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Sample records for assess functional outcome

  1. Assessing function and functional outcome in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth; Brekke, John S

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of schizophrenia can only be made in the presence of a loss of functioning in domains such as employment, independent living, and social functioning. Accurately measuring functioning is central to research on the course of the disorder, treatment and rehabilitation outcomes, and biosocial factors in schizophrenia. Assessments of functional disability have described three dimensions of functioning: functional capacity, functional performance, and functional outcome. The "competence/performance" distinction refers to the observation that an individual may demonstrate an ability to perform a functional task (capacity) but may not do so in her own community environment (performance). Functional outcomes are the result of both capacity and performance. Several recent reviews have compared the characteristics, reliability, and validity of various functional assessment instruments. Two major initiatives are underway to gather additional comparative data about functional assessment strategies. Recently, both the recovery movement and the recognition of the role of environmental factors in functioning have raised questions about the conceptual content of the functioning construct (construct validity). For instance, several studies have demonstrated that features of functioning need not track together over the course of the illness. In addition, the notion of recovery emphasizes processes like community integration and subjective well-being that are not static outcomes but are continually evolving features of the life course in chronic illness. Findings on the dynamic role of environmental moderators such as support and opportunity also present challenges to scientific constructs. For these reasons and others, the ecological validity of functional assessments has become a central concern. Both the verisimilitude and veridicality of functional assessments can be empirically assessed, but to date very few studies have measured the extent to which functional

  2. Functional outcomes assessment in shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, James D; Beckmann, James T; Granger, Erin; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2014-01-01

    The effective evaluation and management of orthopaedic conditions including shoulder disorders relies upon understanding the level of disability created by the disease process. Validated outcome measures are critical to the evaluation process. Traditionally, outcome measures have been physician derived objective evaluations including range of motion and radiologic evaluations. However, these measures can marginalize a patient’s perception of their disability or outcome. As a result of these limitations, patient self-reported outcomes measures have become popular over the last quarter century and are currently primary tools to evaluate outcomes of treatment. Patient reported outcomes measures can be general health related quality of life measures, health utility measures, region specific health related quality of life measures or condition specific measures. Several patients self-reported outcomes measures have been developed and validated for evaluating patients with shoulder disorders. Computer adaptive testing will likely play an important role in the arsenal of measures used to evaluate shoulder patients in the future. The purpose of this article is to review the general health related quality-of-life measures as well as the joint-specific and condition specific measures utilized in evaluating patients with shoulder conditions. Advances in computer adaptive testing as it relates to assessing dysfunction in shoulder conditions will also be reviewed. PMID:25405091

  3. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  4. Multidimensional assessment of functional outcomes of medialization thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-08-01

    Medialization thyroplasty (MT) is the most widely used laryngeal framework phonosurgical procedure for managing glottic incompetence secondary to unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of MT in 32 UVFP patients, comparing multidimensional perceptual and instrumental measures of voice before and after surgery, and to evaluate how close to normal that postoperative voice measure became. Video laryngostroboscopy (VLS), auditory perceptive evaluation of voice, the patients' self-evaluation of hoarseness on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and calculation of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), analysis of objective acoustic voice parameters, quantitative assessment of phonetograms and measurement of maximum phonation time were conducted. Vocal function was evaluated before the surgery and for the period from 1 month to 3 years (Mo 1.0 month; Me 2.0 months) after MT. VLS confirmed remarkable medialization of the paralyzed vocal fold. As a consequence, hoarseness and breathiness were found to be significantly decreased after MT. Pitch and intensity range and phonetogram area were significantly increased. A significant decrease of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy reflected improvement of the stability of acoustic signal and a more efficient pattern of phonation. Thus, the perceptual and acoustic voice parameters studied showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) between preoperative and postoperative voices, and these objective measurements of voice changes provided accurate and documentary evidence of the results of surgical treatment. A high degree of patient satisfaction with the MT was confirmed by a significant decrease of VHI and hoarseness on VAS. Thus, results of the present investigation confirm the functionality and effectiveness of MT in patient voice rehabilitation with UVFP. However, the means of acoustic voice parameters measured in the study did not reach normal limits

  5. Maternal Depression, Family Functioning, and Child Outcomes: A Narrative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickstein, Susan; St. Andre, Martin; Sameroff, Arnold; Seifer, Ronald; Schiller, Masha

    1999-01-01

    Investigated differences in family narratives between mothers with and those without current depressive symptoms as an indicator of family functioning. Found that Family Narrative Consortium measures of narrative coherence distinguished level of symptom severity. Found that more coherent narratives were associated with marital satisfaction,…

  6. Clinical outcome assessment in malignant glioma trials: measuring signs, symptoms, and functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Coons, Stephen Joel; Corboy, John R; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Mendoza, Tito R; Wefel, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    The shared goal of all parties developing therapeutics against malignant gliomas is to positively impact the lives of people affected by these cancers. Clinical outcome assessment (COA) tools, including measures of patient-reported outcome, performance outcome, clinician-reported outcome, and observer-reported outcome, allow patient-focused assessments to complement traditional efficacy measures such as overall survival and radiographic endpoints. This review examines the properties of various COA measures used in malignant glioma clinical trials to date and cross references their content to the priority signs, symptoms, and functional limitations defined through a community survey conducted by the National Brain Tumor Society. The overarching goal of this initiative is to identify COA measures that are feasible and have appropriate psychometric properties for use in this patient population as well as highlight where further development is needed. PMID:26989128

  7. A comparison of prospective and retrospective assessment of functional outcome after rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Bradley, Michael P; Tocci, Stephen; Henn, Ralph F; Rey, Jesus; Green, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Prospective outcome studies are generally considered to be better than retrospective studies. The purpose of this study was to assess correlations between prospective and retrospective outcome assessment after rotator cuff repair. One-hundred and twelve patients (118 shoulders) with chronic rotator cuff tears were evaluated at a mean of 54 months (34-85) after rotator cuff repair, using several outcome measures including a retrospective assessment of improvement. The retrospective assessment of post-operative pain, function, and quality of life had fair correlations with the prospectively determined improvement (R = .23-.25, P < .01). Post-operative patient satisfaction was more highly correlated with all retrospective evaluations than with the prospective improvement in all functional outcome measures. Retrospective and prospective evaluations of the outcome of rotator cuff repair are different. Patient satisfaction has a greater correlation with retrospective outcomes. Retrospective evaluation may aid in supplementing prospective evaluations, as it may better reflect a patient's perception of the success after surgery. PMID:18693118

  8. Total hip arthroplasty outcomes assessment using functional and radiographic scores to compare canine systems.

    PubMed

    Iwata, D; Broun, H C; Black, A P; Preston, C A; Anderson, G I

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective multi-centre study was carried out in order to compare outcomes between cemented and uncemented total hip arthoplasties (THA). A quantitative orthopaedic outcome assessment scoring system was devised in order to relate functional outcome to a numerical score, to allow comparison between treatments and amongst centres. The system combined a radiographic score and a clinical score. Lower scores reflect better outcomes than higher scores. Consecutive cases of THA were included from two specialist practices between July 2002 and December 2005. The study included 46 THA patients (22 uncemented THA followed for 8.3 +/- 4.7M and 24 cemented THA for 26.0 +/- 15.7M) with a mean age of 4.4 +/- 3.3 years at surgery. Multi-variable linear and logistical regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age at surgery, surgeon, follow-up time, uni- versus bilateral disease, gender and body weight. The differences between treatment groups in terms of functional scores or total scores were not significant (p > 0.05). Radiographic scores were different between treatment groups. However, these scores were usually assessed within two months of surgery and proved unreliable predictors of functional outcome (p > 0.05). The findings reflect relatively short-term follow-up, especially for the uncemented group, and do not include clinician-derived measures, such as goniometry and thigh circumference. Longer-term follow-up for the radiographic assessments is essential. A prospective study including the clinician-derived outcomes needs to be performed in order to validate the outcome instrument in its modified form. PMID:18536848

  9. Functional and Attitudinal Outcomes of Teaching Functional Assessment to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Mark A.; Smucker, William; Logue, Everett

    2001-01-01

    Third-year medical students (n=67) conducted structured functional assessments of elderly patients and completed diagnostic/therapeutic plans. Students averaged seven problems and four recommendations per patient. Significant increases in their knowledge of and comfort with comprehensive geriatric assessment were found. (Contains 25 references.)…

  10. Outcome prediction in sepsis: Speckle tracking echocardiography based assessment of myocardial function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a relatively novel and sensitive method for assessing ventricular function and may unmask myocardial dysfunction not appreciated with conventional echocardiography. The association of ventricular dysfunction and prognosis in sepsis is unclear. We sought to evaluate frequency and prognostic value of biventricular function, assessed by STE in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Over an eighteen-month period, sixty patients were prospectively imaged by transthoracic echocardiography within 24 hours of meeting severe sepsis criteria. Myocardial function assessment included conventional measures and STE. Association with mortality was assessed over 12 months. Results Mortality was 33% at 30 days (n = 20) and 48% at 6 months (n = 29). 32% of patients had right ventricle (RV) dysfunction based on conventional assessment compared to 72% assessed with STE. 33% of patients had left ventricle (LV) dysfunction based on ejection fraction compared to 69% assessed with STE. RV free wall longitudinal strain was moderately associated with six-month mortality (OR 1.1, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.02-1.26, p = 0.02, area under the curve, AUC, 0.68). No other conventional echocardiography or STE method was associated with survival. After adjustment (for example, for mechanical ventilation) severe RV free wall longitudinal strain impairment remained associated with six-month mortality. Conclusion STE may unmask systolic dysfunction not seen with conventional echocardiography. RV dysfunction unmasked by STE, especially when severe, was associated with high mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. LV dysfunction was not associated with survival outcomes. PMID:25015102

  11. The Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) in schizophrenia and its relation to functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Katz, Noomi; Tadmor, Inbal; Felzen, Batya; Hartman-Maeir, Adina

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish further the validity of the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) in a population with schizophrenia. Specific objectives were: to examine the construct validity and sensitivity of the BADS in differentiating between adult inpatients during an acute episode of illness, adult outpatients in the chronic stages of illness, and healthy controls; and to examine the predictive validity of the BADS regarding functional outcomes within the chronic group. Participants were 30 inpatients during an acute episode of their illness; 31 outpatients in the chronic stage; and 93 healthy controls. Instruments included the BADS, the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination (Cognistat) and the Routine Task Inventory (RTI). Significant differences in BADS scores were found between participants with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and between both groups of patients, showing the chronic group to have more deficits in executive functions. In addition, within the chronic group the BADS was found to be a significant predictor of two of the RTI outcome areas, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and communication, beyond that accounted for by basic cognitive skills. These results support the validity of the BADS within the schizophrenic population, and highlight the importance of measuring executive functions for rehabilitation. PMID:17454693

  12. Parenteral nutrition in adult inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts: assessment of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2006-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common comorbidity that places inpatients at risk of complications, infections, long length of stay, higher costs, and increased mortality. Thus, nutrition support has become an important therapeutic adjunctive to the care of these patients. For patients unable to feed themselves, nutrition can be delivered via the parenteral or enteral routes. The formulations used to deliver nutrients and the route of nutrient delivery, absorption, and processing differ substantially between parenteral and enteral nutrition. Over the past two decades, many randomised clinical trials have assessed the effects of parenteral versus enteral nutrition on outcomes (ie, complications, infections, length of stay, costs, mortality) in diverse inpatient populations. From a search of medical publications, studies were selected that assessed important clinical outcomes of parenteral versus enteral feeding or intravenous fluids in patients with trauma/burn injuries, surgery, cancer, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, critical illness, liver failure, acute renal failure, and organ transplantation. Our goal was to determine the optimum route of feeding in these patient groups. The available evidence lends support to the use of enteral over parenteral feeding in inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:16581410

  13. Assessing Instructional Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; O'Neil, Harold F.

    This paper presents a discussion of outcome assessment that puts into context how measurement has evolved to its present state. Several types of testing and assessment options are considered against a background of validity. Criterion-referenced measurement is discussed extensively in terms of history, field study, identity problems, intellectual…

  14. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  15. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  16. Surgical management of acromegaly: Long term functional outcome analysis and assessment of recurrent/residual disease

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Deepu; Das, Nitu K.; Sharma, Siddhiraj; Jindal, Yogesh; Jain, Vijendra K.; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Context: Functional growth hormone producing adenomas have long-term deleterious effects on the visual apparatus, the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems, and often predispose to malignancies. Since persistence of acromegaly affects outcome and quality of life, therapeutic interventions become mandatory. Aim: This study represents an analysis of long-term clinical and endocrinal outcome of 115 patients of acromegaly after surgical management. Setting and Design: Tertiary care retrospective study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients (male:female ratio: 1:1.09) with acromegalic features were studied. Apart from acromegalic features, their main clinical presentation also included headache, diminution of vision, field defects, ptosis, irregular menstruation, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Six of them presented with apoplexy. Their preoperative endocrinal evaluation included basal and suppressed growth hormone (GH), prolactin and thyroid levels. On the basis of axial and coronal CT scan or multiplanar MR imaging or both, the tumors were classified according to their suprasellar and parasellar extension (Hardy's grade). Transnasal trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) (n = 37) and sublabial, rhinoseptal TSS (n = 72) were the preferred approaches. Six patients with significant parasellar extensions underwent trans-cranial explorations. The patients were followed up at 6 and 12 weeks and then at 6 monthly intervals. Hormonal and CT/MR evaluation were also done. Attainment of random GH value less than 2.5 µg/L, and the nadir GH value after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) less than 1 µg/L were used as the criteria of cure. Findings: The patients were preoperatively in Hardy's tumor grade 0 (29), A (21), A+E (3), B (21), B+E (5), C (9), C+E (10), D (1) D+E (11), E (5), respectively. One hundred and one patients were available for follow-up (FU; median FU duration: 84 months; range: 6 to 132 months). Surgical cure was achieved

  17. Organizational Effectiveness through Assessing Institutional Outcomes: Measuring the Transfer Function at CCTC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, John; Danek, Kim

    This study assesses the academic performance of Capital Community-Technical College (CCTC) students who transferred to senior institutions in Connecticut and neighboring states between the academic years of 1993-94 and 1996-97. It was designed to address the students' experience at CCTC as compared to the students' experiences at their senior…

  18. Measuring Treatment Outcome for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbances: Discriminant Validity and Clinical Significance of the Child and Adolescent Functioning Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Kimberlee M.; Roberts, Michael C.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Randall, Camille J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the use of a popular measure, the Children and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS), in treatment outcome research. The sample included 70 children who had been discharged from an elementary therapeutic classroom (Intensive Mental Health Program). Significant relationships were found between decreases in CAFAS scores and…

  19. Outcomes assessment in the NCCN.

    PubMed

    Weeks, J C

    1997-11-01

    Outcomes assessment has two primary goals: the evaluation of treatments and the evaluation of quality of care. Data on the outcomes associated with specific interventions may provide an empiric basis for guidelines in areas for which no randomized trial data are available. Also, monitoring of patterns of care and outcomes is an essential component of institutional efforts to implement guidelines and to benchmark themselves against regional and national norms. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has adopted a three-phase approach to its outcomes assessment program. Phase 1, already completed, involved taking a systematic inventory of members' existing institutional data sources. Phase 2, which is currently in progress, entails pooling data from existing outcomes data bases. In particular, tumor registry data from the National Cancer Data Base are being used to examine patterns of care and outcomes in NCCN institutions and to benchmark them against national norms. Phase 3, begun within the past year, involves the creation of a uniform outcomes assessment system for the NCCN. PMID:9430183

  20. The power of outcomes: FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool -- Initial assessment.

    PubMed

    Hart, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate how outcomes assessment can assist in describing clients receiving rehabilitation in occupational health rehabilitation clinics and to describe the preliminary assessment of internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool. METHODS: 266 adults referred for acute work rehabilitation (AWR), work conditioning/hardening (WC/WH) or a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) comprised the data set. Clients were treated between July 1998 and January 1999 in 15 clinics from 6 states by 46 clinicians participating in the Focus on Therapeutic Outcomes (FOTO) national rehabilitation database beta test. For AWR and WC/WH, clients completed a health status questionnaire on intake and discharge, and health status was assessed prior to the FCE. Comprehensive demographic data were collected describing the clinics, clinicians, clients and work status collected 2 weeks following discharge. RESULTS: Internal consistency reliability coefficients for the health status scores ranged from 0.57 to 0.89. Construct validity was supported. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate the power of collecting outcomes from a variety of constructs for clients receiving industrial rehabilitation services. Initial reliability and construct validity findings were adequate and support continuing data analyses. PMID:12441480

  1. Premorbid functioning, cognitive functioning, symptoms and outcome in schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Addington, J; Addington, D

    1993-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between premorbid functioning, outcome, cognitive functioning and positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Cognitive functioning and symptoms were examined longitudinally in a sample of 39 subjects with schizophrenia (according to the DSM-III criteria). Subjects were assessed at admission to hospital and six months later during a period of relative remission. Premorbid functioning was significantly associated with negative symptoms but not with positive symptoms at both the acute phase and the remitted phase of the illness. Outcome was also associated with negative symptoms at admission and with both positive and negative symptoms at follow-up. Deficits on cognitive tests of verbal reasoning and concept formation were significantly associated with poor premorbid functioning and outcome. PMID:8461276

  2. Techniques for objective outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Hesbach, Amie Lamoreaux

    2007-11-01

    Companion animal rehabilitation, a collaborative practice of physical therapy and veterinary medicine, can only demonstrate the effectiveness of its theories, techniques, interventions, and modalities through evidence-based practice, utilizing standardized, reliable, and valid outcome measures, correlated with objective diagnostic data. This essay examines existing and potential objective outcome measures utilized in companion animal rehabilitation and physical therapy regarding pain, vital signs, body condition and composition, range of motion, muscle strength, inflammation, functional mobility, and gait. Discussion is included of the traditional disablement model and the evolution of the physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis, and plan of care. PMID:18198782

  3. Clinical application of optical coherence tomography in combination with functional diagnostics: advantages and limitations for diagnosis and assessment of therapy outcome in central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schliesser, Joshua A; Gallimore, Gary; Kunjukunju, Nancy; Sabates, Nelson R; Koulen, Peter; Sabates, Felix N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While identifying functional and structural parameters of the retina in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) patients, this study investigated how an optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based diagnosis can be significantly supplemented with functional diagnostic tools and to what degree the determination of disease severity and therapy outcome can benefit from diagnostics complementary to OCT. Methods CSCR patients were evaluated prospectively with microperimetry (MP) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to determine retinal sensitivity function and retinal thickness as outcome measures along with measures of visual acuity (VA). Patients received clinical care that involved focal laser photocoagulation or pharmacotherapy targeting inflammation and neovascularization. Results Correlation of clinical parameters with a focus on functional parameters, VA, and mean retinal sensitivity, as well as on the structural parameter mean retinal thickness, showed that functional measures were similar in diagnostic power. A moderate correlation was found between OCT data and the standard functional assessment of VA; however, a strong correlation between OCT and MP data showed that diagnostic measures cannot always be used interchangeably, but that complementary use is of higher clinical value. Conclusion The study indicates that integrating SD-OCT with MP provides a more complete diagnosis with high clinical relevance for complex, difficult to quantify diseases such as CSCR. PMID:25473259

  4. Functional outcomes of face transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, S; Kueckelhaus, M; Pauzenberger, R; Bueno, E M; Pomahac, B

    2015-01-01

    In this study we provide a compilation of functional impairments before and improvements after face transplantation (FT) of five FT recipients of our institution and all FTs reported in current literature. Functional outcome included the ability to smell, breath, eat, speak, grimace and facial sensation. Before FT, all our patients revealed compromised ability to breath, eat, speak, grimace and experience facial sensation. The ability to smell was compromised in two of our five patients. Two patients were dependent on tracheostomy and one on gastrostomy tubes. After FT, all abilities were significantly improved and all patients were independent from artificial air airways and feeding tubes. Including data given in current literature about the other 24 FT recipients in the world, the abilities to smell, eat and feel were enhanced in 100% of cases, while the abilities of breathing, speaking and facial expressions were ameliorated in 93%, 71% and 76% of cases, respectively. All patients that required gastrostomy and 91% of patients depending on tracheostomy were decannulated after FT. Unfortunately, outcomes remain unreported in all other cases and therefore we are unable to comment on improvements. PMID:25359281

  5. Bohler’s angle’s role in assessing the injury severity and functional outcome of internal fixation for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Controversy exits over the role of Böhler’s angle in assessing the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures and predicting the functional outcome following internal fixation. This study aims to investigate whether a correlation exists between Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced calcaneal fractures, and between surgical improvement of Böhler’s angle and functional outcome. Methods Patients treated operatively for unilateral closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from January 1, 2004 to March 31, 2008 were identified. The Böhler’s angles of both calcaneus were measured, and the measurement of the uninjured foot was used as its normal control. The difference in the value of Böhler’s angle measured preoperatively or postoperatively between the angle of the injured foot and that of the contralateral calcaneus were calculated, respectively. The change in Böhler’s angle by ratio was calculated by dividing the difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus by its normal control. The injury severity was assessed according to Sanders classification. The functional outcomes were assessed using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores. Results 274 patients were included into the study with a mean follow-up duration of 71 months. According to Sanders classification, the fracture pattern included 105 type II, 121 type III and 48 type IV fractures. According to American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scoring system, the excellent, good, fair and poor results were achieved in 104, 132, 27, and 11 patients, respectively. The preoperative Böhler’s angle, difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus, and change in Böhler’s angle by ratio each has a significant correlation with Sanders classification (rs=−0.178, P=0.003; rs=−0.174, P=0.004; rs=−0.172, P=0.005, respectively), however, is not correlated with functional outcome

  6. Surgical Outcomes and Correlation of the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale and Modified Japanese Orthopedic Association Assessment Scales in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Azhari, Shirzad; Shazadi, Sohrab; Khayat Kashany, Hamid; Nayeb Aghaei, Hossein; Mohammadi, Hassan Reza

