3) rolling, pitching, and yawing moments; and (4) effective pitch and yaw vector angles. Four different case studies are presented to confirm the applicability of the methodology. Internal and, in most situations, external flow-field regions are required to be modeled. The computed nozzle discharge coefficient matches both the level and the trend of the experimental data within quoted experimental data accuracy (0.5 percent). Moment and force ratios are generally within 1 to 2 percent of the absolute level of experimental data, with the trends of data matched accurately.

  3. Solid rocket motor nozzle flexseal design sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, James R.

    1993-02-01

    On solid rocket motors, direction is controlled by controlling the thrust vector. To achieve this, the nozzle usually incorporates a flexseal that allows the nozzle to vector (or rotate) in any direction. The flexseal has a core of alternating layers of elastomer pads and metal or composite shims. Flexseal core design is an iterative process. An estimate of the flexseal core geometry is made. The core is then analyzed for performance characteristics such as stress, weight, and the torque required to vector the core. Based on a comparison between the requirements/constraints and analysis results, another estimate of the geometry is then made. Understanding the effects changes in the core geometry have on the performance characteristics greatly decreases the number of iterations and time required to optimize the design. This paper documents a study undertaken to better understand these effects and how sensitive performance characteristics are to core geometry changes.

  4. Stackable multi-port gas nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Poppe, Steve; Rozenzon, Yan; Ding, Peijun

    2015-03-03

    One embodiment provides a reactor for material deposition. The reactor includes a chamber and at least one gas nozzle. The chamber includes a pair of susceptors, each having a front side and a back side. The front side mounts a number of substrates. The susceptors are positioned vertically so that the front sides of the susceptors face each other, and the vertical edges of the susceptors are in contact with each other, thereby forming a substantially enclosed narrow channel between the substrates mounted on different susceptors. The gas nozzle includes a gas-inlet component situated in the center and a detachable gas-outlet component stacked around the gas-inlet component. The gas-inlet component includes at least one opening coupled to the chamber, and is configured to inject precursor gases into the chamber. The detachable gas-outlet component includes at least one opening coupled to the chamber, and is configured to output exhaust gases from the chamber.

  5. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  6. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  7. PDE Nozzle Optimization Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Dana; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Genetic algorithms, which simulate evolution in natural systems, have been used to find solutions to optimization problems that seem intractable to standard approaches. In this study, the feasibility of using a GA to find an optimum, fixed profile nozzle for a pulse detonation engine (PDE) is demonstrated. The objective was to maximize impulse during the detonation wave passage and blow-down phases of operation. Impulse of each profile variant was obtained by using the CFD code Mozart/2.0 to simulate the transient flow. After 7 generations, the method has identified a nozzle profile that certainly is a candidate for optimum solution. The constraints on the generality of this possible solution remain to be clarified.

  8. Investigation of nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Ramirez, A.; Aggarwal, S.; El-Hannouny, E.; Longman, D.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-04-01

    Cavitation and turbulence inside a diesel injector play a critical role in primary spray breakup and development processes. The study of cavitation in realistic injectors is challenging, both theoretically and experimentally, since the associated two-phase flow field is turbulent and highly complex, characterized by large pressure gradients and small orifice geometries. We report herein a computational investigation of the internal nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector. A mixture based model in FLUENT V6.2 software is employed for simulations. In addition, a new criterion for cavitation inception based on the total stress is implemented, and its effectiveness in predicting cavitation is evaluated. Results indicate that under realistic diesel engine conditions, cavitation patterns inside the orifice are influenced by the new cavitation criterion. Simulations are validated using the available two-phase nozzle flow data and the rate of injection measurements at various injection pressures (800-1600 bar) from the present study. The computational model is then used to characterize the effects of important injector parameters on the internal nozzle flow and cavitation behavior, as well as on flow properties at the nozzle exit. The parameters include injection pressure, needle lift position, and fuel type. The propensity of cavitation for different on-fleet diesel fuels is compared with that for n-dodecane, a diesel fuel surrogate. Results indicate that the cavitation characteristics of n-dodecane are significantly different from those of the other three fuels investigated. The effect of needle movement on cavitation is investigated by performing simulations at different needle lift positions. Cavitation patterns are seen to shift dramatically as the needle lift position is changed during an injection event. The region of significant cavitation shifts from top of the orifice to bottom of the orifice as the needle position is changed from fully

  9. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  10. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  11. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  12. Dual-bell altitude compensating nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, M.; Fisher, S.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this cold flow test effort was to assess the performance characteristics of dual bell nozzles and to obtain preliminary design criteria by testing a number of configurations. Characteristics of interest included low altitude performance, high altitude performance, and the flow transition process. In combination with this performance data, other factors such as cost, weight, fabricability, and vehicle related issues could then be traded to establish the feasibility of the concept.

  13. Flow Separation Side Loads Excitation of Rocket Nozzle FEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Kurt B.; Brown, Andrew; Ruf, Joseph; Gilbert, John

    2007-01-01

    Modern rocket nozzles are designed to operate over a wide range of altitudes, and are also built with large aspect ratios to enable high efficiencies. Nozzles designed to operate over specific regions of a trajectory are being replaced in modern launch vehicles by those that are designed to operate from earth to orbit. This is happening in parallel with modern manufacturing and wall cooling techniques allowing for larger aspect ratio nozzles to be produced. Such nozzles, though operating over a large range of altitudes and ambient pressures, are typically designed for one specific altitude. Above that altitude the nozzle flow is 'underexpanded' and below that altitude, the nozzle flow is 'overexpanded'. In both conditions the nozzle produces less than the maximum possible thrust at that altitude. Usually the nozzle design altitude is well above sea level, leaving the nozzle flow in an overexpanded state for its start up as well as for its ground testing where, if it is a reusable nozzle such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the nozzle will operate for the majority of its life. Overexpansion in a rocket nozzle presents the critical, and sometimes design driving, problem of flow separation induced side loads. To increase their understanding of nozzle side loads, engineers at MSFC began an investigation in 2000 into the phenomenon through a task entitled "Characterization and Accurate Modeling of Rocket Engine Nozzle Side Loads", led by A. Brown. The stated objective of this study was to develop a methodology to accurately predict the character and magnitude of nozzle side loads. The study included further hot-fire testing of the MC-l engine, cold flow testing of subscale nozzles, CFD analyses of both hot-fire and cold flow nozzle testing, and finite element (fe.) analysis of the MC-1 engine and cold flow tested nozzles. A follow on task included an effort to formulate a simplified methodology for modeling a side load during a two nodal diameter fluid

  14. Oscillating combustion from a premix fuel nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Stringent emissions requirements for stationary gas turbines have produced new challenges in combustor design. In the past, very low NOx pollutant emissions have been achieved through various combustion modifications, such as steam or water injection, or post-combustion cleanup methods such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). An emerging approach to NOx abatement is lean premix combustion. Lean premix combustion avoids the cost and operational problems associated with other NOx control methods. By premixing fuel and air at very low equivalence ratios, the high temperatures which produce NOx are avoided. The challenges of premix combustion include avoiding flashback, and ensuring adequate fuel/air premixing. In addition, the combustion must be stable. The combustor should not operate so close to extinction that a momentary upset will extinguish the flame (static stability), and the flame should not oscillate (dynamic stability). Oscillations are undesirable because the associated pressure fluctuations can shorten component lifetime. Unfortunately, experience has shown that premix fuel nozzles burning natural gas are susceptible to oscillations. Eliminating these oscillations can be a costly and time consuming part of new engine development. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is investigating the issue of combustion oscillations produced by lean premix fuel nozzles. METC is evaluating various techniques to stabilize oscillating combustion in gas turbines. Tests results from a premix fuel nozzle using swirl stabilization and a pilot flame are reported here.

  15. Optimization Methodology for Unconventional Rocket Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, W.

    1996-01-01

    Several current rocket engine concepts such as the bell-annular tripropellant engine, and the linear aerospike being proposed for the X-33, require unconventional three-dimensional rocket nozzles which must conform to rectangular or sector-shaped envelopes to meet integration constraints. These types of nozzles exist outside the current experience database, therefore, development of efficient design methods for these propulsion concepts is critical to the success of launch vehicle programs. Several approaches for optimizing rocket nozzles, including streamline tracing techniques, and the coupling of CFD analysis to optimization algorithms are described. The relative strengths and weaknesses of four classes of optimization algorithms are discussed: Gradient based methods, genetic algorithms, simplex methods, and surface response methods. Additionally, a streamline tracing technique, which provides a very computationally efficient means of defining a three-dimensional contour, is discussed. The performance of the various optimization methods on thrust optimization problems for tripropellant and aerospike concepts is assessed and recommendations are made for future development efforts.

  16. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffery L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  17. Flow energy piezoelectric bimorph nozzle harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary

    2014-04-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  18. Nonequilibrium in a low power arcjet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zube, Dieter M.; Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy measurements were made of the plasma flow inside the nozzle of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster. The thruster propellant was a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture used to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. The 0.25 mm diameter holes were drilled into the diverging section of the tungsten thruster nozzle to provide optical access to the internal flow. Atomic electron excitation, vibrational, and rotational temperatures were determined for the expanding plasma using relative line intensity techniques. The atomic excitation temperatures decreased from 18,000K at a location 3 mm downstream of the constrictor to 9,000K at a location 9 mm from the constrictor, while the molecular vibrational and rotational temperatures decreased from 6,500K to 2,500K and from 8,000K to 3,000K, respectively, between the same locations. The electron density measured using hydrogen H line Stark broadening decreased from about 10(exp 15) cm(-3) to about 2 times 10(exp 14) cm(-3) during the expansion. The results show that the plasma is highly nonequilibrium throughout the nozzle, with most relaxation times equal or exceeding the particle residence time.

  19. RSRM Nozzle Anomalous Throat Erosion Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Wendel, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1996, anomalous pocketing erosion was observed in the aft end of the throat ring of the nozzle of one of the reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM 56B) used on NASA's space transportation system (STS) mission 79. The RSRM throat ring is constructed of bias tape-wrapped carbon cloth/ phenolic (CCP) ablative material. A comprehensive investigation revealed necessary and sufficient conditions for occurrence of the pocketing event and provided rationale that the solid rocket motors for the subsequent mission, STS-80, were safe to fly. The nozzles of both of these motors also exhibited anomalous erosion similar to, but less extensive than that observed on STS-79. Subsequent to this flight, the investigation to identify both the specific causes and the corrective actions for elimination of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the pocketing erosion was intensified. A detailed fault tree approach was utilized to examine potential material and process contributors to the anomalous performance. The investigation involved extensive constituent and component material property testing, pedigree assessments, supplier audits, process audits, full scale processing test article fabrication and evaluation, thermal and thermostructural analyses, nondestructive evaluation, and material performance tests conducted using hot fire simulation in laboratory test beds and subscale and full scale solid rocket motor static test firings. This presentation will provide an over-view of the observed anomalous nozzle erosion and the comprehensive, fault-tree based investigation conducted to resolve this issue.

