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  1. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  2. Objective Integrated Assessment of Functional Outcomes in Reduction Mammaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Ilaria; Malovini, Alberto; Faga, Angela; Toffola, Elena Dalla

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was an objective integrated assessment of the functional outcomes of reduction mammaplasty. Methods: The study involved 17 women undergoing reduction mammaplasty from March 2009 to June 2011. Each patient was assessed before surgery and 2 months postoperatively with the original association of 4 subjective and objective assessment methods: a physiatric clinical examination, the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Berg Balance Scale, and a static force platform analysis. Results: All of the tests proved multiple statistically significant associated outcomes demonstrating a significant improvement in the functional status following reduction mammaplasty. Surgical correction of breast hypertrophy could achieve both spinal pain relief and recovery of performance status in everyday life tasks, owing to a muscular postural functional rearrangement with a consistent antigravity muscle activity sparing. Pain reduction in turn could reduce the antalgic stiffness and improved the spinal range of motion. In our sample, the improvement of the spinal range of motion in flexion matched a similar improvement in extension. Recovery of a more favorable postural pattern with reduction of the anterior imbalance was demonstrated by the static force stabilometry. Therefore, postoperatively, all of our patients narrowed the gap between the actual body barycenter and the ideal one. The static force platform assessment also consistently confirmed the effectiveness of an accurate clinical examination of functional impairment from breast hypertrophy. Conclusions: The static force platform assessment might help the clinician to support the diagnosis of functional impairment from a breast hypertrophy with objectively based data. PMID:25289256

  3. Myocardial Infarction and Functional Outcome Assessment in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Koudstaal, Stefan; Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; van Hout, Gerardus P.J; Jansen, Marlijn S.; Grndeman, Paul F.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Doevendans, Pieter A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of newly discovered cardiovascular therapeutics into first-in-man trials depends on a strictly regulated ethical and legal roadmap. One important prerequisite is a good understanding of all safety and efficacy aspects obtained in a large animal model that validly reflect the human scenario of myocardial infarction (MI). Pigs are widely used in this regard since their cardiac size, hemodynamics, and coronary anatomy are close to that of humans. Here, we present an effective protocol for using the porcine MI model using a closed-chest coronary balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD), followed by reperfusion. This approach is based on 90 min of myocardial ischemia, inducing large left ventricle infarction of the anterior, septal and inferoseptal walls. Furthermore, we present protocols for various measures of outcome that provide a wide range of information on the heart, such as cardiac systolic and diastolic function, hemodynamics, coronary flow velocity, microvascular resistance, and infarct size. This protocol can be easily tailored to meet study specific requirements for the validation of novel cardioregenerative biologics at different stages (i.e. directly after the acute ischemic insult, in the subacute setting or even in the chronic MI once scar formation has been completed). This model therefore provides a useful translational tool to study MI, subsequent adverse remodeling, and the potential of novel cardioregenerative agents. PMID:24796715

  4. Parenteral nutrition in adult inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts: assessment of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2006-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common comorbidity that places inpatients at risk of complications, infections, long length of stay, higher costs, and increased mortality. Thus, nutrition support has become an important therapeutic adjunctive to the care of these patients. For patients unable to feed themselves, nutrition can be delivered via the parenteral or enteral routes. The formulations used to deliver nutrients and the route of nutrient delivery, absorption, and processing differ substantially between parenteral and enteral nutrition. Over the past two decades, many randomised clinical trials have assessed the effects of parenteral versus enteral nutrition on outcomes (ie, complications, infections, length of stay, costs, mortality) in diverse inpatient populations. From a search of medical publications, studies were selected that assessed important clinical outcomes of parenteral versus enteral feeding or intravenous fluids in patients with trauma/burn injuries, surgery, cancer, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, critical illness, liver failure, acute renal failure, and organ transplantation. Our goal was to determine the optimum route of feeding in these patient groups. The available evidence lends support to the use of enteral over parenteral feeding in inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:16581410

  5. Assessing Student Learning Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybert, Jeffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the assessment of student learning outcomes in six domains: general education, transfer programs, vocational and occupational education, remedial and developmental education, continuing education, and affective and noncognitive areas. Discusses the use of assessment results and the implications of assessment for external accountability

  6. Optimal functional outcome measures for assessing treatment for Dupuytren’s disease: a systematic review and recommendations for future practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's disease of the hand is a common condition affecting the palmar fascia, resulting in progressive flexion deformities of the digits and hence limitation of hand function. The optimal treatment remains unclear as outcomes studies have used a variety of measures for assessment. Methods A literature search was performed for all publications describing surgical treatment, percutaneous needle aponeurotomy or collagenase injection for primary or recurrent Dupuytren’s disease where outcomes had been monitored using functional measures. Results Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies reported outcomes using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) ranging from validated questionnaires to self-reported measures for return to work and self-rated disability. The Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score was the most utilised patient-reported function measure (n=11). Patient satisfaction was reported by eighteen studies but no single method was used consistently. Range of movement was the most frequent physical measure and was reported in all 91 studies. However, the methods of measurement and reporting varied, with seventeen different techniques being used. Other physical measures included grip and pinch strength and sensibility, again with variations in measurement protocols. The mean follow-up time ranged from 2 weeks to 17 years. Conclusions There is little consistency in the reporting of outcomes for interventions in patients with Dupuytren’s disease, making it impossible to compare the efficacy of different treatment modalities. Although there are limitations to the existing generic patient reported outcomes measures, a combination of these together with a disease-specific questionnaire, and physical measures of active and passive individual joint Range of movement (ROM), grip and sensibility using standardised protocols should be used for future outcomes studies. As Dupuytren’s disease tends to recur following treatment as well as extend to involve other areas of the hand, follow-up times should be standardised and designed to capture both short and long term outcomes. PMID:23575442

  7. Utilization of the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) for Assessing Program and Clinical Outcomes. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Kay; Landsverk, John; Heflinger, Craig Anne; Simpkins, Celeste G.; Daniels, La Vonne; Clements, Lisa

    The Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) provides information on psychological impairment, including a score for the child's overall functioning as well as scale scores for eight psychosocial areas: school, work, home, community relationships, moods, self-harmful behavior, substance use, and abnormal thinking. This symposium

  8. Optimizing functional imaging protocols for assessing the outcome of fetal cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials aiming to assess the safety and efficacy of fetal cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rely on the hypothesis that the grafted tissue will survive and grow, restore striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission, improve the connectivity between striatum, thalamus and cortex and, thereby, produce long-lasting clinical improvement while avoiding the development of adverse effects. Although transplantation of human fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue has been reported as one of the most effective reparative therapies in Parkinson's disease patients to date, different studies have shown inconsistent results causing a paucity of new trials over the last decade. However, during this period, functional imaging alongside other scientific developments from clinical observations and animal work has significantly aided in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the success or failure of grafting human fetal tissue. Recent advances in functional imaging including both positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging could be proven useful in vivo tools for the development and assessment of new clinically competitive trials. In this commentary we discuss how an optimized functional imaging protocol could assist new clinical trials using fetal cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease. PMID:21569273

  9. Genetic variants associated with female reproductive ageing--potential markers for assessing ovarian function and ovarian stimulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Laisk-Podar, Triin; Kaart, Tanel; Peters, Maire; Salumets, Andres

    2015-08-01

    This study searched for genetic markers of ovarian function, ovarian stimulation and IVF treatment outcome among genetic variants related to female reproductive ageing. It included 471 treatment cycles from 306 women undergoing IVF treatment. Genotypes for 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated for their association with early follicular phase parameters together with ovarian stimulation and IVF outcome parameters. Results show that genetic variation related to menopause timing also affects ovarian function, as several selected genetic markers were associated with studied traits. For example, rs2153157 (SYCP2L) was associated with amount of recombinant FSH (rFSH) necessary for obtaining one oocyte (P = 0.049) and the chances of biochemical and clinical pregnancy (P = 0.024 and P = 0.011, respectively), while rs4886238 (TDRD3) showed association with both the number of punctured ovarian follicles and oocytes obtained (P = 0.008 and P = 0.037, respectively). Furthermore, FSHB polymorphisms influence early follicular phase FSH concentrations and IVF treatment outcome, whereas SNPs in FSHR affect early antral follicle count and follicle numbers obtained during ovarian stimulation. This study suggests that genetic markers of female reproductive ageing are potential new biomarker candidates that could be considered in clinical ovarian reserve and function assessment in assisted conception. PMID:26099445

  10. Functional outcome after thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Miljkovi?, Sinisa; Prtina, Drasko; Rabi Ziki?, Tamara; Vujkovi?, Zoran; Raci?, Dusko; Daji?, Vlado; Jesi?, Aleksandar; Arbutina, Milan; Ziki?, Milorad

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we report our experience from a prospective study in 40 ischemic stroke patients admitted during the last two years at University Department of Neurology Stroke Unit, Banja Luka Clinical Center, in order to assess the safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, the impact of age, sex and risk factors, and functional outcome at 6 months of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment. According to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, there were 5 mild, 22 moderate and 13 severe stroke cases in the study group. The outcome measures at 6 months of thrombolytic treatment were taken in 38 (100%) patients, yielding a Functional Independent Measure score > or=90 (good clinical outcome) in 21 (52.50%) and modified Rankin Score < or =2 (good clinical outcome) in 22 (55%) patients. The rate of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage in tissue plasminogen activator treated patients was 5%, with a mortality rate of 17.50%. The outcomes were comparable with those found in the NINDS t-PA trial. Current guidelines recommend a 'door-to-needle' time of less than 60 minutes and emphasize that 'time is brain'. PMID:21086732

  11. Assessing effects of environmental chemicals on neuroendocrine systems: potential mechanisms and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Mary Ann; Carro, Tiffany; Bohannon, Meredith; Baltos, Leah; Marcell, Allegra M; McKernan, Moira; Dean, Karen M; Lavoie, Emma; Abdelnabi, Mahmoud

    2013-09-01

    Environmental pollutants encompass a vast array of compounds. Most studies in birds have focused on toxicological effects, with little attention to non-lethal effects. Consequently, it has proven difficult to assess potential risk associated with exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Assessing potential adverse effects due to exposure is further complicated by the great variation that occurs across avian species. These include variations in reproductive strategies, life span, sexual differentiation, and migration. Differences in reproductive strategies, particularly in the developmental patterns and mechanisms for precocial and altricial chicks, predispose birds to wide variations in response to steroids and steroid-like EDCs. We have investigated the effects of EDCs in precocial birds including Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) as well as in wild altricial songbirds. Studies in Japanese quail characterized endogenous steroid hormone changes during development and have demonstrated that the developing embryo uses the yolk as a 'steroid hormone depot'. It appears that actual embryonic exposure is quantitatively lower than indicated by the treatment in egg injections and that the true amount of compound necessary for bioactivity may be quite low relative to the actual dosage delivered. Additionally, embryonic exposure to specific EDCs adversely affected sexual differentiation in quail, especially impacting male sexual behavior as well as neural systems, immune response, and thyroid hormones. Many of these studies considered single compounds; however, wild birds are exposed to complex mixtures and multiple compounds. We tested complex mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at concentrations that bracketed those found in eggs in contaminated regions. Results indicated that the predictive value of the toxic equivalency (TEQ), based on comparative activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) relative to dioxin was not as accurate as expected. We discuss the potential of developing an endocrine disruption index (EDI) to bridge the inconsistencies observed between responses predicted by the TEQ and those observed in vivo following exposure to EDCs. Further, we will discuss how an EDI would complement the adverse outcome pathways analyses to consider the range of effects of endocrine disruptors in birds. PMID:23773971

  12. Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slomka, Gregory T.

    This report provides an overview of the use of functional assessment in the evaluation of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. It begins by discussing the difficulties with traditional forms of assessment and the development of functional assessment, particularly in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation. The need to not rely on any single

  13. Outcomes Assessment: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Bill; Walcerz, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Outcomes assessment and continuous improvement are essential elements of educational programs. Emphasis on assessment is based primarily upon the requirements of accrediting agencies, but also on the perceived value of assessment in satisfying the demands for accountability in an increasingly competitive environment. Educational research has shown

  14. The power of outcomes: FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool -- Initial assessment.

    PubMed

    Hart, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate how outcomes assessment can assist in describing clients receiving rehabilitation in occupational health rehabilitation clinics and to describe the preliminary assessment of internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool. METHODS: 266 adults referred for acute work rehabilitation (AWR), work conditioning/hardening (WC/WH) or a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) comprised the data set. Clients were treated between July 1998 and January 1999 in 15 clinics from 6 states by 46 clinicians participating in the Focus on Therapeutic Outcomes (FOTO) national rehabilitation database beta test. For AWR and WC/WH, clients completed a health status questionnaire on intake and discharge, and health status was assessed prior to the FCE. Comprehensive demographic data were collected describing the clinics, clinicians, clients and work status collected 2 weeks following discharge. RESULTS: Internal consistency reliability coefficients for the health status scores ranged from 0.57 to 0.89. Construct validity was supported. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate the power of collecting outcomes from a variety of constructs for clients receiving industrial rehabilitation services. Initial reliability and construct validity findings were adequate and support continuing data analyses. PMID:12441480

  15. Bohler’s angle’s role in assessing the injury severity and functional outcome of internal fixation for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Controversy exits over the role of Böhler’s angle in assessing the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures and predicting the functional outcome following internal fixation. This study aims to investigate whether a correlation exists between Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced calcaneal fractures, and between surgical improvement of Böhler’s angle and functional outcome. Methods Patients treated operatively for unilateral closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from January 1, 2004 to March 31, 2008 were identified. The Böhler’s angles of both calcaneus were measured, and the measurement of the uninjured foot was used as its normal control. The difference in the value of Böhler’s angle measured preoperatively or postoperatively between the angle of the injured foot and that of the contralateral calcaneus were calculated, respectively. The change in Böhler’s angle by ratio was calculated by dividing the difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus by its normal control. The injury severity was assessed according to Sanders classification. The functional outcomes were assessed using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores. Results 274 patients were included into the study with a mean follow-up duration of 71 months. According to Sanders classification, the fracture pattern included 105 type II, 121 type III and 48 type IV fractures. According to American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scoring system, the excellent, good, fair and poor results were achieved in 104, 132, 27, and 11 patients, respectively. The preoperative Böhler’s angle, difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus, and change in Böhler’s angle by ratio each has a significant correlation with Sanders classification (rs=−0.178, P=0.003; rs=−0.174, P=0.004; rs=−0.172, P=0.005, respectively), however, is not correlated with functional outcome individually. The three postoperative measurements were all found to have a significant correlation with American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores (rs=0.223, P<0.001; rs=0.224, P<0.001; rs=0.220, P<0.001, respectively). However, these correlations were all weak to low. Conclusions There was a significant correlation between preoperative Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, but only postoperative Böhler’s angle parameters were found to have a significant correlation with the functional recovery. PMID:24330592

  16. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Camacho, Juan C.; Kokabi, Nima; Xing, Minzhi; Kim, Hyun S.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1) changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2) contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement), which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies. PMID:26854170

  17. The outcome of medical outcomes assessment: it's not necessarily academic.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, R B

    1997-08-01

    The outcomes assessment movement has the potential to significantly enhance the practice of medicine by enabling physicians to identify and implement what works. It represents a rich wellspring of material for investigation and is already proving to be an important source of research support. As such, it also represents a boon to academic medicine, whose activities in patient care, research, and education it may enrich. Yet outcomes research may also prove itself a threat to academic medicine insofar as the "outcomes" of the academic medical center are not adequately represented in its deliberations and recommendations. Ultimately, the results of the outcomes movement will be defined--both now and in the generation to come--by medicine's guiding vision. It behooves those who care about academic medicine to recall that this vision itself is a highly prized outcome. PMID:9282142

  18. Is age relevant to functional outcome after restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis?: prospective assessment of 122 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Y; Gilliland, R; Nogueras, J J; Weiss, E G; Wexner, S D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Restorative proctocolectomy for mucosal ulcerative colitis is well established. However, the effect of age on physiologic sphincter parameters is poorly understood. Our objective was to determine whether age at the time of restorative proctocolectomy correlates with physiologic changes. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In the approximately 20 years during which restorative proctocolectomy has been performed for ulcerative colitis, the indications have changed. Initially, the procedure was recommended only in patients under approximately 50 years. However, the procedure has been considered in older patients because of the increasing age of our population, the increasing frequency of recognition of patients during the "second peak" of mucosal ulcerative colitis, and the decreasing morbidity rates, due to the learning curve and to newer techniques, such as double-stapling. Few authors have presented data analyzing the effects of this operation in older patients. METHODS: One hundred twenty-two patients who had undergone a two-stage restorative proctocolectomy for mucosal ulcerative colitis were divided into three groups according to age: group I (>60 years), 11 men, 6 women; group II (40-60 years), 29 men, 18 women; and group III (<40 years) 29 men, 29 women. The patients were prospectively evaluated using anal manometry and subjective functional results. Comparisons were made before surgery, after colectomy and before closure of ileostomy, and at 1 or more years after surgery. RESULTS: There were no significant differences among the groups relative to manometric results, frequency of bowel movements, incontinence scores, or overall patient satisfaction. The postoperative mean and maximum resting pressures were significantly reduced (p < 0.001), and conversely the sensory threshold (p < 0.005) and capacity (p < 0.001) were increased in all groups up to 1 year after surgery. There were no statistically significant changes in the squeeze pressure or length of the high-pressure zone in any group at any point in time. After surgery, the mean and maximum resting pressures had returned to 80% of their original values. CONCLUSION: Although anorectal function is transiently somewhat impaired after restorative proctocolectomy, the impairment is not an age-related phenomenon. PMID:9488515

  19. Best evidence in multimodal pain management in spine surgery and means of assessing postoperative pain and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Multimodal approaches to pain management have arisen with the goal of improving postoperative pain and reducing opioid analgesic use. We performed a comprehensive literature review to determine grades of recommendation for commonly used agents in multimodal pain management and provide a best practice guideline. To evaluate common drugs used in multimodal treatment of pain, a search was performed on English language publications on Medline (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA). Manuscripts were rated as Level I-V according to the North American Spine Society's (NASS) standardized levels of evidence tables. Grades of recommendation were assigned for each drug based on the NASS Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care. There is good (Grade A) evidence gabapentinoids, acetaminophen, neuraxial blockade and extended-release local anesthetics reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that preemptive analgesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in reduced postoperative pain. There is insufficient and/or conflicting (Grade I) evidence that muscle relaxants and ketamine provide a significant reduction in postoperative pain or narcotic usage. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that short-term use of NSAID result in no long-term reduction in bone healing or fusion rates. Comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of perioperative pain control can be accomplished through the use of validated measures. Multimodal pain management protocols have consistently been demonstrated to allow for improved pain control with less reliance on opioids. There is good quality evidence that supports many of the common agents utilized in multimodal therapy, however, there is a lack of evidence regarding optimal postoperative protocols or pathways. PMID:25766366

  20. Distal extension of the midline urethral-plate incision in the Snodgrass hypospadias repair: An objective assessment of the functional and cosmetic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adl, Ahmed M.; El-Karamany, Tarek M.; Bassiouny, Ayman S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To objectively assess the functional and cosmetic outcomes of a modified tubularised incised-plate (TIP) urethroplasty (Snodgrass) technique, with particular attention to the uroflowmetry study and Hypospadias Objective Scoring Evaluation (HOSE) score. Patients and methods In a prospective case-series study, 43 consecutive patients with primary distal hypospadias were evaluated. The modified Snodgrass technique included an extension of the midline relaxing incision of the urethral plate from within the hypospadiac meatus to the very tip of the glans. The neourethra was tubularised starting at the neomeatus and proceeding proximally. The neourethra was covered with either a single or double dartos flap. In toilet-trained boys, at least 3months after surgery, the flow pattern, maximum (Qmax), and mean urinary flow rate (Qave) were recorded, and the results plotted against a recently published flow-rate nomogram from normal children. The postvoid residual urine volume was measured using ultrasonography. The cosmetic outcome was assessed using the HOSE system. Results The native meatus was coronal in 11 (26%), subcoronal in 23 (53%) and distal penile in nine (21%) of the patients. The median (range) age was 4.2 (0.514) years. The neourethra was covered by a single dorsal dartos flap in 25 and a double dartos flap in 18 patients. At a median (range) follow-up of 6 (324) months, the uroflowmetry findings in 26 uncomplicated toilet-trained boys with a median (range) age of 5.2 (3.314) years showed an abnormal Qmax below the fifth percentile in four (15%), with the Qave above the fifth percentile in all. The flow pattern was bell-shaped in nine boys (35%), interrupted/intermittent in five (19%), slightly flattened in 10 (39%) and a plateau in two (8%). A vertical slit-like meatus located at the distal glans was created in 39 (91%) boys, and at the proximal glans in four (9%). The urinary stream was single and straight in 39 and angled in four patients. A straight erection was observed in 42 (98%) boys. Four patients had preoperative mild penile torsion of <45, that was corrected by surgery. The mean (SD, range) HOSE score was 15.8 (0.6, 1316). Two patients had a small, single subcoronal fistula. Conclusion Extending the midline urethral plate-incision in the modified Snodgrass repair to the apical part of the glans can be done safely with a high rate of locating the neomeatus at the glans tip, with no resultant meatal stenosis. The functional and cosmetic results of the procedure are good, but long-term data and comparative studies are required to confirm these results. PMID:26019935

  1. A systematic review of outcomes assessed in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference tool

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Leite, Jos C de Carvalho; Song, Fujian

    2006-01-01

    Background A wide range of outcomes have been assessed in trials of interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), however there appears to be little consensus on what constitutes the most relevant outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the outcomes assessed in randomized clinical trials of surgical interventions for CTS and to compare these to the concepts contained in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical treatment for CTS. The outcomes assessed in these trials were identified, classified and linked to the different domains of the ICF. Results Twenty-eight studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work. The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation. Conclusion The ICF provides a useful framework for identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures employed to date in trials of surgical intervention for CTS and may help in the selection of the most appropriate domains to be assessed, especially where studies are designed to capture the impact of the intervention at individual and societal level. Comparison of results from different studies and meta-analysis would be facilitated through the use of a core set of standardised outcome measures which cross all domains of the ICF. Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed. PMID:17147807

  2. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for achieving a consensus regarding this complex problem. PMID:26664248

  3. Outcomes Assessment in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Ellen B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 22 dental-hygiene-program directors found that programs routinely and effectively assess student outcomes and use the information for program improvements and to demonstrate accountability. Both policy and faculty/administrative support were deemed important to implementation. Time constraints were a major barrier. Outcomes-assessment…

  4. Outcome Assessment in Aphasia: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Threats, Travis T.; Kagan, Aura

    2005-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in attention to the measurement of ''outcomes'' after speech-language intervention for adult aphasia. Consumers, speech-language pathologists (SLPs), and funding sources desire evidence of therapy outcomes that improve communication and enhance the quality of life for people with aphasia. While many assessment

  5. Oral Assessment in Mathematics: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the planning and implementation of an oral assessment component in a first-year pure mathematics module of a degree course in mathematics. Our aim was to examine potential barriers to using oral assessments, explore the advantages and disadvantages compared to existing common assessment methods and document the outcomes

  6. Co-Curricular Outcomes Assessment and Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how assessment of co-curricular student learning outcomes can be used as part of the institutional accreditation process and the opportunities institutional researchers and student affairs educators have to collaborate in those efforts.

  7. Authentic Assessment for Restorative Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The Developmental Audit[R] is a comprehensive means of assessment and treatment planning that identifies the coping strategies underlying a youth's maladaptive and self-defeating behavior. This is a strength-based assessment that engages youth in conflict in the process of generating solutions rather than focusing on deficits. This process…

  8. Authentic Assessment for Restorative Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The Developmental Audit[R] is a comprehensive means of assessment and treatment planning that identifies the coping strategies underlying a youth's maladaptive and self-defeating behavior. This is a strength-based assessment that engages youth in conflict in the process of generating solutions rather than focusing on deficits. This process

  9. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the

  10. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the…

  11. Perceptions of College Faculty Regarding Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Heath

    2009-01-01

    The perceptions of college faculty regarding outcomes assessment were explored using a qualitative interview research approach. Three faculty members at a liberal arts college in the United States were interviewed about their understandings, reactions to, and concerns regarding the assessment movement. Faculty members differed in their…

  12. Assessing Higher Education Learning Outcomes in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Amaral, Eliana; Knobel, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has developed an encompassing system for quality assessment of higher education, the National System of Higher Education Evaluation (SINAES), which includes a test for assessing learning outcomes at the undergraduate level, the National Exam of Student Performance (ENADE). The present system has been running since 2004, and also serves as

  13. Assessing Higher Education Learning Outcomes in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Amaral, Eliana; Knobel, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has developed an encompassing system for quality assessment of higher education, the National System of Higher Education Evaluation (SINAES), which includes a test for assessing learning outcomes at the undergraduate level, the National Exam of Student Performance (ENADE). The present system has been running since 2004, and also serves as…

  14. Alternative approaches to outcomes assessment: beyond psychometric tests.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jack M

    2014-10-01

    Outcomes assessments in clinical trials involving cognition and behavior rely upon IQ and neuropsychological assessments. These procedures provide limited evaluations of everyday functions. Some participants cannot perform cognitive tasks because they are low functioning or may represent missing data because of inability to travel. Interview-based assessments of adaptive behavior yield results that reflect everyday functions and can be done by telephone regardless of level of cognitive functioning. The design of the neurobehavioral component of the follow-up study for the management of myelomeningocele fetal surgery trial is as an example of a clinical trial that incorporates these alternatives. PMID:24174385

  15. Functional Assessment Inventory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.; Athelstan, Gary T.

    This manual, which provides extensive new instructions for administering the Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI), is intended to enable counselors to begin using the inventory without undergoing any special training. The first two sections deal with the need for functional assessment and issues in the development and use of the inventory. The

  16. Effects of Language of Implementation on Functional Analysis Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rispoli, Mandy; O'Reilly, Mark; Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff; Mulloy, Austin; Aguilar, Jeannie; Singer, George

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of language of implementation on functional analysis outcomes for a child with a severe intellectual disability from a Spanish-speaking home. Challenging behavior was assessed during 5-min sessions under 4 conditions; attention, play-verbal, play-nonverbal, and demand and across 2 phases; implementation in

  17. Multiple-Respondent Anecdotal Assessments: An Analysis of Interrater Agreement and Correspondence with Analogue Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carla M.; Smith, Richard G.; Dracobly, Joseph D.; Pace, Amy Peterson

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated interrater agreement across multiple respondents on anecdotal assessments and compared cases in which agreement was obtained with outcomes of functional analyses. Experiment 1 evaluated agreement among multiple respondents on the function of problem behavior for 27 individuals across 42 target behaviors using the Motivation Assessment

  18. Ideal functional outcomes for amputation levels.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert H; Melton, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    This article provides a generalized overview of amputation classifications and the idealized outcomes for upper and lower amputations at their respective levels. The following levels are discussed: above knee/transfemoral, below knee/transtibial, above elbow/transhumeral, below elbow/transradial, and bilateral for upper and lower extremities. This classification defines a framework for clinicians to share with patients so that they understand the potential for their expected functional outcomes regarding mobility and activities of daily living, both with and without a prosthesis. Moreover, it addresses some of the vocational and avocational needs of the individual regarding amputation. PMID:24287248

  19. Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to

  20. Outcomes Assessment: From Knowledge to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Kent

    A strategic planning model for planning and conducting outcomes assessment was developed and implemented at Wayland Baptist University in Lubbock, Texas. First, the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) model was used to survey 100 undergraduate students regarding their perceptions of skills they would need after graduation.

  1. Assessing Student Learning Outcomes: Performance Accountability Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard Community Coll., Columbia, MD.

    Prepared to document Howard Community College's (HCC's) progress in implementing its plan for assessing student learning outcomes, this performance accountability report describes the implementation of the plan as of November 1991, covering information gathered, actions taken, and proposed activities. Four strategic priorities which apply either…

  2. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  3. Using Outcomes Assessment to Change Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Michelle D.; Wiedenhoeft, Mary H.; Polito, Thomas A.; Gibson, Lance R.; Pogranichniy, Sherry; Mullen, Russ E.

    2006-01-01

    How can student outcomes assessment (SOA) be incorporated into ones courses and teaching? The purposes of this article are to explore a process enacted in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University using SOA to: (i) develop a clearer understanding of what students should learn in a course, (ii) determine how a course or courses fit within

  4. Assessing Early Intervention Outcomes: Beyond Program Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marfo, Kofi; Dinero, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper argues that efficacy of early intervention must be assessed in relation to both program and extra-program variables. A framework outlining five classes of independent variables and two classes of outcomes to be considered in efficacy research is presented, and regression and path analytic techniques are suggested as tools for addressing

  5. Assessment of Outcomes of Free Expression Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andsager, Julie; Ross, Susan Dente

    1999-01-01

    Assesses outcomes of instruction in three college-senior-level courses on freedom of expression. Suggests that increased attention to freedom-of-expression issues may have resulted in broader understanding of First Amendment issues, and individual and media rights. Notes that students seem to develop an appreciation of the reflexive nature of

  6. Using Outcomes Assessment to Change Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Michelle D.; Wiedenhoeft, Mary H.; Polito, Thomas A.; Gibson, Lance R.; Pogranichniy, Sherry; Mullen, Russ E.

    2006-01-01

    How can student outcomes assessment (SOA) be incorporated into ones courses and teaching? The purposes of this article are to explore a process enacted in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University using SOA to: (i) develop a clearer understanding of what students should learn in a course, (ii) determine how a course or courses fit within…

  7. Patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: functional outcome differs with different outcome scores.

    PubMed

    Aunan, Eirik; Næss, Grethe; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Sandvik, Leiv; Kibsgård, Thomas Johan

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Recent research on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has raised the question of the ability of traditional outcome measures to distinguish between treatments. We compared functional outcomes in patients undergoing TKA with and without patellar resurfacing, using the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) as the primary outcome and 3 traditional outcome measures as secondary outcomes. Patients and methods - 129 knees in 115 patients (mean age 70 (42-82) years; 67 female) were evaluated in this single-center, randomized, double-blind study. Data were recorded preoperatively, at 1 year, and at 3 years, and were assessed using repeated-measures mixed models. Results - The mean subscores for the KOOS after surgery were statistically significantly in favor of patellar resurfacing: sport/recreation, knee-related quality of life, pain, and symptoms. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed with the Knee Society clinical rating system, with the Oxford knee score, and with visual analog scale (VAS) for patient satisfaction. Interpretation - In the present study, the KOOS-but no other outcome measure used-indicated that patellar resurfacing may be beneficial in TKA. PMID:26540368

  8. Functional outcomes of conservatively treated clavicle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bajuri, Mohd Yazid; Maidin, S; Rauf, A; Baharuddin, M; Harjeet, S

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The main aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes of clavicle fractures in adults treated non-surgically and to evaluate the clinical effects of displacement, fracture patterns, fracture location, fracture comminution, shortening and fracture union on shoulder function. METHODS: Seventy clavicle fractures were non-surgically treated in the Orthopedics Department at the Tuanku Ja'afar General Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in Seremban, Malaysia, an average of six months after injury. The clavicle fractures were treated conservatively with an arm sling and a figure-eight splint for three weeks. No attempt was made to reduce displaced fractures, and the patients were allowed immediate free-shoulder mobilization, as tolerated. They were prospectively evaluated clinically and radiographically. Shoulder function was evaluated using the Constant scoring technique. RESULTS: There were statistically significant functional outcome impairments in non-surgically treated clavicle fractures that correlated with the fracture type (comminution), the fracture displacement (21 mm or more), shortening (15 mm or more) and the fracture union (malunion). CONCLUSION: This article reveals the need for surgical intervention to treat clavicle fractures and improve shoulder functional outcomes. PMID:21655759

  9. Outcomes of Functional Assessment-Based Interventions for Students with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Job-Share Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Eisner, Shanna L.; Kretzer, James; Bruhn, Allison L.; Crnobori, Mary; Funke, Laura; Lerner, Tara; Casey, Amy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a systematic approach to designing, implementing, and evaluating functional assessment-based interventions developed by Umbreit, Ferro, Liaupsin, and Lane (2007), implemented in a job-share classroom with two first-grade students. One student was at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) according to

  10. Functional outcome prediction following intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoffrey; Bruce, Samuel S; Han, James; Piazza, Matthew; Hwang, Brian; Hickman, Zachary L; Zacharia, Brad E; Carpenter, Amanda; Monahan, Aimee S; Vaughan, Kerry; Badjatia, Neeraj; Connolly, E Sander

    2012-06-01

    The ICH score is a validated method of assessing the risk of mortality and morbidity after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We sought to compare the ability of the ICH score to predict outcome assessed with three of the most widely used scales: the Barthel Index (BI), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). All patients with ICH treated at our institution between February 2009 and March 2011 were followed-up at three months using the mRS, GOS, and BI. The ICH score was highly correlated with the three-month mRS (?=0.59, p<0.001), BI (?=-0.57, p<0.001) and GOS (?=0.61, p<0.001). The ICH score also predicted dependency for each measure well, with areas under the curve falling between 0.826 and 0.833. Our results suggest that future clinical studies that use the ICH score to stratify patients may employ any of the three outcome scales and expect good discrimination of disability. PMID:22516544

  11. Science Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP): Design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Gurkas, P.; Shaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    Columbus State University is under pressure to reduce the number of "unproductive grades in its introductory science classes, to increase the number of STEM majors, and to assess the level of attainment of science outcomes in its general education courses for accreditation documentation. The authors designed a study to examine affective, cognitive, social, and classroom factors as predictors of success in science while also attempting to document the link between introductory "gateway to science major course outcomes and the general education program. One of the factors probed is the match between students understanding of important learning outcomes of the course and the instructor's stated priorities. A very real risk in content focused courses (e.g., astronomy) is the mismatch between the university's stated outcomes for a general education science course (e.g., critical thinking) and the instructor's content related outcomes. This mismatch may become a barrier for students taking `required courses as they may not comprehend the rationale for the requirement, fail to engage in the course, and consequently receive a failing grade. Another possible factor affecting student success in science is the student reasoning level. Students who are concrete thinkers may not be as successful in introductory science classes that require advanced logical thinking about unfamiliar concepts. The authors hope to use the results of this study to help inform university practices such as placement into introductory science courses and for future faculty development.

  12. Fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing to assess swallowing outcomes as a function of head position in a normal population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Head position practice has been shown to influence pill-swallowing ability, but the impact of head position on measures of swallowing outcomes has not yet been studied with fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether head position impacts penetration-aspiration scale scores and/or post-swallow pharyngeal residue as assessed by FEES. Documenting the incidence of pharyngeal residue and laryngeal penetration and aspiration in a normal population was a secondary goal. Methods Adults without swallowing difficulties (N = 84) were taught a pill swallowing technique based on learning five head positions and were asked to practice with small, hard candies (e.g., TicTacs) for two weeks. Then they demonstrated swallowing in each of the head positions for two conditions, liquid and purée, while undergoing FEES. Results Out of 840 examined swallows, one event of aspiration and 5 events of penetration occurred. During practice >50% participants found positions they preferred over the center position for swallowing but head position was not associated with penetration-aspiration scores assessed by FEES. Significant associations and non-significant trends were found between pharyngeal residue and three variables: age, most preferred head position, and least preferred head position. Conclusion Head position during swallowing (head up) and age greater than 40 years may result in increased pharyngeal residue but not laryngeal penetration or aspiration. PMID:24755159

  13. MULTIPLE-RESPONDENT ANECDOTAL ASSESSMENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF INTERRATER AGREEMENT AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH ANALOGUE ASSESSMENT OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carla M.; Smith, Richard G.; Dracobly, Joseph D.; Pace, Amy Peterson

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated interrater agreement across multiple respondents on anecdotal assessments and compared cases in which agreement was obtained with outcomes of functional analyses. Experiment 1 evaluated agreement among multiple respondents on the function of problem behavior for 27 individuals across 42 target behaviors using the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF). Results showed that at least 4 of 5 respondents agreed on the primary maintaining consequence for 52% (22 of 42) of target behaviors with the MAS and 57% (24 of 42) with the QABF. Experiment 2 examined correspondence between the anecdotal assessment results and functional analysis results for 7 individuals for whom at least 4 of 5 respondents showed agreement in Experiment 1. Correspondence with functional analysis results was observed in 6 of 7 cases with the QABF and in 4 of 7 cases with the MAS. Implications of these outcomes for the utility of anecdotal assessments are discussed. PMID:23322932

  14. Outcomes Assessment Handbook: How To Develop a Practical Outcomes Assessment Program for a Home Study School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Robert J.

    This handbook is designed to provide school decision makers with a global view of how assessment programs for home study schools are developed. Outcomes assessment (OA) is a required element for recognition by the National Home Study Council Accrediting Committee and hence for member schools. This handbook is designed to enable program developers

  15. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    PubMed

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to describe the treatment's intended benefit as an effect on a clearly identified aspect of how a patient feels or functions. This aspect must have importance to the patient and be part of the patient's typical life. This meaningful health aspect can be measured directly or measured indirectly when it is impractical to evaluate it directly or when it is difficult to measure. For indirect measurement, a concept of interest (COI) can be identified. The COI must be related to how a patient feels or functions. Procedures are then developed to measure the COI. The relationship of these measurements with how a patient feels or functions in the intended setting and manner of use of the COA (the context of use) could then be defined. A COA has identifiable attributes or characteristics that affect the measurement properties of the COA when used in endpoints. One of these features is whether judgment can influence the measurement, and if so, whose judgment. This attribute defines four categories of COAs: patient reported outcomes, clinician reported outcomes, observer reported outcomes, and performance outcomes. A full description as well as explanation of other important COA features is included in this report. The information in this report should aid in the development, refinement, and standardization of COAs, and, ultimately, improve their measurement properties. PMID:26409600

  16. Clinical Outcomes Assessment of Three Similar Hip Arthroplasty Bearing Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Christopher; Batson, Ryan; Reighard, Shane; Tanner, Stephanie; Snider, Becky; Pace, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    This report examines the clinical performance of three very similar total hip arthroplasty designs with distinctly different bearing surfaces used over the course 10-17 years. Clinical outcomes assessments for each group are compared in the context of varying implant related costs related to the latest technology at the time of surgery. Eighty-one surgeries were studied and differ by bearing surface. In this study, 36 hips are ceramic on polyethylene, 27 are metal on polyethylene and 18 are metal on metal. All polyethylene components are nonhighly cross-linked. The ceramic on polyethylene group has younger patients, on average, and higher percentage of patients with significant polyethylene wear. These groups have an average follow-up time of 8.6 years when assessing functional hip scores, thigh pain, groin pain, revision surgeries and radiographic osteolysis. The implant purchasing cost at the time of surgery was assessed to determine if a correlation exists between outcomes and the more technologically advanced implants use at the time of surgery. Based on midterm clinical outcome assessment, no correlation between initial hospital cost and clinical outcomes of one bearing surface over another can be found. PMID:25002938

  17. Outcome assessment: recommendations for daily practice.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Charles G

    2006-01-01

    The choice of instruments for the assessment of outcome in spinal surgery is bewildering. For day-to-day practice, however, consideration of the purpose for which information is required allows construction of simple strategies for data collection. Recommendations are made for short and convenient data sets for use in personal audit, clinical governance, benchmarking, patient selection and business planning. No simple data set can measure in detail every aspect of practice, but use of these recommendations will provide information that will be of great value to the spinal surgeon and ultimately to his patients. PMID:16315054

  18. Meniscal allograft transplantation: preoperative assessment, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Yanke, Adam B; Frank, Rachel M; Butty, Davietta C; Cole, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to characterize the preoperative assessment of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) candidates, to detail MAT surgical techniques, and to evaluate current clinical outcome data on MAT. The MAT candidate is typically less than 50 years old and has a history of knee injury, previous meniscus surgery, and persistent pain. Physical exam generally reveals knee pain with joint line tenderness with normal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating the postmeniscectomized state. There are several common surgical techniques used for transplantation, with fixation achieved through sutures, bony fixation, or a combination of the two. Concomitant procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteotomy, and other cartilage procedures are commonly performed. The available short- and long-term studies of clinical outcomes of MAT are variable and difficult to effectively compare due to heterogeneity of the study population and available treatment techniques. In addition, there are no published randomized controlled trials. However, recent reviews and cohort studies of clinical outcomes following MAT have shown that whether performed in isolation or performed with concomitant articular cartilage, realignment, or soft tissue reconstruction procedures MAT outcomes have been acceptable with the majority of studies reporting improved clinical outcomes regardless of the scoring system employed. MAT has proven to be a safe and effective technique in reducing knee pain and improving function in the symptomatic meniscal deficient knee. Evaluation of long-term clinical outcomes is necessary as is evaluation of meniscal replacement alternatives. PMID:24951950

  19. Predictors of Functional Outcome Among Stroke Patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abanto, Carlos; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Tirschwell, David L.; Montano, Silvia; Quispe, Yrma; Gonzales, Isidro; Valencia, Ana; Calle, Pilar; Garate, Arturo; Zunt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging population in low- and middle-income countries, cerebrovascular disease is expected to remain a leading cause of death. Little has been published about stroke in Peru. Aims We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized stroke patients at a referral center hospital in Lima, Peru to explore factors associated with functional outcome among stroke patients. Methods We identified 579 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage stroke at the National Institute of Neurologic Sciences in Lima, Peru in 2008 and 2009. A favorable outcome was defined as a modified Rankin score of ≤2 at discharge. Results The mean age was 63.3 years; 75.6% had ischemic stroke; the average length of stay was 17.3 days. At hospital discharge, 231 (39.9%) had a favorable outcome. The overall mortality rate was 5.2%. In multivariate models, the likelihood of having a favorable outcome decreased linearly with increasing age (p=0.02) and increasing NIHSS (p=0.02). Favorable outcome was also associated with male gender (relative risk [RR]=1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.5) and divorced status (RR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). Patients on Salud Integral de Salud (public assistance-type insurance, SIS) (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,1.0) were also less likely to have a favorable outcome. Conclusions Favorable outcome after stroke was independently associated with younger age, lower NIHSS score, male gender, being divorced, and not being on SIS insurance. These findings suggest further study of worse functional outcomes in patients with SIS insurance and confirm the importance of risk adjustment for age, stroke severity (NIHSS) and other socioeconomic factors in outcomes studies. Future studies should preferentially assess outcome at 30-days and 6-months to provide more reliable comparisons and allow additional study of Peruvian end-of-life decision-making and care. PMID:23352681

  20. Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Romano, Joan M.; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Van Tilburg, Miranda; Feld, Lauren D.; Christie, Dennis L.; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive-behavioral interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to one week post-treatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Methods Two-hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a 3-session social learning and cognitive-behavioral treatment (SLCBT) (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6 and 12 month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Results Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the SLCBT condition on child GI symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents’ solicitous responses to their child’s pain symptoms. Reductions in parents’ perceived threat regarding their child’s pain mediated reductions in both parent- and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children’s catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Discussion Results suggest that reductions in reports of children’s pain and GI symptoms following a social learning and cognitive-behavioral intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions. PMID:24469611

  1. Assessing and predicting successful tube placement outcomes in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Kathleen; Choi, Marcia; Travlos, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews feeding tube placement outcomes in 69 ALS outpatients seen at an outpatient interdisciplinary ALS clinic in British Columbia, Canada. The objective was to determine at which point the risks outweigh the benefits of tube placement by reviewing outcomes against parameters of respiratory function, nutritional status and speech and swallowing deterioration. The study was a retrospective review of tube placements between January 2000 and 2005, analysing data on respiratory function (forced vital capacity and respiratory status), weight change from usual body weight (UBW) and speech/swallowing deterioration using ALS Severity Score ratings (Hillel et al., 1989) at time of tube placement. Results show a statistically significant association between nutritional status and successful tube placement outcomes (p=0.003), and none between respiratory status, speech/swallowing variables, or number of deteriorated variables in each patient. Study findings were impacted by lack of available respiratory data. The only study variable that predicted successful tube placement outcome was a body weight greater than or equal to 74% UBW at time of tube placement. In the absence of access to respiratory testing, the relatively simple assessment of weight may assist patients and caregivers in appropriate decisions around tube placement. PMID:19714540

  2. Functional outcomes and quality of life after anorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Grucela, Alexis; Gurland, Brooke; Kiran, Ravi P

    2012-09-01

    There is a paucity of information examining quality of life (QOL) and functional results after anorectal surgery. We aim to prospectively evaluate postoperative QOL, pain, functional outcomes, and satisfaction for a large cohort of patients undergoing anorectal surgery. Data were prospectively accrued for consecutive patients undergoing anorectal operations from June 2009 to September 2010. Preoperative and postoperative electronic questionnaires were completed. QOL was evaluated by the European QOL index (EQ-5D) and functional results with the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Satisfaction was assessed: 1) Are you satisfied with surgery? 2) Would you recommend surgery to others? Responses were reported: 1 to 5 (1 = not at all; 5 = a lot). Pain was scored: 1 (no pain) to 10 (worst). One hundred ninety-five patients, 111 (56.9%) females, median age 44 years (range, 18 to 93 years), underwent anorectal surgery for abscess, condyloma, fissure, fistula, hemorrhoids, incontinence, pilonidal disease, pouch problems, tumors, and prolapse. Overall, pain improved significantly with improved QOL (P = 0.03). This correlated with overall postoperative satisfaction (92.4%). A total of 87.7 per cent of patients would recommend their surgery to others. The FISI was similar pre- and postoperatively (P = 0.18) and did not worsen postoperatively irrespective of surgical indication and procedure. Most patients were satisfied after anorectal surgery, which correlated with improved pain and QOL. Functional outcomes did not worsen. This will help counsel patients preoperatively and allay anxiety about postoperative function. PMID:22964203

  3. Neuropsychological and functional outcomes of very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Vohr, B R; Msall, M E

    1997-06-01

    Advances in perinatal and neonatal management have resulted in a significant increase in the survival of fragile extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants > 1,000 g at birth. The evaluation and reporting of the outcome of these infants aids in assessing the efficacy of interventions, provides data to aid in policy decisions, and provides critical information for parents and primary care providers. Comprehensive assessment of multiple domains including neurologic/neurosensory, developmental-cognitive, visual perceptual, speech/language, motor, functional skills for daily living, and Kindergarten readiness permit a total view of the child within the context of the family. Survival of VLBW infants < 800 g has steadily improved from 0% (1943 to 1945) to 49% to 70% (1994 to 1995). Rates of cerebral palsy, mental retardation, blindness, and deafness have remained stable in the 1980s and 1990s. There is evidence, however, that the percent of functional limitations may be increasing. A requirement for Special Education Resources among VLBW infants remains high at 44% to 56%. As increasing numbers of infants at the limits of viability survive, the medical community must remain vigilant in its surveillance and advocate both humanistically and scientifically for comprehensive strategies that optimize long-term functional, academic, and family outcomes. PMID:9205976

  4. Does obesity predict functional outcome in the dysvascular amputee?

    PubMed

    Kalbaugh, Corey A; Taylor, Spence M; Kalbaugh, Brooke A; Halliday, Matthew; Daniel, Grace; Cass, Anna L; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Cull, David L; Langan, Eugene M; Carsten, Christopher G; York, John W; Snyder, Bruce A; Youkey, Jerry R

    2006-08-01

    Limited information is available concerning the effects of obesity on the functional outcomes of patients requiring major lower limb amputation because of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive ability of body mass index (BMI) to determine functional outcome in the dysvascular amputee. To do this, 434 consecutive patients (mean age, 65.8 +/- 13.3, 59% male, 71.4% diabetic) undergoing major limb amputation (225 below-knee amputation, 27 through-knee amputation, 132 above-knee amputation, and 50 bilateral) as a complication of PAD from January 1998 through May 2004 were analyzed according to preoperative BMI. BMI was classified according to the four-group Center for Disease Control system: underweight, 0 to 18.4 kg/m2; normal, 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2; overweight, 25 to 29.9 kg/m2; and obese, > or = 30 kg/m2. Outcome parameters measured included prosthetic usage, maintenance of ambulation, survival, and maintenance of independent living status. The chi2 test for association was used to examine prosthesis wear. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to assess maintenance of ambulation, survival, and maintenance of independent living status. Multivariate analysis using the multiple logistic regression model and a Cox proportional hazards model were used to predict variables independently associated with prosthetic use and ambulation, survival, and independence, respectively. Overall prosthetic usage and 36-month ambulation, survival, and independent living status for the entire cohort was 48.6 per cent, 42.8 per cent, 48.1 per cent, 72.3 per cent, and for patients with normal BMI was 41.5 per cent, 37.4 per cent, 45.6 per cent, and 69.5 per cent, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in outcomes for overweight patients (59.2%, 50.7%, 52.5%, and 75%) or obese patients (51.8%, 46.2%, 49.7%, and 75%) when compared with normal patients. Although there were significantly poorer outcomes for underweight patients for the parameters of prosthetic usage when compared with the remaining cohort (25%, P = 0.001) and maintenance of ambulation when compared with overweight patients (20.8%, P = 0.026), multivariate analysis adjusting for medical comorbidities and level of amputation showed that BMI was not a significant independent predictor of failure for any outcome parameter measured. In conclusion, BMI failed to correlate with functional outcome and, specifically, obesity did not predict a poorer prognosis. PMID:16913314

  5. Implementing Assessment in an Outcome-Based Marketing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borin, Norm; Metcalf, Lynn E.; Tietje, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of assessment in a new outcome-based marketing curriculum that was developed using a zero-based approach. Outcomes for the marketing curriculum were specified at the program, department, course, and lesson levels. Direct embedded assessments as well as indirect assessment methods were used

  6. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based

  7. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  8. Analyses of functional and oncologic outcomes following supracricoid partial laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaotian; Pan, Zimin

    2015-11-01

    To review the functional and oncologic outcomes of patients who received supracricoid partial laryngectomy (SCPL) with cricohyoidoepiglottopexy (CHEP) or cricohyoidopexy (CHP) in our institution. A total of 208 patients who received SCPL with CHEP or CHP from our institution from 1995 to 2007 were involved. Among them, 190 cases were patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (T1-T4, N0-N2), 14 cases were patients with recurrent larynx cancer and 4 cases were patients with laryngeal stenosis. Forty-four patients also received unilateral neck dissection, and 41 patients received a bilateral neck dissection. All patients were assessed at functional outcome and complications of their treatment. Also, the oncologic outcomes, such as disease-specific survival, total survival, and local recurrence, were measured for patients with tumor. Decannulation was achieved in nearly all patients, with the average time to decannulation being 20 ± 11.52 days in CHEP patients and 28 ± 8.92 days in CHP patients (P < 0.05). The average nasogastric tubes were removed, days postoperation, was 18 ± 7.39 days in CHEP patients and 25 ± 13.87 days in CHP patients (P < 0.05). The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5.77%, the 5-year disease-specific survival was 82.7%, and the 5-year overall survival was 84.1%. The patients with CHEP had a better recovery than the patients with CHP. SCPL was a well-tolerated procedure with generally good functional outcomes for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer, also for some patients with laryngeal stenosis. PMID:25359194

  9. The lip-splitting mandibulotomy: aesthetic and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dziegielewski, Peter T; O'Connell, Daniel A; Rieger, Jana; Harris, Jeffrey R; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-08-01

    To determine the aesthetic and functional outcomes of the most invasive approach to oral cavity/oropharyngeal lesions, the lip-splitting mandibulotomy approach (LSMA), versus the least invasive, the trans-oral approach (TOA). Retrospective paired-cohort study. Thirty-six patients with oral/oropharyngeal cancers treated with primary surgical extirpation, bilateral neck dissections and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled. Half underwent LSMA and half TOA. Patients were paired into gender, age and follow-up time matched cohorts. The primary outcome measure was overall patient satisfaction with scar cosmesis assessed with a 10-point Likert scale. Clinician and nave viewer ratings of disfigurement in addition to the validated Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) were completed. Functional outcomes included lower-lip sensation and movement as well as oral continence assessment. LSMA patients had very high satisfaction and low perceptions of disfigurement with no statistically significant differences between cohorts (p>.05). VSS and POSAS results failed to demonstrate significant differences between groups (p>.05). Nave observers, however, found the LSMA to be more disfiguring than TOA scars (p=.03). No significant differences in lower-lip sensation to touch, two-point discrimination or temperature distinction were found (p>.05). House-Brackman and movement symmetry scores were significantly indifferent between cohorts (p>.05). Video-fluoroscopic swallowing studies showed no difference in oral continence between cohorts (p>.05). The LSMA provides satisfactory scarring and low self-perception of disfigurement for patients. Moreover, the LSMA does not impact lower-lip sensation, movement or oral continence. PMID:20619720

  10. Air ions and respiratory function outcomes: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background From a mechanistic or physical perspective there is no basis to suspect that electric charges on clusters of air molecules (air ions) would have beneficial or deleterious effects on respiratory function. Yet, there is a large lay and scientific literature spanning 80 years that asserts exposure to air ions affects the respiratory system and has other biological effects. Aims This review evaluates the scientific evidence in published human experimental studies regarding the effects of exposure to air ions on respiratory performance and symptoms. Methods We identified 23 studies (published 1933–1993) that met our inclusion criteria. Relevant data pertaining to study population characteristics, study design, experimental methods, statistical techniques, and study results were assessed. Where relevant, random effects meta-analysis models were utilized to quantify similar exposure and outcome groupings. Results The included studies examined the therapeutic benefits of exposure to negative air ions on respiratory outcomes, such as ventilatory function and asthmatic symptoms. Study specific sample sizes ranged between 7 and 23, and studies varied considerably by subject characteristics (e.g., infants with asthma, adults with emphysema), experimental method, outcomes measured (e.g., subjective symptoms, sensitivity, clinical pulmonary function), analytical design, and statistical reporting. Conclusions Despite numerous experimental and analytical differences across studies, the literature does not clearly support a beneficial role in exposure to negative air ions and respiratory function or asthmatic symptom alleviation. Further, collectively, the human experimental studies do not indicate a significant detrimental effect of exposure to positive air ions on respiratory measures. Exposure to negative or positive air ions does not appear to play an appreciable role in respiratory function. PMID:24016271

  11. Mental Health and Functional Outcomes of Maternal and Adolescent Reports of Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Frances; Lifford, Kate J.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of maternal and self-ratings of adolescent depression by investigating the extent to which these reports predicted a range of mental health and functional outcomes 4 years later. The potential influence of mother's own depressed mood on her ratings of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation on adolescent outcome

  12. New trends in assessing the outcomes of mental health interventions

    PubMed Central

    Thornicroft, Graham; Slade, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the outcomes of interventions in mental health care is both important and challenging. The aim of this paper is to advance the field of outcomes research by proposing a taxonomy of the decisions that clinicians and researchers need to consider when evaluating outcomes. Our taxonomy has eight components, framed as decisions: Whose outcome will be considered? Which scientific stage is being investigated? What outcome domain(s) matter? What level of assessment will be used? Will clinical and/or recovery outcomes be assessed? Whose perspective will be considered? Will deficits and/or strengths be the focus? Will invariant or individualized measures be preferred? We propose a future focus on understanding what matters most to people using mental health services, and on the use of measures rated by service users as the primary approach to evaluating outcome. PMID:24890055

  13. Outcomes of Math Faculty Engagement in Student Learning Outcomes Assessment in the Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruley, Marie N.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes a mixed methods exploratory design to examine the nature of math faculty engagement in the student learning outcomes assessment cycle. The focus of the study is on the types of changes that math faculty are implementing as a result of assessment outcomes and the institutional environmental factors that impact faculty engagement…

  14. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in

  15. Students' Conceptions of Assessment: Links to Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gavin T. L.; Hirschfeld, Gerrit H. F.