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Purpose Clinical outcome study comparing the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CNFDS) and modified Japanese orthopedic association (mJOA) assessment scales in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Overview of Literature Comparison of instruments that measure patient-reported outcomes is needed. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted. Ninety five patients with CSM were entered into the study and completed the CNFDS and the mJOA preoperatively and postoperatively. Correlation between the CNFDS and the mJOA was evaluated preoperatively and at the end of follow-up. Responsiveness to change of CNFDS and mJOA was also assessed. Clinical outcomes were also measured with the recovery rate of mJOA score at end of follow-up. Results The mean age of patients was 58.2 (standard deviation, SD=8.7) years. Mean follow-up was 2.1 years (range, 1 to 4 years). The mJOA correlated strongly with the CNFDS score preoperatively and postoperatively (r=–0.81 and –0.82, respectively; p<0.001). The CNFDS and the mJOA were able to detect changes after the surgery (p<0.001). The mean mJOA recovery rate was 51.8% (SD=13.1%). Conclusions Surgery for the treatment of patients with CSM is an efficacious procedure. CNFDS and mJOA scores have a strong correlation in measuring disability among CSM patients. PMID:27340528

  7. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Johannes M; Camacho, Juan C; Kokabi, Nima; Xing, Minzhi; Kim, Hyun S

    2015-01-01

    Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1) changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2) contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement), which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies. PMID:26854170

  8. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Camacho, Juan C.; Kokabi, Nima; Xing, Minzhi; Kim, Hyun S.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1) changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2) contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement), which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies. PMID:26854170

  9. Learning Outcomes: Skills or Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciancone, Tom; Tout, Dave

    Participants in a teacher workshop compared these two approaches to learning outcomes in adult numeracy: (1) teaching mathematical skills and (2) using and applying mathematics from real life. The first approach was illustrated by an Ontario, Canada, program based on traditional school math, whose outcomes are skill-based and are the following:…

  10. Functional outcomes for clinical evaluation of implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Francesco; Carr, Alan B; Chang, Ting-Ling; Estafanous, Emad W; Garrett, Neal R; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Koka, Sreenivas; Laine, Juhani; Osswald, Martin; Reintsema, Harry; Rieger, Jana; Roumanas, Eleni; Salinas, Thomas J; Stanford, Clark M; Wolfaardt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The functional outcomes related to treating patients afflicted with tooth loss are an important hallmark in substantiating prosthodontic intervention. The Oral Rehabilitation Outcomes Network (ORONet) conducted two international workshops to develop a core set of outcome measures, including a functional domain. The process followed the general format used in the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) workshops to develop consensus for clinical outcome measures in arthritis research, which included: developing a comprehensive list of potential outcomes in the literature; submitting them to a filter for validity, clinical discrimination, and feasibility; and ranking those measures meeting all the filter criteria for relative value. The search was conducted to include functional assessments of speech, swallowing, mastication, nutrition, sensation, and motor function as they relate to dental implant therapies. This literature review surveyed 173 papers that produced some result of these descriptors in the functional domain. Of these, 67 papers reported on functional assessments and further defined objective and subjective outcomes. Many of these results were patient-perceived improvements in function, while others were objective assessments based on established methodologies and instruments. Objective evaluations of masticatory function and speech may meet criteria for validity and discriminability for selected interventions, but are generally not feasible for routine use in clinical care settings. The current recommendation is to employ a well-validated survey instrument that covers mastication and speech, such as the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14, short form), recognizing that patient perceptions of function may differ from objective ability. PMID:23998137

  11. Three-dimensional assessment of hand outcome

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, HJCR

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patient reported outcome measures are central to National Health Service quality of care assessments. This study investigated the benefit of elective hand surgery by the simultaneous analysis of pain, function and appearance, using a three-dimensional (3D) graphical model for evaluating and presenting outcome. Methods A total of 188 patients scheduled for surgery completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires grading the severity of their pain, dysfunction and deformity of their hand(s). Scores were plotted on a 3D graph to demonstrate the degree of ‘normalisation’ following surgery. Results Surgical groups included: nerve compression (n=53), Dupuytren’s disease (n=51), trigger finger (n=20), ganglion (n=17) or other lump (n=21), trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis (n=10), rheumatoid disease (n=5) and other pathology (n=13). A significant improvement towards normality was seen after surgery in each group except for patients with rheumatoid disease. Conclusions This study provides a simple, visual representation of hand surgery outcome by plotting patient scores for pain, function and appearance simultaneously on a 3D graph. PMID:24025292

  12. Best evidence in multimodal pain management in spine surgery and means of assessing postoperative pain and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Multimodal approaches to pain management have arisen with the goal of improving postoperative pain and reducing opioid analgesic use. We performed a comprehensive literature review to determine grades of recommendation for commonly used agents in multimodal pain management and provide a best practice guideline. To evaluate common drugs used in multimodal treatment of pain, a search was performed on English language publications on Medline (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA). Manuscripts were rated as Level I-V according to the North American Spine Society's (NASS) standardized levels of evidence tables. Grades of recommendation were assigned for each drug based on the NASS Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care. There is good (Grade A) evidence gabapentinoids, acetaminophen, neuraxial blockade and extended-release local anesthetics reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that preemptive analgesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in reduced postoperative pain. There is insufficient and/or conflicting (Grade I) evidence that muscle relaxants and ketamine provide a significant reduction in postoperative pain or narcotic usage. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that short-term use of NSAID result in no long-term reduction in bone healing or fusion rates. Comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of perioperative pain control can be accomplished through the use of validated measures. Multimodal pain management protocols have consistently been demonstrated to allow for improved pain control with less reliance on opioids. There is good quality evidence that supports many of the common agents utilized in multimodal therapy, however, there is a lack of evidence regarding optimal postoperative protocols or pathways. PMID:25766366

  13. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools. PMID:20128490

  14. Assessing Education Program Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahous, Rima; Nabhani, Mona

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education programs help teachers gain knowledge and skills, develop "new" attitudes, and impact their beliefs about teaching, thereby favorably affecting teaching outcomes. In the absence of national standards and formal studies in Lebanon of existing teacher preparation programs, findings of this study could greatly contribute to needed…

  15. Outcomes Assessment in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Ellen B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 22 dental-hygiene-program directors found that programs routinely and effectively assess student outcomes and use the information for program improvements and to demonstrate accountability. Both policy and faculty/administrative support were deemed important to implementation. Time constraints were a major barrier. Outcomes-assessment…

  16. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient's perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient's recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  17. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  18. Co-Curricular Outcomes Assessment and Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how assessment of co-curricular student learning outcomes can be used as part of the institutional accreditation process and the opportunities institutional researchers and student affairs educators have to collaborate in those efforts.

  19. Amotivation and functional outcomes in early schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2013-12-15

    Negative symptoms, particularly amotivation/apathy, are intimately tied to functional outcomes. In the present study, apathy strongly predicted psychosocial functioning in a sample of early course schizophrenia patients. This relationship remained robust even after controlling for other clinical variables. These data suggest amotivation is core to functioning across the disease course. PMID:23911005

  20. Authentic Assessment for Restorative Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The Developmental Audit[R] is a comprehensive means of assessment and treatment planning that identifies the coping strategies underlying a youth's maladaptive and self-defeating behavior. This is a strength-based assessment that engages youth in conflict in the process of generating solutions rather than focusing on deficits. This process…

  1. Assessing Outcomes in Optometric Education: A Commentary by the Council on Optometric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    A statement of the Council for Optometric Education (COE) defines and characterizes educational outcomes, outcomes assessment, and outcomes data, and explains the reasons for outcomes assessment, its relationship to curricular design, and its function in accreditation of optometry programs. Stated COE standards and expectations of optometry…

  2. Outcome assessment in Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Daiki; Jayne, David

    2016-07-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TAK) is a systemic granulomatous large-vessel vasculitis with a phenotype that overlaps with GCA and defined by the 1993 and 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference statements. However, the diagnosis of TAK is often delayed since TAK patients may be asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms. Once a diagnosis is made, it is difficult to judge remission or recurrence since there are no reliable assessment tools. With the availability of newer agents, such as cytokine blockade, which are being evaluated in GCA, there is the potential for real advances in TAK patient management. Without reliable assessment tools it will be difficult to introduce newer agents in an organized way or to optimally benefit patients in the future. In this article we review the use and performance of disease indicators in TAK clinical trials as a basis for the further development of assessment tools for this disease. PMID:26472566

  3. Assessment Faculty Guide: The Rationale and Process for Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    The Assessment Faculty Guide from St. Louis Community College provides guidance for faculty members about how to implement outcomes assessment. The handbook is divided into five areas: (1) assessment rationale, including history, definition, principles, and questions and answers; (2) the structure of assessment, providing a description,…

  4. Perceptions of College Faculty Regarding Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Heath

    2009-01-01

    The perceptions of college faculty regarding outcomes assessment were explored using a qualitative interview research approach. Three faculty members at a liberal arts college in the United States were interviewed about their understandings, reactions to, and concerns regarding the assessment movement. Faculty members differed in their…

  5. Assessing Higher Education Learning Outcomes in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Amaral, Eliana; Knobel, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has developed an encompassing system for quality assessment of higher education, the National System of Higher Education Evaluation (SINAES), which includes a test for assessing learning outcomes at the undergraduate level, the National Exam of Student Performance (ENADE). The present system has been running since 2004, and also serves as…

  6. Assessing Student Outcomes, Mohave Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohave Community Coll., Kingman, AZ.

    Mohave Community College in Arizona has made a commitment to assessing student outcomes for the purposes of measuring institutional effectiveness and providing data for institutional improvement. The institution must comply with an accreditation mandate to submit an assessment plan and begin implementation by June 1994. Under a plan developed by a…

  7. Outcome Assessment Plan, North Country Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Gail Rogers; Pope, Sandra

    In 1990, North Country Community College (NCCC) in New York developed an outcome assessment plan as a response to a requirement of the State University of New York. The planning process began in summer 1989 with an inventory of current assessment processes and a review of their effectiveness. A new plan was then developed, reviewed, and refined.…

  8. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the…

  9. Cognitive deficits and functional outcome in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Christopher R; Harvey, Philip D

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of schizophrenia. Deficits are moderate to severe across several domains, including attention, working memory, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions. These deficits pre-date the onset of frank psychosis and are stable throughout the course of the illness in most patients. Over the past decade, the focus on these deficits has increased dramatically with the recognition that they are consistently the best predictor of functional outcomes across outcome domains and patient samples. Recent treatment studies, both pharmacological and behavioral, suggest that cognitive deficits are malleable. Other research calls into question the meaningfulness of cognitive change in schizophrenia. In this article, we review cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and focus on their treatment and relationship to functional outcome. PMID:19412501

  10. Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to…

  11. Using Outcomes Assessment to Change Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Michelle D.; Wiedenhoeft, Mary H.; Polito, Thomas A.; Gibson, Lance R.; Pogranichniy, Sherry; Mullen, Russ E.

    2006-01-01

    How can student outcomes assessment (SOA) be incorporated into ones courses and teaching? The purposes of this article are to explore a process enacted in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University using SOA to: (i) develop a clearer understanding of what students should learn in a course, (ii) determine how a course or courses fit within…

  12. Outcome Assessment of the Tibetan Scholarship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of State, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Office of Policy and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) contracted with SRI International to conduct an outcome assessment of the Tibetan Scholarship Program (TSP). The purpose of this evaluation is to determine if the program has been successful in meeting these goals. The assessment…

  13. An Assessment of Transfer Program Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Emily B.

    This paper describes the development of a system for assessing transfer program outcomes (TPO), using the effort at Oakton Community College (OCC) as an example. While originally designed to provide timely information on senior institutions as experienced by transfer students, TPO appeared to do considerably more. System highlights included more…

  14. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  15. Learning Outcomes Assessment Activities, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathay, Geoffrey A.

    In 1987, Seattle Central Community College (SCCC), in Washington, began a 5-year project to gather evidence on SCCC's success in imparting knowledge, skills, and values to its students. This report represents a compilation of major assessment activities and provides brief descriptions of 10 studies on outcomes grouped by specific dimensions of…

  16. Patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: functional outcome differs with different outcome scores

    PubMed Central

    Aunan, Eirik; Næss, Grethe; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Sandvik, Leiv; Kibsgård, Thomas Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent research on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has raised the question of the ability of traditional outcome measures to distinguish between treatments. We compared functional outcomes in patients undergoing TKA with and without patellar resurfacing, using the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) as the primary outcome and 3 traditional outcome measures as secondary outcomes. Patients and methods — 129 knees in 115 patients (mean age 70 (42–82) years; 67 female) were evaluated in this single-center, randomized, double-blind study. Data were recorded preoperatively, at 1 year, and at 3 years, and were assessed using repeated-measures mixed models. Results — The mean subscores for the KOOS after surgery were statistically significantly in favor of patellar resurfacing: sport/recreation, knee-related quality of life, pain, and symptoms. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed with the Knee Society clinical rating system, with the Oxford knee score, and with visual analog scale (VAS) for patient satisfaction. Interpretation — In the present study, the KOOS—but no other outcome measure used—indicated that patellar resurfacing may be beneficial in TKA. PMID:26540368

  17. Science Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP): Design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Gurkas, P.; Shaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    Columbus State University is under pressure to reduce the number of "unproductive grades” in its introductory science classes, to increase the number of STEM majors, and to assess the level of attainment of science outcomes in its general education courses for accreditation documentation. The authors designed a study to examine affective, cognitive, social, and classroom factors as predictors of success in science while also attempting to document the link between introductory "gateway to science major” course outcomes and the general education program. One of the factors probed is the match between students’ understanding of important learning outcomes of the course and the instructor's stated priorities. A very real risk in content focused courses (e.g., astronomy) is the mismatch between the university's stated outcomes for a general education science course (e.g., critical thinking) and the instructor's content related outcomes. This mismatch may become a barrier for students taking `required’ courses as they may not comprehend the rationale for the requirement, fail to engage in the course, and consequently receive a failing grade. Another possible factor affecting student success in science is the student reasoning level. Students who are concrete thinkers may not be as successful in introductory science classes that require advanced logical thinking about unfamiliar concepts. The authors hope to use the results of this study to help inform university practices such as placement into introductory science courses and for future faculty development.

  18. Assessing upper limb function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Ilse; Feys, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The need to fully assess upper limb function in multiple sclerosis (MS) has become increasingly clear with recent studies revealing a high prevalence of upper limb dysfunction in persons with MS leading to increased dependency and reduced quality of life. It is important that clinicians and researchers use tailored outcome measures to systematically describe upper limb (dys)function and evaluate potential deterioration or improvement on treatment. This topical review provides a comprehensive summary of currently used upper limb outcome measures in MS, classified according to the levels of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). The clinical utility, strengths, weaknesses and psychometric properties of common upper limb outcome measures are discussed. Based on this information, recommendations for selecting appropriate upper limb outcome measures are given. The current shortcomings in assessment which need to be addressed are identified. PMID:24664300

  19. Carpal arthrodesis in cats. Long-term functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Calvo, I; Farrell, M; Chase, D; Aisa, J; Rayward, R; Carmichael, S

    2009-01-01

    Pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis were performed in 22 carpi (20 cats) using various surgical methods. Short and long-term outcomes were assessed using a retrospective review of the case notes and via owner questionnaires. Carpal arthrodesis was associated with complications that did not affect the functional outcome, and in most cases, did not necessitate major revision surgery. Following arthrodesis, the cats did not jump as high, and showed a reduction in their willingness to jump and climb. Based on our results, carpal arthrodesis is a suitable salvage surgery to treat severe carpal injuries in the cat. PMID:19876518

  20. MULTIPLE-RESPONDENT ANECDOTAL ASSESSMENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF INTERRATER AGREEMENT AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH ANALOGUE ASSESSMENT OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carla M.; Smith, Richard G.; Dracobly, Joseph D.; Pace, Amy Peterson

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated interrater agreement across multiple respondents on anecdotal assessments and compared cases in which agreement was obtained with outcomes of functional analyses. Experiment 1 evaluated agreement among multiple respondents on the function of problem behavior for 27 individuals across 42 target behaviors using the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF). Results showed that at least 4 of 5 respondents agreed on the primary maintaining consequence for 52% (22 of 42) of target behaviors with the MAS and 57% (24 of 42) with the QABF. Experiment 2 examined correspondence between the anecdotal assessment results and functional analysis results for 7 individuals for whom at least 4 of 5 respondents showed agreement in Experiment 1. Correspondence with functional analysis results was observed in 6 of 7 cases with the QABF and in 4 of 7 cases with the MAS. Implications of these outcomes for the utility of anecdotal assessments are discussed. PMID:23322932

  1. Outcomes Assessment Handbook: How To Develop a Practical Outcomes Assessment Program for a Home Study School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Robert J.

    This handbook is designed to provide school decision makers with a global view of how assessment programs for home study schools are developed. Outcomes assessment (OA) is a required element for recognition by the National Home Study Council Accrediting Committee and hence for member schools. This handbook is designed to enable program developers…

  2. AMEE Guide No. 14. Outcome-Based Education: Part 3--Assessment in Outcome-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Miriam Friedman

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of performance assessment in outcome-based education. Compares the relationship and interplay between the two related paradigms and presents guidelines of assessment programs in outcome-based education. (Author/CCM)

  3. Multiple-Respondent Anecdotal Assessments: An Analysis of Interrater Agreement and Correspondence with Analogue Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carla M.; Smith, Richard G.; Dracobly, Joseph D.; Pace, Amy Peterson

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated interrater agreement across multiple respondents on anecdotal assessments and compared cases in which agreement was obtained with outcomes of functional analyses. Experiment 1 evaluated agreement among multiple respondents on the function of problem behavior for 27 individuals across 42 target behaviors using the Motivation Assessment…

  4. Assessment of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Welge-Lüessen, Antje

    2006-01-01

    Numerous techniques are available for the investigation of chemosensory functions in humans. They include psychophysical measures of chemosensory function, e.g. odor identification, odor discrimination, odor thresholds, odor memory, and retronasal perception of odors. In order to assess changes related to the patients' quality of life or effects of qualitative olfactory dysfunction, questionnaires are being used. Measures relying to a lesser degree on the subjects' cooperation are e.g. chemosensory event-related potentials, odor-induced changes of the EEG, the electroolfactogram, imaging techniques, or measures of respiration. In a clinical context, however, psychophysical techniques are most frequently used, e.g. tests for odor identification, and odor thresholds. Interpretation of results from these measures is frequently supported by the assessment of chemosensory event-related potentials. Other techniques await further standardization before they will become useful in a clinical context. PMID:16733334

  5. Assessment Program Results 1996-1997. Focus on Assessing Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeter, Thomas; Prine, Don

    The Des Moines (Iowa) Public Schools continually evaluate the process of teaching for learning in order to provide quality programming for its diverse student body. Different methods of student outcome assessment are used to identify areas for study and analysis. This report provides information about the achievement of district students on: (1)…

  6. Assessment of outcome after hip fracture: development of a universal assessment system for hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Thomas M.; Parker, Martyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to refine current evaluation systems used to assess outcome after a hip fracture and to devise a simple and practical system to assess all hip fracture patients. Methods: Three continuous scales were defined for pain, mobility and functional independence. These were all found to have an acceptable degree of inter-observer agreement. The pre-fracture mobility and independence scores were related to the one-year mortality for a consecutive series of 381 patients. Results: Scores for mobility and functional independence were highly predictive of mortality (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: It is recommended that the outcome after hip fracture should be standardised to these principle outcomes of pain, regain of mobility and independence and mortality. These scores can be use to assess progress and identify those who may require additional assessment or intervention. PMID:27259572

  7. Outcomes assessment for forensic neuropsychology: recommendations and considerations.

    PubMed

    Kalechstein, A D; van Gorp, W D

    1998-01-01

    Neuropsychologists are frequently retained by attorneys or the courts to assist in the resolution of legal disputes. Yet, an outcomes assessment demonstrating the utility of neuropsychological evaluations in the forensic arena has not been implemented, nor has a method for conducting an outcomes assessment of forensic neuropsychology been delineated. This article offers recommendations and considerations for the formulation of outcomes assessments. These include defining an outcomes assessment, identifying the consumers of forensic neuropsychological assessments, and specifying potential moderator and dependent variables in the context of study designs that may be feasibly implemented. Moreover, the ethical implications of outcomes assessments are discussed. PMID:16318446

  8. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    PubMed

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  9. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  10. Discrepancies in how the impact of gout is assessed in outcomes research compared to how health professionals view the impact of gout, using the lens of the International Classification of Functioning, Health and Disability (ICF).