  20. A study of the transmission characteristics of suppressor nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Salikuddin, M.; Burrin, R. H.; Plumbee, H. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The internal noise radiation characteristics for a single stream 12 lobe 24 tube suppressor nozzle, and for a dual stream 36 chute suppressor nozzle were investigated. An equivalent single round conical nozzle and an equivalent coannular nozzle system were also tested to provide a reference for the two suppressors. The technique utilized a high voltage spark discharge as a noise source within the test duct which permitted separation of the incident, reflected and transmitted signals in the time domain. These signals were then Fourier transformed to obtain the nozzle transmission coefficient and the power transfer function. These transmission parameters for the 12 lobe, 24 tube suppressor nozzle and the reference conical nozzle are presented as a function of jet Mach number, duct Mach number polar angle and temperature. Effects of simulated forward flight are also considered for this nozzle. For the dual stream, 36 chute suppressor, the transmission parameters are presented as a function of velocity ratios and temperature ratios. Possible data for the equivalent coaxial nozzle is also presented. Jet noise suppression by these nozzles is also discussed.

  1. Fuel assembly for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Creagan, Robert J.; Frisch, Erling

    1977-01-01

    A new and improved fuel assembly is formed to minimize the amount of parasitic structural material wherein a plurality of hollow tubular members are juxtaposed to the fuel elements of the assembly. The tubular members may serve as guide tubes for control elements and are secured to a number of longitudinally spaced grid members along the fuel assembly. The grid members include means thereon engaging each of the fuel elements to laterally position the fuel elements in a predetermined array. Openings in the bottom of each hollow member serve as a shock absorber to cushion shock transmitted to the structure when the control elements are rapidly inserted in their corresponding tubular members.

  2. Details of Side Load Test Data and Analysis for a Truncated Ideal Contour Nozzle and a Parabolic Contour Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Two cold flow subscale nozzles were tested for side load characteristics during simulated nozzle start transients. The two test article contours were a truncated ideal and a parabolic. The current paper is an extension of a 2009 AIAA JPC paper on the test results for the same two nozzle test articles. The side load moments were measured with the strain tube approach in MSFC s Nozzle Test Facility. The processing techniques implemented to convert the strain gage signals into side load moment data are explained. Nozzle wall pressure profiles for separated nozzle flow at many NPRs are presented and discussed in detail. The effect of the test cell diffuser inlet on the parabolic nozzle s wall pressure profiles for separated flow is shown. The maximum measured side load moments for the two contours are compared. The truncated ideal contour s peak side load moment was 45% of that of the parabolic contour. The calculated side load moments, via mean-plus-three-standard-deviations at each nozzle pressure ratio, reproduced the characteristics and absolute values of measured maximums for both contours. The effect of facility vibration on the measured side load moments is quantified and the effect on uncertainty is calculated. The nozzle contour designs are discussed and the impact of a minor fabrication flaw in the nozzle contours is explained.

  3. OTW noise correlation for variations in nozzle/wing geometry with 5:1 slot nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic data obtained from a model-scale study with 5:1 slot nozzles are analyzed and correlated in terms of apparent noise sources. Variations in nozzle geometry include roof angle and sidewall cutback. In addition, geometry variations in wing size and flap deflection are included. Three dominant noise sources were evident in the data and correlated: fluctuating lift noise, trailing edge noise and a redirected jet mixing noise that included the effect of reflection of jet noise by the surface. Pertinent variables in the correlations include the shear layer thickness and peak jet flow velocity at the trailing edge.

  4. Acoustic characteristics of externally blown flap systems with mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.; Wagner, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Noise tests were conducted on a large scale, cold flow model of an engine-under-the-wing externally blown flap lift augmentation system employing a mixer nozzle. The mixer nozzle was used to reduce the flap impingement velocity and, consequently, try to attenuate the additional noise caused by the interaction between the jet exhaust and the wing flap. Results from the mixer nozzle tests are summarized and compared with the results for a conical nozzle. The comparison showed that with the mixer nozzle, less noise was generated when the trailing flap was in a typical landing setting (e.g., 60 deg). However, for a takeoff flap setting (20 deg), there was little or no difference in the acoustic characteristics when either the mixer or conical nozzle was used.

  5. Scale model test results of several STOVL ventral nozzle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. E.; Re, R. J.; Yetter, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) ventral nozzle concepts are investigated by means of a static cold flow scale model at a NASA facility. The internal aerodynamic performance characteristics of the cruise, transition, and vertical lift modes are considered for four ventral nozzle types. The nozzle configurations examined include those with: butterfly-type inner doors and vectoring exit vanes; circumferential inner doors and thrust vectoring vanes; a three-port segmented version with circumferential inner doors; and a two-port segmented version with cylindrical nozzle exit shells. During the testing, internal and external pressure is measured, and the thrust and flow coefficients and resultant vector angles are obtained. The inner door used for ventral nozzle flow control is found to affect performance negatively during the initial phase of transition. The best thrust performance is demonstrated by the two-port segmented ventral nozzle due to the elimination of the inner door.

  6. Aerodynamic performance of a transonic low aspect ratio turbine nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moustapha, S.H. . Turbine Aerodynamics); Carscallen, W.E. . Combustion and Fluids Engineering Lab.); McGeachy, J.D. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents detailed information of the three-dimensional flow field in a realistic turbine nozzle with an aspect ratio of 0.65 and a turning angle of 76 deg. The nozzle has been tested in a large-scale planar cascade over a range of exit Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.3. The experimental results are presented in the form of nozzle passage Mach number distributions and spanwise distribution of losses and exit flow angle. Details of the flow field inside the nozzle passage are examined by means of surface flow visualization and Schlieren pictures. The performance of the nozzle is compared to the data obtained for the same nozzle tested in an annular cascade and a stage environment. Excellent agreement is found between the measured pressure distribution and the prediction of a three-dimensional Euler flow solver.

  7. Star 48 solid rocket motor nozzle analyses and instrumented firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The analyses and testing performed by NASA in support of an expanded and improved nozzle design data base for use by the U.S. solid rocket motor industry is presented. A production nozzle with a history of one ground failure and two flight failures was selected for analyses and testing. The stress analysis was performed with the Champion computer code developed by the U.S. Navy. Several improvements were made to the code. Strain predictions were made and compared to test data. Two short duration motor firings were conducted with highly instrumented nozzles. The first nozzle had 58 thermocouples, 66 strain gages, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. The second nozzle had 59 thermocouples, 68 strain measurements, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. Most of this instrumentation was on the nonmetallic parts, and provided significantly more thermal and strain data on the nonmetallic components of a nozzle than has been accumulated in a solid rocket motor test to date.

  8. CF6-50 Short Core Exhaust Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dusa, D. J.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The General Electric CF6-50 engine nacelle was originally equipped with both fan nozzle and core nozzle thrust reversers. Many airline operators later deactivated the core reverser. Elimination of the core reverser enabled design changes to be made to help improve performance. A reduction in core nozzle length of approximately two feet was possible. This concept, defined as the Short Core Exhaust Nozzle, was evaluated in engine ground tests, including performance, acoustic, and endurance tests under the NASA/Lewis Engine Component Improvement Program. The test results verified the performance predictions from scale model tests. The Short Core Exhaust Nozzle provides an internal cruise SFC reduction of 0.9% without an increase in engine noise. The nozzle hardware successfully completed 1000 flight cycles of endurance testing with no signs of distress.

  9. Gas turbine nozzle vane insert and methods of installation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William John; Predmore, Daniel Ross; Placko, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A pair of hollow elongated insert bodies are disposed in one or more of the nozzle vane cavities of a nozzle stage of a gas turbine. Each insert body has an outer wall portion with apertures for impingement-cooling of nozzle wall portions in registration with the outer wall portion. The insert bodies are installed into the cavity separately and spreaders flex the bodies toward and to engage standoffs against wall portions of the nozzle whereby the designed impingement gap between the outer wall portions of the insert bodies and the nozzle wall portions is achieved. The spreaders are secured to the inner wall portions of the insert bodies and the bodies are secured to one another and to the nozzle vane by welding or brazing.

  10. Static performance of five twin-engine nonaxisymmetric nozzles with vectoring and reversing capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    Transonic tunnel test was performed to determine the static performance of five twin-engine nonaxisymmetric nozzles and a base-line axisymmetric nozzle at three nozzle power settings. Static thrust-vectoring and thrust-reversing performance were also determined. Nonaxisymmetric-nozzle concepts included two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles, wedge nozzles, and a nozzle with a single external-expansion ramp. All nonaxisymmetric nozzles had essentially the same statis performance as the axisymmetric nozzle. Effective thrust vectoring and reversing was also achieved.

  11. Equations for the design of two-dimensional supersonic nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving

    1948-01-01

    Equations are presented for obtaining the wall coordinates of two-dimensional supersonic nozzles. The equations are based on the application of the method of characteristics to irrotational flow of perfect gases in channels. Curves and tables are included for obtaining the parameters required by the equations for the wall coordinates. A brief discussion of characteristics as applied to nozzle design is given to assist in understanding and using the nozzle-design method of this report. A sample design is shown.

  12. Fluidized-bed calciner with combustion nozzle and shroud

    DOEpatents

    Wielang, Joseph A.; Palmer, William B.; Kerr, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A nozzle employed as a burner within a fluidized bed is coaxially enclosed within a tubular shroud that extends beyond the nozzle length into the fluidized bed. The open-ended shroud portion beyond the nozzle end provides an antechamber for mixture and combustion of atomized fuel with an oxygen-containing gas. The arrangement provides improved combustion efficiency and excludes bed particles from the high-velocity, high-temperature portions of the flame to reduce particle attrition.

  13. Pressurizer with a mechanically attached surge nozzle thermal sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Wepfer, Robert M

    2014-03-25

    A thermal sleeve is mechanically attached to the bore of a surge nozzle of a pressurizer for the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor steam generating system. The thermal sleeve is attached with a series of keys and slots which maintain the thermal sleeve centered in the nozzle while permitting thermal growth and restricting flow between the sleeve and the interior wall of the nozzle.

  14. 46 CFR 181.320 - Fire hoses and nozzles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire hoses and nozzles. 181.320 Section 181.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Main System § 181.320 Fire hoses and nozzles. (a) A fire hose with a nozzle must be attached to each fire...

  15. An investigation of viscous losses in radial inflow turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, I.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict losses in radial inflow turbine nozzles. The analysis is presented in two parts. The first one evaluates the losses which occur across the vaned region of the nozzle, while the second part deals with the losses which take place in the vaneless field. It is concluded that the losses in a radial nozzle would not be greatly affected by the addition of a large vaneless space.