    2008-01-01

    Students conceive of assessment in at least four major ways (i.e., assessment makes students accountable; assessment is irrelevant because it is bad or unfair; assessment improves the quality of learning; and assessment is enjoyable). A study in New Zealand of 3469 secondary school students' conceptions of assessment used a self-report inventory

  16. An Application of Outcomes Assessment in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Cecile A.; Desjardins, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcomes assessment process developed by the New Jersey Dental School is described and discussed, including required resources, selected outcome measures, strengths and weaknesses, and the evolution of ongoing assessment activities. Documentation produced as part of the process is also described so that other health professions schools may

  17. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,

  18. Evaluating and Enhancing Outcomes Assessment Quality in Higher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kenneth; Goodwin, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Accreditation is a mark of distinction indicating that an institution has met high standards set by the profession, and an increasingly important feature of the accreditation process in higher education is "outcomes assessment." This article presents two rubrics for evaluating the quality of an institution's outcomes assessment system. One rubric

  19. An International Assessment of Bachelor Degree Graduates' Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Hamish; Richardson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines rationales, aspirations, assumptions and methods shaping an international assessment of learning outcomes: the OECD's Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) feasibility study. The first part of the paper is analytical, exploring formative rationales, and shaping contexts and normative perspectives that frame

  20. Faculty Governance and Outcomes Assessment: Compatible or Combustible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBoy, James L.; Monsilovich, Sally B.; DeBoy, Joanne R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies the various factors driving the outcomes assessment movement, contrasts the old paradigm with the model now espoused by regional accreditors, discusses the six-step process of student outcomes assessment, emphasizes faculty ownership of the process to prevent administrative usurpation, and proposes specific strategies to

  1. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  2. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions

  3. Physical Education Performance Outcomes and Cognitive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This article intends to inform physical education teachers about the current research describing the relationship between physical education performance outcomes as identified by the national physical education standards (i.e., regular participation in physical activity, physical fitness, motor competence; National Association of Physical

  4. Functional assessment of nutrition status.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mary Krystofiak

    2015-04-01

    Functional status assessment has been recommended as a part of a complete nutrition assessment for decades, but the specific components of this assessment have eluded a consensus definition. The recent Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus criteria for identification of malnutrition include functional assessment determined by handgrip dynamometry, with the understanding that this technique is not practical for use in some patient populations. Other techniques for functional assessment include physical performance measures such as timed gait and chair stands, as well as activities of daily living tools such as the Katz Index, Lawton Scale, and Karnofsky Scale Index. Manual muscle testing and computed tomography scan assessment of lean tissue are other tools that show promise in correlating functional and nutrition assessments. Functional assessment parameters may be least well correlated with nutrition status in older individuals. Despite a number of scientific studies of a variety of tools for functional assessment, there is to date no definitive tool for use in all individuals in all settings. Nutrition scientists and clinicians must continue to collaborate with colleagues in physical and occupational therapy, geriatrics, and nursing to refine current functional assessment tools to more effectively correlate with nutrition and malnutrition assessment parameters. PMID:25681483

  5. Executive Function Mediates Effects of Gestational Age on Functional Outcomes and Behavior in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Irene M.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Huffman, Lynne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of executive function (EF) skills, measured by parent-rating and performance-based instruments, as mediators of the effects of gestational age on functional outcomes and behavior symptoms in preterm and full term preschoolers. Patients and methods Children born preterm (n=70; mean gestational age 29.6 weeks and mean birth weight 1365g) were compared to children born full term (n=79) on composite measures of EF (using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function and a performance-based EF battery), adaptive function, prereading skills, and behavior symptoms. For the entire sample, mediation analyses examined the effect of gestational age on outcomes with EF as mediator. Results Compared to children born full term, children born preterm had significantly higher parent-rated EF scores and lower performance-based EF scores, both indicating more problems; further, children born preterm had lower adaptive function and prereading scores and more problematic behavior. Gestational age contributed to adaptive function, prereading skills, and behavior symptoms for all children. EF acted as a mediator of gestational age for all three outcomes; different patterns emerged for parent-rated and performance-based EF evaluations. For adaptive function, both EF measures significantly mediated effects of gestational age; for prereading skills, only performance-based EF was significant; for behavior symptoms, only parent-rated EF was significant. Conclusions We propose standard assessment of EF, using both parent-rating and performance-based EF measures, in young preterm children and other children at risk of EF impairments. EF skills are measurable, mediate important functional outcomes, and may serve as intervention targets. PMID:24906034

  6. Functional and radiological outcome of periprosthetic fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Tsitsilonis, S; Schaser, K D; Wichlas, F; Haas, N P; Manegold, S

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures of the ankle is increasing. However, little is known about the outcome of treatment and their management remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of periprosthetic fractures on the functional and radiological outcome of patients with a total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). A total of 505 TAAs (488 patients) who underwent TAA were retrospectively evaluated for periprosthetic ankle fracture: these were then classified according to a recent classification which is orientated towards treatment. The outcome was evaluated clinically using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and a visual analogue scale for pain, and radiologically. A total of 21 patients with a periprosthetic fracture of the ankle were identified. There were 13 women and eight men. The mean age of the patients was 63 years (48 to 74). Thus, the incidence of fracture was 4.17%. There were 11 intra-operative and ten post-operative fractures, of which eight were stress fractures and two were traumatic. The prosthesis was stable in all patients. Five stress fractures were treated conservatively and the remaining three were treated operatively. A total of 17 patients (81%) were examined clinically and radiologically at a mean follow-up of 53.5 months (12 to 112). The mean AOFAS score at follow-up was 79.5 (21 to 100). The mean AOFAS score in those with an intra-operative fracture was 87.6 (80 to 100) and for those with a stress fracture, which were mainly because of varus malpositioning, was 67.3 (21 to 93). Periprosthetic fractures of the ankle do not necessarily adversely affect the clinical outcome, provided that a treatment algorithm is implemented with the help of a new classification system. PMID:26130351

  7. Alternative Approaches to Outcomes Assessment for Postsecondary Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D., Ed.

    This document describes six different approaches to outcomes assessments, approaches that are named in the titles of chapters 2 through 7. The chapters and authors are as follows: "Perspectives on Assessment Policy and Practice" (Bragg, Harmon); "Total Quality Management" (Bragg); "Assessing Student Success" (Harmon); "Value-Added Assessment"

  8. Fundamentals of Clinical Outcomes Assessment for Spinal Disorders: Clinical Outcome Instruments and Applications.

    PubMed

    Vavken, Patrick; Ganal-Antonio, Anne Kathleen B; Quidde, Julia; Shen, Francis H; Chapman, Jens R; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-08-01

    Study Design?A broad narrative review. Objectives?Outcome assessment in spinal disorders is imperative to help monitor the safety and efficacy of the treatment in an effort to change the clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. The following article, part two of a two-part series, discusses the various outcome tools and instruments utilized to address spinal disorders and their management. Methods?A thorough review of the peer-reviewed literature was performed, irrespective of language, addressing outcome research, instruments and tools, and applications. Results?Numerous articles addressing the development and implementation of health-related quality-of-life, neck and low back pain, overall pain, spinal deformity, and other condition-specific outcome instruments have been reported. Their applications in the context of the clinical trial studies, the economic analyses, and overall evidence-based orthopedics have been noted. Additional issues regarding the problems and potential sources of bias utilizing outcomes scales and the concept of minimally clinically important difference were discussed. Conclusion?Continuing research needs to assess the outcome instruments and tools used in the clinical outcome assessment for spinal disorders. Understanding the fundamental principles in spinal outcome assessment may also advance the field of "personalized spine care." PMID:26225283

  9. Fundamentals of Clinical Outcomes Assessment for Spinal Disorders: Clinical Outcome Instruments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Ganal-Antonio, Anne Kathleen B.; Quidde, Julia; Shen, Francis H.; Chapman, Jens R.; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A broad narrative review. Objectives Outcome assessment in spinal disorders is imperative to help monitor the safety and efficacy of the treatment in an effort to change the clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. The following article, part two of a two-part series, discusses the various outcome tools and instruments utilized to address spinal disorders and their management. Methods A thorough review of the peer-reviewed literature was performed, irrespective of language, addressing outcome research, instruments and tools, and applications. Results Numerous articles addressing the development and implementation of health-related quality-of-life, neck and low back pain, overall pain, spinal deformity, and other condition-specific outcome instruments have been reported. Their applications in the context of the clinical trial studies, the economic analyses, and overall evidence-based orthopedics have been noted. Additional issues regarding the problems and potential sources of bias utilizing outcomes scales and the concept of minimally clinically important difference were discussed. Conclusion Continuing research needs to assess the outcome instruments and tools used in the clinical outcome assessment for spinal disorders. Understanding the fundamental principles in spinal outcome assessment may also advance the field of “personalized spine care.” PMID:26225283

  10. The Functional Status Score (FSS): A New Pediatric Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Glass, Penny; Dean, J. Michael; Meert, Kathleen L.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K. J. S.; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Objective To create a functional status outcome measure for large outcome studies that is well defined, quantitative, sufficiently rapid, reliable, minimally dependent on subjective assessments, and applicable to hospitalized pediatric patients across a wide spectrum of ages and inpatient environments. Patients and Methods The Functional Status Scale (FSS) was developed by a multidisciplinary consensus process. Domains of functioning included mental status, sensory, communication, motor, feeding, and respiratory categorized from normal (1) to very severe dysfunction (5). The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System (ABAS) II established construct validity and calibration within domains. Seven institutions provided pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients within 24 hours of PICU discharge, high-risk non-PICU patients within 24 hours of admission, and technology-dependent children. Primary care nurses completed the ABAS II based on patient’s functioning when the FSS was completed. Patients from 10% of the study days were used to evaluate inter-rater reliability. Data were randomly split into estimation and validation sets. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlations, construct validity, linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for discriminant validity, and the intraclass correlation for inter-rater reliability. Results A total of 836 children with a mean FSS of 10.3 (standard deviation 4.4) were studied. Eighteen percent had the minimum possible FSS = 6, 44% had FSS ≥ 10, 14% had a FSS ≥ 15, and 6% had FSS scores ≥ 20. Each FSS domain was associated with mean ABAS II (p<.0001). Cells in each domain were collapsed and reweighted, which improved correlations with ABAS II from −0.58 to −0.62 in the estimation sample, and −0.60 to −0.63 in the validation sample (p<0.001 for improvements). Discrimination was very good for moderate and severe dysfunction (ABAS II categories) and improved with FSS weighting (area under the ROC curve > 0.8). Intraclass correlations of original and weighted total FSS were 0.95 and 0.94 respectively. Conclusions The FSS met our objectives and is well suited for large outcome studies. PMID:19564265

  11. Functional Assessment in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidwell, W. Guy

    2006-01-01

    This paper covers the application of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) to treatment of problem behavior in residential facilities. Basic behavioral concepts are covered with emphasis on antecedent events and their importance in assessment and treatment. The paper focuses on two types of assessment, the behavioral interview and A-B-C narrative

  12. Oral Assessment in Mathematics: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the planning and implementation of an oral assessment component in a first-year pure mathematics module of a degree course in mathematics. Our aim was to examine potential barriers to using oral assessments, explore the advantages and disadvantages compared to existing common assessment methods and document the outcomes…

  13. Regional Accreditation and Learning Outcomes Assessment: Mapping the Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provezis, Staci J.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined the intersection of collegiate-level student learning outcomes assessment with regional accreditation to understand how regional accreditation policies and practices leverage student learning outcomes efforts on US college campuses. To that end, the standards of each of the regional accreditation agencies were carefully…

  14. Regional Accreditation and Learning Outcomes Assessment: Mapping the Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provezis, Staci J.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined the intersection of collegiate-level student learning outcomes assessment with regional accreditation to understand how regional accreditation policies and practices leverage student learning outcomes efforts on US college campuses. To that end, the standards of each of the regional accreditation agencies were carefully

  15. Challenges in Assessing Outcomes in Graduate and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Anne E.; Conrad, Clifton F.

    1996-01-01

    There is a need for cross-disciplinary or cross-institutional research on student learning outcomes in graduate and professional education. Challenges in this endeavor include determining the purposes of assessment and who conducts it, identifying and defining outcomes, and managing the use of results. (MSE)

  16. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: Workplace, Family, and Community Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cheryl A.; Heath, Claudia J.

    2011-01-01

    A project was conducted to assess Family Studies bachelor's degree graduates' use of learning outcomes from course competencies in personal finance, family lifespan development, intervention, and advocacy and policy, and to determine how they apply these learning outcomes to their workplace, family, and community roles. Alumni surveys completed by

  17. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  18. Assessment of Learning Outcomes in Finnish Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risnen, Anu; Rkklinen, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an outline and critical review of assessment, an evaluation of learning outcomes, in vocational education and training (VET) in Finland. Assessment of VET is formative, development-orientated and criteria-based. There are no national tests and information from vocational skills demonstrations is used instead. Assessment

  19. Impact of weather and climate scenarios on conservation assessment outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews selected watershed studies of the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) and interprets findings from the perspective of potential climate change impacts on conservation outcomes. Primary foci are runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, watershed sediment yield, and asso...

  20. Functional remediation in bipolar disorder: 1-year follow-up of neurocognitive and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, C M; Torrent, C; Arango, C; Amann, B L; Sol, B; Gonzlez-Pinto, A; Crespo, J M; Tabars-Seisdedos, R; Reinares, M; Ayuso-Mateos, J L; Garca-Portilla, M P; Ibaez, ; Salamero, M; Vieta, E; Martinez-Aran, A

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundFew randomised clinical trials have examined the efficacy of an intervention aimed at improving psychosocial functioning in bipolar disorder.AimsTo examine changes in psychosocial functioning in a group that has been enrolled in a functional remediation programme 1 year after baseline.MethodThis was a multicentre, randomised, rater-masked clinical trial comparing three patient groups: functional remediation, psychoeducation and treatment as usual over 1-year follow-up. The primary outcome was change in psychosocial functioning measured by means of the Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST). Grouptime effects for overall psychosocial functioning were examined using repeated-measures ANOVA (trial registration NCT01370668).ResultsThere was a significant grouptime interaction for overall psychosocial functioning, favouring patients in the functional remediation group (F = 3.071, d.f. = 2, P = 0.049).ConclusionsImprovement in psychosocial functioning is maintained after 1-year follow-up in patients with bipolar disorder receiving functional remediation. PMID:26541692

  1. Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Materials Guidebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American College Personnel Association's (ACPA's) Sustainability Task Force partnered with the Commission on Assessment and Evaluation with the goal of creating assessment tools to help ACPA members effectively measure student learning around sustainability. Towards these ends, Kimberly Yousey-Elsener (StudentVoice), Diana Richter Keith

  2. Germanna Community College Outcome Assessment Plan. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germanna Community Coll., Locust Grove, VA.

    In order to provide a basis for objective assessment of the accomplishments of the college and to simultaneously document its future course, Germanna Community College (GCC) developed this student assessment plan in 1987. The document consists of sections on the following topics: (1) plan development, including a mission statement; information on

  3. Using Art to Assess Environmental Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Ami A.; Carroll, John P.; Green, Gary T.; Larson, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    Construction of developmentally appropriate tools for assessing the environmental attitudes and awareness of young learners has proven to be challenging. Art-based assessments that encourage creativity and accommodate different modes of expression may be a particularly useful complement to conventional tools (e.g. surveys), but their efficacy and…

  4. Using Art to Assess Environmental Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Ami A.; Carroll, John P.; Green, Gary T.; Larson, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    Construction of developmentally appropriate tools for assessing the environmental attitudes and awareness of young learners has proven to be challenging. Art-based assessments that encourage creativity and accommodate different modes of expression may be a particularly useful complement to conventional tools (e.g. surveys), but their efficacy and

  5. Functional MRI and outcome in traumatic coma.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Brian L; Giacino, Joseph T; Wu, Ona

    2013-09-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL perfusion MRI have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as the mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL perfusion MRI and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  6. Outcomes Assessment: The Tip of the Iceberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the multifaceted process for assessing students over the course of their undergraduate degree work in the Department of Theater and Dance at Appalachian State University in North Carolina. (SR)

  7. Assessing Outcomes: Practical Methods and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jon; Owen, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    University counseling center clients' (N = 52) perceptions of precounseling functioning were highly correlated with their actual well-being scores at intake. The magnitude of change based on perceptions of precounseling functioning to current well-being was approximately double of what is found from the difference of actual precounseling

  8. Biomarkers and functional outcomes from ischemic cerebral events in women: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Pamela M.; Buring, Julie E.; Kase, Carlos S.; Ridker, Paul M; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several biomarkers have been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these biomarkers and functional outcome from cerebral ischemic events is unclear. We aimed to assess the patterns of association between cardiovascular disease biomarkers and functional outcomes after incident ischemic cerebral events in women. Methods Prospective cohort study among 27,728 women enrolled in the Womens Health Study who provided information blood samples and were free of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) at baseline. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between elevated biomarker levels and functional outcomes from ischemic cerebral events. Possible functional outcomes included TIA and ischemic stroke with mRS (modified Rankin scale) score of 01, 23 or 46. Results After a mean follow-up of 15.1 years, 461 TIAs and 380 ischemic strokes occurred. Elevated levels of total cholesterol were associated with the highest risk of poor functional outcome (mRS 46) after incident cerebral ischemic events (relative risk=2.02 95%CI=1.183.46). We observed significant associations between elevated levels of total cholesterol, Lp(a), C-reactive protein, and triglyercides and mild or moderate functional outcomes after ischemic cerebral events. Elevations in all other biomarkers were not significantly associated with functional outcomes. Conclusions While total cholesterol was associated with highest risks of poor functional outcome after stroke, we overall observed an inconsistent pattern of association between biomarkers linked with increased risk of vascular events and more impaired functional outcomes from stroke. PMID:23034002

  9. Assessing Effective Teaching of Psychology: A Meta-Analytic Integration of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Teaching researchers can assess learning outcome effectiveness as a function of students' graded performance or changes in knowledge, skills and behaviors, or attitudes. We meta-analyzed 197 studies to determine the effectiveness of teaching activities in "Teaching of Psychology (ToP)" both overall and also as a function of type of learning

  10. Functional Outcomes in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Levine, Louise R.; Ramsey, Janet L.; Tamura, Roy; Kelsey, Douglas; Ball, Susan G.; Allen, Albert J.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with significant functional impairment in adults. The present study examined functional outcomes following 6-month double-blind treatment with either atomoxetine or placebo. Method: Patients were 410 adults (58.5% male) with "DSM-IV"--defined ADHD. They were randomly assigned to receive either atomoxetine 40 mg/day to

  11. Repeat Partial Nephrectomy: Surgical, Functional and Oncological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Linehan, W. Marston; Bratslavsky, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review The greater utilization of partial nephrectomy and ablative procedures has increased the incidence of patients presenting with local renal recurrence. The choice to either perform a partial or radical nephrectomy in these situations can be a challenging decision. Recent Findings Repeat and salvage partial nephrectomy, while challenging and potentially associated with increased complications, offers patients the ability to maintain excellent renal functional outcomes and promising oncologic outcomes at intermediate follow up. Summary Surgeons should be familiar with the surgical complications and the functional and oncologic outcomes of re-operative nephron-sparing surgery. Recent data and outcome analysis support utilization of these procedures in patients presenting with either local recurrence or de novo lesions in the ipsilateral kidney. PMID:21788903

  12. Community Jobs Outcomes Assessment & Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Annette; Burchfield, Erin; Sommers, Paul

    Unemployment wage data were evaluated to assess employment, job retention, and wage progression for graduates of Community Jobs (CJ), a short-term public job creation program for the hard to employ in the state of Washington. The following were among the findings: (1) 66% of all participants were employed after graduating from CJ; (2) 53% were…

  13. Sensitivity of Outcome Assessment in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denollet, Johan

    1993-01-01

    Differential sensitivity to change of three measures of men who participated in cardiac rehabilitation was measured to evaluate the hypothesis that measures that enhance subjective health and well-being are more appropriate to assess change than are measures of psychopathology. Rehabilitation subjects, but not control subjects, reported a decrease

  14. Regional Needs Assessment: Procedures and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Patricia S.; Deck, Dennis

    This paper presents the procedures used for carrying out a needs assessment concerning drug and alcohol abuse prevention and intervention efforts across nine western states and the Pacific territories prior to and subsequent to the receipt of United States Department of Education funds to implement training and technical services in the region.

  15. Investigating ESL Students' Performance on Outcomes Assessments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.; Elliott, Diane Cardenas; Liu, Ou Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes assessments are gaining great attention in higher education because of increased demand for accountability. These assessments are widely used by U.S. higher education institutions to measure students' college-level knowledge and skills, including students who speak English as a second language (ESL). For the past decade, the increasing

  16. Outcomes Assessment: Not Synonymous with Inputs and Outputs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Robert E.; Hernon, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Presents a rationale for the use of outcomes assessment and identifies three competing assessment perspectives that examine quality: looking at users from the perspective of the academic library; looking at libraries from the users' perspectives; and libraries in the life of the institution. Discusses information literacy, and differentiating

  17. Assessing Outcomes through Congruence of Course Objectives and Reflective Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; Fidler, Herta; Hogan, David B.; Pereles, Laurie; Wright, Bruce; Lebeuf, Christine; Gerritsen, Cory

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Course outcomes have been assessed by examining the congruence between statements of commitment to change (CTCs) and course objectives. Other forms of postcourse reflective exercises (for example, impact and unmet-needs statements) have not been examined for congruence with course objectives or their utility in assessing course

  18. A Model for Effectively Assessing Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohia, Uche O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a model proven to be effective for assessing and documenting evidence of student learning outcomes. Specifically, it will share a model, F.A.M.O.U.S. Copyright 2008, which is an acronym exemplifying six effective steps for complying with institutional accountability and eternal assessment requirements proscribed by the

  19. The State of Learning Outcomes Assessment in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuh, George D.; Ewell, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, economic and other factors are pressing institutions of higher education to assess student learning to insure that graduates acquire the skills and competencies demanded in the 21st century. This paper summarises the status of undergraduate student learning outcomes assessment at accredited colleges and universities in the United

  20. The Role of Institutional Assessment in Assessing Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy H.

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature about assessment in higher education. Much of it is devoted to advocating the benefits of assessment, describing how assessment initiatives and programs might be organized within an institution, identifying key attributes of successful assessment projects (leadership, resources, faculty engagement), and

  1. Strategies for assessment and outcome measurement in physical and rehabilitation medicine: an educational review.

    PubMed

    Kkdeveci, Ay?e A; Tennant, Alan; Grimby, Gunnar; Franchignoni, Franco

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this educational review, which is based upon expert opinion, is to describe to clinicians training in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and research students training to work in the field, the appropriate attributes and standards required for assessment and outcome measurement. "What to assess" is discussed in the context of the conceptual framework provided by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, supplemented with quality of life as an additional construct. The reasons for making the assessment, and the context in which the assessment will be used, are then considered. Examples of recommendations of some international organizations regarding what and how to assess are presented. Suggestions are made about the selection of assessment tools, including examples from two diagnostic groups: stroke and rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, the basic psychometric standards required for any assessment tool, and additional requirements for outcome assessment, are explained. PMID:21687922

  2. Patient assessment: preparing for a predictable aesthetic outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Aulakh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The flux of patients seeking to make changes to the appearance of their smile zone appears to be on a pathway of continual increase. This is possibly due to an increase in awareness towards oral health, and perhaps social, peer and media pressures, respectively. Cohorts of dental practitioners have thus responded to the latter demands by attending a plethora of educational courses, often focusing on either restorative techniques or other disciplines, notably orthodontics and clear aligners in particular. Consequently, treatment planning and thus treatment provision may carry the risk of being biased or indeed 'outcome driven' whereby the skills and knowledge of any clinician towards a particular faculty may significantly influence the ultimate treatment plan, with the unfortunate tendency sometimes to overlook the role of the interdisciplinary approach of concomitant restorative and contemporary techniques. The role of orthodontics to facilitate the provision of such treatment, along with predictable enamel bonding, has the distinct advantage of providing an acceptable aesthetic result with minimal biological intervention. However, to achieve an optimal result in such cases requires meticulous treatment planning and patient selection to avoid pitfalls with regards to long-term stability and function. This article suggests a standardized approach to patient assessment, with an interdisciplinary perspective in mind. Clinical Relevance: With the growth of patient demand for improving the appearance of the smile, a meticulous assessment protocol is required along with effective interdisciplinary communication. This enables a comprehensive treatment plan to be developed with the correct priorities. PMID:26062282

  3. Subjective outcome assessments for cervical spine pathology: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Diane N.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective outcome assessment instruments may be used to determine whether changes occur as a result of a particular treatment intervention. Since 1991, 11 outcome assessment instruments either specific to or validated for use with cervical spine pathologies have been developed and their psychometric properties critically assessed. Though a systematic review of this subject was published in 2002, it included an analysis of only 5 measures available at that time. Objective To present a description of each of the 11 measures and briefly compare their psychometric properties, reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change. Methods Computer-based searches of MEDLINE and CINAHL were performed to capture all data relevant to the eleven outcome assessment tools currently available. Results Data regarding descriptions, reliability and validity of 11 outcome measures were found and collated. Conclusion The choice of which outcome measurement to use becomes a matter of preference based on the particular patient population each clinician treats, the ease of use for the patient and ease of scoring for the clinician, and the domains that are most relevant to a particular patient. PMID:19674654

  4. Alcohol Consumption and Functional Outcome after Stroke in Men

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Pamela M.; Berger, Klaus; Buring, Julie E.; Kase, Carlos S.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Kurth, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with reduced risk of total and ischemic stroke. However, data on the relationship between alcohol consumption and functional outcomes from stroke is sparse. Method Prospective cohort study among 21,862 men enrolled in the Physicians Health Study who provided information on alcohol consumption at baseline, had no prior history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Alcohol consumption was divided into five categories: <1 drink/week, 1 drink/week, 24 drinks/week, 56 drinks/week and ?1 drink/day. Possible functional outcomes included TIA, modified Rankin Scale (MRS)=01, MRS=23, and MRS=46. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between levels of alcohol consumption and functional outcomes from stroke. Results During a mean of 21.6 years of follow-up, 767 TIAs and 1393 strokes (1157 ischemic, 222 hemorrhagic and 14 unknown type) occurred. Men who consumed 1 drink/week had lowest associated odds for any outcome. Compared with men who did not experience a TIA or stroke and who consumed <1 drink/week, men who consumed 1 drink/week had odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for total stroke of 0.85 (0.601.21) for MRS=01, 0.84 (0.641.10) for MRS=23, and 0.60 (0.370.97) for MRS=46. The OR for TIA was 0.95 (0.731.22). The pattern of association did not substantially differ for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Higher alcohol consumption showed no association with functional outcome after stroke. Conclusions Our data do not show strong associations between alcohol consumption and functional outcome after stroke. Modest beneficial associations exist with low alcohol consumption. PMID:19910548

  5. Predicting functional remission in patients with schizophrenia: a cross-sectional study of symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, functioning, and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Marcelo; Fresn, Ana; Barak, Yoram; Jurez, Francisco; Escamilla, Raul; Saracco, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background New approaches to assess outcome in schizophrenia include multidimensional measures such as remission, cognition, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life. Clinical and psychosocial measures have been recently introduced to assess functional outcome. Objective The study presented here was designed to examine the rates of symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, global functioning, and clinical global impressions in a sample of schizophrenia outpatients in order to assess functional remission and to identify predictive factors for functional remission. Methods A total of 168 consecutive Mexican outpatients receiving pharmacological treatment at the National Institute of Psychiatry in Mexico City were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Symptomatic remission was assessed according to the definition and criteria proposed by the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Psychosocial remission was assessed according to Barak criteria using the Psychosocial Remission in Schizophrenia scale. Functioning was measured with the Global Assessment of Functioning, and clinical outcome with the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale. Results Findings showed that 45.2% of patients fulfilled the symptomatic remission criteria, 32.1% achieved psychosocial remission, and 53% reported adequate functioning. However, the combination of these three outcome criteria symptomatic, psychosocial remission, and functioning indicated that 14.9% of the patients achieved our predefined functional remission outcome. The logistic regression model included five predictive variables for functional remission: (1) being employed, (2) use of atypical antipsychotics, (3) lower number of medications, (4) lower negative symptom severity, and (5) lower excitement symptom severity. Conclusion The study demonstrated that symptomatic remission, psychosocial remission, and functioning could be achievable goals for a considerable number of patients. The outcome of functional remission was achieved by a minority of patients, less than 15%. New approaches should include multidimensional measures to assess functional outcome in schizophrenia research. PMID:26396518

  6. A Comparison of Functional Behavioral Assessment and Functional Analysis Methodology among Students with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Mitchell, Barbara S.; Harvey, Kristin; Green, Ambra; McKenzie, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and functional analyses (FA) are grounded in the applied behavior analysis principle that posits problem behavior is functionally related to the environment in which it occurs and is maintained by either providing access to reinforcing outcomes or allowing the individual to avoid or escape that which they…

  7. Assessing Functional Vision Using Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Simon; Ross, Malcolm

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a software system which uses microcomputers to aid in the assessment of functional vision in visually impaired students. The software also aims to be visually stimulating and to develop hand-eye coordination, visual memory, and cognitive abilities. (DB)

  8. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  9. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the

  10. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic

  11. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  12. Functional outcomes after TORS for oropharyngeal cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Katherine A; Holsinger, F Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E; Lewin, Jan S

    2015-02-01

    Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) ± adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: TORS, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (1) case report design (n < 10), (2) review article, or (3) technical, animal, or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS ± adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18-39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0 to 7% (mean follow-up 11-26 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up 12-13 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0-7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4-9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6 and 12 months. Crude end points of functional recovery after TORS ± adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  13. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TORS FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Summarize functional outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) adjuvant therapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). STUDY DESIGN A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE database was searched (MeSH terms: transoral robotic surgery, pharyngeal neoplasms, oropharyngeal neoplasms). METHODS Peer-reviewed human subject papers published through December, 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were: 1) case report design (n<10), 2) review article, or 3) technical, animal or cadaver studies. Functional outcomes extracted included feeding tube dependence, swallow examination findings, speech ratings, velopharyngeal insufficiency, pneumonia, and oral intake measures. RESULTS Twelve papers comprising 441 patients with OPC treated with TORS adjuvant therapy were included. Feeding tube rates were the most commonly reported functional outcome. Excluding prophylactic placement, 18% to 39% of patients required gastrostomy placement, typically during adjuvant therapy. Chronic gastrostomy dependence ranged from 0% to 7% (mean follow-up: 1126 months), regardless of disease stage. Composite MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) scores ranged from 65.2 to 78 (89 patients, 3 series, mean follow-up: 1213 months). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were not systematically reported. Incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0% to 7%. Predictors of swallowing function included baseline function, T-stage, N-stage, tongue base primary tumors, and adjuvant chemoradiation. Rates of transient hypernasality were 4% to 9%. A single study suggested dose-dependent effects of adjuvant therapy (none, radiation alone, chemoradiation) on diet scores at 6- and 12-months. CONCLUSIONS Crude endpoints of functional recovery after TORS adjuvant therapy suggest promising swallowing outcomes, depending on the functional measure reported. PMID:24643851

  14. Beyond Symptomatic Improvement:Assessing Real-World Outcomes in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guico-Pabia, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the negative impact that major depressive disorder (MDD) has on quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning. Available scales that assess these areas of impairment as they relate to patients with MDD are described. Data Sources: PubMed searches were conducted using the following terms: (MDD OR major depressive disorder) AND (absenteeism OR absente*); AND (quality of life OR QOL); AND (psychosocial function*); AND (presente* OR presenteeism); AND (health care cost* OR [health care] cost*); AND (health outcome*); AND (functional outcome*); AND (family life); AND (disabil* OR disability); AND (work function*); AND (unemployment OR unemploy*). The literature search was conducted in July 2008 and was restricted to English language articles. There were no limits set on the dates of the search. Study Selection: Two hundred twenty potential articles were identified. Among these studies, 48 presented primary data directly demonstrating the effect of MDD on quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning. Data Extraction: Primary data were compiled from these studies and are summarily described. Available scales that assess quality of life, disability, and work, family, and overall psychosocial functioning are also described. Data Synthesis: MDD was found to be associated with significant disability and declines in functioning and quality of life. The Sheehan Disability Scale, the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Work Limitations Questionnaire were the most commonly used scales according to this review of the literature, but the majority of studies used direct and indirect disability measures, such as health care and other disability-related costs. Conclusions: In addition to assessing symptomatic outcomes, physicians should routinely assess their depressed patients on real-world outcomes. The development of a concise functional outcome measure specific to MDD is necessary for busy clinical practices. PMID:20694113

  15. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in FCS Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Kaulis, Amy; Crutsinger, Christy

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation, budget, and accountability pressures at the institution and program levels lead to the involvement of faculty in assessment-based activities. Increasingly, programs are being expected to document student learning beyond traditional course grades. The use of outcomes as a tool to improve learning relies heavily on the active…

  16. Assessing Social Learning Outcomes through Participatory Mind Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin G.; DuBois, Bryce; Corwin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a method for using mind mapping to assess social learning outcomes in collaborative environmental restoration and participatory natural resource management initiatives. Using mind mapping for preassessment and postassessment can reveal changes in individual and collective thinking about critical social and ecological issues.

  17. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in FCS Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Kaulis, Amy; Crutsinger, Christy

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation, budget, and accountability pressures at the institution and program levels lead to the involvement of faculty in assessment-based activities. Increasingly, programs are being expected to document student learning beyond traditional course grades. The use of outcomes as a tool to improve learning relies heavily on the active

  18. Pastureland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Status and expected outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multiagency scientific effort to quantify environmental outcomes of conservation practices applied to private agricultural lands. A CEAP effort on pastureland, primarily in the eastern and central United States, began in 2008. In this paper we ...

  19. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  20. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using…

  1. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using

  2. Assessing Social Learning Outcomes through Participatory Mind Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Justin G.; DuBois, Bryce; Corwin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a method for using mind mapping to assess social learning outcomes in collaborative environmental restoration and participatory natural resource management initiatives. Using mind mapping for preassessment and postassessment can reveal changes in individual and collective thinking about critical social and ecological issues.…

  3. Factors influencing functional outcomes in united intertrochanteric hip fractures: a negative effect of lag screw sliding.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Je-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Young; Chang, Jun-Dong; Kwak, Yoon-Hae; Kwon, Yong-Shin

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing functional outcomes in elderly patients with united intertrochanteric fractures treated with hip nails and to ascertain whether decreased femoral offset due to lag screw sliding has a negative effect on functional outcomes in these patients. This retrospective study included 65 patients older than 65 years with united intertrochanteric fractures treated with hip nails. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and a visual analog scale (VAS) 6 months postoperatively. Mean patient age was 77.8 years (range, 65-90 years); mean follow-up was 20.7 months (range, 12-38 months). More lag screw sliding occurred as bone mineral density (BMD) decreased. It was also greater in unstable fractures and acceptable reduction status. Less accurate reduction and greater lag screw sliding showed significant negative effects on most subscales of the SF-36, especially Physical Functioning and Role Physical. A significant positive correlation was observed between the extent of lag screw sliding and VAS. Lag screw sliding affected by fracture type, reduction quality, and BMD has a negative effect on functional outcomes in elderly patients with united intertrochanteric fractures. Therefore, the preservation of anatomical femoral offset as much as possible is needed to obtain better functional outcome through the minimization of lag screw sliding by more accurate reduction, which is a controllable factor, especially in osteoporotic unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:25437085

  4. Functional outcome measures for NF1-associated optic pathway glioma clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Ferner, Rosalie E.; Gutmann, David H.; Listernick, Robert; Martin, Staci; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Liu, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of the Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis Visual Outcomes Committee is to define the best functional outcome measures for future neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated optic pathway glioma (OPG) clinical trials. Methods: The committee considered the components of vision, other ophthalmologic parameters affected by OPG, potential biomarkers of visual function, and quality of life measures to arrive at consensus-based, evidence-driven recommendations for objective and measurable functional endpoints for OPG trials. Results: Visual acuity (VA) assessments using consistent quantitative testing methods are recommended as the main functional outcome measure for NF1-OPG clinical trials. Teller acuity cards are recommended for use as the primary VA endpoint, and HOTV as a secondary endpoint once subjects are old enough to complete it. The optic disc should be assessed for pallor, as this appears to be a contributory variable that may affect the interpretation of VA change over time. Given the importance of capturing patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials, evaluating visual quality of life using the Children's Visual Function Questionnaire as a secondary endpoint is also proposed. Conclusions: The use of these key functional endpoints will be essential for evaluating the efficacy of future OPG clinical trials. PMID:24249802

  5. Migraine and Functional Outcome from Ischemic Cerebral Events in Women

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Pamela M.; Buring, Julie E.; Kase, Carlos S.; Schrks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have linked migraine with aura to an increased risk of ischemic stroke, particularly among women. Data on the relationship of migraine and functional outcome from ischemic cerebral events are sparse. Methods and Results Prospective cohort study among 27,852 women enrolled in the Womens Health Study for whom we had information on migraine and measured cholesterol values and who had no prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Migraine was classified into no history of migraine, active migraine with aura, active migraine without aura, and past history of migraine. Possible functional outcomes were no stroke or TIA, TIA, and stroke with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score 01, mRS 23, and mRS 46. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate the relationship of migraine with functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. During a mean of 13.5 years of follow-up, 398 TIAs and 345 ischemic strokes occurred. Compared with women without history of migraine and who did not experience a TIA or stroke, women who reported migraine with aura had adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval) of 1.56 (1.032.36) for TIA, 2.33 (1.373.97) for stroke with mRS 01, 0.82 (0.302.24) for mRS 23, and 1.18 (0.284.97) for mRS 46. The risk of any outcome was not significantly elevated for women who experienced migraine without aura or who had a past history of migraine. Conclusion Results of this large prospective cohort suggest that women with migraine with aura are at increased risk of experiencing TIA or ischemic stroke with good functional outcome. PMID:21126968

  6. Collaborative Development and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes for LIS Electives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Bradley Wade; Grubesic, Tony H.; Parrish, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    In higher education's environment of accountability, the development and assessment of student learning outcomes (SLOs) are driven by both external stakeholder requirements for accreditation and internal institutional pressures to demonstrate student learning as the core function of universities and colleges. This paper presents a framework to…

  7. Collaborative Development and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes for LIS Electives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Bradley Wade; Grubesic, Tony H.; Parrish, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    In higher education's environment of accountability, the development and assessment of student learning outcomes (SLOs) are driven by both external stakeholder requirements for accreditation and internal institutional pressures to demonstrate student learning as the core function of universities and colleges. This paper presents a framework to

  8. Functional Outcome in Bipolar Disorder: The Big Picture

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Boaz; Manove, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on functional outcome in bipolar disorder (BD) has uncovered various factors that exacerbate psychosocial disability over the course of illness, including genetics, illness severity, stress, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. This paper presents an integrated view of these findings that accounts for the precipitous decline in psychosocial functioning after illness onset. The proposed model highlights a number of reciprocal pathways among previously studied factors that trap people in a powerful cycle of ailing forces. The paper discusses implications to patient care as well as the larger social changes required for shifting the functional trajectory of people with BD from psychosocial decline to growth. PMID:21961062

  9. Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Assessments Consortium: Genesis and initial project plan.