    PubMed

    Kool, Eveline M; Nijsten, Marieke J; van Ede, Annelies E; Jansen, Tim L; Taylor, William J

    2016-09-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a common language to understand what health means. An ICF core set, a list of ICF categories affected by a certain disease, is useful to objectify the content validity of a health status measurement. This study aims to identify the potential items of a gout specific 'ICF core set'. A three-round Delphi exercise was conducted, using web-based questionnaires. Health professionals, specialized in gout, nominated and subsequently rated the relevance of life areas divided into ICF categories. Agreement was determined by using the UCLA/RAND criteria. Simultaneously, a systematic review of gout measure outcomes was conducted. The results of these studies were compared using the second level of the ICF categories. In the Delphi study, consensus was found for 136 relevant ICF categories. The literature study extracted 134 different ICF categories in 149 articles. Three hundred and ten were non-defined outcomes. A large number of ICF categories were deemed to be relevant for people with gout. Only 29.7 % (19/64) of the level 2 categories, deemed to be relevant by health professionals, had been assessed as relevant in at least 5 % of gout outcome studies. Conversely, 70 % (19/27) of level 2 ICF categories assessed in at least 5 % of outcome studies were deemed relevant by health professionals. These ICF codes, which are found relevant in both studies, should be considered as mandatory in further research to a validated and practical core set of ICF categories. Published gout outcomes research fails to evaluate many life areas that are thought relevant by health professionals. PMID:27300705

  11. Meta-Assessment: Assessing the Learning Outcomes Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoepp, Kevin; Benson, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the effectiveness of an assessment program is essential and can be accomplished through analysing the quality of closing the loop actions and through gathering faculty feedback. In this article we present closing the loop data from over 3 years of learning assessment reporting and from findings garnered through a faculty survey. Results…

  12. Meniscal allograft transplantation: preoperative assessment, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Yanke, Adam B; Frank, Rachel M; Butty, Davietta C; Cole, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to characterize the preoperative assessment of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) candidates, to detail MAT surgical techniques, and to evaluate current clinical outcome data on MAT. The MAT candidate is typically less than 50 years old and has a history of knee injury, previous meniscus surgery, and persistent pain. Physical exam generally reveals knee pain with joint line tenderness with normal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating the postmeniscectomized state. There are several common surgical techniques used for transplantation, with fixation achieved through sutures, bony fixation, or a combination of the two. Concomitant procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteotomy, and other cartilage procedures are commonly performed. The available short- and long-term studies of clinical outcomes of MAT are variable and difficult to effectively compare due to heterogeneity of the study population and available treatment techniques. In addition, there are no published randomized controlled trials. However, recent reviews and cohort studies of clinical outcomes following MAT have shown that whether performed in isolation or performed with concomitant articular cartilage, realignment, or soft tissue reconstruction procedures MAT outcomes have been acceptable with the majority of studies reporting improved clinical outcomes regardless of the scoring system employed. MAT has proven to be a safe and effective technique in reducing knee pain and improving function in the symptomatic meniscal deficient knee. Evaluation of long-term clinical outcomes is necessary as is evaluation of meniscal replacement alternatives. PMID:24951950

  13. Predictors of Functional Outcome Among Stroke Patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abanto, Carlos; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Tirschwell, David L.; Montano, Silvia; Quispe, Yrma; Gonzales, Isidro; Valencia, Ana; Calle, Pilar; Garate, Arturo; Zunt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging population in low- and middle-income countries, cerebrovascular disease is expected to remain a leading cause of death. Little has been published about stroke in Peru. Aims We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized stroke patients at a referral center hospital in Lima, Peru to explore factors associated with functional outcome among stroke patients. Methods We identified 579 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage stroke at the National Institute of Neurologic Sciences in Lima, Peru in 2008 and 2009. A favorable outcome was defined as a modified Rankin score of ≤2 at discharge. Results The mean age was 63.3 years; 75.6% had ischemic stroke; the average length of stay was 17.3 days. At hospital discharge, 231 (39.9%) had a favorable outcome. The overall mortality rate was 5.2%. In multivariate models, the likelihood of having a favorable outcome decreased linearly with increasing age (p=0.02) and increasing NIHSS (p=0.02). Favorable outcome was also associated with male gender (relative risk [RR]=1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.5) and divorced status (RR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). Patients on Salud Integral de Salud (public assistance-type insurance, SIS) (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,1.0) were also less likely to have a favorable outcome. Conclusions Favorable outcome after stroke was independently associated with younger age, lower NIHSS score, male gender, being divorced, and not being on SIS insurance. These findings suggest further study of worse functional outcomes in patients with SIS insurance and confirm the importance of risk adjustment for age, stroke severity (NIHSS) and other socioeconomic factors in outcomes studies. Future studies should preferentially assess outcome at 30-days and 6-months to provide more reliable comparisons and allow additional study of Peruvian end-of-life decision-making and care. PMID:23352681

  14. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of oral function in head-neck cancer patients with dental implants placed simultaneously during ablative tumour surgery: an assessment of treatment outcomes and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Schoen, P J; Raghoebar, G M; Bouma, J; Reintsema, H; Burlage, F R; Roodenburg, J L N; Vissink, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess treatment outcome and impact on quality of life of prosthodontic rehabilitation with implant-retained prostheses in head-neck cancer patients. Fifty patients were evaluated by standardized questionnaires and clinical assessment. All received the implants during ablative tumour surgery in native bone in the interforaminal area. About two-thirds of the patients (n=31) needed radiotherapy post-surgery. Both in irradiated and non-irradiated bone two implants were lost 18-24 months after installation. Peri-implant tissues had a healthy appearance. No cases of osteoradionecrosis occurred. In 15 patients no functional implant-retained lower dentures could be made for various reasons. The other 35 patients all functioned well, with an improvement in quality of life. Major improvement was observed in the non-irradiated patients. In the irradiated patients, less improvement in many functional items was observed, while items related to the oral sequelae of radiotherapy did not improve. Similar to the quality-of-life assessments, denture satisfaction was improved and tended to be higher in non-irradiated than irradiated patients. Implant-retained lower dentures can substantially improve the quality of life related to oral functioning and denture satisfaction in head-neck cancer patients. This effect is greater in non-irradiated than irradiated cancer patients. PMID:17766084

  15. Predictors of surgical outcome and their assessment.

    PubMed

    Mannion, Anne F; Elfering, Achim

    2006-01-01

    The relatively high rate of failed back surgery has prompted the search for "risk factors" to predict the result of spinal surgery in a given individual. However, the literature reveals few unequivocal predictors and they often explain a relatively low proportion of variance in outcome. This suggests that we have a long way to go before being able to rest easily, having refused someone surgery on the basis of unfavourable baseline characteristics. The best recommendation is to ensure, firstly, that the indication for surgery is absolutely clear-cut (i.e. that surgically remediable pathology exists) and then to consider the various factors that may influence the "typical" outcome. Consistent risk factors for a poor outcome regarding return-to-work include long-term sick leave/receipt of disability benefit. Hence, every effort should be made to keep the individual in the workforce, despite the ongoing symptoms and plans for surgery. In patients with a particularly heavy job, consultation with occupational physicians might later ease the patient's way back into the workplace. Patients with degenerative disorders and/or comorbidity should be counselled that few of them will have complete/lasting pain relief or a complete return to pre-morbid function. Patients with a high level of distress may benefit from psychological treatment, before and/or accompanying the surgical treatment. The opportunity (time), encouragement (education and positive messages), and resources (referral to appropriate support services) to modify risk factors that are indeed modifiable should be offered, and realistic expectations should be discussed with the patient before the decision to operate is made. PMID:16320033

  16. Assessment of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Janice N.; Askew, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Assessment of patient reported outcomes (PROs) has been shown to provide important information to assist with clinical decision-making. There has been significant progress in the field of PROs over the last two decades with the introduction of a variety of validated disease- and symptom-specific instruments. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Melanoma (FACT-M) is a melanoma-specific module to accompany the FACT-General which has been validated to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with all stages of melanoma. Melanoma-specific health state utilities, which are essential for calculating quality adjusted life years and performing cost-effectiveness studies, have also been reported from a number of studies. Assessment of PROs should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to inform clinicians and researchers of the patient perspective for clinical decision-making and to evaluate the effects of psychosocial and medical interventions. PMID:21111967

  17. A Unified Approach to Outcomes Assessment for Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Waljee, Jennifer F; Ladd, Amy; MacDermid, Joy C; Rozental, Tamara D; Wolfe, Scott W

    2016-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are one of the most common upper extremity injuries. Currently, outcome assessment after treatment of these injuries varies widely with respect to the measures that are used, timing of assessment, and the end points that are considered. A more consistent approach to outcomes assessment would provide a standard by which to assess treatment options and best practices. In this summary, we review the consensus regarding outcomes assessment after distal radius fractures and propose a systematic approach that integrates performance, patient-reported outcomes, pain, complications, and radiographs. PMID:26952734

  18. Renal function trajectory over time and adverse clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sohel, Badrul Munir; Rumana, Nahid; Ohsawa, Masaki; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Kelly, Martina Ann; Al Mamun, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    The growing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), with its associated morbidity and mortality, is recognized as a major public health problem globally and causing substantial load on health care systems. The current framework for the definition and staging of CKD, based on eGFR levels or presence of kidney damage, is useful for clinical classification of patients, but identifies a huge number of people as having CKD which is too many to target for intervention. The ability to identify a subset of patients, at high risk for adverse outcomes, would be useful to inform clinical management. The current staging system applies static definitions of kidney function that fail to capture the dynamic nature of the kidney disease over time. Now-a-days, it is possible to capture multiple measurements of different laboratory test results for an individual including eGFR values. A new possibility for identifying individuals at higher risk of adverse outcomes is being explored through assessment and consideration of the rate of change in kidney function over time, and this approach will be feasible in the current context of digitalization of health record keeping system. On the basis of the existing evidence, this paper summarizes important findings that support the concept of dynamic changes in kidney function over time, and discusses how the magnitude of these changes affect the future adverse outcomes of kidney disease, particularly the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), CVD and mortality. PMID:26728745

  19. Implementing Assessment in an Outcome-Based Marketing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borin, Norm; Metcalf, Lynn E.; Tietje, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of assessment in a new outcome-based marketing curriculum that was developed using a zero-based approach. Outcomes for the marketing curriculum were specified at the program, department, course, and lesson levels. Direct embedded assessments as well as indirect assessment methods were used…

  20. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  1. Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Romano, Joan M.; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Van Tilburg, Miranda; Feld, Lauren D.; Christie, Dennis L.; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive-behavioral interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to one week post-treatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Methods Two-hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a 3-session social learning and cognitive-behavioral treatment (SLCBT) (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6 and 12 month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Results Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the SLCBT condition on child GI symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents’ solicitous responses to their child’s pain symptoms. Reductions in parents’ perceived threat regarding their child’s pain mediated reductions in both parent- and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children’s catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Discussion Results suggest that reductions in reports of children’s pain and GI symptoms following a social learning and cognitive-behavioral intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions. PMID:24469611

  2. Oncological and functional outcome of periosteal osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Puri, Ajay; Pruthi, Manish; Desai, Saral

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periosteal osteosarcoma is an uncommon variant of osteosarcoma which constitutes less than 2% of all osteosarcomas. Whereas adequate surgical excision remains the cornerstone of treatment, the role of chemotherapy in this tumor is still unclear. Existing literature contains very few single center studies on the outcomes for periosteal osteosarcomas and any additional information will help in better understanding of these uncommon lesions. This study aims to evaluate the oncologic and functional outcomes of treatment of periosteal osteosarcoma treated at our institute. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 cases of periosteal osteosarcoma treated between January 2001 and December 2010 was carried out. There were 12 males and 6 females. The mean age at presentation was 16.3 years (range 5-26 years). Tibia and femur were the most common sites (n = 8). 16 of 18 patients received chemotherapy, 16 had limb sparing resection, one had an amputation and one had rotationplasty. Of the 16 patients with limb salvage, conventional wide excision was done in 11 cases. In 5 cases tumor was excised with hemicortical excision. Of the 11 cases treated with wide excisions, 4 patients underwent an osteoarticular resection and in 7 patients a joint preserving segmental intercalary resection was done. Results: All patients were available for followup. Surgical margins were free in all patients. A good response to chemotherapy was seen in 4/11 cases and poor in 6/11 cases. In one case the histological response was not discernible due to predominant chondromyxoid nature of the tumor. The median followup was 61 months (range: 18-130 months). There were two local recurrences (11%) at 9 and 18 months postsurgery. Pulmonary metastasis subsequently occurred in 4 cases (22%). Fourteen patients are currently alive and continuously disease free. Disease free survival at 5 years was 77.8% and overall survival (OVS) was 83.3%. Patients without marrow involvement had a

  3. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4 months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new mobility score were scored immediately after admission. Outcome defined as mortality, residential status, and independent walking ability was assessed at 4 months. Results - 3 of the assessment instruments, namely Barthel-20, Barthel-100, and new mobility score, correlated with outcome at 4 months post-fracture and were valid predictors. Thresholds were estimated. We found no evidence that Barthel-100, with its finer granularity, performs better than Barthel-20 as a predictor. Interpretation - Our findings indicate that pre-fracture scores of Barthel-20 and new mobility score have predictive ability, and further investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted. PMID:27329799

  4. Analyses of functional and oncologic outcomes following supracricoid partial laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaotian; Pan, Zimin

    2015-11-01

    To review the functional and oncologic outcomes of patients who received supracricoid partial laryngectomy (SCPL) with cricohyoidoepiglottopexy (CHEP) or cricohyoidopexy (CHP) in our institution. A total of 208 patients who received SCPL with CHEP or CHP from our institution from 1995 to 2007 were involved. Among them, 190 cases were patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (T1-T4, N0-N2), 14 cases were patients with recurrent larynx cancer and 4 cases were patients with laryngeal stenosis. Forty-four patients also received unilateral neck dissection, and 41 patients received a bilateral neck dissection. All patients were assessed at functional outcome and complications of their treatment. Also, the oncologic outcomes, such as disease-specific survival, total survival, and local recurrence, were measured for patients with tumor. Decannulation was achieved in nearly all patients, with the average time to decannulation being 20 ± 11.52 days in CHEP patients and 28 ± 8.92 days in CHP patients (P < 0.05). The average nasogastric tubes were removed, days postoperation, was 18 ± 7.39 days in CHEP patients and 25 ± 13.87 days in CHP patients (P < 0.05). The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5.77%, the 5-year disease-specific survival was 82.7%, and the 5-year overall survival was 84.1%. The patients with CHEP had a better recovery than the patients with CHP. SCPL was a well-tolerated procedure with generally good functional outcomes for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer, also for some patients with laryngeal stenosis. PMID:25359194

  5. Air ions and respiratory function outcomes: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background From a mechanistic or physical perspective there is no basis to suspect that electric charges on clusters of air molecules (air ions) would have beneficial or deleterious effects on respiratory function. Yet, there is a large lay and scientific literature spanning 80 years that asserts exposure to air ions affects the respiratory system and has other biological effects. Aims This review evaluates the scientific evidence in published human experimental studies regarding the effects of exposure to air ions on respiratory performance and symptoms. Methods We identified 23 studies (published 1933–1993) that met our inclusion criteria. Relevant data pertaining to study population characteristics, study design, experimental methods, statistical techniques, and study results were assessed. Where relevant, random effects meta-analysis models were utilized to quantify similar exposure and outcome groupings. Results The included studies examined the therapeutic benefits of exposure to negative air ions on respiratory outcomes, such as ventilatory function and asthmatic symptoms. Study specific sample sizes ranged between 7 and 23, and studies varied considerably by subject characteristics (e.g., infants with asthma, adults with emphysema), experimental method, outcomes measured (e.g., subjective symptoms, sensitivity, clinical pulmonary function), analytical design, and statistical reporting. Conclusions Despite numerous experimental and analytical differences across studies, the literature does not clearly support a beneficial role in exposure to negative air ions and respiratory function or asthmatic symptom alleviation. Further, collectively, the human experimental studies do not indicate a significant detrimental effect of exposure to positive air ions on respiratory measures. Exposure to negative or positive air ions does not appear to play an appreciable role in respiratory function. PMID:24016271

  6. Assessing the utility of a demand assessment for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Rooker, Griffin W; Pence, Sacha T; Longworth, Lynlea J

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of compliance or high levels of problem behavior (low-probability demands) and demands associated with high levels of compliance or low levels of problem behavior (high-probability demands). Results showed that clearer functional analysis outcomes were obtained for 3 of the 4 participants when low-probability rather than high-probability demands were used. PMID:20514188

  7. Midterm functional outcome after operative management of midfoot injuries.

    PubMed

    Latoo, Irfan A; Wani, Iftikhar H; Farooq, Munir; Wali, G R; Kamal, Younis; Gani, Naseem Ul

    2014-01-01

    Background. Injuries of the midfoot are often missed and therefore underestimated. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the final outcome. The primary aim of this study was to assess the pattern and results of early operative management of mid-foot injuries after a midterm follow up. Material and methods. This study was conducted on 25 patients (19 Males, 6 Females ) with mean age of 34.6 years (range 18-60 years) with mid-foot fracture dislocations who were admitted consecutively at our centre from May 2008 through November 2010. 25 patients fulfilling our inclusion criteria with mid-foot fracture dislocations were included in this study. Mechanism of injury, its pattern and results of operative management of midfoot injuries were assessed after acute management of these fractures on urgent basis. Evaluation of results was done by AOFAS Score. Results. Most common mode of injury was indirect trauma due to fall (n=12) followed by road traffic accident (n=9). Males (n=19) outnumbered females (n=6). The pattern of injuries requiring operative treatment as per our criteria were Lisfranc fracture dislocations (n=22) and navicular fractures (n=3). The mean follow up was 3.2 years and mean AOFAS score at 3.2 years was 78.36, with most patients losing points to pain and decreased recreational function. Conclusion. The Lisfranc fracture dislocations are the most common injuries around midfoot requiring operative treatment, and we believe that operative treatment considerably improves functional outcome in these injuries. PMID:25694378

  8. Outcomes of Math Faculty Engagement in Student Learning Outcomes Assessment in the Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruley, Marie N.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes a mixed methods exploratory design to examine the nature of math faculty engagement in the student learning outcomes assessment cycle. The focus of the study is on the types of changes that math faculty are implementing as a result of assessment outcomes and the institutional environmental factors that impact faculty engagement…

  9. Outcome Assessment in Aphasia: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Threats, Travis T.; Kagan, Aura

    2005-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in attention to the measurement of ''outcomes'' after speech-language intervention for adult aphasia. Consumers, speech-language pathologists (SLPs), and funding sources desire evidence of therapy outcomes that improve communication and enhance the quality of life for people with aphasia. While many assessment…

  10. Faculty Governance and Outcomes Assessment: Compatible or Combustible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBoy, James L.; Monsilovich, Sally B.; DeBoy, Joanne R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies the various factors driving the outcomes assessment movement, contrasts the old paradigm with the model now espoused by regional accreditors, discusses the six-step process of student outcomes assessment, emphasizes faculty ownership of the process to prevent administrative usurpation, and proposes specific strategies to…

  11. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  12. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions…

  13. An International Assessment of Bachelor Degree Graduates' Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Hamish; Richardson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines rationales, aspirations, assumptions and methods shaping an international assessment of learning outcomes: the OECD's Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) feasibility study. The first part of the paper is analytical, exploring formative rationales, and shaping contexts and normative perspectives that frame…

  14. Obstacles in Outcomes Assessment: Identifying and Overcoming Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldt, Janet L.

    The obstacles encountered in an outcomes assessment process were studied, focusing on the specific obstacles that prevent program administration from successfully completing the outcomes assessment process and the degree to which these obstacles operate. Of 135 dental hygiene education program directors surveyed, 107 responded, completing a…

  15. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  16. Using Learning Outcome Measures to assess Doctoral Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    Raup, Glenn H.; King, Jeff; Hughes, Romana J.; Faidley, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Education programs at all levels must be able to demonstrate successful program outcomes. Grades alone do not represent a comprehensive measurement methodology for assessing student learning outcomes at either the course or program level. The development and application of assessment rubrics provides an unequivocal measurement methodology to ensure a quality learning experience by providing a foundation for improvement based on qualitative and quantitatively measurable, aggregate course and program outcomes. Learning outcomes are the embodiment of the total learning experience and should incorporate assessment of both qualitative and quantitative program outcomes. The assessment of qualitative measures represents a challenge for educators in any level of a learning program. Nursing provides a unique challenge and opportunity as it is the application of science through the art of caring. Quantification of desired student learning outcomes may be enhanced through the development of assessment rubrics designed to measure quantitative and qualitative aspects of the nursing education and learning process. They provide a mechanism for uniform assessment by nursing faculty of concepts and constructs that are otherwise difficult to describe and measure. A protocol is presented and applied to a doctoral nursing education program with recommendations for application and transformation of the assessment rubric to other education programs. Through application of these specially designed rubrics, all aspects of an education program can be adequately assessed to provide information for program assessment that facilitates the closure of the gap between desired and actual student learning outcomes for any desired educational competency. PMID:20567217

  17. Physical Education Performance Outcomes and Cognitive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This article intends to inform physical education teachers about the current research describing the relationship between physical education performance outcomes as identified by the national physical education standards (i.e., regular participation in physical activity, physical fitness, motor competence; National Association of Physical…

  18. Alternative Approaches to Outcomes Assessment for Postsecondary Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D., Ed.

    This document describes six different approaches to outcomes assessments, approaches that are named in the titles of chapters 2 through 7. The chapters and authors are as follows: "Perspectives on Assessment Policy and Practice" (Bragg, Harmon); "Total Quality Management" (Bragg); "Assessing Student Success" (Harmon); "Value-Added Assessment"…

  19. Functional Assessment in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidwell, W. Guy

    2006-01-01

    This paper covers the application of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) to treatment of problem behavior in residential facilities. Basic behavioral concepts are covered with emphasis on antecedent events and their importance in assessment and treatment. The paper focuses on two types of assessment, the behavioral interview and A-B-C narrative…

  20. Executive Function Mediates Effects of Gestational Age on Functional Outcomes and Behavior in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Irene M.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Huffman, Lynne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of executive function (EF) skills, measured by parent-rating and performance-based instruments, as mediators of the effects of gestational age on functional outcomes and behavior symptoms in preterm and full term preschoolers. Patients and methods Children born preterm (n=70; mean gestational age 29.6 weeks and mean birth weight 1365g) were compared to children born full term (n=79) on composite measures of EF (using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function and a performance-based EF battery), adaptive function, prereading skills, and behavior symptoms. For the entire sample, mediation analyses examined the effect of gestational age on outcomes with EF as mediator. Results Compared to children born full term, children born preterm had significantly higher parent-rated EF scores and lower performance-based EF scores, both indicating more problems; further, children born preterm had lower adaptive function and prereading scores and more problematic behavior. Gestational age contributed to adaptive function, prereading skills, and behavior symptoms for all children. EF acted as a mediator of gestational age for all three outcomes; different patterns emerged for parent-rated and performance-based EF evaluations. For adaptive function, both EF measures significantly mediated effects of gestational age; for prereading skills, only performance-based EF was significant; for behavior symptoms, only parent-rated EF was significant. Conclusions We propose standard assessment of EF, using both parent-rating and performance-based EF measures, in young preterm children and other children at risk of EF impairments. EF skills are measurable, mediate important functional outcomes, and may serve as intervention targets. PMID:24906034

  1. Fundamentals of Clinical Outcomes Assessment for Spinal Disorders: Clinical Outcome Instruments and Applications.

    PubMed

    Vavken, Patrick; Ganal-Antonio, Anne Kathleen B; Quidde, Julia; Shen, Francis H; Chapman, Jens R; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-08-01

    Study Design A broad narrative review. Objectives Outcome assessment in spinal disorders is imperative to help monitor the safety and efficacy of the treatment in an effort to change the clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. The following article, part two of a two-part series, discusses the various outcome tools and instruments utilized to address spinal disorders and their management. Methods A thorough review of the peer-reviewed literature was performed, irrespective of language, addressing outcome research, instruments and tools, and applications. Results Numerous articles addressing the development and implementation of health-related quality-of-life, neck and low back pain, overall pain, spinal deformity, and other condition-specific outcome instruments have been reported. Their applications in the context of the clinical trial studies, the economic analyses, and overall evidence-based orthopedics have been noted. Additional issues regarding the problems and potential sources of bias utilizing outcomes scales and the concept of minimally clinically important difference were discussed. Conclusion Continuing research needs to assess the outcome instruments and tools used in the clinical outcome assessment for spinal disorders. Understanding the fundamental principles in spinal outcome assessment may also advance the field of "personalized spine care." PMID:26225283

  2. Impact of an integrated treatment algorithm based on platelet function testing and clinical risk assessment: results of the TRIAGE Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Interventions To Improve Clinical Outcomes Through Optimal Platelet Inhibition study.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Aquino, Melissa; Sartori, Samantha; Yu, Jennifer; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin; Skurk, Carsten; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Dangas, George

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of platelet reactivity alone for thienopyridine selection with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has not been associated with improved outcomes. In TRIAGE, a prospective multicenter observational pilot study we sought to evaluate the benefit of an integrated algorithm combining clinical risk and platelet function testing to select type of thienopyridine in patients undergoing PCI. Patients on chronic clopidogrel therapy underwent platelet function testing prior to PCI using the VerifyNow assay to determine high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR, ≥230 P2Y12 reactivity units or PRU). Based on both PRU and clinical (ischemic and bleeding) risks, patients were switched to prasugrel or continued on clopidogrel per the study algorithm. The primary endpoints were (i) 1-year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) composite of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or definite or probable stent thrombosis; and (ii) major bleeding, Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 2, 3 or 5. Out of 318 clopidogrel treated patients with a mean age of 65.9 ± 9.8 years, HTPR was noted in 33.3 %. Ninety (28.0 %) patients overall were switched to prasugrel and 228 (72.0 %) continued clopidogrel. The prasugrel group had fewer smokers and more patients with heart failure. At 1-year MACE occurred in 4.4 % of majority HTPR patients on prasugrel versus 3.5 % of primarily non-HTPR patients on clopidogrel (p = 0.7). Major bleeding (5.6 vs 7.9 %, p = 0.47) was numerically higher with clopidogrel compared with prasugrel. Use of the study clinical risk algorithm for choice and intensity of thienopyridine prescription following PCI resulted in similar ischemic outcomes in HTPR patients receiving prasugrel and primarily non-HTPR patients on clopidogrel without an untoward increase in bleeding with prasugrel. However, the study was prematurely terminated and these findings are therefore hypothesis generating. PMID:27100112

  3. Outcomes Assessment of a Predoctoral Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Sam; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study compared outcomes of the Ohio State University predoctoral dental student research program with those of the University of Iowa by examining the career choices, scholarly activity, and attitudes of participants and nonparticipants. Implications for improving research orientation and student participation are examined. (MSE)

  4. Oral Assessment in Mathematics: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the planning and implementation of an oral assessment component in a first-year pure mathematics module of a degree course in mathematics. Our aim was to examine potential barriers to using oral assessments, explore the advantages and disadvantages compared to existing common assessment methods and document the outcomes…

  5. Is Outcomes Assessment Hurting Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontuso, James F.; Thornton, Saranna R.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of assessment and how it is becoming such a critical problem for higher education, especially for teachers of the liberal arts. While the common-sense goals of assessment are laudable, the actual consequences of the process are far from beneficial. It is suggested that ongoing assessment diverts teachers from…

  6. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  7. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  8. Implementing Outcomes Assessment in an Academic Affairs Support Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Joshua S.; Szelest, Bruce P.; Downey, John P.