  16. Study for conceptual design of VEO, VTOL exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittrick, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Design requirements for a VEO Wing V/STOL exhaust nozzle with a two dimensional shape and having the capability for upper surface blowing, spanwise blowing, and 90 deg turning of the exhaust flow for VTOL were established. A preliminary design of the nozzle that identified the actuation scheme, key dimensions, the flowpath, and the recommended materials were prepared. The airplane characteristics resulting from integrating the study nozzle were established.

  17. Process modeling for carbon-phenolic nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.; Remus, Walter M., III; Clinton, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    A thermochemical model based on the SINDA heat transfer program is developed for carbon-phenolic nozzle material processes. The model can be used to optimize cure cycles and to predict material properties based on the types of materials and the process by which these materials are used to make nozzle components. Chemical kinetic constants for Fiberite MX4926 were determined so that optimization of cure cycles for the current Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle rings can be determined.

  18. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  19. Culture from the Bottom Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Nozzle Interference Fit and Weld Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mathews, Royce; Hanson, Brady D.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-07-31

    Ultrasonic phased array data were collected on a removed-from-service CRDM nozzle specimen to assess a previously reported leak path. First a mock-up CRDM specimen was evaluated that contained two 0.076-mm (3.0-mil) interference fit regions formed from an actual Inconel CRDM tube and two 152.4-mm (6.0-in.) thick carbon steel blocks. One interference fit region has a series of precision crafted electric discharge machining (EDM) notches at various lengths, widths, depths, and spatial separations for establishing probe sensitivity, resolution and calibration. The other interference fit has zones of boric acid (crystal form) spaced periodically between the tube and block to represent an actively leaking CRDM nozzle assembly in the field. Ultrasonic phased-array evaluations were conducted using an immersion 8-element annular 5.0-MHz probe from the tube inner diameter (ID). A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the interference fit regions and J grove weld, where applicable. Responses from the mock-up specimen were evaluated to determine detection limits and characterization ability as well as contrast the ultrasonic response differences with the presence of boric acid in the fit region. Nozzle 63, from the North Anna Unit-2 nuclear power plant, was evaluated to assess leakage path(s) and was destructively dismantled to allow a visual verification of the leak path(s).

  1. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Adriano, L.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Knoška, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injection molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquid flow conservation. Finally, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.

  2. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Adriano, L.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Knoska, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-12-08

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injection molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquidflow conservation. In conclusion, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.

  3. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Adriano, L.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Knoska, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-12-08

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injectionmore » molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquidflow conservation. In conclusion, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.« less

  4. Ceramic micro-injection molded nozzles for serial femtosecond crystallography sample delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerlein, K. R.; Heymann, M.; Kirian, R.; Adriano, L.; Bajt, S.; Knoška, J.; Wilde, F.; Chapman, H. N.

    2015-12-15

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs) allows for room temperature protein structure determination without evidence of conventional radiation damage. In this method, a liquid suspension of protein microcrystals can be delivered to the X-ray beam in vacuum as a micro-jet, which replenishes the crystals at a rate that exceeds the current XFEL pulse repetition rate. Gas dynamic virtual nozzles produce the required micrometer-sized streams by the focusing action of a coaxial sheath gas and have been shown to be effective for SFX experiments. Here, we describe the design and characterization of such nozzles assembled from ceramic micro-injection molded outer gas-focusing capillaries. Trends of the emitted jet diameter and jet length as a function of supplied liquid and gas flow rates are measured by a fast imaging system. The observed trends are explained by derived relationships considering choked gas flow and liquid flow conservation. Finally, the performance of these nozzles in a SFX experiment is presented, including an analysis of the observed background.

  5. Fabrication, Cleaning, and Filtering of Microscopic Droplet Beam Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J.; Hunter, M.; Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Doak, R. B.

    2006-10-01

    Structure determination of proteins is a subject of intense current interest. Most relevant is a protein's native conformation, which generally requires it be immersed in water (if water-soluble) or a lipid jacket (if a membrane protein). Emerging schemes of serial protein diffraction propose to embed proteins in microscopic water droplets (membrane proteins encased in a detergent micelle) and pass these in vacuum through an x-ray or electron beam. Droplet diameters of <2 μm and <200 nm are dictated by the respective probe penetration depths. Rayleigh nozzles of <1 μm and <100 nm can deliver such droplets, but clogging becomes a major hurdle at nozzle diameters below even 10 μm. This talk will present an extensive study of the cleaning, filtering, and operation of 4 μm diameter nozzles with intent to minimize clogging. Borosilicate and fused silica nozzles were investigated in both commercial and self-fabricated forms. Equipment was developed to flush the nozzles from both the tip and distal ends. A variety of solvents and detergents were tested, with and without sonication and both before and after the nozzle tip was formed. Flame burnishing was employed to smooth and clean the nozzles. In situ formation of silicate filter frits was investigated. Still, only about 30% of the 4 μm nozzles would run without clogging. An alternative to solid convergent nozzles will be described.

  6. Computer program for natural gas flow through nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Subroutines, FORTRAN 4 type, were developed for calculating isentropic natural gas mass flow rate through nozzle. Thermodynamic functions covering compressibility, entropy, enthalpy, and specific heat are included.

  7. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  8. Performance Characteristics of the Methane Fueled Rocket Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takashi; Miyajima, Hiroshi

    Performance of the methane fueled rocket nozzles are numerically investigated using computational fluid dynamics approach. A simple set of chemical reactions and kinetics for methane/oxygen nozzle flow is proposed. The chamber pressure, mixture ratio and size of the nozzle are parametrically changed to study the influence of characteristic rocket engine design parameters on nozzle losses. The amount of dissociation is high when the chamber pressure is low and the kinetic loss becomes dominant compared to the other nozzle losses. The peak specific impulse is achieved at a higher mixture ratio region as the chamber pressure increases. The chemical non-equilibrium flow appears mainly at down stream region of the nozzle throat. The influence of the chemical non-equilibrium effect decreases as the chamber pressure increases. Supersonic chemically reactive gas stays longer in the nozzle as the size of the nozzle become larger and the amount of recombination increases which decreases the kinetic loss. When the chamber pressure is high, the kinetic loss becomes small and the effect of the size of nozzle also becomes small.

  9. Evaluation of nozzle shapes for an optical flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow in axisymmetric nozzles using Creare's computer program FLUENT/BFC. The primary objective of the project was to assist Spectron Development Laboratories in selecting an optimum nozzle shape for an optical flowmeter. The nozzle performance is evaluated for various length to diameter ratios, area contraction ratios, and Reynolds numbers. The computations have demonstrated that a cubic profile nozzle with length to diameter ratio of 1.6 and area contraction ratio of 6.2 can decrease the velocity profile non-uniformity from 15 percent at the entrance to 1 percent at the exit. The configuration is recommended for further investigation.

  10. Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2010-01-01

    An axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock (LaNCETS) research airplane, was considered. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature, similar to what was observed in the LaNCETS flight data, is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. The CFD results provide a detailed description of the nozzle flow physics involved in the LaNCETS nozzle at different nozzle expansion conditions and help in interpreting LaNCETS flight data as well as in the eventual CFD analysis of a full LaNCETS aircraft. The current study also provided important information on proper modeling of the LaNCETS aircraft nozzle. The primary objective of the current CFD research effort was to support the LaNCETS flight research data analysis effort by studying the detailed nozzle exhaust jet plume s imperfect expansion effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. Figure 1 illustrates the primary flow physics present in the interaction between the exhaust jet plume shock and the sonic boom coming off of an axisymmetric body in supersonic flight. The steeper tail shock from highly expanded jet plume reduces the dip of the sonic boom N-wave signature. A structured finite-volume compressible full Navier-Stokes CFD code was used in the current study. This approach is not limited by the simplifying assumptions inherent in previous sonic boom analysis efforts. Also, this study was the first known jet plume sonic boom CFD study in which the full viscous nozzle flow field was modeled, without

  11. Noise Benefits of Increased Fan Bypass Nozzle Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan (typical of current engine technology) was tested in the NASA Glenn 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9-by 15-Foot LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects of increased bypass nozzle area. This fan stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry (SDT2) which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. The baseline nozzle was sized to produce maximum stage performance for the engine at a high altitude, cruise point condition. However, the wind tunnel testing is conducted near sea level conditions. Therefore, in order to simulate and obtain performance at other aircraft operating conditions, two additional nozzles were designed and tested-one with a +5 percent increase in weight flow (+5.4 percent increase in nozzle area compared with the baseline nozzle), sized to simulate the performance at the stage design point conditions, and the other with a +7.5 percent increase in weight flow (+10.9 percent increase in nozzle area), sized for maximum weight flow with a fixed nozzle at sea level conditions. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level (OAPWL) reductions of 2 or more dB while the stage thrust actually increased by several percentage points except fro the most open nozzle at takeoff rotor speed where stage performance decreased. These noise reduction benefits were seen to primarily affect broadband noise, and were evident throughout the range of measured sideline angles.

  12. Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles in a cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2015-05-01

    Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles with spray plates used to distribute cooling water to the cooling fills in a cooling tower is one of the important parameters for the selection of nozzles. Water distribution characteristic describes the distribution of water from the axis of the nozzle along a fill. One of the parameters affecting the water distribution characteristic of the nozzle is airflow velocity of counter flow airstream. Water distribution characteristics are commonly measured using by a set of containers. The problem with this method of the measurement of characteristics is block of the airflow with collections of containers. Therefore, this work is using the visualization method.

  13. Flow separation in rocket nozzles under high altitude condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, R.; Génin, C.

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of flow separation in rocket nozzles is crucial for rocket engine design and optimum performance. Typically, flow separation is studied under sea-level conditions. However, this disregards the change of the ambient density during ascent of a launcher. The ambient flow properties are an important factor concerning the design of altitude-adaptive rocket nozzles like the dual bell nozzle. For this reason an experimental study was carried out to study the influence of the ambient density on flow separation within conventional nozzles.

  14. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barriers for RSRM Nozzle Joint Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Solid rockets, including the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, are generally manufactured in large segments which are then shipped to their final destination where they are assembled. These large segments are sealed with a system of primary and secondary 0-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket which are at pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. The seals are protected from hot combustion gases by thick layers of phenolic insulation and by joint-filling compounds between these layers. Recently, though, routine inspections of nozzle-to-case joints in the Shuttle solid rocket motors during disassembly revealed erosion of the primary O-rings. Jets of hot gas leaked through gaps in the joint-filling compound between the layers of insulation and impinged on the O-rings. This is not supposed to take place, so NASA and Thiokol, the manufacturer of the rockets, initiated an investigation and found that design improvements could be made in this joint. One such improvement would involve using NASA Lewis braided thermal barriers as another level of protection for the O-ring seals against the hot combustion gases.