    PubMed

    Rudick, Richard A; Larocca, Nicholas; Hudson, Lynn D

    2014-01-01

    The need for improved clinical outcome measures in multiple sclerosis trials has been recognized for two decades, but only recently has the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) created a pathway for qualification of new clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessments. Additionally, drug development in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been extraordinarily active, with numerous disease-modifying drugs now on the market. This shifting therapeutic landscape, along with the unmet need for drugs to treat the progressive forms of MS and the changing expectations of clinicians, patients, and payers, have led to the call for more sensitive and meaningful disability progression measures. In response to these drivers, the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Assessments Consortium (MSOAC) was launched. A public-private partnership, MSOAC aims to accelerate the development of new therapies for MS by generating new tools for measuring outcomes in clinical trials. At the first annual MSOAC/FDA meeting, a regulatory path was outlined for qualifying a new tool for assessing efficacy in registration trials of MS. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and FDA will provide parallel consultation and review. The consensus approach with engagement by all of the stakeholders, prominently including patients with MS, should also increase acceptance of the measure by clinicians and patients. PMID:24057430

  10. The Effectiveness of Modified Cottle Maneuver in Predicting Outcomes in Functional Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Corey; Taylor, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the outcomes of functional rhinoplasty for nasal valve incompetence and to evaluate an in-office test used to select appropriate surgical techniques. Methods. Patients with nasal obstruction due to nasal valve incompetence were enrolled. The modified Cottle maneuver was used to assess the internal and external nasal valves to help select the appropriate surgical method. The rhinoplasty outcomes evaluation (ROE) form and a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) of nasal breathing were used to compare preoperative and postoperative symptoms. Results. Forty-nine patients underwent functional rhinoplasty evaluation. Of those, 35 isolated batten or spreader grafts were inserted without additional procedures. Overall mean ROE score increased significantly (P < 0.0001) from 41.9 ± 2.4 to 81.7 ± 2.5 after surgery. Subjective improvement in nasal breathing was also observed with the VAS (mean improvement of 4.5 (95% CI 3.8–5.2) from baseline (P = 0.000)). Spearman rank correlation between predicted outcomes using the modified Cottle maneuver and postoperative outcomes was strong for the internal nasal valve (Rho = 0.80; P = 0.0029) and moderate for the external nasal valve (Rho = 0.50; P = 0.013). Conclusion. Functional rhinoplasty improved subjective nasal airflow in our population. The modified Cottle maneuver was effective in predicting positive surgical outcomes. PMID:25243085

  11. Social Cognition in Psychosis: Multidimensional Structure, Clinical Correlates, and Relationship With Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Francesco; Horan, William P.; Kern, Robert S.; Green, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Social cognitive impairments are common, detectable across a wide range of tasks, and appear to play a key role in explaining poor outcome in schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. However, little is known about the underlying factor structure of social cognition in people with psychotic disorders due to a lack of exploratory factor analyses using a relatively comprehensive social cognitive assessment battery. In a sample of 85 outpatients with psychosis, we examined the factor structure and clinical/functional correlates of eight indexes derived from five social cognition tasks that span the domains of emotional processing, social perception, attributional style, and Theory of Mind. Exploratory factor analysis revealed three factors with relatively low inter-correlations that explained a total of 54% of the variance: (1) Hostile attributional style, (2) Lower-level social cue detection, and (3) Higher-level inferential and regulatory processes. None of the factors showed significant correlations with negative symptoms. Factor 1 significantly correlated with clinical symptoms (positive, depression-anxiety, agitation) but not functional outcome, whereas Factors 2 and 3 significantly correlated with functional outcome (functional capacity and real-world social and work functioning) but not clinical symptoms. Furthermore, Factor 2 accounted for unique incremental variance in functional capacity, above and beyond non-social neurocognition (measured with MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery) and negative symptoms. Results suggest that multiple separable dimensions of social cognition can be identified in psychosis, and these factors show distinct patterns of correlation with clinical features and functional outcome. PMID:21112743

  12. Single momentary assessments are not reliable outcomes for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stone, Arthur A; Broderick, Joan E; Kaell, Alan T

    2010-09-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) play an essential role in clinical trials, though questions have been raised about the accuracy of PROs using long recall periods. This paper examines the utility of a PRO employing a single momentary assessment of pain in a sample of community rheumatology patients. We explore the accuracy and reliability of a single assessment versus the average of multiple assessments taken over 1-week, which is considered a common outcome reporting period. A secondary analysis of 128 patients who monitored their pain intensity with momentary data collections several times a day for a week and 3 months later for another week allowed a comparison of randomly-selected single momentary assessments with the average of many assessments from the week. Results from cross-sectional analyses of the first week were that levels of pain measured by single points were not significantly different than the week average in 4 of 5 analyses, but these single-point assessments had much higher variance. Correlations of single-point and week averages were below 0.70. Longitudinal analysis of change scores across 3 months also demonstrated considerable unreliability of single-point measures, thus the statistical power generated by single-point assessments was considerably less than the more reliable week average. Our conclusion is that single momentary assessments, at least for representing an outcome over a period of a week, are not ideal measures. We discuss alternative measurement strategies for efficiently collecting PRO data for a 1-week period using end-of-day diaries or 7-day recall measures. PMID:20580945

  13. Idiosyncratic Variables Affecting Functional Analysis Outcomes: A Review (20012010)

    PubMed Central

    Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Dube, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Although typical functional analyses often produce clear outcomes, some studies have reported ambiguous results that cannot be interpreted. Such undifferentiated outcomes may occur if test conditions do not include relevant antecedent or consequent events. Clinicians then may try to modify the functional analysis conditions to include those events. Hanley, Iwata, and McCord (2003) reviewed the functional analysis literature through the year 2000 and described idiosyncratic variables included in modified functional analyses. The objective of the present review was to present a quantitative analysis of idiosyncratic antecedents and consequences in modified functional analyses during the past decade (2001 to 2010). We discuss the range of stimulus parameters tested and the assessment strategies used for informing the modified analysis conditions. PMID:24114110

  14. Assessing overall functioning with adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Forlenza, Nicholas; Poland, Charlotte; Ray, Sagarika; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Goyal, Ajay; Baity, Matthew R.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sobin, Sean; Leite, David; Sinclair, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study looks to evaluate the validity and reliability of a brief measure of overall functioning for adolescents. Clinicians were asked to complete the Overall Functioning Scale for 72 adolescents consecutively admitted to the adolescent psychiatric inpatient service of a community safety net medical center. The results revealed that this new measure is related to the patients length of stay, clinician-rated measures of social cognition and object relations, Global Assessment of Functioning score at admission, and global rating of engagement in individual psychotherapy. Results also showed that the OFS was related to patients history of non-suicidal self-harm as well as treatment outcome as assessed by measures of psychological health and well-being and symtomatology. Hierarchical regressions reveal that the OFS shows incremental validity above the admission GAF score in predicting length of stay. The results also showed that the OFS demonstrates inter-rater reliability in the excellent range (ICC 1,2) of .88. Clinical implications of the use of this tool as well as areas of future research are discussed. PMID:25259948

  15. Challenges in assessing the process-outcome link in practice.

    PubMed

    Parast, Layla; Doyle, Brian; Damberg, Cheryl L; Shetty, Kanaka; Ganz, David A; Wenger, Neil S; Shekelle, Paul G

    2015-03-01

    The expanded use of clinical process-of-care measures to assess the quality of health care in the context of public reporting and pay-for-performance applications has led to a desire to demonstrate the value of such efforts in terms of improved patient outcomes. The inability to observe associations between improved delivery of clinical processes and improved clinical outcomes in practice has raised concerns about the value of holding providers accountable for delivery of clinical processes of care. Analyses that attempt to investigate this relationship are fraught with many challenges, including selection of an appropriate outcome, the proximity of the outcome to the receipt of the clinical process, limited power to detect an effect, small expected effect sizes in practice, potential bias due to unmeasured confounding factors, and difficulties due to changes in measure specification over time. To avoid potentially misleading conclusions about an observed or lack of observed association between a clinical process of care and an outcome in the context of observational studies, individuals conducting and interpreting such studies should carefully consider, evaluate, and acknowledge these types of challenges. PMID:25564435

  16. The Role of Stress Exposure and Family Functioning in Internalizing Outcomes of Urban Families

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Strachan, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Although research suggests that stress exposure and family functioning are associated with internalizing problems in adolescents and caregivers, surprisingly few studies have investigated the mechanisms that underlie this association. To determine whether family functioning buffers the development of internalizing problems in stress-exposed families, we assessed the relation between stress exposure, family functioning, and internalizing symptoms among a large sample of inner-city male youth and their caregivers living in poverty across five waves of data collection. We hypothesized that stress exposure and family functioning would predict development of subsequent youth and caregiver internalizing problems and that family functioning would moderate this relation, with higher functioning families demonstrating greater resiliency to stress exposure. We used a longitudinal, prospective design to evaluate whether family functioning (assessed at waves one through four) activated or buffered the effects of stress exposure (assessed at wave one) on subsequent internalizing symptoms (assessed at waves four and five). Stress from Developmental Transitions and family functioning were significant predictors of depressive symptoms and anxiety in youth; however, family functioning did not moderate the relation. Family functioning mediated the relation between stress from Daily Hassles and internalizing outcomes suggesting that poor parenting practices, low structure, and low emotional cohesion activate depression and anxiety in youth exposed to chronic and frequent everyday stressors. Surprisingly, only family functioning predicted depressive symptoms in caregivers. Results validate the use of a comprehensive, multi-informant assessment of stress when investigating internalizing outcomes in youth and support using family-based interventions in the treatment and prevention of internalizing. PMID:25601821

  17. REDUCING AMBIGUITY IN THE FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Rooker, Griffin W.; DeLeon, Iser G.; Borrero, Carrie S. W.; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A.; Roscoe, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury and aggression) remains among the most serious challenges for the habilitation of persons with intellectual disabilities and is a significant obstacle to community integration. The current standard of behavior analytic treatment for problem behavior in this population consists of a functional assessment and treatment model. Within that model, the first step is to assess the behavior–environment relations that give rise to and maintain problem behavior, a functional behavioral assessment. Conventional methods of assessing behavioral function include indirect, descriptive, and experimental assessments of problem behavior. Clinical investigators have produced a rich literature demonstrating the relative effectiveness for each method, but in clinical practice, each can produce ambiguous or difficult-to-interpret outcomes that may impede treatment development. This paper outlines potential sources of variability in assessment outcomes and then reviews the evidence on strategies for avoiding ambiguous outcomes and/or clarifying initially ambiguous results. The end result for each assessment method is a set of best practice guidelines, given the available evidence, for conducting the initial assessment. PMID:26236145

  18. Functional outcome of macular edema in different retinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomkins-Netzer, Oren; Ismetova, Filis; Bar, Asaf; Seguin-Greenstein, Sophie; Kramer, Michal; Lightman, Sue

    2015-09-01

    Macular edema accompanies many ocular pathologies, affecting visual function and is an important factor in treatment decisions and disease outcome. Though visual acuity is commonly used to evaluate patient vision it does not always provide a complete estimate of their visual abilities or reflect their own visual perception. Furthermore, different pathologies result in macular edema causing a variable effect on visual function, related to the rate of fluid accumulation and accompanying ocular changes. Use of complementary visual function tests, such as retinal contrast sensitivity on microperimetry and reading speed provide additional information that can be used to evaluate patients and assist in treatment choices. Here we explore the effect of macular edema on visual function in different retinal pathologies, namely diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion and uveitis, examine its influence on the various vision tests and discuss the factors underlying this variable response. PMID:26014685

  19. Treatment assessment of radiotherapy using MR functional quantitative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zheng; Wang, Chunhao

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in magnetic resonance (MR) functional quantitative imaging have made it a potentially powerful tool to assess treatment response in radiation therapy. With its abilities to capture functional information on underlying tissue characteristics, MR functional quantitative imaging can be valuable in assessing treatment response and as such to optimize therapeutic outcome. Various MR quantitative imaging techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, have been investigated and found useful for assessment of radiotherapy. However, various aspects including data reproducibility, interpretation of biomarkers, image quality and data analysis impose challenges on applications of MR functional quantitative imaging in radiotherapy assessment. All of these challenging issues shall be addressed to help us understand whether MR functional quantitative imaging is truly beneficial and contributes to future development of radiotherapy. It is evident that individualized therapy is the future direction of patient care. MR functional quantitative imaging might serves as an indispensable tool towards this promising direction. PMID:25628799

  20. The Association Between Apolipoprotein E and Functional Outcome After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lizhuo; Bao, Yijun; He, Songbai; Wang, Gang; Guan, Yanlei; Ma, Dexuan; Wu, Rile; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaolong; Tao, Shanwei; Liu, Qiwen; Wang, Yunjie; Yang, Jingyun

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability. Previous studies have investigated the association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 with functional outcome after TBI and reported inconsistent results.The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analyses to examine whether APOE ε4 is associated with poorer functional outcome in patients with TBI.We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE.The eligibility criteria of this study included the following: Patients had TBI; the studies reported APOE genotype data or provided odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs); the functional outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE); and patients were followed for at least 3 months after TBI.In all meta-analyses, we used random-effects models to calculate the odds ratio as a measure of association. We examined the association of APOE ε4 with functional outcome at different time points after TBI.A total of 12 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analyses. We did not find a significant association between APOE ε4 and functional outcome at 6 (P = 0.23), 12 (P = 0.44), and 24 months (P = 0.85) after TBI. However, APOE ε4 was associated with an increased risk of unfavorable long-term (≥6 months) functional outcome after TBI (OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07-1.74, P = 0.01).Limitations of this study include The sample size was limited; the initial severity of TBI varied within and across studies; we could not control for potential confounding factors, such as age at injury and sex; a meta-analysis of the genotype dosage effect was not feasible; and we could not examine the association with specific factors such as neurobehavioral or specific cognitive functions.Our meta-analysis indicates APOE ε4 is associated with the long-term functional outcome of patients with TBI. Future studies that control for confounding factors, with large sample sizes and more homogeneous initial TBI severity levels, are needed to validate the findings from this study. PMID:26579811

  1. The Association Between Apolipoprotein E and Functional Outcome After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lizhuo; Bao, Yijun; He, Songbai; Wang, Gang; Guan, Yanlei; Ma, Dexuan; Wu, Rile; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaolong; Tao, Shanwei; Liu, Qiwen; Wang, Yunjie; Yang, Jingyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability. Previous studies have investigated the association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 with functional outcome after TBI and reported inconsistent results. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analyses to examine whether APOE ε4 is associated with poorer functional outcome in patients with TBI. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. The eligibility criteria of this study included the following: Patients had TBI; the studies reported APOE genotype data or provided odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs); the functional outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE); and patients were followed for at least 3 months after TBI. In all meta-analyses, we used random-effects models to calculate the odds ratio as a measure of association. We examined the association of APOE ε4 with functional outcome at different time points after TBI. A total of 12 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analyses. We did not find a significant association between APOE ε4 and functional outcome at 6 (P = 0.23), 12 (P = 0.44), and 24 months (P = 0.85) after TBI. However, APOE ε4 was associated with an increased risk of unfavorable long-term (≥6 months) functional outcome after TBI (OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07–1.74, P = 0.01). Limitations of this study include The sample size was limited; the initial severity of TBI varied within and across studies; we could not control for potential confounding factors, such as age at injury and sex; a meta-analysis of the genotype dosage effect was not feasible; and we could not examine the association with specific factors such as neurobehavioral or specific cognitive functions. Our meta-analysis indicates APOE ε4 is associated with the long-term functional outcome of patients with TBI. Future studies that control for confounding factors, with large sample sizes and more homogeneous initial TBI severity levels, are needed to validate the findings from this study. PMID:26579811

  2. Assessing Treatment Outcomes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Margaret D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To review measures used to assess treatment response in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) across the life span. Data Sources: Keyword searches of English-language articles in the PubMed database up to and including the May 4, 2011, index date were performed with the search strings (1) (attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity [MeSH] OR ADHD) AND (outcome assessment [MeSH] OR adaptation of life skills OR executive function [MeSH]) and (2) (attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity [MeSH] OR ADHD) AND (function OR functioning OR quality of life [MeSH]). Study Selection: Articles found through this search were then selected based on relevance to the topic area; no specific quality criteria were applied. Data Extraction: Narrative review. Results: The vast majority of studies assessing ADHD treatments have measured treatment response using ADHD symptom measures. Additional domains relevant for assessing treatment response among children and adults with ADHD include functional impairment, quality of life, adaptive life skills, and executive function. Validated rating scales exist for assessing these additional domains, but there has been minimal research evaluating the sensitivity of these instruments for detecting treatment response in pediatric and adult samples. Conclusions: Assessment of treatment outcomes in ADHD should move beyond symptom assessment to incorporate measures of functioning, quality of life, adaptive skills, and executive function, especially when assessing long-term treatment response. The authors recommend a potential battery and schedule of measures that could be used to more comprehensively assess treatment response in patients with ADHD. PMID:23585986

  3. Use of Video Clips to Assess the Outcomes of Bilateral Hand Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mansher; Benjamin, Marie-Jose; Turenne, Monique; Lang, Gayle; Li, Hehuan; Bueno, Ericka; Carty, Matthew J.; Pribaz, Julian J.; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Given the initial success of hand transplantation, there has been increased interest in determining functional independence and activities of daily living after hand transplantation. However, the metrics and methodologies used to study these outcomes have not yet been standardized. The goal of this article was to assess the role of video clips in assessing the outcomes of bilateral hand transplantation. We have performed 3 bilateral hand transplantations at our institution. Video clips were taken at standardized time points on our index bilateral hand transplantation patient, and the patient sent multiple home-video clips demonstrating new aspects of function when these improvements have occurred. The index patient demonstrated functional independence and activity of daily living performance without assistance in video clips ranging from 9 months to 2.5 years posttransplantation. He completed the 9-hole peg test with his left hand at 9 months follow-up and with both the hands by 1.5 years. His own video clips demonstrated his ability to perform spontaneous tasks including lawn mowing, driving and swimming. In our experience, the video tools aid in assessing outcomes of hand transplantation and may be incorporated along with multiple objective scoring tests. They can also be used to generate additional standardized tests for functional assessment and may allow retrospective grading as new scoring systems are developed.

  4. Assessing preferences for schizophrenia outcomes: comprehension and decision strategies in three assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Shumway, Martha; Sentell, Tetine; Chouljian, Tandy; Tellier, Jen; Rozewicz, Francine; Okun, Michele

    2003-09-01

    Quantifying the importance of treatment outcomes by measuring preferences allows construction of aggregate outcome indicators that reflect the relative importance of multiple outcomes, trade-offs between outcomes, and the perspectives of different stakeholders. However, standard preference assessment methods are cognitively complex and may be particularly challenging for persons with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses. Preferences may not be meaningful or comparable across stakeholder groups if the groups do not use the methods in similar ways. This study combined qualiative and quantitative methods to compare comprehension and decision strategies across three standard preference assessment methods (Rating Scale, Time Tradeoff, and Paired Comparison) in 2 stakeholder groups (consumers of schizophrenia treatment and clinicians). Results indicate that the Rating Scale method is likely to yield the most valid and comparable preference values because it is well understood and acceptable to both consumers and clinicians. Both groups found the Time Tradeoff method difficult to use and poorly suited to evaluating schizophrenia outcomes. PMID:15224446

  5. Development of a multiple sclerosis functional composite as a clinical trial outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Cutter, G R; Baier, M L; Rudick, R A; Cookfair, D L; Fischer, J S; Petkau, J; Syndulko, K; Weinshenker, B G; Antel, J P; Confavreux, C; Ellison, G W; Lublin, F; Miller, A E; Rao, S M; Reingold, S; Thompson, A; Willoughby, E

    1999-05-01

    The primary clinical outcome measure for evaluating multiple sclerosis in clinical trials has been Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). New therapies appear to favourably impact the course of multiple sclerosis and render continued use of placebo control groups more difficult. Consequently, future trials are likely to compare active treatment groups which will most probably require increased sample sizes in order to detect therapeutic efficacy. Because more responsive outcome measures will be needed for active arm comparison studies, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of New Agents in Multiple Sclerosis appointed a Task Force that was charged with developing improved clinical outcome measures. This Task Force acquired contemporary clinical trial and historical multiple sclerosis data for meta-analyses of primary and secondary outcome assessments to provide a basis for recommending a new outcome measure. A composite measure encompassing the major clinical dimensions of arm, leg and cognitive function was identified and termed the multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFC). The MSFC consists of three objective quantitative tests of neurological function which are easy to administer. Change in this MSFC over the first year of observation predicted subsequent change in the EDSS, suggesting that the MSFC is more sensitive to change than the EDSS. This paper provides details concerning the development and testing of the MSFC. PMID:10355672

  6. Assessment of Global Functioning in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Utility of the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Smith, Laura A.; Schry, Amie R.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of global functioning is an important consideration in treatment outcome research; yet, there is little guidance on its evidence-based assessment for children with autism spectrum disorders. This study investigated the utility and validity of clinician-rated global functioning using the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment

  7. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the following: large vessel infarct, small vessel infarct, embolic infarct, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke severity as assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcomes using the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measurement (FIM), and cognitive function using the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were assessed at admission and discharge. Results Subjects with a family history of stroke were more likely to have an ischemic stroke (90.7%) than were those without a family history (70.9%). The K-MBI, FIM, NIHSS, and K-MMSE scores did not show significant differences between patients with or without family history. Conclusion Family history of stroke was significantly associated with ischemic stroke, but not with functional outcomes. Other prognostic factors of stroke were not distributed differently between patients included in this study with or without a family history of stroke. PMID:26798613

  8. Imatinib enhances functional outcome after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Mathew B; Nilsson, Ingrid; Lewandowski, Sebastian A; Kjell, Jacob; Codeluppi, Simone; Olson, Lars; Eriksson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether imatinib (Gleevec, Novartis), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, could improve functional outcome in experimental spinal cord injury. Rats subjected to contusion spinal cord injury were treated orally with imatinib for 5 days beginning 30 minutes after injury. We found that imatinib significantly enhanced blood-spinal cord-barrier integrity, hindlimb locomotor function, sensorimotor integration, and bladder function, as well as attenuated astrogliosis and deposition of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, and increased tissue preservation. These improvements were associated with enhanced vascular integrity and reduced inflammation. Our results show that imatinib improves recovery in spinal cord injury by preserving axons and other spinal cord tissue components. The rapid time course of these beneficial effects suggests that the effects of imatinib are neuroprotective rather than neurorestorative. The positive effects on experimental spinal cord injury, obtained by oral delivery of a clinically used drug, makes imatinib an interesting candidate drug for clinical trials in spinal cord injury. PMID:22723886

  9. Physical Activity and Functional Outcomes from Cerebral Vascular Events in Men

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Pamela M.; Lee, I-Min; Kase, Carlos S.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Kurth, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background/Purpose In studies enrolling stroke patients, higher levels of pre-stroke physical activity are associated with better functional outcomes. However, prospective studies evaluating this association are sparse. Using a cohort of initially healthy men, we aimed to prospectively assess the association between physical activity and functional outcomes from cerebral vascular events. Methods Prospective cohort study among 21,794 men enrolled in the Physician's Health Study who provided information on physical activity at baseline and who did not have a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Baseline levels of physical activity were categorized as: vigorous exercise <1, 1, 24 and ?5 times/week. Possible functional outcomes included TIA and stroke with mRS score of 01, 23 or 56. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between physical activity and functional outcomes from cerebral vascular events. Results After a mean of 20.2 years of follow-up, 761 TIAs, 1146 ischemic strokes, 221 hemorrhagic strokes and 11 strokes of unknown type occurred. Compared with men who did not experience a stroke or TIA and who exercise vigorously <1 time/week, men who exercise vigorously ?5 times/week had adjusted relative risk (95% CIs) of 0.67 (0.530.86) for TIA, 0.84 (0.611.14) for stroke with mRS 01, 0.85 (0.671.08) for mRS 23, and 1.12 (0.781.60) for mRS 56 after total stroke. Other levels of physical activity did not have a significant impact on the risk of our outcomes. Conclusions Physical activity prior to TIA or stroke does not appear to influence functional outcomes after cerebral vascular events. PMID:21940956

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation: predictors of functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    VILLA, FRANCESCO; RICCI, MARGHERITA; PERDISA, FRANCESCO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; GAMBERINI, JACOPO; CAMINATI, DANIELE; DELLA VILLA, STEFANO

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) leads to full recovery of function and sports activity in a high percentage of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze variables related to the patient, the surgical technique and the post-surgical rehabilitation methods, seeking to identify predictors of outcome and recovery time after ACL reconstruction. One hundred and four patients (81 M, 23 F) undergoing a step-based rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction were evaluated. 43.2% of them had an isolated ACL lesion, whereas 56.8% had one or more concurrent injuries. Data relating to personal characteristics, surgery and post-operative management were collected and analyzed for correlation. Clinical outcome was evaluated with IKDC subjective score and the Tegner score, and the time to reach full recovery was noted as well. Young patients with a higher pre-injury Tegner activity level or who practice sport at professional level, no concurrent capsular lesions and no postoperative knee bracing had better clinical results and took shorter time to recover. Also, a higher percentage of on-the-field rehabilitation sessions, and absence of significant muscle strength deficits at the first knee isokinetic test emerged as rehabilitation-related factors leading to a better post-surgical outcome. Personal, surgical and rehabilitation factors should be considered in order to optimize patient management and maximize the expected results. Further studies are needed to find the strongest factors in different patients. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective study. PMID:26904523

  11. Pretransplantation assessments and symptom profiles: predicting transplantation-related toxicity and improving patient-centered outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Abernethy, Amy P; Giralt, Sergio A

    2012-04-01

    With the advent of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens and improvements in supportive care, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become increasingly available to older adults and medically vulnerable populations with hematologic diseases. However, adverse outcomes including long-term treatment-related distress, disability (frailty), and death remain important concerns in this population. In other areas of oncology, comprehensive geriatric assessments have been used to stratify patients for treatment-related risk, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have helped in understanding treatment-related toxicity from a patient perspective. However, these powerful tools have not yet become widely used in HCT. Here, we review the theories and available data that support the development of pretreatment functional assessments and longitudinal PRO sampling in HCT. We discuss the potential for these techniques to improve transplantation outcomes through risk stratification, interventional studies, and predictive models that incorporate genetic and biomarker data. Predicting and understanding long-term transplantation-related toxicity through functional assessments and PROs will be critical to calculating the risk/benefit ratio of aggressive therapies in older patient populations, and we contend that functional assessments and PRO sampling should become standard parts of the routine evaluation of HCT patients. PMID:22015992

  12. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  13. Effective hand function assessment after burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Umraw, Nisha; Chan, Yvonne; Gomez, Manuel; Cartotto, Robert C; Fish, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    This study compared two methods of hand function assessment, the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) and the Test d'Evaluation des Membres Suprieurs des Personnes Ages (TEMPA) in 20 patients discharged from a regional adult burn center (1995-1999). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis was used to compare the MHQ and TEMPA scores, with P <.05 considered significant. The MHQ revealed that 68% of patients reported hand function deterioration, mainly with the nondominant hand (65%). Activities of daily living (76%) and work (59%) were the most affected. According to the MHQ, patient satisfaction correlated with work performance (r =.66, P =.002), aesthetics (r =.64, P =.003), pain (r =.59, P =.008), and activities of daily living (r =.54, P =.017). The MHQ indicated more hand function deterioration than the TEMPA. There was a significant correlation between the MHQ and TEMPA total scores (r =.68, P =.001). This study supports using the MHQ to determine which patients would benefit from the more resource-consuming TEMPA. PMID:14726754

  14. Functional Connectivity of Brain Structures Correlates with Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, F. Andrew; Rao, Uma; Lu, Hanzhang; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Grannemann, Bruce; McGregor, Tamara; Croarkin, Paul E.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying biosignatures to assess the probability of response to an antidepressant for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is critically needed. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) offers the promise to provide such a measure. Previous work with fcMRI demonstrated that the correlation in signal from one region to another is a measure of functional connectivity. In this pilot work, a baseline non-task fcMRI was acquired in 14 adults with MDD who were free of all medications. Participants were then treated for 8 weeks with an antidepressant and then clinically re-evaluated. Probabilistic anatomic regions of interest (ROI) were defined for 16 brain regions (eight for each hemisphere) previously identified as being important in mood disorders. These ROIs were used to determine mean time courses for each individual's baseline non-task fcMRI. The correlations in time courses between 16 brain regions were calculated. These calculated correlations were considered to signify measures of functional connectivity. The degree of connectivity for each participant was correlated with treatment outcome. Among 13 participants with 8 weeks follow-up data, connectivity measures in several regions, especially the subcallosal cortex, were highly correlated with treatment outcome. These connectivity measures could provide a means to evaluate how likely a patient is to respond to an antidepressant treatment. Further work using larger samples is required to confirm these findings and to assess if measures of functional connectivity can be used to predict differential outcomes between antidepressant treatments. PMID:21556277

  15. Plasma Midregional Pro-Adrenomedullin Improves Prediction of Functional Outcome in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gattringer, Thomas; Simmet, Nicole E.; Scharnagl, Hubert; Bocksrucker, Christoph; Lampl, Christian; Storch, Maria K.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Fazekas, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate if plasma levels of midregional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) improve prediction of functional outcome in ischemic stroke. Methods In 168 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, plasma levels of MR-proADM were measured within 24 hours from symptom onset. Functional outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90 days following stroke. Logistic regression, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, net reclassification improvement (NRI), and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were applied. Results Plasma MR-proADM levels were found significantly higher in patients with unfavourable (mRS 3–6) compared to favourable (mRS 0–2) outcomes. MR-proADM levels were entered into a predictive model including the patients' age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the use of recanalization therapy. The area under the ROC curve did not increase significantly. However, category-free NRI of 0.577 (p<0.001) indicated a significant improvement in reclassification of patients. Furthermore, MR-proADM levels significantly improved reclassification of patients in the prediction of outcome by the Stroke Prognostication using Age and NIHSS-100 (SPAN-100; NRI = 0.175; p = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a rising risk of death with increasing MR-proADM quintiles. Conclusions Plasma MR-proADM levels improve prediction of functional outcome in ischemic stroke when added to the patients' age, NIHSS on admission, and the use of recanalization therapy. Levels of MR-proADM in peripheral blood improve reclassification of patients when the SPAN-100 is used to predict the patients' functional outcome. PMID:23894342

  16. False-Positive Tangible Outcomes of Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooker, Griffin W.; Iwata, Brian A.; Harper, Jill M.; Fahmie, Tara A.; Camp, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the most precise method for identifying variables that maintain problem behavior. Occasionally, however, results of an FA may be influenced by idiosyncratic sensitivity to aspects of the assessment conditions. For example, data from several studies suggest that inclusion of a tangible condition during an FA

  17. Therapist Effects on Functional Analysis Outcomes with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huete, John M.; Kurtz, Patricia F.

    2010-01-01

    Analog functional analyses (FAs) are commonly used to assess factors that maintain problem behavior of individuals with intellectual disabilities. These analyses are usually conducted by trained staff in clinic settings. However, recent research suggests that FAs conducted by unfamiliar individuals, such as hospital or clinic staff, may result in

  18. A Structural Model for Student Outcomes: Assessment Programs in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altieri, Guy

    1990-01-01

    Presents a model for establishing a community college student outcomes assessment program, listing types of student outcomes that should be assessed, and sources of information and measures typically used to assess the outcomes. Reviews steps in program development and in tailoring the program to the college. (DMM)

  19. Strategies for Assessing Learning Outcomes in an Online Oceanography Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    All general education courses at the San Jose State University, including those in the sciences, must present a detailed assessment plan of student learning, prior to certification for offering. The assessment plan must state a clear methodology for acquiring data on student achievement of the learning outcomes for the specific course category, as well as demonstrate how students fulfill a strong writing requirement. For example, an online course in oceanography falls into the Area R category, the Earth and Environment, through which a student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the methods and limits of scientific investigation; distinguish science from pseudo-science; and apply a scientific approach to answer questions about the Earth and environment. The desired learning outcomes are shared with students at the beginning of the course and subsequent assessments on achieving each outcome are embedded in the graded assignments, which include a critical thinking essay, mid-term exam, poster presentation in a symposium-style format, portfolio of web-based work, weekly discussions on an electronic bulletin board, and a take-home final exam, consisting of an original research grant proposal. The diverse nature of the graded assignments assures a comprehensive assessment of student learning from a variety of perspectives, such as quantitative, qualitative, and analytical. Formative assessment is also leveraged into learning opportunities, which students use to identify the acquisition of knowledge. For example, pre-tests are used to highlight preconceptions at the beginning of specific field studies and post-testing encourages students to present the results of small research projects. On a broader scale, the assessment results contradict common misperceptions of online and hybrid courses. Student demand for online courses is very high due to the self-paced nature of learning. Rates of enrollment attrition match those of classroom sections, if students are informed of the instructor's expectations at the beginning of the course. The level of faculty-student and student-student communication is very high, both in terms of quantity and quality, and exceeds that experienced in classroom sections. Student scores on graded assignments compare favorably to classroom sections. Overall, online courses offer a cost-effective means of addressing top priority issues, including increasing student access to learning, accelerating rates of graduation, and improving outreach to K-12 educators, especially those working on credential requirements.

  20. Factors associated with long-term functional outcomes and psychological sequelae in women after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Pallant, Julie F; Rajapaksa, Ishani

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine factors impacting long-term functional outcomes and psychological sequelae in survivors of breast cancer (BC). A clinical assessment and structured interview assessed the impact of BC on participants' (n=85) current activity and restriction in participation, using validated questionnaires: Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Perceived Impact Problem Profile (PIPP) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS). Participants showed good functional recovery (median motor FIM score=78). Three-quarters (74%) reported pain, 32% reported upper limb weakness, 31% pain limiting shoulder movement and 29% lymphoedema. One third (32%) reported greatest impact on psychological wellbeing. A substantial number of participants reported high levels of depression (22%), anxiety and stress (19% each). Factors associated with poorer current level of functioning and wellbeing included: younger participants, recent diagnoses, aggressive tumour types, receiving chemotherapy, shoulder limitation due to pain, and lymphoedema. BC survivors require long-term management of psychological sequelae impacting activity and participation. PMID:22342676

  1. Factors influencing outcome following limb-threatening lower limb trauma: lessons learned from the Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP).

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP) is a multicenter study of severe lower extremity trauma in the US civilian population. At 2- and 7-year follow-ups, the LEAP study found no difference in functional outcome between patients who underwent either limb salvage surgery or amputation. However, outcomes on average were poor for both groups. This study and others provide evidence of wide-ranging variations in outcome following major limb trauma, with a substantial proportion of patients experiencing long-term disability. In addition, outcomes often are more affected by the patient's economic, social, and personal resources than by the initial treatment of the injury--specifically, amputation or reconstruction and level of amputation. A conceptual framework for examining outcomes after injury may be used to identify opportunities for interventions that would improve outcomes. Because of essential differences between the civilian and military populations, the findings of the LEAP study may correlate only roughly with combat casualty outcomes. PMID:17003200

  2. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Patterns Predict Consciousness Level and Recovery Outcome in Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuehai; Zou, Qihong; Hu, Jin; Tang, Weijun; Mao, Ying; Gao, Liang; Zhu, Jianhong; Jin, Yi; Wu, Xin; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Yaojun; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Zhengjia; Gao, Jia-Hong; Weng, Xuchu; Northoff, Georg; Giacino, Joseph T.; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    For accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction of acquired brain injury (ABI), it is crucial to understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying loss of consciousness. However, there is no consensus on which regions and networks act as biomarkers for consciousness level and recovery outcome in ABI. Using resting-state fMRI, we assessed intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) of whole-brain networks in a large sample of 99 ABI patients with varying degrees of consciousness loss (including fully preserved consciousness state, minimally conscious state, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state, and coma) and 34 healthy control subjects. Consciousness level was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised on the day of fMRI scanning; recovery outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the fMRI scanning. One-way ANOVA of FCS, Spearman correlation analyses between FCS and the consciousness level and recovery outcome, and FCS-based multivariate pattern analysis were performed. We found decreased FCS with loss of consciousness primarily distributed in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCU), medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortex. The FCS values of these regions were significantly correlated with consciousness level and recovery outcome. Multivariate support vector machine discrimination analysis revealed that the FCS patterns predicted whether patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and coma would regain consciousness with an accuracy of 81.25%, and the most discriminative region was the PCC/PCU. These findings suggest that intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of the human posteromedial cortex could serve as a potential indicator for consciousness level and recovery outcome in individuals with ABI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Varying degrees of consciousness loss and recovery are commonly observed in acquired brain injury patients, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain elusive. Using a large sample of patients with varying degrees of consciousness loss, we demonstrate that intrinsic functional connectivity strength in many brain regions, especially in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, significantly correlated with consciousness level and recovery outcome. We further demonstrate that the functional connectivity pattern of these regions can predict patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and coma would regain consciousness with an accuracy of 81.25%. Our study thus provides potentially important biomarkers of acquired brain injury in clinical diagnosis, prediction of recovery outcome, and decision making for treatment strategies for patients with severe loss of consciousness. PMID:26377477

  3. Adult functional outcomes of common childhood psychiatric problems: A prospective, longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Wolke, Dieter; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Context Psychiatric problems are among the most common health problems of childhood. Objective To test whether these health problems adversely affect adult functioning even if the problems themselves do not persist. Design Prospective, population-based study of 1420 participants assessed with structured interviews up to 6 times in childhood (ages 9 to 16; 6674 observations) for common psychiatric diagnoses and subthreshold psychiatric problems. Setting and population Community sample. Main outcome measure Participants were then assessed 3 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, and 24–26; 3215 observations of 1273 subjects) for adverse outcomes related to health, legal, financial, and social functioning. Results Participants with a childhood disorder had 6 times higher odds of at least one adverse adult outcome as compared to those with no history of psychiatric problems and 9 times higher odds of 2 or more such indicators (1 indicator: 59.5% vs. 19.9%, p <0.001; 2+ indicators: 34.2% vs. 5.6%, p <0.001). These associations persisted after statistically controlling for childhood psychosocial hardships and adult psychiatric problems. Risk was not limited to those with a diagnosis: participants with subthreshold psychiatric problems had 3 times higher odds of adult adverse outcomes and 5 time higher odds of 2 or more outcomes (1 indicator: 41.9% vs. 19.9%, p <0.001; 2+ indicators: 23.2% vs. 5.6%, p <0.001). The best diagnostic predictor of adverse outcomes was cumulative childhood exposure to psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Common, typically moderately-impairing, childhood psychiatric problems are associated with a disrupted transition to adulthood even if the problems do not persist into adulthood and even if the problems are subthreshold. Such problems provide potential target for public health efforts to ameliorate adult suffering and morbidity. PMID:26176785

  4. Routine outcome measurement in mental health service consumers: who should provide support for the self-assessments?

    PubMed

    Gelkopf, Marc; Pagorek-Eshel, Shira; Trauer, Tom; Roe, David

    2015-06-01

    This study examined whether mental health community service users completed outcome self-reports differently when assessments were supervised by internal vs. external staff. The examination of potential differences between the two has useful implications for mental health systems that take upon themselves the challenge of Routine Outcome Measurement (ROM), as it might impact allocation of public resources and managed care program planning. 73 consumers completed the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), a shortened version of the Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS), and a functioning questionnaire. Questionnaires were administered, once using support provided by internal staff and once using support provided by external professional staff, with a one-month time interval and in random order. A MANOVA Repeated Measures showed no differences in outcomes of quality of life and recovery between internal and external support. Functioning scores were higher for the internal support when the internal assessments were performed first. Overall, except for the differences in functioning assessment, outcome scores were not determined by the supporting agency. This might indicate that when measuring quality of life and recovery, different supporting methods can be used to gather outcome measures and internal staff might be a good default agency to do this. Differences found in functioning assessment are discussed. PMID:25748604

  5. Multiattribute utility assessment of outcomes of treatment for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hodder, S C; Edwards, M J; Brickley, M R; Shepherd, J P

    1997-01-01

    Good clinical practice is dependent on continuous audit. Most audits of head and neck cancer treatment planning have been subjective, with only 5-year survival rates being considered objectively. Improvements in clinical care require not only measurable goals that relate to patients' perspectives, but also a means of assessing to what extent those goals have been met. In this context, 5-year survival rates are too crude to be useful, although they remain important for other reasons. Because a simple clinical objective measure of outcome applicable to head and neck cancer is not available, multiattribute assessment techniques were used to develop a clinically based scale for outcomes following treatment for head and neck cancer, with domains centred on social function, pain, physical appearance, eating and speech problems, nausea, donor site problems and shoulder function. Domains were weighted relative to each other; pain (mean weight 85) and social function (89) were considered most important followed by physical appearance (76), eating (76) and speech problems (74) A series of graded statements was constructed within each domain and scaled relative to each other. These components were also combined into an overall scale that will enable objective outcome assessment in this important area of medical care. PMID:9062413

  6. Assessment and monitoring of physical function for people with CKD.

    PubMed

    Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Although low and deteriorating physical function are increasingly recognized as key characteristics of CKD, assessment of physical function does not yet form part of the routine clinical monitoring of this patient group. This is somewhat surprising as measures of physical function, from across the entire functional measurement spectrum, have been shown to be related to clinically important outcomes (morbidity, quality of life and increasingly survival) in patients being treated for CKD. In order to promote a standardized approach to assessment of people with CKD, it is recommended that renal professionals adopt the physical function and measurement classification systems of the International Classification Framework of Functioning, Disability and Health. Selection of physical function assessment "tool(s)" is influenced by the intended goal of the assessment (e.g., clinical assessment, tracking of progress with physical activity, research purposes, diagnostic purposes), the personal characteristics of the patient, and also by the prevailing information quality requirements and potential operational constraints (e.g., measurement burden, patient inclusiveness/sample size, cost). As exercise tolerance, functional capacity, and functional status assessments have been shown to be safe, feasible, and clinically useful, it is recommended that their implementation be incorporated within clinical management protocols for the patient with CKD. PMID:19801131

  7. Air pollutants and health outcomes: Assessment of confounding by influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Wong, Chit-Ming; Chan, King-Pan; Chau, Yuen-Kwan; Neil Thomas, G.; Ou, Chun-Quan; Yang, Lin; Peiris, Joseph S. M.; Lam, Tai-Hing; Hedley, Anthony J.

    2010-04-01

    We assessed confounding of associations between short-term effects of air pollution and health outcomes by influenza using Hong Kong mortality and hospitalization data for 1996-2002. Three measures of influenza were defined: (i) intensity: weekly proportion of positive influenza viruses, (ii) epidemic: weekly number of positive influenza viruses ?4% of the annual number for ?2 consecutive weeks, and (iii) predominance: an epidemic period with co-circulation of respiratory syncytial virus <2% of the annual positive isolates for ?2 consecutive weeks. We examined effects of influenza on associations between nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ?10 ?m (PM 10) and ozone (O 3) and health outcomes including all natural causes mortality, cardiorespiratory mortality and hospitalization. Generalized additive Poisson regression model with natural cubic splines was fitted to control for time-varying covariates to estimate air pollution health effects. Confounding with influenza was assessed using an absolute difference of >0.1% between unadjusted and adjusted excess risks (ER%). Without adjustment, pollutants were associated with positive ER% for all health outcomes except asthma and stroke hospitalization with SO 2 and stroke hospitalization with O 3. Following adjustment, changes in ER% for all pollutants were <0.1% for all natural causes mortality, but >0.1% for mortality from stroke with NO 2 and SO 2, cardiac or heart disease with NO 2, PM 10 and O 3, lower respiratory infections with NO 2 and O 3 and mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with all pollutants. Changes >0.1% were seen for acute respiratory disease hospitalization with NO 2, SO 2 and O 3 and acute lower respiratory infections hospitalization with PM 10. Generally, influenza does not confound the observed associations of air pollutants with all natural causes mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization, but for some pollutants and subgroups of cardiorespiratory mortality and respiratory hospitalization there was evidence to suggest confounding by influenza.

  8. Improved facial outcome assessment using a 3D anthropometric mask.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Clement, J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to process three-dimensional facial surfaces to objectively assess outcomes of craniomaxillofacial care is urgently required. Available surface registration techniques depart from conventional facial anthropometrics by not including anatomical relationship in their analysis. Current registrations rely on the manual selection of areas or points that have not moved during surgery, introducing subjectivity. An improved technique is proposed based on the concept of an anthropometric mask (AM) combined with robust superimposition. The AM is the equivalent to landmark definitions, as used in traditional anthropometrics, but described in a spatially dense way using (?10.000) quasi-landmarks. A robust superimposition is performed to align surface images facilitating accurate measurement of spatial differences between corresponding quasi-landmarks. The assessment describes magnitude and direction of change objectively and can be displayed graphically. The technique was applied to three patients, without any modification and prior knowledge: a 4-year-old boy with Treacher-Collins syndrome in a resting and smiling pose; surgical correction for hemimandibular hypoplasia; and mandibular hypoplasia with staged orthognathic procedures. Comparisons were made with a reported closest-point (CP) strategy. Contrasting outcomes were found where the CP strategy resulted in anatomical implausibility whilst the AM technique was parsimonious to expected differences. PMID:22103995

  9. Reasons for Seasons Assessment Outcomes For Diverse Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubert, R. M.; Pyke, C.; Lynch, S.; Ochsendorf, R.

    2003-12-01

    National systemic reform initiatives point to the need for a more focused science curriculum and better curriculum materials for teachers to use (aligned with science standards, instructional methods, and assessment/accountability measures). Assessment developers face the difficult task of identifying and revealing what students actually know that is relevant to curricular goals. The SCALE-uP Project at the George Washington University has attempted to create such assessments using an adapted rigorous set of criteria based on an assessment item analysis procedure developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science Project 2061. The procedure evaluates an assessment task's potential to reveal whether students have attained "a well-defined component of knowledge or acquired a particular skill" (Stern and Ahlgren, 2002). To determine students' scientific understanding of what causes the Earth's seasons, the SCALE-uP Project focuses on a single Benchmark from Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS, 1993) that include both empirical observations and theoretical statements related to the target concept (Earth's seasons). In the conceptual model guiding our assessment development, we believe the target concept, articulated through the Benchmark (4B,6-8, #4), represents a single coherent knowledge structure and mental model stored in memory that students can recall or access when needed to explain relevant phenomena or solve tasks. Therefore, students that possess the concept of the Earth's seasons would be expected to respond to phenomena related to seasons with consistent and coherent responses to probes and representations related to the Benchmark idea. The instrument development procedure compares assessment outcomes (cognitive model/framework) of about 30 general 7th grade students with little previous classroom exposure to learning about the seasons, to high achieving 8th graders who have studied the seasons, and to introductory astronomy college students, who presumably understand the reasons for Earth's seasons. In this paper, we report on the results of the initial administrations of the instrument for these three groups.

  10. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrin, Ricardo E.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Goldberg, Terry E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Olvet, Doreen M.; Correll, Christoph U.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders is the long-term disability that involves impaired cognition, lack of social support, and an inability to function independently in the community. A critical goal of early detection and intervention studies in psychosis is therefore to understand the factors leading to this often profound impairment. Objective To develop a predictive model of functional (social and role) outcome in a clinical high-risk sample for psychosis. Design Prospective, naturalistic, longitudinal 3- to 5-year follow-up study. Setting The Recognition and Prevention Program in New York, a research clinic located in the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. Participants One hundred one treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis. Ninety-two (91%) were followed up prospectively for a mean (SD) of 3 (1.6) years. Intervention Neurocognitive and clinical assessment. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome variables were social and role functioning at the last follow-up visit. Results Poor social outcome was predicted by reduced processing speed (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.050-1.823; P = .02), impaired social functioning at baseline (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.258-2.732; P = .002), and total disorganized symptoms (OR, 5.06; 95% CI, 1.548-16.527; P = .007). Reduced performance on tests for verbal memory (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.169-2.594; P = .006), role functioning at baseline (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.053-1.711; P = .02), and motor disturbances (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.060-2.969; P = .03) predicted role outcome. The areas under the curve for the social and role prediction models were 0.824 (95% CI, 0.736-0.913; P < .001) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.87; P < .001), respectively, demonstrating a high discriminative ability. In addition, poor functional outcomes were not entirely dependent on the development of psychosis, because 40.3% and 45.5% of nonconverters at clinical high risk had poor social and role outcomes, respectively. Conclusions and Relevance Results from this study support the increasing emphasis on functional decline as a critically important outcome that parallels conversion to psychosis and suggest that both psychosis and long-term functional disability are equally important targets for prevention. Reduced neurocognitive performance, functional impairments, and nonpositive attenuated symptoms at baseline were associated with an increased risk of poor functional outcomes in our sample. Poor functional outcomes were not entirely dependent on positive symptoms and the development of psychosis, further highlighting the need for intervention at this early stage of development for those who do and do not convert to a full-blown psychotic disorder. PMID:24006090

  11. Functional outcomes in patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection.

    PubMed

    Jares, Tyler M; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kowalski, Todd J

    2014-02-01

    When Lyme disease is treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy in the early stages, long-term outcomes are good. However, a few patients have persistent symptoms despite appropriate therapy. Whether these patients' symptoms are any different from those of patients with reinfection is unclear. Our objective was to compare long-term symptoms and functional outcomes of patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection with those of patients with only 1 episode of infection and with no history of infection. We compared outcomes of Lyme reinfection patients, characterized by recurrent erythema migrans (EM) lesions, with those of patients with 1 episode of Lyme disease (Lyme control) and with no history of Lyme disease (non-Lyme control) by retrospective medical record review and a survey consisting of a 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a 10-item symptom questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and ?(2) analysis for categorical variables were used. In cases of low cell counts, Fisher's exact tests were used. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons when ANOVA was significant. Reinfection was identified in 23/673 (3.4%) patients who had a diagnosis of Lyme disease in our health system during 2000-2004. Of the 23, 15 had long-term follow-up data and were age- and sex-matched to 45 Lyme control and 60 non-Lyme control group patients. Clinical characteristics were similar in the reinfection and Lyme control groups. SF-36 results were similar between groups for all domains except energy/vitality (VT). The SF-36 domain of VT was significantly different between groups: 63.0 vs. 54.5 vs. 64.5 in the reinfection, Lyme control, and non-Lyme control groups, respectively (p=0.047). Clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with recurrent EM lesions were similar to those of the control groups and consistent with B. burgdorferi reinfection, not persistent infection. Patients with Lyme reinfection should be treated with antibiotic regimens similar to those used for patients with an initial episode of Lyme disease. PMID:24215678

  12. Are all outcomes in chronic heart failure rated equally? An argument for a patient-centred approach to outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sungwon; Newton, Phillip J; Inglis, Sally; Luckett, Tim; Krum, Henry; Macdonald, Peter; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a multi-dimensional and complex syndrome. Outcome measures are important for determining both the efficacy and quality of care and capturing the patient's perspective in evaluating the outcomes of health care delivery. Capturing the patient's perspective via patient-reported outcomes is increasingly important; however, including objective measures such as mortality would provide more complete account of outcomes important to patients. Currently, no single measure for CHF outcomes captures all dimensions of the quality of care from the patient's perspective. To describe the role of outcome measures in CHF from the perspective of patients, a structured literature review was undertaken. This review discusses the concepts and methodological issues related to measurement of CHF outcomes. Outcome assessment at the level of the patient, provider and health care system were identified as being important. The perspectives of all stakeholders should be considered when developing an outcomes measurement suite to inform CHF health care. This paper recommends that choice of outcome measures should depend on their ability to provide a comprehensive, comparable, meaningful and accurate assessment that are important to patient. PMID:23238990

  13. Reporting outcome measures of functional constipation in children from 0 to 4 years of age.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga-Wessel, Sophie; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-04-01

    Functional constipation (FC) often begins in the first year of life. Although standard definitions and criteria have been formulated to describe FC, these are rarely used in research and clinical practice. The aim of the study is to systematically assess how definitions and outcome measures are defined in therapeutic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of infants with FC. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. Studies were included if it was a (systematic review of) therapeutic RCT, children ?4 years old, they had FC, a clear definition of constipation was provided, and were written in English. Quality was assessed using the Delphi list. A total of 1115 articles were found; only 5 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four different definitions were used, of which only 2 used the internationally accepted Rome III criteria. Defecation frequency was used as primary outcome in all included trials and stool consistency in 3 trials. Two trials involving infants investigated new infant formulas, whereas the third RCT evaluated the efficacy of a probiotic strain. The 2 trials including infants up to 4 years of age compared polyethylene glycol without electrolytes (PEG4000) with lactulose and milk of magnesia. All of the trials used nonvalidated parental diaries. Different definitions and outcome measures for FC in infants are used in RCTs. Disappointingly, there is a lack of well-designed therapeutic trials in infants with constipation. To make comparison between future trials possible, standard definitions, core outcomes, and validated instruments are needed. PMID:25406527

  14. Assessment of Global Functioning in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Utility of the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Smith, Laura A.; Schry, Amie R.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of global functioning is an important consideration in treatment outcome research; yet, there is little guidance on its evidence-based assessment for children with autism spectrum disorders. This study investigated the utility and validity of clinician-rated global functioning using the Developmental Disability-Child Global Assessment…

  15. Adult Diagnostic and Functional Outcomes of DSM-5 Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Egger, Helen; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objective Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder is a new disorder for DSM-5 that is uncommon and frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Here, we test whether meeting diagnostic criteria for this disorder in childhood predicts adult diagnostic and functional outcomes. Methods In a prospective, population-based study, subjects were assessed with structured interviews up to 6 times in childhood and adolescence (ages 10 to 16; 5336 observations of 1420 subjects) for symptoms of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and 3 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, and 24-26; 3215 observations of 1273 subjects) for psychiatric and functional outcomes (health, risky/illegal behavior, financial/educational and social functioning). Results Young adults with a history of childhood disruptive mood dysregulation disorders had elevated rates of anxiety and depression and were more likely to meet criteria for more than one adult disorder as compared to controls with no history of childhood psychiatric problems (noncases) or subjects meeting criteria for psychiatric disorders other than disruptive mood dysregulation disorder in childhood/adolescence (psychiatric controls). Participants with a history of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder also were more likely to have adverse health outcomes, be impoverished, have reported police contact, and have low educational attainment as adults compared to either psychiatric or noncase controls. Conclusions The long-term prognosis of children with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder cases is one of pervasive impaired functioning that in many cases is worse than that of other childhood psychiatric cases. PMID:24781389

  16. Outcomes Assessment for Beginning and Intermediate Spanish: One Program's Process and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Outcomes assessment is a process by which an academic unit defines and articulates its program goals and assesses its attainment of those goals. This article chronicles one language division's efforts at outcomes assessment for beginning and intermediate Spanish. The evidence used for program assessment consisted of WebCAPE placement scores,

  17. Midline mandibular osteotomy: an analysis of functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Riddle, S A; Andersen, P E; Everts, E C; Cohen, J I

    1997-07-01

    Although the oncologic validity and perioperative complications of midline mandibular osteotomy are well described, little attention has been directed toward the long-term functional problems that may be associated with its use. Thirty-one patients who had undergone this procedure were examined to assess postoperative sensation, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function, occlusion, and cosmesis. The majority (27 of 31) patients had some sequelae but these were minor in nature. Twenty of 31 patients had abnormal sensation, 24 of 31 noted a changed occlusion, and 15 of 31 had signs or symptoms of TMJ myofascial pain. Although patients should be advised of the potential for functional problems with this procedure, they can be reassured that these are likely to be relatively minor in significance. If technically feasible and if an exact restoration of occlusion is a priority, a prefabricated lingual splint should be used. PMID:9217126

  18. Do Curriculum Outcomes and Assessment Activities in Science Encourage Higher Order Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Beverly; Schulz, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for two science units in each of Grades 6 and 7 was analyzed to determine the cognitive levels of the outcomes and their cognitive alignment with the assessments that corresponded with these outcomes. This was done for British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. The outcomes and assessments included a variety of higher…

  19. Assessing Educational Outcomes in Middle Childhood: Validation of the Teacher Academic Attainment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samantha; Marlow, Neil; Wolke, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Assessing educational outcomes in high-risk populations is crucial for defining long-term outcomes. As standardized tests are costly and time-consuming, we assessed the use of the Teacher Academic Attainment Scale (TAAS) as an outcome measure. Method: Three hundred and forty three children in mainstream schools aged 10 to 11 years (144 males,

  20. Do Curriculum Outcomes and Assessment Activities in Science Encourage Higher Order Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Beverly; Schulz, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for two science units in each of Grades 6 and 7 was analyzed to determine the cognitive levels of the outcomes and their cognitive alignment with the assessments that corresponded with these outcomes. This was done for British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. The outcomes and assessments included a variety of higher

  1. Learning Outcomes Assessment: Extrapolating from Study Abroad to International Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Donald L.; Matthews, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    For international service-learning to thrive, it must document student learning outcomes that accrue to participants. The approaches to international service-learning assessment must be compelling to a variety of stakeholders. Recent large-scale projects in study abroad learning outcomes assessment--including the Georgia Learning Outcomes of

  2. Curriculum Assessment as a Direct Tool in ABET Outcomes Assessment in a Chemical Engineering Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Attar, Hazim

    2010-01-01

    The chemical engineering programme at the United Arab Emirates University is designed to fulfil the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) (A-K) EC2000 criteria. The Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering has established a well-defined process for outcomes assessment for the chemical engineering programme in order to…

  3. Curriculum Assessment as a Direct Tool in ABET Outcomes Assessment in a Chemical Engineering Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Attar, Hazim

    2010-01-01

    The chemical engineering programme at the United Arab Emirates University is designed to fulfil the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) (A-K) EC2000 criteria. The Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering has established a well-defined process for outcomes assessment for the chemical engineering programme in order to

  4. Assessing Technical Writing in Institutional Contexts: Using Outcomes-Based Assessment for Programmatic Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Michael; Anson, Chris M.; Miller, Carolyn R.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that technical writing instruction often operates in isolation from other components of students' communication education. Argues for altering this isolation by moving writing instruction to a place of increased programmatic perspective, which may be attained through a means of assessment based on educational outcomes. Discusses two models

  5. FLiGS Score: A New Method of Outcome Assessment for Lip CarcinomaTreated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Rita; Toia, Francesca; Di Rosa, Luigi; Cordova, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lip cancer and its treatment have considerable functional and cosmetic effects with resultant nutritional and physical detriments. As we continue to investigate new treatment regimens, we are simultaneously required to assess postoperative outcomes to design interventions that lessen the adverse impact of this disease process. We wish to introduce Functional Lip Glasgow Scale (FLiGS) score as a new method of outcome assessment to measure the effect of lip cancer and its treatment on patients daily functioning. Methods: Fifty patients affected by lip squamous cell carcinoma were recruited between 2009 and 2013. Patients were asked to fill the FLiGS questionnaire before surgery, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. The subscores were used to calculate a total FLiGS score of global oral disability. Statistical analysis was performed to test validity and reliability. Results: FLiGS scores improved significantly from preoperative to 12 months postoperative values (P = 0.000). Statistical evidence of validity was provided through rs (Spearman correlation coefficient) that resulted >0.30 for all surveys and for which P < 0.001. FLiGS score reliability was shown through examination of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Conclusions: FLiGS score is a simple way of assessing functional impairment related to lip cancer before and after surgery; it is sensitive, valid, reliable, and clinically relevant: it provides useful information to orient the physician in the postoperative management and in the rehabilitation program. PMID:26034652

  6. The Extent to Which Collaborative Teams of Educators Link the Results of Functional Assessment to Function-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Courcy-Bower, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    A promising approach to addressing challenging behavior in schools is to develop and implement "function-based interventions" (Dunlap et al., 2006; Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Function-based interventions are individualized interventions in which five key outcomes of functional assessment (i.e., identification of challenging behavior,

  7. Linking Mission, Strategy and Student Outcomes Assessment: A Cost-Effective Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holoviak, Stephen J.; Verney, Thomas P.; Weigle, Jerry A.; Holoviak, Justin S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a demonstration of the assessment methods and processes that are used by the John L. Grove College of Business to assess student outcomes and how these assessments relate to mission and strategy.