    2004-01-01

    While outcomes assessment has become a focus for institutions of higher education, assessment in academic support units remain sparse. Traditionally, assessment has been comprised of one-time student satisfaction surveys and/or supervisor evaluations tied specifically to job criteria. Although informative, these methods fail to account for or…

  9. Regional Accreditation and Learning Outcomes Assessment: Mapping the Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provezis, Staci J.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined the intersection of collegiate-level student learning outcomes assessment with regional accreditation to understand how regional accreditation policies and practices leverage student learning outcomes efforts on US college campuses. To that end, the standards of each of the regional accreditation agencies were carefully…

  10. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: Workplace, Family, and Community Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cheryl A.; Heath, Claudia J.

    2011-01-01

    A project was conducted to assess Family Studies bachelor's degree graduates' use of learning outcomes from course competencies in personal finance, family lifespan development, intervention, and advocacy and policy, and to determine how they apply these learning outcomes to their workplace, family, and community roles. Alumni surveys completed by…

  11. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  12. Impact of weather and climate scenarios on conservation assessment outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews selected watershed studies of the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) and interprets findings from the perspective of potential climate change impacts on conservation outcomes. Primary foci are runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, watershed sediment yield, and asso...

  13. Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Materials Guidebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American College Personnel Association's (ACPA's) Sustainability Task Force partnered with the Commission on Assessment and Evaluation with the goal of creating assessment tools to help ACPA members effectively measure student learning around sustainability. Towards these ends, Kimberly Yousey-Elsener (StudentVoice), Diana Richter Keith…

  14. Using Art to Assess Environmental Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Ami A.; Carroll, John P.; Green, Gary T.; Larson, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    Construction of developmentally appropriate tools for assessing the environmental attitudes and awareness of young learners has proven to be challenging. Art-based assessments that encourage creativity and accommodate different modes of expression may be a particularly useful complement to conventional tools (e.g. surveys), but their efficacy and…

  15. Sexual function outcomes following fracture of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Gregory J.; McGuire, Barry B.; Liddy, Stephen; Looney, Aisling; Lennon, Gerald M.; Mulvin, David W.; Galvin, David J.; Quinlan, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the penis is a rare urological emergency which occurs as a result of abrupt trauma to an erect penis. There is paucity of data regarding long-term sexual function or erectile potency following fracture of the penis. The aim of this study is to objectively assess the overall sexual function following fracture of the penis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 penile fractures was performed. A voluntary telephone questionnaire was performed to assess long term outcomes using three validated questionnaires-the Erection Hardness Grading Scale, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Brief Male Sexual Function inventory (BMSFI). Results: The mean age was 33.1 years (range: 19–63). The median follow up was 46 months (range: 3–144). All fractures were a result of sexual misadventure and all were surgically repaired. There were two concomitant urethral injuries. Seventeen patients were contactable. Fourteen patients demonstrated no evidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) (IIEF-5>22), 1 patient reported symptoms of mild ED (IIEF-5, 17–21) and one patient reported mild to moderate ED (IIEF-5, 12–16). No patients reported insufficient erection for penetration (EHGS: 1 or 2). Regarding the overall BMSFI, 13 (83%) patients were mostly satisfied or very satisfied with their sex life within the previous month. Conclusion: In a small surgical series of men with penile fracture managed within a short time frame from presentation, we demonstrate erectile potency is maintained. Long-term overall sexual satisfaction is promising. PMID:24032060

  16. Outcomes Assessment: The Tip of the Iceberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the multifaceted process for assessing students over the course of their undergraduate degree work in the Department of Theater and Dance at Appalachian State University in North Carolina. (SR)

  17. Assessing Outcomes: Practical Methods and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jon; Owen, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    University counseling center clients' (N = 52) perceptions of precounseling functioning were highly correlated with their actual well-being scores at intake. The magnitude of change based on perceptions of precounseling functioning to current well-being was approximately double of what is found from the difference of actual precounseling…

  18. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  19. Principles for assessing disease management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Sidorov, Jaan; Fetterolf, Don; Wennberg, David; Eisenberg, Edward; Cousins, Michael; Hoffman, Joel; Haughton, John; Charlton, Warwick; Krause, David; Woolf, Allen; Mcdonough, Kenneth; Todd, Warren; Fox, Kathe; Plocher, David; Juster, Iver; Stiefel, Matt; Villagra, Victor; Duncan, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Disease management (DM) is rapidly becoming an important force in the late 20th and early 21st century as a strategy for managing the chronic illness of large populations. Given the increasing visibility of DM programs, the clinical, economic and financial impact of this support are vital to DM program accountability and its acceptance as a solution to the twin challenges of achieving affordable, quality health care. Measuring and reporting outcomes in DM is difficult. DM programs must adapt to local market conditions and customer desires, which in turn limits generalizability, and still account for the overlapping/interlocking/multifaceted nature of the interventions included in any DM program. The Disease Management Association of America convened a Steering Committee to suggest a preferred approach, not a mandated or standardized approach for DM program evaluation. This paper presents the Steering Committee's "Consensus Statement" and "Guiding Principles" for robust evaluation. PMID:15669579

  20. Assessing Effective Teaching of Psychology: A Meta-Analytic Integration of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Teaching researchers can assess learning outcome effectiveness as a function of students' graded performance or changes in knowledge, skills and behaviors, or attitudes. We meta-analyzed 197 studies to determine the effectiveness of teaching activities in "Teaching of Psychology (ToP)" both overall and also as a function of type of learning…

  1. Research Assessment Exercise, 2001: The Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This document presents the results of the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). The RAE, which operates through a process of peer review by experts, is designed to provide ratings of the quality of research conducted at universities and higher education colleges in the United Kingdom. The ratings are used to inform the allocation of funds and…

  2. Functional Outcome Evaluation of Septorhinoplasty for Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Farah Dayana; Husain, Salina; Gendeh, Balwant Singh

    2016-06-01

    A prospective single blinded interventional study was held in Otorhinolaryngology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre in August 2010 until November 2012 to evaluate the functional outcome of septorhinoplasty objectively and subjectively. Objective assessment was done using rhinomanometry and subjective assessment using Nasal Obstruction Symptoms Evaluation (NOSE) scale and Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires (HRQOL) in Rhino Surgery. All measurements were taken preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. A total of 29 patients were enrolled and completed the study. Septorhinoplasty was commonly performed in Malays and Indians and rare amongst Chinese, with age ranged from 18 to 54 years. Majority had no history of trauma. Twisted nose was the most common external nose abnormality followed by crooked and saddle nose. All patients had internal valve insufficiency. There were significant improvement of the total and of all the parameters in the NOSE scale post septorhinoplasty (p < 0.05). Furthermore, there were significant improvement in total and in all parameters in HRQOL score post septorhinoplasty (p < 0.05). There were improvements in the rhinomanometry data bilaterally during inspiration and expiration, but were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Significant correlations were noted in the improvement between the two subjective assessments (NOSE scale and HRQOL score). However, there was no significant correlation in the improvement between the subjective (NOSE scale and HRQOL score) with objective (rhinomanometry score) assessments. Septorhinoplasty improves the nasal airflow and quality of life of patients with nasal obstruction. PMID:27340641

  3. Assessing Outcomes through Congruence of Course Objectives and Reflective Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; Fidler, Herta; Hogan, David B.; Pereles, Laurie; Wright, Bruce; Lebeuf, Christine; Gerritsen, Cory

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Course outcomes have been assessed by examining the congruence between statements of commitment to change (CTCs) and course objectives. Other forms of postcourse reflective exercises (for example, impact and unmet-needs statements) have not been examined for congruence with course objectives or their utility in assessing course…

  4. Investigating ESL Students' Performance on Outcomes Assessments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.; Elliott, Diane Cardenas; Liu, Ou Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes assessments are gaining great attention in higher education because of increased demand for accountability. These assessments are widely used by U.S. higher education institutions to measure students' college-level knowledge and skills, including students who speak English as a second language (ESL). For the past decade, the increasing…

  5. Assessment of Learning Outcomes in Finnish Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Räisänen, Anu; Räkköläinen, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an outline and critical review of assessment, an evaluation of learning outcomes, in vocational education and training (VET) in Finland. Assessment of VET is formative, development-orientated and criteria-based. There are no national tests and information from vocational skills demonstrations is used instead. Assessment…

  6. A Model for Effectively Assessing Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohia, Uche O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a model proven to be effective for assessing and documenting evidence of student learning outcomes. Specifically, it will share a model, F.A.M.O.U.S. Copyright ©2008, which is an acronym exemplifying six effective steps for complying with institutional accountability and eternal assessment requirements proscribed by the…

  7. The State of Learning Outcomes Assessment in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuh, George D.; Ewell, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, economic and other factors are pressing institutions of higher education to assess student learning to insure that graduates acquire the skills and competencies demanded in the 21st century. This paper summarises the status of undergraduate student learning outcomes assessment at accredited colleges and universities in the United…

  8. Tentative Steps in Outcome Assessment in International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlow, Joan K.; Duly, Leslie C.

    Assessment strategies that colleges and universities design to evaluate the effectiveness of their academic programs should be compatible with other institutional improvement strategies. This paper stems from work done by the Outcomes Assessment Project in International Education, a project that attempts to assist institutions in measuring the…

  9. Breadth-Oriented Outcomes Assessment in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, David; And Others

    Little work has been done regarding the overall assessment of quality of computer science graduates at the undergraduate level. This paper reports on a pilot study at the University of Alabama of a prototype computer science outcomes assessment designed to evaluate the breadth of knowledge of computer science seniors. The instrument evaluated two…

  10. Assessment of a Newark neighborhood: process and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Elliot, N L; Quinless, F W; Parietti, E S

    2000-01-01

    activism; and (d) reorganization of the Collaboration's internal structure and functions to capitalize on opportunities for change. Significant outcomes from this process, in evidence 4 years after the 1996 neighborhood assessment, include: (a) a successful grant application to study violence against Hispanic women, (b) a research program investigating the nature and extent of clinical depression among Hispanic women, (c) establishment of a teenage pregnancy program, (d) English classes for Hispanic women seeking language skills and eventual employment, and (e) partnership extended to the New Jersey Institute of Technology. PMID:11126893

  11. Functional Outcomes in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Levine, Louise R.; Ramsey, Janet L.; Tamura, Roy; Kelsey, Douglas; Ball, Susan G.; Allen, Albert J.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with significant functional impairment in adults. The present study examined functional outcomes following 6-month double-blind treatment with either atomoxetine or placebo. Method: Patients were 410 adults (58.5% male) with "DSM-IV"--defined ADHD. They were randomly assigned to receive either atomoxetine 40 mg/day to…

  12. Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shinchuk, Leonid M; Shinchuk, Leonid; Holick, Michael F

    2007-06-01

    Vitamin D inadequacy is pandemic among rehabilitation patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Male and female patients of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are affected. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis, causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia, and worsens proximal muscle strength and postural sway. Vitamin D inadequacy can be prevented by sensible sun exposure and adequate dietary intake with supplementation. Vitamin D status is determined by measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The recommended healthful serum level is between 30 and 60 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels of >30 ng/mL are sufficient to suppress parathyroid hormone production and to maximize the efficiency of dietary calcium absorption from the small intestine. This can be accomplished by ingesting 1000 IU of vitamin D(3) per day, or by taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D(2) every 2 weeks. Vitamin D toxicity is observed when 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceed 150 ng/mL. Identification and treatment of vitamin D deficiency reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures by improving bone health and musculoskeletal function. Vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myositis. There is a need for better education of health professionals and the general public regarding the optimization of vitamin D status in the care of rehabilitation patients. PMID:17507730

  13. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Shiho; Tanemura, Rumi; Yoshizumi, Miho; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes) test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. PMID:25395854

  14. Assessment of postural balance function.

    PubMed

    Kostiukow, Anna; Rostkowska, Elzbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    Postural balance is defined as the ability to stand unassisted without falling. Examination of the patient's postural balance function is a difficult diagnostic task. Most of the balance tests used in medicine provide incomplete information on this coordination ability of the human body. The aim of this study was to review methods of assessment of the patient's postural balance function, including various tests used in medical diagnostics centers. PMID:20698188

  15. Assessing outcomes of industrial hygiene graduate education.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Lisa; Fredrickson, Ann

    2009-05-01

    To ensure that industrial hygiene professionals continue to be prepared for current and future trends, it is important to regularly assess the value of their education. Described here are the results of discussions with employers and a mailed survey of graduates. Comparisons are made with past mailed surveys of both groups. Two sets of discussions were held in late 2005 with employers of industrial hygienists and other health and safety professionals. Twenty-eight participants were asked to discuss current and future needs for professionals in their organization and economic sector, their expectations for knowledge and skills when hiring professionals, methods for finding and hiring, and the importance of ABET accreditation. At the same time, a survey was mailed to 71 industrial hygiene students graduating in the last 15 years. Respondents were asked to rank the value of and their proficiency in 42 competencies. Questions also assessed employment experience, certification, the importance of ABET accreditation, and demographic characteristics. There was a lot of agreement between the two stakeholder groups (employers and graduates) about the most important skill and knowledge areas. Most employers identified communicating effectively and exposure assessment among the most important skills, with designing and initiating research as among the least. Hazard recognition, exposure measurement principles, and personal protective equipment were the most highly ranked knowledge areas. Employers discussed the need for good "business skills" such as teamwork, communication, and project management, and the importance of problem-solving skills. Graduates reported that skills in the areas of recognition, evaluation, and control were most valuable in their first jobs and generally reported high levels of proficiency in these skill areas. There was a similar dichotomy in opinions about accreditation within each stakeholder group. The reputation of the academic program was

  16. Health insurance and outcomes: comprehensive assessment of health system outputs.

    PubMed

    Perkins, N A

    1991-01-01

    Outcomes analysis in health care has historically meant the examination of clinical results of inpatient hospitalization. In response to climbing health care and health insurance costs, the organization of health care providers, the location of service delivery and reimbursement mechanisms have changed. As the health care industry changes, so too must the definition of outcomes. This article presents a conceptual framework for the analysis of health outcomes as health industry outputs, with an emphasis on the ways in which such outputs are being assessed and improved. PMID:10116955

  17. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D: functional outcomes in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Greer, Frank R

    2008-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency occurs in the United States in exclusively breastfed infants who have high levels of skin pigmentation, inadequate vitamin D supplementation, and insufficient sunlight exposure. I review serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and functional outcomes of vitamin deficiency in young children and breastfed and nonbreastfed infants. These outcomes include the presence or absence of vitamin D deficiency rickets, bone mineral content, and serum parathyroid hormone concentration. Daily vitamin D supplements of 400 IU/L keep serum 25(OH)D concentrations higher than 50 nmol/L and prevent rickets in infants and young children. The available evidence is not sufficient to support the use of bone mineral content or parathyroid hormone concentrations in infants and young children as functional outcomes to define deficient or sufficient levels of 25(OH)D. I therefore propose a research agenda to establish the functional definitions of vitamin D sufficiency or deficiency in infants and young children. PMID:18689395

  18. Long Term Functional Outcomes After Early Childhood Pollicization

    PubMed Central

    Lightdale-Miric, Nina; Mueske, Nicole M.; Lawrence, Emily L.; Loiselle, Jennifer; Berggren, Jamie; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Stevanovic, Milan; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Wren, Tishya A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective Cohort Introduction Pollicization creates a thumb from another finger to treat hypoplasia/aplasia. Important outcomes include strength, function, dexterity, and quality of life. Purpose of the Study To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes and examine predictors of outcome after early childhood pollicization. Methods 8 children who underwent 10 pollicizations (age at surgery ≤ 5 years) were evaluated 3 to 15 years after surgery. Anthropometrics, range of motion, and basic medical history were obtained. Participants completed an upper extremity questionnaire (PODCI) and functional tests including grip and pinch strength, Box and Blocks, 9-hole pegboard, and strength-dexterity (S-D) tests. Results Almost all pollicized hands had poor strength and performed poorly on the traditional functional tests. Six of 10 pollicized hands had normal dexterity scores but were less stable in maintaining a steady-state force. Predictors of poorer outcomes included older age at surgery, reduced metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal range of motion, and radial absence. Discussion Early childhood pollicization resulted in poor strength and overall function, but normal dexterity was often achieved using altered control strategies. Conclusions Most children will likely obtain adequate dexterity despite weakness after pollicization, but older children and those with the most severe involvement may have poorer outcomes. PMID:25835252

  19. A Comparison of Functional Behavioral Assessment and Functional Analysis Methodology among Students with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Mitchell, Barbara S.; Harvey, Kristin; Green, Ambra; McKenzie, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and functional analyses (FA) are grounded in the applied behavior analysis principle that posits problem behavior is functionally related to the environment in which it occurs and is maintained by either providing access to reinforcing outcomes or allowing the individual to avoid or escape that which they…

  20. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Axonal Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the factors that could predict the functional outcome in patients with the axonal type of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Methods Two hundred and two GBS patients admitted to our university hospital between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. We defined a good outcome as being "able to walk independently at 1 month after onset" and a poor outcome as being "unable to walk independently at 1 month after onset". We evaluated the factors that differed between the good and poor outcome groups. Results Twenty-four patients were classified into the acute motor axonal neuropathy type. There was a statistically significant difference between the good and poor outcome groups in terms of the GBS disability score at admission, and GBS disability score and Medical Research Council sum score at 1 month after admission. In an electrophysiologic analysis, the good outcome group showed greater amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial nerve compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and greater amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) than the poor outcome group. Conclusion A lower GBS disability score at admission, high amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial CMAPs, and high amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal SNAPs were associated with being able to walk at 1 month in patients with axonal GBS. PMID:27446785

  1. Student Outcomes Assessment: What Makes it Work? Assessment Practices & Experiences in the California State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ. and Colleges, Long Beach. Inst. for Teaching and Learning.