  15. Critical Propulsion Components. Volume 3; Exhaust Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have concluded that a supersonic aircraft, if environmentally acceptable and economically viable, could successfully compete in the 21st century marketplace. However, before industry can commit to what is estimated as a 15 to 20 billion dollar investment, several barrier issues must be resolved. In an effort to address these barrier issues, NASA and Industry teamed to form the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. As part of this program, the Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) element was created and assigned the task of developing those propulsion component technologies necessary to: (1) reduce cruise emissions by a factor of 10 and (2) meet the ever-increasing airport noise restrictions with an economically viable propulsion system. The CPC-identified critical components were ultra-low emission combustors, low-noise/high-performance exhaust nozzles, low-noise fans, and stable/high-performance inlets. Propulsion cycle studies (coordinated with NASA Langley Research Center sponsored airplane studies) were conducted throughout this CPC program to help evaluate candidate components and select the best concepts for the more complex and larger scale research efforts. The propulsion cycle and components ultimately selected were a mixed-flow turbofan (MFTF) engine employing a lean, premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor coupled to a two-dimensional mixed compression inlet and a two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle. Due to the large amount of material presented in this report, it was prepared in four volumes; Volume 1: Summary, Introduction, and Propulsion System Studies, Volume 2: Combustor, Volume 3: Exhaust Nozzle, and Volume 4: Inlet and Fan/Inlet Acoustic Team.

  16. On the Theory of the Laval Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkovich, S. V.

    1949-01-01

    In the present paper, the motion of a gas in a plane-parallel Laval nozzle in the neighborhood of the transition from subsonic to supersonic velocities is studied. In a recently published paper, F. I. Frankl, applying the holograph method of Chaplygin, undertook a detailed investigation of the character of the flow near the line of transition from subsonic to supersonic velocities. From the results of Tricomi's investigation on the theory of differential equations of the mixed elliptic-hyperbolic type, Frankl introduced as one of the independent variables in place of the modulus of the velocity, a certain specially chosen function of this modulus. He thereby succeeded in explaining the character of the flow at the point of intersection of the transition line and the axis of symmetry (center of the nozzle) and in studying the behavior of the stream function in the neighborhood of this point by separating out the principal term having, together with its derivatives, the maximum value as compared with the corresponding corrections. This principal term is represented in Frankl's paper in the form of a linear combination of two hypergeometric functions. In order to find this linear combination, it is necessary to solve a number of boundary problems, which results in a complex analysis. In the investigation of the flow with which this paper is concerned, a second method is applied. This method is based on the transformation of the equations of motion to a form that may be called canonical for the system of differential equations of the mixed elliptic-hyperbolic type to which the system of equations of the motion of an ideal compressible fluid refers. By studying the behavior of the integrals of this system in the neighborhood of the parabolic line, the principal term of the solution is easily separated out in the form of a polynomial of the third degree. As a result, the computation of the transitional part of the nozzle is considerably simplified.

  17. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems.

  18. Bottom-up tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Recapitulating the elegant structures formed during development is an extreme synthetic and biological challenge. Great progress has been made in developing materials to support transplanted cells, yet the complexity of tissues is far beyond that found in even the most advanced scaffolds. Self-assembly is a motif used in development and a route for the production of complex materials. Self-assembly of peptides, proteins and other molecules at the nanoscale is promising, but in addition, intriguing ideas are emerging for self-assembly of micron-scale structures. In this brief review, very recent advances in the assembly of micron-scale cell aggregates and microgels will be described and discussed. PMID:21524904

  19. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  20. NASA/MSFC nozzle test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crose, James G.; Mack, Thomas E.; Marx, Douglas A.; Goldberg, Benjamin; Shrader, John E.

    1989-01-01

    As part of an effort to improve the state-of-the-art in nozzle technology, a solid propulsion test bed facility is being designed and will be located at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test bed will consist of a plasma arc facility and several small scale rocket motor test facilities ranging in size from the ballistic environmental generator motor with a 1/2 in. diameter throat to the MNASA motor with a 9 and 1/2 in. diameter throat capability. The test bed system will be used primarily to study materials behavior from the standpoint of char, erosion, and thermal stress phenomena.

  1. Mach disk from underexpanded axisymmetric nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I.-S.; Chow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The flowfield associated with the underexpanded axisymmetric nozzle freejet flow including the appearance of a Mach disk has been studied. It is shown that the location and size of the Mach disk are governed by the appearance of a triple-point shock configuration and the condition that the central core flow will reach a state of 'choking at a throat'. It is recognized that coalescence of waves requires special attention and the reflected wave, as well as the vorticity generated from these wave interactions, have to be taken accurately into account. The theoretical results obtained agreed well with the experimental data.

  2. Transonic potential flow in hyperbolic nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, M.; Caughey, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The full potential equation for the classical problem of transonic flow through a hyperbolic nozzle (with or without a shock wave) is solved in conservation form using the finite volume method of Jameson and Caughey (1977). Either a firstor a second-order numerical viscosity is added in the direction of the flow, explicitly, in conservation form. A multigrid alternating direction implicit method is used to solve the difference equations, and the results obtained are compared with analytical and numerical results from previous researches.

  3. A Class of De Laval Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkovich, S. V.

    1949-01-01

    A study is made herein of the irrotational adiabatic motion of a gas in the transition from subsonic to supersonic velocities. A shape of the de Laval nozzle is given, which transforms a homogeneous plane-parallel flow at large subsonic velocity into a supersonic flow without any shockwaves beyond the transition line from the subsonic to the supersonic regions of flow. The method of solution is based on integration near the transition line of the gas equations of motion in the form investigated by S. A. Christianovich.

  4. Effect of magnetic and physical nozzles on plasma thruster performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod; Ando, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Plasma cross-field diffusion in a magnetic nozzle is inhibited by increasing the magnetic field strength in a helicon plasma thruster attached to a pendulum thrust balance, while maintaining constant plasma density and electron temperature in the source tube, i.e. a constant plasma injection into the magnetic nozzle, where the field strength near the radio frequency (rf) antenna is less than 210 G and the operating argon pressure in the vacuum chamber is 0.8 mTorr. Inhibition of the cross-field diffusion yields a higher electron pressure in the magnetic nozzle and a resultant larger thrust. The thrust component arising from the magnetic nozzle approaches the theoretical limit derived from an ideal magnetic nozzle approximation where no plasma is lost from the nozzle and there is an azimuthal plasma current originating from the electron diamagnetic drift. It is also shown that the momentum of the plasma lost from the magnetic nozzle is captured by a physical nozzle attached at the source exit resulting in a larger thrust. Two physical nozzles of different sizes (nozzle 1 : 10.5 cm in length with a maximum diameter of 20 cm, nozzle 2 : 26 cm in length with a maximum diameter of 36 cm) are tested. The maximum thrust of 20 ± 1 mN is obtained for 25 sccm argon propellant and 2 kW rf power with a reflection power less than 5 W, which gives a specific impulse of 2750 ± 165 s and a thrust efficiency of 13.5 ± 1.5%.

  5. Transient Two-Phase Flow in Slide-Gate Nozzle and Mold of Continuous Steel Slab Casting with and without Double-Ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong-Mook; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-07-01

    Transient mold flow could produce undesirable surface instabilities and slag entrainments, leading to the formation of defects during continuous slab casting of steel. In this work, two Large Eddy Simulations coupled with Discrete Phase Model are run, with and without MagnetoHydroDynamic model, to gain new insights into the surface variations of molten steel-argon gas flow with anisotropic turbulence in the slide-gate nozzle and the mold, with and without double-ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking (EMBr). The model calculations are validated with plant measurements, and applied to investigate the flow variations related to the slide gate on nozzle swirl, jet wobbling, and surface flow variations by quantifying the variations of velocity, horizontal angle, and vertical angle of the transient flow. Transient flow in the slide-gate nozzle bottom is almost always swirling, alternating chaotically between clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation. The clockwise swirl, caused by stronger flow down the same side of the nozzle as the open area near the Outside Radius side of the slide-gate middle plate, produces faster jet flow and higher velocity flow across the top surface of the mold. Counter-clockwise swirl produces slower jet and surface flow, but with more variations. The double-ruler EMBr decreases the asymmetry and duration of velocity variations during nozzle swirl flipping, resulting in less flow variations in the jet and across the surface in the mold.

  6. Air assist fuel nozzle reduces aircraft gas turbine engine emissions at idle operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reduction in unburned hydrocarbons from jet engine by use of air assist fuel nozzle is discussed. Operation of nozzle for improving combustion efficiency by improving fuel atomization is analyzed. Advantages to be achieved by air assist fuel nozzle are analyzed.

  7. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  8. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  9. Analysis of film cooling in rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Keith A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings on the NASA contract NAG8-212, Task No. 3. The overall project consists of three tasks, all of which have been successfully completed. In addition, some supporting supplemental work, not required by the contract, has been performed and is documented herein. Task 1 involved the modification of the wall functions in the code FDNS (Finite Difference Navier-Stokes) to use a Reynolds Analogy-based method. This task was completed in August, 1992. Task 2 involved the verification of the code against experimentally available data. The data chosen for comparison was from an experiment involving the injection of helium from a wall jet. Results obtained in completing this task also show the sensitivity of the FDNS code to unknown conditions at the injection slot. This task was completed in September, 1992. Task 3 required the computation of the flow of hot exhaust gases through the P&W 40K subscale nozzle. Computations were performed both with and without film coolant injection. This task was completed in July, 1993. The FDNS program tends to overpredict heat fluxes, but, with suitable modeling of backside cooling, may give reasonable wall temperature predictions. For film cooling in the P&W 40K calorimeter subscale nozzle, the average wall temperature is reduced from 1750R to about 1050R by the film cooling. The average wall heat flux is reduced by a factor of 3.

  10. Dynamic Nanoparticles Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIBING; XU, LIGUANG; KUANG, HUA; XU, CHUANLAI; KOTOV, NICHOLAS A.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Importance Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple sizes of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously formed superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the ‘bottom-up’ fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Classification Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces) are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable superstructures with a nearly constant number same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation and/or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of a molecule from atoms. Finer classification of NP assemblies in accord with established conventions

  11. Static internal performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Capone, Francis J.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring axisymmetric nozzle. Thrust vectoring for this nozzle was achieved by deflection of only the divergent section of this nozzle. The effects of nozzle power setting and divergent flap length were studied at nozzle deflection angles of 0 to 30 at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  12. A Destructive Validation of NDE Responses of Service-Induced PWSCC Found in North Anna 2 Control Rod Drive Nozzle 31

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.; Seffens, Rob J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Moyer, C.

    2009-07-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies.

  13. Investigation of Nozzle Stability for the First Ovalization Mode by Numerical Solution of the Fluid Structure Interaction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwane, R.; Zia, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The present paper validates results from numerical simulations for side load generation in rocket nozzles against related data from analytical models that are presently used for rocket engine nozzle design activities. Key words: Nozzle stability; nozzle ovalization; flow structure interaction.

  14. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been identified as one of the key technologies needed for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to a high temperature followed by expansion through a conventional convergent-divergent nozzle. A parametric study of NTR nozzles was performed using the Rocket Engine Design Expert System (REDES) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The REDES used the JANNAF standard rigorous methodology to determine nozzle performance over a range of chamber temperatures, chamber pressures, thrust levels, and different nozzle configurations. A design condition was set by fixing the propulsion system exit radius at five meters and throat radius was varied to achieve a target thrust level. An adiabatic wall was assumed for the nozzle, and its length was assumed to be 80 percent of a 15 degree cone. The results conclude that although the performance of the NTR, based on infinite reaction rates, looks promising at low chamber pressures, finite rate chemical reactions will cause the actual performance to be considerably lower. Parameters which have a major influence on the delivered specific impulse value include the chamber temperature and the chamber pressures in the high thrust domain. Other parameters, such as 2-D and boundary layer effects, kinetic rates, and number of nozzles, affect the deliverable performance of an NTR nozzle to a lesser degree. For a single nozzle, maximum performance of 930 seconds and 1030 seconds occur at chamber temperatures of 2700 and 3100 K, respectively.

  15. Effects of nozzle spray angle on droplet size and velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray applicators have many choices in selecting a spray nozzle to make an application of an agricultural product. They must balance flowrate, spray pressure, and nozzle type and setup to deliver their agrochemical in the right droplet size for their particular needs. Studies were conducted to det...

  16. Rayleigh Scattering for Measuring Flow in a Nozzle Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos R.; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-engine-component test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust. A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-enginecomponent test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust

  17. Noise from Aft Deck Exhaust Nozzles: Differences in Experimental Embodiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2014-01-01

    Two embodiments of a rectangular nozzle on an aft deck are compared. In one embodiment the lower lip of the nozzle was extended with the sidewalls becoming triangles. In a second embodiment a rectangular nozzle was fitted with a surface that fit flush to the lower lip and extended outward from the sides of the nozzle, approximating a semi-infinite plane. For the purpose of scale-model testing, making the aft deck an integral part of the nozzle is possible for relatively short deck lengths, but a separate plate model is more flexible, accounts for the expanse of deck to the sides of the nozzle, and allows the nozzle to stand off from the deck. Both embodiments were tested and acoustic far-field results were compared. In both embodiments the extended deck introduces a new noise source, but the amplitude of the new source was dependent upon the span (cross-stream dimension) of the aft deck. The noise increased with deck length (streamwise dimension), and in the case of the beveled nozzle it increased with increasing aspect ratio. In previous studies of slot jets in wings it was noted that the increased noise from the extended aft deck appears as a dipole at the aft deck trailing edge, an acoustic source type with different dependence on velocity than jet mixing noise. The extraneous noise produced by the aft deck in the present studies also shows this behavior both in directivity and in velocity scaling.

  18. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Joel Meier; Mosbacher, David Matthew; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  19. The Effect of Nozzle Trailing Edge Thickness on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Haskin, Henry

    2004-01-01

    The effect of nozzle trailing edge thickness on broadband acoustic radiation and the production of tones is investigated for coannular nozzles. Experiments were performed for a core nozzle trailing edge thickness between 0.38 mm and 3.17 mm. The on-set of discrete tones was found to be predominantly affected by the velocity ratio, the ratio of the fan velocity to the core velocity, although some dependency on trailing edge thickness was also noted. For a core nozzle trailing edge thickness greater than or equal to 0.89 mm, tones were produced for velocity ratios between 0.91 and 1.61. For a constant nozzle trailing edge thickness, the frequency varied almost linearly with the core velocity. The Strouhal number based on the core velocity changed with nozzle trailing edge thickness and varied between 0.16 and 0.2 for the core nozzles used in the experiments. Increases in broadband noise with increasing trailing edge thickness were observed for tone producing and non-tone producing conditions. A variable thickness trailing edge (crenellated) nozzle resulted in no tonal production and a reduction of the broadband trailing edge noise relative to that of the corresponding constant thickness trailing edge.

  20. Powered fire nozzle for fast penetration of structures: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. F.; Robbins, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Nozzle has been proposed with tip that will punch through wall very quickly. It would allow extinguishing agent to be delivered inside closed structure in minimum amount of time. Two versions of nozzle have been conceived: one operated from hydraulic pressure source and one activated by explosive charge.

  1. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  2. Rapid Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Channel Wall Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The functions of a regeneratively-cooled nozzle are to (1) expand combustion gases to increase exhaust gas velocity while, (2) maintaining adequate wall temperatures to prevent structural failure, and (3) transfer heat from the hot gases to the coolant fluid to promote injector performance and stability. Regeneratively-cooled nozzles are grouped into two categories: tube-wall nozzles and channel wall nozzles. A channel wall nozzle is designed with an internal liner containing a series of integral coolant channels that are closed out with an external jacket. Manifolds are attached at each end of the nozzle to distribute coolant to and away from the channels. A variety of manufacturing techniques have been explored for channel wall nozzles, including state of the art laser-welded closeouts and pressure-assisted braze closeouts. This paper discusses techniques that NASA MSFC is evaluating for rapid fabrication of channel wall nozzles that address liner fabrication, slotting techniques and liner closeout techniques. Techniques being evaluated for liner fabrication include large-scale additive manufacturing of freeform-deposition structures to create the liner blanks. Abrasive water jet milling is being evaluated for cutting the complex coolant channel geometries. Techniques being considered for rapid closeout of the slotted liners include freeform deposition, explosive bonding and Cold Spray. Each of these techniques, development work and results are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  3. Internal Designs Application for Inlet and Nozzle Aeroperformance Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2000-01-01

    The following research results are based on development of an approach previously proposed by the authors for optimum nozzle design to obtain maximum thrust. The design was denoted a Telescope nozzle. A Telescope nozzle contains one or several internal designs of certain location, which are inserted at certain locations into a divergent conical or planar main nozzle near its exit. Such a design provides additional thrust augmentation over 20% by comparison with the optimum single nozzle of equivalent lateral area. What is more, recent experimental acoustic tests have discovered an essential noise reduction due to Telescope nozzles application. In this paper, some additional theoretical results are presented for Telescope nozzles and a similar approach is applied for aeroperformance improvement of a supersonic inlet. In addition, a classic gas dynamics problem of a similar supersonic flow into a plate has been analyzed. In some particular cases, new exact analytical solutions are obtained for a flow into a wedge with an oblique shock wave. Numerical simulations were conducted for supersonic flow into a divergent portion of a 2D or axisymmetric nozzle with several plane or conical designs as well as into a 2D or axisymmetric supersonic inlet with a forebody. The 1st order Kryko-Godunov march- ing numerical scheme for inviscid supersonic flows was used. Several cases were tested using the NASA CFL3d code based on full Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical simulation results have confirmed essential benefits of Telescope design applications in propulsion systems.

  4. Internal Designs Application for Inlet and Nozzle Aeroperformance Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2000-01-01

    The following research results are based on development of an approach previously proposed by the authors for optimum nozzle design to obtain maximum thrust. The design was denoted a Telescope nozzle. A Telescope nozzle contains one or several internal designs of certain location, which are inserted at certain locations into a divergent conical or planar main nozzle near its exit. Such a design provides additional thrust augmentation over 20% by comparison with the optimum single nozzle of equivalent lateral area. What is more, recent experimental acoustic tests have discovered an essential noise reduction due to Telescope nozzles application. In this paper, some additional theoretical results are presented for Telescope nozzles and a similar approach is applied for aeroperformance improvement of a supersonic inlet. In addition, a classic gas dynamics problem of a similar supersonic flow into a plate has been analyzed. In some particular cases, new exact analytical solutions are obtained for a flow into a wedge with an oblique shock wave. Numerical simulations were conducted for supersonic flow into a divergent portion of a 2D or axisymmetric nozzle with several plane or conuical designs as well as into a 2D or axisymmetric supersonic inlet with a forebody. The 1st order Kryko-Godunov marching numerical scheme for inviscid supersonic flows was used. Several cases were tested using the NASA CFL3d code based on full Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical simulation results have confirmed essential benefits of Telescope design applications in propulsion systems.

  5. Internal Designs Application for Inlet and Nozzle Aeroperformance Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2000-01-01

    The following research results are based on development of an approach previously proposed by the authors for optimum nozzle design to obtain maximum thrust. The design was denoted a Telescope nozzle. A Telescope nozzle contains one or several internal designs of certain location, which are inserted at certain locations into a divergent conical or planar main nozzle near its exit. Such a design provides additional thrust augmentation over 20% by comparison with the optimum single nozzle of equivalent lateral area. What is more, recent experimental acoustic tests have discovered an essential noise reduction due to Telescope nozzles application. In this paper, some additional theoretical results are presented for Telescope nozzles and a similar approach is applied for aeroperformance improvement of a supersonic inlet. In addition, a classic gas dynamics problem of a similar supersonic flow into a plate has been analyzed. In some particular cases, new exact analytical solutions are obtained for a flow into a wedge with an oblique shock wave. Numerical simulations were conducted for supersonic flow into a divergent portion of a 2D or axisymmetric nozzle with several plane or conical designs as well as into a 2D or axisymmetric supersonic inlet with a forebody. The 1st order Kryko-Godunov marching numerical scheme for inviscid supersonic flows was used. Several cases were tested using the NASA CFL3d code based on full Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical simulation results have confirmed essential benefits of Telescope design applications in propulsion systems.

  6. Analysis of nitrogen condensation in an expanding nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    Condensation of nitrogen flow in an expanding nozzle flow is analyzed using one-dimensional gas dynamic equations and the equations for nucleation and droplet growth. Effects of variations in the Tolman constant and the mass accommodation factor are discussed as well as the effect of foreign nuclei. Comparisons are made with experimental data obtained from a small, contoured nozzle.

  7. Closeup view looking into the nozzle of the Space Shuttle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view looking into the nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine number 2061 looking at the cooling tubes along the nozzle wall and up towards the Main Combustion Chamber and Injector Plate - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Improved technique for localizing electropolishing features novel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Impingement electropolishing is accomplished by use of an electrolyte film, which is evenly distributed by an insulated nozzle designed to match the contour of the workpiece to be treated. The workpiece is connected to the positive terminal of a generator and the nozzle to the negative terminal.

  9. Comparative Results of Tests on Several Different Types of Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisenko, M. S.

    1944-01-01

    This paper presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of the constructional elements of a Laval nozzle on the velocity and pressure distribution and the magnitude of the reaction force of the jet. The effect was studied of the shapes of the entrance section of the nozzle and three types of divergent sections: namely, straight cone, conoidal with cylindrical and piece and diffuser obtained computationally by a graphical method due to Professor F. I. Frankle. The effect of the divergence angle of the nozzle on the jet reaction was also investigated. The results of the investigation showed that the shape of the generator of the inner surface of the entrance part of the nozzle essentially has no effect on the character of the flow and on the reaction. The nozzle that was obtained by graphical computation assured the possibility of obtaining a flow for which the velocity of all the gas particles is parallel to the axis of symmetry of the nozzle, the reaction being on the average 2 to 3 percent greater than for the usual conical nozzle under the same conditions, For the conical nozzle the maximum reaction was obtained for a cone angle of 25deg to 27deg. At the end of this paper a sample computation is given by the graphical method. The tests were started at the beginning of 1936 and this paper was written at the same time.

  10. Two-Phase Hero Turbine With Curved Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, Gracio

    1991-01-01

    Proposed hero turbine includes de Laval nozzles modified to new curved, longer, more-gradually-tapered shape that promotes flashing and reduces separation. Turbines designed with new nozzles compete with rotary separator turbines used in geothermal powerplants. Other potential applications include heat pumps and thermal-energy conversion systems.

  11. Investigation of Hypersonic Nozzle Flow Uniformity Using NO Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Byrne, S.; Danehy, P. J.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence visualisation is used to investigate nonuniformities in the flow of a hypersonic conical nozzle. Possible causes for the nonuniformity are outlined and investigated, and the problem is shown to be due to a small step at the nozzle throat. Entrainment of cold boundary layer gas is postulated as the cause of the signal nonuniformity.

  12. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1989-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, means for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and means for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  13. Effect of several geometric parameters on the static internal performance of three nonaxisymmetric nozzle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of several geometric parameters on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent, single-ramp expansion, and wedge nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to approximately 10. In addition, two different thrust-vectoring schemes were investigated with the wedge nozzle. The results indicated that as with conventional round nozzles, peak nonaxisymmetric nozzle, internal performance occurred near the nozzle pressure ratio required for fully expanded exhaust flow. Nozzle sidewall length or area generally had little effect on the internal performance of the nozzles investigated.

  14. Side wall cooling for nozzle segments for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane segment includes outer and inner band portions with a vane extending therebetween and defining first and second cavities separated by an impingement plate for flowing cooling medium for impingement cooling of nozzle side walls. The side wall of each nozzle segment has an undercut region. The impingement plate has an inturned flange with a plurality of openings. Cooling inserts or receptacles having an open end are received in the openings and the base and side walls of the receptacles have apertures for receiving cooling medium from the first cavity and directing the cooling medium for impingement cooling of the side wall of the nozzle segment and a portion of the nozzle wall.

  15. Thermographic Leak Detection of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engines Nozzles consist of over one thousand tapered Inconel coolant tubes brazed to a stainless steel structural jacket. Liquid Hydrogen flows through the tubing, from the aft to forward end of the nozzle, under high pressure to maintain a thermal balance between the rocket exhaust and the nozzle wall. Three potential problems occur within the SSME nozzle coolant tubes as a result of manufacturing anomalies and the highly volatile service environment including poor or incomplete bonding of the tubes to the structural jacket, cold wall leaks and hot wall leaks. Of these conditions the identification of cold wall leaks has been the most problematic. The methods and results presented in this summary addresses the thermographic identification of cold wall "interstitial" leaks between the structural jacket and coolant tubes of the Space Shuttle Main Engines Nozzles.

  16. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  17. Experimental determination of three dimensional liquid rocket nozzle admittances.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, B. T.; Bell, W. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Smith, A. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The three dimensional nozzle admittance, an important parameter in combustion instability studies, was experimentally measured for several nozzle configurations. The admittance values were obtained using a modification of the classical impedance tube technique. The modified impedance tube method measures the admittance of a duct termination in the presence of one dimensional mean flow and three dimensional oscillations. Values of the nozzle admittance were obtained from pressure amplitude measurements taken at discrete points along the length of the tube. To determine the effects of nozzle geometry, nozzles were tested with half-angles of 15, 30, and 45 degrees and entrance Mach numbers of 0.08, 0.16, and 0.20. The admittance results are presented as functions of nondimensional frequency for mixed first tangential-longitudinal modes. These results are compared with available theoretical predictions and favorable agreement between theory and experiment is shown.

  18. Transonic wind tunnel test of a supersonic nozzle installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Evelyn, G. B.; Mercer, C.

    1982-01-01

    The design of the propulsion system installation affects strongly the total drag and overall performance of an aircraft, and the concept, placement, and integration details of the exhaust nozzle are major considerations in the configuration definition. As part of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program, a wind tunnel test program has been conducted to investigate exhaust nozzle-airframe interactions at transonic speeds. First phase testing is to establish guidelines for follow-on testing. A summary is provided of the results of first phase testing, taking into account the test approach, the effect of nozzle closure on aircraft aerodynamic characteristics, nozzle installation effects and nacelle interference drag, and an analytical study of the effects of nozzle closure on the aircraft.

  19. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  20. Simulation of the radiation-convective heat transfer in multinozzle assemblies of rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Tsatsuev, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The method and results of numerical modeling of the radiation-convective heat transfer and thermal state in the systems of multinozzle rocket-engine (RE) assemblies are presented. The method is implemented in a form of a software module entered as the component into the program of calculation of the nonsteady thermal state of the RE nozzles. The results of calculation by the consolidated program are given, and the two-dimensional thermal fields on the external and internal surfaces of mouthpieces of the four-nozzle liquid rocket engine allow us to refine the thermal state of the nozzles themselves and evaluate the radiation heat flows in the engine module.

  1. Novel design for transparent high-pressure fuel injector nozzles.

    PubMed

    Falgout, Z; Linne, M

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency and emissions of internal combustion (IC) engines are closely tied to the formation of the combustible air-fuel mixture. Direct-injection engines have become more common due to their increased practical flexibility and efficiency, and sprays dominate mixture formation in these engines. Spray formation, or rather the transition from a cylindrical liquid jet to a field of isolated droplets, is not completely understood. However, it is known that nozzle orifice flow and cavitation have an important effect on the formation of fuel injector sprays, even if the exact details of this effect remain unknown. A number of studies in recent years have used injectors with optically transparent nozzles (OTN) to allow observation of the nozzle orifice flow. Our goal in this work is to design various OTN concepts that mimic the flow inside commercial injector nozzles, at realistic fuel pressures, and yet still allow access to the very near nozzle region of the spray so that interior flow structure can be correlated with primary breakup dynamics. This goal has not been achieved until now because interior structures can be very complex, and the most appropriate optical materials are brittle and easily fractured by realistic fuel pressures. An OTN design that achieves realistic injection pressures and grants visual access to the interior flow and spray formation will be explained in detail. The design uses an acrylic nozzle, which is ideal for imaging the interior flow. This nozzle is supported from the outside with sapphire clamps, which reduces tensile stresses in the nozzle and increases the nozzle's injection pressure capacity. An ensemble of nozzles were mechanically tested to prove this design concept. PMID:27587161

  2. Analysis, design and testing of high pressure waterjet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    1996-01-01

    The Hydroblast Research Cell at MSFC is both a research and a processing facility. The cell is used to investigate fundamental phenomena associated with waterjets as well as to clean hardware for various NASA and contractor projects. In the area of research, investigations are made regarding the use of high pressure waterjets to strip paint, grease, adhesive and thermal spray coatings from various substrates. Current industrial methods of cleaning often use ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as chlorinated solvents, and high pressure waterjet cleaning has proven to be a viable alternative. Standard methods of waterjet cleaning use hand held or robotically controlled nozzles. The nozzles used can be single-stream or multijet nozzles, and the multijet nozzles may be mounted in a rotating head or arranged in a fan-type shape. We consider in this paper the use of a rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzle which is robotically controlled. This method enables rapid cleaning of a large area, but problems such as incomplete coverage (e.g. the formation of 'islands' of material not cleaned) and damage to the substrate from the waterjet have been observed. In addition, current stripping operations require the nozzle to be placed at a standoff distance of approximately 2 inches in order to achieve adequate performance. This close proximity of the nozzle to the target to be cleaned poses risks to the nozzle and the target in the event of robot error or the striking of unanticipated extrusions on the target surface as the nozzle sweeps past. Two key motivations of this research are to eliminate the formation of 'coating islands' and to increase the allowable standoff distance of the nozzle.

  3. Novel design for transparent high-pressure fuel injector nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency and emissions of internal combustion (IC) engines are closely tied to the formation of the combustible air-fuel mixture. Direct-injection engines have become more common due to their increased practical flexibility and efficiency, and sprays dominate mixture formation in these engines. Spray formation, or rather the transition from a cylindrical liquid jet to a field of isolated droplets, is not completely understood. However, it is known that nozzle orifice flow and cavitation have an important effect on the formation of fuel injector sprays, even if the exact details of this effect remain unknown. A number of studies in recent years have used injectors with optically transparent nozzles (OTN) to allow observation of the nozzle orifice flow. Our goal in this work is to design various OTN concepts that mimic the flow inside commercial injector nozzles, at realistic fuel pressures, and yet still allow access to the very near nozzle region of the spray so that interior flow structure can be correlated with primary breakup dynamics. This goal has not been achieved until now because interior structures can be very complex, and the most appropriate optical materials are brittle and easily fractured by realistic fuel pressures. An OTN design that achieves realistic injection pressures and grants visual access to the interior flow and spray formation will be explained in detail. The design uses an acrylic nozzle, which is ideal for imaging the interior flow. This nozzle is supported from the outside with sapphire clamps, which reduces tensile stresses in the nozzle and increases the nozzle's injection pressure capacity. An ensemble of nozzles were mechanically tested to prove this design concept.

  4. Convoluted nozzle design for the RL10 derivative 2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The convoluted nozzle is a conventional refractory metal nozzle extension that is formed with a portion of the nozzle convoluted to show the extendible nozzle within the length of the rocket engine. The convoluted nozzle (CN) was deployed by a system of four gas driven actuators. For spacecraft applications the optimum CN may be self-deployed by internal pressure retained, during deployment, by a jettisonable exit closure. The convoluted nozzle is included in a study of extendible nozzles for the RL10 Engine Derivative 2B for use in an early orbit transfer vehicle (OTV). Four extendible nozzle configurations for the RL10-2B engine were evaluated. Three configurations of the two position nozzle were studied including a hydrogen dump cooled metal nozzle and radiation cooled nozzles of refractory metal and carbon/carbon composite construction respectively.

  5. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  6. Multidisciplinary Approach to Linear Aerospike Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional fink-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against sequential aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single- discipline design strategy.

  7. Noise Prediction Module for Offset Stream Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2011-01-01

    A Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) analysis of data acquired for an offset stream technology was presented. The data acquisition and concept development were funded under a Supersonics NRA NNX07AC62A awarded to Dimitri Papamoschou at University of California, Irvine. The technology involved the introduction of airfoils in the fan stream of a bypass ratio (BPR) two nozzle system operated at transonic exhaust speeds. The vanes deflected the fan stream relative to the core stream and resulted in reduced sideline noise for polar angles in the peak jet noise direction. Noise prediction models were developed for a range of vane configurations. The models interface with an existing ANOPP module and can be used or future system level studies.

  8. Multidisciplinary Approach to Aerospike Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional finite-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against separate aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single-discipline design strategy.

  9. Improved ablative materials for the ASRM nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, A.; Clinton, R. G.; Armour, W.; Koenig, J.

    1992-01-01

    Rayon precursor carbon-cloth phenolic was developed more than 30 years ago and is used in most nozzles today including the Poseidon, Trident, Peacekeeper, Small ICBM, Space Shuttle, and numerous tactical and space systems. Specifications and manufacturing controls were placed on these materials and, once qualified, a no-change policy was instituted. The current material is acceptable; however, prepreg variability does not always accommodate the requirements of automation. The advanced solid rocket motor requires material with less variability for automated manufacturing. An advanced solid rocket motor materials team, composed of NASA, Thiokol, Aerojet, SRI, and Lockheed specialists, along with materials suppliers ICI Fiberite/Polycarbon, BP Chemicals/Hitco, and Amoco, embarked on a program to improve the current materials. The program consisted of heat treatment studies and standard and low-density material improvements evaluation. Improvements evaluated included fiber/fabric heat treatments, weave variations, resin application methods, process controls, and monitors.

  10. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  11. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  12. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  13. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  14. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  15. Secondary Vortex Formation in Bifurcated Submerged Entry Nozzles: Numerical Simulation of Gas Bubble Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirker, Stefan; Kahrimanovic, Damir; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The submerged entry nozzle (SEN) flow behavior is crucial for continuous casting of slab steel since it controls the mold flow pattern. In this study, we focus on the bottom zone of a bifurcated SEN where the flow deflection determines the port outflow. By applying a hybrid finite volume and lattice Boltzmann-based turbulence model, the dynamic behavior of horizontally orientated secondary vortices is investigated. In addition to the pure liquid metal flow, gas bubbles are traced in both discrete and continuous way. Simulation results indicate the existence of highly turbulent secondary vortices in the deflection zone of a bifurcated SEN, which attract gas bubbles in form of bubble threads or continuous gas volumes at their rotational axes. In addition, cyclically detaching gas volumes are formed at the upper port region at higher gas flow rates. Numerical predictions agree well with observations from physical water-air models.

  16. Serrating Nozzle Surfaces for Complete Transfer of Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chang-Jin " CJ" ; Yi, Uichong

    2010-01-01

    A method of ensuring the complete transfer of liquid droplets from nozzles in microfluidic devices to nearby surfaces involves relatively simple geometric modification of the nozzle surfaces. The method is especially applicable to nozzles in print heads and similar devices required to dispense liquid droplets having precise volumes. Examples of such devices include heads for soft printing of ink on paper and heads for depositing droplets of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or protein solutions on glass plates to form microarrays of spots for analysis. The main purpose served by the present method is to ensure that droplets transferred from a nozzle have consistent volume, as needed to ensure accuracy in microarray analysis or consistent appearance of printed text and images. In soft printing, droplets having consistent volume are generated inside a print head, but in the absence of the present method, the consistency is lost in printing because after each printing action (in which a drop is ejected from a nozzle), a small residual volume of liquid remains attached to the nozzle. By providing for complete transfer of droplets (and thus eliminating residual liquid attached to the nozzle) the method ensures consistency of volume of transferred droplets. An additional benefit of elimination of residue is prevention of cross-contamination among different liquids printed through the same nozzle a major consideration in DNA microarray analysis. The method also accelerates the printing process by minimizing the need to clean a printing head to prevent cross-contamination. Soft printing involves a hydrophobic nozzle surface and a hydrophilic print surface. When the two surfaces are brought into proximity such that a droplet in the nozzle makes contact with the print surface, a substantial portion of the droplet becomes transferred to the print surface. Then as the nozzle and the print surface are pulled apart, the droplet is pulled apart and most of the droplet remains on the

  17. The Low Frequency Aeroacoustics of Buried Nozzle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. V.; Crighton, D. G.; Cargill, A. M.

    1993-05-01

    A simplified model of a "buried nozzle" aeroengine system is considered. The primary flow issues into a co-annular flow within a mixing chamber, and then the co-annular flow issues into the ambient medium from a secondary nozzle. Within the mixing chamber only fine scale mixing takes place, and shear layers within the mixing chamber and downstream of the secondary nozzle are assumed to sustain large scale instability waves. Excitation of this system is provided by low frequency plane waves, incident from upstream on the primary nozzle (and emanating from combustion processes in the hot core of an aeroengine). The response of this system, in the acoustic far field and in the mixing chamber, is obtained analytically from the asymptotic solution, at low frequency, of model sub-problems the solutions of which determine the wave reflection and transmission processes at the primary and secondary nozzles. In these sub-problems the shear layers are represented by vortex sheets and the nozzle walls by semi-infinite circular ducts, with Kutta conditions imposed on the unsteady flow at the primary and secondary nozzle lips. Analytical descriptions are given of the various wave modes (quasi-plane acoustic waves, and instability waves localized on the primary and secondary shear layers), of the acoustic field strength and directivity (essentially monopole, dipole and quadrupole fields), and of the conditions under which near-resonant response may occur, with large amplitudes of the perturbations in the mixing chamber and in the acoustic field.

  18. Research on stability of nozzle-floating plate institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Tao, Jiayue; Yi, Jiajing; Chen, Shijing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, air hammer instability of nozzle-floating plate institution in gas lubricated force sensor were studied. Through establishment of the theoretical model for the analysis of the nozzle-floating plate institution stability, combined with air hammer stability judgment theorems, we had some simulation research on the radius of the nozzle, the radius of the pressure chamber, pressure chamber depth, orifice radius and the relationship between air supply pressure and bearing capacity, in order to explore the instability mechanism of nozzle-floating plate institution. For conducting experimental observations for the stability of two groups nozzle-floating plate institution, which have typical structural parameters conducted experimental observations. We set up a special experimental device, verify the correctness of the theoretical study and simulation results. This paper shows that in the nozzle-floating plate institution, increasing the nozzle diameter, reduced pressure chamber radius, reducing the depth of the pressure chamber and increase the supply orifice radius, and other measures is conducive to system stability. Results of this study have important implications for research and design of gas lubricated force sensor.

  19. Influence of nozzle random side loads on launch vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Nilabh; Tkacik, Peter T.; Keanini, Russell G.

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that the dynamic performance of a rocket or launch vehicle is enhanced when the length of the divergent section of its nozzle is reduced or the nozzle exit area ratio is increased. However, there exists a significant performance trade-off in such rocket nozzle designs due to the presence of random side loads under overexpanded nozzle operating conditions. Flow separation and the associated side-load phenomena have been extensively investigated over the past five decades; however, not much has been reported on the effect of side loads on the attitude dynamics of rocket or launch vehicle. This paper presents a quantitative investigation on the influence of in-nozzle random side loads on the attitude dynamics of a launch vehicle. The attitude dynamics of launch vehicle motion is captured using variable-mass control-volume formulation on a cylindrical rigid sounding rocket model. A novel physics-based stochastic model of nozzle side-load force is developed and embedded in the rigid-body model of rocket. The mathematical model, computational scheme, and results corresponding to side loading scenario are subsequently discussed. The results highlight the influence of in-nozzle random side loads on the roll, pitch, yaw, and translational dynamics of a rigid-body rocket model.

  20. Calculation of propulsive nozzle flowfields in multidiffusing chemically reacting environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth John

    1994-04-01

    An advanced engineering model has been developed to aid in the analysis and design of hydrogen/oxygen chemical rocket engines. The complete multispecies, chemically reacting and multidiffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, including the Soret thermal diffusion and the Dufour energy transfer terms. In addition to the spectrum of multispecies aspects developed, the model developed in this study is also conservative in axisymmetric flow for both inviscid and viscous flow environments and the boundary conditions employ a viscous, chemically reacting, reference plane characteristics method. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film cooled nozzle, and a transpiration cooled plug and spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 and the 25 lbf film cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements when all of the chemical reaction and diffusion terms are considered. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. The Soret thermal diffusion term is demonstrated to have a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle in both the laminar flow 1030:1 nozzle and the turbulent flow plug and spool nozzle analysis cases performed. Further, the Soret term was shown to represent an important fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in a transpiration cooled rocket engine.

  1. An experimental study on jets issuing from elliptic inclined nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on an experimental flow visualisation and digital particle image velocimetry investigation on forced jets exhausting from aspect ratio equal to three elliptic nozzles with exits inclined at 30° and 60°. Flow images show that shear layer instabilities and subsequent vortex roll-ups are formed parallel to the inclined nozzle exits at 30° incline and that rapid re-orientation of the vortex roll-ups occurs at 60° incline. Flow observations also show that strong axis-switching occurs in a non-inclined elliptic nozzle. However, 30° and 60° elliptic inclined nozzles produce significant distortions to and suppression of the axis-switching behaviour, respectively. As a result, flow stresses and turbulent kinetic energy distributions become increasingly asymmetric. Their coherency and magnitudes along the shorter nozzle lengths also vary significantly. This can be attributed to the dissimilar formations of vortex roll-ups and rib structures, as well as unequal mutual interactions between them as the incline-angle increases. Lastly, results also show that unlike circular inclined nozzles, elliptic inclined nozzles do not produce serpentine-shaped jet columns nor lead to significant lateral jet-spread at large incline-angles.

  2. Unsteady transitions of separation patterns in single expansion ramp nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Xu, J.; Yu, K.; Mo, J.

    2015-11-01

    The single expansion ramp nozzle is one of the optimal configurations for a planar rocket-based combined cycle engine because of its good integration and self-adaptability at off-design operation. The single expansion ramp nozzle is seriously overexpanded when the vehicle is at low speed, resulting in complex flow separation phenomena. Several separation patterns have been found in the single expansion ramp nozzle. Numerical simulations have shown that the transition between these separation patterns occurs in the nozzle startup and shutdown processes. However, only a few relevant experimental studies have been reported. This study reproduces the nozzle startup and shutdown processes using wind tunnel experiments. Two restricted shock separation patterns are observed in the experiment, namely, a separation bubble either forms on the ramp or the flap. The detailed flow fields in the transition processes are captured using a high-speed camera. The shock wave structures in the two separation patterns, influences of the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) on the separation patterns and changes of the shock waves in the transition processes are discussed in detail. Shock wave instabilities accompany the separation transition, which usually takes less than 5 ms. The nozzle pressure ratios corresponding to the separation pattern transition are different in the startup and shutdown processes, which leads to a hysteresis effect.

  3. A shear reversal nozzle for efficient gas atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.W.

    1992-12-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to establish definitive rationale and technical drivers for atomizing nozzles that employ the shear reversal principle. In a shear reversing nozzle, the liquid to be atomized is introduced into a supersonic gas flow and is allowed to accelerate to a velocity near that of the gas before it exits the nozzle. The pressure conditions at the exit of the nozzle are managed in such a manner to produce a strong normal shock wave in the gas flow field. The shock wave causes a large reduction in the gas velocity at the exit of the nozzle. Because the liquid is traveling near the initial gas velocity as it exits the nozzle, it now encounters a relatively slow moving gas flow field, which causes further reductions in the particle size. An elementary atomizing model is presented comprising two distinct processes: (1) particle divisions and (2) particle shearing. From the model, the primary process variables were identified and strategies were presented to maximize the production of fine diameter particles. In addition, an elementary finite difference model was presented to aid in the determination of the overall length of the shear reversing nozzle. Finally, a procedure was given to establish proper sizing of the components involved.

  4. Droplet formation under the effect of a flexible nozzle plate.

    PubMed

    Sangplung, S; Liburdy, J A

    2009-09-01

    Droplet formation from a flexible nozzle plate driven by a prescribed-waveform excitation of a piezoelectric is numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with the volume of fluid (VOF) method. The droplet generator with a flexible nozzle plate, which is free to vibrate due to the pressure acting on the plate, is modeled in a CFD computational domain. The CFD analysis includes the fluid-structure interaction between fluid and a flexible plate using large deflection theory. The problem is characterized by the nondimensional variables based on the capillary parameters of time, velocity, and pressure. The CFD model is validated with the experiment results. This study examines the characteristics of the applied waveforms and nozzle plate material properties to change the vibrational characteristics of the nozzle plate. The effect of fluid properties on the droplet formation process is also investigated focusing on surface tension and viscous forces. Increasing the impulse of the piezoelectric can be used to cause a higher droplet velocity and it is shown that the vibration of the nozzle plate has a strong effect on the droplet velocity, shape, and volume. Surface tension has a strong influence on the droplet formation characteristics in contrast to viscous forces. For the combination of a fluid with high surface tension and the most flexible nozzle plate, this system cannot cause the droplet ejected out of the nozzle. PMID:19501837

  5. Static investigation of several yaw vectoring concepts on nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, M. L.; Berrier, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    A test has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the effects on nozzle internal performance of several yaw vectoring concepts. Nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with throat areas simulating dry and afterburning power settings and single expansion ramp nozzles with a throat area simulating a dry power setting were modified for yaw thrust vectoring. Forward-thrust and pitch-vectored nozzle configurations were tested with each yaw vectoring concept. Four basic yaw vectoring concepts were investigated on the nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles: (1) translating sidewall; (2) downstream (of throat) flaps; (3) upstream (of throat) port/flap; and (4) powered rudder. Selected combinations of the rudder with downstream flaps or upstream port/flap were also tested. A single yaw vectoring concept, post-exit flaps, was investigated on the single expansion ramp nozzles. All testing was conducted at static (no external flow) conditions and nozzle pressure ratios varied from 2.0 up to 10.0.

  6. Final data report: Plenum-Nozzle Flow Characteristics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; May, C.P.

    1993-09-01

    A database was developed for the flow of water through a scaled nozzle of a Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor inlet plenum. The water flow in the nozzle was such that it ranged from stratified to water-solid conditions. Data on the entry of air into the nozzle and plenum as a function of water flow are of interest in loss-of-coolant studies. The scaled nozzle was 0.44 m long, had an entrance diameter of 0.095 m, an exit opening of 0.058 m {times} 0.356 m, and an exit hydraulic diameter approximately equal to that of the inlet. Within the nozzle were three flow-straightening vanes which divided the flow path into four channels. This report includes all of the data taken for the first phase of the Plenum-Nozzle and Cold-Leg Vertical Process-Pipe Flow Characteristics Experiments: Plenum-Nozzle Experiment. Those data include daily reference checks, to determine proper operation of all instrumentation before the experiment was run, and the actual data themselves in engineering units. Not included are the videographic data which are available for each test run. However, there are four (4) 3/4 in. -video tapes of visual data and the specific tape and the location on that tape are indicated for each test run on the data sheets. The database is from sixteen test modes (e.g., flow direction, location of pipe break, air-water or just water, single nozzle or three nozzle). The flow rates ranged to approximately 320 gpm ({approx}10 kgpm prototypic) for both air and water. All data were taken at steady-state, isothermal (300 K{plus_minus}1.5 K), and atmospheric pressure conditions.

  7. Application of LBB to a nozzle-pipe interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.J.; Sohn, G.H.; Kim, Y.J.

    1997-04-01

    Typical LBB (Leak-Before-Break) analysis is performed for the highest stress location for each different type of material in the high energy pipe line. In most cases, the highest stress occurs at the nozzle and pipe interface location at the terminal end. The standard finite element analysis approach to calculate J-Integral values at the crack tip utilizes symmetry conditions when modeling near the nozzle as well as away from the nozzle region to minimize the model size and simplify the calculation of J-integral values at the crack tip. A factor of two is typically applied to the J-integral value to account for symmetric conditions. This simplified analysis can lead to conservative results especially for small diameter pipes where the asymmetry of the nozzle-pipe interface is ignored. The stiffness of the residual piping system and non-symmetries of geometry along with different material for the nozzle, safe end and pipe are usually omitted in current LBB methodology. In this paper, the effects of non-symmetries due to geometry and material at the pipe-nozzle interface are presented. Various LBB analyses are performed for a small diameter piping system to evaluate the effect a nozzle has on the J-integral calculation, crack opening area and crack stability. In addition, material differences between the nozzle and pipe are evaluated. Comparison is made between a pipe model and a nozzle-pipe interface model, and a LBB PED (Piping Evaluation Diagram) curve is developed to summarize the results for use by piping designers.

  8. Fuel Injector Nozzle For An Internal Combustion Engine

    DOEpatents

    Cavanagh, Mark S.; Urven, Jr.; Roger L.; Lawrence, Keith E.

    2006-04-25

    A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

  9. Fuel injector nozzle for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Cavanagh, Mark S.; Urven, Jr., Roger L.; Lawrence, Keith E.

    2008-11-04

    A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

  10. Fuel injector nozzle for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Cavanagh, Mark S.; Urven, Jr., Roger L.; Lawrence, Keith E.

    2007-11-06

    A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

  11. Effusive atomic oven nozzle design using an aligned microcapillary array

    SciTech Connect

    Senaratne, Ruwan Rajagopal, Shankari V.; Geiger, Zachary A.; Fujiwara, Kurt M.; Lebedev, Vyacheslav; Weld, David M.

    2015-02-15

    We present a simple and inexpensive design for a multichannel effusive oven nozzle which provides improved atomic beam collimation and thus extended oven lifetimes. Using this design, we demonstrate an atomic lithium source suitable for trapped-atom experiments. At a nozzle temperature of 525 °C, the collimated atomic beam flux directly after the nozzle is 1.2 × 10{sup 14} atoms/s with a peak beam intensity greater than 5.0 × 10{sup 16} atoms/s/sr. This suggests an oven lifetime of several decades of continuous operation.

  12. Numerical simulation of film-cooled ablative rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Beard, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research effort was to evaluate the impact of incorporating an additional cooling port downstream between the injector and nozzle throat in the NASA Fast Track chamber. A numerical model of the chamber was developed for the analysis. The analysis did not model ablation but instead correlated the initial ablation rate with the initial nozzle wall temperature distribution. The results of this study provide guidance in the development of a potentially lighter, second generation ablative rocket nozzle which maintains desired performance levels.

  13. Effect of Delta Tabs on Free Jets from Complex Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of 'delta-tabs' on the mixing and noise characteristics of two model-scale nozzles have been investigated experimentally. The two models are (1) an eight-lobed nozzle simulating the primary flow of a mixer-ejector configuration considered for the HSCT program, (2) an axisymmetric nozzle with a centerbody simulating the 'ACE' configuration also considered for the HSCT program. Details of the flow-field for model (1) are explored, while primarily the noise-field is explored for model (2). Effects of different tab configurations are documented.

  14. Remote installation of PWR steam generator nozzle dams

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, A.

    1994-12-31

    Funded by a grant from the US Department of Energy, prototype equipment for remote installation of steam generator nozzle dams has been developed. The new nozzle dam design eliminates the need for personnel entry into the steam generator bowl and does not require installation of a sophisticated robotic arm. An innovative new bolt allows simple remote attachment to the existing nozzle seal ring in Westinghouse-type steam generators. Installation is performed manually away from the high radiation emanating from the steam generator manway.

  15. Factors which influence the analysis and design of ejector nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the viscous interaction between the primary and secondary streams of ejector nozzles was developed. The analysis accounts for real sonic-line effects and the streamwise variation in stream mixing and boundary layer within the ejector. The aspects of the analysis are explained and illustrated by applying the theory to a variety of ejector configurations including cylindrical shroud, contoured flap and plug nozzles. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and data to show the importance of various analytical assumptions and such design variables as diameter ratio, spacing ratio, total temperature ratio, and primary nozzle geometry.

  16. Factors which influence the analysis and design of ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the viscous interaction between the primary and secondary streams of ejector nozzles was developed. The analysis accounts for real sonic line effects and the streamwise variation in stream mixing and boundary layer within the ejector. The aspects of the analysis are explained and illustrated by applying the theory to a variety of ejector configurations including cylindrical shroud, contoured flap and plug nozzles. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and data to show the importance of various analytical assumptions and such design variables as diameter ratio, spacing ratio, total temperature ratio, and primary nozzle geometry.

  17. Fuel injector nozzle for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, Mark S.; Urven, Jr., Roger L.; Lawrence, Keith E.

    2011-03-22

    A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

  18. Probabilistic assessment of space nuclear propulsion system nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Ball, Richard D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    In assessing the reliability of a space nuclear propulsion system (SNPS) nozzle, uncertainties associated with the following design parameters were considered: geometry, boundary conditions, material behavior, and thermal and pressure loads. A preliminary assessment of the reliability was performed using NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress), a finite-element computer code developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The sensitivity of the nozzle reliability to the uncertainties in the random variables was quantified. With respect to the effective stress, preliminary results showed that the nozzle spatial geometry uncertainties have the most significant effect at low probabilities whereas the inner wall temperature has the most significant effect at higher probabilities.

  19. Vectoring Single Expansion Ramp Nozzle (VSERN) static model test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eames, D. J. H.; Mason, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    A variable throat-area, side-vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle (VSERN) concept's internal performance characteristics are studied with a view to controlling the bypass flow of an unmixed turbofan engine. Static tests have been conducted on VSERN at NASA-Langley using a variety of parametric models giving attention to the effects of upstream bend angle, ramp geometry, area ratio, and nozzle pressure ratio on static thrust and flow performance. Advantages of VSERN over the conventional vectoring axisymmetric convergent side-nozzles typified by those of the Harrier's Pegasus engine.

  20. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.