  8. Obstetrical outcomes and biomarkers to assess exposure to phthalates: A review.

    PubMed

    Marie, Ccile; Vendittelli, Franoise; Sauvant-Rochat, Marie-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Studies of the effects on pregnancy outcomes of in utero exposure to phthalates, contaminants that are widely present in the environment, have yielded conflicting results. In addition, the mode of assessment of exposure varies between studies. The aim of this review was therefore to establish a current state of knowledge of the phthalates and metabolites involved in unfavorable pregnancy outcomes. Extant data were analyzed to determine which biomarker is the best suited to assess the relation between in utero exposure to phthalates and pregnancy outcomes. This review of the literature was conducted using the database of PubMed. A search was made of studies investigating exposure to phthalates and the following birth outcomes: preterm birth (gestational age <37 weeks), change in gestational age, change in body size at birth (birth weight, length, head circumference), anti-androgenic function, decreased anogenital distance, cryptorchidism, hypospadias and congenital malformation. The methodological approach adopted in each study was examined, in particular the methods used for exposure assessment (biomarkers and/or questionnaire). Thirty-five studies were included. Premature birth and decreased anogenital distance were the most commonly reported outcomes resulting from a moderate level of exposure to phthalates. The principal metabolites detected and involved were primary metabolites of di-2(ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl-phthalate (DnBP). No clear conclusion could be drawn with regard to gestational age at birth, body size at birth and congenital malformations. In epidemiological studies, maternal urine is the most suitable matrix to assess the association between in utero exposure to phthalates and pregnancy outcomes: in contrast to other matrices (cord blood, amniotic fluid, meconium and milk), sampling is easy, non-invasive and, can be repeated to assess exposure throughout pregnancy. Oxidative metabolites are the most relevant biomarkers since they are not prone to external contamination. Further epidemiological studies are required during pregnancy to i) determine the role of phthalates other than DEHP [currently replaced by various substitution products, in particular diisononyl-phthalate (DiNP)]; ii) establish the effect of phthalates on other outcomes (body size adjusted for gestational age, and congenital malformations); iii) determine the pathophysiological pathways; and iv) identify the most suitable time for biomarker determination of in utero exposure to phthalates. PMID:26118330

  9. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-04-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten individuals with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (14-18 years of age), and the results were analyzed to determine feasibility of use, potential for improvement, and internal consistency. It was determined that the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet are valid tests of cognitive function in 15q13.3 microdeletion patients. Therefore, these tests may be considered for use as objective outcome measures in future clinical trials, assessing change in cognitive function over a period of pharmacological treatment. PMID:26754479

  10. Functional Outcome After Lower Limb Amputation: Is Hyperhomocysteinemia a Predictive Factor?: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Stefano; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Ricciardi, Elena; Traballesi, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Lower limb amputation (LLA) is the drastic stage of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) where the hyperhomocysteinemia (H-HCY) seems to be a risk factor. Surprisingly, in literature the levels and the role of homocysteinemia (HCY) in persons with LLA are understudied. This study aims to investigate the level of HCY and its correlation with the functional outcomes after LLA.A case-control study to analyze HCY levels in amputees admitted in a rehabilitation hospital during an investigation period of 1.5 years. Barthel Index was used to assess the functional outcome.We enrolled 91 dysvascular amputees and 44 amputees for other reasons than PAD (controls). The mean level of HCY was found higher in dysvascular amputees (15.2??7.5) compared to controls (11.0??5.0, P?functional outcomes of the rehabilitative treatment only in LLA due to PAD. PMID:26656344

  11. Assessing patient reported outcome measures: A practical guide for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Hayley A; Williams, John G

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses cause physical, emotional and social impact on patients. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in clinical decision-making, clinical research and approval of new therapies. In the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in the number of PROMs in gastroenterology and, therefore, the choice between which of these PROMs to use can be difficult. Not all PROM instruments currently used in research and clinical practice in gastroenterology have gone through a rigorous development methodology. New drugs and therapies will not have access to the market if the PROMs used in their clinical trials are not validated according to the guidelines of the international agencies. Therefore, it is important to know the required properties of PROMs when choosing or evaluating a drug or a clinical intervention. This paper reviews the current literature on how to assess the validity and reliability of PROMs. It summarises the required properties into a practical guide for gastroenterologists to use in assessing an instrument for use in clinical practice or research. PMID:25452841

  12. Comparison of musculoskeletal and urological functional outcomes in patients with bladder exstrophy undergoing repair with and without osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Marco; Gigante, Cosimo; Perrone, Giorgio; Rigamonti, Waifro

    2008-06-01

    It is controversial as to whether osteotomy, by restoring a more normal pelvic anatomy, might improve the final outcome of bladder exstrophy (BE) repairs. We compared the functional orthopaedic and urological outcomes in BE patients treated with and without osteotomy. Orthopaedic and urological outcomes were compared in eight BE patients treated with osteotomy and six BE patients treated without osteotomy. Orthopaedic evaluation included an assessment of pubic bones dissymmetry, bending of the spine, presence of Trendelenburg or Thomas sign, and presence of out-toeing. Pubic diastasis was ruled out on a plain X-ray of the pelvis. A Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America (POSNA) questionnaire was administered to every child or his/her caregiver to assess functional outcome. Urological evaluation included an assessment of required continence surgeries and of contemporary continence status. All patients presented a pubic diastasis. This was in median 49 (24-66) mm in patients treated without osteotomy and 42 (25-101) mm in those treated with osteotomy (p = 0.3). There was no difference either in the orthopaedic outcome or in any features of the POSNA questionnaire between groups. Neither was there a difference in the final continence rate nor in the number of additional continence procedures required. Although osteotomy is an essential step in the treatment of many BE patients in order to achieve a tension-free closure of the abdominal wall and bladder, our preliminary results suggest that it does not improve the eventual orthopaedic or urological outcomes of BE. PMID:18386019

  13. Long-term outcome after cerebral venous thrombosis: analysis of functional and vocational outcome, residual symptoms, and adverse events in 161 patients.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Sini; Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) affects mainly working-aged individuals. Functional recovery after CVT is generally considered good with about 3/4 of patients achieving short-term independence. However, vascular events, long-term functional outcome, and employment after CVT remain poorly investigated. We identified consecutive adult CVT patients treated at the Helsinki University Hospital (1987-2013) and invited them to a follow-up visit. Each clinical examination was combined with interview. We also recorded recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) and hemorrhagic events during follow-up and antithrombotic medication use. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) served to assess functional outcome. Logistic regression served to identify independent factors associated with unemployment and functional recovery. Of the 195 patients identified, 21 died, 9 declined to participate, and 4 were excluded from the study. Thus, 161 patients (106 women) underwent an examination after a median of 39 months (interquartile range 14-95). VTE (one of which was CVT) occurred in 9 (6 %) patients, and severe hemorrhagic events in 10 (6 %). Functional outcome was good, with 84 % scoring 0-1 on the mRS; 42 % reported residual symptoms. Altogether, 91 (57 %) patients were employed. After adjusting for age and sex, a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >2 at admission and low education level, associated with both unfavorable functional outcome and unemployment. Long-term functional outcome after CVT may appear good if measured with mRS, but patients often have residual symptoms and are frequently unable to return to their previous work. PMID:26725090

  14. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  15. Effect of the Interaction between Recanalization and Collateral Circulation on Functional Outcome in Acute Ischaemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mangiafico, Salvatore; Saia, Valentina; Nencini, Patrizia; Romani, Ilaria; Palumbo, Vanessa; Pracucci, Giovanni; Consoli, Arturo; Rosi, Andrea; Renieri, Leonardo; Nappini, Sergio; Limbucci, Nicola; Inzitari, Domenico; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-12-01

    Identification of patients with acute ischaemic stroke who could most benefit from arterial recanalization after endovascular treatment remains an unsettled issue. Although several classifications of collateral circulation have been proposed, the clinical role of collaterals is still debated. We evaluated the effect of the collateral circulation in relation to recanalization as a predictor of clinical outcome. Data were prospectively collected from 103 patients consecutively treated for proximal middle cerebral or internal carotid artery occlusion. The collateral circulation was evaluated with a novel semiquantitative-qualitative score, the Careggi collateral score (CCS), in six grades. Both CCS and recanalization grades (TICI) were analysed in relation to clinical outcome. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of interaction between recanalization and collateral circulation on clinical outcome. Out of the 103 patients, 37 (36.3%) had poor collaterals, and 65 (63.7%) had good collaterals. Patients with good collaterals had lower basal National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), more distal occlusion, smaller lesions at 24h CT scan and better functional outcome. After multivariate analysis, the interaction between recanalization and collateral grades was significantly stronger as a predictor of good outcome (OR 6.87, 95% CI 2.11-22.31) or death (OR 4.66, 95%CI 1.48-14.73) compared to the effect of the single variables. Collaterals showed an effect of interaction with the recanalization grade in determining a favourable clinical outcome. Assessment of the collateral circulation might help predict clinical results after recanalization in patients undergoing endovascular treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:25496680

  16. Total sacrectomy and reconstruction: oncologic and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Wuisman, P; Lieshout, O; Sugihara, S; van Dijk, M

    2000-12-01

    The oncologic and functional outcomes of nine patients who were treated by total sacrectomy through L5 (three cases) or L5-S1 (six cases) were reviewed. Histologic diagnoses were one osteosarcoma, two giant cell tumors, two chondrosarcomas, and four chordomas. Patients' ages ranged from 17 to 70 years (mean age, 44.5 years). Resection margins were intralesional (giant cell tumors) in two, marginal in one, and wide in six patients (one contaminated). Reconstruction was performed using polymethylmethacrylate in two, screw and plate fixation in one, and a custom-made device in one. In five patients no reconstruction was performed. Five patients (45.5%) had wound complications: one had a wound dehiscence and two had deep infection; all needed surgical reintervention. In addition, in one a ventral and in another a dorsal hernia developed; only the ventral hernia was revised successfully. One patient had a deep vein thrombosis that was treated with a Coumadin derivate. Three patients (33%) died after 14, 18, and 50 months postoperatively respectively. One died of lung and widespread metastases, and two died of local recurrence and metastases. One patient with a giant cell tumor had a solitary lung metastasis. After resection the patient has been disease-free more than 90 months. At followup, six patients had no evidence of disease (mean followup, 73 months; range, 30-120 months). Functionally, there was no correlation between patients who had a reconstruction and those who had not. Total sacrectomy is a valuable procedure to secure local tumor control and overall survival, despite potential complications and neurologic and sexual dysfunction. PMID:11127656

  17. Neuroglobin Genetic Polymorphisms and Their Relationship to Functional Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Yvette P.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Okonkwo, David O.; Ren, Dianxu; Sherwood, Paula R.; Hravnak, Marilyn; Alexander, Sheila A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Neuroglobin has shown rich neuroprotective effects against cerebral hypoxia, and therefore has the potential to impact outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, to date an association between genetic variation within the human neuroglobin (NGB) gene and recovery post-TBI has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between NGB genotypes and outcomes (as assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS], the Disability Rating Scale [DRS], and the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised [NRS-R]) after severe TBI. Genotyping using TaqMan allele discrimination for two tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) that represent the two haplotype blocks for NGB (rs3783988 and rs10133981) was completed on DNA obtained from 196 Caucasian patients recovering from severe TBI. Patients were dichotomized based on the presence of the variant allele for each tSNP. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare characteristics between groups. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine NGB tSNPs and recovery from severe TBI. Subjects with the TT genotype (wild-type) for rs3783988 were more likely to have better GOS and DRS scores at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, while rs10133981 genotype was not significantly related to functional outcome. After controlling for age, gender, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, those subjects with the rs3783988 TT genotype had more than a 2.65-times greater likelihood of better functional outcomes than individuals with genotypes harboring a variant allele. Data suggest that the haplotype block represented by rs3783988 in NGB appears to influence recovery after severe TBI. Represented within this haplotype block of NGB is the region that codes for the oxygen-binding portion of NGB. PMID:20345238

  18. Maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D and its association with childhood atopic outcomes and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Wills, A K; Shaheen, S O; Granell, R; Henderson, A J; Fraser, W D; Lawlor, D A

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy influences the risk of asthma and atopy in the offspring. The epidemiological evidence to support these claims is conflicting and may reflect chance findings and differences in how vitamin D was assessed. Objective To examine the association between blood total maternal 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in pregnancy and offspring asthma, atopy and lung function in the largest birth cohort study to date. Methods Participants were largely of white European origin and resident in the South West of England. We examined the associations of maternal 25(OH)D concentrations in pregnancy with the following outcomes in the offspring: wheeze, asthma, atopy, eczema, hayfever, at mean age 7.5 years (n = 36524696 depending on outcome), IgE at 7 years (n = 2915) and lung function and bronchial responsiveness at mean age 8.7 years (n = 37283784). Results Sixty-eight per cent of mothers had sufficient (> 50 nmol/L) concentrations of 25(OH)D, 27% were insufficient (27.549.99 nmol/L) and 5% were deficient (< 27.5 nmol/L). There was no evidence to suggest that maternal 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy was associated with any respiratory or atopic outcome in the offspring. These findings remained after adjustment for season of measurement and for potential confounders. There was also no evidence that these relationships followed a non-linear form and no evidence that either deficient or high concentrations of maternal 25(OH)D were associated with atopic or respiratory outcomes. Conclusions We found no evidence that maternal blood 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy is associated with childhood atopic or respiratory outcomes. PMID:24074336

  19. Achieving Faculty Buy-In: Motivation Performance in Learning Outcome Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sujitparapitaya, Sutee

    2014-01-01

    Despite the great value of student learning outcome assessment (SLOA), faculty have not fully embraced the assessment movement, and many remain locked in debates on its merits. To gain faculty buy-in and explain why many faculty were motivated to engage in outcome assessment, the modified CANE (Commitment And Necessary Effort) model was used to

  20. A Report on Outcomes Assessment in the Montana University System and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowen, Sonia S.

    Prepared as part of a review of outcomes assessment programs at the six universities and three community colleges of the Montana University System, this report reviews existing or planned assessment initiatives and provides recommendations. Following an introduction, the historical context of outcomes assessment is described, highlighting

  1. Component alignment and functional outcome following computer assisted and jig based total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Dnyanesh G; Thilak, Jai; Thadi, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Incorrect positioning of the implant and improper alignment of the limb following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can lead to rapid implant wear, loosening, and suboptimal function. Studies suggest that alignment errors of > 3° are associated with rapid failure and less satisfactory function. Computer navigated systems have been developed to enhance precision in instrumentation during surgery. The aim of the study was to compare component alignment following computer assisted surgery (CAS) and jig based TKA as well as functional outcome. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of 100 knees to compare computer-assisted TKA and jig-based surgery in relation to femoral and tibial component alignment and functional outcome. The postoperative x-rays (anteroposterior and lateral) of the knee and CT scanogram from hip to foot were obtained. The coronal alignment of the femoral and tibial components and rotational alignment of femoral component was calculated. Knee society score at 24 months was used to assess the function. Results: Results of our study show that mean placement of the tibial component in coronal plane (91.3037°) and sagittal planes (3.6058°) was significantly better with CAS. The difference was statistically insignificant in case of mean coronal alignment of the femoral components (90.34210° in navigation group and 90.5444° in jig group) and in case of the mean femoral condylar twist angle (external rotation 2.3406° in navigation group versus 2.3593° in jig group). Conclusions: A significantly improved placement of the component was found in the coronal and sagittal planes of the tibial component by CAS. The placement of the components in the other planes was comparable with the values recorded in the jig-based surgery group. Functional outcome was not significantly different. PMID:23533002

  2. Development and Applications of an Outcomes Assessment Framework for Care Management Programs in Learning Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Kuntz-Melcavage, Kara; Forrest, Christopher B.; Lu, Yanyan; Piet, Leslie; Evans, Kathy; Uriyo, Maria; Sherry, Melissa; Richardson, Regina; Hawkins, Michelle; Neale, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and apply an outcomes assessment framework (OAF) for care management programs in health care delivery settings. Background: Care management (CM) refers to a regimen of organized activities that are designed to promote health in a population with particular chronic conditions or risk profiles, with focus on the triple aim for populations: improving the quality of care, advancing health outcomes, and lowering health care costs. CM has become an integral part of a care continuum for population-based health care management. To sustain a CM program, it is essential to assure and improve CM effectiveness through rigorous outcomes assessment. To this end, we constructed the OAF as the foundation of a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment. Innovations: To construct the OAF, we first systematically analyzed the operation process of a CM program; then, based on the operation analysis, we identified causal relationships between interventions and outcomes at various implementation stages of the program. This set of causal relationships established a roadmap for the rest of the outcomes assessment. Built upon knowledge from multiple disciplines, we (1) formalized a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment, and (2) integrated proven analytics methodologies and industrial best practices into operation-oriented CM outcomes assessment. Conclusion: This systematic approach to OAF for assessing the outcomes of CM programs offers an opportunity to advance evidence-based care management. In addition, formalized CM outcomes assessment methodologies will enable us to compare CM effectiveness across health delivery settings. PMID:25992387

  3. Coordinating ecological restoration options analysis and risk assessment to improve environmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapustka, Lawrence A; Bowers, Keith; Isanhart, John; Martinez-Garza, Cristina; Finger, Susan; Stahl, Ralph G; Stauber, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Ecological risk assessment as currently practiced has hindered consideration of ecosystem services endpoints and restoration goals in the environmental management process. Practitioners have created barriers between procedures to clean up contaminated areas and efforts to restore ecosystem functions. In this article, we examine linkages between contaminant risk assessment approaches and restoration efforts with the aim of identifying ways to improve environmental outcomes. We advocate that project managers and other stakeholders use an ecological planning framework, with restoration options included upfront in the risk assessment. We also considered the opportunities to incorporate ecosystem services as potential assessment endpoints in the Problem Formulation stages of a risk assessment. Indeed, diverse perspectives of stakeholders are central to understand the relevance of social, cultural, economic, and regional ecology as influences on future use options for the landscape being restored. The measurement endpoints used to characterize the existing ecological conditions for selected ecosystem services can also be used to evaluate restoration success. A regional, landscape, or seascape focus is needed throughout the risk assessment process, so that restoration efforts play a more prominent role in enhancing ecosystem services. In short, we suggest that practitioners begin with the question of "how can the ecological risk assessment inform the decision on how best to restore the ecosystem?" Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:253-263. © 2015 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:26077395

  4. Functional outcomes of adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Chow, Eva W.C.; Costain, Gregory; Karas, Dominique; Ho, Andrew; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common multisystem genomic disorder with congenital and later-onset manifestations, including congenital heart disease, intellectual disability, and psychiatric illness, that may affect long-term functioning. There are limited data on adult functioning in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to assess functioning in 100 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 46 male; mean age = 28.8 (standard deviation = 9.7) years) where intellect ranged from average to borderline (n = 57) to mild intellectual disability (n = 43). Results More than 75% of the subjects scored in the functional deficit range. Although personal, vocational, and financial demographics confirmed widespread functional impairment, daily living skills and employment were relative strengths. Intelligence quotient was a significant predictor (P < 0.001) of overall and domain-specific adaptive functioning skills. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was a significant predictor (P < 0.05) of overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, and socialization scores. Notably, congenital heart disease, history of mood/anxiety disorders, sex, and age were not significant predictors of functioning. Conclusion Despite functional impairment in adulthood that is primarily mediated by cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, relative strengths in activities of daily living and employment have important implications for services and long-term planning. These results may help to inform expectations about outcomes for patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:22744446

  5. Anticipating the future: assessment of occupational function.

    PubMed

    Trombly, C

    1993-03-01

    I believe that the occupational therapy assessment procedure should reflect our conceptualization of occupational functioning and that there should be a congruence among goals, assessments, and treatment. I believe that there should be a universal occupational therapy intake assessment procedure that follows a top-down approach to clarify for the client that the role of occupational therapy is to promote his or her occupational functioning. All the layers of function that we treat should be assessed, with the particulars of context incorporated into assessments at the activity and higher levels. Further and most important, occupational functioning should be fully conceptualized and the relevant constructs and their relationships verified and made clear to all. PMID:8456926

  6. Validating the Measurement of Real-World Functional Outcomes: Phase I Results of the VALERO Study

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Philip D.; Raykov, Tenko; Twamley, Elizabeth; Vella, Lea; Heaton, Robert K.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits are associated with disability in people with schizophrenia so treatment of cognitive impairment has been proposed as an intervention to reduce disability. However, studies relying on patient self-report have found very minimal relationships between ratings of real-world functioning and cognitive performance, raising questions about the measurement of real-world functioning as a treatment outcome. The Validation of Everyday Real-world Outcomes (VALERO) study was conducted to evaluate functional rating scales and to identify the rating scale or scales most robustly related to performance-based measures of cognition and everyday living skills. Method 198 adults with schizophrenia were tested with the neurocognitive measures from the MATRICS Consensus cognitive Battery and performed the UCSD performance-based skills assessment-Brief and advanced finances subtest from the Everyday Functioning Battery. They and a friend, relative, clinician, or case manager also reported their everyday functioning on 6 ratings scales: Social Behavior Schedule, Social Adjustment Scale, Heinrichs Carpenter Quality of Life Scale, Specific Levels of Functioning, Independent Living skills Survey, and Life Skills Profile. Best judgment ratings were generated by an interviewer who administered the rating scales to patients and informants. Results Statistical analyses developed an ability latent trait that reflected scores on the three performance-based (i.e., ability) measures and canonical correlation analysis related interviewer ratings to the latent trait. The overall fit of the model with all six rating scales was good: ?2 = 78.100, df = 56, p = .027, and RMSEA = .078. Individual rating scales that did not improve the fit of the model were systematically deleted and a final model with two rating scales fit the data: ?2 = 32.059, df = 24, p = .126, RMSEA = .072. A regression analysis found that the Specific Levels of Functioning was a superior predictor of the three-performance based ability measures. Conclusions We found that systematic assessments of real world functioning are related to performance on neurocognitive and functional capacity measures. Of the six rating scales evaluated, the Specific Levels of Functioning (SLOF) was best in this study. Use of a single rating scale provides a very efficient assessment of real-world functioning that accounts for considerable variance in performance-based scores. PMID:21572166

  7. Repeat Partial Nephrectomy on the Solitary Kidney: Surgical, Functional, and Oncologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nick W.; Khurana, Kiranpreet; Sudarshan, Sunil; Pinto, Peter A.; Linehan, W. Marston; Bratslavsky, Gennady

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcomes of patients with recurrent or de novo renal lesions treated with repeat partial nephrectomy on a solitary kidney. Methods We reviewed the records of patients who underwent nephron-sparing surgeries at the NCI from 1989 to 2008. Patients were included in the analysis if they underwent a repeat partial nephrectomy on a solitary kidney. Perioperative, functional, and oncologic outcomes were assessed. Functional outcomes were evaluated using the MDRD equation for eGFR. Oncologic efficacy was examined by the need for subsequent repeat renal surgery and development of metastatic disease. Results Twenty-five patients were included in the analysis. The median number of tumors resected was 4; with median EBL of 2,400ml, and median operative time of 8.5 hours. Perioperative complications occurred in 52% of the cases and included one mortality, and the loss of 3 renal units. There was a decline in eGFR (p<0.01) on the first follow up visit within 3 months after surgery, but at the 1 year follow up, the difference was not significant (p=0.12). Surgical interventions were recommended to eight patients (38%) for recurrent or de-novo tumors at a median time of 36 months, while metastasis-free survival of the cohort at an average of 57 months (range 3196, median 50 months) was 95%. Conclusions Repeat partial nephrectomy for patients with a solitary kidney is a high risk alternative. Although the complication rates are high and there is a modest decline in renal function, most patients remain free from dialysis with acceptable oncologic outcomes at intermediate follow up. PMID:20299057

  8. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leonards, Christopher O.; Schneider, Harald J.; Liman, Thomas G.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Endres, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations are frequently altered in acute ischemic stroke patients. It is becoming increasingly apparent that various hormones in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be associated with functional stroke outcome. We have previously shown that white matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are strong indicators of functional outcome. It is unclear whether an association exists between WMH and TSH. We therefore sought to determine whether TSH levels, measured in acute ischemic stroke patients, are associated with WMH and functional outcome. Methods We analyzed all first ischemic stroke patients who participated in the Berlin Cream & Sugar Study (NCT 01378468) and completed a 1-year follow-up assessment from January 2009 to March 2013. Patients were stratified into 3 groups: (1) low TSH (0.1-0.44 ?U/ml); (2) normal TSH (0.44-2.5 ?U/ml), and (3) high TSH (2.5-20 ?U/ml). WMH were assessed using the Fazekas and Wahlund visual rating scales. Functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale and was performed via telephone at 1 year by a certified rater. Results 183 patients were included [median age 66, interquartile range (IQR) 54-75; 33% females; median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale 3, IQR 1-4, range 0-24]. Venous samples were collected a median of 4 days (IQR 3-5) following initial symptom onset between 8 and 9 a.m. following a 10-hour fast. Patients with normal TSH levels (n = 132; 72%) had significantly higher rates of prestroke diabetes than patients with high TSH levels (normal TSH 17%; high TSH 1%; p = 0.03). Additionally, patients with normal TSH levels tended to have higher estimated glomerular filtration rates than patients with high and low TSH concentrations (normal TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 83 ml/min/1.73 m2; high TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 76 ml/min/1.73 m2; low TSH median: 78 ml/min/1.73 m2; p = 0.068). Logistical regression analysis force-adjusted for age (quartiles), NIHSS (quartiles), prestroke diabetes status, and stroke subtype revealed significant associations between WMH and TSH [Wahlund scores: odds ratio 2.547, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.159-5.598, p = 0.020; Fazekas scores: odds ratio 2.530, 95% CI 1.115-5.741, p = 0.003]. Functional outcome was not significantly associated with TSH levels in univariate or multivariate models. Conclusion TSH levels are independently associated with WMH in acute ischemic stroke patients. Based on our findings, we cannot recommend assessing TSH to estimate the 1-year functional outcome following ischemic stroke. PMID:24803914

  9. Responsiveness and uniqueness of the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument compared to the gross motor function measure for measuring orthopaedic and neurosurgical outcomes in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Gilgannon, Marc D; Abel, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    The Pediatrics Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) is a valid and reliable measure of functional health status in children with acute and chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), but its responsiveness has not been documented specifically for this population. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) are the only two instruments validated specifically as evaluative measures for CP, and while widely used, they are limited by a ceiling effect when assessing higher-functioning children. The PEDI is further restricted to children who are 7 years old or less. The goal of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness, and secondarily the uniqueness, of the PODCI compared with the GMFM for evaluating surgical outcomes in CP. Changes in the GMFM and PODCI Parent forms were assessed at two time points in 64 children with spastic CP who underwent muscle-tendon lengthenings (MT; n = 22) or neurosurgical spasticity reduction consisting of either selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR; n = 18) or intrathecal baclofen pump implantation (ITB; n = 11) or who had no surgery between assessments (n = 13). The GMFM Total score was responsive to change after both MT surgery and SDR, with a nearly equivalent magnitude of change in both groups. However, the PODCI Global Function Scale was responsive to changes only after MT surgery, with improvement in the Sports and Physical Function subscale particularly prominent. No significant changes were noted in the ITB group for either measure. PMID:16199947

  10. Functional and Oncologic Outcomes of Primary versus Salvage Transoral Laser Microsurgery for Supraglottic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Jantharapattana, Kitti; Barringer, Denise A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional and oncologic outcomes of transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) in patients with previously untreated supraglottic carcinoma compared with salvage cases after radiation-based treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-control study at a single academic tertiary care institution. Functional outcomes were stratified by prior radiation, and assessed at baseline, <1 week postoperatively, and last follow-up. Results Five patients underwent TLM for previously untreated disease and five previously radiated patients underwent salvage TLM for local failure. No patient required tracheostomy. There was no local recurrence after TLM as primary therapy and none required radiotherapy. One salvage patient developed local recurrence. Length of feeding tube dependence (p=0.049) and rates of chronic aspiration (>1 month postoperatively, p=0.048) were significantly higher in salvage TLM cases compared with previously untreated cases. Median PSS-HN Understandability of Speech scores were 75 (“usually understandable”) in the salvage group compared with 100 (“always understandable”) in the previously untreated group. Conclusions Both local control and function were superior in previously untreated patients compared with salvage patients. Our findings provide support for the use of TLM as a primary treatment modality for selected supraglottic carcinomas, but also suggest a potential for functional recovery in both previously untreated and salvage cases. PMID:23130541

  11. Validity of a brief outpatient functional assessment measure.

    PubMed

    Baker, J G; Granger, C V; Ottenbacher, K J

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of validity are investigated with a brief functional assessment measure among outpatients undergoing rehabilitation for musculoskeletal problems. The Medical Rehabilitation Follow Along measure (MRFA) currently has screening, musculoskeletal, neurologic, and multiple sclerosis forms. In this study, the 31-item musculoskeletal form of the MRFA is compared with and contrasted to a measure of general health status, the Medical Outcomes Trust SF-36. Content, construct, and criterion validity are addressed using scale scores before (n = 94) and after (n = 48) outpatient rehabilitation. Scale scores are compared with therapists' ratings of improvement. The results provide support for the validity of inferences made from scale scores of the MRFA for persons with musculoskeletal problems. Applications of the MRFA, including screening, monitoring, and outcome assessment are discussed for clinical management, measuring treatment effectiveness, and program evaluation. PMID:8873703

  12. Can the Assessment of Spontaneous Oscillations by Near Infrared Spectrophotometry Predict Neurological Outcome of Preterm Infants?

    PubMed

    Stammwitz, André; von Siebenthal, Kurt; Bucher, Hans U; Wolf, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to assess the correlation between cerebral autoregulation and outcome. Included were 31 preterm infants, gestational age 26 1/7 to 32 2/7 and <24 h life. Coherence between cerebral total haemoglobin (tHb) or oxygenation index (OI) measured by near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) and systemic heart rate (HR) or arterial blood pressure (MAP) was calculated as a measure of autoregulation. In contrast to previous studies, low coherences in the first 24 h were significantly associated with intraventricular haemorrhage, death or abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months or later. We suggest that our results can be explained by the concept of a multi-oscillatory-functions-order. PMID:26782253

  13. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study

  14. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  15. Obesity and long term functional outcomes following elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obesity rates continue to rise and more total hip arthroplasty procedures are being performed in progressively younger, obese patients. Hence, maintenance of long term physical function will become very important for quality of life, functional independence and hip prosthesis survival. Presently, there are no reviews of the long term efficacy of total hip arthroplasty on physical function. This review: 1) synopsized available data regarding obesity effects on long term functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty, and 2) suggested future directions for research. Methods A literature search was conducted from 1965 to January of 2011 for studies that evaluated long term functional outcomes at one year or longer after THA in obese (body mass index values ≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m2). Results Five retrospective studies and 18 prospective studies were identified as those that assessed physical function before surgery out to ≥ one year after total hip arthroplasty. Study sample sizes ranged from 108–18,968 and followed patients from one to twenty years. Total hip arthroplasty confers significant pain reduction and improvement in quality of life irrespective of body mass index. Functional improvement occurred after total hip arthroplasty among all studies, but obese patients generally did not attain the same level of physical function by the follow-up time point. Discussion Uncontrolled obesity after total hip arthroplasty is related to worsening of comorbidities and excessive health care costs over the long term. Aggressive and sustainable rehabilitation strategies that include physical exercise, psychosocial components and behavior modification may be highly useful in maximizing and maintaining weight loss after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:22533938

  16. Posterior shoulder instability in the athletic population: Variations in assessment, clinical outcomes, and return to sport

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Bradley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Posterior instability of the shoulder is becoming an increasingly recognized shoulder injury in the athletic population. Diagnostic elements, such as etiology, directionality, and degree of instability are essential factors to assess in the unstable athletic shoulder. Concomitant injuries and associated pathologic lesions continue to be a significant challenge in the surgical management of posterior shoulder instability. Return to sport and previous level of play is ultimately the goal for every committed athlete and surgeon, thus subpopulations of athletes should be recognized as distinct entities requiring unique diagnostic, functional outcome measures, and surgical approaches. PMID:26716088

  17. Community College Strategies: Linking Course, Program, and Institutional Learning Outcomes--An Embedded Assessment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovich, Paulette M.; Vierheller, Tim R.

    2005-01-01

    Faculty at The University of Akron Wayne College, the two-year regional branch campus of the University of Akron, developed and implemented a plan to assess student learning in 1997. The plan was based on an embedded outcomes model, linking course-level student learning outcomes to program outcomes for each of six technical associate degree

  18. Systematic assessment of the influence of complement gene polymorphisms on kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Ermini, Luca; Weale, Michael E; Brown, Katherine M; Mesa, Irene Rebollo; Howell, W Martin; Vaughan, Robert; Chowdhury, Paramit; Sacks, Steven H; Sheerin, Neil S

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the innate immune system, including complement, in causing transplant injury and augmenting adaptive immune responses is increasingly recognized. Therefore variability in graft outcome may in part be due to genetic polymorphism in genes encoding proteins of the immune system. This study assessed the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in complement genes and outcome after transplantation. Analysis was performed on two patient cohorts of 650 and 520 transplant recipients. 505 tagged SNPs in 47 genes were typed in both donor and recipient. The relationships between SNPs and graft survival, serum creatinine, delayed graft function and acute rejection were analyzed. One recipient SNP in the gene encoding mannose binding lectin was associated with graft outcome after correction for analysis of multiple SNPs (p=6.41×10(-5)). When further correction was applied to account for analysis of the effect of SNPs in both donor and recipient this lost significance. Despite association p values of <0.001 no SNP was significantly associated with clinical phenotypes after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, the variability seen in transplant outcome in this patient cohort cannot be explained by variation in complement genes. If causal genetic effects exist in these genes, they are too small to be detected by this study. PMID:26797657

  19. Behaviors and Corresponding Functions Addressed via Functional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Horovitz, Max; Worley, Julie A.; Shoemaker, Mary E.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    One-hundred seventy-three studies that employed functional assessment were evaluated with respect to types of challenging behaviors studied and the functions identified that maintained those behaviors. For most studies, two to three behaviors were targeted. Of the 38 different challenging behaviors identified, self-injurious behavior (SIB) and

  20. Behaviors and Corresponding Functions Addressed via Functional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Horovitz, Max; Worley, Julie A.; Shoemaker, Mary E.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    One-hundred seventy-three studies that employed functional assessment were evaluated with respect to types of challenging behaviors studied and the functions identified that maintained those behaviors. For most studies, two to three behaviors were targeted. Of the 38 different challenging behaviors identified, self-injurious behavior (SIB) and…

  1. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Young, Brittany M; Walton, Leo M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain-computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients' upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients' motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients' motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID:25964753

  2. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Young, Brittany M.; Walton, Leo M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E.; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID:25964753

  3. Assessing the Utility of a Demand Assessment for Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Pence, Sacha T.; Longworth, Lynlea J.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of

  4. Functional Outcome of Hemorrhagic Transformation after Thrombolysis for Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Annan, Mariam; Gaudron, Marie; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Cazals, Xavier; Dejobert, Maelle; Corcia, Philippe; Bertrand, Philippe; Mondon, Karl; de Toffol, Bertrand; Debiais, Sverine

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is usually taken into account when symptomatic, but the role of asymptomatic HT is not well known. The aim of our study was to evaluate the link between HT after thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and functional outcome at 3 months, with particular emphasis on asymptomatic HT. Methods Our study was performed prospectively between June 2012 and June 2013 in the Stroke Unit of the University Hospital Center of Tours (France). All patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis were consecutively included. HT was classified on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with 3-tesla MRI at 7 3 days after treatment. We evaluated functional outcome at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Dependency was defined as an mRS score of ?3. Results After 1 year, 128 patients had received thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke, of whom 90 patients underwent both 3-tesla MRI and SWI at day 7. Fifty-two had HT, including 8 symptomatic cases. At 3 months, 68% of those patients were dependent compared to 31% of patients without HT [OR 4.6 (1.9-11.4), p = 0.001]. In asymptomatic HT, the rate was 62% [OR 3.5 (1.4-8.9), p = 0.007], but did not reach significance after adjustment for stroke severity. Discussion Our study found no statistically significant effect of HT on outcome after adjustment for initial stroke severity. However, the innocuousness of HT is not certain, and only few studies have already highlighted the increased risk of dependency. Using 3-tesla MRI with SWI allows us to increase the detection rate of small hemorrhage. Conclusion HT after thrombolysis is very frequent on SWI, but the initial stroke severity is an important predictor to assess the role of HT for patient outcome. PMID:26648965

  5. What Do They Measure? Comparing Three Learning Outcomes Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steedle, Jeffrey; Kugelmass, Heather; Nemeth, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Many postsecondary institutions currently administer standardized tests of general college outcomes; more than a quarter of Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) member institutions do so. Using standardized tests for accountability purposes has been contentious mainly because these tests do not measure every important outcome

  6. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three latent domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Emily L.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Fassola, Isabella; Requejo, Philip; Leclercq, Caroline; Winstein, Carolee J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1 ± 11.6 years, range: 45–88 years) and 33 older adults (65.8 ± 9.7 years, 44–81 years, 51 hands) diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch), Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain. Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them. PMID:26097455

  7. Ability of Lower-Extremity Injury Severity Scores to Predict Functional Outcome After Limb Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuan V.; Travison, Thomas G.; Castillo, Renan C.; Bosse, Michael J.; MacKenzie, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lower-extremity injury severity scoring systems were developed to assist surgeons in decision-making regarding whether to amputate or perform limb salvage after high-energy trauma to the lower extremity. These scoring systems have been shown to not be good predictors of limb amputation or salvage. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical utility of the five commonly used lower-extremity injury severity scoring systems as predictors of final functional outcome. Methods: We analyzed data from a cohort of patients who participated in a multicenter prospective study of clinical and functional outcomes after high-energy lower-extremity trauma. Injury severity was assessed with use of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score; the Limb Salvage Index; the Predictive Salvage Index; the Nerve Injury, Ischemia, Soft-Tissue Injury, Skeletal Injury, Shock, and Age of Patient Score; and the Hannover Fracture Scale-98. Functional outcomes were measured with use of the physical and psychosocial domains of the Sickness Impact Profile at both six months and two years following hospital discharge. Four hundred and seven subjects for whom the reconstruction regimen was considered successful at six months were included in the analysis. We used partial correlation statistics and multiple linear regression models to quantify the association between injury severity scores and Sickness Impact Profile outcomes with the subjects' ages held constant. Results: The mean age of the patients was thirty-six years (interquartile range, twenty-six to forty-four years); 75.2% were male and 24.8% were female. The median Sickness Impact Profile scores were 15.2 and 6.0 points at six and twenty-four months, respectively. The analysis showed that none of the scoring systems were predictive of the Sickness Impact Profile outcomes at six or twenty-four months to any reasonable degree. Likewise, none were predictive of patient recovery between six and twenty-four months postoperatively as measured by a change in the scores in either the physical or the psychosocial domain of the Sickness Impact Profile. Conclusions: Currently available injury severity scores are not predictive of the functional recovery of patients who undergo successful limb reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level I. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18676906

  8. Does Functional Outcome Improve with Time Postsurgery for Hirschsprung Disease?

    PubMed

    Aworanti, Olugbenga Michael; McDowell, Dermot Thomas; Martin, Ian Michael; Quinn, Feargal

    2016-04-01

    Purpose Constipation and incontinence are significant problems following pull-through surgery for Hirschsprung disease (HD). There is evidence that these problems improve with time. However, there is also evidence showing no improvements and furthermore, significant long-term data are lacking for the newer endorectal pull-through. We aim to determine if there is clinical evidence that show improvements in functional outcomes with time after an endorectal pull-through surgery for HD. Methods We utilized the validated pediatric incontinence and constipation scoring system (PICSS) to score 51 consecutive children 3 months to 15 years posttransabdominal or transanal endorectal pull-through for HD. Cases of total colonic aganglionosis and Down syndrome were excluded. PICSS scores below the age-specific lower limit 95% confidence interval scores represent incomplete continence or constipation, respectively. We performed linear regression to analyze the relationship between PICSS scores and the follow-up duration and then compared the demographics of children with and without incomplete continence and constipation, respectively. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results The median age at PICSS interview was 71 months (range, 6-191 months). Incontinence scores obtained from 42 children older than 35 months showed a positive relationship with the follow-up duration (p = 0.03). Constipation scores obtained from 51 children were unrelated to follow-up duration (p = 0.486). When demographics were compared, the continent children had longer follow-up than those with incomplete continence (mean, 111.64 vs. 69.19 months; p = 0.051), however follow-up duration did not differ in the group of constipated children compared with the nonconstipated group (mean, 61.88 vs. 71.80 months; p = 0.321). Conclusion These findings suggest that after an endorectal pull-through, improved continence should be expected with time but constipation often continues to be an ongoing problem. PMID:25643245

  9. Functional outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Athayde, Filipe T. S.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Britto, Raquel R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple factors can influence the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the functioning of patients with COPD, such as personal characteristics and systemic manifestations. Objective To evaluate the different factors that can influence the activity and psychosocial impact domains of the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in COPD patients. Method Participants, recruited in a university-based hospital, responded to the SGRQ, and in addition, personal, anthropometric, and clinical data were collected. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression models, with the SGRQ activity and psychosocial impact scores as outcome variables, and 10 explanatory variables (age, gender, forced expiratory volume in the first second - FEV1, smoking load, body mass index, oxygen therapy, associated diseases, regular physical activity, participation in a formal rehabilitation program, and SGRQ symptoms score) were considered. Results The best regression model for predicting the SGRQ activity score (r2=0.477) included gender, FEV1, and SGRQ symptoms. In contrast, the predictive model with the highest proportion of explained variance in psychosocial impact score (r2=0.426) included the variables gender, oxygen therapy, and SGRQ symptoms. Conclusions The results indicate that the outcomes, while based on functioning parameters in COPD patients, could be partly explained by the personal and clinical factors analyzed, especially by the symptoms assessed by the SGRQ. Thus, it appears that the health conditions of these patients cannot be described by isolated variables, including pulmonary function parameters. PMID:24675914

  10. Evaluation of oral glucose tolerance test, β-cell function and adverse obstetric outcomes

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HONGXIU; ZHAO, DONGMEI; SHEN, JIE; ZHOU, XIAOPING; CHEN, WENWEI; JIANG, SHIWEN

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), their effect on pregnancy and their association with adverse obstetric outcomes. A cross-sectional study was performed on 345 pregnant women, who were screened between the 24th and 28th gestational week with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test following abnormal results at 1 h after a 50-g oral glucose challenge test. The obstetric outcomes were recorded along with plasma glucose and insulin levels, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function index (HOMA-βCFI) and 50 subjects were excluded due to incomplete data recovery. Of the 295 pregnant women, 18.6% (55/295) were diagnosed with GDM and 32% (95/295) with IGT. The GDM group exhibited significantly higher fasting and 1-h blood glucose concentrations compared to the normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and IGT groups (P<0.01). The 2- and 3-h insulin values of the NGT group were significantly lower compared to those of the GDM group (P<0.05, P<0.01). In the IGT group, the 2-h insulin values were higher compared to the NGT group and the 3-h values were significantly higher (P<0.01), similar to the GDM group. There was a tendency for progressively decreased β-cell function and increased HOMA-IR from the NGT to the IGT to the GDM group. The adverse outcomes of pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, preterm delivery, macrosomia and cesarean delivery indicated an association with HOMA-βCFI and HOMA-IR. In conclusion, these findings suggest a clinical significance of β-cell dysfunction in women with gestational IGT. PMID:24649033

  11. Voice and Functional Outcomes of Transoral Laser Microsurgery for Early Glottic Cancer: Ventricular Fold Resection as a Surrogate

    PubMed Central

    Berania, Ilyes; Dagenais, Christophe; Moubayed, Sami P.; Ayad, Tareck; Olivier, Marie-Jo; Guertin, Louis; Bissada, Eric; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Christopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the oncological and functional outcomes with transoral laser microsurgery (TOLM) of patients with early glottic cancer. Methods We have prospectively evaluated patients treated with TOLM for Tis, T1 or T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma. Evaluation of oncological outcomes, and voice and functional outcomes was assessed using voice-handicap index 10 (VHI-10) and performance status scale for head & neck cancer patients (PSS-H&N). Predictors of poor voice quality were evaluated using Student’s t-test. Results Thirty patients were included, with 17.7 months mean follow-up. There were no cases of locoregional recurrence. Twelve patients (40%) were considered as having a problematic voice outcome. Four subjects out of 30 (13.3%) had significant problems with understandability of speech. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in VHI-10 score were found with tumor stage and partial resection of the ventricular fold. Conclusions We report excellent oncological and functional outcomes in early glottic cancer treated with TOLM, with advanced tumors and partial resection of the ventricular fold as a surrogate predicting worse voice outcomes. PMID:26124910

  12. Standardized Testing for Outcome Assessment: Analysis of the Educational Testing Systems MBA Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of standardized tests for outcome assessment has grown dramatically in recent years. Two driving factors have been the No Child Left Behind legislation, and the increase in outcome assessment measures by accrediting agencies such as AACSB, the international accrediting body for business schools. Despite the growth in usage, little effort

  13. Use of Adverse Outcome Pathways for Assessing Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole on Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) are used to describe the linkage of biological events from a molecular initiating point, to individual-level-endpoints relevant to risk assessment. This study was done to assess toxicity outcomes for the conazole fungicide propiconazole based on a p...