    This monograph is a collection of papers that emerged from a project evaluating the implementation of college outcomes assessment at the campuses of the California State University (CSU) system. Fifteen pilot projects integrated their outcomes assessment in the academic majors and in general education from 1986 to 1990 and the projects were then…

  2. Assessing Outcomes Assessment Efforts: The View From 30,000 Feet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Witmer, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Describes how Skagit Valley College (Washington) addresses program-level learning outcomes assessment. Reports that the activities and requirements related to the college's participation in the League for Innovation in the Community Colleges' 21st Century Learning Outcomes Project have encouraged a more comprehensive assessment effort. (Contains…

  3. Predicting functional remission in patients with schizophrenia: a cross-sectional study of symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, functioning, and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Marcelo; Fresán, Ana; Barak, Yoram; Juárez, Francisco; Escamilla, Raul; Saracco, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background New approaches to assess outcome in schizophrenia include multidimensional measures such as remission, cognition, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life. Clinical and psychosocial measures have been recently introduced to assess functional outcome. Objective The study presented here was designed to examine the rates of symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, global functioning, and clinical global impressions in a sample of schizophrenia outpatients in order to assess functional remission and to identify predictive factors for functional remission. Methods A total of 168 consecutive Mexican outpatients receiving pharmacological treatment at the National Institute of Psychiatry in Mexico City were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Symptomatic remission was assessed according to the definition and criteria proposed by the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Psychosocial remission was assessed according to Barak criteria using the Psychosocial Remission in Schizophrenia scale. Functioning was measured with the Global Assessment of Functioning, and clinical outcome with the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale. Results Findings showed that 45.2% of patients fulfilled the symptomatic remission criteria, 32.1% achieved psychosocial remission, and 53% reported adequate functioning. However, the combination of these three outcome criteria – symptomatic, psychosocial remission, and functioning – indicated that 14.9% of the patients achieved our predefined functional remission outcome. The logistic regression model included five predictive variables for functional remission: (1) being employed, (2) use of atypical antipsychotics, (3) lower number of medications, (4) lower negative symptom severity, and (5) lower excitement symptom severity. Conclusion The study demonstrated that symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, and functioning could be achievable goals for a considerable

  4. Mental Health and Functional Outcomes of Maternal and Adolescent Reports of Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Frances; Lifford, Kate J.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of maternal and self-ratings of adolescent depression by investigating the extent to which these reports predicted a range of mental health and functional outcomes 4 years later. The potential influence of mother's own depressed mood on her ratings of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation on adolescent outcome…

  5. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  6. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  7. Functional Outcome Analysis: Do the Costs Outweigh the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Susan M.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to previous article (Noell and Gresham, this issue) on Functional Outcome Analysis (FOA) as important construct for evaluation of consultation and prereferral interventions. Notes that, practically speaking, one must wonder if information gleaned from FOA is worth costs. Addresses perceived scientific and practical merits of FOA. (NB)

  8. Beyond Symptomatic Improvement:Assessing Real-World Outcomes in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guico-Pabia, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the negative impact that major depressive disorder (MDD) has on quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning. Available scales that assess these areas of impairment as they relate to patients with MDD are described. Data Sources: PubMed searches were conducted using the following terms: (MDD OR major depressive disorder) AND (absenteeism OR absente*); AND (quality of life OR QOL); AND (psychosocial function*); AND (presente* OR presenteeism); AND (health care cost* OR [health care] cost*); AND (health outcome*); AND (functional outcome*); AND (family life); AND (disabil* OR disability); AND (work function*); AND (unemployment OR unemploy*). The literature search was conducted in July 2008 and was restricted to English language articles. There were no limits set on the dates of the search. Study Selection: Two hundred twenty potential articles were identified. Among these studies, 48 presented primary data directly demonstrating the effect of MDD on quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning. Data Extraction: Primary data were compiled from these studies and are summarily described. Available scales that assess quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning are also described. Data Synthesis: MDD was found to be associated with significant disability and declines in functioning and quality of life. The Sheehan Disability Scale, the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Work Limitations Questionnaire were the most commonly used scales according to this review of the literature, but the majority of studies used direct and indirect disability measures, such as health care and other disability-related costs. Conclusions: In addition to assessing symptomatic outcomes, physicians should routinely assess their depressed patients on “real-world” outcomes. The development of a concise functional outcome measure specific to MDD is

  9. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  10. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using…

  11. Outcome Assessment of the Visiting Fulbright Scholar Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of State, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Policy and Evaluation of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State contracted with SRI International to conduct a series of assessments of outcomes and impacts of various specialized exchange programs under the overall umbrella of the Fulbright Educational Exchange Program, the U.S. government's…

  12. The Reading Behavior Inventory: An Outcome Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Gregory L.; Kirby, Jennine; Wood, Jennifer; Peters, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Many questionnaires attempt to assess the quality of life of individuals who are visually impaired (that is, those who are blind or have low vision), but few apply to those who are undergoing visual rehabilitation and hence are difficult to adapt as an outcome measure Massof & Rubin, 2001). The Reading Behavior Inventory (RBI) was developed as a…

  13. Graduate Programs: The Wild West of Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzoff, Jordan H.; Peinovich, Paula E.; Riedel, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education is an increasingly diverse segment of higher education. The master's degree is replacing the baccalaureate as the new standard for adult learners, and professional doctorates all signal an expanding domain. Graduate programs are not exempt from requirements for assessment of outcomes, yet standards and best practices for…

  14. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in FCS Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Kaulis, Amy; Crutsinger, Christy

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation, budget, and accountability pressures at the institution and program levels lead to the involvement of faculty in assessment-based activities. Increasingly, programs are being expected to document student learning beyond traditional course grades. The use of outcomes as a tool to improve learning relies heavily on the active…

  15. Consideration of What May Influence Student Outcomes on Alternate Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Diane M.; Fallin, Kathy; Davis, Stephanie; Karvonen, Meagan

    2003-01-01

    This article describes variables that may influence alternate assessment outcomes for students with disabilities and offers recommendations to enhance student achievement. These variables include technical quality, curriculum access, data collection, instructional effectiveness, risk factors, and resources allocated to instruction. Two of four…

  16. Building Assessment Tools Aligned with Grade-Level Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Caryl; Horton, Mel L.; Tarr, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of assessment tools to enhance the acquisition of the grade-level outcomes developed in the K-12 curriculum. Physical education is one of the few educational programs that does not have a multitude of available state and national tests to measure student progress. This distinction has been both a strength…

  17. Assessing Social Learning Outcomes through Participatory Mind Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin G.; DuBois, Bryce; Corwin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a method for using mind mapping to assess social learning outcomes in collaborative environmental restoration and participatory natural resource management initiatives. Using mind mapping for preassessment and postassessment can reveal changes in individual and collective thinking about critical social and ecological issues.…

  18. Leigh Syndrome in Childhood: Neurologic Progression and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Sook; Kim, Hunmin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies have analyzed the clinical course and functional outcome in Leigh syndrome (LS). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, radiological, biochemical, and genetic features of patients with LS, and identify prognostic indicators of the disease progression and neurological outcome. Methods Thirty-nine patients who had been diagnosed with LS at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital were included. Their medical records, neuroimaging findings, and histological/biochemical findings of skeletal muscle specimens were reviewed. Targeted sequencing of mitochondrial DNA was performed based on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme defects. Results Isolated complex I deficiency was the most frequently observed MRC defect (in 42% of 38 investigated patients). Mitochondrial DNA mutations were identified in 11 patients, of which 81.8% were MT-ND genes. The clinical outcome varied widely, from independent daily activity to severe disability. Poor functional outcomes and neurological deterioration were significantly associated with early onset (before an age of 1 year) and the presence of other lesions additional to basal ganglia involvement in the initial neuroimaging. Conclusions The neurological severity and outcome of LS may vary widely and be better than those predicted based on previous studies. We suggest that age at onset and initial neuroimaging findings are prognostic indicators in LS. PMID:27074294

  19. The Relationship between Students' Approaches to Learning and the Assessment of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gijbels, David; Van de Watering, Gerard; Dochy, Filip; Van den Bossche, Piet

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to gain more insight into the relationship between students' approaches to learning and students' quantitative learning outcomes, as a function of the different components of problem-solving that are measured within the assessment. Data were obtained from two sources: the revised two factor study process…

  20. Collaborative Development and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes for LIS Electives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Bradley Wade; Grubesic, Tony H.; Parrish, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    In higher education's environment of accountability, the development and assessment of student learning outcomes (SLOs) are driven by both external stakeholder requirements for accreditation and internal institutional pressures to demonstrate student learning as the core function of universities and colleges. This paper presents a framework to…

  1. Functional outcome measures for NF1-associated optic pathway glioma clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Ferner, Rosalie E.; Gutmann, David H.; Listernick, Robert; Martin, Staci; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Liu, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of the Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis Visual Outcomes Committee is to define the best functional outcome measures for future neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated optic pathway glioma (OPG) clinical trials. Methods: The committee considered the components of vision, other ophthalmologic parameters affected by OPG, potential biomarkers of visual function, and quality of life measures to arrive at consensus-based, evidence-driven recommendations for objective and measurable functional endpoints for OPG trials. Results: Visual acuity (VA) assessments using consistent quantitative testing methods are recommended as the main functional outcome measure for NF1-OPG clinical trials. Teller acuity cards are recommended for use as the primary VA endpoint, and HOTV as a secondary endpoint once subjects are old enough to complete it. The optic disc should be assessed for pallor, as this appears to be a contributory variable that may affect the interpretation of VA change over time. Given the importance of capturing patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials, evaluating visual quality of life using the Children's Visual Function Questionnaire as a secondary endpoint is also proposed. Conclusions: The use of these key functional endpoints will be essential for evaluating the efficacy of future OPG clinical trials. PMID:24249802

  2. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TORS FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) ± adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). STUDY DESIGN A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: transoral robotic surgery, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). METHODS Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December, 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were: 1) case report design (n<10), 2) review article, or 3) technical, animal or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. RESULTS Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS ± adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18% to 39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0% to 7% (mean follow-up: 11–26 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up: 12–13 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0% to 7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4% to 9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6- and 12-months. CONCLUSIONS Crude endpoints of functional recovery after TORS ± adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  3. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation–Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment – Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force DOES THIS HAVE TO BE LABLED AS PART 1

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald L; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Sprios; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan J; Burke, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient’s health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation, COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties in order to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment – Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment’s benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is in the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a

  4. Kidney function outcomes following thermal ablation of small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M; Qi, David

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of small renal masses (SRMs) continues to increase likely attributable to widespread use of axial cross-sectional imaging. Many of these SRMs present in elderly patients with abnormal baseline renal function. Such patients are at risk for further decline following therapeutic intervention. Renal thermal ablation presents one approach for management of SRMs whereby tumors are treated in situ without need for global renal ischemia. These treatment characteristics contribute to favorable renal function outcomes following kidney tumor ablation particularly in patients with an anatomic or functional solitary renal unit. PMID:27152264

  5. Kidney function outcomes following thermal ablation of small renal masses.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M; Qi, David

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of small renal masses (SRMs) continues to increase likely attributable to widespread use of axial cross-sectional imaging. Many of these SRMs present in elderly patients with abnormal baseline renal function. Such patients are at risk for further decline following therapeutic intervention. Renal thermal ablation presents one approach for management of SRMs whereby tumors are treated in situ without need for global renal ischemia. These treatment characteristics contribute to favorable renal function outcomes following kidney tumor ablation particularly in patients with an anatomic or functional solitary renal unit. PMID:27152264

  6. Single momentary assessments are not reliable outcomes for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stone, Arthur A; Broderick, Joan E; Kaell, Alan T

    2010-09-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) play an essential role in clinical trials, though questions have been raised about the accuracy of PROs using long recall periods. This paper examines the utility of a PRO employing a single momentary assessment of pain in a sample of community rheumatology patients. We explore the accuracy and reliability of a single assessment versus the average of multiple assessments taken over 1-week, which is considered a common outcome reporting period. A secondary analysis of 128 patients who monitored their pain intensity with momentary data collections several times a day for a week and 3 months later for another week allowed a comparison of randomly-selected single momentary assessments with the average of many assessments from the week. Results from cross-sectional analyses of the first week were that levels of pain measured by single points were not significantly different than the week average in 4 of 5 analyses, but these single-point assessments had much higher variance. Correlations of single-point and week averages were below 0.70. Longitudinal analysis of change scores across 3 months also demonstrated considerable unreliability of single-point measures, thus the statistical power generated by single-point assessments was considerably less than the more reliable week average. Our conclusion is that single momentary assessments, at least for representing an outcome over a period of a week, are not ideal measures. We discuss alternative measurement strategies for efficiently collecting PRO data for a 1-week period using end-of-day diaries or 7-day recall measures. PMID:20580945

  7. Coronary vasomotor function assessed by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Nagara; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac PET has the unique ability to assess coronary flow reserve and coronary endothelial function on the basis of response of blood flow to pharmacological stress and the cold pressor test. Quantitative analysis of coronary vasomotor function is valuable for precise assessment of function and treatment monitoring in the presence of various coronary risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown prognostic value of PET assessment of coronary vasomotor imaging in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Thus, quantitative analysis of PET has a great potential for wide application in identifying microcirculatory dysfunction and "individualized" monitoring of the effects of primary or preventive medical intervention to optimize cardiovascular outcome. PMID:19937243

  8. Three measures of functional outcome for lower limb amputees: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Treweek, S P; Condie, M E

    1998-12-01

    Outcome measures are becoming increasingly important in health care. Functional outcome measures are of particular importance for lower limb amputees since much of the rehabilitation process is concerned with increasing mobility and personal independence. The Scottish Physiotherapy Amputee Research Group (SPARG) has used three measures of functional outcome: the Barthel Index, Russek's classification and the Locomotor Index. The review reported here involves 938 patients having a primary amputation at the transtibial or transfemoral level between October 1992 and July 1997. Differences in function due to age and level of amputation are well known clinically and the measures were compared by looking at their ability to detect these differences. The Barthel Index lacked sensitivity because of ceiling effects and should not be considered as a suitable functional outcome measure for amputee patients. Russek's classification does detect significant differences but requires a large number of patients making it unsuitable for single hospital investigations. The Locomotor Index demonstrates significant differences due to age and amputation level despite fewer patients being assessed by this measure during the period covered by this paper. The range of the Locomotor Index can be extended to cover more active amputees by considering its 'advanced activities' subscale separately. The Locomotor Index is a promising measure and should be considered by rehabilitation teams looking for a valid, reliable and sensitive functional outcome measure for use with lower limb amputees. PMID:9881605

  9. Spinal meningiomas: clinicoradiological factors predicting recurrence and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Kalakoti, Piyush; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal meningiomas are benign tumors with a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features at presentation. The authors analyzed multiple clinicoradiological factors to predict recurrence and functional outcome in a cohort with a mean follow-up of more than 4 years. The authors also discuss the results of clinical studies regarding spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological details of patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors between 2001 and 2015 that were histopathologically confirmed as meningiomas. Demographic parameters, such as age, sex, race, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2, were considered. Radiological parameters, such as tumor size, signal changes of spinal cord, spinal level, number of levels, location of tumor attachment, shape of tumor, and presence of dural tail/calcification, were noted. These factors were analyzed to predict recurrence and functional outcome. Furthermore, a pooled analysis was performed from 13 reports of spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. RESULTS A total of 38 patients were included in this study. Male sex and tumors with radiological evidence of a dural tail were associated with an increased risk of recurrence at a mean follow-up of 51.2 months. Ventral or ventrolateral location, large tumors, T2 cord signal changes, and poor preoperative functional status were associated with poor functional outcome at 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Spine surgeons must be aware of the natural history and risk factors of spinal meningiomas to establish a prognosis for their patients. PMID:27476848

  10. Functional outcome of supracondylar elbow fractures in children: a 3- to 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Ahaoiza Diana; Furey, Andrew; Stone, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term functional outcomes of supracondylar elbow fractures (SCEF) have not been well documented in the literature. We retrospectively evaluated functional outcomes of pediatric SCEF using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of patients who presented to our tertiary care pediatric emergency department with SCEF between January 2005 and December 2009. We reviewed their charts to assess several clinical parameters, including age, sex, Gartland classification of SCEF, weight, comorbidities, treatment intervention, physiotherapy and the extremity involved. The DASH questionnaire was administered in 2012. We performed a multiple linear regression analysis to determine the significance of these clinical parameters as they related to the DASH score for functional outcome. Results We included 94 patients with SCEF in our review. Pediatric SCEF had good functional outcomes based on the DASH questionnaire (mean score 0.77 ± 2.10). We obtained the following DASH scores: 0.45 ± 2.20 for type I, 1.09 ± 1.70 for type II and 1.43 ± 2.40 for type III fractures. There was no statistical difference in functional outcome, regardless of sex (p = 0.07), age at injury (p = 0.96), fracture type (p = 0.14), weight (p = 0.59), right/left extremity (p = 0.26) or surgery (p = 0.52). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that good functional outcomes can be expected with pediatric SCEF based on the DASH questionnaire, regardless of age at injury, sex, weight, right/left extremity or surgical/nonsurgical intervention, provided satisfactory reduction is achieved and maintained. PMID:25078928

  11. REDUCING AMBIGUITY IN THE FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Rooker, Griffin W.; DeLeon, Iser G.; Borrero, Carrie S. W.; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A.; Roscoe, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury and aggression) remains among the most serious challenges for the habilitation of persons with intellectual disabilities and is a significant obstacle to community integration. The current standard of behavior analytic treatment for problem behavior in this population consists of a functional assessment and treatment model. Within that model, the first step is to assess the behavior–environment relations that give rise to and maintain problem behavior, a functional behavioral assessment. Conventional methods of assessing behavioral function include indirect, descriptive, and experimental assessments of problem behavior. Clinical investigators have produced a rich literature demonstrating the relative effectiveness for each method, but in clinical practice, each can produce ambiguous or difficult-to-interpret outcomes that may impede treatment development. This paper outlines potential sources of variability in assessment outcomes and then reviews the evidence on strategies for avoiding ambiguous outcomes and/or clarifying initially ambiguous results. The end result for each assessment method is a set of best practice guidelines, given the available evidence, for conducting the initial assessment. PMID:26236145

  12. Idiosyncratic Variables Affecting Functional Analysis Outcomes: A Review (2001–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Dube, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Although typical functional analyses often produce clear outcomes, some studies have reported ambiguous results that cannot be interpreted. Such undifferentiated outcomes may occur if test conditions do not include relevant antecedent or consequent events. Clinicians then may try to modify the functional analysis conditions to include those events. Hanley, Iwata, and McCord (2003) reviewed the functional analysis literature through the year 2000 and described idiosyncratic variables included in modified functional analyses. The objective of the present review was to present a quantitative analysis of idiosyncratic antecedents and consequences in modified functional analyses during the past decade (2001 to 2010). We discuss the range of stimulus parameters tested and the assessment strategies used for informing the modified analysis conditions. PMID:24114110

  13. The Effects Of Reinforcement Magnitude On Functional Analysis Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The duration or magnitude of reinforcement has varied and often appears to have been selected arbitrarily in functional analysis research. Few studies have evaluated the effects of reinforcement magnitude on problem behavior, even though basic findings indicate that this parameter may affect response rates during functional analyses. In the current study, 6 children with autism or developmental disabilities who engaged in severe problem behavior were exposed to three separate functional analyses, each of which varied in reinforcement magnitude. Results of these functional analyses were compared to determine if a particular reinforcement magnitude was associated with the most conclusive outcomes. In most cases, the same conclusion about the functions of problem behavior was drawn regardless of the reinforcement magnitude. PMID:16033163

  14. Long-term functional outcomes of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Karen A; Gudmudsson, Larus S; Lew, Henry L

    2015-01-01

    We review the literature on two long-term functional outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) important to patients, family members, and rehabilitation treatment teams: work for pay and driving outcomes. Estimates on the percentages working after TBI have ranged widely, and few consistent prognostic indicators of long-term outcomes have been identified. The few large randomized controlled treatment trials of these long-term productive outcomes have been negative, but have identified promising subgroup results that bear further investigation. Salazar et al. (2000) identified patients with loss of consciousness of 1 hour or longer as a subgroup that benefited from intensive in-hospital treatment. Vanderploeg et al. (2008) found that the cognitive treatment arm resulted in improved cognitive performance, and that younger patients benefited more from the cognitive treatment; whereas older patients (31 plus) benefited from a more functional approach to treatment. The research evidence on driving post TBI is sparse - relying upon small studies, and lacking follow-up data. This review included only published research studies of 100 or more subjects, with control groups, and outcomes 6 months or longer after injury. The inclusion of more reliable studies narrowed return to work estimates and provided evidence that type of control group affects findings about return to work after mild TBI (mTBI). Prognostic indicators remain inconsistently measured among these more reliable studies. Heeding the frequent recommendation that research in this area be more stringently conducted, well powered, and use shared measures of critical variables would improve evidence. Adequately powered treatment trials of existing and innovative treatment modalities remain a priority. PMID:25701912

  15. The Role of Stress Exposure and Family Functioning in Internalizing Outcomes of Urban Families

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Strachan, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Although research suggests that stress exposure and family functioning are associated with internalizing problems in adolescents and caregivers, surprisingly few studies have investigated the mechanisms that underlie this association. To determine whether family functioning buffers the development of internalizing problems in stress-exposed families, we assessed the relation between stress exposure, family functioning, and internalizing symptoms among a large sample of inner-city male youth and their caregivers living in poverty across five waves of data collection. We hypothesized that stress exposure and family functioning would predict development of subsequent youth and caregiver internalizing problems and that family functioning would moderate this relation, with higher functioning families demonstrating greater resiliency to stress exposure. We used a longitudinal, prospective design to evaluate whether family functioning (assessed at waves one through four) activated or buffered the effects of stress exposure (assessed at wave one) on subsequent internalizing symptoms (assessed at waves four and five). Stress from Developmental Transitions and family functioning were significant predictors of depressive symptoms and anxiety in youth; however, family functioning did not moderate the relation. Family functioning mediated the relation between stress from Daily Hassles and internalizing outcomes suggesting that poor parenting practices, low structure, and low emotional cohesion activate depression and anxiety in youth exposed to chronic and frequent everyday stressors. Surprisingly, only family functioning predicted depressive symptoms in caregivers. Results validate the use of a comprehensive, multi-informant assessment of stress when investigating internalizing outcomes in youth and support using family-based interventions in the treatment and prevention of internalizing. PMID:25601821

  16. Assessing Treatment Outcomes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Margaret D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To review measures used to assess treatment response in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) across the life span. Data Sources: Keyword searches of English-language articles in the PubMed database up to and including the May 4, 2011, index date were performed with the search strings (1) (attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity [MeSH] OR ADHD) AND (outcome assessment [MeSH] OR adaptation of life skills OR executive function [MeSH]) and (2) (attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity [MeSH] OR ADHD) AND (function OR functioning OR quality of life [MeSH]). Study Selection: Articles found through this search were then selected based on relevance to the topic area; no specific quality criteria were applied. Data Extraction: Narrative review. Results: The vast majority of studies assessing ADHD treatments have measured treatment response using ADHD symptom measures. Additional domains relevant for assessing treatment response among children and adults with ADHD include functional impairment, quality of life, adaptive life skills, and executive function. Validated rating scales exist for assessing these additional domains, but there has been minimal research evaluating the sensitivity of these instruments for detecting treatment response in pediatric and adult samples. Conclusions: Assessment of treatment outcomes in ADHD should move beyond symptom assessment to incorporate measures of functioning, quality of life, adaptive skills, and executive function, especially when assessing long-term treatment response. The authors recommend a potential battery and schedule of measures that could be used to more comprehensively assess treatment response in patients with ADHD. PMID:23585986

  17. Self-Conscious emotions’ role in functional outcomes within clinical populations

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Rebecca; Cohen, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Patients with severe mental illnesses (SMI) often experience dysfunction in their ability to efficiently carry out everyday roles and/or skills. These deficits are seen across many domains of daily functioning. We suggest that the “self-conscious emotions” of pride and shame play a role in these functional outcomes. Pride and shame appear to facilitate individuals’ ability to evaluate their group status, detect social threats, and to adjust their behaviors accordingly. This study utilized an objective performance measure of functional capacity and a self-report of quality of life (QoL) to examine the respective roles of pride and shame in functional outcomes within two SMI patient groups (schizophrenia and affective disorder) and a community control group. The influence of neurocognition, affect and symptomatology on functional outcomes was also assessed. The patient groups did not differ in cognitive functioning, QoL, or shame. The schizophrenia group reported significantly higher pride and displayed worse objective performance than the other groups. Within each of the groups, shame had an inverse relationship with QoL, while pride positively associated with QoL. Shame associated with worse functional capacity in the schizophrenia group. Shame associated with better functional capacity, while pride associated with worse functional capacity within the affective disorder group. PMID:24508025

  18. Knee Function Assessment in Patients With Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Naimark, Micah B.; Kegel, Gary; O’Donnell, Thomas; Lavigne, Stephanie; Heveran, Chelsea; Crawford, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Outcomes of meniscus surgery are typically assessed with patient questionnaires that help capture symptoms and functional limitations but may not provide an accurate representation of underlying joint health. There are currently no performance-based measures of knee function in patients with symptomatic meniscus injury. Purpose: To assess the reproducibility, response to partial meniscectomy, and correlation with patient-reported questionnaire outcomes of novel performance-based knee function tests. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A battery of 9 tests for activities that require knee movements essential for everyday living was developed. Intra- and interrater reproducibility was assessed in 50 meniscus tear patients completing the battery at 2 preoperative assessments with either the same or different examiners. Response to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was evaluated in 35 of these patients 6 weeks after surgery. Subjects also completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaires pre- and postoperatively. Results: The intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were excellent for all tests (ICC > 0.8). Interrater ICC > 0.8 was observed for step-down, stair descent, star lunges, and timed treadmill travel. Performance on all tests improved significantly with surgery (P < .05), with the greatest improvement in sit-to-stand and stair ascent and descent. A greater percentage response to surgery was seen on questionnaire outcomes (20%-65%) than on performance-based tests (3%-15%). Moderate to poor correlations existed between the KOOS activities of daily living subscale and the performance-based tests (all ICCs ≤ 0.4). Conclusion: Performance-based knee function tests demonstrated good reproducibility and responsiveness in patients undergoing partial meniscectomy. Clinical Relevance: As both patient perception and functional

  19. Open Versus Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis: A Comparison of Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeMik, David E.; Uribe, Bastian; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background The proximal aspect of the long head of the biceps brachii (LHB) is a frequent source of anterior shoulder pain. Multiple techniques for LHB tenodesis have been described. However, comparative outcomes are lacking. The present study aims to compare functional results, patient reported outcomes, complications, and clinical failures for patients undergoing open versus arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. Methods All patients who underwent open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis from 2009-2012 at a single institution were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative variables of interest, including concomitant procedures, were recorded. Minimum 1-year follow-up was required for inclusion. Outcomes, including patient reported outcomes, physical exam findings, and complications were compared between open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis patients. Results Overall, 45 patients (25 open, 20 arthroscopic) were available for analysis. In total, there was a single clinical failure in a patient who underwent arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. No other complications or failures were noted. Active shoulder forward elevation was increased in the open tenodesis group as compared to the arthroscopic tenodesis group (177.8 ± 9.3° vs. 171.3 ± 11.7°; p = 0.049). Otherwise, there was no difference in range of motion or strength. For both groups, both the SF-36 and ASES scores improved significantly from preoperative values. Conclusion Both open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis provide good to excellent outcomes with few complications. Given the recent increased utilization of LHB tenodesis, future studies should use randomization and prospective data collection in order to determine if discrete patient populations are better served by either open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis techniques PMID:27528841

  20. Severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity are not associated with worse functional outcomes after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Catherine N.; Robbins, Ivan M.; Petracek, Michael R.; Pugh, Meredith E.; Brittain, Evan L.; Hemnes, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predictors of functional outcomes in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) are important to identify preoperatively. We hypothesized that baseline severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity would not be associated with 6-month functional outcomes after PTE. Clinical and hemodynamic data were collected on consecutive patients undergoing PTE from 2008 to 2014. Patients were stratified according to baseline pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and body mass index (BMI). Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), New York Heart Association functional class (FC), and echocardiography were assessed in each group at baseline and 6 months after PTE. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between functional outcomes and baseline PVR and BMI. Forty-two patients underwent PTE and had 6-month follow up data. In comparisons of patients with high and low baseline PVR, the baseline characteristics, distribution of disease, 6MWD, and FC were similar. Postoperative hemodynamics for both groups were similar. At 6 months, both groups achieved improvements in FC, and there were no between-group differences in the change in 6MWD or FC. In comparisons of obese and nonobese patients, perioperative and FC improvement were similar; however, obese patients achieved a greater improvement in 6MWD than nonobese patients (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our data suggest that baseline severity of CTEPH and obesity were not associated with worse functional outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these results, as these findings could have implications for patient selection for PTE. PMID:27252843

  1. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the following: large vessel infarct, small vessel infarct, embolic infarct, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke severity as assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcomes using the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measurement (FIM), and cognitive function using the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were assessed at admission and discharge. Results Subjects with a family history of stroke were more likely to have an ischemic stroke (90.7%) than were those without a family history (70.9%). The K-MBI, FIM, NIHSS, and K-MMSE scores did not show significant differences between patients with or without family history. Conclusion Family history of stroke was significantly associated with ischemic stroke, but not with functional outcomes. Other prognostic factors of stroke were not distributed differently between patients included in this study with or without a family history of stroke. PMID:26798613

  2. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  3. Defining and Measuring Student Competencies: A Content Validation Approach for Business Program Outcome Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Michael T.; Carnes, Lana W.; Vice, Janna P.

    2002-01-01

    Points out problems in assessing student learning outcomes. Outlines a content validation approach to outcomes assessment and suggests steps for defining the content domains and developing and adopting measures. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation: predictors of functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VILLA, FRANCESCO; RICCI, MARGHERITA; PERDISA, FRANCESCO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; GAMBERINI, JACOPO; CAMINATI, DANIELE; DELLA VILLA, STEFANO

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) leads to full recovery of function and sports activity in a high percentage of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze variables related to the patient, the surgical technique and the post-surgical rehabilitation methods, seeking to identify predictors of outcome and recovery time after ACL reconstruction. One hundred and four patients (81 M, 23 F) undergoing a step-based rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction were evaluated. 43.2% of them had an isolated ACL lesion, whereas 56.8% had one or more concurrent injuries. Data relating to personal characteristics, surgery and post-operative management were collected and analyzed for correlation. Clinical outcome was evaluated with IKDC subjective score and the Tegner score, and the time to reach full recovery was noted as well. Young patients with a higher pre-injury Tegner activity level or who practice sport at professional level, no concurrent capsular lesions and no postoperative knee bracing had better clinical results and took shorter time to recover. Also, a higher percentage of on-the-field rehabilitation sessions, and absence of significant muscle strength deficits at the first knee isokinetic test emerged as rehabilitation-related factors leading to a better post-surgical outcome. Personal, surgical and rehabilitation factors should be considered in order to optimize patient management and maximize the expected results. Further studies are needed to find the strongest factors in different patients. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective study. PMID:26904523

  5. Hydrophilic Polymers Enhance Early Functional Outcomes after Nerve Autografting

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Del Corral, Gabriel A.; Bittner, George D.; Shack, R. Bruce; Nanney, Lillian B.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 12% of operations for traumatic neuropathy are for patients with segmental nerve loss and less than 50% of these injuries obtain meaningful functional recovery. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) therapy has been shown to improve functional outcomes after nerve severance and we hypothesized this therapy could also benefit nerve autografting. Methods A segmental rat sciatic nerve injury model was used, whereby a 0.5 cm defect was repaired with an autograft using microsurgery. Experimental animals were treated with solutions containing methylene blue (MB) and PEG; control animals did not receive PEG. Compound Actions Potentials (CAPs) were recorded before nerve transection, after solution therapy, and at 72 hours postoperatively. The animals underwent behavioral testing at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively. After sacrifice, nerves were fixed, sectioned, and immunostained to allow for quantitative morphometric analysis. Results The introduction of hydrophilic polymers greatly improved morphological and functional recovery of rat sciatic axons at 1–3 days following nerve autografting. PEG therapy restored CAPs in all animals and CAPs were still present 72 hours postoperatively. No CAPS were detectable in control animals. Footfall asymmetry scores and sciatic functional index scores were significantly improved for PEG therapy group at all time points (p <0.05 and p<0.001; p <0.001 and p <0.01). Sensory and motor axon counts were increased distally in nerves treated with PEG compared to control (p = 0.0189 and p = 0.0032). Conclusions PEG therapy improves early physiologic function, behavioral outcomes, and distal axonal density after nerve autografting. PMID:22521220

  6. The influence of demographic factors on functional capacity and everyday functional outcomes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gould, Felicia; Bowie, Christopher R; Harvey, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have impaired everyday living and social outcomes. Performance-based measures, including neuropsychological (NP) performance and functional capacity (FC) measures have demonstrated usefulness in predicting these outcomes. We examined the correlation of demographic factors (race, age, and education) and FC measures, and the relative ability of NP performance, FC, and demographic factors to predict real-world outcomes in social, vocational, and residential domains in 194 outpatients with schizophrenia. Age, education, sex, and racial status were significantly, but modestly, associated with performance-based measures of everyday functioning, while, in addition, age and education had a similar modest relationship with social competence. Age, but none of the other demographic variables, contributed to the prediction of all three domains of everyday functioning. Functional capacity variables predicted everyday outcomes even when demographic variables were entered into a predictive equation first. These data suggest a similar and modest but detectable effect of demographic factors on performance-based measures of functional capacity as seen with NP performance in schizophrenia populations. Older age contributed to poorer everyday functioning even after consideration of functional capacity, which seems similar to findings in healthy populations without clinically notable cognitive decline. PMID:22272559

  7. Strategies for Assessing Learning Outcomes in an Online Oceanography Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    All general education courses at the San Jose State University, including those in the sciences, must present a detailed assessment plan of student learning, prior to certification for offering. The assessment plan must state a clear methodology for acquiring data on student achievement of the learning outcomes for the specific course category, as well as demonstrate how students fulfill a strong writing requirement. For example, an online course in oceanography falls into the Area R category, the Earth and Environment, through which a student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the methods and limits of scientific investigation; distinguish science from pseudo-science; and apply a scientific approach to answer questions about the Earth and environment. The desired learning outcomes are shared with students at the beginning of the course and subsequent assessments on achieving each outcome are embedded in the graded assignments, which include a critical thinking essay, mid-term exam, poster presentation in a symposium-style format, portfolio of web-based work, weekly discussions on an electronic bulletin board, and a take-home final exam, consisting of an original research grant proposal. The diverse nature of the graded assignments assures a comprehensive assessment of student learning from a variety of perspectives, such as quantitative, qualitative, and analytical. Formative assessment is also leveraged into learning opportunities, which students use to identify the acquisition of knowledge. For example, pre-tests are used to highlight preconceptions at the beginning of specific field studies and post-testing encourages students to present the results of small research projects. On a broader scale, the assessment results contradict common misperceptions of online and hybrid courses. Student demand for online courses is very high due to the self-paced nature of learning. Rates of enrollment attrition match those of classroom sections, if students

  8. Functional Connectivity of Brain Structures Correlates with Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, F. Andrew; Rao, Uma; Lu, Hanzhang; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Grannemann, Bruce; McGregor, Tamara; Croarkin, Paul E.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying biosignatures to assess the probability of response to an antidepressant for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is critically needed. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) offers the promise to provide such a measure. Previous work with fcMRI demonstrated that the correlation in signal from one region to another is a measure of functional connectivity. In this pilot work, a baseline non-task fcMRI was acquired in 14 adults with MDD who were free of all medications. Participants were then treated for 8 weeks with an antidepressant and then clinically re-evaluated. Probabilistic anatomic regions of interest (ROI) were defined for 16 brain regions (eight for each hemisphere) previously identified as being important in mood disorders. These ROIs were used to determine mean time courses for each individual's baseline non-task fcMRI. The correlations in time courses between 16 brain regions were calculated. These calculated correlations were considered to signify measures of functional connectivity. The degree of connectivity for each participant was correlated with treatment outcome. Among 13 participants with 8 weeks follow-up data, connectivity measures in several regions, especially the subcallosal cortex, were highly correlated with treatment outcome. These connectivity measures could provide a means to evaluate how likely a patient is to respond to an antidepressant treatment. Further work using larger samples is required to confirm these findings and to assess if measures of functional connectivity can be used to predict differential outcomes between antidepressant treatments. PMID:21556277

  9. False-Positive Tangible Outcomes of Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooker, Griffin W.; Iwata, Brian A.; Harper, Jill M.; Fahmie, Tara A.; Camp, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the most precise method for identifying variables that maintain problem behavior. Occasionally, however, results of an FA may be influenced by idiosyncratic sensitivity to aspects of the assessment conditions. For example, data from several studies suggest that inclusion of a tangible condition during an FA…

  10. Correlation of Thyroid Functions with Severity and Outcome of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, S; Sardana, D; Nanda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: During normal pregnancy, changes in thyroid function are well documented; however, information regarding thyroid function in preeclampsia is scanty. Aim: The present study was planned to study thyroid hormones in mild and severe preeclamptic women and normotensive women and correlate them with outcome of pregnancy. Subject and Methods: Thyroid hormones were analyzed in mild (n = 50) and severe (n = 50) cases of preeclamptic women and normotensive women (n = 100). Results: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TT4 levels were higher in mild preeclampsia as compared with severe preeclampsia (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). TT3 levels were lower in preeclampsia (more so in severe preeclamptics as compared with normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant women). Preeclamptic with raised TSH levels had significantly higher mean arterial blood pressure and low birth weight (BW). A negative correlation was observed between BW and TSH levels (r = 0.296, P < 0.001) and BW and TT4 levels. A positive correlation was observed between BW and TT3 levels. Conclusion: These findings indicate that there is a state of biochemical hypothyroidism that correlates with severity of preeclampsia and influences obstetric outcome in these women. Identification of thyroid hormone in pregnancy might be of help in predicting occurrence of preeclampsia. PMID:23634328

  11. Low hemoglobin is associated with poor functional outcome after non-traumatic, supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The impact of anemia on functional outcome and mortality in patients suffering from non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the relationship between hemoglobin (HB) levels and clinical outcome after ICH. Methods One hundred and ninety six patients suffering from supratentorial, non-traumatic ICH were extracted from our local stroke database (June 2004 to June 2006). Clinical and radiologic computed tomography data, HB levels on admission, mean HB values and nadir during hospital stay were recorded. Outcome was assessed at discharge and 3 months using the modified Rankin score (mRS). Results Forty six (23.5%) patients achieved a favorable functional outcome (mRS ≤ 3) and 150 (76.5%) had poor outcome (mRS 4 - 6) at discharge. Patients with poor functional outcome had a lower mean HB (12.3 versus 13.7 g/dl, P < 0.001) and nadir HB (11.5 versus 13.0 g/dl, P < 0.001). Ten patients (5.1%) received red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the mean HB was an independent predictor for poor functional outcome at three months (odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.92, P = 0.007), along with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 - 1.24, P < 0.001), and age (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04 - 1.12, P < 0.001). Conclusions We report an association between low HB and poor outcome in patients with non-traumatic, supratentorial ICH. While a causal relationship could not be proven, previous experimental studies and studies in brain injured patients provide evidence for detrimental effects of anemia on brain metabolism. However, the potential risk of anemia must be balanced against the risk of harm from red blood cell infusion. PMID:20398266

  12. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Patterns Predict Consciousness Level and Recovery Outcome in Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuehai; Zou, Qihong; Hu, Jin; Tang, Weijun; Mao, Ying; Gao, Liang; Zhu, Jianhong; Jin, Yi; Wu, Xin; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Yaojun; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Zhengjia; Gao, Jia-Hong; Weng, Xuchu; Northoff, Georg; Giacino, Joseph T.; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    For accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction of acquired brain injury (ABI), it is crucial to understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying loss of consciousness. However, there is no consensus on which regions and networks act as biomarkers for consciousness level and recovery outcome in ABI. Using resting-state fMRI, we assessed intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) of whole-brain networks in a large sample of 99 ABI patients with varying degrees of consciousness loss (including fully preserved consciousness state, minimally conscious state, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state, and coma) and 34 healthy control subjects. Consciousness level was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised on the day of fMRI scanning; recovery outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the fMRI scanning. One-way ANOVA of FCS, Spearman correlation analyses between FCS and the consciousness level and recovery outcome, and FCS-based multivariate pattern analysis were performed. We found decreased FCS with loss of consciousness primarily distributed in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCU), medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortex. The FCS values of these regions were significantly correlated with consciousness level and recovery outcome. Multivariate support vector machine discrimination analysis revealed that the FCS patterns predicted whether patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and coma would regain consciousness with an accuracy of 81.25%, and the most discriminative region was the PCC/PCU. These findings suggest that intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of the human posteromedial cortex could serve as a potential indicator for consciousness level and recovery outcome in individuals with ABI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Varying degrees of consciousness loss and recovery are commonly observed in acquired brain injury patients, yet the

  13. Adult functional outcomes of common childhood psychiatric problems: A prospective, longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Wolke, Dieter; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Context Psychiatric problems are among the most common health problems of childhood. Objective To test whether these health problems adversely affect adult functioning even if the problems themselves do not persist. Design Prospective, population-based study of 1420 participants assessed with structured interviews up to 6 times in childhood (ages 9 to 16; 6674 observations) for common psychiatric diagnoses and subthreshold psychiatric problems. Setting and population Community sample. Main outcome measure Participants were then assessed 3 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, and 24–26; 3215 observations of 1273 subjects) for adverse outcomes related to health, legal, financial, and social functioning. Results Participants with a childhood disorder had 6 times higher odds of at least one adverse adult outcome as compared to those with no history of psychiatric problems and 9 times higher odds of 2 or more such indicators (1 indicator: 59.5% vs. 19.9%, p <0.001; 2+ indicators: 34.2% vs. 5.6%, p <0.001). These associations persisted after statistically controlling for childhood psychosocial hardships and adult psychiatric problems. Risk was not limited to those with a diagnosis: participants with subthreshold psychiatric problems had 3 times higher odds of adult adverse outcomes and 5 time higher odds of 2 or more outcomes (1 indicator: 41.9% vs. 19.9%, p <0.001; 2+ indicators: 23.2% vs. 5.6%, p <0.001). The best diagnostic predictor of adverse outcomes was cumulative childhood exposure to psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Common, typically moderately-impairing, childhood psychiatric problems are associated with a disrupted transition to adulthood even if the problems do not persist into adulthood and even if the problems are subthreshold. Such problems provide potential target for public health efforts to ameliorate adult suffering and morbidity. PMID:26176785

  14. Improved facial outcome assessment using a 3D anthropometric mask.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Clement, J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to process three-dimensional facial surfaces to objectively assess outcomes of craniomaxillofacial care is urgently required. Available surface registration techniques depart from conventional facial anthropometrics by not including anatomical relationship in their analysis. Current registrations rely on the manual selection of areas or points that have not moved during surgery, introducing subjectivity. An improved technique is proposed based on the concept of an anthropometric mask (AM) combined with robust superimposition. The AM is the equivalent to landmark definitions, as used in traditional anthropometrics, but described in a spatially dense way using (∼10.000) quasi-landmarks. A robust superimposition is performed to align surface images facilitating accurate measurement of spatial differences between corresponding quasi-landmarks. The assessment describes magnitude and direction of change objectively and can be displayed graphically. The technique was applied to three patients, without any modification and prior knowledge: a 4-year-old boy with Treacher-Collins syndrome in a resting and smiling pose; surgical correction for hemimandibular hypoplasia; and mandibular hypoplasia with staged orthognathic procedures. Comparisons were made with a reported closest-point (CP) strategy. Contrasting outcomes were found where the CP strategy resulted in anatomical implausibility whilst the AM technique was parsimonious to expected differences. PMID:22103995

  15. Air pollutants and health outcomes: Assessment of confounding by influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Wong, Chit-Ming; Chan, King-Pan; Chau, Yuen-Kwan; Neil Thomas, G.; Ou, Chun-Quan; Yang, Lin; Peiris, Joseph S. M.; Lam, Tai-Hing; Hedley, Anthony J.

    2010-04-01

    We assessed confounding of associations between short-term effects of air pollution and health outcomes by influenza using Hong Kong mortality and hospitalization data for 1996-2002. Three measures of influenza were defined: (i) intensity: weekly proportion of positive influenza viruses, (ii) epidemic: weekly number of positive influenza viruses ≥4% of the annual number for ≥2 consecutive weeks, and (iii) predominance: an epidemic period with co-circulation of respiratory syncytial virus <2% of the annual positive isolates for ≥2 consecutive weeks. We examined effects of influenza on associations between nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM 10) and ozone (O 3) and health outcomes including all natural causes mortality, cardiorespiratory mortality and hospitalization. Generalized additive Poisson regression model with natural cubic splines was fitted to control for time-varying covariates to estimate air pollution health effects. Confounding with influenza was assessed using an absolute difference of >0.1% between unadjusted and adjusted excess risks (ER%). Without adjustment, pollutants were associated with positive ER% for all health outcomes except asthma and stroke hospitalization with SO 2 and stroke hospitalization with O 3. Following adjustment, changes in ER% for all pollutants were <0.1% for all natural causes mortality, but >0.1% for mortality from stroke with NO 2 and SO 2, cardiac or heart disease with NO 2, PM 10 and O 3, lower respiratory infections with NO 2 and O 3 and mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with all pollutants. Changes >0.1% were seen for acute respiratory disease hospitalization with NO 2, SO 2 and O 3 and acute lower respiratory infections hospitalization with PM 10. Generally, influenza does not confound the observed associations of air pollutants with all natural causes mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization, but for some pollutants

  16. Reasons for Seasons Assessment Outcomes For Diverse Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubert, R. M.; Pyke, C.; Lynch, S.; Ochsendorf, R.