  14. An Illustration of Diagnostic Classification Modeling in Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurich, Daniel P.; Bradshaw, Laine P.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of higher-education student learning outcomes is an important component in understanding the strengths and weaknesses of academic and general education programs. This study illustrates the application of diagnostic classification models, a burgeoning set of statistical models, in assessing student learning outcomes. To facilitate

  15. Assessing Outcomes of a Realistic Major Preview in an Introductory Sport Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, David; Wanless, Elizabeth; Johnson, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper assessed the outcomes of a field experience assignment (FEA) in an introductory sport management course designed as a realistic major preview. Student learning outcomes assessed were commitment to the major, intent to pursue the major, expectation of a career in sports, and perceived preparation for a career in sports. A

  16. Assessing Outcomes of a Realistic Major Preview in an Introductory Sport Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, David; Wanless, Elizabeth; Johnson, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper assessed the outcomes of a field experience assignment (FEA) in an introductory sport management course designed as a realistic major preview. Student learning outcomes assessed were commitment to the major, intent to pursue the major, expectation of a career in sports, and perceived preparation for a career in sports. A…

  17. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment Model: A Structural Equation Model Examination of Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Susan E.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation sought to operationalize a comprehensive theoretical model, the Trauma Outcome Process Assessment, and test it empirically with structural equation modeling. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment reflects a robust body of research and incorporates known ecological factors (e.g., family dynamics, social support) to explain…

  18. 76 FR 45271 - Review and Qualification of Clinical Outcome Assessments; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Review and Qualification of Clinical Outcome Assessments... principles for clinical outcome assessments (COAs) for use in clinical trials for new drugs. COAs...

  19. MANUAL FOR ASSESSMENT OF BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual outlines a procedure for qualitatively assessing the functions and values of bottomland hardwoods (BLH). he procedure is based on the Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET) and for this reason is referred to as WET-BLH. etland functions are the physical, chemical, and bio...

  20. Assessment of Functional Status and Quality of Life in Claudication

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Casserly, Ivan P.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Ho, P. Michael; Hiatt, William R.; Nehler, Mark R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Treadmill walking is commonly used to evaluate walking impairment and efficacy of treatment for intermittent claudication (IC) in clinical and research settings. Although this is an important measure, it does not provide information about how patients perceive the effects of their treatments on more global measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods PubMed/Medline was searched to find publications about the most commonly used questionnaires to assess functional status and/or general and disease-specific HRQOL in patients with PAD who experience IC. Inclusion criteria for questionnaires were based on existence of a body of literature in symptomatic PAD. Results Six general questionnaires and 7 disease-specific questionnaires are included with details about the number of domains covered and how each tool is scored. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 item questionnaire and Walking Impairment Questionnaire are currently the most used general and disease-specific questionnaires at baseline and following treatment for IC, respectively. Conclusions The use of tools which assess functional status and HRQOL has importance in both the clinical and research areas to assess treatment efficacy from the patient perspective. Therefore, assessing HRQOL in addition to treadmill-measured walking ability provides insight as to effects of treatments on patient outcomes and may help guide therapy. PMID:21334172

  1. Effects of Balance Control Training on Functional Outcomes in Subacute Hemiparetic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jin Seok; Lee, Yang-Soo; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Min, Yu-Sun; Kang, Min-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of balance control training using a newly developed balance control trainer (BalPro) on the balance and gait of patients with subacute hemiparetic stroke. Methods Forty-three subacute stroke patients were assigned to either a balance control training (BCT) group or a control group. The BCT group (n=23) was trained with BalPro for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks, and received one daily session of conventional physical therapy. The control group (n=20) received two sessions of conventional physical therapy every day for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was assessment with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Secondary outcomes were Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), the 6-minute walking test (6mWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG), the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), and the manual muscle test (MMT) of the knee extensor. All outcome measures were evaluated before and after 2 weeks of training in both groups. Results There were statistically significant improvements in all parameters except MMT and FAC after 2 weeks of treatment in both groups. After training, the BCT group showed greater improvements in the BBS and the 6mWT than did the control group. Conclusion Balance control training using BalPro could be a useful treatment for improving balance and gait in subacute hemiparetic stroke patients. PMID:26798615

  2. Budgeting Attitudes in Smaller Universities: A Function of the Environment, Environmental Outcomes, and Personal Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Bernadette; Tarnopolsky, Debra

    1990-01-01

    A survey of academic and administrative staff involved in budgeting in four small-to-medium Ontario universities gathered information on budgeting attitudes as they relate to content, context, process, environmental outcomes, and personal factors. Differences between administrators and faculty were also investigated. (MSE)

  3. An outcomes evaluation of an emergency department early pregnancy assessment service and early pregnancy assessment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Kim; Crilly, Julia; May, Chris; Bates, Kym; Saxena, Rakhee

    2014-01-01

    Background Complications in early pregnancy, such as threatened or actual miscarriage is a common occurrence resulting in many women presenting to the emergency department (ED). Early pregnancy service delivery models described in the literature vary in terms of approach, setting and outcomes. Our objective was to determine outcomes of women who presented to an Australian regional ED with diagnoses consistent with early pregnancy complications following the implementation of an early pregnancy assessment service (EPAS) and early pregnancy assessment protocol (EPAP) in July 2011. Methods A descriptive, comparative (6 months before and after) study was undertaken. Data were extracted from the hospital ED information system and medical healthcare records. Outcome measures included: time to see a clinician, ED length of stay, admission rate, re-presentation rate, hospital admission and types of pathology tests ordered. Results Over the 12 -month period, 584 ED presentations were made to the ED with complications of early pregnancy (268 PRE and 316 POST EPAS–EPAP). Outcomes that improved statistically and clinically following implementation included: time to see a clinician (decreased by 6 min from 35 to 29 min), admission rate (decreased 6% from 14.5% to 8.5%), increase in β-human chorionic gonadotrophin ordering by 10% (up to 80% POST), increase in ultrasound (USS) performed by 10% (up to 73% POST) and increase in pain score documentation by 23% (up to 36% POST). Conclusions The results indicate that patient and service delivery improvements can be achieved following the implementation of targeted service delivery models such as EPAS and EPAP in the ED. PMID:24136123

  4. Critical Assessment of Function Annotation Meeting, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Iddo

    2015-01-21

    The Critical Assessment of Function Annotation meeting was held July 14-15, 2011 at the Austria Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. There were 73 registered delegates at the meeting. We thank the DOE for this award. It helped us organize and support a scientific meeting AFP 2011 as a special interest group (SIG) meeting associated with the ISMB 2011 conference. The conference was held in Vienna, Austria, in July 2011. The AFP SIG was held on July 15-16, 2011 (immediately preceding the conference). The meeting consisted of two components, the first being a series of talks (invited and contributed) and discussion sections dedicated to protein function research, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of computational methods utilized in functional annotation. The second component provided a large-scale assessment of computational methods through participation in the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA).

  5. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and functional outcomes in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to consider key evidence that treatment of vitamin D insufficiency has measurable clinical benefits for the musculoskeletal system in the elderly. The outcomes considered are increased bone mass, decreased rates of bone loss, improved muscle performance, reduced risk o...

  6. Reward Circuitry Function in Autism during Face Anticipation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Richey, J. Anthony; Rittenberg, Alison M.; Sabatino, Antoinette; Bodfish, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate reward circuitry responses in autism during reward anticipation and outcomes for monetary and social rewards. During monetary anticipation, participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) showed hypoactivation in right nucleus accumbens and hyperactivation in right hippocampus, whereas during monetary

  7. The importance of team functioning to natural resource planning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stern, Marc J; Predmore, S Andrew

    2012-09-15

    In its recent history, the U.S. Forest Service is among many federal land management agencies struggling with questions concerning why its planning procedures are sometimes inefficient, perform poorly in the eyes of the public, and fail to deliver outputs that advance agency mission. By examining a representative sample of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) processes conducted by the agency between 2007 and 2009, we provide new insights into what drives outcomes in these planning processes. We examined team leaders' perceptions of the following outcomes: achievement of agency goals and NEPA mandates, process efficiency, public relations, and team outcomes. The most consistently important predictors of positive outcomes were team harmony and a clearly empowered team leader. Other factors, such as perceptions of the use of best science, a clear and unambiguous purpose and need, team turnover (personnel changes during the process), extra-agency engagement, and intra-agency relations, were also important, but played a less consistent role. The findings suggest the importance of empowering team leaders and team members through enhancing elements of discretion, responsibility, clear role definition, collaborative interdisciplinary deliberation, and perceived self-efficacy. The results also suggest the importance of genuine concern and respect for participating publics and effective inter-agency coordination. PMID:22562009

  8. Anatomical and functional outcomes in contusion injuries of posterior segment

    PubMed Central

    Cuneyt Erdurman, F; Sobaci, G; Acikel, C H; Ceylan, M O; Durukan, A H; Hurmeric, V

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features, and anatomical and visual outcomes in patients with closed-globe contusion injury involving the posterior segment. Methods Retrospective review of posterior segment contusion injuries admitted to our tertiary referral center. Results In all, 115 patients (115 eyes) with complete data were reviewed. Surgery had been performed in 79 (69%) patients. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range, 234 months). Retinal detachment, in 31% of eyes, was the most frequently encountered posterior segment pathology. The presence of retinal detachment was associated with poor visual outcome (<20/100), (P<0.001). Coexisting (five patients, 4%) and postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) (two patients, 2%) was the main cause of failure in these cases. A significant positive correlation was obtained between initial and final visual acuity levels in both the medical treatment group and the surgical treatment group (P<0.05). The presenting visual acuity of <20/400 was associated with poor visual outcome (P<0.05 for both groups). Poor visual outcome in 13 patients with successful repair of retinal detachment was due to the macular lesions and the optic atrophy. Conclusion Retinal detachment was the most frequently encountered posterior segment pathology subsequent to closed-globe contusion injuries. In addition to macular scarring and optic nerve damage, development of PVR has prognostic significance in these eyes. PMID:21617696

  9. Reward Circuitry Function in Autism during Face Anticipation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Richey, J. Anthony; Rittenberg, Alison M.; Sabatino, Antoinette; Bodfish, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate reward circuitry responses in autism during reward anticipation and outcomes for monetary and social rewards. During monetary anticipation, participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) showed hypoactivation in right nucleus accumbens and hyperactivation in right hippocampus, whereas during monetary…

  10. Exploring Posttraumatic Outcomes as a Function of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakespeare-Finch, Jane; de Dassel, Therese

    2009-01-01

    There is sparse systematic examination of the potential for growth as well as distress that may occur for some adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. The presented study explored posttraumatic growth and its relationship with negative posttrauma outcomes within the specific population of survivors of childhood sexual abuse (N = 40). Results

  11. Abortion Outcome as a Function of Sex-Role Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Robin C.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between sex-role identification and abortion outcome in 120 women receiving first trimester abortions. Measured the sex-role concept dimension by self-attributions of sex-role traits and by life-style trait attributions. Results found Androgyny and Masculinity to be related to positive adjustment (BH)

  12. [Distant functional outcomes of treatment and physiotherapy of tibial eminence fractures in adults].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sebastian; Golec, Edward; Golec, Joanna; Szczygie?, Elzbieta; Ciszek, Elzbieta; Walocha, Jerzy; Mizia, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Authors of paper present distant functional outcomes of treatment and physiotherapy of tibial eminence fractures basing on clinical material covering years from 1998 to 2006, that make up 15 patients, 7 women (46.7%) and 8 men (53.3%), aged between 18 and 57 years, on average 37.5-years-old. Subject fractures ware classified basing on Meyers i McKeever criteria, however obtained outcomes basing on IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) system. Obtained outcomes persuade authors to standpoint, that inoperative treatment of fractures type I leads to good functional outcomes, operative treatment of fracture type II leads to good functional outcomes too and operative treatment of fracture type III and III+ leads to sufficient outcomes. PMID:20201332

  13. Start Making Sense: Practical Approaches to Outcomes Assessment for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabine, Julie; Cardwell, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the accountability of university libraries and assessment methods to show library effectiveness focuses on two assessment tools developed at Bowling Green State University: one program-level assessment which involved a student library skills assessment survey; and one class-level assessment which involved one-shot library instruction

  14. Older Age Does Not Affect Healing Time and Functional Outcomes After Fracture Nonunion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, David P.; Shulman, Brandon S.; Karia, Raj; Spitzer, Allison B.; Konda, Sanjit R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients are at risk of fracture nonunion, given the potential setting of osteopenia, poorer fracture biology, and comorbid medical conditions. Risk factors predicting fracture nonunion may compromise the success of fracture nonunion surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of patient age on clinical and functional outcome following long bone fracture nonunion surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data identified 288 patients (aged 18-91) who were indicated for long bone nonunion surgery. Two-hundred and seventy-two patients satisfied study inclusion criteria and analyses were performed comparing elderly patients aged ≥65 years (n = 48) with patients <65 years (n = 224) for postoperative wound complications, Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA) functional status, healing, and surgical revision. Regression analyses were performed to look for associations between age, smoking status, and history of previous nonunion surgery with healing and functional outcome. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 91.5% (249 of 272) of patients. Results: Despite demographic differences in the aged population, including a predominance of medical comorbidities (P < .01) and osteopenia (P = .02), there was no statistical differences in the healing rate of elderly patients (95.8% vs 95.1%, P = .6) or time to union (6.2 ± 4.1 months vs. 7.2 ± 6.6, P = .3). Rates of postoperative wound complications and surgical revision did not statistically differ. Elderly patients reported similar levels of function up to 12 months after surgery. Regression analyses failed to show any significant association between age and final union or time to union. There was a strong positive association between smoking and history of previous nonunion surgery with time to union. Age was associated (positively) with 12-month SMFA activity score. Conclusions: Smoking and failure of previous surgical intervention were associated with nonunion surgery outcomes. Patient’s age at the time of surgery was not associated with achieving union. Advanced age was generally not associated with poorer nonunion surgery outcomes. PMID:25360341

  15. Assessing Outcome Criteria in Rehabilitation: A Multi-Component Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch

    1988-01-01

    Reviews approaches for categorizing outcome criterion measures in the human services. Suggests a multidimensional paradigm based on conceptualizations advocated in the literature. Discusses paradigm's implications for rehabilitation practice. (Author/ABL)

  16. Dorsolateral prefrontal lobe volume and neurological soft signs as predictors of clinical social and functional outcome in schizophrenia: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Behere, Rishikesh V

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a disorder with variable outcome and the ability to predict the outcome has important clinical utility. Neurological soft signs (NSS) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volumes have been described as trait markers for schizophrenia and their relation to long-term outcome in schizophrenia has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between baseline dorsolateral prefrontal lobe (DLPFL) volume and NSS scores to clinical and functional outcome variables in a cohort of schizophrenia patients who were anti-psychotic nave at baseline. Fourteen anti-psychotic naive schizophrenia patients whose baseline magnetic resonance imaging scans, NSS scores and positive and negative signs and symptoms scale (PANSS) scores (assessed in drug nave state) were available were reevaluated after a mean follow-up period of 74.224.2 months. The clinical outcome variables measured was PANSS. The social and functional outcome was assessed comprehensively by the socio occupational functioning scale and the Strauss Carpenter outcome scale. The DLPFL, volume was measured from the baseline scans using the region of interest method. Statistical analysis was done using the paired samples t-test and the Pearson's correlation co-efficient. The results showed that smaller left DLPFL volume and greater primitive reflexes at baseline predicted greater negative symptoms and poorer functional outcome on follow-up. This study also demonstrates the clinical utility of NSS as a simple bedside tool in assessing schizophrenia patients. PMID:23825842

  17. Determinants of revision and functional outcome following unicompartmental knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, A.D.; Judge, A.; Pandit, H.; Murray, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Unicompartmental Knee Replacement (UKR) has important advantages over total knee replacement (TKR) but has a higher revision rate. Outcomes vary between centres, suggesting that risk factors for revision may be modifiable with changes to patient selection or operative technique. The objective of this study was to determine factors affecting revision, patient-reported outcome and satisfaction following UKR. Method 25,982 cases from three national databases were analysed. Multilevel multivariable regression models were used to examine the effect of patient and surgical factors on implant survival, patient-reported outcome and satisfaction at 6months and 8years following UKR. Results Of the 25,982 cases, 3862 (14.9%) had pre-operative and 6-month Oxford Knee Scores (OKS). Eight-year survival was 89.1% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 88.389.9). OKS increased from 21.9 (SD 7.6) to 37.5 (SD 9.5). Age (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.96 (95% CI 0.960.97) per year), male gender (HR 0.86 (95% CI 0.760.96)), unit size (HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.860.97) per case up to 40 cases/year) and operating surgeon grade (HR 0.78 (95% CI 0.670.91) if consultant) predicted improved implant survival. Older patients (?75 years), and those with lower deprivation levels had superior OKS and satisfaction (adjusted mean difference 0.14 (95% CI 0.090.20) points per year of age and 0.93 (95% CI 0.601.27) per quintile of deprivation). Ethnicity, anxiety and co-morbidities also affected patient-reported outcome. Conclusions This study has identified important predictors of revision and patient-reported outcome following UKR. Older patients, who are least likely to be offered UKR, may derive the greatest benefits. Improved understanding of these factors may improve the long-term outcomes of UKR. PMID:25042552

  18. Differences in Functional Outcomes for Adult Patients with Prosthodontically-Treated and -Untreated Shortened Dental Arches: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saadika; Musekiwa, Alfred; Chikte, Usuf M. E.; Omar, Ridwaan

    2014-01-01

    This review examined differences in functional outcomes and patient satisfaction when shortened dental arches are left untreated compared to their restoration to complete arch lengths with different prosthodontic interventions. Methods A protocol was developed according to the criteria for a systematic review. All relevant databases were searched to identify appropriate clinical trials regardless of language or publication status. Predetermined eligibility criteria were applied, trial quality assessed and data extracted for each study. Relevant outcomes assessed were: functioning ability, patient satisfaction and harmful effects on oral structures. Results Searches yielded 101 articles: 81 from electronic databases and 20 from reference lists of retrieved articles (PEARLing searches). Sixty-nine citations were assessed for eligibility after removing 32 duplicate records. After reading titles and abstracts, a total of 41 records were excluded and the full-texts of the remaining 28 records were read. Only 21 records were included for the SR because 7 records were excluded after reading the full-text reports. These 21 records report the outcomes of four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and one non-randomized clinical trial (CT) which were pre-specified and used for this review. No on-going studies were found and no eligible studies were excluded for failure to report the reviewers pre-specified outcomes. Outcomes were reported in the retrieved 21 articles. A narrative explanation of the pre-specified outcomes is reported for the 3 comparison groups (which were based on the different interventions used for the individual clinical trials). The shortened dental arch as a treatment option is encouraging in terms of functioning, patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. By using only high quality studies it was expected that the results would be more reliable when making conclusions and recommendations, but some of the included studies had to be downgraded due to methodological errors. PMID:24992473

  19. Functional assessment of time course microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Nueda, María José; Sebastián, Patricia; Tarazona, Sonia; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquín; Ferrer, Alberto; Conesa, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Motivation Time-course microarray experiments study the progress of gene expression along time across one or several experimental conditions. Most developed analysis methods focus on the clustering or the differential expression analysis of genes and do not integrate functional information. The assessment of the functional aspects of time-course transcriptomics data requires the use of approaches that exploit the activation dynamics of the functional categories to where genes are annotated. Methods We present three novel methodologies for the functional assessment of time-course microarray data. i) maSigFun derives from the maSigPro method, a regression-based strategy to model time-dependent expression patterns and identify genes with differences across series. maSigFun fits a regression model for groups of genes labeled by a functional class and selects those categories which have a significant model. ii) PCA-maSigFun fits a PCA model of each functional class-defined expression matrix to extract orthogonal patterns of expression change, which are then assessed for their fit to a time-dependent regression model. iii) ASCA-functional uses the ASCA model to rank genes according to their correlation to principal time expression patterns and assess functional enrichment on a GSA fashion. We used simulated and experimental datasets to study these novel approaches. Results were compared to alternative methodologies. Results Synthetic and experimental data showed that the different methods are able to capture different aspects of the relationship between genes, functions and co-expression that are biologically meaningful. The methods should not be considered as competitive but they provide different insights into the molecular and functional dynamic events taking place within the biological system under study. PMID:19534758

  20. Neurobehavioral assessment of outcome following traumatic brain injury in rats: an evaluation of selected measures.

    PubMed

    Hamm, R J

    2001-11-01

    Neurobehavioral assessment of outcome has played an integral part in traumatic brain injury (TBI) research. Given the fundamental role of neurobehavioral measurement, it is critical that the tasks used are of the highest psychometric quality. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate several, commonly used neurobehavioral measures along the dimensions of reliability, sensitivity, and validity. Using both the midline and lateral fluid-percussion injury models, nine neurobehavioral measures were evaluated that assessed three different neurobehavioral constructs. Reflex suppression was measured by the duration of the suppression of the pinna, corneal, and righting reflexes. Vestibulomotor function was assessed with the beam-balance, beam-walking, and rotorod tasks. Cognitive function was evaluated by three measures of Morris water maze performance (goal latency, path length, cumulative distance). The evaluation of the reliability of the nine neurobehavioral measures found that all had acceptably high reliability coefficients (0.79 or higher). The analysis of each measure's sensitivity to injury found that all measures were capable of detecting injury-induced impairments. However, there were some substantial differences in the sensitivity of the measures of vestibulomotor and maze performance: the rotorod was the most sensitive vestibulomotor measure and goal latency and path length were equally sensitive measures of maze performance. In the assessment of validity, the results of a factor analysis supported the convergent and discriminative validity of the measures. And in cases in which the preclinical and clinical research have assessed the same construct, the animal model neurobehavioral measures had predictive (or external) validity. Thus, according to the psychometric standards by which measurement instruments are evaluated, the results indicated that these measures provide a valid assessment of neurobehavioral function after fluid percussion TBI. PMID:11721739

  1. Assessment of Cognitive Functions in Methadone Maintenance Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Keshvari, Zeinab; Sabahi, Abdolreza; Mottaghian, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance has received little scientific attention regarding neurocognitive effects. This study is aimed to assess the neuropsychological performance of methadone maintenance patients (MMP) compared to those healthy controls. Methods Thirty-five MMP and 35 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, education and employment status, examined on a battery of tests aimed at assessing verbal fluency, executive functions, verbal memory, and working memory, using controlled oral word association test (COWAT), trial making test (TMT) Part A and B, Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), and backward digit span. Findings MMP performed significantly poorly than controls in cognitive domains of verbal fluency, executive function, and verbal memory. MMP did not exhibit impairment in working memory, and TMT Part A compared to controls. Conclusion These results suggest that methadone consumption induces significant cognitive impairment that could compromise drug-treatment outcomes in MMP. PMID:26885347

  2. Intraspinal MDL28170 Microinjection Improves Functional and Pathological Outcome following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen-Guang; Joshi, Aashish

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Although calpain (calcium-activated cysteine protease) inhibition represents a rational therapeutic target for spinal cord injury (SCI), few studies have reported improved functional outcomes with post-injury administration of calpain inhibitors. This reflects the weak potency and limited aqueous solubility of current calpain inhibitors. Previously, we demonstrated that intraspinal microinjection of the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 resulted in greater inhibition of calpain activity as compared to systemic administration of the same compound. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of intraspinal MDL28170 microinjection to spare spinal tissue and locomotor dysfunction following SCI. Contusion SCI was produced in female Long-Evans rats using the Infinite Horizon impactor at the 200-kdyn force setting. Open-field locomotion was evaluated until 6 weeks post-injury. Histological assessment of tissue sparing was performed at 6 weeks after SCI. The results demonstrate that MDL28170, administered with a single post-injury intraspinal microinjection (50 nmoles), significantly improves both locomotor function and pathological outcome measures following SCI. PMID:18627259

  3. Diode laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity: structural and functional outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, C S; Fleck, B W; Wright, E; Anderson, C; Laing, I

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The anatomical and functional outcome of 13 babies with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) treated with binocular indirect ophthalmoscope diode laser photocoagulation was assessed. METHODS--Thirteen babies (25 eyes) at median postmenstrual age (PMA) 25.5 weeks and median birth weight 725 g were treated with binocular indirect ophthalmoscope (BIO) diode laser photocoagulation when threshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) was detected at median PMA 35 weeks. Retinopathy was more severe in the nasal retina in 15 eyes. The median severity of retinopathy was 6 clock hours grade 3 disease. All babies were treated under general anaesthetic with no significant ocular or systemic complications during treatment. The median number of burns was 1200. RESULTS--Resolution of active retinopathy occurred 1-2 weeks following treatment in all but one baby. All eyes had favourable anatomical and functional outcome as defined by the Cryo-ROP study group at a median age of 19.5 months of follow up. CONCLUSION--BIO diode laser treatment is as effective as cryotherapy with less morbidity. PMID:7662625

  4. Brain immune cell composition and functional outcome after cerebral ischemia: comparison of two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Whittle, Stephanie C.; Lee, Seyoung; Chu, Hannah X.; Zhang, Shenpeng R.; Wei, Zihui; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Vinh, Anthony; Drummond, Grant R.; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to secondary brain injury following cerebral ischemia. The C57Bl/6 mouse strain is known to exhibit a T helper 1-prone, pro-inflammatory type response to injury, whereas the FVB strain is relatively T helper 2-prone, or anti-inflammatory, in its immune response. We tested whether stroke outcome is more severe in C57Bl/6 than FVB mice. Male mice of each strain underwent sham surgery or 1 h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Despite no difference in infarct size, C57Bl/6 mice displayed markedly greater functional deficits than FVB mice after stroke, as assessed by neurological scoring and hanging wire test. Total numbers of CD45+ leukocytes tended to be larger in the brains of C57Bl/6 than FVB mice after stroke, but there were marked differences in leukocyte composition between the two mouse strains. The inflammatory response in C57Bl/6 mice primarily involved T and B lymphocytes, whereas neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages were more prominent in FVB mice. Our data are consistent with the concept that functional outcome after stroke is dependent on the immune cell composition which develops following ischemic brain injury. PMID:25477780

  5. Outcome of humeral shaft fractures treated by functional cast brace

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Jitendra Nath; Biswas, Prahas; Roy, Avik; Hazra, Sunit; Mahato, Somnath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional brace application for isolated humeral shaft fracture persistently yields good results. Nonunion though uncommon involves usually the proximal third shaft fractures. Instead of polyethylene bivalve functional brace four plaster sleeves wrapped and molded with little more proximal extension expected to prevent nonunion of proximal third fractures. Periodic compressibility of the cast is likely to yield a better result. This can be applied on the 1st day of the presentation as an outpatient basis. Comprehensive objective scoring system befitting for fracture humeral shaft is a need. Materials and Methods: Sixty six (male = 40, female = 26) unilateral humeral shaft fractures of mean age 34.4 years (range 1175 years) involving 38 left and 28 right hands were included in this study during April 2008 to December 2012. Fractures involved proximal (n = 18), mid (n = 35) and distal (n = 13) of humerus. Transverse, oblique, comminuted and spiral orientations in 18, 35 and 13 patients respectively. One had segmental fracture and three had a pathological fracture with cystic bone lesion. Mechanisms of injuries as identified in this study were road traffic accidents 57.6% (n = 38), fall 37.9% (n = 25). 12.1% (n = 8) had radial nerve palsy 7.6% (n = 5) had Type I open fracture. Four plaster strips of 12 layers and 57.5 cm broad depending on the girth of arm were prepared. Arm was then wrapped with single layer compressed cotton. Lateral and medial strips were applied and then after molding anterior and posterior strips were applied in such a way that permits full elbow range of motion and partial abduction of the shoulder. Care was taken to prevent adherence of one strip with other except in the proximal end. Limb was then put in loose collar and cuff sling intermittently allowing active motion of the elbow ROM and pendular movement of the shoulder. Weekly tightening of the cast by fresh layers of bandage over the existing cast brace continued. Results: The results were assessed using 100 point scoring system where union allotted 30 points and 60 points allotted for angulations (10), elbow motion (10), shoulder abduction (10), shortening (5), rotation (5), absence of infection (10), absence of nerve palsy during treatment (10). Remaining 10 points were allotted for five items with two points each. They were the absence of skin sore, absence of vascular problem, absence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), recovery of paralyzed nerve during injury and recovery of paralyzed nerve during treatment. Results were considered excellent with 90 and above, good with 8089, fair with 7079 and poor below 70 point. Results at 6 months were excellent in 43.94% (n = 29), good in 42.42% (n = 28), fair in 9.1% (n = 6), poor in 4.55% (n = 3). Union took place in 98.48% (n = 65) with an average of 10.3 weeks (range 616 weeks). 87.5% (n = 7) paralyzed radial nerve recovered. All wounds healed. Four patients had transient skin problem. One patient with mid shaft fracture had nonunion due to the muscle interposition. Conclusion: Modified functional cast brace is one of the options in treatment for humeral shaft fractures as it can be applied on the 1st day of the presentation in most of the situations. Simple objective scoring system was useful particularly in uneducated patients. PMID:26229161

  6. Assessment of brown adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Sam; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss practical considerations for the assessment of brown adipose tissue in rodent models, focusing on mice. The central aim of the review is to provide a critical appraisal of the utility of specialized techniques for assessing brown adipose tissue function in vivo. We cover several of the most common specialized methods for analysing brown adipose tissue function in vivo, including assessment of maximal thermogenic capacity by indirect calorimetry and the measurement of sympathetic tone to brown adipose tissue. While these techniques are powerful, they are not readily available to all laboratories; therefore we also cover several simple measurements that, particularly in combination, can be used to determine if a mouse model is likely to have alterations in brown adipose tissue function. Such techniques include: pair feeding, analysis of brown adipose tissue lipid content and mRNA and protein markers of brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:23760815

  7. Neurocognitive and Social Cognitive Approaches for Improving Functional Outcome in Early Psychosis: Theoretical Considerations and Current State of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomeusz, Cali F.; Allott, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Improving functional outcome, in addition to alleviating psychotic symptoms, is now a major treatment objective in schizophrenia research. Given the large body of evidence suggesting pharmacological treatments generally have minimal effects on indices of functioning, research has turned to psychosocial rehabilitation programs. Among these, neurocognitive and social cognitive interventions are at the forefront of this field and are argued to target core deficits inherent to the schizophrenia illness. However, to date, research trials have primarily focused on chronic schizophrenia populations, neglecting the early psychosis groups who are often as severely impaired in social and occupational functioning. This theoretical paper will outline the rationale for investigating adjunctive cognitive-based interventions in the early phases of psychotic illness, critically examine the current approach strategies used in these interventions, and assess the evidence supporting certain training programs for improving functional outcome in early psychosis. Potential pathways for future research will be discussed. PMID:22966447

  8. Handgrip Strength is an Independent Predictor of Functional Outcome in Hip-Fracture Women

    PubMed Central

    Di Monaco, Marco; Castiglioni, Carlotta; De Toma, Elena; Gardin, Luisa; Giordano, Silvia; Tappero, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of handgrip strength in predicting the functional outcome after hip fracture in women. We prospectively investigated white women (N = 193 of 207) who were consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation hospital after a hip fracture. We measured handgrip strength with a Jamar dynamometer (Lafayette Instrument Co, Lafayette, IN), on admission to rehabilitation. Ability to function in activities of daily living was assessed by the Barthel index both on discharge from rehabilitation and at a 6-month follow-up. We found significant correlations between handgrip strength measured before rehabilitation and Barthel index scores assessed both on discharge from rehabilitation (ρ = 0.52, P < 0.001) and after 6 months (ρ = 0.49, P < 0.001). Significant associations between handgrip strength and Barthel index scores persisted after adjustment for age, comorbidities, pressure ulcers, medications in use, concomitant infections, body mass index, hip-fracture type, and Barthel index scores assessed both preinjury and on admission to rehabilitation (P = 0.001). Further adjustments for both Barthel index scores and Timed Up-and-Go test assessed at rehabilitation ending did not erase the significant association between handgrip strength and the Barthel index scores at the 6-month evaluation (P = 0.007). To define successful rehabilitation, we categorized the Barthel index scores as either high (85 or higher) or low (<85). The adjusted odds ratio for 1 SD increase in grip strength was 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.84, P = 0.032) for having a high Barthel index score at the end of inpatient rehabilitation and 2.24 (95% CI 1.06–5.18) for having a high Barthel index score at the 6-month follow-up. Handgrip strength assessed before rehabilitation independently predicted the functional outcome both after inpatient rehabilitation and at a 6-month follow-up in hip-fracture women. PMID:25674760

  9. Significance of adverse outcome pathways in biomarker-based environmental risk assessment in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wuk; Won, Eun-Ji; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-09-01

    In environmental risk assessments (ERA), biomarkers have been widely used as an early warning signal of environmental contamination. However, biomarker responses have limitation due to its low relevance to adverse outcomes (e.g., fluctuations in community structure, decreases in population size, and other similar ecobiologically relevant indicators of community structure and function). To mitigate these limitations, the concept of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) was developed. An AOP is an analytical, sequentially progressive pathway that links a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome. Recently, AOPs have been recognized as a potential informational tool by which the implications of molecular biomarkers in ERA can be better understood. To demonstrate the utility of AOPs in biomarker-based ERA, here we discuss a series of three different biological repercussions caused by exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and selenium (Se). Using mainly aquatic invertebrates and selected vertebrates as model species, we focus on the development of the AOP concept. Aquatic organisms are suitable bioindicator species whose entire lifespans can be observed over a short period; moreover, these species can be studied on the molecular and population levels. Also, interspecific differences between aquatic organisms are important to consider in an AOP framework, since these differences are an integral part of the natural environment. The development of an environmental pollutant-mediated AOP may enable a better understanding of the effects of environmental pollutants in different scenarios in the diverse community of an ecosystem. PMID:26354700

  10. A practical assessment of magnetic resonance diffusion-perfusion mismatch in acute stroke: observer variation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Kane, I; Hand, P J; Rivers, C; Armitage, P; Bastin, M E; Lindley, R; Dennis, M; Wardlaw, J M

    2009-11-01

    MR diffusion/perfusion mismatch may help identify patients for acute stroke treatment, but mixed results from clinical trials suggest that further evaluation of the mismatch concept is required. To work effectively, mismatch should predict prognosis on arrival at hospital. We assessed mismatch duration and associations with functional outcome in acute stroke. We recruited consecutive patients with acute stroke, recorded baseline clinical variables, performed MR diffusion and perfusion imaging and assessed 3-month functional outcome. We assessed practicalities, agreement between mismatch on mean transit time (MTT) or cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps, visually and with lesion volume, and the relationship of each to functional outcome. Of 82 patients starting imaging, 14 (17%) failed perfusion imaging. Overall, 42% had mismatch (56% at <6 h; 41% at 12-24 h; 23% at 24-48 h). Agreement for mismatch by visual versus volume assessment was fair using MTT (kappa 0.59, 95% CI 0.34-0.84) but poor using CBF (kappa 0.24, 95% CI 0.01-0.48). Mismatch by either definition was not associated with functional outcome, even when the analysis was restricted to just those with mismatch. Visual estimation is a reasonable proxy for mismatch volume on MTT but not CBF. Perfusion is more difficult for acute stroke patients than diffusion imaging. Mismatch is present in many patients beyond 12 h after stroke. Mismatch alone does not distinguish patients with good and poor prognosis; both can do well or poorly. Other factors, e.g. reperfusion, may influence outcome more strongly, even in patients without mismatch. PMID:19536582

  11. Decellularized Nerves for Upper Limb Nerve Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Adikrishna, Arnold; Jeon, In-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Background?This is a systematic review for evaluating the evidence for functional outcomes after decellularized nerve use in clinical setting. Decellularized nerves are allografts whose antigenic components have been removed, leaving only a scaffold that promotes the full regeneration of axons. Methods?Literature research was performed using the PubMed/MEDLINE database for English language studies with the keywords "decellularized nerve" and "processed nerve allograft." Inclusion criteria were prospective and retrospective case reviews in clinical settings. Exclusion criteria were case reports and case series. Results?We retrieved six level VIII studies and one level VI study (classified according to the Jovell and Navarro-Rubio scale) with a total of 131 reconstructions. The basic data ranges of the studies were as follows: patient age, 18 to 86 years; duration between initial injury and nerve reconstruction procedure, 8 hours to 4 years; and follow-up period, 40 days to 2 years. The maximum lengths of the nerve gap for chemically washed decellularized nerves and cryopreserved decellularized nerves were 50 and 100?mm, respectively. Quantitatively, the functional outcome ranges were as follows: static two-point discrimination, 3 to 5?mm; and moving two-point discrimination, 2 to 15 mm. For motor assessment, all patients had a?>?M3 Medical Research Council score. It is also important to notice that a large variability occurs in almost every factor in the reviewed studies. Conclusion?Our study is the first to summarize the clinical results of decellularized nerves. Decellularized nerves have been used to bridge nerve gaps ranging from 5 to 100?mm with associated satisfactory outcomes in static and moving two-point discriminations. PMID:26280520

  12. Comparison of measures to assess outcomes in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Murray, D; Carr, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the performance of a disease specific and a general health questionnaire in assessing changes resulting from total hip replacement. DESIGN--Two stage prospective study of patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery involving an assessment at a clinic before and six months after surgery. 60(32%) patients were followed up by post. SETTING--Outpatient departments at a specialist orthopaedic hospital and peripheral clinics within Oxfordshire. PATIENTS--188 patients admitted for unilateral total hip replacement between February and mid-August 1994. MAIN MEASURES--Patients' self assessed scores with the 12 item Oxford hip score and SF-36 general health questionnaire together with surgeons' assessment with Charnley hip score obtained before and again at six months after surgery. RESULTS--186 patients were followed up six months after total hip replacement; a subsample (n=60) by post. Of the 60 postal patients, 59(98.3%) fully completed the Oxford hip score compared with 44(73.3%) who fully completed the SF-36. For the followup sample as a whole, post operative changes in scores produced a large effect size of 2.75 on the Oxford hip score, compared with -1.89 physical function (SF-36), -2.13 pain (SF-36). With the exception of physical function and role (physical), postoperative SF-36 scores were shown to be similar to or better than those found by two population surveys on patients of comparable age. The responsiveness of a disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and relevant sections of a general questionnaire, SF-36, were found to be similar as assessed by three different criteria. CONCLUSIONS--A disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and a general state of health questionnaire, SF-36, performed similarly in assessing outcomes of total hip replacement except that the disease specific questionnaire resulted in a higher completion rate and greater responsiveness in some sections. On the other hand the general health questionnaire drew attention to broader problems of physical function not considered by the Oxford hip score. The health questionnaires examined here offer a valid and practical means of monitoring outcomes of hip replacement surgery. PMID:10158596

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Severity, Psychiatric Symptoms, and Functional Outcomes in Perinatally Infected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Chernoff, Miriam; Williams, Paige; Hodge, Janice; Heston, Jerry; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate associations between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease severity and psychiatric and functional outcomes in youth with perinatal HIV infection. Design Cross-sectional analysis of entry data from an observational, prospective 2-year study. Logistic and linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used. Setting Twenty-nine sites of the International Maternal Pediatrics Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group study in the United States and Puerto Rico. Participants Youth aged 6 to 17 years who had HIV infection (N=319). Main Exposures Antiretroviral treatment and perinatal HIV infection. Main Outcome Measures Youth and primary care-givers were administered an extensive battery of measures that assessed psychiatric symptoms; cognitive, social, and academic functioning; and quality of life. Results Characteristics of HIV were a current CD4 percentage of 25% or greater (74% of participants), HIV RNA levels of less than 400 copies/mL (59%), and current highly active antiretroviral therapy (81%). Analyses indicated associations of past and current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention class C designation with less severe attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder inattention symptoms, older age at nadir CD4 percentage and lower CD4 percentage at study entry with more severe conduct disorder symptoms, higher RNA viral load at study entry with more severe depression symptoms, and lower CD4 percentage at study entry with less severe symptoms of depression. There was little evidence of an association between specific antiretroviral therapy and severity of psychiatric symptoms. A lower nadir CD4 percentage was associated with lower quality of life, worse Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Coding Recall scores, and worse social functioning. Conclusion Human immunodeficiency virus illness severity markers are associated with the severity of some psychiatric symptoms and, notably, with cognitive, academic, and social functioning, all of which warrant additional study. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00100542 PMID:22312169

  14. Total hip arthroplasty in steroid-induced osteonecrosis: early functional and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wael A.; Garbuz, Donald S.; Masri, Bassam A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) associated with corticosteroid use is uncertain, and the mechanisms of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes, complications and satisfaction with THA among patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Methods We retrospectively assessed functional outcome at a minimum 1-year follow-up using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC); Oxford Hip Score; Short Form (SF)-12; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Activity; and patient satisfaction scores. Results We included 31 patients (35 hips). The average follow-up was 20 (range 12–55) months, and the average age at surgery was 47 (range 19–78) years. At follow-up, patients showed significant improvement in all 4 components of the WOMAC (means: function 84, stiffness 75, pain 86, global 84), Oxford-12 (mean 83) and SF-12 (means: mental 40 and physical 48) scores. However, there was no significant improvement in the UCLA Activity scores. Mean patient satisfaction scores were good for pain relief (86), function (80), recreation (77.5) and overall results of surgery (86). Radiographic review at follow-up showed that all components were well fixed with no evidence of loosening. The complication rate was high (17%), with 6 complications in 5 patients (6 of 35 hips). Four patients (4 of 35 hips; 11%) required reoperations. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty in patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head is successful in reducing pain and improving function; however, the rate of complications and reoperation is high. PMID:22992403

  15. Assessment of Outcome-Focused Library Instruction in Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Timothy K.; Carter, Elizabeth W.

    1997-01-01

    A sample of 49 non-psychology majors taking a course integrating library research skills with social science research showed increases in skill level, efficiency, and positive attitudes toward the library after a semester of outcome-focused instruction. The results suggest that co-development between course and library faculty can be an effective

  16. What Do They Measure? Comparing Three Learning Outcomes Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steedle, Jeffrey; Kugelmass, Heather; Nemeth, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Many postsecondary institutions currently administer standardized tests of general college outcomes; more than a quarter of Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) member institutions do so. Using standardized tests for accountability purposes has been contentious mainly because these tests do not measure every important outcome…

  17. Assessment of Student Outcomes Using a Theoretical Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levins, Lesley

    1997-01-01

    Examines the scientific concept of evaporation. Attempts to show how students develop their understanding through the levels of the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) taxonomy. Shows how designing learning experiences to suit the learners' developmental stages in understanding a concept is paramount to the overall growth of the

  18. Assessing Medication Effects in the MTA Study Using Neuropsychological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jeffery N.; Conners, C. Keith; Hervey, Aaron S.; Tonev, Simon T.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Abikoff, Howard B.; Elliott, Glen; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Pelham, William E.; Severe, Joanne B.; Swanson, James M.; Wells, Karen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background: While studies have increasingly investigated deficits in reaction time (RT) and RT variability in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), few studies have examined the effects of stimulant medication on these important neuropsychological outcome measures. Methods: 316 children who participated in the Multimodal

  19. Assessing Individual Support Needs to Enhance Personal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Jos; Claes, Claudia; Vandevelde, Stijn; Van Hove, Geert; Schalock, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Education and human service organizations providing services to people with intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities are increasingly being impacted by the supports paradigm, the quality of life concept, and the evaluation of personal outcomes. In this article the authors discuss the relationship among these three areas,

  20. Functional outcome following an ankle or subtalar arthrodesis in adults.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Adnan A; Loveday, David T

    2014-06-01

    Arthrodesis surgery aims to give pain relief by abolishing the movement of the joint concerned. Few studies describe the outcome as appreciated by the patient. This was the major concern of the authors, when they set up this retrospective study about the outcome after ankle fusion or subtalar fusion. Inclusion criteria were: pre-existing idiopathic and posttraumatic osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain unresponsive to conservative treatment, clinically and radiologically fused with an open approach between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were: preexisting joint infection, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, nonunion, age below 18 years, decease, and arthroscopic fusion. Fifteen ankle fusions and 18 subtalar fusions fulfilled the criteria. The mean age of the patients was 77 and 69 years, respectively; the average follow-up period was 3 and 4 years. A telephone questionnaire showed that the average patients' satisfaction was 7.86/10 in the ankle group and 7.94/10 in the subtalar group. All patients driving a car prior to surgery were able to do so afterwards. Forty percent walked unaided and without problems (excellent). Fifty-one percent were able to mobilise, but their walking distance was limited and a stick was required (good or fair). Nine percent were unable to mobilise out of their homes (poor), however it was generalized osteoarthritis which limited their mobility. Forty-five percent were involved in sports including judo, swimming, cycling, jogging, gardening, bowling, golf, and boules. PMID:25090803

  1. Does Computer-Aided Formative Assessment Improve Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-01-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final

  2. Individual prediction of chronic motor outcome in the acute post-stroke stage: Behavioral parameters versus functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Rehme, Anne K; Volz, Lukas J; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Several neurobiological factors have been found to correlate with functional recovery after brain lesions. However, predicting the individual potential of recovery remains difficult. Here we used multivariate support vector machine (SVM) classification to explore the prognostic value of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to predict individual motor outcome at 4-6 months post-stroke. To this end, 21 first-ever stroke patients with hand motor deficits participated in an fMRI hand motor task in the first few days post-stroke. Motor impairment was quantified assessing grip force and the Action Research Arm Test. Linear SVM classifiers were trained to predict good versus poor motor outcome of unseen new patients. We found that fMRI activity acquired in the first week post-stroke correctly predicted the outcome for 86% of all patients. In contrast, the concurrent assessment of motor function provided 76% accuracy with low sensitivity (<60%). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with initially moderate impairment and high outcome variability could not be predicted based on motor tests. In contrast, fMRI provided 87.5% prediction accuracy in these patients. Classifications were driven by activity in ipsilesional motor areas and contralesional cerebellum. The accuracy of subacute fMRI data (two weeks post-stroke), age, time post-stroke, lesion volume, and location were at 50%-chance-level. In conclusion, multivariate decoding of fMRI data with SVM early after stroke enables a robust prediction of motor recovery. The potential for recovery is influenced by the initial dysfunction of the active motor system, particularly in those patients whose outcome cannot be predicted by behavioral tests. PMID:26381168

  3. A Multilevel Assessment of Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    A multilevel approach was proposed for the assessment of differential item functioning and compared with the traditional logistic regression approach. Data from the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination for 2,300 freshman osteopathic medical students were analyzed. The multilevel approach used three-level hierarchical generalized

  4. Functional Assessment: Old Wine in New Bottles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Ruth A.; Ehrhardt, Kristal E.; Poling, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Traces functional assessment (FA) in school settings to early contributions by B. F. Skinner. FA plays an important role in behavior analysis, and the value of this approach in dealing with behavior problems in many settings has long been evident. Although interest in FA in school settings has only recently become widespread, FA in education has a…

  5. Functional Assessment: Old Wine in New Bottles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Ruth A.; Ehrhardt, Kristal E.; Poling, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Traces functional assessment (FA) in school settings to early contributions by B. F. Skinner. FA plays an important role in behavior analysis, and the value of this approach in dealing with behavior problems in many settings has long been evident. Although interest in FA in school settings has only recently become widespread, FA in education has a

  6. Long-Term Functional Outcomes after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Matthew J.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Albertsen, Peter C.; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Potosky, Arnold L.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Van Horn, R. Lawrence; Penson, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this analysis was to compare long-term urinary, bowel, and sexual function after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiation therapy. Methods The Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study (PCOS) enrolled 3533 men in whom prostate cancer had been diagnosed in 1994 or 1995. The current cohort comprised 1655 men in whom localized prostate cancer had been diagnosed between the ages of 55 and 74 years and who had undergone either surgery (1164 men) or radiotherapy (491 men). Functional status was assessed at baseline and at 2, 5, and 15 years after diagnosis. We used multivariable propensity scoring to compare functional outcomes according to treatment. Results Patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have urinary incontinence than were those undergoing radiotherapy at 2 years (odds ratio, 6.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 20.29) and 5 years (odds ratio, 5.10; 95% CI, 2.29 to 11.36). However, no significant between-group difference in the odds of urinary incontinence was noted at 15 years. Similarly, although patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have erectile dysfunction at 2 years (odds ratio, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.93 to 6.17) and 5 years (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.05 to 3.63), no significant between-group difference was noted at 15 years. Patients undergoing prostatectomy were less likely to have bowel urgency at 2 years (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.68) and 5 years (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.84), again with no significant between-group difference in the odds of bowel urgency at 15 years. Conclusions At 15 years, no significant relative differences in disease-specific functional outcomes were observed among men undergoing prostatectomy or radiotherapy. Nonetheless, men treated for localized prostate cancer commonly had declines in all functional domains during 15 years of follow-up. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute.) PMID:23363497

  7. Electrical impedance myography to assess outcome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rutkove, Seward B.; Zhang, Hui; Schoenfeld, David A.; Raynor, Elizabeth M.; Shefner, Jeremy M.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Chin, Anne B.; Aaron, Ronald; Shiffman, Carl A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Standard outcome measures used for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinical trials, including the ALS Functional Rating Scale-revised (ALSFRS-R), maximal voluntary isometric contraction testing (MVICT), and manual muscle testing (MMT) are limited in their ability to detect subtle disease progression. Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a new non-invasive technique that provides quantitative data on muscle health by measuring localized tissue impedance. This study investigates whether EIM could provide a new outcome measure for use in ALS clinical trials work. Methods Fifteen ALS patients underwent repeated EIM measurements of one or more muscles over a period of up to 18 months and the primary outcome variable, θz-max, measured. The θz-max megascore was then calculated using the same approach as has been applied in the past for MVICT. This and the MMT data were then used to assess each measure’s statistical power to detect a given effect on disease progression in a hypothetical planned clinical therapeutic trial. Results θz-max showed a mean decline of about 21% for the test period, averaged across all patients and all tested muscles. The θz-max megascore had a power of 73% to detect a 10% treatment effect in our planned hypothetical trial, as compared to a 28% power for MMT. These results also compared favorably to historical data for ALSFRS-R and MVICT arm megascore from the trial of celecoxib in ALS, where both measures had only a 23% power to detect the same 10% treatment effect. Conclusions The θz-max megascore may provide a powerful new outcome measure for ALS clinical trials. Significance The application of EIM to future ALS trials may allow for smaller, faster studies with an improved ability to detect subtle treatment effects. PMID:17897874

  8. Addressing the Challenges of Obtaining Functional Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury Research: Missing Data Patterns, Timing of Follow-Up, and Three Prognostic Models

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Laurie J.; Devlin, Sean M.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Sheehan, Kellie; Minei, Joseph P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Rizoli, Sandro; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; van Heest, Rardi; Newgard, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and debilitating. Randomized trials of interventions for TBI ideally assess effectiveness by using long-term functional neurological outcomes, but such outcomes are difficult to obtain and costly. If there is little change between functional status at hospital discharge versus 6 months, then shorter-term outcomes may be adequate for use in future clinical trials. Using data from a previously published multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled TBI clinical trial, we evaluated patterns of missing outcome data, changes in functional status between hospital discharge and 6 months, and three prognostic models to predict long-term functional outcome from covariates available at hospital discharge (functional measures, demographics, and injury characteristics). The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Hypertonic Saline trial enrolled 1282 TBI patients, obtaining the primary outcome of 6-month Glasgow Outcome Score Extended (GOSE) for 85% of patients, but missing the primary outcome for the remaining 15%. Patients with missing outcomes had less-severe injuries, higher neurological function at discharge (GOSE), and shorter hospital stays than patients whose GOSE was obtained. Of 1066 (83%) patients whose GOSE was obtained both at hospital discharge and at 6-months, 71% of patients had the same dichotomized functional status (severe disability/death vs. moderate/no disability) after 6 months as at discharge, 28% had an improved functional status, and 1% had worsened. Performance was excellent (C-statistic between 0.88 and 0.91) for all three prognostic models and calibration adequate for two models (p values, 0.22 and 0.85). Our results suggest that multiple imputation of the standard 6-month GOSE may be reasonable in TBI research when the primary outcome cannot be obtained through other means. PMID:24552494

  9. Reporting of IMMPACT-recommended core outcome domains among trials assessing opioids for chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sohail M; Maqbool, Amna; Sivananthan, Laxsanaa; Lopes, Luciane C; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Kamaleldin, Mostafa; Hsu, Sandy; Riva, John J; Vandvik, Per Olav; Tsoi, Ludwig; Lam, Tommy; Ebrahim, Shanil; Johnston, Bradley C; Olivieri, Lori; Montoya, Luis; Kunz, Regina; Scheidecker, Anne; Buckley, D Norman; Sessler, Daniel I; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2015-09-01

    The Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) has recommended that trialists evaluating treatments for chronic pain should consider reporting 9 patient-important outcome domains. We examined the extent to which clinical trials evaluating the effect of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) report outcome domains recommended by IMMPACT. We systematically searched electronic databases for English-language studies that randomized patients with CNCP to receive an opioid or a non-opioid control. In duplicate and independently, reviewers established the eligibility of each identified study and recorded all reported outcome domains from eligible trials. We conducted a priori regression analyses to explore factors that may be associated with IMMPACT-recommended outcome domains. Among 156 eligible trials, reporting of IMMPACT-recommended outcome domains was highly variable, ranging from 99% for pain to 7% for interpersonal functioning. Recently published trials were more likely to report the effect of treatment on physical functioning, emotional functioning, role functioning, sleep and fatigue, and participant disposition. Trials for which the corresponding author was from North America were more likely to report treatment effects on physical functioning and participant ratings of improvement and satisfaction with treatment. Trials published in higher impact journals were more likely to report treatment effects on emotional function, but less likely to report participant ratings of improvement and satisfaction with treatment. Most IMMPACT domains showed an increased rate of reporting over time, although many patient-important outcome domains remained unreported by over half of all trials evaluating the effects of opioids for CNCP. PMID:26020224

  10. Longitudinal Assessment of Comprehensive School Reform Program Implementation and Outcomes: First-Year Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushnet, Naida C., Flaherty, John, Jr., Smith, And

    2004-01-01

    The Longitudinal Assessment of Comprehensive School Reform Implementation and Outcomes (LACIO) responds to the No Child Left Behind Act's requirement for an evaluation of the federal Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) program. The legislation stipulates two broad goals for the evaluation: (1) to evaluate the implementation and outcomes achieved by…

  11. The Other Half: Non-Tenure Track Faculty Thoughts on Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danley-Scott, Jennifer; Scott, Gray

    2014-01-01

    Articles on student learning outcomes assessment often treat faculty as one homogenous body. Yet the exponential growth of contingent faculty in universities and colleges has created two distinct faculty groups with varied concerns and thoughts on everything from the future of higher education to shared governance to student learning outcomes.…

  12. Methods for Assessing Single-Case School-Based Intervention Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busse, R. T.; McGill, Ryan J.; Kennedy, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present various single-case outcome assessment methods for evaluating school-based intervention effectiveness. We present several outcome methods, including goal attainment scaling, visual analysis, trend analysis, percentage of non-overlapping data, single-case mean difference effect size, reliable change index,…

  13. Beyond Student Learning Outcomes: Developing Comprehensive, Strategic Assessment Plans for Advising Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that while the importance of assessment in academic advising is clear and the current emphasis on defining and measuring student learning outcomes represents an essential component of any comprehensive advising assessment plan, an even more comprehensive understanding of programme assessment is needed. Drawing upon business

  14. How to Tackle the Shift of Educational Assessment from Learning Outcomes to Competencies: One Program's Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Adams, Nancy; Potts, Marilyn K.; Koob, Jeffrey J.; Dorsey, Catherine J.; Rosales, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) represent a shift from measuring learning outcomes to core competencies, results from assessments conducted prior to this shift continue to provide useful information for program-level assessment and can serve as a baseline as programs redesign assessments for reaffirmation.…

  15. Student Outcomes Assessment Plan. Pima County Community College District Institutional Effectiveness Series: 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pima County Community Coll. District, AZ.

    The Student Outcomes Assessment Program (SOAP) at Pima Community College (PCC) in Arizona has six major components: (1) the use of success indicators to assess the college's success in achieving its mission; (2) a classroom assessment mini-grant program designed to support faculty research with a direct effect on learning; (3) the use of general

  16. A Web-Based Course Assessment Tool with Direct Mapping to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Walid; Atif, Yacine; Shuaib, Khaled; Sampson, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of curriculum outcomes is an essential element for continuous academic improvement. However, the collection, aggregation and analysis of assessment data are notoriously complex and time-consuming processes. At the same time, only few developments of supporting electronic processes and tools for continuous academic program assessment

  17. Accountability, Program Quality, Outcome Assessment, and Graduate Education for Public Affairs and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Edward T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the development of the movement toward accountability in public higher education and its implication for Master of Public Administration (MPA) programs. Analyzes prior and existing efforts to ensure and assess quality in MPA programs and the different forms that outcome assessment might take and describes assessment techniques.

  18. How to Tackle the Shift of Educational Assessment from Learning Outcomes to Competencies: One Program's Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Adams, Nancy; Potts, Marilyn K.; Koob, Jeffrey J.; Dorsey, Catherine J.; Rosales, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) represent a shift from measuring learning outcomes to core competencies, results from assessments conducted prior to this shift continue to provide useful information for program-level assessment and can serve as a baseline as programs redesign assessments for reaffirmation.

  19. Assessing outcomes following arthroscopic labral debridement—what can the IHOT-33 reveal?

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Maureen K.; Green, Marlon; McCarthy, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    As the complexity of arthroscopic procedures continues to increase, assessing the success of these procedures is of utmost importance to determine appropriate treatment plans for patients. This study compares outcome scores on the International Hip Outcome Tool (IHOT-33) using an analysis of its four subscales to scores on the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS) in patients following hip arthroscopy. Patients who had undergone hip arthroscopy between 1 and 5 years ago were assessed using both the IHOT-33 and MHHS at their most recent follow-up visit. Total scores for each outcome measure were calculated. A composite score for each of the IHOT subscales was calculated by averaging the total points in each section. Total score on the MHHS was compared with total score on the IHOT-33 and its four subscales using separate wilcoxin signed ranks tests. In total, 44 patients met our inclusion criteria with an average follow-up of 24.8 ± 18.8 months. MHHS total score was greater than IHOT-33 total score (P = 0.04). Comparisons between MHHS total score and the IHOT-33 subscales revealed reductions in sport (P = 0.001) and social (P = 0.004), but no difference in symptoms (P = 0.74) and job (P = 0.84). Our findings demonstrated that scores on the MHHS are inflated when compared with scores on the IHOT-33 for patients following hip arthroscopy. Subscale analysis revealed that the reductions in IHOT-33 scores exist in the sport and recreational domain and social, emotional, lifestyle domain compared with the MHHS. Our results suggest that analysing the subscales of the IHOT-33 would provide a more thorough understanding of functional limitations in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011832

  20. The measurement of outcomes in the assessment of educational program effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, D G

    1990-05-01

    Postsecondary accrediting agencies recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation, including the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), are required to evaluate educational program effectiveness by determining that institutions and programs document the achievement of their students and graduates in verifiable and consistent ways, indicating that institutional and program purposes are met. For the assessment of medical education programs this represents a departure from the traditional method of inferring quality from institutional compliance with standards for program organization and function. In the new assessment calculus, success is measured as the integrated product of the outcomes, the indicators of achievement that medical schools already are collecting from many sources, for instance, data on premedical achievement and attributes, medical school performance, graduate education ratings and test results, specialty certification, licensure, and practice. Although a recent LCME enquiry showed that 80% of U.S. medical schools were collecting outcome data on students and graduates, there was a lack of coherence and system, little integrated analysis, rare longitudinal study, and limited use of the information to evaluate and revise the curriculum or to validate admissions, promotion, and graduation criteria. The longitudinal study of the quantified results of educational programs need not resurrect old controversies about the linkage between learning in medical school and the quality of doctors' later practice. The purpose of examining outcomes is to gain sharper focus on the achievement of distinctive institutional goals, to facilitate program improvement and renewal, and to better assure the competence of graduates within the boundaries of achievement that schools have drawn as their educational objectives. PMID:2337430

  1. Relationship between Parental PODCI Questionnaire and School Function Assessment in Measuring Performance in Children with CP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Philip E.; Otsuka, Norman Y.; Sanders, James O.; McGee-Brown, Jeanie

    2008-01-01

    Little data exists assessing the relationship between functional limitations in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their participation in everyday activities. This prospective study evaluates the relationship between the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), a functional health-related quality of life instrument for children

  2. Relationship between Sleep Disturbance and Functional Outcomes in Daily Life Habits of Children with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Shervin S.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Herting, Jerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to describe sleep patterns and accomplishment of daily life habits in children with Down syndrome (DS) and to investigate the relationship between subjective indicators of sleep disturbance with functional outcomes in daily life. Design: Cross-sectional study with an Internet sample Setting: Online survey filled out at home Participants: 110 parents of children with DS and 29 parents of children with typical development (TD), age 5 to 18 years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire was employed to collect information about sleep disturbances in 8 domains (subscales) and a total score. The Life Habits questionnaire (Life-H) sampled information about daily life habits in 11 domains. Multivariable regression modeling was used to assess the associations between sleep disturbances and the accomplishment of daily life habits. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) was a significant explanatory factor in 10 of 11 daily life habits and the total Life-H score. Sleep anxiety and parasomnias significantly influenced the accomplishment of life habits in children with DS as compared to children with typical development. When evaluated in multivariable models in conjunction with the other 7 domains of sleep disturbances, SDB was the most dominant explanatory factor for accomplishment of life habits. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are negatively related to accomplishment of daily life functions. Prevention and treatment of sleep problems, particularly sleep disordered breathing, in children with Down syndrome may lead to enhanced accomplishment of daily life habits and activities. Citation: Churchill SS, Kieckhefer GM, Bjornson KF, Herting JR. Relationship between sleep disturbance and functional outcomes in daily life habits of children with Down syndrome. SLEEP 2015;38(1):61–71. PMID:25325444

  3. The Effect of Perioperative Anemia on Clinical and Functional Outcomes in Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Ethan A.; Wang, Jason J.; Boockvar, Kenneth; Penrod, Joan; Silberzweig, Stacey B.; Magaziner, Jay; Koval, Kenneth J.; Siu, Albert L.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the epidemiology of perioperative anemia in patients with hip fracture and assess the relationship between the hemoglobin measurements and clinical outcomes. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Four university and community teaching hospitals. Patients A consecutive cohort of 550 patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture and survived to discharge from August 1997 and August 1998 were evaluated and followed prospectively. Main Outcome Measures Deaths, readmissions and Functional Independence Motor mobility scores within 60 days of discharge. Results Anemia (defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dL) was present in 40.4% of patients on admission, 45.6% at the presurgery nadir, 93.0% at the postsurgery nadir, and 84.6% near discharge. The mean drop in hemoglobin after surgery was 2.8 1.6 g/dL. In multivariate analyses, higher hemoglobin levels on admission were associated with shorter lengths of hospital stay and lower odds of death and readmission even after controlling for a broad range of prefracture patient characteristics, clinical status on discharge, and use of blood transfusion. Admission and preoperative anemia was not associated with risk-adjusted Functional Independence Motor mobility scores. In multivariable analyses, higher postoperative hemoglobin was associated with shorter length of stay and lower readmission rates, but did not effect rates of death or Functional Independence Motor mobility scores. Conclusions Substantial declines in hemoglobin were common in patients with hip fracture. Higher preoperative hemoglobin was associated with shorter length of stay and lower odds of death and readmission within 60 days of discharge. Postoperative hemoglobin was also related to length of stay and readmission rates. PMID:15213502

  4. Functional outcome following a large head total hip arthroplasty: A retrospective analysis of mid term results

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the reasons that hip resurfacing and large head metal on metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) became popular in Asia was the possible increased range of movement and thereby improved function of the hip joint. Due to concerns of MOM articulation an alternative bearing was sought. Hence, a shift from large head MOM to large head ceramic on ceramic (COC) was made. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcome including range of motion (ROM) and dislocation rates following large head MOM and large head COC THA. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 39 primary THA with large head MOM with a mean age of 56 years (range 36-72 years) and average followup of 54 months (range 38-70 months) were compared with 23 primary THA with large head COC bearing with a mean age of 48 years (range 36-68 years) and an average followup of 18 months (range 12-26 months). Functional outcome was assessed using the Modified Harris Hip Score. Dislocation rate and ROM were compared. Results: Global ROM averaged 248 degrees with MOM group and 252 degrees with the COC group. One patient with metal bearing had dislocation at an average 3 year followup which required revision THA while there were no complications in the COC group. MHHS averaged 89 points in MOM and 94 in COC THR. Conclusion: This study has shown that large head ceramic on ceramic THA is a good alternative to large head metal on metal THA with comparable dislocation rates and range of movements and without complications of metallosis in Asian patients. PMID:25143647

  5. Assessing performance outcomes of new graduates utilizing simulation in a military transition program.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robie V; Smith, Sherrill J; Sheffield, Clair M; Wier, Grady

    2013-01-01

    This multi-site, quasi-experimental study examined the performance outcomes of nurses (n = 152) in a military nurse transition program. A modified-performance instrument was used to assess participants in two high-fidelity simulation scenarios. Although results indicated a significant increase in scores posttraining, only moderate interrater reliability results were found for the new instrument. These findings have implications for nurse educators assessing performance-based outcomes of new nurses completing transition programs. PMID:23703274

  6. Some implications of the technology assessment function for the effective public decision-making process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary provisional assessment of the prospects for the establishment of an adequate technology assessment function and the implications of the assessment function for the public decision process are presented. Effects of the technology assessment function on each phase of the public decision process and briefly explored. Significant implications during the next decade are projected with respect to the following phases: invention and development of alternative means (technological configurations); evaluation, selection and promotion of preferred courses of action; and modification of statutory scheme or social action program as an outcome of continuing monitoring and appraisal.

  7. [Endothelial function: role, assessment and limits].

    PubMed

    Puissant, C; Abraham, P; Durand, S; Humeau-Heurtier, A; Faure, S; Rousseau, P; Mahé, G

    2014-02-01

    For several years, detecting and preventing cardiovascular diseases have become a major issue. Different methods have been developed to evaluate endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first steps leading to atherosclerosis. This review presents an insight into endothelial function, the interests of its assessment and methods for studying endothelial function. To date, the vascular endothelium must be considered as a specific organ with its own functions that contribute to the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Endothelial dysfunction typically corresponds to a decrease of nitric oxide NO bioavailability. Biological or physico-chemical methods may be used to assess dysfunction. Biological methods allow measuring NO metabolites and pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictor mediators released by the endothelium. The physico-chemical methods include intra-coronary injections, plethysmography, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), digital plethysmography and optical techniques using laser (laser Doppler single-point, laser Doppler imager, laser speckle contrast imaging) that can be coupled with provocation tests (iontophoresis, microdialysis, post-ischemic hyperemia, local heating). The principle of each technique and its use in clinical practice are discussed. Studying endothelial dysfunction is a particularly promising field because of new drugs being developed. Nevertheless, assessment methodology still needs further development to enable reliable, non-invasive, reproducible, and inexpensive ways to analyze endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24355615

  8. Assessing the Outcomes of Instruction in Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassard, John R.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an assessment system currently being developed by the Florida Educational Research and Development Program that is relevant for earth science teaching. Designed to be comprehensive in scope, to provide flexibility for classroom teachers, and to make assessment on individualized process. (Author/JR)

  9. Outcomes of Synergetic Peer Assessment: First-Year Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Paula; Chan, Kitty; Liu, Justina

    2014-01-01

    Active participation in learning activities and reviewing assessment activity can facilitate learners engaged in these processes. This case study reports student experiences of the process of peer assessment with teacher guidance in a group project for a first-year nursing course with 153 students. Twenty groups of students were assigned roles in…

  10. Educational Quality, Outcomes Assessment, and Policy Change: The Virginia Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The higher education system in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States provides a case model for how discussions regarding educational quality and assessment of that quality have affected institutions' policy decisions and implementation. Using Levin's (1998) policy analysis framework, this essay explores how assessment of student

  11. The Case for Assessing Complex General Education Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of general education has a long history, although relative to the age of liberal education and educational evaluation it is a very recent development. One of the first recorded efforts to comprehensively assess student achievement in higher education in the United States occurred in the late 1920s and early 1930s, when many institutions

  12. Assessing the Dimensions and Outcomes of an Effective Teammate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutchfield, Tammy N.; Klamon, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Though teamwork is a mainstay of corporate America and business academia, individual assessment and compensation are problematic in disciplining and removing teammates who are free-riders and rewarding high performing team members who bear a disproportionate burden of the project. Therefore, the authors set out to develop and test an assessment

  13. Outcomes of Synergetic Peer Assessment: First-Year Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Paula; Chan, Kitty; Liu, Justina

    2014-01-01

    Active participation in learning activities and reviewing assessment activity can facilitate learners engaged in these processes. This case study reports student experiences of the process of peer assessment with teacher guidance in a group project for a first-year nursing course with 153 students. Twenty groups of students were assigned roles in

  14. An Outcomes Assessment Project: Basic Writing and Essay Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, David; DeRusha, Jeanine; Stanton-Hammond, Gail; Straight, Steve; Sullivan, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on an assessment project they recently conducted at their open admissions community college to assess student work at the end of the basic writing sequence. The authors' focus for this project was on the way students used essay structure. They gathered artifacts from students who were deemed "ready" by their

  15. Alternative Perspectives on Learning Outcomes: Challenges for Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Richard; Black, Paul; Ecclestone, Kathryn; James, Mary; Newton, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In discussing the relationship between curriculum and assessment it is commonly argued that assessment should be aligned to curriculum or, alternatively, that they should be congruent with each other. This article explores that relationship in five educational contexts in the UK and in Europe, ranging across school education, workplace learning,

  16. Multicomponent exercises including muscle power training enhance muscle mass, power output, and functional outcomes in institutionalized frail nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Cadore, Eduardo L; Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Millor, Nora; Gmez, Marisol; Rodriguez-Maas, Leocadio; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-04-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the effects of multicomponent training on muscle power output, muscle mass, and muscle tissue attenuation; the risk of falls; and functional outcomes in frail nonagenarians. Twenty-four elderly (91.9??4.1years old) were randomized into intervention or control group. The intervention group performed a twice-weekly, 12-week multicomponent exercise program composed of muscle power training (8-10 repetitions, 40-60% of the one-repetition maximum) combined with balance and gait retraining. Strength and power tests were performed on the upper and lower limbs. Gait velocity was assessed using the 5-m habitual gait and the time-up-and-go (TUG) tests with and without dual-task performance. Balance was assessed using the FICSIT-4 tests. The ability to rise from a chair test was assessed, and data on the incidence and risk of falls were assessed using questionnaires. Functional status was assessed before measurements with the Barthel Index. Midthigh lower extremity muscle mass and muscle fat infiltration were assessed using computed tomography. The intervention group showed significantly improved TUG with single and dual tasks, rise from a chair and balance performance (P?functional outcomes. Routine multicomponent exercise intervention should be prescribed to nonagenarians because overall physical outcomes are improved in this population. PMID:24030238

  17. Predicting Functional Performance and Range of Motion Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J.; Kittelson, John M.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of functional performance and range of motion measures on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Design This is a secondary analysis of two pooled prospective randomized controlled trials. Sixty-four subjects (32 men and 32 women) with end-stage knee osteoarthritis scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty were enrolled. Active knee flexion and extension range of motion, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test time, and 6-min walk test distance were assessed. Results Preoperative measures of knee flexion and extension were predictive of long-term flexion (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) and extension (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Acute measures of knee flexion and extension were not predictive of long-term flexion (β= 0.09, P = 0.26) or extension (β = 0.04, P = 0.76). Preoperative TUG performance was predictive of long-term 6-min walk performance (β = −21, P < 0.001). Acute TUG performance was predictive of long-term functional performance on the 6-min walk test, after adjusting for the effects of sex and age (P = 0.02); however, once adjusted for preoperative TUG performance, acute TUG was no longer related to long-term 6-min walk performance (P = 0.65). Conclusions Acute postoperative measures of knee range of motion are of limited prognostic value, although preoperative measures have some prognostic value. However, acute measures of functional performance are of useful prognostic value, especially when preoperative functional performance data are unavailable. PMID:24508937

  18. Long-Term Intellectual Functioning and School-Related Behavioural Outcomes in Children and Adolescents after Invasive Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spijkerboer, A. W.; Utens, E. M. W. J.; Bogers, A. J. J. C.; Verhulst, F. C.; Helbing, W. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, long-term intellectual functioning and school-related behavioural outcomes were assessed in a patient sample that underwent invasive treatment for congenital heart disease (ConHD) between 1990 and 1995. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised was used to measure intellectual functioning and the Teacher's Report Form to

  19. The assessment of neuropsychological functioning in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Reichenberg, Abraham (Avi)

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence suggests that compromised neuropsychological function is frequently observed in schizophrenia. The neuropsychological profile is typically characterized by prominent specific deficits in memory and learning, working memory, executive functions, attention, and processing speed, which are evident on a background of a generalized cognitive deficit This paper provides a review of studies of neuropsychological functioning in schizophrenia. The main cognitive ability areas affected in schizophrenia are described, and the degree of impairment in each ability area as found in studies of schizophrenia patients is summarized, based on meta-analytic findings. Recent studies that have compared neuropsychological functioning across psychotic disorders are presented, and finally, neuropsychological assessment batteries specifically developed for schizophrenia are introduced. PMID:20954432

  20. Multilevel quantile function modeling with application to birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Luke B; Reich, Brian J; Herring, Amy H; Langlois, Peter H; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Infants born preterm or small for gestational age have elevated rates of morbidity and mortality. Using birth certificate records in Texas from 2002 to 2004 and Environmental Protection Agency air pollution estimates, we relate the quantile functions of birth weight and gestational age to ozone exposure and multiple predictors, including parental age, race, and education level. We introduce a semi-parametric Bayesian quantile approach that models the full quantile function rather than just a few quantile levels. Our multilevel quantile function model establishes relationships between birth weight and the predictors separately for each week of gestational age and between gestational age and the predictors separately across Texas Public Health Regions. We permit these relationships to vary nonlinearly across gestational age, spatial domain and quantile level and we unite them in a hierarchical model via a basis expansion on the regression coefficients that preserves interpretability. Very low birth weight is a primary concern, so we leverage extreme value theory to supplement our model in the tail of the distribution. Gestational ages are recorded in completed weeks of gestation (integer-valued), so we present methodology for modeling quantile functions of discrete response data. In a simulation study we show that pooling information across gestational age and quantile level substantially reduces MSE of predictor effects. We find that ozone is negatively associated with the lower tail of gestational age in south Texas and across the distribution of birth weight for high gestational ages. Our methods are available in the R package BSquare. PMID:25761678

  1. Gross Motor Function Outcome After Intensive Rehabilitation in Children With Bilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Shim, Jae Sun; Kim, Kiyoung; Moon, Jinkyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare gross motor function outcomes in children with moderate to severe degrees of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP) who received either intensive inpatient rehabilitation or intermittent rehabilitation on an outpatient basis. Methods A non-biased retrospective chart review was done for patients diagnosed with bilateral spastic CP who received rehabilitation therapy. The intensive rehabilitation group (inpatient group) agreed to be hospitalized to receive 22 sessions of physical and occupational therapy per week for 1 month. The intermittent rehabilitation group (outpatient group) received four sessions of physical and occupational therapy per week for 3 months in an outpatient setting. Changes in the total score on the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) between baseline and the follow-up period were analyzed. Results Both groups showed significant improvements in total GMFM scores at the follow-up assessment compared to that at baseline (p=0.000 for inpatient group, p=0.001 for outpatient group). The increase in mean total GMFM score after 1 month was significantly greater in the inpatient group than that in the outpatient group (p=0.020). Higher increase in GMFM score was observed in younger subjects as revealed by the negative correlation between age and the increase in GMFM score after 1 month (p=0.002, r=-0.460). Conclusion Intensive inpatient rehabilitation therapy for patients with bilateral spastic CP of moderate to severe degree was more effective for improving gross motor function than intermittent rehabilitation therapy on an outpatient basis. PMID:26361600

  2. Functional outcome after computer-assisted versus conventional total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ltzner, Jrg; Gnther, Klaus-Peter; Kirschner, Stephan

    2010-10-01

    Despite the frequent use of computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and better radiological results for coronal alignment reported in many studies, there is still no evidence of improved clinical outcomes when compared to conventional TKA. We compared alignment after navigated TKA and conventional TKA in 80 randomized patients. Seventy three patients were available for physical and radiological examination at 20month after surgery. Both groups showed similar Knee Society Score results, with medians of 89 points (navigated 49-95 points, conventional 48-95 points, n.s.) in the Knee Score and 70 points (navigated 45-100 points, conventional 40-100 points, n.s.) in the Function Score. The median improvement in the Knee Society Knee Score was 45 points (-3 to 88 points) in the navigated group and 35 points (-13 to 62 points) in the conventional group (P=0.03), and the Knee Society Function Score improvement was 15 points (-10 to 50 points) in the navigated group versus 10 points (-10 to 50 points) in the conventional group (n.s.). The current health state at follow-up using the EuroQuol questionnaire was similar in both groups, with medians of 67 points in the navigated group and 65 points in the conventional group. This investigation did show slightly greater functional improvement at short-term follow-up in the navigated TKA group. Longer follow-up will be required to assess the possible benefit of computer-assisted navigation. PMID:20442982

  3. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  4. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-Ping; Tao, Lu-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  5. Comparison of Select Health Outcomes by Deployment Health Assessment Completion.

    PubMed

    Luse, Tina M; Slosek, Jean; Rennix, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) requires service members to complete regular health assessments for identification of deployment-related physical/behavioral issues and environmental/occupational exposures. Compliance among active duty Department of the Navy personnel varies; however, and the impact of incomplete assessments on generalizability of results is unclear. This study examines the differences between Navy and Marine Corps service members who completed both the Post-Deployment Health Assessment and Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (n = 9,452) as compared to service members who never attempted either form (n = 5,603) in fiscal year 2010. Deployment rosters, assessments, and clinical data were analyzed to determine certified assessment completion rates and incidence of certain health conditions in these populations. Only 38.9% of applicable personnel met the completion and certification criteria for the required assessments. Service members who did not complete the forms were distinctly different demographically and at increased risk for psychotropic drug use, post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury diagnosis following deployment. The prevailing assumption that the risk of adverse health effects on operational forces can be estimated using the population that completed the required assessments is incorrect, and the true operational impact and medical burden of these conditions may be underestimated. PMID:26837080

  6. [Patient-relevant outcomes and surrogates in the early benefit assessment of drugs: first experiences].

    PubMed

    Kvitkina, Tatjana; ten Haaf, Anette; Reken, Stefanie; McGauran, Natalie; Wieseler, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG) became effective in Germany on January 1, 2011. Since then, the assessment of the added benefit of new drugs versus a therapeutic standard on the basis of dossiers submitted by pharmaceutical companies has been required by law. The Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) generally commissions the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) with this task. The added benefit is primarily to be demonstrated on the basis of patient-relevant outcomes. The aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the early benefit assessment on the basis of patient-relevant outcomes by systematically characterising the outcomes available in company dossiers and comparing the companies' and IQWiG's evaluations regarding patient relevance and surrogate validity. Dossier assessments published between October 2011 and June 2012 were used for this purpose. The outcomes available and the respective evaluations were extracted and compared. 12 out of 22 submitted dossiers contained sufficient data to assess outcomes; all 12 assessable dossiers provided data on patient-relevant outcomes. Data on mortality and adverse events were available in all dossiers, except that one dossier did not contain adverse event data on the relevant subpopulation. In contrast, data on morbidity and health-related quality of life were available in 8 and 7 dossiers, respectively. Of a total of 214 outcomes extracted by IQWiG, 124 patient-relevant and 3 surrogate outcomes were included in IQWiG's assessment (companies: a total of 183 outcomes included, of which 172 were patient-relevant and 11 were surrogates). The first experiences with AMNOG have shown that in principle an early benefit assessment of drugs based on patient-relevant outcomes is feasible. The companies' and IQWiG's evaluations regarding patient relevance and surrogate validity of outcomes partly deviated from each other. By increasingly considering patient-relevant outcomes in approval studies, pharmaceutical companies can create the necessary data basis for the early benefit assessment. PMID:25523852

  7. Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement: Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, B.; Goodey, R.; Azevedo, A.; Bjorne, A.; Cacace, A.; Crocetti, A.; Del Bo, L.; De Ridder, D.; Diges, I.; Elbert, T.; Flor, H.; Herraiz, C.; Sanchez, T. Ganz; Eichhammer, P.; Figueiredo, R.; Hajak, G.; Kleinjung, T.; Landgrebe, M.; Londero, A.; Lainez, M.J.A.; Mazzoli, M.; Meikle, M.B.; Melcher, J.; Rauschecker, J.P.; Sand, P.G.; Struve, M.; Van de Heyning, P.; Van Dijk, P.; Vergara, R.

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread recognition that consistency between research centres in the ways that patients with tinnitus are assessed and outcomes following interventions are measured would facilitate more effective co-operation and more meaningful evaluations and comparisons of outcomes. At the first Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting held in Regensburg in July 2006 an attempt was made through workshops to gain a consensus both for patient assessments and for outcome measurements. It is hoped that this will contribute towards better cooperation between research centres in finding and evaluating treatments for tinnitus by allowing better comparability between studies. PMID:17956816

  8. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications, and Functional Outcomes After Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single-institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); conformal methods were used in 36 after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1-18.9 years). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls 27), race (white 43), extent of resection (gross-total 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurologic, endocrine, and cognitive effects. Results: With a median follow-up time of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range, 0.2-23.2 years), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died of disease, and 1 of central nervous system necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients, and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult-to-control seizures. The average values for intelligence quotient and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion: RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods.

  9. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications and Functional Outcomes after Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); 36 were using conformal methods after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 118.9). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls = 27), race (Caucasian = 43), extent of resection (gross-total = 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic = 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurological, endocrine and cognitive effects. Results With a median follow-up of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range 0.223.2), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died from disease and one from CNS necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult to control seizures. Average values for IQ and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods. PMID:23245280

  10. A weight of evidence assessment approach for adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Collier, Zachary A; Gust, Kurt A; Gonzalez-Morales, Benette; Gong, Ping; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Linkov, Igor; Perkins, Edward J

    2016-03-01

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a framework to mechanistically link molecular initiating events to adverse biological outcomes. From a regulatory perspective, it is of crucial importance to determine the confidence for the AOP in question as well as the quality of data available in supporting this evaluation. A weight of evidence approach has been proposed for this task, but many of the existing frameworks for weight of evidence evaluation are qualitative and there is not clear guidance regarding how weight of evidence should be calculated for an AOP. In this paper we advocate the use of a subject matter expertise driven approach for weight of evidence evaluation based on criteria and metrics related to data quality and the strength of causal linkages between key events. As a demonstration, we notionally determine weight of evidence scores for two AOPs: Non-competitive ionotropic GABA receptor antagonism leading to epileptic seizures, and Antagonist-binding and stabilization of a co-repressor to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) signaling complex ultimately causing starvation-like weight loss. PMID:26724267

  11. Outcomes Assessment at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleine, Lawrence J.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo; Kimball, Grayson

    2002-01-01

    Using a survey, compared relative values assigned by Tufts veterinary alumni to questions about skills, training, attitudes, and behaviors with those of veterinary employers and faculty. Also assessed their perceptions of future employment opportunities. (EV)

  12. Quantitative assessment of protein function prediction programs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B N; Steffens, M B R; Raittz, R T; Santos-Weiss, I C R; Marchaukoski, J N

    2015-01-01

    Fast prediction of protein function is essential for high-throughput sequencing analysis. Bioinformatic resources provide cheaper and faster techniques for function prediction and have helped to accelerate the process of protein sequence characterization. In this study, we assessed protein function prediction programs that accept amino acid sequences as input. We analyzed the classification, equality, and similarity between programs, and, additionally, compared program performance. The following programs were selected for our assessment: Blast2GO, InterProScan, PANTHER, Pfam, and ScanProsite. This selection was based on the high number of citations (over 500), fully automatic analysis, and the possibility of returning a single best classification per sequence. We tested these programs using 12 gold standard datasets from four different sources. The gold standard classification of the databases was based on expert analysis, the Protein Data Bank, or the Structure-Function Linkage Database. We found that the miss rate among the programs is globally over 50%. Furthermore, we observed little overlap in the correct predictions from each program. Therefore, a combination of multiple types of sources and methods, including experimental data, protein-protein interaction, and data mining, may be the best way to generate more reliable predictions and decrease the miss rate. PMID:26782400

  13. HIP FRACTURE: POST-OPERATIVE EVALUATION OF CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel; Thober, Thomas Alexandre; Bigolin, André Vicente; de Souza, Marcos Paulo; Echeveste, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from patients undergoing surgery to treat hip fractures, with regard to the ASA score and time spent waiting for definitive surgical treatment. Method: Over a one-year period, 154 patients with hip fractures, aged 65 years and over, underwent operations. Data on the preoperative ASA score and the time spent waiting for the operation were obtained. Two years after the operation, Zuckerman‘s Functional Recovery Score (FRS) questionnaire was used to assess the patients' current functional capacity. Results: Mortality during the first postoperative year differed between patients with ASA 3 or 4 and those classified as ASA 1 or 2 (significant data; p < 0.05). Mortality up to the end of the second postoperative year was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the ASA 3 or 4 group. The preoperative ASA score did not demonstrate any significant relationship with the patients' current functional capacity (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference between the group operated within 48 hours of admission and the group operated after 48 hours, in relation to mortality or current functional capacity (p > 0.05). The group aged 80 years and over showed significantly higher mortality (p < 0.05) than the group aged 65 to 79 years up to the end of the second postoperative year. Conclusion: The preoperative ASA score and an age of 80 years or over may be considered to be factors associated with higher mortality two years after hip fracture surgery. In isolation, time spent waiting for surgery was not significant.

  14. [Assessment of cognitive functions in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Capron, J

    2015-12-01

    The evaluation of cognitive functions can be performed using two approaches: a quantitative one, based on screening tools; a qualitative one, based on the examination of specific cognitive functions. The quantitative approach offers a pragmatic process: to screen rapidly for a cognitive dysfunction that may require assistance or treatments. We will present three screening tools and their diagnostic value: the clock test, the Mini Mental State Examination and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. They help select patients who require a more detailed examination to precisely diagnose their cognitive dysfunction. We propose a way to perform a detailed cognitive examination at the bedside, including the examination of alertness, attention, memory, language, frontal functions, praxis and hemi-neglect. This simple examination indicates the location of the cerebral lesion and sometimes suggests the underlying disease. PMID:26346265

  15. Methods for assessing mitochondrial function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lanza, Ian R; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes. PMID:23520284

  16. Methods for Assessing Mitochondrial Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.; Lanza, Ian R.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes. PMID:23520284

  17. Putting the Patient in Patient Reported Outcomes: A Robust Methodology for Health Outcomes Assessment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian M

    2015-12-01

    When analyzing many health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) outcomes, statistical inference is often based on the summary score formed by combining the individual domains of the HRQoL profile into a single measure. Through a series of Monte Carlo simulations, this paper illustrates that reliance solely on the summary score may lead to biased estimates of incremental effects, and I propose a novel two-stage approach that allows for unbiased estimation of incremental effects. The proposed methodology essentially reverses the order of the analysis, from one of 'aggregate, then estimate' to one of 'estimate, then aggregate'. Compared to relying solely on the summary score, the approach also offers a more patient-centered interpretation of results by estimating regression coefficients and incremental effects in each of the HRQoL domains, while still providing estimated effects in terms of the overall summary score. I provide an application to the estimation of incremental effects of demographic and clinical variables on HRQoL following surgical treatment for adult scoliosis and spinal deformity. Copyright 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25303748

  18. Mouse models of osteoarthritis: modelling risk factors and assessing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hang; Beier, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disease that results in pain and low quality of life for patients, as well as enormous medical and socioeconomic burdens. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation and progression of OA are still poorly understood. As such, mouse models of the disease are having increasingly important roles in OA research owing to the advancements of microsurgical techniques and the use of genetically modified mice, as well as the development of novel assessment tools. In this Review, we discuss available mouse models of OA and applicable assessment tools in studies of experimental OA. PMID:24662645

  19. Echocardiographic Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure and Outcomes in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P.; Siwamogsatham, Sarawut; Hayek, Salim; Li, Song; Deka, Anjan; Marti, Catherine N.; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V.; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with worse outcomes and is rapidly being recognized as a therapeutic target. To facilitate pragmatic research efforts, data regarding the prognostic importance of noninvasively assessed pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in stable ambulatory patients with HF are needed. Methods and Results We examined the association between echocardiographic PASP and outcomes in 417 outpatients with HF (age, 54±13 years; 60.7% men; 50.4% whites; 24.9% with preserved ejection fraction). Median PASP was 36 mm Hg (interquartile range [IQR]: 29, 46). After a median follow‐up of 2.6 years (IQR: 1.7, 3.9) there were 72 major events (57 deaths; 9 urgent heart transplants; and 6 ventricular assist device implantations) and 431 hospitalizations for HF. In models adjusting for clinical risk factors and therapy, a 10‐mm Hg higher PASP was associated with 37% higher risk (95% CI: 18, 59; P<0.001) for major events, and 11% higher risk (95% CI: 1, 23; P=0.039) for major events or HF hospitalization. The threshold that maximized the likelihood ratio for both endpoints was 48 mm Hg; those with PASP ≥48 mm Hg (N=84; 20.1%) had an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.33 (95% CI: 1.96, 5.65; P<0.001) for major events and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.11; P=0.037) for major events or HF hospitalization. Reduced right ventricular systolic function had independent prognostic utility over PASP for adverse outcomes. Right atrial pressure and transtricuspid gradient both contributed to risk. Conclusions Elevated PASP, determined by echocardiography, identifies ambulatory patients with HF at increased risk for adverse events. PMID:24492947

  20. Assessing Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Orthognathic Surgery and Osseous Genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A; Albino, Frank P; Mathis, Ryan K; Scott, Amie M; Gamble, Laurie; Baker, Stephen B

    2015-11-01

    Primary outcomes for orthognathic surgery and genioplasty patients include satisfaction with appearance, improved motor function, and enhanced quality of life. The goal of this study was to assess outcomes among patients undergoing these procedures, and to highlight the potential use of FACE-Q instrument for use in patients with dentofacial deformities. A total of 56 patients presenting for orthognathic surgery and/or osseous genioplasty completed the FACE-Q during preoperative and/or at postoperative visits. FACE-Q scores increased following surgery in satisfaction with facial appearance overall (+24.5, P?outcomes possible for patients undergoing these procedures. PMID:26501967

  1. A physiotherapy triage assessment service for people with low back disorders: evaluation of short-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Brenna; Pahwa, Punam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the short-term effects of physiotherapy triage assessments on self-reported pain, functioning, and general well-being and quality of life in people with low back-related disorders. Methods: Participants with low backrelated complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists (PTs). Before undergoing the triage assessment, the participants completed a battery of questionnaires covering a range of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial features. The study used the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and the Medical Outcomes Survey 36-item short-form version 2 (SF-36v2) to assess self-reported pain, function, and quality of life. Baseline measures and variables were analyzed using a descriptive analysis method (ie, proportions, means, medians). Paired samples t-tests or Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank tests were used to analyze the overall group differences between the pretest and posttest outcome measures where appropriate. Results: A total of 108 out of 115 (93.9%) participants completed the posttest survey. The Physical Component Summary of the SF36v2 was the only measure that demonstrated significant improvement (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A spinal triage assessment program delivered by PTs can be viewed as a complex intervention that may have the potential to affect a wide range of patient-related outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the long-term outcomes and explore potential mechanisms of improvement using a biopsychosocial framework. PMID:22915980

  2. Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomgren, Michael; Roy, Nelson; Callister, Thomas; Merrill, Ray M.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen adults who stutter participated in a 3-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program [SSMP]). A series of 14 fluency and affective-based measures were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Measures included stuttering frequency; the…

  3. Biochemical Visual Literacy with Constructive Alignment: Outcomes, Assessment, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herraez, Angel; Costa, Manuel Joao

    2013-01-01

    Several contributions in "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education" have highlighted the role of visualization tools and the importance of developing students' visual literacy in biochemistry education. In this forum, the authors suggest that more focus is needed on the assessment of student learning, and they advance…

  4. The Alaska Statewide Assessment: Implementation and Outcome, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stofflet, Frederick P.; And Others

    In October 1989 Alaska conducted its statewide student assessment. Over 23,000 students in grades 4, 6, and 8 completed the reading, mathematics, and language arts sections of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS). At the same time, a series of questionnaires asked building principals about their schools' philosophy, climate, and problems; asked…

  5. Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomgren, Michael; Roy, Nelson; Callister, Thomas; Merrill, Ray M.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen adults who stutter participated in a 3-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program [SSMP]). A series of 14 fluency and affective-based measures were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Measures included stuttering frequency; the

  6. Biochemical Visual Literacy with Constructive Alignment: Outcomes, Assessment, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herraez, Angel; Costa, Manuel Joao

    2013-01-01

    Several contributions in "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education" have highlighted the role of visualization tools and the importance of developing students' visual literacy in biochemistry education. In this forum, the authors suggest that more focus is needed on the assessment of student learning, and they advance

  7. Cognitive and academic outcomes after pediatric liver transplantation: Functional Outcomes Group (FOG) results.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, L G; Neighbors, K; Martz, K; Zelko, F; Bucuvalas, J C; Alonso, E M

    2011-02-01

    This multicenter study examined prevalence of cognitive and academic delays in children following liver transplant (LT). One hundred and forty-four patients ages 5-7 and 2 years post-LT were recruited through the SPLIT consortium and administered the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition (WPPSI-III), the Bracken Basic Concept Scale, Revised (BBCS-R), and the Wide Range Achievement Test, 4th edition (WRAT-4). Parents and teachers completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Participants performed significantly below test norms on intelligence quotient (IQ) and achievement measures (Mean WPPSI-III Full Scale IQ = 94.7 13.5; WRAT-4 Reading = 92.7 17.2; WRAT-4 Math = 93.1 15.4; p < 0001). Twenty-six percent of patients (14% expected) had 'mild to moderate' IQ delays (Full Scale IQ = 71-85) and 4% (2% expected) had 'serious' delays (Full Scale IQ ? 70; p < 0.0001). Reading and/or math scores were weaker than IQ in 25%, suggesting learning disability, compared to 7% expected by CDC statistics (p < 0.0001). Executive deficits were noted on the BRIEF, especially by teacher report (Global Executive Composite = 58; p < 0.001). Results suggest a higher prevalence of cognitive and academic delays and learning problems in pediatric LT recipients compared to the normal population. PMID:21272236

  8. Core outcome measures for opioid abuse liability laboratory assessment studies in humans: IMMPACT recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Zacny, James P.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.; Bigelow, George E.; Foltin, Richard W.; Jasinski, Donald R.; Sellers, Edward M.; Adams, Edgar H.; Balster, Robert; Burke, Laurie B.; Cerny, Igor; Colucci, Robert D.; Cone, Edward; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T.; Haddox, J. David; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Junor, Roderick; Katz, Nathaniel P.; Klein, Michael; Kopecky, Ernest A.; Leiderman, Deborah B.; McDermott, Michael P.; O’Brien, Charles; O’Connor, Alec B.; Palmer, Pamela P.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rowbotham, Michael C.; Sampaio, Cristina; Setnik, Beatrice; Sokolowska, Marta; Stauffer, Joseph W.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    A critical component in development of opioid analgesics is assessment of their abuse liability (AL). Standardization of approaches and measures used in assessing AL has the potential to facilitate comparisons across studies, research laboratories, and drugs. The goal of this report is to provide consensus recommendations regarding core outcome measures for assessing abuse potential of opioid medications in humans in a controlled laboratory setting. Although many of the recommended measures are appropriate for assessing the AL of medications from other drug classes, the focus here is on opioid medications because they present unique risks from both physiological (e.g., respiratory depression, physical dependence) and public health (e.g., individuals in pain) perspectives. A brief historical perspective on AL testing is provided and then those measures that can be considered primary and secondary outcomes and possible additional outcomes in AL assessment are discussed. These outcome measures include: (1) subjective effects (some of which comprise the primary outcome measures, including drug liking); (2) physiological responses; (3) drug self-administration behavior; and (4) cognitive and psychomotor performance. Prior to presenting recommendations for standardized approaches and measures to be used in AL assessments, the appropriateness of using these measures in clinical trials with patients in pain is discussed. PMID:22998781

  9. Are well functioning civil registration and vital statistics systems associated with better health outcomes?

    PubMed

    Phillips, David E; AbouZahr, Carla; Lopez, Alan D; Mikkelsen, Lene; de Savigny, Don; Lozano, Rafael; Wilmoth, John; Setel, Philip W

    2015-10-01

    In this Series paper, we examine whether well functioning civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems are associated with improved population health outcomes. We present a conceptual model connecting CRVS to wellbeing, and describe an ecological association between CRVS and health outcomes. The conceptual model posits that the legal identity that civil registration provides to individuals is key to access entitlements and services. Vital statistics produced by CRVS systems provide essential information for public health policy and prevention. These outcomes benefit individuals and societies, including improved health. We use marginal linear models and lag-lead analysis to measure ecological associations between a composite metric of CRVS performance and three health outcomes. Results are consistent with the conceptual model: improved CRVS performance coincides with improved health outcomes worldwide in a temporally consistent manner. Investment to strengthen CRVS systems is not only an important goal for individuals and societies, but also a development imperative that is good for health. PMID:25971222

  10. Behavioral, Brain Imaging and Genomic Measures to Predict Functional Outcomes Post - Bed Rest and Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; DeDios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Goel, R.; Seidler, R. D.; Oddsson, L.; Zanello, S.; Clarke, T.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt crewmembers' ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from spaceflight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual spaceflight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures. Our approach includes: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features, using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; and 3) assessment of genotypic markers of genetic polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyl transferase, dopamine receptor D2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes and genetic polymorphisms of alpha2-adrenergic receptors that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate that these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration spaceflight and exposure to an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a retrospective study, leveraging data already collected from relevant ongoing or completed bed rest and spaceflight studies. These data will be combined with predictor metrics that will be collected prospectively (as described for behavioral, brain imaging and genomic measures) from these returning subjects to build models for predicting post-mission (bed rest - non-astronauts or space flight - astronauts) adaptive capability as manifested in their outcome measures. To date we have completed a study on 15 normal subjects with all of the above measures. In this presentation we will discuss the optimized set of tests for predictive metrics to be used for evaluating post mission adaptive capability as manifested in their outcome measures. Comparisons of model performance will allow us to better design and implement sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures against decrements in post-mission adaptive capability that are customized for each crewmember's sensory biases, adaptive capacity, brain structure and functional capacities, and genetic predispositions. The ability to customize adaptability training will allow more efficient use of crew time during training and will optimize training prescriptions for astronauts to ensure expected outcomes.

  11. Community College Faculty Attitudes and Concerns about Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Janet Smith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes and concerns community college faculty have about student learning outcomes assessment and to further explore the relationship between these factors and faculty levels of involvement in assessment activities. Combining the conceptual frameworks of the concerns-based adoption Model (CBAM) and

  12. Towards a Model and Methodology for Assessing Student Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Lola C.; Weeks, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to introduce a conceptual model for assessing undergraduate student learning outcomes and satisfaction that involves concepts drawn from the services marketing and assessment literatures; second, to illustrate the utility of the model as implemented in an academic department (geography)…

  13. Evaluating the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Process in Undergraduate Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Craig M.; Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly being held more accountable for assessing student learning both in and out of their classrooms along with reporting results to their stakeholders. The purpose of this study, which examined assessment of student learning outcomes in undergraduate park and recreation academic programs, was two-fold:

  14. Combining the Tasks of Grading Individual Assignments and Assessing Student Outcomes in Project-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    ABET requires that engineering programs demonstrate continuous assessment and continuous improvement in order to be accredited. Central to the process is establishing and assessing measurable "student outcomes" that reflect whether the goals and objectives of the program are being met. This paper examines effective strategies for

  15. A Web-Based Course Assessment Tool with Direct Mapping to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Walid; Atif, Yacine; Shuaib, Khaled; Sampson, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of curriculum outcomes is an essential element for continuous academic improvement. However, the collection, aggregation and analysis of assessment data are notoriously complex and time-consuming processes. At the same time, only few developments of supporting electronic processes and tools for continuous academic program assessment…

  16. Does Performance in Progressive Assessment Influence the Outcome in Final Examination? An Australian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alauddin, Mohammad; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates whether performance in progressive assessment necessarily influences the outcome in the end-of-semester final examination using the experience of an introductory postgraduate statistics course at a large Australian university. The average score on progressive assessments was higher than that of the final examination.

  17. Faculty Engagement with Learning Outcomes Assessment: A Study of Public Two-Year Colleges in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the assumption that faculty at the postsecondary level in the U. S. are not sufficiently or effectively engaged with student learning outcomes assessment (LOA) activities and/or practices. This issue emerged in two primary ways within the Scholarship of Assessment (SoA) body of literature: (1) as a

  18. Can Assessment Reactivity Predict Treatment Outcome among Adolescents with Alcohol and Other Substance Use Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminer, Yifrah; Burleson, Joseph A.; Burke, Rebecca H.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are two-fold: to examine first, if the change from positive to negative alcohol and any other substance use status from baseline assessment to the onset of the first session (i.e., pre-treatment phase) occurs in adolescents, that is, Assessment Reactivity (AR); second, whether AR predicts treatment outcome.

  19. Community College Faculty Attitudes and Concerns about Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Janet Smith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes and concerns community college faculty have about student learning outcomes assessment and to further explore the relationship between these factors and faculty levels of involvement in assessment activities. Combining the conceptual frameworks of the concerns-based adoption Model (CBAM) and…

  20. Faculty Engagement with Learning Outcomes Assessment: A Study of Public Two-Year Colleges in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the assumption that faculty at the postsecondary level in the U. S. are not sufficiently or effectively engaged with student learning outcomes assessment (LOA) activities and/or practices. This issue emerged in two primary ways within the Scholarship of Assessment (SoA) body of literature: (1) as a…

  1. Functional Plasticity in Childhood Brain Disorders: When, What, How, and Whom to Assess

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Spiegler, Brenda J.; Simic, Nevena; Sinopoli, Katia J.; Wilkinson, Amy; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry; Bigler, Erin D.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    At every point in the lifespan, the brain balances malleable processes representing neural plasticity that promote change with homeostatic processes that promote stability. Whether a child develops typically or with brain injury, his or her neural and behavioral outcome is constructed through transactions between plastic and homeostatic processes and the environment. In clinical research with children in whom the developing brain has been malformed or injured, behavioral outcomes provide an index of the result of plasticity, homeostasis, and environmental transactions. When should we assess outcome in relation to age at brain insult, time since brain insult, and age of the child at testing? What should we measure? Functions involving reacting to the past and predicting the future, as well as social-affective skills, are important. How should we assess outcome? Information from performance variability, direct measures and informants, overt and covert measures, and laboratory and ecological measures should be considered. In whom are we assessing outcome? Assessment should be cognizant of individual differences in gene, socio-economic status (SES), parenting, nutrition, and interpersonal supports, which are moderators that interact with other factors influencing functional outcome. PMID:24821533

  2. Patient-Specific Surgical Outcomes Assessment Using Population-Based Data Analysis for Risk Model Development

    PubMed Central

    AbuSalah, Ahmad M.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Adam, Terrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal surgical planning and decision making surrounding surgical interventions requires patient-specific risk assessment which incorporates patient pre-operative clinical assessment and clinical literature. In this paper, we utilized population-based data analysis to construct surgical outcome predictive models for spinal fusion surgery using hospital, patient and admission characteristics. We analyzed population data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) –a nationally representative database– to identify data elements affecting inpatient mortality, length of stay, and disposition status for patients receiving spinal fusion surgery in the years 2004–2008. In addition to outcomes assessment, we want to make the analytic model results available to clinicians and researchers for pre-operative surgical risk assessment, hospital resource allocation, and hypothesis generation for future research without an individual patient data management burden. Spinal fusion was the selected prototype procedure due to it being a high volume and typically inpatient procedure where patient risk factors will likely affect clinical outcomes. PMID:23304385

  3. Paper tools for assessing visual function.

    PubMed

    Powers, Maureen K

    2009-06-01

    Instruments for assessing visual function are valuable tools for optometry, ophthalmology, vision science, education, and public health. Inspired by my observations in the Teller lab, with Dobson, on the process of developing a useful clinical tool from laboratory work, I present four examples of functional vision tests that are made of paper and currently used in the field: the Amsler Grid, the Pelli-Robson Contrast Sensitivity Chart, the Teller Acuity Cards, and the Developmental Eye Movement Test. All are characterized by ease of use and rigorous design. All are either being used with children or have the potential to be so. Each tool is reviewed in terms of its development, with a view toward similarities in the steps or process taken. The goal is to encourage the further development of the functional vision assessments already in existence, and to urge scientists and clinicians alike to consider ways in which their own work can be translated into clinically useful, simple paper tools. PMID:19483511

  4. Outcomes of a nurse-led osteoporosis and falls assessment.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser; Gardiner, Annie; El Gaafary, Maha; Toth, Mathias

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern. Recent evidence from clinical and epidemiological trials on osteoporosis has stressed the urgency for early and accurate diagnosis of vertebral fractures. Despite the fact that vertebral fractures are very common and associated with decreased quality of life, they are frequently missed in daily clinical practice. The authors developed a protocol to be applied through a specialized nurse-led osteoporosis vertebral fracture service that allows for accurate diagnosis, identifies patients at risk and shortens the time of assessment and management. A total of 114 patients have been reviewed over 12 months. Completing the referral form and the clinic proforma helped the nurse cover all causes of vertebral fractures and shortened the lag time for assessment and management. Osteoporosis therapy was commenced once diagnosis was confirmed. PMID:17167368

  5. Are Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Improving? Impact of Bayley Assessment on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vohr, Betty R.; Stephens, Bonnie E.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bann, Carla M.; Hintz, Susan R.; Epi, MS; Das, Abhik; Newman, Jamie E.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Yolton, Kimberly; Dusick, Anna M.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Bauer, Charles R.; Bodnar, Anna; Heyne, Roy J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Dillard, Robert G.; Acarregui, Michael J.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Myers, Gary J.; Fuller, Janell

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 18- to 22-month cognitive scores and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in 2 time periods using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Neonatal Research Network assessment of extremely low birth weight infants with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (Bayley II) in 2006–2007 (period 1) and using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley III), with separate cognitive and language scores, in 2008–2011 (period 2). Study design Scores were compared with bivariate analysis, and regression analyses were run to identify differences in NDI rates. Results Mean Bayley III cognitive scores were 11 points higher than mean Bayley II cognitive scores. The NDI rate was reduced by 70% (from 43% in period 1 to 13% in period 2; P < .0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that Bayley III contributed to a decreased risk of NDI by 5 definitions: cognitive score <70 and <85, cognitive or language score <70; cognitive or motor score <70, and cognitive, language, or motor score <70 (P < .001). Conclusion Whether the Bayley III is overestimating cognitive performance or whether it is a more valid assessment of emerging cognitive skills than the Bayley II is uncertain. Because the Bayley III identifies significantly fewer children with disability, it is recommended that all extremely low birth weight infants be offered early intervention services at the time of discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit, and that Bayley scores be interpreted with caution. PMID:22421261

  6. Cascading and combined effects of cognitive deficits and residual symptoms on functional outcome in schizophrenia - A path-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Bhagyavathi, Haralahalli D; Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Kumar, C Naveen; Kumar, J Keshav; Subbakrishna, D K; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2015-09-30

    Understanding the complex relationship among determinants of real-world functioning in schizophrenia patients in remission is important in planning recovery-oriented interventions. We explored two path-analytical models of functioning in schizophrenia. 170 Schizophrenia patients remitted from positive symptoms underwent fairly comprehensive assessments of cognition - neurocognition (NC) and social cognition (SC), residual symptoms - insight, motivation and other negative symptoms, and socio-occupational functioning. We explored (a) a cascading model, where NC predicted functional outcome through its effects on other determinants and (b) a combined model, incorporating additional direct paths from each of the determinants. The combined model, and not the cascading model demonstrated a good fit. Post-hoc trimming of the combined model by elimination of non-significant paths maintained the goodness-of-fit and was retained as the final model. In addition to the direct paths, this final model demonstrated that (a) NC influenced functioning through SC and insight and (b) SC influenced functioning through motivation and negative symptoms. This suggests that NC and SC may influence functional outcome directly, as well as indirectly, via specific impact on insight, and motivation and negative symptoms respectively. PMID:26208988

  7. Specific Steps for Creating Outcomes Assessment Measures for an Undergraduate Management Program: Bridging the Gap from Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Shani D.

    2007-01-01

    The article recounts in detail the process used to include all department faculty members in the design of outcomes assessment measures for the management major, basing these on broad learning outcomes which the department had previously identified. While other literature has described the outcomes assessment design process in broad terms, the

  8. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Spiegel, Daphna Y.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B.; Bussière, Marc R.; Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary adverse effect.

  9. 42 CFR 441.535 - Assessment of functional need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assessment of functional need. 441.535 Section 441...) 441.535 Assessment of functional need. States must conduct a face-to-face assessment of the individual..., if applicable, service budget. (c) The assessment of functional need must be conducted at least...

  10. 42 CFR 441.535 - Assessment of functional need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assessment of functional need. 441.535 Section 441...) 441.535 Assessment of functional need. States must conduct a face-to-face assessment of the individual..., if applicable, service budget. (c) The assessment of functional need must be conducted at least...

  11. The Relationship between Preoperative Expectations and the Short-Term Postoperative Satisfaction and Functional Outcome in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Daniel J; Mallozzi, Scott S; Mathews, Jacob E; Moss, Isaac L; Ouellet, Jean A; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Objective?To examine the relationship between the patient's preoperative expectations and short-term postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome in lumbar spine surgery. Methods?The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were queried using a predefined search algorithm to identify all lumbar spine studies analyzing the influence of preoperative expectations on postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome. Two independent reviewers and a third independent mediator reviewed the literature and performed study screening, selection, methodological assessment, and data extraction using an objective protocol. Results?Of 444 studies identified, 13 met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality scores ranged from 59 to 100% with the greatest variability in defining patient characteristics and the methods of assessing patient expectations. Patient expectations were assessed in 22 areas, most frequently back and leg pain expectations and general expectations. Functional outcome was assessed by 13 tools; the most common were the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Positive expectations for symptomatology, activity, general health, and recovery correlated with satisfaction. General expectations correlated with higher SF-36 Physical Subcomponent scores, better global function, and lower ODI outcome. Conclusions on the influence of the expectations for pain were limited due to the study heterogeneity, but the evidence suggests a positive correlation between the expectation and outcome for back and leg pain. Conclusions?Positive expectations correlated significantly with short-term postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome, including higher SF-36 scores, earlier return to work, and decreased ODI scores. Future expectation-based investigations will benefit from implementation of the standardized methods of expectation, satisfaction, and outcome analysis discussed herein. PMID:26430599

  12. The Relationship between Preoperative Expectations and the Short-Term Postoperative Satisfaction and Functional Outcome in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Daniel J.; Mallozzi, Scott S.; Mathews, Jacob E.; Moss, Isaac L.; Ouellet, Jean A.; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Objective?To examine the relationship between the patient's preoperative expectations and short-term postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome in lumbar spine surgery. Methods?The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were queried using a predefined search algorithm to identify all lumbar spine studies analyzing the influence of preoperative expectations on postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome. Two independent reviewers and a third independent mediator reviewed the literature and performed study screening, selection, methodological assessment, and data extraction using an objective protocol. Results?Of 444 studies identified, 13 met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality scores ranged from 59 to 100% with the greatest variability in defining patient characteristics and the methods of assessing patient expectations. Patient expectations were assessed in 22 areas, most frequently back and leg pain expectations and general expectations. Functional outcome was assessed by 13 tools; the most common were the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Positive expectations for symptomatology, activity, general health, and recovery correlated with satisfaction. General expectations correlated with higher SF-36 Physical Subcomponent scores, better global function, and lower ODI outcome. Conclusions on the influence of the expectations for pain were limited due to the study heterogeneity, but the evidence suggests a positive correlation between the expectation and outcome for back and leg pain. Conclusions?Positive expectations correlated significantly with short-term postoperative satisfaction and functional outcome, including higher SF-36 scores, earlier return to work, and decreased ODI scores. Future expectation-based investigations will benefit from implementation of the standardized methods of expectation, satisfaction, and outcome analysis discussed herein. PMID:26430599

  13. Clinical application of 3D imaging for assessment of treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H.C.; Oliveira, Ana Emilia Figueiredo; Grauer, Dan; Styner, Martin; Proffit, William R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the clinical application of CBCT for assessment of treatment outcomes, and discusses current work to superimpose digital dental models and 3D photographs. Superimposition of CBCTs on stable structures of reference now allow assessment of 3D dental, skeletal and soft tissue changes for both growing and non-growing patients. Additionally, we describe clinical findings from CBCT superimpositions in assessment of surgery and skeletal anchorage treatment. PMID:21516170

  14. Outcome measurement tools currently used to assess pediatric burn patients: an occupational therapy and physiotherapy perspective.

    PubMed

    Heath, Kathryn; Timbrell, Vanessa; Calvert, Philip; Stiller, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Given the high incidence of burn injuries in children, it is important that all clinicians involved in the care of these patients, including occupational therapists and physiotherapists, are able to assess patients with valid, sensitive, and reliable measurement tools to optimize outcomes and clinical management. The aims of this study were to identify therapist- relevant outcome measurement tools that have been previously used with pediatric burn patients and to ascertain the outcome measurement tools currently used by occupational therapists and physiotherapists working in pediatric burns units. A literature review was undertaken to identify therapist-relevant outcome measurement tools that have been used in the pediatric burn population. A survey involving therapists working in Australian pediatric burns units was then conducted to identify outcome measurement tools in common usage. Few outcome measurement tools were identified that had been specifically validated for use, or were in common usage in Australia, with pediatric patients with burn injury. The lack of validated and widely used measurement tools adversely impacts on the ability of therapists to accurately assess outcomes of treatment and undertake clinical research involving pediatric patients with burn injury. PMID:22002208

  15. Interaction between anesthesia, gender, and functional outcome task following diffuse traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christine A; Cernak, Ibolja; Vink, Robert

    2003-06-01

    A number of experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that functional outcome following traumatic brain injury differs between males and females. Some studies report that females have a better outcome than males following trauma while others report the opposite. In experimental studies, some of the contradictory results may be due to the different experimental conditions, including type of anesthesia and the outcome measures employed. In the present study we have used three different anesthetic protocols and four different outcome measures to determine how these parameters interact and affect functional outcome following traumatic brain injury in male and female rats. Diffuse traumatic brain injury was induced in adult male and female animals using the impact-acceleration brain injury model. Mortality in female animals was no different than males when using halothane anesthesia, slightly better than males when using isoflurane anesthesia, but significantly worse than males under pentobarbital anesthesia. Female animals always performed better than males on rotarod tests of motor outcome, with this effect being unrelated to anesthetic effects. Conversely, in cognitive tests using the Barnes Maze, only isoflurane-anesthetized females performed better than their male counterparts. Similarly, in an open field activity task, females always performed better than males after trauma, with isoflurane-anesthetized females also performing significantly better than the halothane-anesthetized female group after injury. Our results suggest that female animals do better than males after diffuse traumatic brain injury, although this observation is dependent upon the type of anesthesia and the functional task employed. Isoflurane is particularly protective in females, pentobarbital is deleterious to female outcome, while halothane anesthesia has the least influence on gender-related outcome. PMID:12906738

  16. Assessing outcomes of a study abroad course for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda J; Garcia, Alexandra A

    2012-01-01

    There is little debate about the importance of preparing nursing graduates to provide culturally sensitive care to an increasingly diverse society. However, it is difficult for nurse educators to fit learning experiences that help students develop cultural competence into already full programs and create mechanisms to evaluate the results. This article describes a study to assess the impact of a study abroad program on developing cultural competence, including cultural awareness, sensitivity, knowledge, and skills. Results from the Cultural Awareness Survey, reflective journals, and interviews illustrate how the study abroad experience influenced the development of components of cultural competence and might influence clinical practice. Results suggest effective teaching strategies to assist students in becoming culturally competent are experiential in nature and include role modeling, reflective activities, and group discussion. PMID:22616405

  17. Assessing Student Outcomes of Undergraduate Research with URSSA, the Undergraduate Student Self-Assessment Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, S. L.; Weston, T. J.; Thiry, H.

    2012-12-01

    URSSA is the Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment, an online survey instrument for programs and departments to use in assessing the student outcomes of undergraduate research (UR). URSSA focuses on what students learn from their UR experience, rather than whether they liked it. The online questionnaire includes both multiple-choice and open-ended items that focus on students' gains from undergraduate research. These gains include skills, knowledge, deeper understanding of the intellectual and practical work of science, growth in confidence, changes in identity, and career preparation. Other items probe students' participation in important research-related activities that lead to these gains (e.g. giving presentations, having responsibility for a project). These activities, and the gains themselves, are based in research and thus constitute a core set of items. Using these items as a group helps to align a particular program assessment with research-demonstrated outcomes. Optional items may be used to probe particular features that are augment the research experience (e.g. field trips, career seminars, housing arrangements). The URSSA items are based on extensive, interview-based research and evaluation work on undergraduate research by our group and others. This grounding in research means that URSSA measures what we know to be important about the UR experience The items were tested with students, revised and re-tested. Data from a large pilot sample of over 500 students enabled statistical testing of the items' validity and reliability. Optional items about UR program elements were developed in consultation with UR program developers and leaders. The resulting instrument is flexible. Users begin with a set of core items, then customize their survey with optional items to probe students' experiences of specific program elements. The online instrument is free and easy to use, with numeric results available as raw data, summary statistics, cross-tabs, and graphs, and as raw, downloadable data. Finally, URSSA has high content validity based on its research grounding and rigorous development. We will present examples of how URSSA has been used in evaluations of UR programs. A multi-year evaluation of a university-based UR program shows that URSSA items are sensitive to differences in students' prior level of experience with research. For example, experienced student researchers reported greater gains than did their peers new to UR in understanding the process of research and in coming to see themselves as scientists. These differences are consistent with interview data that suggest a developmental progression of gains as students pursue research and gain confidence in their ability to contribute meaningfully. A second example comes from a multi-site evaluation of sites funded by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in Biology. This study acquired data from nearly 800 students at some 60 Bio REU sites in 2010 and 2011. Results reveal differences in gains among demographic groups, and the general strength of these well-planned programs relative to a comparison sample of UR programs that are not part of REU. Our presentation will demonstrate the evaluative use of URSSA and its potential applications to undergraduate research in the geosciences.

  18. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James E.; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Kumar, Amit; Niewczyk, Paulette; Granger, Carl V.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501). The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the sample was 64.5 years (13.4) and 64% were male. More than 75% of patients had a dysvascular-related amputation. Patients with bilateral transfemoral amputations and higher functional severity experienced longest lengths of stay (average 13.7 days) and lowest functional rating at discharge (average 79.4). Likelihood of community discharge was significantly lower for those in more functionally severe patients but did not differ between amputation categories. Functional levels and amputation type are associated with rehabilitation outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients with transfemoral amputations and those in case mix group 1003 (admission motor score less than 36.25) generally experience poorer outcomes than those in other case mix groups. These relationships may be associated with other demographic and/or health factors, which should be explored in future research. PMID:25400948

  19. A Comparison of Functional Outcome in Patients Sustaining Major Trauma: A Multicentre, Prospective, International Study

    PubMed Central

    Rainer, Timothy H.; Yeung, Hiu Hung; Gabbe, Belinda J.; Yuen, Kai Y.; Ho, Hiu F.; Kam, Chak W.; Chang, Annice; Poon, Wai S.; Cameron, Peter A.; Graham, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare 6 month and 12 month health status and functional outcomes between regional major trauma registries in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia. Summary Background Data Multicentres from trauma registries in Hong Kong and the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR). Methods Multicentre, prospective cohort study. Major trauma patients and aged ?18 years were included. The main outcome measures were Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) functional outcome and risk-adjusted Short-Form 12 (SF-12) health status at 6 and 12 months after injury. Results 261 cases from Hong Kong and 1955 cases from VSTR were included. Adjusting for age, sex, ISS, comorbid status, injury mechanism and GCS group, the odds of a better functional outcome for Hong Kong patients relative to Victorian patients at six months was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.17), and at 12 months was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12). Adjusting for age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, Hong Kong patients demonstrated comparable mean PCS-12 scores at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.2, 95% CI: ?1.2, 3.6) and 12-months (adjusted mean difference: ?0.4, 95% CI: ?3.2, 2.4) compared to Victorian patients. Keeping age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, there was no difference in the MCS-12 scores of Hong Kong patients compared to Victorian patients at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 0.4, 95% CI: ?2.1, 2.8) or 12-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.8, 95% CI: ?0.8, 4.5). Conclusion The unadjusted analyses showed better outcomes for Victorian cases compared to Hong Kong but after adjusting for key confounders, there was no difference in 6-month or 12-month functional outcomes between the jurisdictions. PMID:25157522

  20. Executive Functioning in Individuals with a History of ASDs Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Troyb, Eva; Rosenthal, Michael; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Kelley, Elizabeth; Tyson, Katherine; Orinstein, Alyssa; Barton, Marianne; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Executive functioning (EF) is examined among children and adolescents once diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but who no longer meet diagnostic criteria. These individuals have average social and language skills, receive minimal school support and are considered to have achieved optimal outcomes (OOs). Since residual impairments in these individuals might be expected in deficits central to autism, and in developmentally advanced skills, EF was examined in: 34 individuals who achieved OOs, 43 individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA), and 34 typically-developing (TD) peers. Groups were matched on age (M=13.49), gender, and NVIQ, but differed on VIQ (HFAassessment, all three groups demonstrated average EF; however, the OO and HFA groups exhibited more impulsivity and less efficient planning and problem-solving than the TD group, and more HFA participants exhibited below average inhibition than did OO and TD participants. Parent report measures revealed average EF among the OO and TD groups; however, the OO group exhibited more difficulty than the TD group on set-shifting and working memory. HFA participants demonstrated more difficulty on all parent reported EF domains, with a clinical impairment in attention-shifting. Results suggest that EF in OO appears to be within the average range, even for functions that were impaired among individuals with HFA. Despite their average performance, however, the OO and TD groups differed on measures of impulsivity, set-shifting, problem-solving, working memory, and planning, suggesting that the OO group does not have the above-average EF scores of the TD group despite their high-average IQs. PMID:23731181

  1. Direct and Mediated Effects of Cognitive Function with Multidimensional Outcome Measures in Schizophrenia: The Role of Functional Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer S.; Moore, Raeanne C.; Davine, Taylor; Cardenas, Veronica; Bowie, Christopher R.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Mausbach, Brent T.

    2013-01-01

    Although cognitive ability is a known predictor of real-world functioning in schizophrenia, there has been an expanded interest in understanding the mechanisms by which it explains real-world functioning in this population. We examined the extent to which functional capacity (i.e., skills necessary to live independently) mediated the relationship between cognitive ability and both observer and self-reported real-world functioning in 138 outpatients with schizophrenia. Functional capacity significantly mediated the relations between cognitive ability and observer rated real world functioning, but not self-reported real world functioning, with small to medium effect sizes observed for all outcomes. The role of cognitive ability in observer vs. self-reported real-world functioning may be explained by different mechanisms. PMID:23984631

  2. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  3. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood

  4. A Bayesian approach to functional mixed-effects modeling for longitudinal data with binomial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Oleson, Jacob

    2014-08-15

    Longitudinal growth patterns are routinely seen in medical studies where individual growth and population growth are followed up over a period of time. Many current methods for modeling growth presuppose a parametric relationship between the outcome and time (e.g., linear and quadratic); however, these relationships may not accurately capture growth over time. Functional mixed-effects (FME) models provide flexibility in handling longitudinal data with nonparametric temporal trends. Although FME methods are well developed for continuous, normally distributed outcome measures, nonparametric methods for handling categorical outcomes are limited. We consider the situation with binomially distributed longitudinal outcomes. Although percent correct data can be modeled assuming normality, estimates outside the parameter space are possible, and thus, estimated curves can be unrealistic. We propose a binomial FME model using Bayesian methodology to account for growth curves with binomial (percentage) outcomes. The usefulness of our methods is demonstrated using a longitudinal study of speech perception outcomes from cochlear implant users where we successfully model both the population and individual growth trajectories. Simulation studies also advocate the usefulness of the binomial model particularly when outcomes occur near the boundary of the probability parameter space and in situations with a small number of trials. PMID:24723495

  5. A Bayesian Approach to Functional Mixed Effect Modeling for Longitudinal Data with Binomial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Oleson, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal growth patterns are routinely seen in medical studies where individual and population growth is followed over a period of time. Many current methods for modeling growth presuppose a parametric relationship between the outcome and time (e.g., linear, quadratic); however, these relationships may not accurately capture growth over time. Functional mixed effects (FME) models provide flexibility in handling longitudinal data with nonparametric temporal trends. Although FME methods are well-developed for continuous, normally distributed outcome measures, nonparametric methods for handling categorical outcomes are limited. We consider the situation with binomially distributed longitudinal outcomes. Although percent correct data can be modeled assuming normality, estimates outside the parameter space are possible and thus estimated curves can be unrealistic. We propose a binomial FME model using Bayesian methodology to account for growth curves with binomial (percentage) outcomes. The usefulness of our methods is demonstrated using a longitudinal study of speech perception outcomes from cochlear implant users where we successfully model both the population and individual growth trajectories. Simulation studies also advocate the usefulness of the binomial model particularly when outcomes occur near the boundary of the probability parameter space and in situations with a small number of trials. PMID:24723495

  6. Improving Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Functional Behavioral Assessments Using Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Shanna Eisner; Kennedy, Michael J.; Haines, Shana J.; Thomas, Cathy Newman; Alves, Kat D.

    2015-01-01

    Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) is an empirically supported intervention associated with decreasing problem behavior and increasing appropriate behavior. To date, few studies have examined multimedia approaches to FBA training. This paper provides the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial across three university sites and evaluates…

  7. Functional profile of mental health consumers assessed by occupational therapists: level of independence and associations with functional cognition.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Justin Newton; Still, Megan

    2013-06-30

    The assessment of mental health consumers' functional independence is a core duty of occupational therapists. Despite the clear impact of cognition on functional outcomes, it is not always routinely assessed. We sought to explore the relationship between cognition and functional independence as well as to describe which areas of performance were most challenging for the sample. Two hundred and twenty-five assessment reports were analysed. These included a "skills summary table" rating independence in a variety of basic and instrumental activities of daily living and a measure of cognition (using the Allen Cognitive Level test (ACL)). Rasch analysis was used to evaluate the internal validity of the "skills summary table" instrument and to construct person measures of functional independence. Correlational and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to explore relationships between functional independence, cognition, diagnosis, age and gender. Functional cognition explained 30% of the variance in functional independence. The most challenging areas of performance included medication management, money management, housework and cooking. This project confirms the importance of including routine assessment of functional cognition as a key element of functional independence and provides further evidence for the validity of observational assessment of basic and instrumental activities of daily living. PMID:23521900

  8. Learning Outcomes with Linked Assessments an Essential Part of our Regular Teaching Practice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ann C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2010-01-01

    Setting up learning outcomes with linked assessments is a best practice in science education. In biology teaching, faculty are beginning to establish learning outcomes and assessments in the style of concept inventories. At a recent meeting of biology faculty who have designed concept inventories, the characteristics and uses of concept inventories were defined. Concept inventories used as pre- and post-measures of student learning provide a window into students understanding of key concepts of a discipline and serve as a tool to motivate faculty toward evidence-based teaching habits. A movement for the development of a microbiology concept inventory is suggested. PMID:23653711

  9. Assessing the outcome of rehabilitation in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Porter, G A

    1994-07-01

    Assessing the rehabilitative/restorative process requires the definition of desired outcome. Traditionally, medicine has defined the desired outcome of treatment as curing disease. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) cannot be cured by applying current biotechnology. Thus, to assess treatment interventions in patients with ESRD, the desired outcome must be expanded to incorporate the broader components of health, which include physical, mental, and social well-being or quality of life. Based on this expanded definition of health, desirable treatment outcomes in patients with ESRD include employment of those able to work, individual control over the effects of kidney disease and dialysis, enhanced fitness, improved communications with caregivers and family, improved compliance with the dialysis regimen, and resumption of many activities enjoyed before the initiation of dialysis. Broadening the definition of desired outcome requires new measurement techniques. Measurement instruments for health status must evaluate fixed disease, which imposes certain limits on expected outcome; mutable health status, which represents the focus of intervention; and factors unrelated to healthcare, which will modify the scope of intervention that can be prescribed. Health-care status involves both self-reported evaluation and physical assessment. The reporting forms should be comprehensive, convenient, controlled, and valid. Such forms can be targeted to gain information about the natural evolution of a disease or disability process, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment or other intervention on altering the disease or disability outcome, and to measure the quality of care. Two examples of the application of health status assessment will be reviewed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8023836

  10. Epigenetic regulation of human placental function and pregnancy outcome: considerations for causal inference.

    PubMed

    Januar, Vania; Desoye, Gernot; Novakovic, Boris; Cvitic, Silvija; Saffery, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, often defined as regulating gene activity independently of underlying DNA sequence, are crucial for healthy development. The sum total of epigenetic marks within a cell or tissue (the epigenome) is sensitive to environmental influence, and disruption of the epigenome in utero has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Not surprisingly, given its multifaceted functions and important role in regulating pregnancy outcome, the placenta shows unique epigenetic features. Interestingly however, many of these are only otherwise seen in human malignancy (the pseudomalignant placental epigenome). Epigenetic variation in the placenta is now emerging as a candidate mediator of environmental influence on placental functioning and a key regulator of pregnancy outcome. However, replication of findings is generally lacking, most likely due to small sample sizes and a lack of standardization of analytical approaches. Defining DNA methylation "signatures" in the placenta associated with maternal and fetal outcomes offers tremendous potential to improve pregnancy outcomes, but care must be taken in interpretation of findings. Future placental epigenetic research would do well to address the issues present in epigenetic epidemiology more generally, including careful consideration of sample size, potentially confounding factors, issues of tissue heterogeneity, reverse causation, and the role of genetics in modulating epigenetic profile. The importance of animal or in vitro models in establishing a functional role of epigenetic variation identified in human beings, which is key to establishing causation, should not be underestimated. PMID:26428498

  11. Emotion in bipolar I disorder: Implications for functional and symptom outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Tharp, Jordan A; Peckham, Andrew D; McMaster, Kaja J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the centrality of emotion disturbance in neurobiological models of bipolar disorder, the behavioral literature has not yet clearly identified the most central aspects of emotion disturbance in bipolar disorder. Toward this aim, we gathered a battery of emotion-related measures in 67 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder as assessed with the SCID and a well-matched control group of 58 persons without a history of mood disorders. Those with bipolar disorder were interviewed monthly until they achieved remission, and then tested on emotion measures. A subset of 36 participants with bipolar disorder completed symptom severity interviews at 12-month follow-up. Factor analyses indicated 4 emotion factor scores: Negative Emotion, Positive Emotion, Reappraisal, and Suppression. Bivariate analyses suggested that bipolar disorder was tied to a host of emotion disturbances, but multivariate analyses suggested that bipolar disorder was particularly tied to elevations of Negative Emotion. High Negative Emotion, low Positive Emotion, and high Suppression were conjointly related to lower functioning. Reappraisal predicted declines in depression over time for those with bipolar disorder. Findings highlight the importance of considering the overall profile of emotion disturbance in bipolar disorder. Emotion and emotion regulation appear central to a broad range of outcomes in bipolar disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26480234

  12. Social Work Assessment Notes: A Comprehensive Outcomes-Based Hospice Documentation System.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Angela Gregory; Martin, Ellen; Jones, Barbara L; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the development of an integrated psychosocial patient and caregiver assessment and plan of care for hospice social work documentation. A team of hospice social workers developed the Social Work Assessment Notes as a quality improvement project in collaboration with the information technology department. Using the Social Work Assessment Tool as an organizing framework, this comprehensive hospice social work documentation system is designed to integrate assessment, planning, and outcomes measurement. The system was developed to guide the assessment of patients' and caregivers' needs related to end-of-life psychosocial issues, to facilitate collaborative care plan development, and to measure patient- and family-centered outcomes. Goals established with the patient and the caregiver are documented in the plan of care and become the foundation for patient-centered, strengths-based interventions. Likert scales are used to assign numerical severity levels for identified issues and progress made toward goals and to track the outcome of social work interventions across nine psychosocial constructs. The documentation system was developed for use in an electronic health record but can be used for paper charting. Future plans include automated aggregate outcomes measurement to identify the most effective interventions and best practices in end-of-life care. PMID:26285358

  13. The Impact of a Proficiency-Based Assessment and Reassessment of Learning Outcomes System on Student Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This research compares a student-centered, proficiency-based assessment and reassessment of learning outcomes (PARLO) system to traditional assessment in a college-level introductory statistics class. The PARLO class was assessed on learning outcomes using a three-tiered proficiency scale and given the opportunity to resubmit assignments to

  14. How Do We Know We're Doing It Right? Assessing Outcomes in Core Business Communications Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Thomas A., II

    Outcomes assessment is increasingly important to regional accrediting agencies, which are requiring self-study reports to not only analyze the outcomes assessment efforts, but also use assessment results to improve programs. This paper illustrates the process in a university-wide required business communications course by discussing the problems

  15. Does percutaneous nephrolithotomy and its outcomes have an impact on renal function? Quantitative analysis using SPECT-CT DMSA.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fentes, Daniel; Cortés, Julia; Gude, Francisco; García, Camilo; Ruibal, Alvaro; Aguiar, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    To assess the functional effects of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and its outcomes in the operated kidney, we prospectively studied 30 consecutive cases undergoing PCNL. Kidney function was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months after surgery with serum creatinine, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and with (99m)Tc-DMSA SPECT-CT scans to determine the differential renal function (DRF). PCNL effects in the operated kidney DRF were considered globally (DRFPLANAR, DRFSPECT) and in the region of percutaneous access (DRFACCESS). PCNL functional impact was also assessed depending on its outcomes, namely success (stone-free status) and the development of perioperative complications. PCNL has rendered 73 % of the cases completely stone free with a 33 % complication rate. After PCNL, serum creatinine and GFR did not change significantly, whereas DRFPLANAR and DRFSPECT dropped 1.2 % (p = 0.014) and 1.0 % (p = 0.041), respectively. The highest decrease was observed in DRFACCESS (1.8 %, p = 0.012). Stone-free status after PCNL did not show any impact on kidney function. Conversely, cases that suffered from a complication showed impairment in serum creatinine (0.1 mg/dL, p = 0.028), in GFR (11.1 mL/min, p = 0.036) as well as in DRFPLANAR (2.7 %, p = 0.018), DRFSPECT (2.2 %, p = 0.023) and DRFACCESS (2.7 %, p = 0.049). We conclude that PCNL has a minimal impact on global kidney function, which is mainly located in the region of percutaneous access. The advent of perioperative complications increased PCNL functional damage, whereas the stone-free status did not show any meaningful effect. PMID:25074714

  16. The functional outcomes of coloanal and low colorectal anastomoses with reservoirs after low rectal cancer resections.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Franois; Douard, Richard; Wind, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Nearly half of patients undergoing low anterior rectal cancer resection have a functional sequelae after straight coloanal or low colorectal anastomoses (SA), including low anterior rectal resection syndrome, which combines stool fragmentation, urge incontinence, and incontinence. SA are responsible for anastomotic leakage rates of 0 to 29.2 per cent. Adding a colonic reservoir improves the functional results while reducing anastomotic complications. These colonic reservoir techniques include the colonic J pouch (CJP), transverse coloplasty (TC), and side-to-end anastomosis (STEA) procedures. The aim of this literature review was to compare the functional outcomes of these three techniques from a high level of evidence. CJP with a 4- to 6-cm reservoir is a good surgical option because it reduces functional impairments during the first year, and probably up to 5 years, but is not always feasible. TC appears to perform as well as CJP, is achievable in over 95 per cent of patients, but still with some doubts about a higher anastomotic leakage rate and worse functional outcomes. STEA appears equivalent to CJP in terms of morbidity and even better functional outcomes. STEA, with a terminal side segment size of 3 cm, is feasible in the majority of nonobese patients, combines good functional results, has low anastomotic leakage rates, and is easy to complete. PMID:25513921

  17. The MAO inhibitor phenelzine improves functional outcomes in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Musgrave, Travis; Benson, Curtis; Wong, Grace; Browne, Ikennah; Tenorio, Gustavo; Rauw, Gail; Baker, Glen B; Kerr, Bradley J

    2011-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and the animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), are both accompanied by motor and non-motor symptoms. Pathological changes in the activities of key neurotransmitters likely underlie many of these symptoms. We have previously described disturbances in the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT/serotonin), noradrenaline (NE) and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in a mouse model of EAE. The potential therapeutic effect of a drug that targets these three neurotransmitters, the antidepressant and anti-panic drug phenelzine (PLZ), was assessed in mice with MOG(35-55) induced EAE. The neurotransmitter content of EAE and control tissue after PLZ administration was first evaluated by HPLC. The ability of PLZ treatment to modulate EAE disease course and clinical signs was then assessed. Daily PLZ treatment, starting seven days after disease induction, delayed EAE onset, reduced disease severity in the chronic phase and was associated with substantial improvements in exploratory behavior and a novel measure of sickness and/or depression. Upon completion of the experiment, PLZ's effects on histopathological markers of the disease were examined. No differences were observed in T cell infiltration, microglia/macrophage reactivity, demyelination or axonal injury in PLZ-treated spinal cords. However, EAE mice treated with PLZ showed a normalization of 5-HT levels in the ventral horn of the spinal cord that might account for the improvements in behavioral outcomes. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of MAO inhibitors such as PLZ in MS. Additionally, the behavioral changes observed in EAE mice indicate that alterations in non-motor or 'affective' measures may be valuable to consider in addition to traditional measures of gross locomotor function. PMID:21723939

  18. Long-term vestibulocochlear functional outcome following retro-sigmoid approach to resection of vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Tammam; Regelsberger, Jan; Matschke, Jakob; Jowett, Nathan; Westphal, Manfred; Dalchow, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term vestibulocochlear functional outcomes of patients operated for unilateral vestibular schwannoma via the retro-sigmoid approach. Patients who underwent vestibular schwannoma resection via retro-sigmoid approach between 2004 and 2008 at our institution, without prior surgical or radio-surgical therapy were considered to be eligible for this study. Preoperative auditory and vestibular symptoms were assessed retrospectively. Postoperative symptoms were prospectively assessed using a standardised questionnaire, pure tone audiometry, video-oculography, and rotary chair testing. Out of a total of 203 patients, 120 were eligible for this study, of whom 64 responded to follow-up requests and could be enrolled. Serviceable hearing was reported in 42 patients (66 %) preoperatively and was maintained in 18 (43 %) postoperatively. While no significant change in rate of tinnitus and balance impairment between pre- and postoperative periods was detected, vertigo decreased significantly (40 to 28 %, p < 0.001). Postoperative video-oculography demonstrated vestibular paresis in 80 %. Rotary chair testing demonstrated normal or central compensation in 84 %. Absence of central compensation was associated with postoperative balance disturbance (p = 0.035). Increasing tumour size and patient age, also decreasing quality of preoperative hearing were independent factors predictive of a postoperative non-serviceable hearing (p = 0.020, p = 0.039 and p = 0.002, respectively). Resection of vestibular schwannoma via the retro-sigmoid approach is associated with improvement in postoperative vertiginous symptoms. Absence of central compensation leads to increased postoperative balance disturbances. Preservation of serviceable postoperative hearing is associated with good preoperative hearing status, younger age, and smaller tumours. PMID:25700833

  19. A global assessment of the social and conservation outcomes of protected areas.

    PubMed

    Oldekop, J A; Holmes, G; Harris, W E; Evans, K L

    2016-02-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are a key strategy for protecting biological resources, but they vary considerably in their effectiveness and are frequently reported as having negative impacts on local people. This has contributed to a divisive and unresolved debate concerning the compatibility of environmental and socioeconomic development goals. Elucidating the relationship between positive and negative social impacts and conservation outcomes of PAs is key for the development of more effective and socially just conservation. We conducted a global meta-analysis on 165 PAs using data from 171 published studies. We assessed how PAs affect the well-being of local people, the factors associated with these impacts, and crucially the relationship between PAs' conservation and socioeconomic outcomes. Protected areas associated with positive socioeconomic outcomes were more likely to report positive conservation outcomes. Positive conservation and socioeconomic outcomes were more likely to occur when PAs adopted comanagement regimes, empowered local people, reduced economic inequalities, and maintained cultural and livelihood benefits. Whereas the strictest regimes of PA management attempted to exclude anthropogenic influences to achieve biological conservation objectives, PAs that explicitly integrated local people as stakeholders tended to be more effective at achieving joint biological conservation and socioeconomic development outcomes. Strict protection may be needed in some circumstances, yet our results demonstrate that conservation and development objectives can be synergistic and highlight management strategies that increase the probability of maximizing both conservation performance and development outcomes of PAs. PMID:26096222

  20. Functional Behavior Assessment in Schools: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Cynthia M.; Rodriguez, Billie Jo; Campbell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Functional behavior assessment is becoming a commonly used practice in school settings. Accompanying this growth has been an increase in research on functional behavior assessment. We reviewed the extant literature on documenting indirect and direct methods of functional behavior assessment in school settings. To discern best practice guidelines…

  1. Functional Behavior Assessment in Schools: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Cynthia M.; Rodriguez, Billie Jo; Campbell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Functional behavior assessment is becoming a commonly used practice in school settings. Accompanying this growth has been an increase in research on functional behavior assessment. We reviewed the extant literature on documenting indirect and direct methods of functional behavior assessment in school settings. To discern best practice guidelines

  2. Impact of frailty and functional status on outcomes in elderly patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty: rationale and design of the IFFANIAM study.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Sol, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Vidn, Maria T; Bueno, Hctor; Curs, Antoni; Aboal, Jaime; Llibre, Cinta; Rueda, Ferran; Bernal, Eva; Cequier, Angel

    2013-10-01

    The IFFANIAM study (Impact of frailty and functional status in elderly patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty) is an observational multicenter registry to assess the impact of frailty and functional status on outcomes of elderly patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary angioplasty. STEMI patients age 75 years or older undergoing primary angioplasty will be extensively studied during admission in 4 tertiary care Hospitals in Spain, assessing their baseline functional status (Barthel index, Lawton-Brody index), frailty (Fried criteria, FRAIL scale [fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight]), comorbidities (Charlson index), nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form), and quality of life (Seattle Angina Questionnaire). Participants will be managed according current recommendations. The primary outcome will be the description of 1-year mortality, its causes, and associated factors. Secondary outcomes will be functional capacity and quality of life. Results will help to better understand the impact of frailty and functional ability on outcomes in elderly STEMI patients undergoing primary angioplasty, thus potentially contributing to improving their clinical management. Higher life expectancy has resulted in a large segment of elderly population and an increase in myocardial infarction in these patients. This calls attention to healthcare systems to focus on promoting methods to improve the clinical management of this population. PMID:24114768

  3. Customizing Instruction To Maximize Functional Outcomes for Students with Profound Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pamela D.; Gast, David L.; Logan, Kent R.; Jacobs, Heidi A.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a process for customizing instruction for students with profound multiple disabilities that has been used to design instructional programs and maximize attainment of functional outcomes. The process focuses on collaborative teamwork and problem solving to design and implement instructional programs and includes five major

  4. Effects of a summer treatment program on functional sports outcomes in young children with ADHD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participation in youth sports can be very beneficial, but children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may participate less often and less successfully. The current study evaluated functional sports outcomes for children with ADHD who attended an intensive behavioral treatment that...

  5. Does Surgical Management of the Hand in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Affect Functional Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Munster, Judith C.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; Haga, Nienke; Verheij, Nienke P.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the literature on the effects of surgery of the spastic hand in children with cerebral palsy on functional outcome and muscle coordination. We performed a search of the relevant literature in Medline, Embase, and Biological Abstracts from 1966 to June 2006. The search resulted in eight studies on the effect of…

  6. Functional Outcomes of Child and Adolescent Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Young Adult Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey D.; Rowe, Richard; Boylan, Khrista

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is considered to be a disorder of childhood, yet evidence suggests that prevalence rates of the disorder are stable into late adolescence and trajectories of symptoms persist into young adulthood. Functional outcomes associated with ODD through childhood and adolescence include conflict within…

  7. Functional Outcomes of Child and Adolescent Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Young Adult Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey D.; Rowe, Richard; Boylan, Khrista

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is considered to be a disorder of childhood, yet evidence suggests that prevalence rates of the disorder are stable into late adolescence and trajectories of symptoms persist into young adulthood. Functional outcomes associated with ODD through childhood and adolescence include conflict within

  8. Functions, Targets, and Outcomes of Specific Forms of Social Aggression: A Daily Diary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyches, Karmon D.; Mayeux, Lara

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated 8 specific forms of social aggression (SA) in terms of the functions they serve, the characteristics of the peers targeted by them, and the outcomes associated with using the behaviors. Two hundred and seventeen fifth- and seventh-grade boys and girls completed a structured daily diary for 5 consecutive days in their…

  9. The role of dietary protein in optimizing muscle mass, function and health outcomes in older individuals.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert R

    2012-08-01

    The determination of whether increased dietary protein can positively affect health outcomes is hindered by the absence of prospective, randomized trials directly addressing this issue in which all pertinent variables are controlled. Consequently, we can only address the question deductively by considering the support for the rationale underlying the notion of a beneficial effect of increased dietary protein intake. With regard to health outcomes, we have focused on older individuals. Muscle mass and function are progressively lost with aging, so that by the age of 60 many individuals have reached a threshold where function begins to be affected. An association between reduced muscle mass and strength and unfavourable health outcomes is more likely to be revealed in individuals who have significant decrements in muscle mass and strength. In this article support for the rationale underlying the notion of a beneficial effect of increased dietary protein intake is considered. Dietary protein intake, and the resulting increased availability of plasma amino acids, stimulates muscle protein synthesis. If all other variables are controlled, increased muscle protein synthesis leads to improved muscle mass, strength and function over time. Increased muscle mass, strength and function are related to improved health outcomes in older individuals. Since adverse effects of reasonable increases in protein intake above the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of 0·8 g protein/kg/day have not been reported, it is reasonable to conclude that the optimal protein intake for an older individual is greater than the RDA. PMID:23107552

  10. Does Surgical Management of the Hand in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Affect Functional Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Munster, Judith C.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; Haga, Nienke; Verheij, Nienke P.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the literature on the effects of surgery of the spastic hand in children with cerebral palsy on functional outcome and muscle coordination. We performed a search of the relevant literature in Medline, Embase, and Biological Abstracts from 1966 to June 2006. The search resulted in eight studies on the effect of

  11. Health, Functioning, and Participation of Adolescents and Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisch, Dana; Msall, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    With medical advances, more individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes who reside in developed countries are surviving to adolescence and adulthood. However, there continues to be a paucity of research examining long-term health, functional activities, and participatory outcomes over their life-course. This article reviews the current…

  12. Health, Functioning, and Participation of Adolescents and Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisch, Dana; Msall, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    With medical advances, more individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes who reside in developed countries are surviving to adolescence and adulthood. However, there continues to be a paucity of research examining long-term health, functional activities, and participatory outcomes over their life-course. This article reviews the current

  13. Anterior Temporal Lobe Connectivity Correlates with Functional Outcome after Aphasic Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane E.; Crinion, Jennifer T.; Ralph, Matthew A. Lambon; Wise, Richard J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Focal brain lesions are assumed to produce language deficits by two basic mechanisms: local cortical dysfunction at the lesion site, and remote cortical dysfunction due to disruption of the transfer and integration of information between connected brain regions. However, functional imaging studies investigating language outcome after aphasic

  14. Outcomes of a 5-day physiotherapy programme for functional (psychogenic) motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, G; Ricciardi, L; Demartini, B; Hunter, R; Joyce, E; Edwards, M J

    2015-03-01

    Patients with functional motor disorder (FMD) are commonly seen by physiotherapists and there is growing evidence to support a physical rehabilitation approach. There are, however, few descriptions in the literature of the content of successful physiotherapy treatment. This prospective cohort study reports the practicalities and outcomes of a pilot 5-day physiotherapy programme. Patients were referred from a specialist movement disorders clinic. The treatment consisted of education and movement retraining, with a long-term self-management focus. Education and movement retraining was based on a pathophysiological model for FMD that stresses the importance of self-focussed attention and illness belief. Patients were assessed at baseline, end of treatment and 3-month follow-up. 47 patients completed the programme, mean symptom duration was 5.5 years, 64 % were unemployed due to ill health. At the end of treatment, 65 % rated their symptoms as "very much improved" or "much improved", this reduced to 55 % at 3 months. At follow-up, there was a significant improvement in physical domains of the SF-36, Berg Balance Scale and 10 Metre Timed Walk. Measures of mental health did not change. This prospective cohort study adds to the growing evidence that supports the use of specialist physiotherapy treatment for FMD. Improvements here were made despite the cohort having characteristics associated with poor prognosis. We argue that specific treatment techniques are important and have the potential to improve physical function, quality of life and may prove to be a cost-effective treatment for selected patients with FMD. PMID:25557282

  15. Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of deaf individuals.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Cawthon, Stephanie W; Bond, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Lower English literacy achievement of deaf students is often hypothesized to be an impediment for successful adult life experiences. Yet, literacy practices that individuals engage in throughout their daily lives are much more complex than what school-based measures of English can capture and particularly so for deaf individuals. A national large-scale data set with a sample of over 1,000 deaf youths was used to assess what, precisely, standardized measures of literacy may predict in terms of postschool outcomes in three domains: life, employment, and education. Regression analyses indicate that these measures predicted some postschool outcomes, but not all, and if significant, only a small amount of variation in the outcomes was explained. Findings suggest that English literacy, particularly the narrow conceptualization of English literacy skills that are measured through school-based assessments, may not play a significant role in the lives of deaf individuals, contrary to expectations. PMID:24077877

  16. Quantitative functional outcomes of the conservative management of partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Gresty, H; Tadtayev, S; Arumainayagam, N; Patel, S; King, C; Boustead, G; Banks, F

    2015-10-01

    The low incidence of partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum (PSTCC) means its management is guided by isolated case reports. Erectile function is an important outcome that has not been described quantitatively in the literature. We present two cases of PSTCC managed conservatively. Although both patients reported resolution of local symptoms, formal analysis of sexual function at follow-up review has revealed that only one achieved complete recovery. PMID:26414373

  17. Assessing the reproducibility of discriminant function analyses

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Rose L.; Albert, Arianne Y.K.; Renaut, Sebastien; Rennison, Diana J.; Bock, Dan G.

    2015-01-01

    Data are the foundation of empirical research, yet all too often the datasets underlying published papers are unavailable, incorrect, or poorly curated. This is a serious issue, because future researchers are then unable to validate published results or reuse data to explore new ideas and hypotheses. Even if data files are securely stored and accessible, they must also be accompanied by accurate labels and identifiers. To assess how often problems with metadata or data curation affect the reproducibility of published results, we attempted to reproduce Discriminant Function Analyses (DFAs) from the field of organismal biology. DFA is a commonly used statistical analysis that has changed little since its inception almost eight decades ago, and therefore provides an opportunity to test reproducibility among datasets of varying ages. Out of 100 papers we initially surveyed, fourteen were excluded because they did not present the common types of quantitative result from their DFA or gave insufficient details of their DFA. Of the remaining 86 datasets, there were 15 cases for which we were unable to confidently relate the dataset we received to the one used in the published analysis. The reasons ranged from incomprehensible or absent variable labels, the DFA being performed on an unspecified subset of the data, or the dataset we received being incomplete. We focused on reproducing three common summary statistics from DFAs: the percent variance explained, the percentage correctly assigned and the largest discriminant function coefficient. The reproducibility of the first two was fairly high (20 of 26, and 44 of 60 datasets, respectively), whereas our success rate with the discriminant function coefficients was lower (15 of 26 datasets). When considering all three summary statistics, we were able to completely reproduce 46 (65%) of 71 datasets. While our results show that a majority of studies are reproducible, they highlight the fact that many studies still are not the carefully curated research that the scientific community and public expects. PMID:26290793

  18. Using social outcomes to inform decision-making in schizophrenia: Relationships with symptoms and functioning.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Timothy R; Fisher, Aaron J; Kring, Ann M

    2016-02-01

    The outcomes of the decisions we make can be used to inform subsequent choices and behavior. We investigated whether and how people with and without schizophrenia use positive and negative social outcomes and emotional displays to inform decisions to place trust in social partners. We also investigated the impact of reversals in social partners' behavior on decisions to trust. Thirty-two people with schizophrenia and 29 control participants completed a task in which they decided how much trust to place in social partners' showing either a dynamic emotional (smiling, scowling) or neutral display. Interactions were predetermined to result in positive (trust reciprocated) or negative (trust abused) outcomes, and we modeled changes in trust decisions over the course of repeated interactions. Compared to controls, people with schizophrenia were less sensitive to positive social outcomes in that they placed less trust in trustworthy social partners during initial interactions. By contrast, people with schizophrenia were more sensitive to negative social outcomes during initial interactions with untrustworthy social partners, placing less trust in these partners compared to controls. People with schizophrenia did not differ from controls in detecting social partner behavior reversals from trustworthy to untrustworthy; however, they had difficulties detecting reversals from untrustworthy to trustworthy. Importantly, decisions to trust were associated with real-world social functioning. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding social engagement among people with schizophrenia and the development of psychosocial interventions for social functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26854512

  19. A Multidimensional Approach to Student Outcomes Assessment. AIR 1987 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moden, Gary O.; Williford, A. Michael

    A multidimensional program of student assessment that has been used for over 7 years at Ohio University is described. Between 200 and 250 freshman actually participate each year. Various forms of value-added testing, measures of social and academic integration, and alumni outcomes measures are used. The program is unique in that general education…

  20. Applying Social Cognitive Theory to Academic Advising to Assess Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene

    2011-01-01

    Review of social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning is applied to academic advising for the purposes of assessing student learning. A brief overview of the history of student learning outcomes in higher education is followed by an explanation of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning constructs and how they

  1. An Outcomes-Based Assessment of Quality of Life in Social Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Laura Elisabet; Arias, Benito; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Navas, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this article consists of describing the calibration of an instrument to assess quality of life-related personal outcomes using Rasch analysis. The sample was composed of 3.029 recipients of social services from Catalonia (Spain) and was selected using a probabilistic polietapic sample design. Results related to unidimensionality, item

  2. Institutionalizing Student Outcomes Assessment: The Need for Better Research to Inform Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the organizational impediments and facilitators that influence the implementation of student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). This review points to the importance of culture, leadership, and organizational policies to the implementation of SLOA. However, we need to approach research differently, both conceptually and…

  3. Developing a Rubric to Assess Student Learning Outcomes Using a Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Nicholas; Kazemi, Ellie; Huscher, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    We developed a rubric to assess several of our department's undergraduate student learning outcomes (SLOs). Target SLOs include applications of principles of research methodology, using appropriate statistics, adherence to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, and written communication skills. We randomly sampled 20

  4. Career Preparedness Survey Outcomes of Food Science Graduates--A Follow-Up Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlscheid, Jeffri; Clark, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight recent graduates (1998-2008) from the joint Washington State University (WSU) and University of Idaho (UI) BiState School of Food Science program and 27 of their employers participated in a survey assessing learning outcomes based on the 2001 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) core competencies for undergraduate food science

  5. Identifying Low-Effort Examinees on Student Learning Outcomes Assessment: A Comparison of Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Joseph A.; Liu, Ou Lydia; Bridgeman, Brent

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a study that compares two approaches (self-reported effort [SRE] and response time effort [RTE]) for identifying low-effort examinees in student learning outcomes assessment. Although both approaches equally discriminated from measures of ability (e.g., SAT scores), RTE was found to have a stronger relationship with test…

  6. Institutionalizing Student Outcomes Assessment: The Need for Better Research to Inform Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the organizational impediments and facilitators that influence the implementation of student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). This review points to the importance of culture, leadership, and organizational policies to the implementation of SLOA. However, we need to approach research differently, both conceptually and

  7. Two Loops That Need Closing: Contingent Faculty Perceptions of Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Gray; Danley-Scott, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The existing literature on non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty focuses largely on whether relying on contingent faculty is harmful to students. However, studies rarely survey contingent faculty or explore how to increase NTT faculty participation in outcomes assessment, even though contingent faculty teach most general education courses. Our survey of

  8. Public Relations Education and Outcomes Assessment: An Immediate Challenge for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruckeberg, Dean

    It is unlikely that Harvard University (Massachusetts) considered "outcomes assessment" for its first class of nine students in 1640, and most certainly the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States did not offer a public relations curriculum. A short history of education in the United States shows increasing numbers of students

  9. Faculty and Administrator Beliefs Regarding Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strollo, Toni Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined higher education faculty and academic administrator (AO) beliefs regarding the value of assessment of student learning outcomes (ASLO) as a means for improving teaching and learning at a Southeastern community college known for its commitment as a learning college and as an exemplar for such efforts. Faculty and AOs at this

  10. Motivating Learning and Assessing Outcomes in Continuing Medical Education Using a Personal Learning Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Virginia A.; Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Turco, Mary G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although there is increasing focus on provider behavior change as an outcome of continuing medical education (CME), it has long been known that an increase in knowledge alone is rarely sufficient to induce such change. The Personal Learning Plan (PLP), designed to motivate and assess CME learning, was partly derived from SMART goals…

  11. Assessment of the United States Military Academy's Academic Program Outcome Goal: Understand Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Johnston

    The assessment model used to examine the human behavior outcome goal had three components: purpose, principles, and process. The purpose was to improve programs and respond to external agencies. Six principles provided a framework and addressed three general criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, and accuracy. The process contained four components:

  12. Learning Outcomes Afforded by Self-Assessed, Segmented Video-Print Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Learning affordances of video and print are examined in order to assess the learning outcomes afforded by hybrid video-print learning packages. The affordances discussed for print are: navigability, surveyability and legibility. Those discussed for video are: design for constructive reflection, provision of realistic experiences, presentational

  13. USE OF CASE REPORTS IN ASSESSING ADVERSE OUTCOMES OF HUMAN PRENATAL DRUG EXPOSURES: AN APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of case reports for assessing the developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure is limited by the inability to determine the incidence of adverse outcomes and by the high likelihood for bias. Yet, because it is impossible to conduct clinical trials for the assessme...

  14. Assessment of Educational Outcomes in Pediatric Dentistry: A Site Examiner's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casamassimo, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    Outcomes assessment reduced to its simplest definition is quality control. Characteristics of the new Accreditation Standards for Dental Education Programs include: patient oriented, take a definite posture in relation to the specialties, create a minimally educated practitioner, are process oriented, and provide a form of quality assurance in

  15. A Qualitative Assessment of the Learning Outcomes of Teaching Introductory American Politics in Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelbman, Shamira M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of an ethnographic content analysis of students' written reflections as a means for assessing the learning outcomes of teaching introductory American politics in comparative perspective. It focuses especially on determining whether and how this approach enhanced students' understanding and retention of knowledge

  16. Implementing an Outcomes-Based Assessment Process in a Major Metropolitan Community College District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2008-01-01

    To propose recommendations for implementing an outcomes-based assessment program review in a California community college district, a grounded theory analysis was performed within the district. The findings generated were cross-referenced with findings from a multi-institutional case study analysis. A key finding from the cross-reference was the

  17. Recommendations for Implementing an Effective, Efficient, and Enduring Outcomes-Based Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2012-01-01

    To propose recommendations to implement outcomes-based assessment program review in a California Community College District, a grounded theory analysis was performed within the district. The findings generated were cross-referenced with findings from a multi-institutional case study analysis. A key finding from the cross-reference was the need for

  18. Career Preparedness Survey Outcomes of Food Science Graduates--A Follow-Up Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlscheid, Jeffri; Clark, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight recent graduates (1998-2008) from the joint Washington State University (WSU) and University of Idaho (UI) BiState School of Food Science program and 27 of their employers participated in a survey assessing learning outcomes based on the 2001 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) core competencies for undergraduate food science…

  19. Towards a Framework for Aligning Learning Outcomes, Academic Literacies and Assessment Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Robert; Goscinski, Andrzej; Coldwell-Neilson, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Although Australian students spend three or more years studying they can seem quite unaware of any of the expected learning outcomes of their course. They are often single unit focused, paying most attention to individual assessment items thus not developing a holistic view of their course. This paper presents a theoretical framework to support…

  20. State Practices in the Assessment of Outcomes for Students with Disabilities. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriner, James G.; And Others

    This technical report describes the methodology, results, and conclusions of a 1991 survey, which was conducted to determine state efforts to develop systems to assess educational outcomes, states' needs for solutions to technical/implementation problems, existing databases, and efforts of states to design a comprehensive system of indicators in

  1. An Outcome Evaluation of an Inpatient Crisis Stabilization and Assessment Program for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenham, Stephanie L.; Bisnaire, Lise

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and outcomes of youth aged 7 to 17 who received inpatient psychiatric and mental health services along different clinical pathways of a new service delivery model. Method: Participants included 211 admissions to an inpatient crisis stabilization and assessment program over a one-year period. Standardized

  2. Sleeping with the Enemy: Making Outcomes Assessment Work in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schueler, Paul

    In 1991, the New Jersey Board of Higher Education's College Outcomes Evaluation Program (COEP) was canceled due to lack of state funding. Despite the cancellation, 17 community colleges formed the New Jersey County College Project on General Education to develop goals, objectives, and assessment criteria for general education. The Project grounds…

  3. Assessing the Relationship between Prosody and Reading Outcomes in Children Using the PEPS-C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrin, Margaret; Arciuli, Joanne; Sharma, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between both receptive and expressive prosody and each of three reading outcomes: accuracy of reading aloud words, accuracy of reading aloud nonwords, and comprehension. Participants were 63 children aged 7 to 12 years. To assess prosody, we used the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech Communication

  4. Assessing Intermediate Outcomes of a Faith-Based Residential Prisoner Reentry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Caterina G.; Wolff, Ashley; Correa, Vanessa; Buck, Janeen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined intermediate outcomes of a faith-based prisoner reentry program by assessing how client spirituality related to client- and program-level characteristics, investigating differences between completers and terminators, and examining how religious preference, religiosity/spirituality, religious salience, and

  5. A Study of Foreign Language Learning Outcomes Assessment in U.S. Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricardo-Osorio, Jose G.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on findings obtained from an online survey answered by 97 foreign language department chairs. The Web survey was pilot tested for validity and reliability and obtained a Cronbach's reliability coefficient of .80. The results suggest that student learning outcomes assessment in American undergraduate foreign language education

  6. Assessment Theory and Practice of Students' Outcomes in the Nordic Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysne, Anders

    2006-01-01

    In the latest decades assessment in education has become a very controversial issue in many western countries, and especially so in the Nordic countries, where the controversy became most passionate in Norway. It was really not a debate about whether or not formal marks should be used in communication of educational outcomes for the individual

  7. Peer-Assessed Outcomes in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoza, Betsy; Gerdes, Alyson C.; Mrug, Sylvie; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Bukowski, William M.; Gold, Joel A.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Abikoff, Howard B.; Conners, C. Keith; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Jensen, Peter S.; Kraemer, Helena C.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Severe, Joanne B.; Swanson, James M.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wells, Karen C.; Wigal, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Peer-assessed outcomes were examined at the end of treatment (14 months after study entry) for 285 children (226 boys, 59 girls) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who were rated by their classmates (2,232 classmates total) using peer sociometric procedures. All children with ADHD were participants in the Multimodal Treatment

  8. Assessing Intermediate Outcomes of a Faith-Based Residential Prisoner Reentry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Caterina G.; Wolff, Ashley; Correa, Vanessa; Buck, Janeen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined intermediate outcomes of a faith-based prisoner reentry program by assessing how client spirituality related to client- and program-level characteristics, investigating differences between completers and terminators, and examining how religious preference, religiosity/spirituality, religious salience, and…

  9. The Integration of Outcomes Assessment Information in the Management of Arizona Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleishman, Joseph H.

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities throughout the country are increasingly coming under pressure from accrediting institutions and legislative bodies to implement comprehensive outcomes assessment initiatives designed to measure and document student performance. Over the past ten years pressure has been directed towards colleges to reshape their current…

  10. Learning Outcomes Afforded by Self-Assessed, Segmented Video-Print Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Learning affordances of video and print are examined in order to assess the learning outcomes afforded by hybrid video-print learning packages. The affordances discussed for print are: navigability, surveyability and legibility. Those discussed for video are: design for constructive reflection, provision of realistic experiences, presentational…

  11. Assessing the Relationship between Prosody and Reading Outcomes in Children Using the PEPS-C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrin, Margaret; Arciuli, Joanne; Sharma, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between both receptive and expressive prosody and each of three reading outcomes: accuracy of reading aloud words, accuracy of reading aloud nonwords, and comprehension. Participants were 63 children aged 7 to 12 years. To assess prosody, we used the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech Communication…

  12. Assessing Family Outcomes in Two-Generation Programs: Lessons Learned and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Janet; And Others

    The interrelationships between child and family outcomes can best be understood within an ecological perspective of psychological, social, and economic factors. Based on work with a group of early education and intervention projects with a two-generation focus, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for defining and assessing the impact of

  13. Creating an Outcomes-Based Tool for Learning Barrier Assessment in an Outpatient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Rupnow, Jana M.; Currie, Kristi A.; Procious, James K.; Adams, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    An outcomes-based assessment instrument was devised to screen patients for learning problems that would impede patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Criteria for seven barriers were established: hearing, language, cultural, religious, vision, cognitive, emotional). Points of data collection and a rationale for collection were identified.…

  14. Magnetic resonance volumetric assessments of brains in fetuses with ventriculomegaly correlated to outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pier, Danielle B; Levine, Deborah; Kataoka, Miliam L; Estroff, Judy A.; Werdich, Xiang Q.; Ware, Janice; Beeghly, Marjorie; Poussaint, Tina Y; DuPlessis A, Adre; Li, Y; Feldman, Henry A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To correlate MR 2D measurements of lateral ventricular width and 3D measures of lateral ventricular and supratentorial parenchymal volumes to postnatal outcomes in fetuses with ventriculomegaly (VM). Methods 307 fetuses (mean gestational age 26.0 weeks, range 15.7-39.4 weeks) had MR volumetry after referral for VM. Fetuses were grouped into those with (N=114) or without (N=193) other CNS anomalies. Pregnancy outcome and postnatal neurodevelopmental outcomes up to age 3 were obtained. A subgroup analysis was performed excluding fetuses with other CNS anomalies. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess which measure was most predictive of outcome. Results There were 50 terminations and 2 stillbirths. There were 255 live births. 75 were lost to follow-up. Among 180 liveborn infants with follow-up, 140 had an abnormal and 40 had normal outcome. Atrial diameter (p<0.0001), frontal horn diameter (p<0.0001), and ventricular volume (p=0.04) were each predictive of live-birth, with each having 92% specificity at 60% sensitivity. Among fetuses without other CNS anomalies, 180/193 (93%) pregnancies resulted in live deliveries, with atrial diameter (p<0.0001), frontal horn diameter (p=0.003), and ventricular volume (p=0.008) associated with live birth, and with atrial diameter having highest specificity of >99% at 60% sensitivity. Parenchymal volume was not associated with normal or abnormal outcome (either livebirth vs. demise or normal vs. abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome). Among live-borns, there was no age-adjusted threshold for any of the measures that reliably distinguished between normal and abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome. Conclusions Ventricular volume and diameter, but not parenchymal volume, correlate with live birth in fetuses with VM. However, once live-born, neither 2D nor 3D measurements can distinguish a fetus that will go on to have a normal outcome. PMID:21527607

  15. The Impact of Pain Assessment on Critically Ill Patients' Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Evanthia; Hadjibalassi, Maria; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Andreou, Panayiota; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D. E.

    2015-01-01

    In critically ill patients, pain is a major problem. Efficient pain management depends on a systematic, comprehensive assessment of pain. We aimed to review and synthesize current evidence on the impact of a systematic approach to pain assessment on critically ill patients' outcomes. A systematic review of published studies (CINAHL, PUBMED, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and COCHRANE databases) with predetermined eligibility criteria was undertaken. Methodological quality was assessed by the EPHPP quality assessment tool. A total of 10 eligible studies were identified. Due to big heterogeneity, quantitative synthesis was not feasible. Most studies indicated the frequency, duration of pain assessment, and types of pain assessment tools. Methodological quality assessment yielded strong ratings for 5/10 and weak ratings for 3/10 studies. Implementation of systematic approaches to pain assessment appears to associate with more frequent documented reports of pain and more efficient decisions for pain management. There was evidence of favorable effects on pain intensity, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, mortality, adverse events, and complications. This systematic review demonstrates a link between systematic pain assessment and outcome in critical illness. However, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions. More high quality randomized clinical studies are needed. PMID:26558273

  16. MRI Default Mode Network Connectivity is Associated with Functional Outcome after Cardiopulmonary Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Matthew A.; Holt, John L.; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steven D.; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Stenger, Victor A.; Chang, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that the degree of preserved functional connectivity within the DMN during the first week after cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) would be associated with functional outcome at hospital discharge. Methods Initially comatose CPA survivors with indeterminate prognosis at 72 hours were enrolled. Seventeen CPA subjects between 47 days after CPA and 17 matched controls were studied with task-free fMRI. Independent component analysis was performed to delineate the DMN. Connectivity strength in the DMN was compared between CPA subjects and controls, as well as between CPA subjects with good outcome (discharge Cerebral Performance Category or CPC 12) and those with bad outcome (CPC 35). The relationship between connectivity strength in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus (PC) within the DMN with discharge CPC was evaluated using linear regression. Results Compared to controls, CPA subjects had significantly lower connectivity strength in subregions of the DMN, the PCC and PC (p <0.0001). Furthermore, connectivity strength in the PCC and PC was greater in CPA subjects with good outcome (n=8) than those with bad outcome (n=9) (p <0.003). Among CPA subjects, the connectivity strength in the PCC and PC showed strong linear correlations with the discharge CPC (p <0.005). Conclusion Among initially comatose CPA survivors with indeterminate prognosis, task-free fMRI demonstrated graded disruption of DMN connectivity, especially in those with bad outcomes. If confirmed, connectivity strength in the PC/PCC may provide a clinically useful prognostic marker for functional recovery after CPA. PMID:24464830

  17. Short-term functional outcome in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita after multiple surgeries at an early age

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Moutasem M; Audat, Ziad; Khriesat, Wadah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report our short-term functional outcome for 14 children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) who underwent multiple surgical procedures at an early age. Methods During the period 20022010, 14 children (11 males and three females) with AMC underwent multiple surgical procedures to treat deformities of the lower and upper limbs. About 81 procedures were performed, at a rate of 5.9 procedures per child. The mean age at the last follow-up was 5.9 years. The average follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 1.56 years). The functional outcome assessment included walking ability and the activities of daily living for the upper limb function. Results At the last follow-up visit, six (43%) children (four males, two females) with a mean age of 8.3 years (range, 415) were independent walkers. Three children (males) with a mean age of 3.5 years (range, 2.55) were able to walk, but with support. One child (male), 3 years old, was a household ambulator. Three children (two males, one female) with a mean age of 4.2 years (range, 2.56) were nonfunctional ambulators. The last child (male) was nonambulatory at the age of 5 years. Activities of daily living were severely affected in the nonambulatory child. One child in the nonfunctional ambulators group had limitations in the activities of daily living; however, upper limb function was not affected in the remaining 12 children. Conclusion We believe that aggressive surgical treatment using multiple operations at an early age can improve the short-term functional and clinical outcomes of children with AMC. PMID:22973110

  18. Functional Outcomes and Efficiency of Rehabilitation in a National Cohort of Patients with Guillain - Barr Syndrome and Other Inflammatory Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Roxana; Siegert, Richard John; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe functional outcomes, care needs and cost-efficiency of hospital rehabilitation for a UK cohort of inpatients with complex rehabilitation needs arising from inflammatory polyneuropathies. Subjects and Setting 186 patients consecutively admitted to specialist neurorehabilitation centres in England with Guillain-Barr Syndrome (n?=?118 (63.4%)) or other inflammatory polyneuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (n?=?15 (8.1%) or critical illness neuropathy (n?=?32 (17.2%)). Methods Cohort analysis of data from the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative national clinical dataset. Outcome measures include the UK Functional Assessment Measure, Northwick Park Dependency Score (NPDS) and Care Needs Assessment (NPCNA). Patients were analysed in three groups of dependency based on their admission NPDS score: low (NPDS<10), medium (NPDS 1024) and high (NPDS ?25). Cost-efficiency was measured as the time taken to offset the cost of rehabilitation by savings in NPCNA-estimated costs of on-going care in the community. Results The mean rehabilitation length of stay was 72.2 (sd?=?66.6) days. Significant differences were seen between the diagnostic groups on admission, but all showed significant improvements between admission and discharge, in both motor and cognitive function (p<0.0001). Patients who were highly dependent on admission had the longest lengths of stay (mean 97.0 (SD 79.0) days), but also showed the greatest reduction in on-going care costs (1049 per week (SD 994)), so that overall they were the most cost-efficient to treat. Conclusions Patients with polyneuropathies have both physical and cognitive disabilities that are amenable to change with rehabilitation, resulting in significant reduction in on-going care-costs, especially for highly dependent patients. PMID:25402491

  19. Longitudinal Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Functional Outcomes Before and After Repairing Otic Capsule Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Wackym, P. Ashley; Balaban, Carey D.; Mackay, Heather T.; Wood, Scott J.; Lundell, Christopher J.; Carter, Dale M.; Siker, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patients with peripheral vestibular dysfunction because of gravitational receptor asymmetries display signs of cognitive dysfunction and are assumed to have neurobehavioral sequelae. This was tested with pre- and postoperatively quantitative measurements in three cohort groups with superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome (SSCDS) symptoms with: 1) superior canal dehiscence (SCD) repaired via a middle cranial fossa craniotomy and canal plugging only; 2) otic capsule defects not visualized with imaging (no-iOCD) repaired with round window reinforcement (RWR) only; or 3) both SCD plugging and subsequent development of no-iOCD followed by RWR. Study Design: Prospective patient series. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: There were 13 adult and 4 pediatric patients with SSCDS who had completion of neuropsychology test batteries pre- and every 3 months postoperatively. Eight patients had no-iOCD and RWR exclusively, 5 had SCD and plugging exclusively, and 4 had both SCD plugging and then development of no-iOCD with RWR. These cohorts included SSCDS with 2 different dehiscence locations. Interventions: Completion of a neuropsychology test battery preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively that included: Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI); Wide Range Intelligence Test (WRIT FSIQ) including average verbal (crystallized intelligence) and visual (fluid intelligence); Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML), including the four domains of verbal memory, visual memory, attention/concentration, and working memory; and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) were also completed to assess the impact of their disease on activities pre- and postoperatively. Main Outcome Measures: Quantitative and statistical analysis of their cognitive and neurobehavioral function. Results: The pattern of differences between the SCD group and the no-iOCD group from WRAML verbal, visual, and attention test performance indicate different postoperative clinical trajectories. For the WRAML, there was a statistically significant improvement for visual memory and verbal memory for the no-iOCD only and both (SCD and subsequent no-iOCD) groups, but no mean improvement for the SCD only group. By contrast, the no-iOCD group had significantly lower scores on the WRAML attention test preoperatively, but they recovered postoperatively to match the other groups. The preoperative findings and postoperative outcomes did not differ significantly among patient groups on the WRAML working memory test, D-KEFS motor scores, D-KEFS number and letter scores, or Wide Range Intelligence Test scores. There was a significant decrease in the BDI for all groups. The IQ scores were unchanged. There was a statistically significant improvement in the DHI and HIT-6 scores postoperatively in all groups. Conclusions: There was a marked overall improvement in cognitive and neurobehavioral function postoperatively. Variability may result from duration of underlying disease before intervention. The initial decrement or delay in performance improvement measured in several patients may represent brain reorganization. Greater longitudinal data and greater subject numbers are necessary to better understand and optimize cognitive recovery. PMID:26649608

  20. Defining, Valuing, and Teaching Clinical Outcomes Assessment in Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Alison R.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Sauers, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide a basic introduction for athletic training educators about the importance of clinical outcomes measures and to recommend strategies for implementing clinical outcomes assessment education in professional and post-professional athletic training education programs. Background: Outcomes is a frequently used term amongst

  1. Understanding Cognitive Presence in an Online and Blended Community of Inquiry: Assessing Outcomes and Processes for Deep Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyol, Zehra; Garrison, D. Randy

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on deep and meaningful learning approaches and outcomes associated with online and blended communities of inquiry. Applying mixed methodology for the research design, the study used transcript analysis, learning outcomes, perceived learning, satisfaction, and interviews to assess learning processes and outcomes. The findings for

  2. The assessment of glomerular function: creatinine clearance or plasma creatinine?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D. B.; Dillon, S.; Payne, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma creatinine concentration is superior to creatinine clearance for the detection of abnormal glomerular function, of changes of glomerular function in patients with chronic renal disease. Creatinine clearance should be abandoned as the routine assessment of glomerular function. PMID:673986

  3. Functional and neuropsychological late outcomes in posterior fossa tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Lassaletta, Alvaro; Bouffet, Eric; Mabbott, Donald; Kulkarni, Abhaya V

    2015-10-01

    Tumors of the posterior fossa (PF) account for up to 60 % of all childhood intracranial tumors. Over the last decades, the mortality rate of children with posterior fossa tumors has gradually decreased. While survival has been the primary objective in most reports, quality of survival increasingly appears to be an important indicator of a successful outcome. Children with a PF tumor can sustain damage to the cerebellum and other brain structures from the tumor itself, concomitant hydrocephalus, the consequences of treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy), or a combination of these factors. Together, these contribute to long-term sequelae in physical functioning, neuropsychological late outcomes (including academic outcome, working memory, perception and estimation of time, and selective attention, long-term neuromotor speech deficits, and executive functioning). Long-term quality of life can also be affected by endocrinological complication or the occurrence of secondary tumors. A significant proportion of survivors of PF tumors require long-term special education services and have reduced rates of high school graduation and employment. Interventions to improve neuropsychological functioning in childhood PF tumor survivors include (1) pharmacological interventions (such as methylphenidate, modafinil, or donepezil), (2) cognitive remediation, and (3) home-based computerized cognitive training. In order to achieve the best possible outcome for survivors, and ultimately minimize long-term complications, new interventions must be developed to prevent and ameliorate the neuro-toxic effects experienced by these children. PMID:26351237

  4. Validation of GAITRite and PROMIS as High-Throughput Physical Function Outcome Measures Following ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papuga, M. Owen; Beck, Christopher A.; Kates, Stephen L.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Maloney, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    New healthcare demands for quality measures of elective procedures, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery, warrant the establishment of high through-put outcomes for high volume clinics. To this end we evaluated the PROMIS and GAITRite as physical function outcome measures to quantify early healing and post-operative complications in 106 patients at pre-op and 3, 10, 20 and 52 weeks post-ACL reconstruction with bone-tendon-bone autograft, and compared the results to the current IKDC validated outcome measure. The results showed that both PROMIS and GAITRite were significantly quicker to administer versus IKDC (p < 0.0001). Additional advantages were that PROMIS and GAITRite detected a significant decrease in physical function at 3 weeks post-op, and a significant improvement at 10 weeks post-op, versus pre-op (p<0.001), which were not detected with IKDC. GAITRite was limited by a low ceiling that could not detect improvement of physical function beyond 20 weeks, while both PROMIS and IKDC detected significant improvement out to 52 weeks postop (p<0.001). Linear regressions demonstrated a significant relationship between IKDC and PROMIS, with a combined correlation value of 0.8954 (p<.001) for all time points. Finally, ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PROMIS is a diagnostic test for poor outcomes. PMID:24532421

  5. Progression free survival and functional outcome after surgical resection of intramedullary ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Kalil G; Lubelski, Daniel; Miller, Jacob; Steinmetz, Michael P; Shin, John H; Krishnaney, Ajit; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    We present a 15year institutional analysis of the factors affecting progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients undergoing attempted resection of adult intramedullary spinal cord ependymomas. Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are rare but important clinical entities, and ependymomas are the most commonly encountered intramedullary tumor. In total, 53 adult patients over the span of 15years were analyzed for OS, PFS, and the effects of plane of dissection (POD) and gross total resection (GTR) on functional and long term outcomes. The mean age was 45years and median follow-up was 54months. The follow-up neurological outcome and modified McCormick scale were used to determine the functional outcome. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to calculate progression and survival. The overall ability to achieve GTR was significantly correlated to identification of an intraoperative POD (p<0.001). There was a trend towards increased PFS with the ability to achieve a GTR. There was no significant difference in the pre- and postoperative functional outcome scores. The ability to achieve a GTR is strongly correlated to the identification of a POD in ependymomas. There is a trend towards an increased probability of PFS in intramedullary spinal cord tumors when GTR is achieved. The resection of these tumors is likely to halt, but not reverse, neurological deterioration. PMID:26234635

  6. Gait Analysis at Multiple Speeds Reveals Differential Functional and Structural Outcomes in Response to Graded Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Krizsan-Agbas, Dora; Winter, Michelle K.; Eggimann, Linda S.; Meriwether, Judith; Berman, Nancy E.; McCarson, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Open-field behavioral scoring is widely used to assess spinal cord injury (SCI) outcomes, but has limited usefulness in describing subtle changes important for posture and locomotion. Additional quantitative methods are needed to increase the resolution of locomotor outcome assessment. This study used gait analysis at multiple speeds (GAMS) across a range of mild-to-severe intensities of thoracic SCI in the rat. Overall, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores and subscores were assessed, and detailed automated gait analysis was performed at three fixed walking speeds (3.5, 6.0, and 8.5?cm/sec). Variability in hindpaw brake, propel, and stance times were analyzed further by integrating across the stance phase of stepping cycles. Myelin staining of spinal cord sections was used to quantify white matter loss at the injury site. Varied SCI intensity produced graded deficits in BBB score, BBB subscores, and spinal cord white matter and total volume loss. GAMS measures of posture revealed decreased paw area, increased limb extension, altered stance width, and decreased values for integrated brake, propel, and stance. Measures of coordination revealed increased stride frequency concomitant with decreased stride length, resulting in deviation from consistent forelimb/hindlimb coordination. Alterations in posture and coordination were correlated to impact severity. GAMS results correlated highly with functional and histological measures and revealed differential relationships between sets of GAMS dynamics and cord total volume loss versus epicenter myelin loss. Automated gait analysis at multiple speeds is therefore a useful tool for quantifying nuanced changes in gait as an extension of histological and observational methods in assessing SCI outcomes. PMID:24405378

  7. Mechanomyogram for Muscle Function Assessment: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Anamul; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, R. Badlishah; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanomyography (MMG) has been extensively applied in clinical and experimental practice to examine muscle characteristics including muscle function (MF), prosthesis and/or switch control, signal processing, physiological exercise, and medical rehabilitation. Despite several existing MMG studies of MF, there has not yet been a review of these. This study aimed to determine the current status on the use of MMG in measuring the conditions of MFs. Methodology/Principal Findings Five electronic databases were extensively searched for potentially eligible studies published between 2003 and 2012. Two authors independently assessed selected articles using an MS-Word based form created for this review. Several domains (name of muscle, study type, sensor type, subject's types, muscle contraction, measured parameters, frequency range, hardware and software, signal processing and statistical analysis, results, applications, authors' conclusions and recommendations for future work) were extracted for further analysis. From a total of 2184 citations 119 were selected for full-text evaluation and 36 studies of MFs were identified. The systematic results find sufficient evidence that MMG may be used for assessing muscle fatigue, strength, and balance. This review also provides reason to believe that MMG may be used to examine muscle actions during movements and for monitoring muscle activities under various types of exercise paradigms. Conclusions/Significance Overall judging from the increasing number of articles in recent years, this review reports sufficient evidence that MMG is increasingly being used in different aspects of MF. Thus, MMG may be applied as a useful tool to examine diverse conditions of muscle activity. However, the existing studies which examined MMG for MFs were confined to a small sample size of healthy population. Therefore, future work is needed to investigate MMG, in examining MFs between a sufficient number of healthy subjects and neuromuscular patients. PMID:23536834

  8. Programmatic assessment of a university-based implant training program using patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Jenkins, Diane W; de Leeuw, Reny; Nihill, Patricia; Robinson, Fonda G; Thomas, Mark V

    2014-11-01

    The University of Kentucky College of Dentistry (UKCD) established an implant training program that provides training in the use of a single implant system, evidence-based diagnostic and treatment protocols (standardized work practices), and a total quality management system (Implant Quality Assurance Program). The aim of this study was to assess the programmatic effectiveness of the UKCD implant training program by reporting the success and survival of implants placed, using patient-reported outcomes and comparing them to previously established benchmarks. A total of 415 patients (963 implants) were interviewed, approximately 50 percent of all qualified patients. The implant survival rate was 97 percent, and 88 percent of the implants were considered successful (as determined by patient-centric criteria). These outcomes were consistent with the program's previously established benchmarks of 90 percent. These results suggest that work standardization (in the form of specific treatment protocols) and the use of a formal, incremental learning system can result in positive patient outcomes. Clinical outcomes should be monitored in academic dental settings as part of clinical process improvement, and these outcomes can provide a means of assessing the effectiveness of the training program. PMID:25362695

  9. Functional and speech outcomes of superiorly based flap pharyngoplasty combined with radical intravelar veloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Abdelrahman E. M.; Khalifa, Rana A.; Akel, Mabrouk M.; El-Shenawy, Hanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate functional and speech outcomes of superiorly based pharyngeal flap (SBF) pharyngoplasty combined with radical intravelar veloplasty (RIVVP) for the management of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) following surgically repaired cleft palate. Design A case series with chart review. The study was conducted in academic tertiary care medical centre. Patients and Methods Fifteen patients with VPIs following surgically repaired cleft palate were managed between May 2011 and August 2014, with SBF pharyngoplasty combined with RIVVP. Results We found that the speech defects improved by a success rate of 93.4%; the VP function became normal (circular pattern of closure) in 80% of patients and the postoperative overall success rate of VP competence grades was 93.4%. Moreover, we found that the overall incidence of complications were 33.3%. Conclusion By doing SBF pharyngoplasty combined with RIVVP the surgical procedure was satisfactory in both functional and speech outcomes. PMID:26005709

  10. Use of scoring systems for assessing and reporting the outcome results from shoulder surgery and arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Simon; Alfahad, Nawaf; Scott, Martin; Gooding, Ben; Wallace, W Angus

    2015-01-01

    To investigate shoulder scoring systems used in Europe and North America and how outcomes might be classified after shoulder joint replacement. All research papers published in four major journals in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed for the shoulder scoring systems used in their published papers. A method of identifying how outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty might be used to categorize patients into fair, good, very good and excellent outcomes was explored using the outcome evaluations from patients treated in our own unit. A total of 174 research articles that were published in the four journals used some form of shoulder scoring system. The outcome from shoulder arthroplasty in our unit has been evaluated using the constant score (CS) and the oxford shoulder score and these scores have been used to evaluate individual patient outcomes. CSs of < 30 = unsatisfactory; 30-39 = fair; 40-59 = good; 60-69 = very good; and 70 and over = excellent. The most popular shoulder scoring systems in North America were Simple Shoulder Test and American shoulder and elbow surgeons standard shoulder assessment form score and in Europe CS, Oxford Shoulder Score and DASH score. PMID:25793164

  11. New Dental Accreditation Standard on Critical Thinking: A Call for Learning Models, Outcomes, Assessments.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, David C; Williams, John N; Baughman, Pauletta Gay; Roesch, Darren M; Feldman, Cecile A

    2015-10-01

    This opinion article applauds the recent introduction of a new dental accreditation standard addressing critical thinking and problem-solving, but expresses a need for additional means for dental schools to demonstrate they are meeting the new standard because articulated outcomes, learning models, and assessments of competence are still being developed. Validated, research-based learning models are needed to define reference points against which schools can design and assess the education they provide to their students. This article presents one possible learning model for this purpose and calls for national experts from within and outside dental education to develop models that will help schools define outcomes and assess performance in educating their students to become practitioners who are effective critical thinkers and problem-solvers. PMID:26427773

  12. Interventions for postnatal depression assessing the mother–infant relationship and child developmental outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tsivos, Zoe-Lydia; Calam, Rachel; Sanders, Matthew R; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal depression (PND) has negative effects on maternal well-being as well as implications for the mother–infant relationship, subsequent infant development, and family functioning. There is growing evidence demonstrating that PND impacts on a mother’s ability to interact with sensitivity and responsiveness as a caregiver, which may have implications for the infant’s development of self-regulatory skills, making the infant more vulnerable to later psychopathology. Given the possible intergenerational transmission of risk to the infant, the mother–infant relationship is a focus for treatment and research. However, few studies have assessed the effect of treatment on the mother–infant relationship and child developmental outcomes. The main aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review and investigate effect sizes of interventions for PND, which assess the quality of the mother–infant dyad relationship and/or child outcomes in addition to maternal mood. Nineteen studies were selected for review, and their methodological quality was evaluated, where possible, effect sizes across maternal mood, quality of dyadic relationship, and child developmental outcomes were calculated. Finally, clinical implications in the treatment of PND are highlighted and recommendations made for further research. PMID:25960678

  13. Functional outcomes and quality of life after chemoradiotherapy: baseline and 3 and 6 months post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Hu, K; Culliney, B; Li, Z; Urken, M; Jacobson, A; Persky, M; Tran, T; Concert, C; Palacios, D; Metcalfe-Klaw, R; Kumar, M; Bennett, B; Harrison, L

    2014-06-01

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy provides organ preservation for those patients with head and neck cancer. We report the results of a prospective study that examined functional outcomes and quality of life (QOL) after chemoradiotherapy over the first 6 months post-treatment (tx). Twenty-nine patients with head and neck cancer were treated with chemoradiotherapy. All were seen baseline and 3 and 6 months post-tx. Assessments included the performance status scale (PSS), Karnofsky performance status scale, tongue strength, jaw opening, and saliva weight. QOL was patient-rated using the eating assessment tool (EAT-10), MD Anderson dysphagia inventory, speech handicap index (SHI), and the EORTC H&N35 scale. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used, with significance at p < 0.05. PSS scores were significantly different across time points. Tongue strength, jaw range of motion (ROM), and saliva weight were significantly lower at 3 and 6 months than at baseline. QOL was significantly worse after tx, although it improved by 6 months as rated with the EAT-10 and the SHI scores were significantly worse at 3 and 6 months. EORTC domains of swallowing, senses, speech, dry mouth, and sticky saliva were significantly worse at 3 and 6 months. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy for treatment of head and neck tumors can result in impaired performance outcomes and QOL over the first 6 months post-tx. However, performance status, tongue strength, jaw ROM, and eating QOL were only mildly impaired by 6 months post-tx. Saliva production and speech QOL remained significantly impaired at 6 months post-treatment. Current studies are examining outcomes at 12 and 24 months post-treatment to better predict outcomes over time in this population. PMID:24609609

  14. Role of Biological Sex in Normal Cardiac Function and in its Disease Outcome A Review

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, K.Tamarai; Poornima, K.N.; Sarvanan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Biological sex plays an important role in normal cardiac physiology as well as in the hearts response to cardiac disease. Women generally have better cardiac function and survival than do men in the face of cardiac disease; however, this is progressively lost when comparing postmenopausal women with age matched men. Animal model of cardiac disease mirror what is seen in humans. Sex hormones contribute significantly to sex based difference in cardiac functioning and in its disease outcome. Estrogen is considered to be cardioprotective, whereas testosterone is detrimental to heart function. PMID:25302188

  15. Methods for Functional Assessment After C7 Spinal Cord Hemisection in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Nout, Yvette S.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Strand, Sarah C.; Moseanko, Rod; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Zdunowski, Sharon; Nielson, Jessica L.; Roy, Roland R.; Zhong, Hui; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Brock, John H.; Courtine, Grgoire; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Reliable outcome measures are essential for preclinical modeling of spinal cord injury (SCI) in primates. Measures need to be sensitive to both increases and decreases in function in order to demonstrate potential positive or negative effects of therapeutics. Objectives To develop behavioral tests and analyses to assess recovery of function after SCI in the nonhuman primate. Methods In all, 24 male rhesus macaques were subjected to complete C7 lateral hemisection. The authors scored recovery of function in an open field and during hand tasks in a restraining chair. In addition, EMG analyses were performed in the open field, during hand tasks, and while animals walked on a treadmill. Both control and treated monkeys that received candidate therapeutics were included in this report to determine whether the behavioral assays were capable of detecting changes in function over a wide range of outcomes. Results The behavioral assays are shown to be sensitive to detecting a wide range of motor functional outcomes after cervical hemisection in the nonhuman primate. Population curves on recovery of function were similar across the different tasks; in general, the population recovers to about 50% of baseline performance on measures of forelimb function. Conclusions The behavioral outcome measures that the authors developed in this preclinical nonhuman primate model of SCI can detect a broad range of motor recovery. A set of behavioral assays is an essential component of a model that will be used to test efficacies of translational candidate therapies for SCI. PMID:22331214

  16. Uncertainty and the decision maker: assessing and managing the risk of undesirable outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Amiram; Walter, Stephen; Birch, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    We present an approach to rank order new programs in ways that accommodate uncertainty of different outcomes occurring, on the basis of the size and nature ('bad' or 'good') of those outcomes. This represents an improvement on the way uncertainty has been accommodated in existing approaches (e.g., threshold approach to cost-effectiveness analysis). We illustrate the approach using the decision making plane, which explicitly incorporates opportunity costs and relaxes the assumptions of perfect divisibility and constant returns to scale of the cost-effectiveness plane. The nature of the bad (or good) outcome is determined by the quadrant that it falls into (i.e., a 'quadrant effect') and its magnitude by its location within the quadrant (i.e., 'within quadrant effect'). By explicitly defining the loss function, the process of accepting (or rejecting) a new program becomes transparent. We illustrate the approach using a loss function and a net gain function. We show that by recognizing that, not all bad (or good) outcomes are equal and the choice of a loss or a net gain function can result in different ranking of resource allocation options. Further implications of the proposed approach are discussed. PMID:23280702

  17. Reporting of radiographic methods in randomised controlled trials assessing structural outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Gabriel; Boutron, Isabelle; Giraudeau, Bruno; Ravaud, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Background Because an increasing number of clinical trials evaluating disease?modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) emphasise radiographic outcomes as a primary outcome, using a reproducible radiographic measure should be placed at a premium. Aim To evaluate the reporting of radiographic methods in randomised trials assessing radiographic outcomes in RA. Methods Medline was searched for randomised controlled trials assessing radiographic outcomes published between January 1994 and December 2005 in general medical and specialty journals with a high impact factor. One reader extracted data (radiographic acquisition, assessment and reproducibility) using a standardised form. Results A total of 46 reports were included in the analysis. The mean (SD) methodological quality scores on the Jadad scale (range 05) and the Delphi list (09) were 2.9 (1.2) and 6.4 (1.3), respectively. Use of a standardised procedure for the acquisition of the radiographs was reported in 2 (4.3%) articles. 2 (4.3%) reports indicated that the quality of the radiographs was evaluated. In 65.2% of the reports, ?2 radiographic scores were used. Reporting of radiographic assessment was well detailed for number of readers (91.3%), information on readers (71.7%), blinding (91.4%) and how films were viewed (74.0%). The reproducibility of the reading was reported in 39.1% of the articles. Conclusion The reporting of results of randomised controlled trials of radiographic outcomes in RA shows great variability in radiographic scores used. Reporting of radiographic methods could be improved upon, especially the acquisition procedure and the reproducibility of the reading. PMID:17158823

  18. Does suprascapular nerve block reduce shoulder pain following stroke: a double-blind randomised controlled trial with masked outcome assessment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common complication of a stroke which can impede participation in rehabilitation programs and has been associated with poorer outcomes. The evidence base for current medical and therapeutic management options of hemiplegic shoulder pain is limited. This study will evaluate the use of suprascapular nerve block injection as part of an interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of shoulder pain following stroke. The technique has previously been proven safe and effective in the treatment of shoulder pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative shoulder conditions but its usefulness in a stroke population is unclear. Methods/Design A double blind randomised placebo controlled trial will assess the effect of a suprascapular nerve block compared with placebo in a population of 66 stroke patients. The trial will measure effect of injection on the primary outcome of pain, and secondary outcomes of function and quality of life. Measurements will take place at baseline, and 1, 4 and 12 weeks post intervention. Both groups will continue to receive routine physiotherapy and standard ward care. Discussion The results of this study could reduce pain symptoms in persons with mechanical shoulder pain post stroke and provide improvement in upper limb function. Trial Registration This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) - ACTRN12609000621213. PMID:20854696

  19. Neuropsychological Functioning Predicts Community Outcomes in Affective and Non-Affective Psychoses: A 6-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E.; Cohen, Bruce M.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Sperry, Sarah H.; ngr, Dost

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neurocognitive dysfunction is a major symptom feature of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A prognostic relationship between cognition and community outcomes is well-documented in schizophrenia and increasingly recognized in bipolar disorder. However, specific associations amongst neurocognition, diagnosis, state symptomatology, and community functioning are unclear, and few studies have compared these relationships amongst patients with affective and non-affective psychoses in the same study. We examined neurocognitive, clinical, and community functioning in a cross-diagnostic sample of patients with psychotic disorders over a 6-month follow-up interval. Method Neurocognitive, clinical and community functioning were assessed in participants with schizophrenia (n=13), schizoaffective disorder (n=17), or bipolar disorder with psychosis (n=18), and healthy controls (n=18) at baseline and 6 months later. Results Neurocognitive functioning was impaired in all diagnostic groups and, despite reductions in primary symptoms, did not recover on most measures over the follow-up period. Neurocognitive impairment was not associated with diagnosis or clinical improvement. Several neurocognitive scores at baseline (but not diagnosis or clinical baseline or follow-up scores) predicted community functioning at follow-up. Discussion In one of the few studies to longitudinally examine neurocognition in association with clinical and outcomes variables in a cross diagnostic sample of psychotic disorders patients, neurocognitive deficits were pronounced across diagnoses and did not recover on most measures despite significant reductions in clinical symptoms. Baseline neurocognitive functioning was the only significant predictor of patients community functioning six months later. Efforts to recognize and address cognitive deficits, an approach that has shown promise in schizophrenia, should be extended to all patients with psychosis. PMID:23791391

  20. Functional outcomes in children with abusive head trauma receiving inpatient rehabilitation compared with children with non-abusive head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Risen, Sarah R; Suskauer, Stacy J; DeMatt, Ellen J; Slomine, Beth S; Salorio, Cynthia F

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical features and functional outcomes of age and sex matched children with abusive and non-abusive head trauma receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Study design Children with abusive head trauma (n = 28) and age, sex matched children with non-abusive head trauma (n = 20) admitted to one inpatient pediatric rehabilitation unit from 1995–2012 were studied. Acute hospitalization and inpatient rehabilitation records were retrospectively reviewed for pertinent clinical data: initial GCS score, signs of increased intracranial pressure, neuroimaging findings, and presence of associated injuries. Functional status at admission to and discharge from inpatient rehabilitation was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). Outcome at discharge and outpatient follow-up was described based on attainment of independent ambulation and expressive language. Results Children with abusive and non-abusive head trauma had similar levels of injury severity although associated injuries were greater in abusive head trauma. Functional impairment upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation was comparable and functional gains during inpatient rehabilitation were similar between groups. More children with non-abusive than abusive head trauma attained independent ambulation and expressive language after discharge from rehabilitation; the difference was no longer significant when only children greater than 12 months of age at injury were examined. There was variability in delay to obtain these skills and quality of gained skills in both groups. Conclusions Despite more associated injuries, children with abusive head trauma make significant functional gains during inpatient rehabilitation comparable with an age and sex matched sample with non-abusive head trauma. Key functional skills may be gained by children in both groups following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. PMID:24321537