    2003-12-01

    National systemic reform initiatives point to the need for a more focused science curriculum and better curriculum materials for teachers to use (aligned with science standards, instructional methods, and assessment/accountability measures). Assessment developers face the difficult task of identifying and revealing what students actually know that is relevant to curricular goals. The SCALE-uP Project at the George Washington University has attempted to create such assessments using an adapted rigorous set of criteria based on an assessment item analysis procedure developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science Project 2061. The procedure evaluates an assessment task's potential to reveal whether students have attained "a well-defined component of knowledge or acquired a particular skill" (Stern and Ahlgren, 2002). To determine students' scientific understanding of what causes the Earth's seasons, the SCALE-uP Project focuses on a single Benchmark from Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS, 1993) that include both empirical observations and theoretical statements related to the target concept (Earth's seasons). In the conceptual model guiding our assessment development, we believe the target concept, articulated through the Benchmark (4B,6-8, #4), represents a single coherent knowledge structure and mental model stored in memory that students can recall or access when needed to explain relevant phenomena or solve tasks. Therefore, students that possess the concept of the Earth's seasons would be expected to respond to phenomena related to seasons with consistent and coherent responses to probes and representations related to the Benchmark idea. The instrument development procedure compares assessment outcomes (cognitive model/framework) of about 30 general 7th grade students with little previous classroom exposure to learning about the seasons, to high achieving 8th graders who have studied the seasons, and to introductory astronomy college

  17. Comparative Study on the Difference in Functional Outcomes at Discharge between Proximal and Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fujimori, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have regarded proximal gastrectomy (PG) as optimal compared to total gastrectomy (TG) for upper stomach cancer. In addition to the traditional outcomes of complication and mortality, change in functional status should be considered as another relevant outcome in aging generations. However, there has been no community-based appraisal of functional outcomes between PG and TG. Using an administrative database, we compared functional outcomes between PG and TG. Among 12,508 patients who survived for ≥15 years and underwent open gastrectomy between 2008 and 2010, we examined patient characteristics, comorbidities, functional status estimated by the Barthel index (BI) at admission and discharge, complications, ICU care, ventilation administration, blood transfusion, operating room time, resumption of oral intake, length of stay and total charges. With reference to distal gastrectomy (DG), we performed multivariate analyses to assess the impacts of PG and TG on complications and BI deterioration. A total of 434 PGs and 4,941 TGs were observed in 148 and 295 hospitals, respectively. Patient characteristics, care process, resumption of oral intake, operating room time, length of stay and total charges were also significantly different among the three gastrectomy types. PG, TG and DG were not associated with complications or functional deterioration. Patient characteristics, preoperative blood transfusion and longer operating room time were significantly associated with more complications and BI deterioration. Since patient case mix and longer operating room time were associated with poor outcomes, physicians should recognize the role of PG and might optimally challenge and complete gastrectomies within the appropriate indications. PMID:22933986

  18. Do clinical outcome measures assess consumer-defined recovery?

    PubMed

    Andresen, Retta; Caputi, Peter; Oades, Lindsay G

    2010-05-30

    There is an international call for mental health services to become recovery-oriented, and also to use evidence-based practices. Addressing this call requires recovery-oriented measurement of outcomes and service evaluation. Mental health consumers view recovery as leading as meaningful life, and have criticised traditional clinical measures for being too disability-oriented. This study compares three measures of consumer-defined recovery from enduring mental illness: the Recovery Assessment Scale, the Mental Health Recovery Measure and the Self-Identified Stage of Recovery, with four conventional clinical measures. Correlational analyses supported the convergent validity of the recovery measures, although certain subscales were unrelated to each other. More importantly, little relationship was found between consumer-defined recovery and the clinical measures. Analyses of variance revealed that scores on the recovery measures increased across self-identified stage of recovery, but scores on most clinical measures did not improve consistently across stage of recovery. The findings demonstrate the qualitative difference between the two types of measures, supporting the claim by consumers that clinical measures do not assess important aspects of recovery. There is a need for further research and refinement of recovery measurement, including assessment of stages of recovery, with the aim of including such measures as an adjunct in routine clinical assessment, service evaluation and research. PMID:20227768

  19. Patient-Reported Outcome Assessments as Endpoints in Studies in Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Powers, John H; Howard, Kellee; Saretsky, Todd; Clifford, Sarah; Hoffmann, Steve; Llorens, Lily; Talbot, George

    2016-08-15

    The goal of administering medical interventions is to help patients live longer or live better. In keeping with this goal, there has been increasing interest in taking the "voice" of the patient into account during the development process, specifically in the evaluation of treatment benefits of medical interventions, and use of patient-centered outcome data to justify reimbursement. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are outcome assessments (OAs) used to define endpoints that can provide direct evidence of treatment benefit on how patients feel or function. When PROs are appropriately developed, they can increase the efficiency and clinical relevance of clinical trials. Several PROs have been developed for OA in specific infectious diseases indications, and more are under development. PROs also hold promise for use in evaluating adherence, adverse effects, satisfaction with care, and routine clinical practice. PMID:27481954

  20. Assessment of Global Functioning in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Utility of the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Smith, Laura A.; Schry, Amie R.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of global functioning is an important consideration in treatment outcome research; yet, there is little guidance on its evidence-based assessment for children with autism spectrum disorders. This study investigated the utility and validity of clinician-rated global functioning using the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment…

  1. Associations between preoperative functional status and functional outcomes of total joint replacement in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jamie E.; Ghazinouri, Roya; Alcantara, Luis; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. In developed countries, the functional status scores of patients with poor preoperative scores undergoing total joint replacement (TJR) improve more following TJR than those for patients with better preoperative scores. However, those with better preoperative scores achieve the best postoperative functional outcomes. We determined whether similar associations exist in a developing country. Methods. Dominican patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement completed WOMAC and SF-36 surveys preoperatively and at 12-month follow-up. Patients were stratified into low-, medium- and high-scoring preoperative groups based on their preoperative WOMAC function scores. We examined the associations between the baseline functional status of these groups and two outcomes—improvement in functional status over 12 months and functional status at 12 months—using analysis of variance with multivariable linear regression. Results. Patients who scored the lowest preoperatively made the greatest gains in function and pain relief following their TJRs. However, there were no significant differences in pain or function at 12-month follow-up between patients who scored low and those who scored high on preoperative WOMAC and SF-36 surveys. Conclusion. Patients with poor preoperative functional status had greater improvement but similar 12-month functional outcomes compared with patients who had a higher level of function before surgery. These results suggest that a policy of focusing scarce resources on patients with worse functional status in developing countries may optimize improvement following TJR without threatening functional outcome. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in other developing countries and to understand why these associations vary between patients in the Dominican Republic and patients from developed countries. PMID:23748412

  2. Functional Outcomes After Both Bone Forearm Fractures in Adults.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Mary K; Vaidya, Rahul; Langfitt, Maxwell; Carroll, Eben A; Cannada, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate midterm outcomes after both bone forearm fractures. A retrospective review of patients treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) at three level 1 trauma centers was completed. Eligible patients were sent three questionnaires: Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Short Form-12 (SF-12), and questions about postinjury experience. Twenty-nine patients with an average age of 45 years returned the materials. The forms were completed an average of 60 months after ORIF. The mean DASH was 22 for all respondents. Twenty-one subjects participated in physical therapy (72%). Eight patients (28%) screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The mean SF-12 physical component score was 39 and the SF-12 mental component score was 40, both of which were lower than the non-PTSD group, indicating a lower subjective level of health (p < .05). The data suggest that, years after surgery, patients have decreased functional outcomes. PMID:26688986

  3. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Ricardo E.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Goldberg, Terry E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Olvet, Doreen M.; Correll, Christoph U.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders is the long-term disability that involves impaired cognition, lack of social support, and an inability to function independently in the community. A critical goal of early detection and intervention studies in psychosis is therefore to understand the factors leading to this often profound impairment. Objective To develop a predictive model of functional (social and role) outcome in a clinical high-risk sample for psychosis. Design Prospective, naturalistic, longitudinal 3- to 5-year follow-up study. Setting The Recognition and Prevention Program in New York, a research clinic located in the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. Participants One hundred one treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis. Ninety-two (91%) were followed up prospectively for a mean (SD) of 3 (1.6) years. Intervention Neurocognitive and clinical assessment. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome variables were social and role functioning at the last follow-up visit. Results Poor social outcome was predicted by reduced processing speed (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.050-1.823; P = .02), impaired social functioning at baseline (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.258-2.732; P = .002), and total disorganized symptoms (OR, 5.06; 95% CI, 1.548-16.527; P = .007). Reduced performance on tests for verbal memory (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.169-2.594; P = .006), role functioning at baseline (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.053-1.711; P = .02), and motor disturbances (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.060-2.969; P = .03) predicted role outcome. The areas under the curve for the social and role prediction models were 0.824 (95% CI, 0.736-0.913; P < .001) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.87; P < .001), respectively, demonstrating a high discriminative ability. In addition, poor functional outcomes were not entirely dependent on the development of psychosis, because 40.3% and 45.5% of nonconverters at clinical high risk had poor social

  4. Functional outcomes in patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection.

    PubMed

    Jares, Tyler M; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kowalski, Todd J

    2014-02-01

    When Lyme disease is treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy in the early stages, long-term outcomes are good. However, a few patients have persistent symptoms despite appropriate therapy. Whether these patients' symptoms are any different from those of patients with reinfection is unclear. Our objective was to compare long-term symptoms and functional outcomes of patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection with those of patients with only 1 episode of infection and with no history of infection. We compared outcomes of Lyme reinfection patients, characterized by recurrent erythema migrans (EM) lesions, with those of patients with 1 episode of Lyme disease (Lyme control) and with no history of Lyme disease (non-Lyme control) by retrospective medical record review and a survey consisting of a 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a 10-item symptom questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and χ(2) analysis for categorical variables were used. In cases of low cell counts, Fisher's exact tests were used. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons when ANOVA was significant. Reinfection was identified in 23/673 (3.4%) patients who had a diagnosis of Lyme disease in our health system during 2000-2004. Of the 23, 15 had long-term follow-up data and were age- and sex-matched to 45 Lyme control and 60 non-Lyme control group patients. Clinical characteristics were similar in the reinfection and Lyme control groups. SF-36 results were similar between groups for all domains except energy/vitality (VT). The SF-36 domain of VT was significantly different between groups: 63.0 vs. 54.5 vs. 64.5 in the reinfection, Lyme control, and non-Lyme control groups, respectively (p=0.047). Clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with recurrent EM lesions were similar to those of the control groups and consistent with B. burgdorferi reinfection, not persistent infection. Patients with Lyme reinfection should be treated with

  5. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  6. Outcomes Assessment for Beginning and Intermediate Spanish: One Program's Process and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Outcomes assessment is a process by which an academic unit defines and articulates its program goals and assesses its attainment of those goals. This article chronicles one language division's efforts at outcomes assessment for beginning and intermediate Spanish. The evidence used for program assessment consisted of WebCAPE placement scores,…

  7. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  8. Preoperative physiotherapy and short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mohd Shukry Mat Eil @; Sharifudin, Mohd Ariff; Shokri, Amran Ahmed; Rahman, Shaifuzain Ab

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiotherapy is an important part of rehabilitation following arthroplasty, but the impact of preoperative physiotherapy on functional outcomes is still being studied. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of preoperative physiotherapy on the short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS 50 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis who underwent unilateral primary TKA were randomised into two groups: the physiotherapy group (n = 24), whose patients performed physical exercises for six weeks immediately prior to surgery, and the nonphysiotherapy group (n = 26). All patients went through a similar physiotherapy regime in the postoperative rehabilitation period. Functional outcome assessment using the algofunctional Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale and range of motion (ROM) evaluation was performed preoperatively, and postoperatively at six weeks and three months. RESULTS Both groups showed a significant difference in all algofunctional KOOS subscales (p < 0.001). The mean score difference at six weeks and three months was not significant in the sports and recreational activities subscale for both groups (p > 0.05). Significant differences were observed in the time-versus-treatment analysis between groups for the symptoms (p = 0.003) and activities of daily living (p = 0.025) subscales. No significant difference in ROM was found when comparing preoperative measurements and those at three months following surgery, as well as in time-versus-treatment analysis (p = 0.928). CONCLUSION Six-week preoperative physiotherapy showed no significant impact on short-term functional outcomes (KOOS subscales) and ROM of the knee following primary TKA. PMID:26996450

  9. Curriculum Assessment as a Direct Tool in ABET Outcomes Assessment in a Chemical Engineering Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Attar, Hazim

    2010-01-01

    The chemical engineering programme at the United Arab Emirates University is designed to fulfil the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) (A-K) EC2000 criteria. The Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering has established a well-defined process for outcomes assessment for the chemical engineering programme in order to…

  10. Do Curriculum Outcomes and Assessment Activities in Science Encourage Higher Order Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Beverly; Schulz, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for two science units in each of Grades 6 and 7 was analyzed to determine the cognitive levels of the outcomes and their cognitive alignment with the assessments that corresponded with these outcomes. This was done for British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. The outcomes and assessments included a variety of higher…

  11. Assessing Educational Outcomes in Middle Childhood: Validation of the Teacher Academic Attainment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samantha; Marlow, Neil; Wolke, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Assessing educational outcomes in high-risk populations is crucial for defining long-term outcomes. As standardized tests are costly and time-consuming, we assessed the use of the Teacher Academic Attainment Scale (TAAS) as an outcome measure. Method: Three hundred and forty three children in mainstream schools aged 10 to 11 years (144 males,…

  12. Adult Diagnostic and Functional Outcomes of DSM-5 Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Egger, Helen; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objective Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder is a new disorder for DSM-5 that is uncommon and frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Here, we test whether meeting diagnostic criteria for this disorder in childhood predicts adult diagnostic and functional outcomes. Methods In a prospective, population-based study, subjects were assessed with structured interviews up to 6 times in childhood and adolescence (ages 10 to 16; 5336 observations of 1420 subjects) for symptoms of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and 3 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, and 24-26; 3215 observations of 1273 subjects) for psychiatric and functional outcomes (health, risky/illegal behavior, financial/educational and social functioning). Results Young adults with a history of childhood disruptive mood dysregulation disorders had elevated rates of anxiety and depression and were more likely to meet criteria for more than one adult disorder as compared to controls with no history of childhood psychiatric problems (noncases) or subjects meeting criteria for psychiatric disorders other than disruptive mood dysregulation disorder in childhood/adolescence (psychiatric controls). Participants with a history of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder also were more likely to have adverse health outcomes, be impoverished, have reported police contact, and have low educational attainment as adults compared to either psychiatric or noncase controls. Conclusions The long-term prognosis of children with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder cases is one of pervasive impaired functioning that in many cases is worse than that of other childhood psychiatric cases. PMID:24781389

  13. Creating clinical trial designs that incorporate clinical outcome assessments.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark R; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Lesser, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcome assessments (COAs) are increasingly being used in determining the efficacy of new treatment regimens. This was typified in the recent use of a symptom-based instrument combined with an organ-based measure of response for the approval of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis. There are challenges in incorporating these COAs into clinical trials, including designating the level of priority, incorporating these measures into a combined or composite endpoint, and dealing with issues related to compliance and interpretation of results accounting for missing data. This article describes the results of a recent panel discussion that attempted to address these issues and provide guidance to the incorporation of COAs into clinical trials, including novel statistical designs, so that the testing of new treatments in patients with cancers of the central nervous system can incorporate these important clinical endpoints. PMID:26989129

  14. Functional outcome of Schatzker type V and VI tibial plateau fractures treated with dual plates

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G Thiruvengita; Kumar, T Suresh; Kumar, R Krishna; Murthy, Ganapathy K; Sundaram, Nandkumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dual plate fixation in comminuted bicondylar tibial plateau fractures remains controversial. Open reduction and internal fixation, specifically through compromised soft tissues, has historically been associated with major wound complications. Alternate methods of treatment have been described, each with its own merits and demerits. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the functional outcome of lateral and medial plate fixation of Schatzker type V and VI fractures through an anterolateral approach, and a medial minimally invasive approach or a posteromedial approach. Materials and Methods: We treated 46 tibial plateau fractures Schatzker type V and VI with lateral and medial plates through an anterolateral approach and a medial minimal invasive approach over an 8 years period. Six patients were lost to followup. Radiographs in two planes were taken in all cases. Immediate postoperative radiographs were assessed for quality of reduction and fixation. The functional outcome was evaluated according to the Oxford Knee Score criteria on followup. Results: Forty patients (33 men and 7 women) who completed the followup were included in the study. There were 20 Schatzker type V fractures and 20 Schatzker type VI fractures. The mean duration of followup was 4 years (range 1-8 years). All patients had a satisfactory articular reduction defined as ≤2 mm step-off or gap as assessed on followup. All patients had a good coronal and sagittal plane alignment, and articular width as assessed on supine X-rays of the knee in the anteroposterior (AP) and lateral views. The functional outcome, as assessed by the Oxford Knee Score, was excellent in 30 patients and good in 10 patients. All patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity and employment. There were no instances of deep infection. Conclusions: Dual plate fixation of severe bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is an excellent treatment option as it provides rigid fixation and allows early knee

  15. The Extent to Which Collaborative Teams of Educators Link the Results of Functional Assessment to Function-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Courcy-Bower, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    A promising approach to addressing challenging behavior in schools is to develop and implement "function-based interventions" (Dunlap et al., 2006; Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Function-based interventions are individualized interventions in which five key outcomes of functional assessment (i.e., identification of challenging behavior,…

  16. The Daily Activity Report (DAR) a Novel Measure of Functional Outcome for Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn I; Mintz, Jim; Sierra, Cynthia; Martin, Mona L; Fredrick, Megan; Maglinte, Gregory A; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of real-world functional outcomes in clinical trials for medications targeting negative symptoms and cognitive impairment is extremely important. We tested the psychometric properties of the Daily Activity Report (DAR), a novel assessment of productive daily activity. We administered the DAR and additional assessments of functional outcome, functional capacity, cognition and symptomatology to 50 individuals with schizophrenia at 2 time points, 1 month apart and to 25 healthy controls. The DAR records a person's daily activity for 7 consecutive days based upon phone calls made 3 times a day. A total score and scores in 3 domains; instrumental activities (ie, independent living), social and work or school related activities are generated for the DAR. Inter-item consistency was high 0.89-0.94 for each domain and 0.88 overall. Test-retest reliability across 1 month for the total DAR score was 0.67,P< .0001. The total DAR score as well as scores for social activity and nondomestic work/school differed significantly between control and patient participants (P< .0001). DAR domain scores were associated with negative symptoms and functional outcomes, but the primary score related to these measures was the work/school dimension of the DAR. DAR scores were only weakly and nonsignificantly related to positive symptoms. This study provides preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the DAR using interviewer administration. The development of a patient reported version of the DAR using smart phone technology with automatic scoring is the next step. PMID:26712856

  17. The Daily Activity Report (DAR) a Novel Measure of Functional Outcome for Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Mintz, Jim; Sierra, Cynthia; Martin, Mona L.; Fredrick, Megan; Maglinte, Gregory A.; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of real-world functional outcomes in clinical trials for medications targeting negative symptoms and cognitive impairment is extremely important. We tested the psychometric properties of the Daily Activity Report (DAR), a novel assessment of productive daily activity. We administered the DAR and additional assessments of functional outcome, functional capacity, cognition and symptomatology to 50 individuals with schizophrenia at 2 time points, 1 month apart and to 25 healthy controls. The DAR records a person’s daily activity for 7 consecutive days based upon phone calls made 3 times a day. A total score and scores in 3 domains; instrumental activities (ie, independent living), social and work or school related activities are generated for the DAR. Inter-item consistency was high 0.89–0.94 for each domain and 0.88 overall. Test–retest reliability across 1 month for the total DAR score was 0.67, P < .0001. The total DAR score as well as scores for social activity and nondomestic work/school differed significantly between control and patient participants (P < .0001). DAR domain scores were associated with negative symptoms and functional outcomes, but the primary score related to these measures was the work/school dimension of the DAR. DAR scores were only weakly and nonsignificantly related to positive symptoms. This study provides preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the DAR using interviewer administration. The development of a patient reported version of the DAR using smart phone technology with automatic scoring is the next step. PMID:26712856

  18. Stereotype threat and executive functions: which functions mediate different threat-related outcomes?

    PubMed

    Rydell, Robert J; Van Loo, Katie J; Boucher, Kathryn L

    2014-03-01

    Stereotype threat research shows that women's math performance can be reduced by activating gender-based math stereotypes. Models of stereotype threat assert that threat reduces cognitive functioning, thereby accounting for its negative effects. This work provides a more detailed understanding of the cognitive processes through which stereotype threat leads women to underperform at math and to take risks, by examining which basic executive functions (inhibition, shifting, and updating) account for these outcomes. In Experiments 1 and 2, women under threat showed reduced inhibition, reduced updating, and reduced math performance compared with women in a control condition (or men); however, only updating accounted for women's poor math performance under threat. In Experiment 3, only updating accounted for stereotype threat's effect on women's math performance, whereas only inhibition accounted for the effect of threat on risk-taking, suggesting that distinct executive functions can account for different stereotype threat-related outcomes. PMID:24345711

  19. Linking Mission, Strategy and Student Outcomes Assessment: A Cost-Effective Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holoviak, Stephen J.; Verney, Thomas P.; Weigle, Jerry A.; Holoviak, Justin S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a demonstration of the assessment methods and processes that are used by the John L. Grove College of Business to assess student outcomes and how these assessments relate to mission and strategy.

  20. Obstetrical outcomes and biomarkers to assess exposure to phthalates: A review.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cécile; Vendittelli, Françoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Studies of the effects on pregnancy outcomes of in utero exposure to phthalates, contaminants that are widely present in the environment, have yielded conflicting results. In addition, the mode of assessment of exposure varies between studies. The aim of this review was therefore to establish a current state of knowledge of the phthalates and metabolites involved in unfavorable pregnancy outcomes. Extant data were analyzed to determine which biomarker is the best suited to assess the relation between in utero exposure to phthalates and pregnancy outcomes. This review of the literature was conducted using the database of PubMed. A search was made of studies investigating exposure to phthalates and the following birth outcomes: preterm birth (gestational age <37 weeks), change in gestational age, change in body size at birth (birth weight, length, head circumference), anti-androgenic function, decreased anogenital distance, cryptorchidism, hypospadias and congenital malformation. The methodological approach adopted in each study was examined, in particular the methods used for exposure assessment (biomarkers and/or questionnaire). Thirty-five studies were included. Premature birth and decreased anogenital distance were the most commonly reported outcomes resulting from a moderate level of exposure to phthalates. The principal metabolites detected and involved were primary metabolites of di-2(ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl-phthalate (DnBP). No clear conclusion could be drawn with regard to gestational age at birth, body size at birth and congenital malformations. In epidemiological studies, maternal urine is the most suitable matrix to assess the association between in utero exposure to phthalates and pregnancy outcomes: in contrast to other matrices (cord blood, amniotic fluid, meconium and milk), sampling is easy, non-invasive and, can be repeated to assess exposure throughout pregnancy. Oxidative metabolites are the most relevant biomarkers since they

  1. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  2. Achieving Faculty Buy-In: Motivation Performance in Learning Outcome Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sujitparapitaya, Sutee

    2014-01-01

    Despite the great value of student learning outcome assessment (SLOA), faculty have not fully embraced the assessment movement, and many remain locked in debates on its merits. To gain faculty buy-in and explain why many faculty were motivated to engage in outcome assessment, the modified CANE (Commitment And Necessary Effort) model was used to…

  3. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Methods Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Results Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. Conclusions In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months

  4. Development and Applications of an Outcomes Assessment Framework for Care Management Programs in Learning Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Kuntz-Melcavage, Kara; Forrest, Christopher B.; Lu, Yanyan; Piet, Leslie; Evans, Kathy; Uriyo, Maria; Sherry, Melissa; Richardson, Regina; Hawkins, Michelle; Neale, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and apply an outcomes assessment framework (OAF) for care management programs in health care delivery settings. Background: Care management (CM) refers to a regimen of organized activities that are designed to promote health in a population with particular chronic conditions or risk profiles, with focus on the triple aim for populations: improving the quality of care, advancing health outcomes, and lowering health care costs. CM has become an integral part of a care continuum for population-based health care management. To sustain a CM program, it is essential to assure and improve CM effectiveness through rigorous outcomes assessment. To this end, we constructed the OAF as the foundation of a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment. Innovations: To construct the OAF, we first systematically analyzed the operation process of a CM program; then, based on the operation analysis, we identified causal relationships between interventions and outcomes at various implementation stages of the program. This set of causal relationships established a roadmap for the rest of the outcomes assessment. Built upon knowledge from multiple disciplines, we (1) formalized a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment, and (2) integrated proven analytics methodologies and industrial best practices into operation-oriented CM outcomes assessment. Conclusion: This systematic approach to OAF for assessing the outcomes of CM programs offers an opportunity to advance evidence-based care management. In addition, formalized CM outcomes assessment methodologies will enable us to compare CM effectiveness across health delivery settings. PMID:25992387

  5. Functional assessment of laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David O.

    1988-03-01

    Exposure of the fovea to intense coherent light can produce either transient or permanent changes in the eye's ability to resolve fine spatial detail. Permanent functional changes can occur in the absence of gross morphological damage and at power densities below the ED50 level. Furthermore, the eye may become increasingly susceptible to damage after repeated low-level exposures which initially produce only transient effects. Independent of any long-term hazards, laser exposures can also disrupt visual/motor behavior for periods of up to 96 hrs

  6. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoñO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  7. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Li, Wen-yu; Hu, Xing-yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01–0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  8. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wen-Yu; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01-0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  9. Maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D and its association with childhood atopic outcomes and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Wills, A K; Shaheen, S O; Granell, R; Henderson, A J; Fraser, W D; Lawlor, D A

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy influences the risk of asthma and atopy in the offspring. The epidemiological evidence to support these claims is conflicting and may reflect chance findings and differences in how vitamin D was assessed. Objective To examine the association between blood total maternal 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in pregnancy and offspring asthma, atopy and lung function in the largest birth cohort study to date. Methods Participants were largely of white European origin and resident in the South West of England. We examined the associations of maternal 25(OH)D concentrations in pregnancy with the following outcomes in the offspring: wheeze, asthma, atopy, eczema, hayfever, at mean age 7.5 years (n = 3652–4696 depending on outcome), IgE at 7 years (n = 2915) and lung function and bronchial responsiveness at mean age 8.7 years (n = 3728–3784). Results Sixty-eight per cent of mothers had sufficient (> 50 nmol/L) concentrations of 25(OH)D, 27% were insufficient (27.5–49.99 nmol/L) and 5% were deficient (< 27.5 nmol/L). There was no evidence to suggest that maternal 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy was associated with any respiratory or atopic outcome in the offspring. These findings remained after adjustment for season of measurement and for potential confounders. There was also no evidence that these relationships followed a non-linear form and no evidence that either deficient or high concentrations of maternal 25(OH)D were associated with atopic or respiratory outcomes. Conclusions We found no evidence that maternal blood 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy is associated with childhood atopic or respiratory outcomes. PMID:24074336

  10. A Day-Hospital Approach to Treatment of Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Initial Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Carpino, Elizabeth A.; Chiang, Gloria; Condon, Marianne; Firn, Emily; Gaughan, Veronica J.; Hogan, Melinda, P.T.; Leslie, David S.; Olson, Katie, P.T.; Sager, Susan; Sethna, Navil; Simons, Laura E.; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical outcomes of an interdisciplinary day hospital treatment program (comprised of physical, occupational, and cognitive-behavioral therapies with medical and nursing services) for pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Methods The study is a longitudinal case series of consecutive patients treated in a day hospital pediatric pain rehabilitation program. Participants were 56 children and adolescents ages 8–18 years (median = 14 years) with CRPS spectrum conditions who failed to progress sufficiently with a previous outpatient and/or inpatient treatments. Patients participated in daily physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychological treatment and received nursing and medical care as necessary. The model places equal emphasis on physical and cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management. Median duration of stay was 3 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of physical, occupational, and psychological functioning at program admission, discharge, and at post-treatment follow-up at a median of 10 months post-discharge. Scores at discharge and follow-up were compared with measures on admission by Wilcoxon tests, paired t tests, or ANOVA as appropriate, with corrections for multiple comparisons. Results Outcomes demonstrate clinically and statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge in pain intensity (p<0.001), functional disability (p<0.001), subjective report of limb function (p<0.001), timed running (p<0.001) occupational performance (p<0.001), medication use (p<0.01), use of assistive devices (p<0.001), and emotional functioning (anxiety, p<0.001; depression, p<0.01). Functional gains were maintained or further improved at follow-up. Discussion A day-hospital interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach appears effective in reducing disability and improving physical and emotional functioning and occupational performance among children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndromes that

  11. Functional outcomes of adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Costain, Gregory; Karas, Dominique; Ho, Andrew; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common multisystem genomic disorder with congenital and later-onset manifestations, including congenital heart disease, intellectual disability, and psychiatric illness, that may affect long-term functioning. There are limited data on adult functioning in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to assess functioning in 100 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 46 male; mean age = 28.8 (standard deviation = 9.7) years) where intellect ranged from average to borderline (n = 57) to mild intellectual disability (n = 43). Results More than 75% of the subjects scored in the functional deficit range. Although personal, vocational, and financial demographics confirmed widespread functional impairment, daily living skills and employment were relative strengths. Intelligence quotient was a significant predictor (P < 0.001) of overall and domain-specific adaptive functioning skills. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was a significant predictor (P < 0.05) of overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, and socialization scores. Notably, congenital heart disease, history of mood/anxiety disorders, sex, and age were not significant predictors of functioning. Conclusion Despite functional impairment in adulthood that is primarily mediated by cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, relative strengths in activities of daily living and employment have important implications for services and long-term planning. These results may help to inform expectations about outcomes for patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:22744446

  12. Behaviors and Corresponding Functions Addressed via Functional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Horovitz, Max; Worley, Julie A.; Shoemaker, Mary E.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    One-hundred seventy-three studies that employed functional assessment were evaluated with respect to types of challenging behaviors studied and the functions identified that maintained those behaviors. For most studies, two to three behaviors were targeted. Of the 38 different challenging behaviors identified, self-injurious behavior (SIB) and…

  13. Assessing the Utility of a Demand Assessment for Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Pence, Sacha T.; Longworth, Lynlea J.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of…

  14. Selected Science Educational Outcomes as a Function of South Dakota Educational Reform Policies 1995-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.; Tien, K. C.

    2005-05-01

    This research investigates selected South Dakota science educational outcomes as a function of selected educational reform policies. In the state of South Dakota, echoing divergent reform initiatives from "A Nation at Risk" to "No Child Left Behind," new guidelines and requirements have been instituted. Yet, very little effort has been made to assess the progress of these educational changes. In this study, selected educational outcomes-SAT8/9/10 scores-as a function of selected South Dakota educational reform policies were examined. School districts, ranked in the top and bottom five percent of socioeconomic status (SES) in the state, were selected for analysis. Comparison on student's science educational outcomes was also be made between the two major ethnic populations-Caucasians and Native Americans. All research questions were stated in the null form for hypothesis for statistical testing. Critical t was the statistic technique used to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that the selected reform policies in South Dakota appeared to assist students from the higher socioeconomic backgrounds to perform better than pupils from the lower socioeconomic backgrounds. The academic performance for the ethnic and social class minorities remained unchanged within the study timeline for reform. Examined from the prism of Michael Apple's critical theory, the selected South Dakota reform policies have paid little attention to the issues of social equality. Continuing and collective efforts to promote equitable reform policies for enhancing the learning experience of all children in South Dakota seem necessary.

  15. Posterior shoulder instability in the athletic population: Variations in assessment, clinical outcomes, and return to sport

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Bradley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Posterior instability of the shoulder is becoming an increasingly recognized shoulder injury in the athletic population. Diagnostic elements, such as etiology, directionality, and degree of instability are essential factors to assess in the unstable athletic shoulder. Concomitant injuries and associated pathologic lesions continue to be a significant challenge in the surgical management of posterior shoulder instability. Return to sport and previous level of play is ultimately the goal for every committed athlete and surgeon, thus subpopulations of athletes should be recognized as distinct entities requiring unique diagnostic, functional outcome measures, and surgical approaches. PMID:26716088

  16. Decompressive hemicraniectomy: predictors of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Daou, Badih; Kent, Anthony P; Montano, Maria; Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Patients presenting with large-territory ischemic strokes may develop intractable cerebral edema that puts them at risk of death unless intervention is performed. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of outcome for decompressive hemicraniectomy (DH) in ischemic stroke. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective electronic medical record review of 1624 patients from 2006 to 2014. Subjects were screened for DH secondary to ischemic stroke involving the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery, or both. Ninety-five individuals were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for an array of clinical variables in relationship to functional outcome according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Clinical outcome was assessed at 90 days and at the latest follow-up (mean duration 16.5 months). RESULTS The mean mRS score at 90 days and at the latest follow-up post-DH was 4. Good functional outcome was observed in 40% of patients at 90 days and in 48% of patient at the latest follow-up. The mortality rate at 90 days was 18% and at the last follow-up 20%. Univariate analysis identified a greater likelihood of poor functional outcome (mRS scores of 4-6) in patients with a history of stroke (OR 6.54 [95% CI1.39-30.66]; p = 0.017), peak midline shift (MLS) > 10 mm (OR 3.35 [95% CI 1.33-8.47]; p = 0.011), or a history of myocardial infarction (OR 8.95 [95% CI1.10-72.76]; p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis demonstrated elevated odds of poor functional outcome associated with a history of stroke (OR 9.14 [95% CI 1.78-47.05]; p = 0.008), MLS > 10 mm (OR 5.15 [95% CI 1.58-16.79; p = 0.007), a history of diabetes (OR 5.63 [95% CI 1.52-20.88]; p = 0.01), delayed time from onset of stroke to DH (OR 1.32 [95% CI 1.02-1.72]; p = 0.037), and evidence of pupillary dilation prior to DH (OR 4.19 [95% CI 1.06-16.51]; p = 0.04). Patients with infarction involving the dominant hemisphere had higher odds of unfavorable functional outcome at 90

  17. Prefrontal Function at Presentation Directly Related to Clinical Outcome in People at Ultrahigh Risk of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, P.; Broome, M.R.; Matthiasson, P.; Woolley, J.B.; Mechelli, A.; Johns, L.C.; Tabraham, P.; Bramon, E.; Valmaggia, L.; Williams, S.C.; McGuire, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The prodromal phase of psychosis is characterized by impaired executive function and altered prefrontal activation. The extent to which the severity of these deficits at presentation predicts subsequent clinical outcomes is unclear. Methods: We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of subjects at clinical risk for psychosis and in healthy controls. Images were acquired at clinical presentation and again after 1 year, using a 1.5-T Signa MRI scanner while subjects were performing a verbal fluency task. SPM5 was used for the analysis of imaging data. Psychopathological assessment of the “at-risk” symptoms was performed by using the Comprehensive Assessment for the At-Risk Mental State (CAARMS) and the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). Results: In the at-risk mental state (ARMS) group, between presentation and follow-up, the CAARMS (perceptual disorder and thought disorder subscales) and the PANSS general scores decreased, while the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score increased. Both the ARMS and control groups performed the verbal fluency task with a high degree of accuracy. The ARMS group showed greater activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus but less activation in the anterior cingulate gyrus than controls. Within the ARMS group, the longitudinal normalization of neurofunctional response in the left inferior frontal gyrus was positively correlated with the improvement in severity of hallucination-like experiences. Conclusions: The normalization of the abnormal prefrontal response during executive functioning is associated with 12-month psychopathological improvement of prodromal symptoms. PMID:19666832

  18. Systematic assessment of the influence of complement gene polymorphisms on kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Ermini, Luca; Weale, Michael E; Brown, Katherine M; Mesa, Irene Rebollo; Howell, W Martin; Vaughan, Robert; Chowdhury, Paramit; Sacks, Steven H; Sheerin, Neil S

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the innate immune system, including complement, in causing transplant injury and augmenting adaptive immune responses is increasingly recognized. Therefore variability in graft outcome may in part be due to genetic polymorphism in genes encoding proteins of the immune system. This study assessed the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in complement genes and outcome after transplantation. Analysis was performed on two patient cohorts of 650 and 520 transplant recipients. 505 tagged SNPs in 47 genes were typed in both donor and recipient. The relationships between SNPs and graft survival, serum creatinine, delayed graft function and acute rejection were analyzed. One recipient SNP in the gene encoding mannose binding lectin was associated with graft outcome after correction for analysis of multiple SNPs (p=6.41 × 10(-5)). When further correction was applied to account for analysis of the effect of SNPs in both donor and recipient this lost significance. Despite association p values of <0.001 no SNP was significantly associated with clinical phenotypes after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, the variability seen in transplant outcome in this patient cohort cannot be explained by variation in complement genes. If causal genetic effects exist in these genes, they are too small to be detected by this study. PMID:26797657

  19. Patient preference assessment reveals disease aspects not covered by recommended outcomes in polymyositis and dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Alemo Munters, Li; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Alexanderson, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are characterized by impaired muscle function with a majority of patients developing sustained disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient's individual priorities (patient preference) of disabilities most important to improve in PM/DM using the MacMaster Toronto Arthritis Patient Preference Disability Questionnaire (MACTAR), to correlate the MACTAR to myositis outcomes and to evaluate its test-retest reliability. Methods. Twenty-eight patients with PM/DM performed recommended outcomes as well as the MACTAR, which was performed twice with one week apart. Results. Sexual activity, walking, biking, social activities, and sleep constituted the predominating disabilities. Seventy-two and 33% of the identified disabilities were not covered by items of the Health Assessment Questionnaire and the Myositis Activities Profile. Correlations between the MACTAR and health-related quality of life measures were r(s) = -0.67-0.73, correlations with measures of activities of daily living and participation in society were r(s) = 0.51-0.60 with lower correlations for other outcomes. Intraclass correlation (ICC) and weighted Kappa (K(w)) coefficients were 0.83 and 0.68, respectively, for test-retest reliability of the MACTAR. Conclusions. The MACTAR interview had promising measurement properties and identified patient preference disabilities in PM/DM that were not covered by recommended outcomes. PMID:22389795

  20. Recognition and Assessment of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: The Development of New Clinical Outcome Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nathalie; Menard-Katcher, Calies

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, food-allergic disease manifest by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense esophageal eosinophilia in which other causes have been excluded. Treatments include dietary restriction of the offending allergens, topical corticosteroids, and dilation of strictures. EoE has become increasingly prevalent over the past decade and has been increasingly recognized as a major health concern. Advancements in research and clinical needs have led to the development of novel pediatric- and adult-specific clinical outcome metrics (COMs). These COMs provide ways to measure clinically relevant features in EoE and set the stage for measuring outcomes in future therapeutic trials. In this article, we review novel symptom measurement assessments, the use of radiographic imaging to serve as a metric for therapeutic interventions, recently developed standardized methods for endoscopic assessment, novel techniques to evaluate esophageal mucosal inflammation, and methods for functional assessment of the esophagus. These advancements, in conjunction with current consensus recommendations, will improve the clinical assessment of patients with EoE. PMID:27330494

  1. Obesity and long term functional outcomes following elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obesity rates continue to rise and more total hip arthroplasty procedures are being performed in progressively younger, obese patients. Hence, maintenance of long term physical function will become very important for quality of life, functional independence and hip prosthesis survival. Presently, there are no reviews of the long term efficacy of total hip arthroplasty on physical function. This review: 1) synopsized available data regarding obesity effects on long term functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty, and 2) suggested future directions for research. Methods A literature search was conducted from 1965 to January of 2011 for studies that evaluated long term functional outcomes at one year or longer after THA in obese (body mass index values ≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m2). Results Five retrospective studies and 18 prospective studies were identified as those that assessed physical function before surgery out to ≥ one year after total hip arthroplasty. Study sample sizes ranged from 108–18,968 and followed patients from one to twenty years. Total hip arthroplasty confers significant pain reduction and improvement in quality of life irrespective of body mass index. Functional improvement occurred after total hip arthroplasty among all studies, but obese patients generally did not attain the same level of physical function by the follow-up time point. Discussion Uncontrolled obesity after total hip arthroplasty is related to worsening of comorbidities and excessive health care costs over the long term. Aggressive and sustainable rehabilitation strategies that include physical exercise, psychosocial components and behavior modification may be highly useful in maximizing and maintaining weight loss after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:22533938

  2. Core Outcome Sets and Multidimensional Assessment Tools for Harmonizing Outcome Measure in Chronic Pain and Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Neustadt, Katrin; Kopkow, Christian; Schmitt, Jochen; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are a set of domains and measurement instruments recommended for application in any clinical trial to ensure comparable outcome assessment (both domains and instruments). COSs are not exclusively recommended for clinical trials, but also for daily record keeping in routine care. There are several COS recommendations considering clinical trials as well as multidimensional assessment tools to support daily record keeping in low back pain. In this article, relevant initiatives will be described, and implications for research in COS development in chronic pain and back pain will be discussed. PMID:27589816

  3. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  4. Usefulness of an early neurofunctional assessment in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome in very low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Picciolini, O; Giannì, M L; Vegni, C; Fumagalli, M; Mosca, F

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether early neurofunctional assessment may be useful in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome in children of very low birth weight (VLBW). Design Observational longitudinal study. Settings Northern Italy. Patients A total of 250 VLBW children (129 boys, 121 girls) born consecutively 1996–1999. Main outcome measures Neurodevelopment at 36 months of chronological age, classified in accordance with the classification of Tardieu and the International classification of functioning. Results Of the infants exhibiting normal neurodevelopment (n  =  183) or major dysfunction (n  =  17) at 3 months of corrected age, 72% and 94% respectively did not change their score during the study. Minor dysfunctions at 3 months of corrected age were transient in 17 (34%) children. After adjustment for neonatal variables, neurodevelopment at 3 months of corrected age remained predictive of dysfunction at 36 months (odds ratio  =  4.33, 95% confidence interval 2.05 to 9.12). If the results for the normal and minor dysfunction groups were pooled, the predictive qualities of the 3 month neurofunctional assessment were: sensitivity 0.5, specificity 0.99, positive predictive value 0.94, negative predictive value 0.93. Conclusion Early neurofunctional evaluation may be useful in predicting later neurodevelopmental outcome in VLBW children. PMID:16492947

  5. Functional respiratory assessment in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect, to a greater or lesser degree, the alveolus, peripheral airway, and septal interstitium. Functional assessment in patients suspected of having an interstitial lung disease has implications for diagnosis and makes it possible to objectively analyze both response to treatment and prognosis. Recently the clinical value of lung-diffusing capacity and the six-minute walking test has been confirmed, and these are now important additions to the traditional assessment of lung function that is based on spirometry. Here we review the state-of-the-art methods for the assessment of patients with interstitial lung disease. PMID:25857578

  6. A Practical Guide to Functional Behavioral Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Margaret E.; Simpson, Robert G.; Crites, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides guidance on the use of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) techniques to identify the function of problem behaviors by recording antecedents and consequences of each behavior. It includes a case study illustrating application of FBA as well as a sample form for recording observations, developing a behavioral hypothesis,…

  7. MANUAL FOR ASSESSMENT OF BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual outlines a procedure for qualitatively assessing the functions and values of bottomland hardwoods (BLH). he procedure is based on the Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET) and for this reason is referred to as WET-BLH. etland functions are the physical, chemical, and bio...

  8. Coordinating ecological restoration options analysis and risk assessment to improve environmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapustka, Lawrence A; Bowers, Keith; Isanhart, John; Martinez-Garza, Cristina; Finger, Susan; Stahl, Ralph G; Stauber, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Ecological risk assessment as currently practiced has hindered consideration of ecosystem services endpoints and restoration goals in the environmental management process. Practitioners have created barriers between procedures to clean up contaminated areas and efforts to restore ecosystem functions. In this article, we examine linkages between contaminant risk assessment approaches and restoration efforts with the aim of identifying ways to improve environmental outcomes. We advocate that project managers and other stakeholders use an ecological planning framework, with restoration options included upfront in the risk assessment. We also considered the opportunities to incorporate ecosystem services as potential assessment endpoints in the Problem Formulation stages of a risk assessment. Indeed, diverse perspectives of stakeholders are central to understand the relevance of social, cultural, economic, and regional ecology as influences on future use options for the landscape being restored. The measurement endpoints used to characterize the existing ecological conditions for selected ecosystem services can also be used to evaluate restoration success. A regional, landscape, or seascape focus is needed throughout the risk assessment process, so that restoration efforts play a more prominent role in enhancing ecosystem services. In short, we suggest that practitioners begin with the question of "how can the ecological risk assessment inform the decision on how best to restore the ecosystem?" PMID:26077395

  9. Assessment of Functional Status and Quality of Life in Claudication

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Casserly, Ivan P.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Ho, P. Michael; Hiatt, William R.; Nehler, Mark R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Treadmill walking is commonly used to evaluate walking impairment and efficacy of treatment for intermittent claudication (IC) in clinical and research settings. Although this is an important measure, it does not provide information about how patients perceive the effects of their treatments on more global measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods PubMed/Medline was searched to find publications about the most commonly used questionnaires to assess functional status and/or general and disease-specific HRQOL in patients with PAD who experience IC. Inclusion criteria for questionnaires were based on existence of a body of literature in symptomatic PAD. Results Six general questionnaires and 7 disease-specific questionnaires are included with details about the number of domains covered and how each tool is scored. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 item questionnaire and Walking Impairment Questionnaire are currently the most used general and disease-specific questionnaires at baseline and following treatment for IC, respectively. Conclusions The use of tools which assess functional status and HRQOL has importance in both the clinical and research areas to assess treatment efficacy from the patient perspective. Therefore, assessing HRQOL in addition to treadmill-measured walking ability provides insight as to effects of treatments on patient outcomes and may help guide therapy. PMID:21334172

  10. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Young, Brittany M.; Walton, Leo M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E.; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID