Sample records for assessing drug distribution

  1. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  2. A Quantitative Assessment of Nanoparticle Ligand Distributions: Implications for Targeted Drug and Imaging Delivery in Dendrimer Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Douglas G.; Fang, Ming; Desai, Ankur; Baker, James R.; Orr, Bradford G.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    Functional nanoparticles often contain ligands including targeting molecules, fluorophores, and/or active moieties such as drugs. Characterizing the number of these ligands bound to each particle, and the distribution of nanoparticle-ligand species, is important for understanding the nanomaterial’s function. In this study, the amide coupling methods commonly used to conjugate ligands to poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers were examined. A skewed Poisson distribution was observed and quantified using HPLC for two sets of dendrimer-ligand samples prepared using the amine terminated form of the PAMAM dendrimer and a partially acetylated form of the PAMAM dendrimer that has been used for targeted in vivo drug delivery. The prepared samples had an average number of ligands per dendrimer ranging from 0.4 to 13. Distributions identified by HPLC are in excellent agreement with the mean ligand/dendrimer ratio, measured by 1H NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and potentiometric titration. These results provide insight into the heterogeneity of distributions that are obtained for many classes of nanomaterials to which ligands are conjugated and belie the use of simple cartoon models that present the “average” number of ligands bound as a physically meaningful representation for the material. PMID:20131876

  3. Distributed road assessment system

    DOEpatents

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  4. Autoradiography techniques and quantification of drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Solon, Eric G

    2015-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled drug compounds offers the most efficient way to quantify the amount of drug and/or drug-derived metabolites in biological samples. Autoradiography is a technique using X- ray film, phosphor imaging plates, beta imaging systems, or photo-nuclear emulsion to visualize molecules or fragments of molecules that have been radioactively labeled, and it has been used to quantify and localize drugs in tissues and cells for decades. Quantitative whole-body autoradiography or autoradioluminography (QWBA) using phosphor imaging technology has revolutionized the conduct of drug distribution studies by providing high resolution images of the spatial distribution and matching tissue concentrations of drug-related radioactivity throughout the body of laboratory animals. This provides tissue-specific pharmacokinetic (PK) compartmental analysis which has been useful in toxicology, pharmacology, and drug disposition/patterns, and to predict human exposure to drugs and metabolites, and also radioactivity, when a human radiolabeled drug study is necessary. Microautoradiography (MARG) is another autoradiographic technique that qualitatively resolves the localization of radiolabeled compounds to the cellular level in a histological preparation. There are several examples in the literature of investigators attempting to obtain drug concentration data from MARG samples; however, there are technical issues which make that problematic. These issues will be discussed. This review will present a synopsis of both techniques and examples of how they have been used for drug research in recent years. PMID:25604842

  5. Environmental assessment requirements for live biological drugs.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Ann

    2008-02-01

    Marketing approval of biological products by the US Food and Drug Administration must comply with requirements of Code of Federal Regulations title 21 part 25, "Environmental Impact Considerations." An environmental impact statement is usually not required. Environmental assessment is required unless excluded. As naturally occurring substances, biological products qualify for categorical exclusion if manufacture and use do not significantly alter their concentration or distribution in the human environment. The manufacturing process and establishment descriptions in the license application should include enough detail to ensure that waste is controlled and inactivated. During clinical development of a live biotherapeutic product, data should be collected regarding the shedding of live organisms from treated patients. The ability of the live organism to persist in the environment should be assessed, and instructions for safe handling by health care providers and consumers should be incorporated into the package insert. PMID:18181713

  6. Nutritional assessment of drug addicts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco J. Santolaria-Fernández; J. L. Gómez-Sirvent; C. Emilio González-Reimers; José N. Batista-López; José A. Jorge-Hernández; Fermín Rodríguez-Moreno; Antonio Martínez-Riera; Miguel T. Hernández-García

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To discern if factors such as organic pathology, sex, duration and\\/or intensity of drug addiction, alcohol abuse, hepatitis B infection, anorexia with poor food and drink consumption, or disturbance of social and familial networks, are related to an impaired nutritional status in hospitalized drug addicts. Design: Cross-sectional prospective study. Setting: Detoxication unit and internal medicine unit of a university

  7. Reducing drug related deaths: a pre-implementation assessment of knowledge,barriers and enablers for naloxone distribution through general practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Scottish Naloxone Programme aims to reduce Scotland’s high number of drug-related deaths (DRDs) caused by opiate overdose. It is currently implemented through specialist drug services but General Practitioners (GPs) are likely to have contact with drug using patients and their families and are therefore in an ideal position to direct them to naloxone schemes, or provide it themselves. This research gathered baseline data on GP’s knowledge of and willingness to be involved in DRD prevention, including naloxone administration, prior to the implementation of primary care based delivery. Methods Mixed methods were used comprising a quantitative, postal survey and qualitative telephone interviews. A questionnaire was sent to 500 GPs across Scotland. An initial mailing was followed by a reminder. A shortened questionnaire containing seven key questions was posted as a final reminder. Telephone interviews were conducted with 17 GPs covering a range of demographic characteristics and drug user experience. Results A response rate of 55% (240/439) was achieved. There was some awareness of the naloxone programme but little involvement (3.3%), 9% currently provided routine overdose prevention, there was little involvement in displaying overdose prevention information (<20%). Knowledge of DRD risk was mixed. There was tentative willingness to be involved in naloxone prescribing with half of respondents willing to provide this to drug users or friends/family. However half were uncertain GP based naloxone provision was essential to reduce DRDs. Factors enabling naloxone distribution were: evidence of effectiveness, appropriate training, and adding to the local formulary. Interviewees had limited awareness of what naloxone distribution in primary care may involve and considered naloxone supply as a specialist service rather than a core GP role. Wider attitudinal barriers to involvement with this group were expressed. Conclusions There was poor awareness of the Scottish National Naloxone Programme in participants. Results indicated GPs did not currently feel sufficiently skilled or knowledgeable to be involved in naloxone provision. Appropriate training was identified as a key requirement. PMID:24428947

  8. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary. PMID:1893512

  9. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Huang, Shiew-Mei, E-mail: shiewmei.huang@fda.hhs.go [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  10. Assessing the new medicare prescription drug law.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Robert B

    2004-09-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) is the product of a political compromise to attract moderate Republicans and enough Democrats without losing Republican conservatives. The compromise offered more private health plans to beneficiaries while maintaining and improving traditional Medicare's benefits. This compromise did not settle the debate over the legislation, which is a major issue in the 2004 elections. Voters poorly understand the law because of its complexity. In this paper, I explain how the policy decisions made by the U.S. Congress have contributed to the law's complexity and controversy. I examine the new private health plan options that will be offered to beneficiaries, improvements made to traditional Medicare, and the impact of introducing income-based determinations into Medicare. I also discuss the impact of the drug benefit on beneficiaries in different income and assets categories and Congress's decision to prohibit the federal government from directly negotiating prices with drug manufacturers. I conclude by assessing the major claims made by critics and proponents. Both might be more circumspect in their assessments of the law's impact, since it is impossible to predict how a law of such complexity, with so many human variables, will work out in the end. The MMA is a worthwhile but imperfect effort to extend drug coverage to seniors who are most in need. It deserves neither condemnation nor indiscriminate praise but instead a commitment to help it succeed. PMID:15353431

  11. Optimizing Distribution of Pandemic Influenza Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Chan; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Gutfraind, Alexander; Galvani, Alison P.; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a data-driven method for optimizing pharmacy-based distribution of antiviral drugs during an influenza pandemic in terms of overall access for a target population and apply it to the state of Texas, USA. We found that during the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Texas Department of State Health Services achieved an estimated statewide access of 88% (proportion of population willing to travel to the nearest dispensing point). However, access reached only 34.5% of US postal code (ZIP code) areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. Optimized distribution networks increased expected access to 91% overall and 60% in hard-to-reach regions, and 2 or 3 major pharmacy chains achieved near maximal coverage in well-populated areas. Independent pharmacies were essential for reaching ZIP code areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. This model was developed during a collaboration between academic researchers and public health officials and is available as a decision support tool for Texas Department of State Health Services at a Web-based interface. PMID:25625858

  12. Similarity Between Obesity and Drug Addiction as Assessed

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Similarity Between Obesity and Drug Addiction as Assessed by Neurofunctional Imaging: A Concept behavior observed in drug-addicted subjects. The mechanism of these behaviors is not well understood. Our]: "Similarity Between Obesity and Drug Addiction as Assessed by Neurofunctional Imaging: A Concept Review." Wang

  13. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The Administrator has reinstated the...

  14. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The Administrator has reinstated the...

  15. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG...exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The Administrator has reinstated the...

  16. Distribution of veterinary drug residues among muscles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets tolerances for veterinary drug residues in muscle, but does not specify which muscle should be sampled for analysis. The goal of this research was to determine if antibiotic residue levels are dependent on muscle type. In this study, penicillin G (Pen G) d...

  17. Assessing abuse liability during drug development: changing standards and expectations.

    PubMed

    Schoedel, K A; Sellers, E M

    2008-04-01

    As public health concerns have changed, regulatory expectations for assessing abuse liability of new central nervous system (CNS) drugs have increased. All CNS-active drugs with any properties indicating stimulant, depressant, hallucinogenic, or mood-elevating effects will require an evaluation of abuse liability. Abuse liability assessment involves the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on chemistry and tampering, animal behavioral pharmacology, clinical trial adverse events (AEs), diversion and overdose, and potentially reinforcing (subjective) effects in recreational drug users. PMID:18212799

  18. Assessing Website Pharmacy Drug Quality: Safer Than You Think?

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Roger; Hess, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet-sourced drugs are often considered suspect. The World Health Organization reports that drugs from websites that conceal their physical address are counterfeit in over 50 percent of cases; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) works with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) to regularly update a list of websites likely to sell drugs that are illegal or of questionable quality. Methods and Findings This study examines drug purchasing over the Internet, by comparing the sales of five popular drugs from a selection of websites stratified by NABP or other ratings. The drugs were assessed for price, conditions of purchase, and basic quality. Prices and conditions of purchase varied widely. Some websites advertised single pills while others only permitted the purchase of large quantities. Not all websites delivered the exact drugs ordered, some delivered no drugs at all; many websites shipped from multiple international locations, and from locations that were different from those advertised on the websites. All drug samples were tested against approved U.S. brand formulations using Raman spectrometry. Many (17) websites substituted drugs, often in different formulations from the brands requested. These drugs, some of which were probably generics or perhaps non-bioequivalent copy versions, could not be assessed accurately. Of those drugs that could be assessed, none failed from “approved”, “legally compliant” or “not recommended” websites (0 out of 86), whereas 8.6% (3 out of 35) failed from “highly not recommended” and unidentifiable websites. Conclusions Of those drugs that could be assessed, all except Viagra® passed spectrometry testing. Of those that failed, few could be identified either by a country of manufacture listed on the packaging, or by the physical location of the website pharmacy. If confirmed by future studies on other drug samples, then U.S. consumers should be able to reduce their risk by relying on credentialing agencies recommended lists and by using common sense when examining packaging and pills. PMID:20730049

  19. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suchismita S. Duttagupta; Chanan Singh

    2006-01-01

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economical manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, distributed generation (DG), is forecasted to increase in distribution networks. This paper presents a new methodology that can be used to quantitatively analyze the reliability of such distribution systems

  20. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION,...

  1. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION,...

  2. 45 CFR 156.295 - Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...Standards § 156.295 Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...percentage of prescriptions for which a generic drug was available and dispensed...

  3. 45 CFR 156.295 - Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...Standards § 156.295 Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...percentage of prescriptions for which a generic drug was available and dispensed...

  4. 45 CFR 156.295 - Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...Standards § 156.295 Prescription drug distribution and cost reporting...percentage of prescriptions for which a generic drug was available and dispensed...

  5. Environmental risk assessment of pharmaceutical drug substances—conceptual considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Länge; Daniel Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    Drugs, i.e. active ingredients of human medicinal products, may be introduced into the environment after use in patients by sewage effluent pathways and consequently are detected at low concentrations in sewage effluents and in surface waters. Legal requirements in a number of geographical regions (Europe, US, and intended in Canada) demand environmental risk assessments (ERA) for new drug substances. Existing

  6. Transporters: Importance in Drug Absorption, Distribution, and Removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frans G. M. Russel

    \\u000a There is an increasing appreciation of the role that transport proteins play in the absorption, distribution, and elimination\\u000a of a wide variety of drugs in clinical use. These transporters can be divided into efflux transporters belonging to the ATP-binding\\u000a cassette (ABC) family and solute carrier (SLC) family members that mediate the influx or bidirectional movement of drugs across\\u000a the cell

  7. Assessing illicit drug use among adults with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Van Dorn, Richard A.; Desmarais, Sarah L.; Young, M. Scott; Sellers, Brian G.; Swartz, Marvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate drug use assessment is vital to understanding the prevalence, course, treatment needs, and outcomes among individuals with schizophrenia because they are thought to remain at long-term risk for negative drug use outcomes, even in the absence of drug use disorder. This study evaluated self-report and biological measures for assessing illicit drug use in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study (N=1460). Performance was good across assessment methods, but differed as a function of drug type, measure, and race. With the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R as the criterion, self-report evidenced greater concordance, accuracy and agreement overall, and for marijuana, cocaine, and stimulants specifically, than did urinalysis and hair assays, whereas biological measures outperformed self-report for detection of opiates. Performance of the biological measures was better when self-report was the criterion, but poorer for black compared white participants. Overall, findings suggest that self-report is able to garner accurate information regarding illicit drug use among adults with schizophrenia. Further work is needed to understand the differential performance of assessment approaches by drug type, overall and as a function of race, in this population. PMID:22796100

  8. Guidelines and methodological reviews concerning drug abuse liability assessment.

    PubMed

    Balster, Robert L; Bigelow, George E

    2003-06-01

    Regulatory control of drugs with abuse liability is an important component of drug control policy and is believed to help prevent nonmedical use. To be maximally effective, this requires a scientific assessment of abuse liability of drugs considered for regulatory control. These assessments have relied extensively on laboratory-based animal and human testing, but also utilize information from clinical trials, actual abuse and other sources. Here, we discuss recommendations and guidelines that have been proposed for abuse liability assessment and describe important review papers and conference proceedings that have addressed this matter, focusing primarily on drugs with medical usefulness. Historically, there is substantial consensus about how to approach abuse liability evaluation of drugs with actions similar to those of abused opiates, stimulants, depressants, and to a somewhat lesser extent, cannabinoids and hallucinogens, and much of what has been recommended for abuse potential assessment in the past remains valid and useful. On the other hand, novel CNS-active medications which cannot be readily classified with these traditional drugs of abuse are increasingly under development. In addition, advances in the science of abuse liability assessment need to be incorporated into future guidelines and recommendations on this subject. Developers of new medications need guidance on how to utilize scientific research to maximize therapeutic benefit while minimizing risk for abuse. Thus, another goal of this review has been to identify areas where critical thinking and new guideline development are needed. PMID:12759195

  9. Quantitative detection of drug dose and spatial distribution in the lung revealed by Cryoslicing Imaging.

    PubMed

    Barapatre, Nirav; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Möller, Winfried; Prade, Friedrich; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Hertel, Sebastian; Winter, Gerhard; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Stoeger, Tobias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Schmid, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Administration of drugs via inhalation is an attractive route for pulmonary and systemic drug delivery. The therapeutic outcome of inhalation therapy depends not only on the dose of the lung-delivered drug, but also on its bioactivity and regional distribution. Fluorescence imaging has the potential to monitor these aspects already during preclinical development of inhaled drugs, but quantitative methods of analysis are lacking. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that Cryoslicing Imaging allows for 3D quantitative fluorescence imaging on ex vivo murine lungs. Known amounts of fluorescent substance (nanoparticles or fluorophore-drug conjugate) were instilled in the lungs of mice. The excised lungs were measured by Cryoslicing Imaging. Herein, white light and fluorescence images are obtained from the face of a gradually sliced frozen organ block. A quantitative representation of the fluorescence intensity throughout the lung was inferred from the images by accounting for instrument noise, tissue autofluorescence and out-of-plane fluorescence. Importantly, the out-of-plane fluorescence correction is based on the experimentally determined effective light attenuation coefficient of frozen murine lung tissue (10.0 ± 0.6 cm(-1) at 716 nm). The linear correlation between pulmonary total fluorescence intensity and pulmonary fluorophore dose indicates the validity of this method and allows direct fluorophore dose assessment. The pulmonary dose of a fluorescence-labeled drug (Fc?R-Alexa750) could be assessed with an estimated accuracy of 9% and the limit of detection in ng regime. Hence, Cryoslicing Imaging can be used for quantitative assessment of dose and 3D distribution of fluorescence-labeled drugs or drug carriers in the lungs of mice. PMID:25262414

  10. Managed care pharmacy, socioeconomic assessments and drug adoption decisions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Lyles; Bryan R. Luce; Anne M. Rentz

    1997-01-01

    A telephone survey of a representative national sample of 51 large managed care organizations in the U.S. (> 50,000 enrollees) was undertaken (1) to understand the role of socioeconomic assessments on drug adoption decisions; (2) to determine the sources of these assessments and the reliance of managed care pharmacy on each; and (3) to determine the resources for internally versus

  11. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...the drug product; (2) The manner of distribution and advertising of the drug product; (3) Evidence of diversion of the...is based, the Administrator shall immediately suspend the effectiveness of the order until he may reconsider the application...

  12. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...the drug product; (2) The manner of distribution and advertising of the drug product; (3) Evidence of diversion of the...is based, the Administrator shall immediately suspend the effectiveness of the order until he may reconsider the application...

  13. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...the drug product; (2) The manner of distribution and advertising of the drug product; (3) Evidence of diversion of the...is based, the Administrator shall immediately suspend the effectiveness of the order until he may reconsider the application...

  14. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310...possession or distribution of listed chemicals contained in the exempt drug product. (c) Changes in exempt drug product compositions: Any change in the quantitative or...

  15. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310...possession or distribution of listed chemicals contained in the exempt drug product. (c) Changes in exempt drug product compositions: Any change in the quantitative or...

  16. Modelling Dermal Drug Distribution After Topical Application in Human

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuri G. Anissimov; Michael Stephen Roberts

    Purpose  To model and interpret drug distribution in the dermis and underlying tissues after topical application which is relevant\\u000a to the treatment of local conditions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We created a new physiological pharmacokinetic model to describe the effect of blood flow, blood protein binding and dermal\\u000a binding on the rate and depth of penetration of topical drugs into the underlying skin. We used

  17. Vulnerability Assessment of Regional Water Distribution Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baoyu Zhuang; Xinhua Zhao; Yuan Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A vulnerability assessment model for regional water distribution system (VAMRWDS) is presented. The model takes into account the impact of residual chlorine and water age, as well as the uncertainty and probabilistic characteristic of the distribution systems. Monte-Carlo stochastic simulation is adopted in the model to randomly generate bulk and wall reaction coefficients. Employing the EPANET toolkit as the hydraulic

  18. In Vivo Methods for the Assessment of Topical Drug Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Herkenne, Christophe; Alberti, Ingo; Naik, Aarti; Kalia, Yogeshvar N.; Mathy, François-Xavier; Préat, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews some current methods for the in vivo assessment of local cutaneous bioavailability in humans after topical drug application. After an introduction discussing the importance of local drug bioavailability assessment and the limitations of model-based predictions, the focus turns to the relevance of experimental studies. The available techniques are then reviewed in detail, with particular emphasis on the tape stripping and microdialysis methodologies. Other less developed techniques, including the skin biopsy, suction blister, follicle removal and confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques are also described. PMID:17985216

  19. 78 FR 59308 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Annual Summary Report Data Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ...Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0447] Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Annual Summary Report...collected from sponsors of antimicrobial new animal drugs in accordance with the new animal drug records and reporting provisions of...

  20. 21 CFR 203.50 - Requirements for wholesale distribution of prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG MARKETING Wholesale Distribution § 203.50 Requirements for... (b) The drug origin statement is subject to the record retention requirements of § 203.60 and must be retained by all...

  1. 21 CFR 203.50 - Requirements for wholesale distribution of prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG MARKETING Wholesale Distribution § 203.50 Requirements for... (b) The drug origin statement is subject to the record retention requirements of § 203.60 and must be retained by all...

  2. A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Patrick, E-mail: patrick-poulin@videotron.ca [Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Ekins, Sean [Collaborations in Chemistry, 601 Runnymede Avenue, Jenkintown, PA 19046 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 Penn Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Theil, Frank-Peter [Genentech, South San Francisco (United States)

    2011-01-15

    A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

  3. [Interplay between marketing authorization and early benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Beinlich, Peggy; Müller-Berghaus, J; Sudhop, T; Vieths, S; Broich, K

    2015-03-01

    The early benefit assessment of newly approved drugs with new active substances or new applications that came into force on 1 January 2011 still presents a challenge to the parties involved. This article highlights the interplay between drug marketing approval and early benefit assessment. The constellation of a European, and even an international, largely harmonized, drug authorization process, with a mostly nationally regulated drug reimbursement situation causes inevitably friction, which could be reduced through joint advice discussions during the planning phase for pivotal studies. In 2013, the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) and the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI) provided 439 scientific advice procedures, compared with 98 advice meetings held at the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA), for 12 of which the BfArM or PEI provided written advice. The numbers of advice meetings held at the G-BA are increasing; however, the national competent authorities are involved in only a fraction of these. From the perspective of the national competent authorities, prompt and consistent involvement in the advice procedures regarding early benefit assessment would be useful and desirable. PMID:25566840

  4. The pKa Distribution of Drugs: Application to Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Manallack, David T.

    2007-01-01

    The acid-base dissociation constant (pKa) of a drug is a key physicochemical parameter influencing many biopharmaceutical characteristics. While this has been well established, the overall proportion of non-ionizable and ionizable compounds for drug-like substances is not well known. Even less well known is the overall distribution of acid and base pKa values. The current study has reviewed the literature with regard to both the proportion of ionizable substances and pKa distributions. Further to this a set of 582 drugs with associated pKa data was thoroughly examined to provide a representative set of observations. This was further enhanced by delineating the compounds into CNS and non-CNS drugs to investigate where differences exist. Interestingly, the distribution of pKa values for single acids differed remarkably between CNS and non-CNS substances with only one CNS compound having an acid pKa below 6.1. The distribution of basic substances in the CNS set also showed a marked cut off with no compounds having a pKa above 10.5. The pKa distributions of drugs are influenced by two main drivers. The first is related to the nature and frequency of occurrence of the functional groups that are commonly observed in pharmaceuticals and the typical range of pKa values they span. The other factor concerns the biological targets these compounds are designed to hit. For example, many CNS targets are based on seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (7TM GPCR) which have a key aspartic acid residue known to interact with most ligands. As a consequence, amines are mostly present in the ligands that target 7TM GPCR’s and this influences the pKa profile of drugs containing basic groups. For larger screening collections of compounds, synthetic chemistry and the working practices of the chemists themselves can influence the proportion of ionizable compounds and consequent pKa distributions. The findings from this study expand on current wisdom in pKa research and have implications for discovery research with regard to the composition of corporate databases and collections of screening compounds. Rough guidelines have been suggested for the profile of compound collections and will evolve as this research area is expanded. PMID:19812734

  5. Aligning New Tuberculosis Drug Regimens and Drug Susceptibility Testing: A Needs Assessment and Roadmap for Action

    PubMed Central

    Wells, William A.; Boehme, Catharina C.; Cobelens, Frank G.J.; Daniels, Colleen; Dowdy, David; Gardiner, Elizabeth; Gheuens, Jan; Kim, Peter; Kimerling, Michael E.; Kreiswirth, Barry; Lienhardt, Christian; Mdluli, Khisi; Pai, Madhukar; Perkins, Mark D.; Peter, Trevor; Zignol, Matteo; Zumla, Alimuddin; Schito, Marco

    2014-01-01

    New tuberculosis drug regimens are creating new priorities for drug susceptibility testing (DST) and surveillance. To minimise turnaround time, rapid DST will need to be prioritised, but developers of these assays will need better data about the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Efforts are underway to link mutations with drug resistance and to develop strain collections to enable assessment of new diagnostic assays. In resource-limited settings, DST might not be appropriate for all patients with tuberculosis. Surveillance data and modelling will help country stakeholders to design appropriate DST algorithms and to decide whether to change drug regimens. Finally, development of practical DST assays is needed so that, in countries where surveillance and modelling show that DST is advisable, these assays can be used to guide clinical decisions for individual patients. If combined judiciously during both development and implementation, new tuberculosis regimens and new DST assays have enormous potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce the burden of disease. PMID:23531393

  6. Drug distribution in man: a positron emission tomography study after oral administration of the labelled neuroprotective drug vinpocetine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Balázs Gulyás; Christer Halldin; Judit Sóvágó; Johan Sandell; Zsolt Cselényi; ÁdÁm Vas; Béla Kiss; Egon Kárpáti; Lars Farde

    2002-01-01

    Direct information on the distribution of a drug requires measurements in various tissues. Such data have until now been obtained in animals, or have indirectly been calculated from plasma measurements in humans using mathematical models. Here we suggest the use of positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to obtain direct measurements of drug distribution in the human body. The

  7. Critical Assessment of Implantable Drug Delivery Devices in Glaucoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Manickavasagam, Dharani; Oyewumi, Moses O.

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of heterogeneous disorders involving progressive optic neuropathy that can culminate into visual impairment and irreversible blindness. Effective therapeutic interventions must address underlying vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degeneration in conjunction with correcting other associated risk factors (such as elevated intraocular pressure). However, realization of therapeutic outcomes is heavily dependent on suitable delivery system that can overcome myriads of anatomical and physiological barriers to intraocular drug delivery. Development of clinically viable sustained release systems in glaucoma is a widely recognized unmet need. In this regard, implantable delivery systems may relieve the burden of chronic drug administration while potentially ensuring high intraocular drug bioavailability. Presently there are no FDA-approved implantable drug delivery devices for glaucoma even though there are several ongoing clinical studies. The paper critically assessed the prospects of polymeric implantable delivery systems in glaucoma while identifying factors that can dictate (a) patient tolerability and acceptance, (b) drug stability and drug release profiles, (c) therapeutic efficacy, and (d) toxicity and biocompatibility. The information gathered could be useful in future research and development efforts on implantable delivery systems in glaucoma. PMID:24066234

  8. Technology assessment and the Food and Drug Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, A. H.; Becker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The statutory standards underlying the activities of the FDA, and the problems the Agency faces in decision making are discussed from a legal point of view. The premarketing clearance of new drugs and of food additives, the two most publicized and criticized areas of FDA activity, are used as illustrations. The importance of statutory standards in technology assessment in a regulatory setting is developed. The difficulties inherent in the formulation of meaningful standards are recognized. For foods, the words of the statute are inadequate, and for drugs, a statutory recognition of the various other objectives would be useful to the regulator and the regulated.

  9. Risk Assessment of Mechanism-Based Inactivation in Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Yasushi; Kunze, Kent L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) that occur via mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P450 are of serious concern. Although several predictive models have been published, early risk assessment of MBIs is still challenging. For reversible inhibitors, the DDI risk categorization using [I]/Ki ([I], the inhibitor concentration; Ki, the inhibition constant) is widely used in drug discovery and development. Although a simple and reliable methodology such as [I]/Ki categorization for reversible inhibitors would be useful for mechanism-based inhibitors (MBIs), comprehensive analysis of an analogous measure reflecting in vitro potency for inactivation has not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the term ?/kdeg (?, first-order inactivation rate at a given MBI concentration; kdeg, enzyme degradation rate constant) would be useful in the prediction of the in vivo DDI risk of MBIs. Twenty-one MBIs with both in vivo area under the curve (AUC) change of marker substrates and in vitro inactivation parameters were identified in the literature and analyzed. The results of this analysis show that in vivo DDIs with >2-fold change of object drug AUC can be identified with the cutoff value of ?/kdeg = 1, where unbound steady-state Cmax is used for inhibitor concentration. However, the use of total Cmax led to great overprediction of DDI risk. The risk assessment using ?/kdeg coupled with unbound Cmax can be useful for the DDI risk evaluation of MBIs in drug discovery and development. PMID:22685217

  10. Assessment of biotechnology drugs: what are the issues?

    PubMed

    van Rijkom, J; Leufkens, H; Crommelin, D; Rutten, F; Broekmans, A

    1999-06-01

    Biotechnology is increasingly regarded as an important reservoir for the development of new and innovative, but generally expensive, pharmaceuticals. At the same time, concerns about cost containment have triggered a keen interest in evaluating and comparing the values of diverse health care interventions. In this paper we studied the process of assessment and diffusion of biotechnology drugs by studying three cases, i.e. nebacumab, colony stimulating factors and recombinant human growth hormone. These cases are evaluated in a standardised format, concerning safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness and ethical, legal and social issues. Many factors that determine the fate of a biotechnology drug seemed to be similar to those of 'classical' drugs. The definition and measurement of clinically relevant outcomes has been identified as a key factor in the assessment process. Another important issue is the relatively small population for the primary indications of biotechnology drugs and the subsequent process of broadening of indications. Paradoxically, the current trend towards evidence-based medicine means that we will increasingly have to make decisions based on 'incomplete' knowledge'. PMID:10538922

  11. Assessing cardiovascular drug safety for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Woosley, Raymond L; Romero, Klaus

    2013-06-01

    Optimal therapeutic decision-making requires integration of patient-specific and therapy-specific information at the point of care, particularly when treating patients with complex cardiovascular conditions. The formidable task for the prescriber is to synthesize information about all therapeutic options and match the best treatment with the characteristics of the individual patient. Computerized decision support systems have been developed with the goal of integrating such information and presenting the acceptable therapeutic options on the basis of their effectiveness, often with limited consideration of their safety for a specific patient. Assessing the safety of therapies relative to each patient is difficult, and sometimes impossible, because the evidence required to make such an assessment is either imperfect or does not exist. In addition, many of the alerts sent to prescribers by decision-support systems are not perceived as credible, and 'alert fatigue' causes warnings to be ignored putting patients at risk of harm. The CredibleMeds.org and BrugadaDrugs.org websites are prototypes for evidence-based sources of safety information that rank drugs for their risk of a specific form of drug toxicity-in these cases, drug-induced arrhythmias. Broad incorporation of this type of information in electronic prescribing algorithms and clinical decision support could speed the evolution of safe personalized medicine. PMID:23591268

  12. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  13. 22 CFR 1008.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 1008...GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? You...be given to each employee who will be engaged in the...

  14. 49 CFR 32.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 32...GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? You...be given to each employee who will be engaged in the...

  15. 32 CFR 26.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 26...GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? You...be given to each employee who will be engaged in the...

  16. Drug assessment by a Pharmacy and Therapeutics committee: from drug selection criteria to use in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Blázquez, Ana; Calvo-Pita, Cecilia; Carbajales-Álvarez, Mónica; Suárez-Gil, Patricio; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Background In Spain, hospital medicines are assessed and selected by local Pharmacy and Therapeutics committees (PTCs). Of all the drugs assessed, cancer drugs are particularly important because of their budgetary impact and the sometimes arguable added value with respect to existing alternatives. This study analyzed the PTC drug selection process and the main objective was to evaluate the degree of compliance of prescriptions for oncology drugs with their criteria for use. Methods This was a retrospective observational study (May 2007 to April 2010) of PTC-assessed drugs. The variables measured to describe the committee’s activity were number of drugs assessed per year and number of drugs included in any of these settings: without restrictions, with criteria for use, and not included in formulary. These drugs were also analyzed by therapeutic group. To assess the degree of compliance of prescriptions, a score was calculated to determine whether prescriptions for bevacizumab, cetuximab, trastuzumab, and bortezomib were issued in accordance with PTC drug use criteria. Results The PTC received requests for inclusion of 40 drugs, of which 32 were included in the hospital formulary (80.0%). Criteria for use were established for 28 (87.5%) of the drugs included. In total, 293 patients were treated with the four cancer drugs in eight different therapeutic indications. The average prescription compliance scores were as follows: bevacizumab, 83% for metastatic colorectal cancer, 100% for metastatic breast cancer, and 82.3% for non-small-cell lung cancer; cetuximab, 62.0% for colorectal cancer and 50% for head and neck cancer; trastuzumab, 95.1% for early breast cancer and 82.4% for metastatic breast cancer; and bortezomib, 63.7% for multiple myeloma. Conclusion The degree of compliance with criteria for use of cancer drugs was reasonably high. PTC functions need to be changed so that they can carry out more innovative tasks, such as monitoring conditions for drug use. PMID:25031538

  17. Comparative QSAR-and Fragments Distribution Analysis of Drugs, Druglikes, Metabolic Substances, and Antimicrobial Compounds

    E-print Network

    that include conventional drugs, inactive druglikes, antimicrobial substituents, and bacterial and humanComparative QSAR- and Fragments Distribution Analysis of Drugs, Druglikes, Metabolic Substances, and Antimicrobial Compounds Emre Karakoc, S. Cenk Sahinalp, and Artem Cherkasov*, School of Computing Science, Simon

  18. Statistical assessment of Monte Carlo distributional tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Solomon, Clell J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09

    Four tests are developed to assess the statistical reliability of distributional or mesh tallies. To this end, the relative variance density function is developed and its moments are studied using simplified, non-transport models. The statistical tests are performed upon the results of MCNP calculations of three different transport test problems and appear to show that the tests are appropriate indicators of global statistical quality.

  19. The assessment of impurities for genotoxic potential and subsequent control in drug substance and drug product.

    PubMed

    Dow, Linda K; Hansen, Marvin M; Pack, Brian W; Page, Todd J; Baertschi, Steven W

    2013-05-01

    The strategies implemented at Eli Lilly and Company to address European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration requirements governing the control of genotoxic impurities (GTIs) are presented. These strategies were developed to provide understanding with regard to the risk and potential liabilities that could be associated with developmental and marketed compounds. The strategies systematize the assessment of impurities for genotoxic potential, addressing both actual and potential impurities. Timing of activities is designed to minimize impact to development timelines while building a data package sufficient to either discharge the risk of potential GTI formation or support the implementation of a specification necessary for long-term control. This article presents the background associated with GTI control, the types of impurities that should be assessed, and the actions to be taken when an impurity is found to be genotoxic. A systematic approach to define potential degradation products derived from stress-testing studies is outlined with a proposal to perform a genotoxic risk assessment on these impurities. Finally, an Arrhenius-based strategy is proposed for a rapid assessment of the likelihood of potential degradation impurities to form in the commercial drug product formulation. Importantly, this article makes a proposal for discharging the risk of a potential GTI with supporting data. PMID:23436613

  20. IVAN: Intelligent Van for the Distribution of Pharmaceutical Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Asier; Angulo, Ignacio; Perallos, Asier; Landaluce, Hugo; Zuazola, Ignacio Julio García; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Falcone, Francisco; Villadangos, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a telematic system based on an intelligent van which is capable of tracing pharmaceutical drugs over delivery routes from a warehouse to pharmacies, without altering carriers' daily conventional tasks. The intelligent van understands its environment, taking into account its location, the assets and the predefined delivery route; with the capability of reporting incidences to carriers in case of failure according to the established distribution plan. It is a non-intrusive solution which represents a successful experience of using smart environments and an optimized Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) embedded system in a viable way to resolve a real industrial need in the pharmaceutical industry. The combination of deterministic modeling of the indoor vehicle, the implementation of an ad-hoc radiating element and an agile software platform within an overall system architecture leads to a competitive, flexible and scalable solution. PMID:22778659

  1. IVAN: intelligent van for the distribution of pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Asier; Angulo, Ignacio; Perallos, Asier; Landaluce, Hugo; García Zuazola, Ignacio Julio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Falcone, Francisco; Villadangos, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a telematic system based on an intelligent van which is capable of tracing pharmaceutical drugs over delivery routes from a warehouse to pharmacies, without altering carriers' daily conventional tasks. The intelligent van understands its environment, taking into account its location, the assets and the predefined delivery route; with the capability of reporting incidences to carriers in case of failure according to the established distribution plan. It is a non-intrusive solution which represents a successful experience of using smart environments and an optimized Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) embedded system in a viable way to resolve a real industrial need in the pharmaceutical industry. The combination of deterministic modeling of the indoor vehicle, the implementation of an ad-hoc radiating element and an agile software platform within an overall system architecture leads to a competitive, flexible and scalable solution. PMID:22778659

  2. Validation of pharmacy records in drug exposure assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong S. Lau; Anthonius de Boer; Karin S. Beuning; Arijan Porsius

    1997-01-01

    The validity of drug exposure measurement based on pharmacy records was investigated taking into account completeness of data, drug compliance, and different methods of drug exposure measurement in pharmacy records. Data on prescription drug use were collected from home inventories and community pharmacies in a survey on drug use and compliance in 115 elderly people. To compare drug exposure in

  3. Assessment of drug-drug interactions in hypertensive patients at a superspeciality hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sivva, Divya; Mateti, Uday Venkat; Neerati, Venu Madhav; Thiruthopu, Nimbagiri Swamy; Martha, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the incidence and pattern of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in hypertensive patients by using Micromedex and Medscape databases. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out in a superspeciality hospital setting in South India for period of 9 months. Hypertensive patients who admitted into the hospital with the age more than 18 years, received more than 3 drugs per prescription and length of hospital stay for more than 24 hours were included in the study. An appropriate data was collected and assessed for DDIs with the help of Micromedex and Medscape databases. Results: A total of 227 patients were enrolled during the study period. Among the 227 patients, 48 of them developed 53 clinically significant DDIs. Out of 48 patients, most of them were in the age-group of 50–60 years [18 (37.49%)]. The percentage of DDIs were higher in males [30 (62.5%)] compared to females [18 (37.5%)]. The most common drugs responsible for DDIs in the present study were Insulin [18 (33.96%)] followed by Metoprolol [10 (18.86%)], Torsemide [8 (15.09%)], and Hydrochlorothiazide [8 (15.09%)]. The most commonly interacting pairs were Ciprofloxacin-Insulin [6 (11.32%)], followed by Metoprolol-Insulin [4 (7.54%)] and Atenolol-Insulin [4 (7.54%)]. The most common consequences of interacting pairs were reduced serum potassium levels and hyperglycemia. Conclusion: The overall incidence rate of DDIs was found to be 21.14% and the increasing number of co-morbidities (P ? 0.003) and polypharmacy (P ? 0.002) were the risk factor for the development of significant number of DDIs.

  4. Measurement Tools Utilized to Assess Specialty Groups for Drug Court Participants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Kleinpeter; Jeffrey J. Koob; Jo Brocato; Cathy Golden Joseph; Diane Holley

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the initial construction of measurement instruments for use in an enhanced drug court program in Orange County, California. The evaluation instruments include pre- and post-test surveys that assess 11 specialty groups utilized in this drug court. The specialty groups offered to drug court participants were designed to increase program retention and successful completion of the drug court

  5. Numerical simulation on the effects of drug eluting stents at different Reynolds numbers on hemodynamic and drug concentration distribution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The changes of hemodynamics and drug concentration distribution caused by the implantation of drug eluting stents (DESs) in curved vessels have significant effects on In-Stent Restenosis. Methods A 3D virtual stent with 90°curvature was modelled and the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) and drug concentration in this model were numerically studied at Reynolds numbers of 200, 400, 600, 800. Results The results showed that (1) the intensity of secondary flow at the 45° cross-section was stronger than that at the 90° cross-section; (2) As the Reynolds number increases, the WSS decreases. When the Reynolds number reaches 600, the low-WSS region only accounts for 3% of the total area. (3) The effects of Reynolds number on drug concentration in the vascular wall decreases in proportionally and then the blood velocity increased 4 times, the drug concentration in the vascular wall decreased by about 30%. (4) The size of the high drug concentration region is inversely proportional to the Reynolds number. As the blood velocity increases, the drug concentration in the DES decreases, especially at the outer bend. Conclusions It is beneficial for the patient to decrease vigorous activities and keep calm at the beginning of the stent implantation, because a substantial amount of the drug is released in the first two months of stent implantation, thus a calm status is conducive to drug release and absorption; Subsequently, appropriate exercise which increases the blood velocity is helpful in decreasing regions of low-WSS. PMID:25602685

  6. Comparison of Self-Reported Drug Use With Quantitative and Qualitative Urinalysis for Assessment of Drug Use in Treatment Studies

    E-print Network

    Kenzie L. Preston; Kenneth Silverman; Charles R. Schuster; Edward J. Cone

    The effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programs can be monitored by self-reported drug use and objectively measured by qualitative and quantitative urinalysis. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these three methods of assessing drug use are reviewed. Data collected in a clinical

  7. Comparison of Self-Reported Drug Use With Quantitative and Qualitative Urinalysis for Assessment of Drug Use in Treatment Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenzie L. Preston; Kenneth Silverman; Charles R. Schuster; Edward J. Cone

    The effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programs can be monitored by self-reported drug use and objectively measured by qualitative and quantitative urinalysis. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these three methods of assessing drug use are reviewed. Data collected in a clinical trial of a behavioral treatment for cocaine abuse are used to evaluate the relationships among qualitative and

  8. Quantitative assessment of time dependent drug-use trends by the analysis of drugs and related metabolites in raw sewage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malcolm J. Reid; Katherine H. Langford; Jørg Mørland; Kevin V. Thomas

    Background: Accurate and timely information on the scale and dynamics of drug consumption is important for assessing the needs of law enforcement and public health services in a community. Aims: This paper presents a detailed examination of a comprehensive sewage-sampling campaign for the purposes of increasing an understanding of the dynamics of drug-flows in sewage streams, and developing new methodology

  9. Impact of flow pulsatility on arterial drug distribution in stent-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Caroline C.; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Barber, Tracie J.; Simmons, Anne; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents reside in a dynamic fluid environment where the extent to which drugs are distributed within the arterial wall is critically modulated by the blood flowing through the arterial lumen. Yet several factors associated with the pulsatile nature of blood flow and their impact on arterial drug deposition has not been fully investigated. We employed an integrated framework comprising bench-top and computational models to explore the factors governing the time-varying fluid dynamic environment within the vasculature and their effects on arterial drug distribution patterns. A custom-designed bench-top framework comprising a model of a single drug-eluting stent strut and a poly-vinyl alcohol-based hydrogel as a model tissue bed simulated fluid flow and drug transport under fully apposed strut settings. Bench-top experiments revealed a relative independence between drug distribution and the factors governing pulsatile flow and these findings were validated with the in silico model. Interestingly, computational models simulating suboptimal deployment settings revealed a complex interplay between arterial drug distribution, Womersley number and the extent of malapposition. In particular, for a stent strut offset from the wall, total drug deposition was sensitive to changes in the pulsatile flow environment, with this dependence increasing with greater wall displacement. Our results indicate that factors governing pulsatile luminal flow on arterial drug deposition should be carefully considered in conjunction with device deployment settings for better utilization of drug-eluting stent therapy for various arterial flow regimes. PMID:23541929

  10. Reducing attrition in drug development: smart loading preclinical safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Kavanagh, Stefan L; Mellor, Howard R; Pollard, Christopher E; Robinson, Sally; Platz, Stefan J

    2014-03-01

    Entry into the crucial preclinical good laboratory practice (GLP) stage of toxicology testing triggers significant R&D investment yet >20% of AstraZeneca's potential new medicines have been stopped for safety reasons in this GLP phase alone. How could we avoid at least some of these costly failures? An analysis of historical toxicities that caused stopping ('stopping toxicities') showed that >50% were attributable to target organ toxicities emerging within 2 weeks of repeat dosing or to acute cardiovascular risks. By frontloading 2-week repeat-dose toxicity studies and a comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular safety, we anticipate a potential 50% reduction in attrition in the GLP phase. This will reduce animal use overall, save significant R&D costs and improve drug pipeline quality. PMID:24269835

  11. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution...procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  12. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution...procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  13. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution...procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  14. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution...procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  15. 21 CFR 212.90 - What actions must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? 212.90 Section 212...must I take to control the distribution of PET drug products? (a) Written distribution...procedures for the control of distribution of PET drug products shipped from the PET...

  16. Open drug scenes and drug-related public nuisance: a visual rapid assessment research study in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Bingham, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The research was undertaken at a time of increasing public concerns for drug- and alcohol-related public nuisance in the city center of Dublin, Ireland. Rapid Assessment Research was conducted involving qualitative interviewing with drug service users; business, transport, community, voluntary, and statutory stakeholders (n = 61); and an environmental mapping exercise. The interplay between homelessness, loitering, an influx of drug users via city metro systems, transient open drug scenes, street drinking, drug injecting, intimidation, knife crime, and prescribed medication abuse was evident. Potential strategies to address drug and alcohol related public nuisance are advised to include the relocation of treatment services, targeted harm reduction initiatives, urban regeneration, improved community rehabilitation pathways, and heightened policing intensity. PMID:23768432

  17. Examining the Spatial Distribution of Law Enforcement Encounters among People Who Inject Drugs after Implementation of Mexico's Drug Policy Reform.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Tommi L; Beletsky, Leo; Arredondo, Jaime; Werb, Daniel; Rangel, Gudelia; Vera, Alicia; Brouwer, Kimberly

    2014-10-10

    In 2009, Mexico decriminalized the possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use in order to refocus law enforcement resources on drug dealers and traffickers. This study examines the spatial distribution of law enforcement encounters reported by people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico to identify concentrated areas of policing activity after implementation of the new drug policy. Mapping the physical location of law enforcement encounters provided by PWID (n?=?461) recruited through targeted sampling, we identified hotspots of extra-judicial encounters (e.g., physical/sexual abuse, syringe confiscation, and money extortion by law enforcement) and routine authorized encounters (e.g., being arrested or stopped but not arrested) using point density maps and the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic calculated at the neighborhood-level. Approximately half of the participants encountered law enforcement more than once in a calendar year and nearly one third of these encounters did not result in arrest but involved harassment or abuse by law enforcement. Statistically significant hotspots of law enforcement encounters were identified in a limited number of neighborhoods located in areas with known drug markets. At the local-level, law enforcement activities continue to target drug users despite a national drug policy that emphasizes drug treatment diversion rather than punitive enforcement. There is a need for law enforcement training and improved monitoring of policing tactics to better align policing with public health goals. PMID:25300503

  18. Risk Assessment of Drug Management Process in Women Surgery Department of Qaem Educational Hospital (QEH) Using HFMEA Method (2013)

    PubMed Central

    khani-Jazani, Reza; Molavi-Taleghani, Yasamin; Seyedin, Hesam; Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Pourtaleb, Arefeh

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of drug management process are essential for patient safety. The present study was performed whit the aim of assessing risk of drug management process in Women Surgery Department of QEH using HFMEA method in 2013. A mixed method was used to analyze failure modes and their effects with HFMEA. To classify failure modes; nursing errors in clinical management model, for classifying factors affecting error; approved model by the UK National Health System, and for determining solutions for improvement; Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, were used. 48 failure modes were identified for 14 sub-process of five steps drug management process. The frequency of failure modes were as follow :35.3% in supplying step, 20.75% in prescription step, 10.4% in preparing step, 22.9% in distribution step and 10.35% in follow up and monitoring step. Seventeen failure modes (35.14%) were considered as non-acceptable risk (hazard score? 8) and were transferred to decision tree. Among 51 Influencing factors, the most common reasons for error were related to environmental factors (21.5%), and the less common reasons for error were related to patient factors (4.3%). HFMEA is a useful tool to evaluating, prioritization and analyzing failure modes in drug management process. Revision drug management process based focus-PDCA, assessing adverse drug reactions (ADR), USE patient identification bracelet, holding periodical pharmaceutical conferences to improve personnel knowledge, patient contribution in drug therapy; are performance solutions which were placed in work order.

  19. Structural biomechanics modulate intramuscular distribution of locally delivered drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter I-Kung Wu; Elazer R. Edelman

    2008-01-01

    As local drug delivery continues to emerge as a clinical force, so does understanding of its potentially narrow therapeutic window. Classic molecular transport studies are of value but do not typically account for the local nature of drug transport or the effects of regional dynamic function in target tissues like muscle that may undergo cyclical and variable mechanical motion and

  20. Impact of drug administration route on drug delivery and distribution into the lung: an imaging mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Zecchi, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Pittelli, Maria; Pedretti, Pamela; Manni, Maria Elena; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Pioselli, Barbara; Amadei, Francesco; Moneti, Gloriano; Catinella, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, significant technological improvements in mass spectrometry have had a great impact on drug discovery. The development of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has set a new frontier for the study of the distribution of endogenous and exogenous molecules present within a tissue. MALDI-IMS is a surface sampling technique that allows not only the detection of multiple analytes but also gives the spatial distribution of those analytes. Active compounds for pulmonary disease need an optimal and well-studied delivery into the lungs, in order to assure distribution with greater penetration into the peripheral or the alveolar region of the lung to maximize the therapeutic effects. IMS is very useful in the field of drug discovery, showing drug delivery and distribution in the body and organs. In this study, we present a comparison between two different ways of carrying out pulmonary drug administration: inhalation of a nebulized aerosol of aqueous drug solutions and intratracheal administration, which is much simpler, not expensive and commonly used during in vivo screening. Tiotropium bromide is a long-acting anticholinergic medicine used for maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the present work, tiotropium was administered by nebulization and by intratracheal instillation to guinea pigs at doses able to induce significant anti-bronchoconstrictive activity. Lung samples were dissected, frozen, cryosectioned and coated with matrix (?-hydroxy-cinnamic acid). IMS analyses were performed using a MALDI-LTQ-Orbitrap XL. Using this technique we were able to compare different distributions of the drug depending on the method of administration. PMID:24378465

  1. An evidence-based assessment of the clinical significance of drug-drug interactions between disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and non-antirheumatic drugs according to rheumatologists and pharmacists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric N. van Roon; Patricia M. L. A. van den Bemt; Tim L. Th. A. Jansen; Nella M. Houtman; Mart A. F. J. van de Laar; Jacobus R. B. J. Brouwers

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) must be recognized in a timely manner and managed appropriately to prevent adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. Because the evidence for most DDIs is based on case reports or poorly documented clinical information, there is a need for better assessment of their clinical relevance.Objective: This study evaluates the interdisciplinary agreement between rheumatologists and

  2. Rapid Assessment of Drug Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Means of Luciferase Reporter Phages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R. Jacobs Jr.; Raul G. Barletta; Rupa Udani; John Chan; Gary Kalkut; Gabriel Sosne; Tobias Kieser; Gary J. Sarkis; Graham F. Hatfull; Barry R. Bloom

    1993-01-01

    Effective chemotherapy of tuberculosis requires rapid assessment of drug sensitivity because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Drug susceptibility was assessed by a simple method based on the efficient production of photons by viable mycobacteria infected with specific reporter phages expressing the firefly luciferase gene. Light production was dependent on phage infection, expression of the luciferase gene, and the

  3. A Rational Probabilistic Method for Spatially Distributed Landslide Hazard Assessment

    E-print Network

    Haneberg, William C.

    A Rational Probabilistic Method for Spatially Distributed Landslide Hazard Assessment WILLIAM C, Landslides, Probabi- listic, Computer Applications, West Virginia ABSTRACT First-order, second-moment (FOSM models to perform spatially distributed probabilistic landslide hazard analyses. This is most easily

  4. A Marginal Structural Modeling Approach to Assess the Cumulative Effect of Drug Treatment on the Later Drug Use Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Libo; Evans, Elizabeth; Hser, Yih-ing

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we applied a marginal structural model (MSM) to estimate the effect on later drug use of drug treatments occurring over 10 years following first use of the primary drug. The study was based on the longitudinal data that were collected in three projects among 421 subjects and covered 15 years since first use of their primary drug. The cumulative treatment effect was estimated by the inverse-probability of treatment weighted estimators of MSM as well as the traditional regression analysis. Contrary to the traditional regression analysis, results of the MSM showed that the cumulative treatment occurring over the 10 years significantly increased the likelihood of drug use abstinence in the subsequent 5-year period. From both the statistical and empirical point of view, MSM is a better approach to assessing cumulative treatment effects, considering its advantage of controlling for self-selection bias over time. PMID:21566677

  5. Sex, drugs, and HIV: Rapid assessment of HIV risk behaviors among street-based drug using sex workers in Durban, South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Needle; Karen Kroeger; Hrishikesh Belani; Angeli Achrekar; Charles D. Parry; Sarah Dewing

    2008-01-01

    South Africa is experiencing significant changes in patterns of illicit drug use, including increasing injection and non-injection drug use, and the use of drugs by persons engaged in sex work, both of which could further expand the HIV\\/AIDS epidemic. In 2005, a rapid ethnographic assessment was conducted in Durban, South Africa, to learn more about patterns of drug use and

  6. Comparative Genomic Assessment of Novel Broad-Spectrum Targets for Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    Single and multiple resistance to antibacterial drugs currently in use is spreading, since they act against only a very small number of molecular targets; finding novel targets for anti-infectives is therefore of great importance. All protein sequences from three pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL993) were assessed via comparative genomics methods for their suitability as antibacterial targets according to a number of criteria, including the essentiality of the protein, its level of sequence conservation, and its distribution in pathogens, bacteria and eukaryotes (especially humans). Each protein was scored and ranked based on weighted variants of these criteria in order to prioritize proteins as potential novel broad-spectrum targets for antibacterial drugs. A number of proteins proved to score highly in all three species and were robust to variations in the scoring system used. Sensitivity analysis indicated the quantitative contribution of each metric to the overall score. After further analysis of these targets, tRNA methyltransferase (trmD) and translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) emerged as potential and novel antimicrobial targets very worthy of further investigation. The scoring strategy used might be of value in other areas of post-genomic drug discovery. PMID:18629165

  7. Investigation on fabrication process of dissolving microneedle arrays to improve effective needle drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Yao, Gangtao; Dong, Pin; Gong, Zihua; Li, Ge; Zhang, Kejian; Wu, Chuanbin

    2014-10-23

    The dissolving microneedle array (DMNA) offers a novel potential approach for transdermal delivery of biological macromolecular drugs and vaccines, because it can be as efficient as hypodermic injection and as safe and patient compliant as conventional transdermal delivery. However, effective needle drug distribution is the main challenge for clinical application of DMNA. This study focused on the mechanism and control of drug diffusion inside DMNA during the fabrication process in order to improve the drug delivery efficiency. The needle drug loading proportion (NDP) in DMNAs was measured to determine the influences of drug concentration gradient, needle drying step, excipients, and solvent of the base solution on drug diffusion and distribution. The results showed that the evaporation of base solvent was the key factor determining NDP. Slow evaporation of water from the base led to gradual increase of viscosity, and an approximate drug concentration equilibrium was built between the needle and base portions, resulting in NDP as low as about 6%. When highly volatile ethanol was used as the base solvent, the viscosity in the base rose quickly, resulting in NDP more than 90%. Ethanol as base solvent did not impact the insertion capability of DMNAs, but greatly increased the in vitro drug release and transdermal delivery from DMNAs. Furthermore, the drug diffusion process during DMNA fabrication was thoroughly investigated for the first time, and the outcomes can be applied to most two-step molding processes and optimization of the DMNA fabrication. PMID:25446513

  8. Single Cell Analysis of Drug Distribution by Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giedt, Randy J.; Koch, Peter D.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of intravital imaging have for the first time allowed us to conduct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies at the single cell level in live animal models. Due to these advances, there is now a critical need for automated analysis of pharmacokinetic data. To address this, we began by surveying common thresholding methods to determine which would be most appropriate for identifying fluorescently labeled drugs in intravital imaging. We then developed a segmentation algorithm that allows semi-automated analysis of pharmacokinetic data at the single cell level. Ultimately, we were able to show that drug concentrations can indeed be extracted from serial intravital imaging in an automated fashion. We believe that the application of this algorithm will be of value to the analysis of intravital microscopy imaging particularly when imaging drug action at the single cell level. PMID:23593370

  9. Investigation of distribution, transport and uptake of anti-HIV drugs to the central nervous system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald J. Sawchuk; Zheng Yang

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of currently available anti-HIV drugs into the CNS is reviewed with a focus on transport mechanisms. Among these drugs, nucleoside analogs are most well studied for their CNS distribution. The average reported values of the CSF\\/plasma steady-state concentration or corresponding AUC ratios are 0.23 (AZT), 0.06 (ddI), 0.04 (ddC), 0.49 (d4T), and 0.08 (3TC). Active efflux transport out

  10. Assessing intraepithelial neoplasia and drug safety in cancer-preventive drug development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline C. Sigman; Gary J. Kelloff

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant interest from the research community and the population in general, drug approvals for cancer prevention and\\/or cancer risk reduction are few. This is due, in part, to the requirement that new cancer-preventive drugs must first be shown to be efficacious in reducing cancer incidence or mortality. Moreover, such drugs need to have proven safety for long-term administration. This

  11. Plasmodium falciparum Drug Resistance Phenotype as Assessed by Patient Antimalarial Drug Levels and Its Association With pfmdr1 Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, Maja; Ferreira, Pedro E.; Tarning, Joel; Ursing, Johan; Ngasala, Billy; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas; Gil, José P.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum is a major threat to global malaria control. Parasites develop resistance by gradually acquiring genetic polymorphisms that decrease drug susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which parasites with different genetic characteristics are able to withstand individual drug blood concentrations. Methods.?We analyzed 2 clinical trials that assessed the efficacy and effectiveness of artemether-lumefantrine. As a proof of concept, we used measured day 7 lumefantrine concentrations to estimate the concentrations at which reinfections multiplied. P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1) genotypes of these parasites were then correlated to drug susceptibility. Results.?Reinfecting parasites with the pfmdr1 N86/184F/D1246 haplotype were able to withstand lumefantrine blood concentrations 15-fold higher than those with the 86Y/Y184/1246Y haplotype. Conclusions.?By estimating drug concentrations, we were able to quantify the contribution of pfmdr1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to reduced lumefantrine susceptibility. The method can be applied to all long–half-life antimalarial drugs, enables early detection of P. falciparum with reduced drug susceptibility in vivo, and represents a novel way for unveiling molecular markers of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:23225895

  12. An Assessment of Drug Testing within the Construction Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Jonathan K.; Yacoubian, George S., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the efficacy of workplace drug-testing programs in reducing injury incident rates and workers' compensation experience-rating modification factors within the construction industry. Analyses indicate that companies with drug-testing programs experienced a 51 percent reduction in incident rates within two years of implementation.…

  13. Principles of initial experimental drug abuse liability assessment in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland R. Griffiths; George E. Bigelow; Nancy A. Ator

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and procedures for conducting what is considered by many to be the current “gold standard” for initial abuse liability testing of a novel compound: the classic acute dose–effect comparison study in volunteers with histories of drug abuse. Such a trial is most appropriate for predicting the likelihood of abuse by drug abusers and, in turn,

  14. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johanna; Theile, Dirk; Dvorak, Zdenek; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI-258) is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1) inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 ?M). Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3), and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. PMID:25521244

  15. Interaction potential of the multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib with drug transporters and drug metabolising enzymes assessed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Theile, Dirk; Dvorak, Zdenek; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI-258) is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1) inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 ?M). Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3), and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. PMID:25521244

  16. Assessment of drug transporter function using fluorescent cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Bircsak, Kristin M; Gibson, Christopher J; Robey, Robert W; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, including the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance proteins (MDRs), actively transport structurally diverse chemicals from a number of tissues and are being increasingly cited as mediators of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The potential outcomes of concomitantly administering two drugs that interact at the same transporter include altered disposition and toxicity and/or efficacy of one or both of the drugs. Research demonstrating the role of transporters in clinical pharmacokinetics has shed light on the need for in vitro screening methods that detect drug-transporter interactions during preclinical development. This unit describes cell-based procedures for detecting functional inhibitors of BCRP and MDR1 by measuring fluorescent substrate accumulation in suspended cells using an automated cell counter, which offers convenience, sensitivity, and speed in measuring intracellular fluorescence and identifying new inhibitors. An alternative method is provided for making similar measurements using a spectrophotometer with fluorescence detection capabilities. PMID:24510579

  17. Behavioural assessment of drug reinforcement and addictive features in rodents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Spanagel, Rainer

    2006-03-01

    Some psychoactive drugs are abused because of their ability to act as reinforcers. As a consequence behavioural patterns (such as drug-seeking/drug-taking behaviours) are promoted that ensure further drug consumption. After prolonged drug self-administration, some individuals lose control over their behaviour so that these drug-seeking/taking behaviours become compulsive, pervading almost all life activities and precipitating the loss of social compatibility. Thus, the syndrome of addictive behaviour is qualitatively different from controlled drug consumption. Drug-induced reinforcement can be assessed directly in laboratory animals by either operant or non-operant self-administration methods, by classical conditioning-based paradigms such as conditioned place preference or sign tracking, by facilitation of intracranial electric self-stimulation, or, alternatively by drug-induced memory enhancement. In contrast, addiction cannot be modelled in animals, at least as a whole, within the constraints of the laboratory. However, various procedures have been proposed as possible rodent analogues of addiction's major elements including compulsive drug seeking, relapse, loss of control/impulsivity, and continued drug consumption despite negative consequences. This review provides an extensive overview and a critical evaluation of the methods currently used for studying drug-induced reinforcement as well as specific features of addictive behaviour. In addition, comic strips that illustrate behavioural methods used in the drug abuse field are provided given for free download under http://www.zi-mannheim/psychopharmacology.de. PMID:16759333

  18. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Kumar, Dhakchinamoorthi Krishna; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual's genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs) and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1) with Indian perspective. PMID:24604039

  19. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of aspergiolide A in early drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Qi, Xin; Li, Dehai; Zhu, Tianjiao; Mo, Xiaomei; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A), from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD) of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary. PMID:25378909

  20. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of Aspergiolide A in early drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Qi, Xin; Li, Dehai; Zhu, Tianjiao; Mo, Xiaomei; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A), from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD) of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary. PMID:25378909

  1. Scientometric assessment of drugs for chronic pain, 1979–2013: rapid growth of publications, paucity of successful drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find signs of progress in the pharmacotherapy of chronic pain over the past 35 years using scientometric analysis. The following scientometric indices were used: 1) popularity index, representing the share of articles on a specific drug(s) relative to all articles in the field of chronic pain; 2) index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; 3) index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and 4) index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 55 drugs used in the treatment of chronic pain were assessed during seven 5-year periods, from 1979 to 2013. The rate of rise in the number of publications on chronic pain was exponential, with an increase of nearly ninefold from 2,346 articles over the 5-year period 1979–1983 to 21,095 articles in 2009–2013. However, despite this huge increase in publications, our scientometric analysis did not reveal signs of really successful drugs in this field. For the 2009–2013 period, the popularity index had a meaningful magnitude (from 0.5–2.8) for only 13 of 55 drugs. Five of them were opioids, including morphine, which had the highest index value of all drugs (2.8). None of the drugs had a high index of expectations in 2009–2013. The index of ultimate success was positive only with triptans in the relatively limited area of acute treatment of migraine. As a result, despite rapid growth in the number of publications, our scientometric analysis did not reveal signs of substantial progress in the field of pharmacotherapy for chronic pain. PMID:25187736

  2. Assessment of Club Patrons’ Alcohol and Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brenda A.; Byrnes, Hilary F.; Branner, Amy C.; Voas, Robert; B. Johnson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Young adulthood (ages 18–25 years) represents a time when high-risk behaviors, including alcohol and drug use, peak. Electronic music dance events (EMDEs) featured at clubs provide an ecologic niche for these high-risk behaviors. Purpose This paper examines the prevalence of alcohol and drug use among EMDE patrons. Examination of personal characteristics associated with exit levels of alcohol and drug use identifies important indicators of risk taking for prevention strategies. Methods Data were collected anonymously during 2010–2012 from 2028 patrons as they entered and exited clubs in the San Francisco Bay area featuring EMDEs. Nearly half were aged ?25 years. Biological measures of drug and alcohol and self-reported personal characteristics were attained. Analyses were completed in 2012. Results At entrance, more than one fifth of patrons were positive for drug use and one fourth arrived either impaired (blood alcohol concentration [BAC]: 0.05%–0.079%) or intoxicated (BAC: >0.08%) by alcohol. At exit, one fourth tested positive for drugs, and nearly half were impaired or intoxicated by alcohol. Individual characteristics that were important for levels of risk included prior alcohol use behaviors, sexual identity, ethnic/racial identity, and transportation to the event. Gender did not differentiate for alcohol use but fewer women used drugs. Conclusions Findings confirm the importance of targeting EMDEs for prevention efforts. EMDEs attract young working adults who are engaged in heavy alcohol and/or drug use. Targeting these social settings for delivering public health prevention strategies regarding alcohol and drug use and related harms is indicated by the findings. PMID:24139778

  3. Effect of heterogeneous microvasculature distribution on drug delivery to solid tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wenbo; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2014-11-01

    Most of the computational models of drug transport in vascular tumours assume a uniform distribution of blood vessels through which anti-cancer drugs are delivered. However, it is well known that solid tumours are characterized by dilated microvasculature with non-uniform diameters and irregular branching patterns. In this study, the effect of heterogeneous vasculature on drug transport and uptake is investigated by means of mathematical modelling of the key physical and biochemical processes in drug delivery. An anatomically realistic tumour model accounting for heterogeneous distribution of blood vessels is reconstructed based on magnetic resonance images of a liver tumour. Numerical simulations are performed for different drug delivery modes, including direct continuous infusion and thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery, and the anti-cancer effectiveness is evaluated through changes in tumour cell density based on predicted intracellular concentrations. Comparisons are made between regions of different vascular density, and between the two drug delivery modes. Our numerical results show that both extra- and intra-cellular concentrations in the liver tumour are non-uniform owing to the heterogeneous distribution of tumour vasculature. Drugs accumulate faster in well-vascularized regions, where they are also cleared out more quickly, resulting in less effective tumour cell killing in these regions. Compared with direct continuous infusion, the influence of heterogeneous vasculature on anti-cancer effectiveness is more pronounced for thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery.

  4. Impact of copolymer ratio on drug distribution in styrene-isobutylene-styrene block copolymers.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Martin K; Kim, Chang-Soo; Saylor, David M; Patwardhan, Dinesh V

    2013-10-01

    Drug-polymer composite coatings, composed of styrene-isobutylene-styrene (SIBS) tri-block copolymers, are frequently used in controlled drug release biomedical device applications. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy to characterize the effects of different drug loadings and polymer chemistries (i.e., block copolymer ratio) on the variation of surface structures and compositions of SIBS-tetracycline (SIBS-TC) cast composites including tetracycline (TC) drug amount, drug phase size distribution, and drug and polymer phase morphologies. We tested the structural variations by fabricating and characterizing two types of composite specimens, that is, SIBS15 and SIBS30, composed of 15 and 30 Wt % of polystyrene (PS), respectively. The differences in the distribution of TC drug, PS, and polyisobutylene (PIB) polymer phase structures observed in SIBS15 and SIBS30 resulted in more drug at the surface of SIBS30 compared to SIBS15. To support the experimental findings, we have determined the Hildebrand solubility parameter of TC using molecular dynamics (MD) computation and compared it to the polymer components, PS and PIB. The MD results show that the solubility parameter of TC is much closer to that of PS than PIB, which demonstrates a higher thermodynamic stability of TC-PS mixtures. PMID:23564439

  5. Surveying Teens in School to Assess the Prevalence of Problematic Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falck, Russel S.; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Li, Linna; Carlson, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Illicit drug use by school-aged teens can adversely affect their health and academic achievement. This study used a survey administered in schools to assess the prevalence of problematic drug use among teenagers in a Midwestern community. Methods: Self-report data were collected from 11th- and 12th-grade students (N = 3974) in 16…

  6. Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Disorders in the Seriously Mentally Ill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen L. Barry; Michael F. Fleming; James Greenley; Prudence Widlak; Svetlana Kropp; David McKee

    1995-01-01

    Brief assessment methods are needed to determine the presence of alcohol and drug problems in persons with severe mental illness. The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of alcohol and other drug problems in a rural population of 253 clients with severe mental illness and to determine the accuracy of case manager responses to specific alcohol and

  7. Quality assessment of drug sales data: the case of antibacterials in Iceland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingunn Björnsdóttir; Ebba Holme Hansen; Almar Grímsson

    1999-01-01

    Background: Two sets of drug sales data, published by the Icelandic Ministry of Health, did not match for antibacterials in 1989. The search for causes turned out to be a project in itself. Objective: To analyze quality problems in the sales data on antibacterials and describe a method for systematic quality assessment of drug sales data. Methods: Documentary analysis based

  8. Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Behaviors in Health Professions Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Scott, David M.; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Bartek, Jean K.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; Reardon, Thomas P.; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors of health professions students (HPS) were assessed by surveying both university-based HPS and other nursing programs in a Midwestern state in 1999. Response was 2,646 (56.4%) of surveyed students. Family history of alcohol-related and drug-related problems were reported by 39.8% and 13.9%, respectively,…

  9. A Choice Procedure to Assess the Aversive Effects of Drugs in Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Woods, James H.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this series of experiments was to develop an operant choice procedure to examine rapidly the punishing effects of intravenous drugs in rats. First, the cardiovascular effects of experimenter-administered intravenous histamine, a known aversive drug, were assessed to determine a biologically active dose range. Next, rats responded on…

  10. ASSESSMENT OF NEW CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS Relationships Between Considerations, Professional Characteristics, and Prescribing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolien F. Wieringa; Petra Denig; Pieter A. de Graeff

    Objectives: To study considerations used by professional and academic leaders to assess the position of new cardiovascular drugs in the therapeutic regimen in relationship to professional characteristics and the level of prescribing. Methods: Interviews with 39 internists, cardiologists, general practitioners, and hospital pharmacists about considerations regarding the therapeutic position and prescribing of a new cardiovascular drug (losartan or atorvastatin) and

  11. Assessing dietary intake of drug abusing Hispanic adults with and without HIV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug abuse is an important risk factor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Hispanics in the Northeastern United States and both drug abuse and HIV are associated with nutritional deficiencies. The selection of a dietary assessment method most appropriate for Hispanic adults with/without HIV...

  12. ADVANCED TOOLS FOR ASSESSING SELECTED PRESCRIPTION AND ILLICIT DRUGS IN TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENTS AND SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this poster is to present the application and assessment of advanced technologies in a real-world environment - wastewater effluent and source waters - for detecting six drugs (azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, and methylenedioxy...

  13. Risk Assessment of Drug Management Process in Women Surgery Department of Qaem Educational Hospital (QEH) Using HFMEA Method (2013).

    PubMed

    Khani-Jazani, Reza; Molavi-Taleghani, Yasamin; Seyedin, Hesam; Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Pourtaleb, Arefeh

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of drug management process are essential for patient safety. The present study was performed whit the aim of assessing risk of drug management process in Women Surgery Department of QEH using HFMEA method in 2013. A mixed method was used to analyze failure modes and their effects with HFMEA. To classify failure modes; nursing errors in clinical management model, for classifying factors affecting error; approved model by the UK National Health System, and for determining solutions for improvement; Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, were used. 48 failure modes were identified for 14 sub-process of five steps drug management process. The frequency of failure modes were as follow :35.3% in supplying step, 20.75% in prescription step, 10.4% in preparing step, 22.9% in distribution step and 10.35% in follow up and monitoring step. Seventeen failure modes (35.14%) were considered as non-acceptable risk (hazard score? 8) and were transferred to decision tree. Among 51 Influencing factors, the most common reasons for error were related to environmental factors (21.5%), and the less common reasons for error were related to patient factors (4.3%). HFMEA is a useful tool to evaluating, prioritization and analyzing failure modes in drug management process. Revision drug management process based focus-PDCA, assessing adverse drug reactions (ADR), USE patient identification bracelet, holding periodical pharmaceutical conferences to improve personnel knowledge, patient contribution in drug therapy; are performance solutions which were placed in work order. PMID:25901157

  14. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation

    E-print Network

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16

    and forced outage of the WTG. A two-state model represented other components of the distribution system such as transformers etc. The authors [5] noted the reliability impact on an individual load point to be dependent on the location of the load point...; Bus 2 RBTS and Bus 4 RBTS networks described in chapter IV. Different magnitudes of system supply constitutes each case. Within each case, the orginal network?s reliability is compared with the networks when DG is added to them. A total of eighteen...

  15. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrer, Estelle, E-mail: estelle.marrer@novartis.co [Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Dieterle, Frank [Molecular Diagnostics, Novartis Pharma, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-03-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  16. Assessment of Drug Transporter Function Using Fluorescent Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bircsak, Kristin M.; Gibson, Christopher J.; Robey, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, including the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance proteins (MDRs), actively transport structurally diverse chemicals from a number of tissues. Moreover, transporters are being increasingly cited as mediators of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The potential outcomes of concomitantly administering two drugs that interact at the same transporter include altered disposition and toxicity and/or efficacy of one or both of the drugs. Research demonstrating the role of transporters in clinical pharmacokinetics has shed light on the need for in vitro screening methods that detect drug-transporter interactions during preclinical development. This paper describes a cell-based model for the detection of functional inhibitors of BCRP and MDR1 by measuring fluorescent substrate accumulation in suspended cells that overexpress or endogenously express these proteins using an automated cell counter. An alternate protocol is provided describing the use of a spectrophotometer with fluorescence detection capabilities to identify functional inhibitors of BCRP and MDR1 in transporter overexpressing cells. While a spectrophotometer is available in most laboratories, an automatic cell counter offers convenience, sensitivity, and speed in measuring the cellular accumulation of fluorescent substrates and identification of novel inhibitors. PMID:24510579

  17. In Vitro Assessment of Antiretroviral Drugs Demonstrates Potential for Ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thein, Pru; Kalinec, Gilda M.; Park, Channy; Kalinec, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported an increased incidence of auditory dysfunction among HIV/AIDS patients. We used auditory HEI-OC1 cells in cell viability, flow cytometry and caspases 3/7-activation studies to investigate the potential ototoxicity of fourteen HIV antiretroviral agents: Abacavir, AZT, Delavirdine, Didenosine, Efavirenz, Emtricitabine, Indinavir, Lamivudine, Nefinavir, Nevirapine, Tenofovir, Ritonavir, Stavudine and Zalcitabine, as well as combinations of these agents as used in the common anti-HIV cocktails Atripla™, Combivir™, Epzicom™, Trizivir™, and Truvada™. Our results suggested that most of the single assayed anti-HIV drugs are toxic for HEI-OC1 auditory cells. The cocktails, on the other hand, decreased auditory cells’ viability with high significance, with the following severity gradient: Epzicom ~ Trizivir ? Atripla ~ Combivir > Truvada. Interestingly, our results suggest that Trizivir- and Epzicom-induced cell death would be mediated by a caspase-independent mechanism. L-Carnitine, a natural micronutrient known to protect HEI-OC1 cells against some ototoxic drugs as well as to decrease neuropathies associated with anti-HIV treatments, increased viability of cells treated with Lamivudine and Tenofovir as well as with the cocktail Atripla, but had only minor effects on cells treated with other drugs and drug combinations. Altogether, these results suggest that some frequently used anti-HIV agents could have deleterious effects on patients hearing, and provide arguments in favor of additional studies aimed at elucidating the potential ototoxicity of current as well as future anti-HIV drugs. PMID:24487230

  18. Opinion: Assessing the Barriers to Image Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Moonen, Chrit; Baker, James R.; Chang, Esther; Cheng, Zheng; Grodzinski, Piotr; Ferrara, Katherine; Hynynen, Kullervo; Kelloff, Gary; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Patri, Anil K; Sept, David; Schnitzer, Jan E.; Wood, Bradford J.; Zhang, Miqin; Zheng, Gang; Farahani, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Imaging has become a cornerstone for medical diagnosis and the guidance of patient management. A new field called Image Guided Drug Delivery (IGDD) now combines the vast potential of the radiological sciences with the delivery of treatment and promises to fulfill the vision of personalized medicine. Whether imaging is used to deliver focused energy to drug-laden particles for enhanced, local drug release around tumors, or it is invoked in the context of nanoparticle-based agents to quantify distinctive biomarkers that could risk-stratify patients for improved targeted drug delivery efficiency, the overarching goal of IGDD is to use imaging to maximize effective therapy in diseased tissues and to minimize systemic drug exposure in order to reduce toxicities. Over the last several years innumerable reports and reviews covering the gamut of IGDD technologies have been published, but inadequate attention has been directed towards identifying and addressing the barriers limiting clinical translation. In this consensus opinion, the opportunities and challenges impacting the clinical realization of IGDD-based personalized medicine were discussed as a panel and recommendations were proffered to accelerate the field forward. PMID:24339356

  19. Characterization of Lung's Emphysema Distribution: Numerical Assessment of Disease Development

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterization of Lung's Emphysema Distribution: Numerical Assessment of Disease Development M that block airflow and make it increasingly difficult for you to breathe. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis bronchitis. Pulmonary emphysema is defined as a lung disease characterized by "abnormal enlargement

  20. Preclinical Assessment of the Anticancer Drug Response of Plexiform Neurofibroma Tissue Using Primary Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mautner, Victor-F.; Friedrich, Reinhard E.; Kluwe, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Individualized drug testing for tumors using a strategy analogous to antibiotic tests for infectious diseases would be highly desirable for personalized and individualized cancer care. Methods Primary cultures containing tumor and nontumor stromal cells were utilized in a novel strategy to test drug responses with respect to both efficacy and specificity. The strategy tested in this pilot study was implemented using four primary cultures derived from plexiform neurofibromas. Responses to two cytotoxic drugs (nilotinib and imatinib) were measured by following dose-dependent changes in the proportions of tumor and nontumor cells, determined by staining them with cell-type-specific antibodies. The viability of the cultured cells and the cytotoxic effect of the drugs were also measured using proliferation and cytotoxicity assays. Results The total number of cells decreased after the drug treatment, in accordance with the observed reduction in proliferation and increased cytotoxic effect upon incubation with the two anticancer drugs. The proportions of Schwann cells and fibroblasts changed dose-dependently, although the patterns of change varied between the tumor samples (from different sources) and between the two drugs. The highly variable in vitro drug responses probably reflect the large variations in the responses of tumors to therapies between individual patients in vivo. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that the concept of assessing in vitro drug responses using primary cultures is feasible, but demands the extensive further development of an application for preclinical drug selection and drug discovery. PMID:25851896

  1. A study of the distribution of schistosomicidal drug H-3-7505 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, T.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have studied the distribution of H-3 labelled schistosomicidal drug in mice by autoradiography. The H-3-labelled substances were found in liver and kidney and in successfully decreasing amounts in brain, lung, heart, fat, testis, pancreas and spleen. In various cells the silver granules were present mainly in the cytoplasms but a few in the nucleus. After administration of this labelled schistosomicidal drug, the mice were killed and studied in groups successively at 4, 8, 24 hrs. No difference in the distribution of silver granules were observed. This fact indicated that, this drug was rapidly absorbed and highly concentrated with a long duration of reservation in liver. All of these favours the schistosomicidal effect of the drug. As this drug was highly concentrated in the cytoplasm of liver cells, that might provide a pathophysiologic basis for the explanation of jaundice in the clinical practice. Moreover, the appearance of toxic reaction in nervous system may be related to the relatively high concentration of the drug distributed in the brain.

  2. An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment*

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Teknowledge Corporation Abstract: The goal of any intrusion detection, anti-virus, firewall or other security of a system to complete its mission. A human or robot analyst can use the model to assess the security status of a monitored system and to allocate resources in an optimal way. 1. Introduction* Intrusion detection and other

  3. Evolution of the Food and Drug Administration approach to liver safety assessment for new drugs: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Senior, John R

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by approval in 1997 of troglitazone and bromfenac, two drugs that promptly began to show serious and sometimes fatal liver toxicity, we began at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) a series of annual conferences in 1999 to consider issues of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). First inviting reviewers of new drug applications we opened the audiences in 2001 to pharmaceutical industry and academic consultants to industry and FDA, and slides shown at the meetings were posted on the internet to be available at the website of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)-go to ( http://www.aasld.org/dili/Pages/default.aspx ). Observations by Dr. Hyman J. Zimmerman that "drug-induced hepatocellular jaundice is a serious lesion" with possible mortality formed a basis for developing a computer program to plot peak serum values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total bilirubin (TBL) in an x-y log-log graph for all subjects enrolled in clinical trials. This program had the capability to show the time course of all liver tests for individuals who had both hepatocellular injury and reduced whole liver function, plus clinical narratives to diagnose the severity and most likely cause of the abnormalities. We called the program eDISH (for evaluation of Drug-Induced Serious Hepatotoxicity), and began in 2004 to use it to assess DILI in clinical trial subjects. From 2008, comments made by the presenters at the conferences about their slides and ensuing discussions have been added to the website. All this has raised awareness of the problem, and since 1997, the FDA has not had to withdraw a single drug because of post-marketing hepatotoxicity. Many issues still remain to be resolved; among the most controversial is the best method to estimate likelihood that a given liver injury was actually caused by the drug in question. On November 9, 2012, a workshop was convened to discuss the best practices for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in clinical trials. PMID:25352324

  4. In Vivo Assessment of Drug Efficacy against Mycobacterium abscessus Using the Embryonic Zebrafish Test System

    PubMed Central

    Bernut, Audrey; Le Moigne, Vincent; Lesne, Tiffany; Lutfalla, Georges; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes and is one of the most intrinsically drug-resistant mycobacterial species. Recent evaluation of the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of the few potentially active antibiotics against M. abscessus was essentially performed using immunocompromised mice. Herein, we assessed the feasibility and sensitivity of fluorescence imaging for monitoring the in vivo activity of drugs against acute M. abscessus infection using zebrafish embryos. A protocol was developed where clarithromycin and imipenem were directly added to water containing fluorescent M. abscessus-infected embryos in a 96-well plate format. The status of the infection with increasing drug concentrations was visualized on a spatiotemporal level. Drug efficacy was assessed quantitatively by measuring the index of protection, the bacterial burden (CFU), and the number of abscesses through fluorescence measurements. Both drugs were active in infected embryos and were capable of significantly increasing embryo survival in a dose-dependent manner. Protection from bacterial killing correlated with restricted mycobacterial growth in the drug-treated larvae and with reduced pathophysiological symptoms, such as the number of abscesses within the brain. In conclusion, we present here a new and efficient method for testing and compare the in vivo activity of two clinically relevant drugs based on a fluorescent reporter strain in zebrafish embryos. This approach could be used for rapid determination of the in vivo drug susceptibility profile of clinical isolates and to assess the preclinical efficacy of new compounds against M. abscessus. PMID:24798271

  5. An assessment of derived flood frequency distributions

    E-print Network

    Raines, Timothy Howard

    1991-01-01

    were compared with those computed from the historic streamflow recorded at each site using the Log-Pearson Type III extreme value distribution. The HEC-I rainfaH- runoff model was also used to simulate peak discharges for a specified recurtence.... 2 . 6 DERIVED MODEL DESCRIPTIONS Marginal PDFs of Total Rainfall Intensity and Duration. . . Infiltration Models Joint PDF of Excess Rainfall Intensity and Duration . . . . . . . Watershed Response Models. CDF of Peak Direct Runoff...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF VANADIUM DISTRIBUTION IN1 SHALLOW GROUNDWATERS2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ASSESSMENT OF VANADIUM DISTRIBUTION IN1 SHALLOW GROUNDWATERS2 3 4 5 Olivier Pourret1 *, Aline Dia2 1, CNRS13 Campus de Beaulieu14 35042 Rennes Cedex, France15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Keywords: vanadium) concentrations, with the aim29 to investigate the controlling factors of vanadium (V) distribution. Two spatially

  7. Atom type preferences, structural diversity, and property profiles of known drugs, leads, and nondrugs: a comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Viswanadhan, Vellarkad N; Rajesh, Hariharan; Balaji, Vitukudi N

    2011-05-01

    A new characterization of known drug, lead, and representative nondrug databases was performed taking into account several properties at the atomic and molecular levels. This characterization included atom type preferences, intrinsic structural diversity (Atom Type Diversity, ATD), and other well-known physicochemical properties, as an approach for rapid assessment of druglikeness for small molecule libraries. To characterize ATD, an elaborate united atom classification, UALOGP (United Atom Log P), with 148 atom types, was developed along with associated atomic physicochemical parameters. This classification also enabled an analysis of atom type and physicochemical property distributions (for calculated log P, molar refractivity, molecular weight, total atom count, and ATD) of drug, lead, and nondrug databases, a reassessment of the Ro5 (Rule of Five) and GVW (Ghose?Viswanadhan?Wendoloski) criteria, and development of new criteria and ranges more accurately reflecting the chemical space occupied by small molecule drugs. A relative druglikeness parameter was defined for atom types in drugs, identifying the most preferred types. The present work demonstrates that drug molecules are constitutionally more diverse relative to nondrugs, while being less diverse than leads. PMID:21480669

  8. Training Needs of Rehabilitation Counselors concerning Alcohol and Other Drugs Abuse Assessment and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lee Za; Cardoso, Elizabeth; Chan, Fong; Chronister, Julie; Chou, Chih Chin

    2007-01-01

    Forty-two rehabilitation counselors participated in a study regarding perceived training needs concerning alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) treatment and assessment. Participants reported that 85% of consumers with whom they worked had AODA issues, yet over half rated their graduate training in AODA treatment and assessment as poor, and their…

  9. Establishing the Validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory Drug and Alcohol Scales in a Corrections Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patry, Marc W.; Magaletta, Philip R.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Weinman, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Although not originally designed for implementation in correctional settings, researchers and clinicians have begun to use the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) to assess offenders. A relatively small number of studies have made attempts to validate the alcohol and drug abuse scales of the PAI, and only a very few studies have validated those…

  10. Assessing the Clinical Importance of Statistically Significant Improvement in Anti-Dementia Drug Trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Rockwood; Chris MacKnight

    2001-01-01

    A strategy for assessing the clinical importance of statistically significant treatment benefits in recent dementia drug trials is proposed. Traditional criteria for the assessment of valid inferences are helpful: the more likely the treatment effects are valid, the greater the chance that they will be clinically important. The role of the Clinician’s Interview-Based Impression of Change is also of some

  11. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through th...

  12. Hospital drug distribution systems in the UK and Germany ? a study of medication errors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katja Taxis; Bryony Dean; Nick Barber

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of medication errors and the stages of the drug distribution system at which they occur in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital using the ward pharmacy system, a German hospital using the unit dose system and a German hospital using their traditional system. Medication errors were identified by observing the preparation

  13. The Virtual Laboratory: A Toolset to Enable Distributed Molecular Modelling for Drug Design on the World-Wide Grid

    E-print Network

    Abramson, David

    in the chemical database (CDB) against a protein target to identify those with potential use for drug design. We synthesis in the laboratory until the therapeutic agent, or drug, is brought to market [11]. Reducing1 The Virtual Laboratory: A Toolset to Enable Distributed Molecular Modelling for Drug Design

  14. Prediction and Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse: Role of Preclinical Assessment of Substance Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    Marusich, Julie A.; Lefever, Timothy W.; Novak, Scott P.; Blough, Bruce E.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, the prevalence of prescription drug abuse exceeded that of any other illicit drug except marijuana. Consequently, efforts to curtail abuse of new medications should begin during the drug development process, where abuse liability can be identified and addressed before a candidate medication has widespread use. The first step in this process is scheduling with the Drug Enforcement Agency so that legal access is appropriately restricted, dependent upon levels of abuse risk and medical benefit. To facilitate scheduling, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has published guidance for industry that describes assessment of abuse liability. The purpose of this paper is to review methods that may be used to satisfy the FDA’s regulatory requirements for animal behavioral and dependence pharmacology. Methods include psychomotor activity, self-administration (an animal model of the rewarding effects of a drug), drug discrimination (an animal model of the subjective effects of a drug), and evaluation of tolerance and dependence. Data from tests conducted at RTI with known drugs of abuse illustrate typical results, and demonstrate that RTI is capable of performing these tests. While using preclinical data to predict abuse liability is an imperfect process, it has substantial predictive validity. The ultimate goal is to increase consumer safety through appropriate scheduling of new medications. PMID:24008590

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, S.W.

    2003-05-22

    Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

  16. Trastuzumab emtansine. An inadequately assessed combination of two cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    There is no consensus on second-line treatment for women with metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer over-expressing HER-2 protein in whom treatment with a taxane + trastuzumab has failed. Capecitabine is one option. Adding lapatinib does not prolong survival. Trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla, Roche) has received EU marketing authorisation for use in this setting. It consists of two covalently bound drugs: trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to HER-2 receptors, and DM1, a cytotoxic microtubule inhibitor. DM1 is derived from maytansine, a cytotoxic drug abandoned in the 1980s because it proved to be too toxic after systemic administration. Clinical evaluation of trastuzumab emtansine is based on an unblinded trial versus capecitabine + lapatinib in 991 patients. The use of lapatinib in all patients in the control group is questionable. An interim analysis suggested that overall survival was about 6 months longer with trastuzumab emtansine (30.9 versus 25.1 months). In addition to the adverse effects of trastuzumab (thrombocytopenia, heart failure, etc.), trastuzumab emtansine causes frequent and potentially life-threatening hepatic toxicity, peripheral neuropathy, and urinary tract infections. Trastuzumab emtansine appears to be less toxic to the skin and mucous membranes than the capecitabine + lapatinib combination. DM1 is metabolised by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and is also a P-glycoprotein substrate, creating a potential risk of multiple pharmacokinetic interactions. Trastuzumab emtansine appears to be teratogenic and embryotoxic. The international nonproprietary name of this drug is easily confused with trastuzumab. In practice, it is best to at least wait for the full results of the only available comparative trial of trastuzumab emtansine before drawing conclusions about its harm-benefit balance and its possible use if it represents a real therapeutic advance. PMID:25629144

  17. The application of 3D cell models to support drug safety assessment: opportunities & challenges.

    PubMed

    Roth, Adrian; Singer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The selection of drug candidates early in development has become increasingly important to minimize the use of animals and to avoid costly failures of drugs later in development. In vitro systems to predict and assess organ toxicity have so far been of limited value due to difficulties in demonstrating in vivo-relevant toxicity at a cell culture level. To overcome the limitations of single-cell type monolayer cultures and short-lived primary cell preparations, researchers have created novel 3-dimensional culture systems which appear to more closely resemble in vivo biology. These could become a key for the pharmaceutical industry in the evaluation of drug candidates. However, the value and acceptance of those new models in standard drug safety applications have yet to be demonstrated. This review aims to provide an overview of the different approaches undertaken in the field of pre-clinical safety assessment, organ toxicity, in particular, with an emphasis on examples and technical challenges. PMID:24378580

  18. Assessment of drugs in schizophrenia. Diagnosis and patient selection.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, A D

    1976-01-01

    It would seem that some set of operational definitions are required for the spectrum of psychotic patients often embraced by the rubric schizophrenia. The problems of acute (first-admission) and chronic patients have been described. At the present time 'relapse re-admissions' would seem to constitute the best population for drug evaluations. The importance of factors such as age, sex, ethnics, geography and length of history has been emphasized. Finally the importance of carefully excluding patients who would be at risk from pre-existing disease or hypersensitivity has been emphasized. PMID:791323

  19. Distribution of primaquine in human blood: Drug-binding to alpha 1-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.; Frischer, H. (Rush Univ., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-12-01

    To clarify the distribution of the antimalarial primaquine in human blood, we measured the drug separately in the liquid, cellular, and ultrafiltrate phases. Washed red cells resuspended at a hematocrit of 0.4 were exposed to a submaximal therapeutic level of 250 ng/ml of carbon 14-labeled primaquine. The tracer was recovered quantitatively in separated plasma and red cells. Over 75% of the total labeled drug was found in red cells suspended in saline solution, but only 10% to 30% in red cells suspended in plasma. The plasma effect was not mediated by albumin. Studies with alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, an agent that displaces AGP-bound drugs, and cord blood known to have decreased AGP established that primaquine binds to physiologic amounts of the glycoprotein in plasma. Red cell primaquine concentration increased linearly as AGP level fell and as the free drug fraction rose. We suggest that clinical blood levels of primaquine include the red cell fraction or whole blood level because (1) erythrocytic primaquine is a sizable and highly variable component of the total drug in blood; (2) this component reflects directly the free drug in plasma, and inversely the extent of binding to AGP; (3) the amount of free primaquine may influence drug transport into specific tissues in vivo; and (4) fluctuations of AGP, an acute-phase reactant that increases greatly in patients with malaria and other infections, markedly affect the partition of primaquine in blood. Because AGP binds many basic drugs, unrecognized primaquine-drug interactions may exist.

  20. [Drugs use assessment in a group of bus drivers].

    PubMed

    Maccà, I; Maso, S; Marcuzzo, G; Bartolucci, G B

    2012-01-01

    Bus driver is one of those tasks inherent transport activity, which involves special risks to safety and health of others and for which it is necessary, according to art. 41 of Decree No. 81/08, to check the consumption of psychoactive substances during the health surveillance. This assumption was investigated in a group of 461 bus drivers of a large trucking company. In medical history, one subject reported a previous history of opiate addiction and another, in the past, occasional taking of cannabis, and at the time of the visit, in no cases the objectivity has shown intoxication or abstinence signs, or signs of parenteral injection. Laboratory tests were found positive in one case of screening texts, not confirmed by subsequent laboratory analysis and a case of positive analysis for confirmation. The worker, temporarily suspended from driving and taken over by the Service for Drug Addiction of competence, was then reinstated in his job, having held that the absence of drug addiction. PMID:23405659

  1. Application of GIS in water distribution system assessment.

    PubMed

    Sargaonkar, Aabha; Islam, Raisul

    2009-10-01

    Water distribution system (WDS) is the most important component of water supply chain--supplying water from source to consumer. When supply system is poorly maintained, contaminants enter into the supply pipes through cracks and this leads to significant public health risk. Being underground, pipe condition assessment is a difficult task. In this paper, a case study is presented for assessment of pipe condition in a water distribution network of Moinbagh area in Hyderabad (India). The mathematical model-Pipe Condition Assessment (PCA) Model was used, which utilizes GIS based maps of water distribution network, sewer network, drains and soil as input in addition to data on physical properties of the network as well as operational parameters. The application of PCA identified that only 3% pipes in the network were in bad condition. PMID:21117426

  2. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, L. J.

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  3. New drug adoption models: a review and assessment of future needs.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, M; Calantone, R J

    1995-01-01

    New drug products today are the key to survival in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the new product development process in the pharmaceutical industry also happens to be one of the riskiest and most expensive undertakings because of the huge research and development costs involved. Consequently market forecasting of new pharmaceutical products takes on added importance if the formidable investments are to be recovered. New drug adoption models provide the marketer with a means to assess new product potential. Although several adoption models are available in the marketing literature for assessing potential of common consumer goods, the unique characteristics of the prescription drug market makes it necessary to examine the current state of pharmaceutical innovations. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to: (1) review new drug adoption models in the pharmaceutical literature, (2) evaluate the existing models of new drug adoption using the ten criteria for a good model as prescribed by Zaltman and Wallendorf (1983), and (3) provide an overall assessment and a ¿prescription¿ for better forecasting of new drug products. PMID:10143893

  4. eDrugCalc: an online self-assessment package to enhance medical students' drug dose calculation skills

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Daniel S; Begg, Michael J; Maxwell, Simon R J

    2010-01-01

    AIMS Dose calculation errors can cause serious life-threatening clinical incidents. We designed eDrugCalc as an online self-assessment tool to develop and evaluate calculation skills among medical students. METHODS We undertook a prospective uncontrolled study involving 1727 medical students in years 1–5 at the University of Edinburgh. Students had continuous access to eDrugCalc and were encouraged to practise. Voluntary self-assessment was undertaken by answering the 20 questions on six occasions over 30 months. Questions remained fixed but numerical variables changed so each visit required a fresh calculation. Feedback was provided following each answer. RESULTS Final-year students had a significantly higher mean score in test 6 compared with test 1 [16.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.2, 17.0 vs. 12.6, 95% CI 11.9, 13.4; n = 173, P < 0.0001 Wilcoxon matched pairs test] and made a median of three vs. seven errors. Performance was highly variable in all tests with 2.7% of final-year students scoring < 10/20 in test 6. Graduating students in 2009 (30 months' exposure) achieved significantly better scores than those in 2007 (only 6 months): mean 16.5, 95% CI 16.0, 17.0, n = 184 vs. 15.1, 95% CI 14.5, 15.6, n = 187; P < 0.0001, Mann–Whitney test. Calculations based on percentage concentrations and infusion rates were poorly performed. Feedback showed that eDrugCalc increased confidence in calculating doses and was highly rated as a learning tool. CONCLUSIONS Medical student performance of dose calculations improved significantly after repeated exposure to an online formative dose-calculation package and encouragement to develop their numeracy. Further research is required to establish whether eDrugCalc reduces calculation errors made in clinical practice. PMID:20840441

  5. A Strategy for assessing potential drug-drug interactions of a concomitant agent against a drug absorbed via an intestinal transporter in humans.

    PubMed

    Mizuno-Yasuhira, Akiko; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Gunji, Emi; Uchida, Saeko; Takahashi, Teisuke; Kinoshita, Kohnosuke; Jingu, Shigeji; Sakai, Soichi; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    A strategy for assessing potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on a simulated intestinal concentration is described. The proposed prediction method was applied to the DDI assessment of luseogliflozin, a novel antidiabetic drug, against miglitol absorbed via the intestinal sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). The method involves four steps: collection of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters of luseogliflozin for use in a computer simulation; evaluation of the validity of these parameters by verifying the goodness of fit between simulated and observed plasma profiles; simulation of the intestinal luseogliflozin concentration-time profile using the Advanced Compartment Absorption and Transit (ACAT) model in a computer program and estimation of the time spent above a value 10-fold higher than the IC50 value (TAIC) for SGLT1; and evaluation of the DDI potential of luseogliflozin by considering the percentage of TAIC against the miglitol Tmax (time for Cmax) value (TAIC/Tmax). An initial attempt to prove the validity of this method was performed in rats. The resulting TAIC/Tmax in rats was 32%, suggesting a low DDI potential of luseogliflozin against miglitol absorption. The validity was then confirmed using an in vivo interaction study in rats. In humans, luseogliflozin was expected to have no DDI potential against miglitol absorption, since the TAIC/Tmax in humans was lower than that in rats. This prediction was proven, as expected, in a clinical interaction study. In conclusion, the present strategy based on a simulation of the intestinal concentration-time profile using dynamic modeling would be useful for assessing the clinical DDI potential of a concomitant agent against drugs absorbed via an intestinal transporter. PMID:25005603

  6. Perpetrators of pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions arising from altered cytochrome P450 activity: a criteria-based assessment

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Lin, Frank P Y; Miners, John O; Doogue, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To catalogue the perpetrators of CYP-mediated pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (PK-DDIs) using clinically relevant criteria, and to compare this with an analogous catalogue. METHODS Candidate inhibitors and inducers of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A (‘perpetrators’) were evaluated using published clinical pharmacokinetic interaction studies. Studies were selected on the basis of ?six human subjects, use of a validated in vivo probe substrate for the CYP enzyme, and clinically relevant dosing. Inhibitors were described according to the FDA classifications of strong, moderate or weak, whereas inducers were classified as major (?twofold decrease in AUC) or weak (Drug Interaction Table (CDIT) were compared with the ‘accepted’ major perpetrators. RESULTS From a list of 216 candidate drugs (349 CYP-perpetrator pairs, CYP-PPs), 36 inhibitors and eight inducers were accepted as major perpetrators of PK-DDIs, resulting in 58 CYP-PPs. In comparison, the clinical version of the CDIT had a sensitivity of 33% and a positive predictive value of 68%. One hundred and ninety-nine CYP-PPs were rejected as major perpetrators, and 92 CYP-PPs had insufficient published human pharmacokinetic data for robust classification. CONCLUSIONS Using a criteria-based assessment, the number of drugs that are proven or likely major perpetrators of CYP-mediated PK-DDIs is relatively small. Current clinical decision support on PK-DDIs is inconsistent with the published evidence and can be improved using simple criteria. PMID:21223357

  7. Completing the logarithmic scoring rule for assessing probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad, Frank; Sanfilippo, Giuseppe; Agrò, Gianna

    2012-10-01

    We propose and motivate an expanded version of the logarithmic score for forecasting distributions, termed the Total Log score. It incorporates the usual logarithmic score, which is recognised as incomplete and has been mistakenly associated with the likelihood principle. The expectation of the Total Log score equals the Negentropy plus the Negextropy of the distribution. We examine both discrete and continuous forms of the scoring rule, and we discuss issues of scaling for scoring assessments. The analysis suggests the dual tracking of the quadratic score along with the usual log score when assessing the qualities of probability distributions. An application to the sequential scoring of forecast distributions for the daily rate of stock returns displays the usefulness of the proposal.

  8. Simulation of drug distribution in the vitreous body after local drug application into intact vitreous body and in progress of posterior vitreous detachment.

    PubMed

    Loch, Christian; Bogdahn, Malte; Stein, Sandra; Nagel, Stefan; Guthoff, Rudolf; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Intravitreal injections and drug-loaded implants are current approaches to treat diseases of the posterior eye. To investigate the release of active agents and their distribution in the vitreous body, a new test system was developed that enables a realistic simulation of eye motions. It is called the eye movement system (EyeMoS). In combination with a previously developed model containing a polyacrylamide gel as a substitute for the vitreous body, this new system enables the characterization of the influence of eye motions on drug distribution within the vitreous body. In the presented work, the distribution of fluorescence-tagged model drugs of different molecular weight within the simulated vitreous was examined under movement with the EyeMoS and without movement. By replacing a part of the gel in the simulated vitreous body with buffer, the influence of the progress of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on the distribution of these model substances was also studied. The results indicate that convective forces may be of predominate influence on initial drug distribution. The impact of these forces on drug transport increases with simulated progression of PVD. Using the EyeMoS, the investigation of release and distribution from intravitreal drug delivery systems becomes feasible under biorelevant conditions. PMID:24311438

  9. Exploiting structural information for drug-target assessment.

    PubMed

    Volkamer, Andrea; Rarey, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    The amount of known protein structures is continuously growing, exhibited in over 95,000 3D structures freely available via the PDB. Over the last decade, pharmaceutical research has sparked interest in computationally extracting information from this large data pool, resulting in a homology-driven knowledge transfer from annotated to new structures. Studying protein structures with respect to understanding and modulating their functional behavior means analyzing their centers of action. Therefore, the detection and description of potential binding sites on the protein surface is a major step towards protein classification and assessment. Subsequently, these representations can be incorporated to compare proteins, and to predict their druggability or function. Especially in the context of target identification and polypharmacology, automated tools for large-scale target comparisons are highly needed. In this article, developments for automated structure-based target assessment are reviewed and remaining challenges as well as future perspectives are discussed. PMID:24575967

  10. Assessment of adverse effects of neurotropic drugs in monkeys with the “Drug Effects on the Nervous System” (DENS) scale

    PubMed Central

    Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Shaffer, Christopher L.; Menniti, Frank S.; Schmidt, Christopher J.; Papa, Stella M.

    2013-01-01

    Research in therapeutics of neuropsychiatric disorders is increasingly focusing on drugs with new mechanisms of action, and such agents are often assessed in preclinical studies using nonhuman primates. However, researchers lack a standardized method to compare distinct drugs for common adverse effects on the nervous system. We have developed a new scale for this purpose, named “Drug Effects on the Nervous System” (DENS), and here tested its utility in an analysis of the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone in monkeys. Behavioral effects of risperidone over a ten-fold clinically relevant exposure range were rated with the DENS scale and compared with a standard motor disability scale for primates. Ratings were correlated with projected D2 and 5-HT2A receptor occupancy over time. The DENS scale detected dose-dependent side effects of risperidone involving various functions of the nervous system (cognitive, sensorimotor and autonomic functions) and, thus, beyond the motor effects detected with the motor disability scale. A consistent temporal association of DENS scale changes with projected D2 receptor occupancy was observed, and DENS scale ratings demonstrated high inter-rater reliability. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the DENS scale as a highly sensitive, reliable and accurate method to identify common adverse effects of risperidone and potentially other neurotropics for translational studies in primates. PMID:23419700

  11. Condition Assessment of Drinking Water Transmission and Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Condition assessment of water transmission and distribution mains is the collection of data and information through direct and/or indirect methods, followed by analysis of the data and information, to make a determination of the current and/or future structural, water quality, an...

  12. The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Poyer; E. Earl; B. Bonner

    1995-01-01

    The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  13. Condition Assessment Technologies for Water Transmission and Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (EPA?s) Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program, this research was conducted to identify and characterize the state of the technology for structural condition assessment of drinking water transmission and distribution syst...

  14. A framework for assessing the consistency of drug classes across sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to develop a framework for assessing the consistency of drug classes across sources, such as MeSH and ATC. Our framework integrates and contrasts lexical and instance-based ontology alignment techniques. Moreover, we propose metrics for assessing not only equivalence relations, but also inclusion relations among drug classes. Results We identified 226 equivalence relations between MeSH and ATC classes through the lexical alignment, and 223 through the instance-based alignment, with limited overlap between the two (36). We also identified 6,257 inclusion relations. Discrepancies between lexical and instance-based alignments are illustrated and discussed. Conclusions Our work is the first attempt to align drug classes with sophisticated instance-based techniques, while also distinguishing between equivalence and inclusion relations. Additionally, it is the first application of aligning drug classes in ATC and MeSH. By providing a detailed account of similarities and differences between drug classes across sources, our framework has the prospect of effectively supporting the creation of a mapping of drug classes between ATC and MeSH by domain experts. PMID:25101165

  15. Assessing the bioequivalence of analogues of endogenous substances (‘endogenous drugs’): considerations to optimize study design

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Sanjeeva

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assessment of the bioequivalence of generic versions of certain reference drugs is complicated by the presence of endogenous levels of said compounds which cannot be distinguished from externally derived compound levels following drug administration. If unaccounted for, the presence of endogenous compound biases towards equivalence in bioequivalence studies of these drugs. Bioequivalence assessments may be complicated further as disposition of the exogenous analogue can be subject to various endogenous processes resulting in nonlinear pharmacokinetics. To overcome these inherent biases a number of different strategies have been employed. AIMS To critically review methods used to overcome confounding biases in bioequivalence studies of ‘endogenous’ drugs. METHODS A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases was performed. RESULTS The following strategies were identified: ablation/modulation of baseline endogenous substance levels; recruitment of ‘substance-deficient’ populations; restriction of dietary intake of the relevant substance; standardization of conditions with the potential to affect relevant homeostatic mechanisms; correction for baseline substance levels; and administration of supra-therapeutic drug doses. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of this review key study design concepts, intended to optimize the design of future bioequivalence studies of these so-called ‘endogenous drugs’, are described. The dual stable isotope method, which could be used in a specific context, is also discussed. PMID:20233194

  16. Criteria for assessing high-priority drug-drug interactions for clinical decision support in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High override rates for drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts in electronic health records (EHRs) result in the potentially dangerous consequence of providers ignoring clinically significant alerts. Lack of uniformity of criteria for determining the severity or validity of these interactions often results in discrepancies in how these are evaluated. The purpose of this study was to identify a set of criteria for assessing DDIs that should be used for the generation of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts in EHRs. Methods We conducted a 20-year systematic literature review of MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify characteristics of high-priority DDIs. These criteria were validated by an expert panel consisting of medication knowledge base vendors, EHR vendors, in-house knowledge base developers from academic medical centers, and both federal and private agencies involved in the regulation of medication use. Results Forty-four articles met the inclusion criteria for assessing characteristics of high-priority DDIs. The panel considered five criteria to be most important when assessing an interaction- Severity, Probability, Clinical Implications of the interaction, Patient characteristics, and the Evidence supporting the interaction. In addition, the panel identified barriers and considerations for being able to utilize these criteria in medication knowledge bases used by EHRs. Conclusions A multi-dimensional approach is needed to understanding the importance of an interaction for inclusion in medication knowledge bases for the purpose of CDS alerting. The criteria identified in this study can serve as a first step towards a uniform approach in assessing which interactions are critical and warrant interruption of a provider’s workflow. PMID:23763856

  17. Bioavailability Assessment of Vitamin A Self-Nanoemulsified Drug Delivery Systems in Rats: A Comparative Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ehab Taha; Dalia Ghorab; Abdel-azim Zaghloul

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess and compare the bioavailability of three different oral dosage forms of vitamin A in rats. The formulations included vitamin A self-nanoemulsified drug delivery (SNEDD) optimized formulation-filled capsule (F1), vitamin A SNEDD optimized formulation compressed tablet (F2) and vitamin A oily solution-filled capsules without any additives (control, F3). Materials and Methods: Bioavailability was assessed after a single oral

  18. In Vitro Assessment of Dual Drug Combinations To Inhibit Growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Pettus, Kevin; Sharpe, Samera; Papp, John R

    2015-04-01

    The development of resistance to first-line antimicrobial therapies has led to recommendations for combination therapies for the treatment of gonorrhea infection. Recent studies have shown the success of combination therapies in treating patients, but few have reported on the in vitro activities of these drug combinations. An in vitro assessment of azithromycin in combination with gentamicin demonstrated inhibition of growth and suggests that clinical trials may be warranted to assess the utility of this combination in treating gonorrhea infections. PMID:25624328

  19. Risk assessment for drugs of abuse in the Dutch watercycle.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Monique; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Emke, Erik; Dijkman, Ellen; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; van de Ven, Bianca; Hernández, Felix; Versteegh, Ans; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-04-01

    A screening campaign of drugs of abuse (DOA) and their relevant metabolites in the aqueous environment was performed in the Netherlands. The presence of DOA, together with the potential risks for the environment and the possible human exposure to these compounds through consumption of drinking water was investigated. Sewage water (influent and effluent), surface water of the rivers Rhine and Meuse, and drinking water (raw and finished) were analysed by four different laboratories using fully in-house validated methods for a total number of 34 DOA and metabolites. In this way, data reported for several compounds could also be confirmed by other laboratories, giving extra confidence to the results obtained in this study. In total 17 and 22 DOA were detected and quantified in influent and effluent sewage samples, respectively. The tranquilizers oxazepam and temazepam, and cocaine and its metabolite benzoylecgonine were found in high concentrations in sewage water. Nine compounds were possibly not efficiently removed during treatment and were detected in surface waters. The results indicated that substantial fractions of the total load of DOA and metabolites in the rivers Rhine and Meuse enter the Netherlands from abroad. For some compounds, loads appear to increase going downstream, which is caused by a contribution from Dutch sewage water effluents. As far as data are available, no environmental effects are expected of the measured DOA in surface waters. In raw water, three DOA were detected, whereas in only one finished drinking water out of the 17 tested, benzoylecgonine was identified, albeit at a concentration below the limit of quantification (<1 ng/L). Concentrations were well below the general signal value of 1 ?g/L, which is specified for organic compounds of anthropogenic origin in the Dutch Drinking Water Act. PMID:23391332

  20. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Small; Andrea Glickman; Galen Rigter; Thia Walter

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a

  1. Simulated Drug Discovery Process to Conduct a Synoptic Assessment of Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Anthony D.M.; Moss, Gary P.; Pearson, Russell J.; White, Simon; Rutten, Frank J.M.; Perumal, Dhaya; Maddock, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess a task-based learning exercise that prompts pharmacy students to integrate their understanding of different disciplines. Design. Master of pharmacy (MPharm degree) students were provided with simulated information from several preclinical science and from clinical trials and asked to synthesize this into a marketing authorization application for a new drug. Students made a link to pharmacy practice by creating an advice leaflet for pharmacists. Assessment. Students’ ability to integrate information from different disciplines was evaluated by oral examination. In 2 successive academic years, 96% and 82% of students demonstrated an integrated understanding of their proposed new drug. Students indicated in a survey that their understanding of the links between different subjects improved. Conclusion. Simulated drug discovery provides a learning environment that emphasizes the connectivity of the preclinical sciences with each other and the practice of pharmacy. PMID:24672074

  2. Applications of Genetically Modified Tools to Safety Assessment in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Hee Yeon; Wu, Hongmin; Lee, Seo In

    2010-01-01

    The process of new drug development consists of several stages; after identifying potential candidate compounds, preclinical studies using animal models link the laboratory and human clinical trials. Among many steps in preclinical studies, toxicology and safety assessments contribute to identify potential adverse events and provide rationale for setting the initial doses in clinical trials. Gene modulation is one of the important tools of modern biology, and is commonly employed to examine the function of genes of interest. Advances in new drug development have been achieved by exploding information on target selection and validation using genetically modified animal models as well as those of cells. In this review, a recent trend of genetically modified methods is discussed with reference to safety assessments, and the exemplary applications of gene-modulating tools to the tests in new drug development were summarized. PMID:24278499

  3. Distribution of Drug Molecules in Lipid Membranes: Neutron Diffraction and MD Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Mihailescu, Ella; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. In this study, using neutron diffraction, the DOPC lipid bilayer structure (with and without drug) as well as the distribution of a model NSAID (Ibuprofen) as a function of its position along the membrane normal was obtained at sub-nanometer resolution. It was found that the bilayer thickness reduces as the drug is added. Further, the results are successfully compared with atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. Based on this successful comparison and motivated by atomic details from MD, quasi-molecular modeling of the lipid membrane is being carried out and will be presented. The above study is expected to provide an effective methodology to design drug delivery nanoparticles based on a variety of soft condensed matter such as lipids or polymers.

  4. Assessing the efficacy of specific cerebellomodulatory drugs for use as therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Nag, Nupur; Tarlac, Volga; Storey, Elsdon

    2013-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias are autosomal dominant diseases, associated in some types with a CAG repeat expansion, and characterised by a progressive loss of motor function. Currently, as there is no cure for most ataxias, treatment predominantly involves physical therapy. Various symptomatic drug treatments have been tried; however, published clinical studies have provided inconsistent results, likely due to small sample sizes, mixed patient populations and insensitive or subjective assessment scales. SCA1(154Q) transgenic mice display motor function impairments and ultimately a reduced number of cerebellar Purkinje neurons-characteristics comparable to most forms of sporadic and hereditary ataxias. We monitored motor function in SCA1(154Q) mice from 5 to 20 weeks of age and assessed the efficacy of four potential cerebellar modulatory drugs in attenuating deficits in rotor-rod performance. The drugs riluzole, amantadine, zolpidem and buspirone were selected based on their different mechanisms of action and their Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration approval for other indications. SCA1(154Q) and C57/Bl6 wild-type mice were administered with four ascending acute doses of each drug, over 2 days. Following each dose, mice were assesed for motor function on the accelerating rotor-rod. None of the four drugs attenuated motor deficts in SCA1(154Q) mice at any dose; at FDA equivalent and higher dose administration of zolpidem and buspirone led to sedation in both strains. Our results suggest that the aforementioned drugs are likely to be ineffective for symptomatic treatment of SCA1 and most other ataxic patients and emphasise the need for comphrehensive drug studies prior to clinical use. PMID:22718440

  5. Assessing malaria drug resistance in US military areas of operation using microarrays.

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Assessing malaria drug resistance in US military areas of operation using microarrays. A. Taylor Bright University of California, San Diego Background: Malaria inflicts an incredible burden of the developed world, roughly 40% of the world's population live in areas where malaria is endemic(1

  6. Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment, 1991. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primmerman, William

    This report presents findings from the Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment conducted in 1991. It is noted that the survey instrument was comprised of 155 questions and was completed by 2,891 junior and senior high school student athletes in grades 7 through 12. Results are presented in these areas: (1) percent of athletes…

  7. ADVANCED TOOLS FOR ASSESSING SELECTED PRESCRIPTION AND ILLICIT DRUGS IN TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENTS AND SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this poster is to present the application and assessment of advanced state-of-the-art technologies in a real-world environment - wastewater effluent and source waters - for detecting six drugs [azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, m...

  8. USE OF CASE REPORTS IN ASSESSING ADVERSE OUTCOMES OF HUMAN PRENATAL DRUG EXPOSURES: AN APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of case reports for assessing the developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure is limited by the inability to determine the incidence of adverse outcomes and by the high likelihood for bias. Yet, because it is impossible to conduct clinical trials for the assessme...

  9. Tissue Distribution and Plasma Binding of a Novel Antifibrotics Drug Pirfenidone in Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-Hong Wu; Ji Wu; Hui Chen; Shun-Chang Zhou; Fan-Dian Zeng

    2006-01-01

    Pirfenidone (5-methyl-1-phenyl-2-(1H)-pyridone, RuiXing Genomics, Inc, Shanghai, China), a novel compound, has therapeutic potential for IPF. The tissue distribution and plasma binding of Pirfenidone (PF) had been investigated in rats. The HPLC method with DAD detection was applied for the measurement of PF in biological samples. After oral administration at 100 mg·kg-1 in rats, the parent drug and its metabolites were

  10. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sagnik, E-mail: Sagnik.Chatterjee@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Richert, Lysiane, E-mail: l.richert@kaly-cell.com [KaLy-Cell, 20A rue du Général Leclerc, 67115 Plobsheim (France); Augustijns, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Augustijns@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Annaert, Pieter, E-mail: Pieter.Annaert@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24–48 h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI ? 0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI ? 0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. - Highlights: • Novel in vitro assay to detect drug-induced cholestasis • Rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) as in vitro models • Cholestatic compounds sensitize SCH to toxic effects of accumulating bile acids • Drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI) as measure of a drug's cholestatic signature • In vitro findings correlate well with clinical reports on cholestasis.

  11. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate - an X-ray spectromicroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere. PMID:25804516

  12. In silico assessment of drug safety in human heart applied to late sodium current blockers

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Gomis-Tena, Julio; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Rajamani, Sridharan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Giles, Wayne R; Saiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced action potential (AP) prolongation leading to Torsade de Pointes is a major concern for the development of anti-arrhythmic drugs. Nevertheless the development of improved anti-arrhythmic agents, some of which may block different channels, remains an important opportunity. Partial block of the late sodium current (INaL) has emerged as a novel anti-arrhythmic mechanism. It can be effective in the settings of free radical challenge or hypoxia. In addition, this approach can attenuate pro-arrhythmic effects of blocking the rapid delayed rectifying K+ current (IKr). The main goal of our computational work was to develop an in-silico tool for preclinical anti-arrhythmic drug safety assessment, by illustrating the impact of IKr/INaL ratio of steady-state block of drug candidates on “torsadogenic” biomarkers. The O’Hara et al. AP model for human ventricular myocytes was used. Biomarkers for arrhythmic risk, i.e., AP duration, triangulation, reverse rate-dependence, transmural dispersion of repolarization and electrocardiogram QT intervals, were calculated using single myocyte and one-dimensional strand simulations. Predetermined amounts of block of INaL and IKr were evaluated. “Safety plots” were developed to illustrate the value of the specific biomarker for selected combinations of IC50s for IKr and INaL of potential drugs. The reference biomarkers at baseline changed depending on the “drug” specificity for these two ion channel targets. Ranolazine and GS967 (a novel potent inhibitor of INaL) yielded a biomarker data set that is considered safe by standard regulatory criteria. This novel in-silico approach is useful for evaluating pro-arrhythmic potential of drugs and drug candidates in the human ventricle. PMID:23696033

  13. Quantitative risk assessment in classification of drugs with identical API content.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, O Ye; Balyklova, K S; Titova, A V; Pomerantsev, A L

    2014-09-01

    When combating counterfeits it is equally important to recognize fakes and to avoid misclassification of genuine samples. This study presents a general approach to the problem using a newly-developed method called Data Driven Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy. The possibility to collect representative data for both training and validation is of great importance in classification modeling. When fakes are not available, we propose to compose the test set using the legitimate drug's analogs, manufactured by various producers. These analogs should have the identical API and a similar composition of excipients. The approach shows satisfactory results both in revealing counterfeits and in accounting for the future variability of the target class drugs. The presented case studies demonstrate that theoretically predicted misclassification errors can be successfully employed for the science-based risk assessment in drug identification. PMID:24929870

  14. Water distribution studies within cellulose ethers using differential scanning calorimetry. 2. Effect of polymer substitution type and drug addition.

    PubMed

    McCrystal, C B; Ford, J L; Rajabi-Siahboomi, A R

    1999-08-01

    The distribution of water within gels composed of a range of cellulose ether polymers of similar molecular weights (viscosity grades of 4000-6000 cP) but varying substitution types and levels was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Water loosely bound to the polymer was detected as one or more events appearing at the low-temperature side of the main endotherm for the melting of free water in DSC scans. Polymer substitution types and levels, and added drugs (50 mM propranolol hydrochloride or 50 mM diclofenac sodium) influenced the appearance of these melting events. Hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC F4M) gels showed behavior different to that of the other polymers studied. It is thought that any water binding to HPC gels is tightly attached and is not visible as pre-endothermic events on DSC scans. The amount of water bound per polymer repeating unit (PRU) was influenced by and related to the degree of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substitution on the polymer backbone and by the inclusion of either drug. HPC gels had the highest bound water content after 96 h and this was probably related to the high percentage of hydrophilic hydroxypropoxyl substitutions in this polymer. In contrast, methylcellulose (MC A4M) had the lowest bound water content after 96 h storage, and this was explained by the lack of hydrophilic hydroxypropoxyl substitutions in the polymer. PMID:10430545

  15. Developing and evaluating distributions for probabilistic human exposure assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2002-08-01

    This report describes research carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assist the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in developing a consistent yet flexible approach for evaluating the inputs to probabilistic risk assessments. The U.S. EPA Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) recently released Volume 3 Part A of Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS), as an update to the existing two-volume set of RAGS. The update provides policy and technical guidance on performing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consequently, EPA risk managers and decision-makers need to review and evaluate the adequacy of PRAs for supporting regulatory decisions. A critical part of evaluating a PRA is the problem of evaluating or judging the adequacy of input distributions PRA. Although the overarching theme of this report is the need to improve the ease and consistency of the regulatory review process, the specific objectives are presented in two parts. The objective of Part 1 is to develop a consistent yet flexible process for evaluating distributions in a PRA by identifying the critical attributes of an exposure factor distribution and discussing how these attributes relate to the task-specific adequacy of the input. This objective is carried out with emphasis on the perspective of a risk manager or decision-maker. The proposed evaluation procedure provides consistency to the review process without a loss of flexibility. As a result, the approach described in Part 1 provides an opportunity to apply a single review framework for all EPA regions and yet provide the regional risk manager with the flexibility to deal with site- and case-specific issues in the PRA process. However, as the number of inputs to a PRA increases, so does the complexity of the process for calculating, communicating and managing risk. As a result, there is increasing effort required of both the risk professionals performing the analysis and the risk manager reviewing it. For deterministic risk assessments, the use of default inputs has improved the ease and the consistency of both performing and reviewing assessments. By analogy, it is expected that similar advantage will be seen in the field of probabilistic risk assessment through the introduction of default distributions. In Part 2 of this report, we consider when a default distribution might be appropriate for use in PRA and work towards development of recommended task-specific distributions for several frequently used exposure factors. An approach that we develop using body weight and exposure duration as case studies offers a transparent way for developing task-specific exposure factor distributions. A third case study using water intake highlights the need for further study aimed at improving the relevance of ''short-term'' data before recommendations on task-specific distributions of water intake can be made.

  16. New investigation of distribution imaging and content uniformity of very low dose drugs using hot-melt extrusion method.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Bom; Kang, Chin-Yang; Kang, Wie-Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-12-31

    The content uniformity of low dose drugs in dosage forms is very important for quality assurance. The aim of this study was to prepare uniformly and homogeneously distributed dosage forms of very low-dose drugs using twin screw hot-melt extrusion (HME) and to investigate the distribution of drugs using instrumental analyses. For the feasibility of HME method, a very low amount of coumarin-6, a fluorescent dye, was used to visualize distribution images using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Limaprost, tamsulosin and glimepiride were then used as low-dose model drugs to study the applicability of HME for content uniformity and distribution behaviors. Hydrophilic thermosensitive polymers with low melting point, such as Poloxamer188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, were chosen as carriers. The melt extrusion was carried out around 50°C, at which both carriers were easily dissolved but model drugs remained in solid form. The physicochemical properties of the hot-melt extrudates, including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), were measured. Content uniformity of the drugs was also checked by HPLC. CLSM imaging showed that model drugs were well distributed throughout the hot-melt extrudate, giving better content uniformity with low batch-to-batch variations compared with simple physical mixtures. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR data showed that there was no interaction or interference between model drugs and thermosensitive polymers. The current HME methods could be used to prepare uniformly distributed and reproducible solid dosage forms containing very low dose drugs for further pharmaceutical applications. PMID:24157343

  17. Assessment of PLGA-PEG-PLGA Copolymer Hydrogel for Sustained Drug Delivery in the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Ward, Jonette A.; Li, S. Kevin; Tolia, Gaurav; Hao, Jinsong; Choo, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitive copolymer systems were previously studied using modified diffusion cells in vitro for intratympanic injection, and the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer systems were found to provide sustained drug delivery for several days. The objectives of the present study were to assess the safety of PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers in intratympanic injection in guinea pigs in vivo and to determine the effects of additives glycerol and poloxamer in PLGA-PEG-PLGA upon drug release in the diffusion cells in vitro for sustained inner ear drug delivery. In the experiments, the safety of PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers to inner ear was evaluated using auditory brainstem response (ABR). The effects of the additives upon drug release from PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogel were investigated in the modified Franz diffusion cells in vitro with cidofovir as the model drug. The phase transition temperatures of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers in the presence of the additives were also determined. In the ABR safety study, the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer alone did not affect hearing when delivered at 0.05-mL dose but caused hearing loss after 0.1-mL injection. In the drug release study, the incorporation of the bioadhesive additive, poloxamer, in the PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulations was found to decrease the rate of drug release whereas the increase in the concentration of the humectant additive, glycerol, provided the opposite effect. In summary, the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer did not show toxicity to the inner ear at the 0.05-mL dose and could provide sustained release that could be controlled by using the additives for inner ear applications. PMID:24438444

  18. Assessment of PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer hydrogel for sustained drug delivery in the ear.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Ward, Jonette A; Li, S Kevin; Tolia, Gaurav; Hao, Jinsong; Choo, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitive copolymer systems were previously studied using modified diffusion cells in vitro for intratympanic injection, and the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer systems were found to provide sustained drug delivery for several days. The objectives of the present study were to assess the safety of PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers in intratympanic injection in guinea pigs in vivo and to determine the effects of additives glycerol and poloxamer in PLGA-PEGPLGA upon drug release in the diffusion cells in vitro for sustained inner ear drug delivery. In the experiments, the safety of PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers to inner ear was evaluated using auditory brainstem response (ABR). The effects of the additives upon drug release from PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogel were investigated in the modified Franz diffusion cells in vitro with cidofovir as the model drug. The phase transition temperatures of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymers in the presence of the additives were also determined. In the ABR safety study, the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer alone did not affect hearing when delivered at 0.05-mL dose but caused hearing loss after 0.1-mL injection. In the drug release study, the incorporation of the bioadhesive additive, poloxamer, in the PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulations was found to decrease the rate of drug release whereas the increase in the concentration of the humectant additive, glycerol, provided the opposite effect. In summary, the PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer did not show toxicity to the inner ear at the 0.05-mL dose and could provide sustained release that could be controlled by using the additives for inner ear applications. PMID:24438444

  19. Assessment of the Role of Renal Organic Anion Transporters in Drug-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hagos, Yohannes; Wolff, Natascha A.

    2010-01-01

    In the present review we have attempted to assess the involvement of the organic anion transporters OAT1, OAT2, OAT3, and OAT4, belonging to the SLC22 family of polyspecific carriers, in drug-induced renal damage in humans. We have focused on drugs with widely recognized nephrotoxic potential, which have previously been reported to interact with OAT family members, and whose underlying pathogenic mechanism suggests the participation of tubular transport. Thus, only compounds generally believed to cause kidney injury either by means of direct tubular toxicity or crystal nephropathy have been considered. For each drug, or class of agents, the evidence for actual transport mediated by individual OATs under in vivo conditions is discussed. We have then examined their role in the context of other carriers present in the renal proximal tubule sharing certain substrates with OATs, as these are critical determinants of the overall contribution of OAT-dependent transport to intracellular accumulation and transepithelial drug secretion, and thus the impact it may have in drug-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:22069672

  20. Communication Needs Assessment for Distributed Turbine Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Behbahani, Alireza R.

    2008-01-01

    Control system architecture is a major contributor to future propulsion engine performance enhancement and life cycle cost reduction. The control system architecture can be a means to effect net weight reduction in future engine systems, provide a streamlined approach to system design and implementation, and enable new opportunities for performance optimization and increased awareness about system health. The transition from a centralized, point-to-point analog control topology to a modular, networked, distributed system is paramount to extracting these system improvements. However, distributed engine control systems are only possible through the successful design and implementation of a suitable communication system. In a networked system, understanding the data flow between control elements is a fundamental requirement for specifying the communication architecture which, itself, is dependent on the functional capability of electronics in the engine environment. This paper presents an assessment of the communication needs for distributed control using strawman designs and relates how system design decisions relate to overall goals as we progress from the baseline centralized architecture, through partially distributed and fully distributed control systems.

  1. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite evident success of malaria control in many sites in the Arabian Peninsula, malaria remains endemic in a few spots, in Yemen and south-west of Saudi Arabia. In addition to local transmission, imported malaria sustains an extra source of parasites that can challenge the strengths of local control strategies. This study examined the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen and mutations of drug resistant genes, to elucidate parasite structure and distribution of drug resistance genotypes in the region. Methods Five polymorphic loci (MSP-2, Pfg377 and three microsatellites on chromosome 8) not involved in anti-malarial drug resistance, and four drug resistant genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr and dhps) were genotyped in 108 P. falciparum isolates collected in three sites in Yemen: Dhamar, Hodeidah and Taiz. Results High diversity was seen in non-drug genes, pfg377 (He?=?0.66), msp-2 (He?=?0.80) and three microsatellites on chr 8, 7.7 kb (He?=?0.88), 4.3 kb (He?=?0.77) and 0.8 kb (He?=?0.71). There was a high level of mixed-genotype infections (57%), with an average 1.8 genotypes per patient. No linkage disequilibrium was seen between drug resistant genes and the non-drug markers (p?

  2. Assessment of immunosuppressive drug interactions: inhibition of lymphocyte function in peripheral human blood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus J. Barten; Stefan Dhein; Hubert Chang; Hartmuth B. Bittner; Attila Tarnok; Axel Rahmel; Friederich W. Mohr; Jan F. Gummert

    2003-01-01

    Cyclosporin (CsA) or tacrolimus (TRL) is routinely combined with either sirolimus (SRL) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in immunosuppressive regimes in organ transplantation. The aim of our study was to establish a specific human blood assay of lymphocyte function in order to assess interactions of these drug combinations. Different concentrations (106–109 nM) of CsA, TRL, SRL or mycophenolic acid (MPA, the

  3. Assessing Drug Use in the Workplace: A Comparison of Self Report, Urinalysis, and Hair Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Royer F. Cook; Alan D. Bernstein; Christine M. Andrews

    A random sample of 1,200 employees of a steel plant in the western United States was randomly assigned to four different self-report methods of assessing illicit drug use: individual interview in the workplace, group-administered questionnaire in the workplace, telephone interview, and individual interview off the worksite. Urine specimens were collected and analyzed on all 928 subjects participating in the study,

  4. The US’ Food and Drug Administration, Normativity of Risk Assessment, GMOs, and American Democracy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zahra Meghani

    2009-01-01

    The process of risk assessment of biotechnologies, such as genetically modified organisms (GMOs), has normative dimensions.\\u000a However, the US’ Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seems committed to the idea that such evaluations are objective. This\\u000a essay makes the case that the agency’s regulatory approach should be changed such that the public is involved in deciding\\u000a any ethical or social questions

  5. PILOT TRIAL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE BIOAVAILABILITY IN GENERIC DRUG PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: STATISTICAL POWER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yibin Wang; Shuqin Zhou

    1999-01-01

    In developing generic drug products, pilot trials are used for identifying successful test formulations to enter pivotal trials. In this study, we derive the power function based on the log-normal distribution and evaluate the effects of potential influential factors—the true test-reference ratio, intrasubject variability, and sample sizes—on the statistical power of a pilot trial to identify successful test formulations, defined

  6. Site of drug absorption after oral administration: assessment of membrane permeability and luminal concentration of drugs in each segment of gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Yoshie; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kataoka, Makoto; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-11-01

    This study was conducted to assess the site of drug absorption in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract after oral administration. Drug permeability to different regions of rat intestine, jejunum, ileum and colon, was measured by in situ single-pass perfusion method. It was revealed that the epithelial surface area should not be a determinant of the regional difference in the intestinal permeability of highly permeable drugs. Effects of the mucus layer at the surface of the epithelium and the fluidity of the epithelial cell membrane on the drug permeability were investigated. These factors are demonstrated to contribute to the regional differences in intestinal drug permeability. The luminal drug concentration in each segment of the GI tract after oral administration was measured directly in fasted rats. Water ingested orally was absorbed quickly in the jejunum and the luminal fluid volume was diminished in the middle to lower part of the small intestine. According to the absorption of water luminal concentration of atenolol, a drug with low permeability, was elevated and exceeded the initial dose concentration. In contrast, the concentration of highly permeable drugs, antipyrine and metoprolol, decreased quickly in the upper part of the intestine and a significant amount of drugs was not detected in the lower jejunum and the ileum. From the time-profiles of luminal drug concentration, fraction of dose absorbed from each segment of the GI tract was calculated. Both antipyrine and metoprolol were found to be absorbed quickly at the upper part of the small intestine. In addition, the possible contribution of gastric absorption was demonstrated for these drugs. The pattern of site-dependent absorption of atenolol showed the higher absorbability in the middle and lower portion of the jejunum. These informations on site-dependent absorption of drugs are considered to be important for effective oral delivery systems. PMID:16876987

  7. Herbal interactions on absorption of drugs: Mechanisms of action and clinical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Colalto, Cristiano

    2010-09-01

    Many herbal medications are used to treat diseases but while they are often efficacious, their safety is rarely considered by physicians or users. One particular safety concern is the risk of interactions with drugs, which often lead to toxicity or loss of therapeutic efficacy. In order to assess this risk, it is important to consider all potential mechanisms of pharmacokinetic interference. A large number of in vivo and invitro experiments and clinical studies have cast light on the possible effects of botanical products and phytochemicals on the many enzymes and transporters involved in gastrointestinal drug absorption. This review gives an overview and assessment of the most widely sold herbal medicinal products, including liquorice, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, green tea, St. John's wort, saw palmetto, turmeric, valerian, milk thistle and echinacea, on the basis of the available scientific evidence. Sound knowledge of the mechanisms of herb-drug interactions is essential for clinical risk assessment, in turn vital to healthcare practitioners in their efforts to reduce minimise risk and ensure that taking herbal medicinal products is as safe as possible. PMID:20399862

  8. Assessing introduction risk using species' rank-abundance distributions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Farrah T; Bradie, Johanna; Briski, Elizabeta; Bailey, Sarah A; Simard, Nathalie; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2015-01-22

    Mixed-species assemblages are often unintentionally introduced into new ecosystems. Analysing how assemblage structure varies during transport may provide insights into how introduction risk changes before propagules are released. Characterization of introduction risk is typically based on assessments of colonization pressure (CP, the number of species transported) and total propagule pressure (total PP, the total abundance of propagules released) associated with an invasion vector. Generally, invasion potential following introduction increases with greater CP or total PP. Here, we extend these assessments using rank-abundance distributions to examine how CP : total PP relationships change temporally in ballast water of ocean-going ships. Rank-abundance distributions and CP : total PP patterns varied widely between trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific voyages, with the latter appearing to pose a much lower risk than the former. Responses also differed by taxonomic group, with invertebrates experiencing losses mainly in total PP, while diatoms and dinoflagellates sustained losses mainly in CP. In certain cases, open-ocean ballast water exchange appeared to increase introduction risk by uptake of new species or supplementation of existing ones. Our study demonstrates that rank-abundance distributions provide new insights into the utility of CP and PP in characterizing introduction risk. PMID:25473007

  9. 75 FR 4400 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Assessment of Abuse Potential of Drugs; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ...scheduled under the Controlled Substances Act. Drugs with abuse potential generally include drugs that affect the central nervous system, drugs that are chemically or pharmacologically similar to other drugs with known abuse potential, and drugs...

  10. Microbial degradation of illicit drugs, their precursors, and manufacturing by-products: implications for clandestine drug laboratory investigation and environmental assessment.

    PubMed

    Janusz, A; Kirkbride, K P; Scott, T L; Naidu, R; Perkins, M V; Megharaj, M

    2003-06-24

    Chemicals associated with clandestine drug laboratories are often disposed of covertly into soil, sewerage systems, or public waste management facilities. There are two significant issues relating to such dumps of materials; they might contain valuable evidence as to drug manufacture, and they might be a source of pollution. This study presents initial findings in relation to the impact microorganisms from environmental sources have upon drugs, their precursors, and manufacturing by-products. The aim of this study was to identify which chemicals associated with clandestine drug laboratories persist in the environment in order to allow forensic drug chemists to link discarded residues with the method of manufacture, and to allow the environmental impact of clandestine drug laboratories to be assessed accurately. When exposed to soil microorganisms, phenyl-2-propanone (P2P) was rapidly metabolized into mixtures of 1-phenyl-2-propanol, 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione, 1-hydroxy-1-phenyl-2-propanone, 2-hydroxy-1-phenyl-1-propanone, and the two diastereoisomers of 1-phenyl-1,2-propanediol. On the other hand, when exposed under the same conditions, methylamphetamine sulphate (MAS) remained virtually unchanged. Implications relating to evidence gathering for forensic purposes and to environmental assessment of clandestine drug laboratories are discussed. PMID:12842360

  11. Rapid assessment of drug-related HIV risk among men who have sex with men in three South African cities.

    PubMed

    Parry, Charles; Petersen, Petal; Dewing, Sarah; Carney, Tara; Needle, Richard; Kroeger, Karen; Treger, Latasha

    2008-05-01

    The current assessment was undertaken to examine the link between drug use and sexual risk behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM) in locations known to have high prevalence rates of drug use and sexual risk behavior in Cape Town, Durban and Pretoria, South Africa. Street intercepts and purposive snowball sampling were used to recruit drug-using MSM. A rapid assessment was undertaken which included observation, mapping, key informant interviews and focus group interviews with MSM. Drug using key informants were tested for HIV. The use of drugs like crack cocaine, cannabis and methamphetamine to specifically facilitate sexual encounters was evident. Drugs led to inconsistent condom use and other high-risk sexual activities despite HIV risk knowledge being high. Many injecting drug-using MSM shared needles and reused equipment. Among MSM who agreed to HIV testing, one-third tested positive. Views about drug and HIV treatment and preventive services and their efficacy were mixed. Various barriers to accessing services were highlighted including homosexual stigmatization and availability of drugs in treatment facilities. Recommendations include addressing the gap between HIV-risk knowledge and practice, extending VCT services for MSM, increasing the visibility of drug abuse services within communities, addressing concerns about drug availability in treatment centers as well as reintegration issues and the need for after-care services, reducing stigmatization in drug and HIV services for MSM and finally, strengthening the link between drug treatment services and HIV prevention by integrating HIV/drug-related risks into HIV prevention efforts and HIV risks into drug use prevention efforts. PMID:18242881

  12. HoughFeature, a novel method for assessing drug effects in three-color cDNA microarray experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongya Zhao; Hong Yan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-color microarray experiments can be performed to assess drug effects on the genomic scale. The methodology may be useful in shortening the cycle, reducing the cost, and improving the efficiency in drug discovery and development compared with the commonly used dual-color technology. A visualization tool, the hexaMplot, is able to show the interrelations of gene expressions in normal-disease-drug samples

  13. Drug use during pregnancy in Sweden – assessed by the Prescribed Drug Register and the Medical Birth Register

    PubMed Central

    Stephansson, Olof; Granath, Fredrik; Svensson, Tobias; Haglund, Bengt; Ekbom, Anders; Kieler, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to study drug use during pregnancy in Sweden and agreement between use according to antenatal medical records and dispensed drugs from a pharmacy database. Patients and methods: From the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR), we established a population-based cohort of 102,995 women who gave birth in 2007. Using the unique personal registration number, information on dispensed drugs from the Prescribed Drug Register (PDR) was obtained prior to, during, and after the pregnancies and compared with MBR information on drug use from standardized antenatal medical records. Results: According to the PDR, 57.6% of the 102,995 women filled a prescription with at least one drug during pregnancy and 50.9% during the lactating period (until 3 months after delivery). The most dispensed drugs during pregnancy were B-lactam antibacterials and penicillins. Agreement between drugs recorded in antenatal medical records and dispensed drugs was highest for drugs used for chronic conditions. The agreement was particularly high for thyroid therapy (85.3%), anti-intestinal inflammatory drugs (80.3%), antiepileptics (69.2%), immunosuppressants (67.4%), and insulin (63.8%). Agreement for drugs used for occasional use was generally lower, ranging between 42.5% for antihistamines and 0.8% for gynecological anti-infectives. Conclusions: A large proportion of women filled a prescription during pregnancy or the lactating period. Agreement between drug use in medical antenatal records and register information from a national pharmacy database was high for drugs used for chronic conditions but low for occasional use. For occasionally used drugs, medical record and register-based data may provide incomplete exposure information because of nonreporting or noncompliance. PMID:21386973

  14. Distribution and drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria isolated from cancer hospital in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linjuan; Li, Qi; Zhang, Qingyun; Wang, Guohong; Xu, Guobin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand distribution and drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria from a specialized cancer hospital in 2013 in order to provide a basis for rational clinical antimicrobial agents. Methods Pathogenic bacteria identification and drug sensitivity tests were performed with a VITEK 2 compact automatic identification system and data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. Results Of the 1,378 strains tested, 980 were Gram-negative bacilli, accounting for 71.1%, in which Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the dominant strains. We found 328 Gram-positive coccus, accounting for 23.8%, in which the amount of Staphylococcus aureus was the highest. We identified 46 fungi, accounting for 4.1%. According to the departmental distribution within the hospital, the surgical departments isolated the major strains, accounting for 49.7%. According to disease types, lung cancer, intestinal cancer and esophagus cancer were the top three, accounting for 20.9%, 17.3% and 14.2%, respectively. No strains were resistant to imipenem, ertapenem or vancomycin. Conclusions Pathogenic bacteria isolated from the specialized cancer hospital have different resistance rates compared to commonly used antimicrobial agents; therefore antimicrobial agents to reduce the morbidity and mortality of infections should be used. PMID:25561768

  15. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sagnik; Richert, Lysiane; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24-48h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI?0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI?0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. PMID:24211272

  16. The practice of pre-marketing safety assessment in drug development.

    PubMed

    Chuang-Stein, Christy; Xia, H Amy

    2013-01-01

    The last 15 years have seen a substantial increase in efforts devoted to safety assessment by statisticians in the pharmaceutical industry. While some of these efforts were driven by regulations and public demand for safer products, much of the motivation came from the realization that there is a strong need for a systematic approach to safety planning, evaluation, and reporting at the program level throughout the drug development life cycle. An efficient process can help us identify safety signals early and afford us the opportunity to develop effective risk minimization plan early in the development cycle. This awareness has led many pharmaceutical sponsors to set up internal systems and structures to effectively conduct safety assessment at all levels (patient, study, and program). In addition to process, tools have emerged that are designed to enhance data review and pattern recognition. In this paper, we describe advancements in the practice of safety assessment during the premarketing phase of drug development. In particular, we share examples of safety assessment practice at our respective companies, some of which are based on recommendations from industry-initiated working groups on best practice in recent years. PMID:23331218

  17. Understanding the Assessment of Psychotropic Drug Harms in Clinical Trials to Improve Social Workers' Role in Medication Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Shannon; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to facilitate social work practitioners' understanding of how psychotropic drug harms are assessed in clinical trials and to make specific suggestions for social workers' increased involvement in detecting drug harms in their clients. The authors undertook a comprehensive review of interdisciplinary…

  18. Statistical and regulatory considerations in assessments of interchangeability of biological drug products.

    PubMed

    Tóthfalusi, Lászlo; Endrényi, László; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-05-01

    When the patent of a brand-name, marketed drug expires, new, generic products are usually offered. Small-molecule generic and originator drug products are expected to be chemically identical. Their pharmaceutical similarity can be typically assessed by simple regulatory criteria such as the expectation that the 90% confidence interval for the ratio of geometric means of some pharmacokinetic parameters be between 0.80 and 1.25. When such criteria are satisfied, the drug products are generally considered to exhibit therapeutic equivalence. They are then usually interchanged freely within individual patients. Biological drugs are complex proteins, for instance, because of their large size, intricate structure, sensitivity to environmental conditions, difficult manufacturing procedures, and the possibility of immunogenicity. Generic and brand-name biologic products can be expected to show only similarity but not identity in their various features and clinical effects. Consequently, the determination of biosimilarity is also a complicated process which involves assessment of the totality of the evidence for the close similarity of the two products. Moreover, even when biosimilarity has been established, it may not be assumed that the two biosimilar products can be automatically substituted by pharmacists. This generally requires additional, careful considerations. Without declaring interchangeability, a new product could be prescribed, i.e. it is prescribable. However, two products can be automatically substituted only if they are interchangeable. Interchangeability is a statistical term and it means that products can be used in any order in the same patient without considering the treatment history. The concepts of interchangeability and prescribability have been widely discussed in the past but only in relation to small molecule generics. In this paper we apply these concepts to biosimilars and we discuss: definitions of prescribability and interchangeability and their statistical implementation; the relation between bioequivalence and interchangeability for small-molecule drug products; regulatory requirements and expectations of biosimilar products in various jurisdictions; possible statistical approaches to establish the similarity and interchangeability of biologic drug products; definition of other technical terms such as switchability and automatic substitution. The paper will be concluded with a discussion of the anticipated future use of interchangeability of biological drug products. PMID:24832831

  19. Novel nanocarriers for topical drug delivery: investigating delivery efficiency and distribution in skin using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirejev, Vladimir; Guldbrand, Stina; Bauer, Brigitte; Smedh, Maria; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-03-01

    The complex structure of skin represents an effective barrier against external environmental factors, as for example, different chemical and biochemical compounds, yeast, bacterial and viral infections. However, this impermeability prevents efficient transdermal drug delivery which limits the number of drugs that are able to penetrate the skin efficiently. Current trends in drug application through skin focus on the design and use of nanocarriers for transport of active compounds. The transport systems applied so far have several drawbacks, as they often have low payload, high toxicity, a limited variability of inclusion molecules, or long degradation times. The aim of these current studies is to investigate novel topical drug delivery systems, e.g. nanocarriers based on cyclic oligosaccharides - cyclodextrins (CD) or iron (III)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOF). Earlier studies on cell cultures imply that these drug nanocarriers show promising characteristics compared to other drug delivery systems. In our studies, we use two-photon microscopy to investigate the ability of the nanocarriers to deliver compounds through ex-vivo skin samples. Using near infrared light for excitation in the so called optical window of skin allows deep-tissue visualization of drug distribution and localization. In addition, it is possible to employ two-photon based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of drug distribution and concentrations in different cell layers.

  20. Non-invasive Acceleration-based Methodology for Damage Detection and Assessment of Water Distribution System

    E-print Network

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    system for water distribution systems. Keywords: Water pipe monitoring, MEMS sensors, ruptures, wireless sensor network 1. INTRODUCTION Urban water distribution systems, particularly underground pipeline an advanced sensor network for real-time monitoring and condition assessment of utility water distribution

  1. Assessment of DNA damage in Japanese nurses handling antineoplastic drugs by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Makiko; Dakeishi, Miwako; Hoshi, Shigeko; Ishii, Noriko; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    To clarify genotoxic effects of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in Japan, we examined DNA damage, assessed by the comet assay, in 121 female nurses and 46 female clerks working at three hospitals in the northeast of Japan. The comet assay is considered to be a sensitive and rapid method for DNA strand break detection in individual cells, and tail length and tail moment are used as the comet parameters. Concerning the basal characteristics, the 46 control subjects had higher rates of smoking and coffee-drinking habits and lower hemoglobin than the 121 nurses (p<0.05). The log-transformed tail length in the nurses was significantly longer than that in the control subjects after adjusting for possible covariates such as age and smoking habit (p<0.05). Also, the log-transformed tail length was significantly longer, in the 57 nurses who had handled antineoplastic drugs in the last six months, than that in the 46 control subjects (p<0.05); but, no significant difference in tail length or tail moment was seen between the two nurse groups with and without experience of handling hazardous drugs (p>0.05). These results suggest that Japanese nurses who have worked at hospitals using antineoplastic drugs may have a potential risk of DNA damage. To minimize this risk in Japan, use of biological safety cabinet and appropriate protective equipment, in addition to staff education and training, should be implemented in the healthcare environment. PMID:18285639

  2. Principles of laboratory assessment of drug abuse liability and implications for clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2009-01-01

    Abuse liability testing plays an important role in informing drug development, regulatory processes, and clinical practice. This paper describes the current “gold standard” methodologies that are used for laboratory assessments of abuse liability in non-human and human subjects. Particular emphasis is given to procedures such as non-human drug discrimination, self-administration, and physical dependence testing, and human dose effect abuse liability studies that are commonly used in regulatory submissions to governmental agencies. The potential benefits and risks associated with the inclusion of measures of abuse liability in industry-sponsored clinical trials is discussed. Lastly, it is noted that many factors contribute to patterns of drug abuse and dependence outside of the laboratory setting and positive or negative signals in abuse liability studies do not always translate to high or low levels of actual abuse or dependence. Well-designed patient and physician education, pharmacovigilance, and postmarketing surveillance can reduce the diversion and misuse of drugs with abuse liability and can effectively foster the protection and promotion of public health. PMID:19443137

  3. 75 FR 52765 - Development and Distribution of Patient Medication Information for Prescription Drugs; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...with quality prescription drug information are as follows...information about the drug, and is accurate, balanced...counting all innovator and generic products). Second...PMI system be applied to generic drugs? (4) What...

  4. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of ?-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the ?-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of ?-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in ?-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in ?-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of ?-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of ?-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of ?-oryzanol and lipids (solid and liquid) inside the lipid nanoparticle systems are proposed.

  5. Myocardial drug distribution generated from local epicardial application: potential impact of cardiac capillary perfusion in a swine model using epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Pezone, Matthew J; Wei, Abraham E; Wakim, Matthew G; Murray, Michael R; Tsukada, Hisashi; Gerogiannis, Iraklis S; Groothuis, Adam; Lovich, Mark A

    2014-11-28

    Prior studies in small mammals have shown that local epicardial application of inotropic compounds drives myocardial contractility without systemic side effects. Myocardial capillary blood flow, however, may be more significant in larger species than in small animals. We hypothesized that bulk perfusion in capillary beds of the large mammalian heart not only enhances drug distribution after local release, but also clears more drug from the tissue target than in small animals. Epicardial (EC) drug releasing systems were used to apply epinephrine to the anterior surface of the left heart of swine in either point-sourced or distributed configurations. Following local application or intravenous (IV) infusion at the same dose rates, hemodynamic responses, epinephrine levels in the coronary sinus and systemic circulation, and drug deposition across the ventricular wall, around the circumference and down the axis, were measured. EC delivery via point-source release generated transmural epinephrine gradients directly beneath the site of application extending into the middle third of the myocardial thickness. Gradients in drug deposition were also observed down the length of the heart and around the circumference toward the lateral wall, but not the interventricular septum. These gradients extended further than might be predicted from simple diffusion. The circumferential distribution following local epinephrine delivery from a distributed source to the entire anterior wall drove drug toward the inferior wall, further than with point-source release, but again, not to the septum. This augmented drug distribution away from the release source, down the axis of the left ventricle, and selectively toward the left heart follows the direction of capillary perfusion away from the anterior descending and circumflex arteries, suggesting a role for the coronary circulation in determining local drug deposition and clearance. The dominant role of the coronary vasculature is further suggested by the elevated drug levels in the coronary sinus effluent. Indeed, plasma levels, hemodynamic responses, and myocardial deposition remote from the point of release were similar following local EC or IV delivery. Therefore, the coronary vasculature shapes the pharmacokinetics of local myocardial delivery of small catecholamine drugs in large animal models. Optimal design of epicardial drug delivery systems must consider the underlying bulk capillary perfusion currents within the tissue to deliver drug to tissue targets and may favor therapeutic molecules with better potential retention in myocardial tissue. PMID:25234821

  6. Concentration distributions of the drugs most frequently identified in post-mortem femoral blood representing all causes of death.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2009-10-01

    Interpreting the concentrations of drugs determined in post-mortem blood is not an easy task owing to poly-drug use, adverse drug-drug interactions, as well as a host of pre-analytical factors and various artefacts in post-mortem toxicology. Highly sensitive and specific methods (GC-FID, GC-NPD. GC-MS and LC-MS) were used to determine the concentrations of drugs in femoral blood from 24,876 autopsies representing all causes of death. Ethanol topped the list of psychoactive substances (N=8108 or 33%) at mean, median and highest concentrations of 1.43 g/L, 1.20 g/L and 8.0 g/L, respectively. In second place was paracetamol (N=2741 or 11%). Amphetamine and cannabis were the major illicit drugs at 13th and 15th positions, respectively. Newer antidepressants, citalopram (no 3), sertraline (no 14), venlafaxine (no 16) were prominent as were sedative-hypnotics, such as diazepam (no 4), zopiclone (no 5) and zolpidem (no 18). This compilation of drugs and their concentration distributions will be useful to identify and flag for a likely overdose or drug-related poisoning death. The drug concentration together with the findings at autopsy and the police report can then be used to reach a conclusion about the cause and manner of death. PMID:20025102

  7. Modifying the intensity distribution by assessing the reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lan-chi; Jin, Xing; Wei, Yong-xiang

    2013-12-01

    This article presents an application of a procedure to modify the intensity distribution by assessing the reliability. There are two potential possibilities that may influence the intensity distribution: (1) For the interpolation error, we generate a measured grid across the calculation region. When the point to station spacing is <5 km, we consider the results precise; however, some points have less precision because these are farther from the corresponding stations. When the spacing is between 5 and 50 km, we consider the results imprecise and define a reliability factor that correlates with the distance. (2) Some records may have errors that result from local site conditions, equipment problems, or some disturbance such as lightning stroke, which will lead to some grid points having an incorrect intensity. We regress the attenuation relation for sites with abnormal intensities and consider the results to be accurate when the standard deviation (STD) is < ? and inaccurate when the STD is > 2?. We then define a reliability factor to correlate with STD between ? and 2?, such that the intensity distribution is in accord with both wave propagation theory and the investigation intensity.

  8. A Challenge for Diagnosing Acute Liver Injury with Concomitant/Sequential Exposure to Multiple Drugs: Can Causality Assessment Scales Be Utilized to Identify the Offending Drug?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Roxanne; Conner, Kim; Karnsakul, Wikrom

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity most commonly manifests as an acute hepatitis syndrome and remains the leading cause of drug-induced death/mortality and the primary reason for withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. We report a case of acute liver injury in a 12-year-old Hispanic boy, who received a series of five antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and clindamycin) for cervical lymphadenitis/retropharyngeal cellulitis. Histopathology of the liver biopsy specimen revealed acute cholestatic hepatitis. All known causes of acute liver injury were appropriately excluded and (only) drug-induced liver injury was left as a cause of his cholestasis. Liver-specific causality assessment scales such as Council for the International Organization of Medical Sciences/Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scoring system (CIOMS/RUCAM), Maria and Victorino scale, and Digestive Disease Week-Japan were applied to seek the most likely offending drug. Although clindamycin is the most likely cause by clinical diagnosis, none of causality assessment scales aid in the diagnosis. PMID:25506455

  9. Exposure time independent summary statistics for assessment of drug dependent cell line growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vitro generated dose-response curves of human cancer cell lines are widely used to develop new therapeutics. The curves are summarised by simplified statistics that ignore the conventionally used dose-response curves’ dependency on drug exposure time and growth kinetics. This may lead to suboptimal exploitation of data and biased conclusions on the potential of the drug in question. Therefore we set out to improve the dose-response assessments by eliminating the impact of time dependency. Results First, a mathematical model for drug induced cell growth inhibition was formulated and used to derive novel dose-response curves and improved summary statistics that are independent of time under the proposed model. Next, a statistical analysis workflow for estimating the improved statistics was suggested consisting of 1) nonlinear regression models for estimation of cell counts and doubling times, 2) isotonic regression for modelling the suggested dose-response curves, and 3) resampling based method for assessing variation of the novel summary statistics. We document that conventionally used summary statistics for dose-response experiments depend on time so that fast growing cell lines compared to slowly growing ones are considered overly sensitive. The adequacy of the mathematical model is tested for doxorubicin and found to fit real data to an acceptable degree. Dose-response data from the NCI60 drug screen were used to illustrate the time dependency and demonstrate an adjustment correcting for it. The applicability of the workflow was illustrated by simulation and application on a doxorubicin growth inhibition screen. The simulations show that under the proposed mathematical model the suggested statistical workflow results in unbiased estimates of the time independent summary statistics. Variance estimates of the novel summary statistics are used to conclude that the doxorubicin screen covers a significant diverse range of responses ensuring it is useful for biological interpretations. Conclusion Time independent summary statistics may aid the understanding of drugs’ action mechanism on tumour cells and potentially renew previous drug sensitivity evaluation studies. PMID:24902483

  10. Penetration and Distribution of Thiocolchicoside through Human Skin: Comparison Between a Commercial Foam (Miotens ® ) and a Drug Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carola Aguzzi; Silvia Rossi; Michela Bagnasco; Luigi Lanata; Giuseppina Sandri; Fosca Bona; Franca Ferrari; Maria Cristina Bonferoni; Carla Caramella

    2008-01-01

    Penetration and distribution of thiocolchicoside from a commercially available foam (Miotens® 0.25%, w\\/v) through human excised full-thickness skin were evaluated using two different in vitro apparatus: a Franz diffusion cell and a Saarbruecken penetration model-based cell. In order to evaluate the intrinsic capability\\u000a of the drug to penetrate into the skin, a simple drug aqueous solution prepared at the same

  11. Assessing a Tornado Climatology from Global Tornado Intensity Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Dotzek, Nikolai; Grieser, Jürgen

    2005-02-01

    Recent work demonstrated that the shape of tornado intensity distributions from various regions worldwide is well described by Weibull functions. This statistical modeling revealed a strong correlation between the fit parameters c for shape and b for scale regardless of the data source. In the present work it is shown that the quality of the Weibull fits is optimized if only tornado reports of F1 and higher intensity are used and that the c-b correlation does indeed reflect a universal feature of the observed tornado intensity distributions. For regions with likely supercell tornado dominance, this feature is the number ratio of F4 to F3 tornado reports R(F4/F3) = 0.238. The c-b diagram for the Weibull shape and scale parameters is used as a climatological chart, which allows different types of tornado climatology to be distinguished, presumably arising from supercell versus nonsupercell tornadogenesis. Assuming temporal invariance of the climatology and using a detection efficiency function for tornado observations, a stationary climatological probability distribution from large tornado records (U.S. decadal data 1950-99) is extracted. This can be used for risk assessment, comparative studies on tornado intensity distributions worldwide, and estimates of the degree of underreporting for areas with poor databases. For the 1990s U.S. data, a likely tornado underreporting of the weak events (F0, F1) by a factor of 2 can be diagnosed, as well as asymptotic climatological c,b values of c = 1.79 and b = 2.13, to which a convergence in the 1950-99 U.S. decadal data is verified.

  12. Milk excretion of ivermectin and moxidectin in dairy sheep: assessment of drug residues during cheese elaboration and ripening period.

    PubMed

    Imperiale, Fernanda A; Busetti, Margarita R; Suárez, Victor H; Lanusse, Carlos E

    2004-10-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MXD) are broad-spectrum endectocide antiparasitic drugs extensively used in food-producing animals. The patterns of IVM and MXD excretion in milk were comparatively characterized following their subcutaneous administration (200 microg.kg(-1) of body weight) to lactating dairy sheep. The relationship between milk excretion and plasma disposition kinetics of both compounds was characterized. A pool of milk collected from all of the animals in each experimental group was used for cheese elaboration. IVM and MXD residual concentrations were assessed during the cheese-making process and ripening period. IVM and MXD concentrations were measured in plasma, milk, and milk product (whey, curd, and cheese) samples using an HPLC-based methodology with fluorescence detection. IVM and MXD were extensively distributed from the bloodstream to the mammary gland, and large quantities, particularly of MXD, were excreted in milk. Residual concentrations of both compounds were recovered in milk up to 30 (IVM) and 35 (MXD) days post-treatment. The total fraction of the administered dose excreted in milk for MXD was significantly higher than that of IVM. During cheese production, the highest residual concentrations of both molecules were measured in the curd. Thirty-four percent of the total drug residue measured in the pooled milk collected from treated sheep was lost during the cheese-making process. The lowest residual concentrations were measured in the whey. IVM and MXD concentrations in the elaborated cheese tended to increase during the ripening period, reaching the highest residual level at 40 days of cheese maturation. The long persistence of milk residual concentrations of MXD and IVM in lactating dairy sheep and the high concentrations found in cheese and other milk-related products should be seriously considered before recommendation of the extralabel use of these antiparasitic drugs in dairy animals. PMID:15453688

  13. Fine mapping the spatial distribution and concentration of unlabeled drugs within tissue micro-compartments using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Fehniger, Thomas E; Gustavsson, Lena; Andersson, Malin; Kenne, Kerstin; Marko-Varga, György; Andrén, Per E

    2010-01-01

    Readouts that define the physiological distributions of drugs in tissues are an unmet challenge and at best imprecise, but are needed in order to understand both the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties associated with efficacy. Here we demonstrate that it is feasible to follow the in vivo transport of unlabeled drugs within specific organ and tissue compartments on a platform that applies MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to tissue sections characterized with high definition histology. We have tracked and quantified the distribution of an inhaled reference compound, tiotropium, within the lungs of dosed rats, using systematic point by point MS and MS/MS sampling at 200 microm intervals. By comparing drug ion distribution patterns in adjacent tissue sections, we observed that within 15 min following exposure, tiotropium parent MS ions (mass-to-charge; m/z 392.1) and fragmented daughter MS/MS ions (m/z 170.1 and 152.1) were dispersed in a concentration gradient (80 fmol-5 pmol) away from the central airways into the lung parenchyma and pleura. These drug levels agreed well with amounts detected in lung compartments by chemical extraction. Moreover, the simultaneous global definition of molecular ion signatures localized within 2-D tissue space provides accurate assignment of ion identities within histological landmarks, providing context to dynamic biological processes occurring at sites of drug presence. Our results highlight an important emerging technology allowing specific high resolution identification of unlabeled drugs at sites of in vivo uptake and retention. PMID:20644728

  14. Distribution and drug susceptibilities of Candida species causing candidemia from a medical center in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Pin; Ho, Mao-Wang; Yang, Yun-Liang; Lo, Pai-Chang; Lin, Pei-Sheng; Wang, An-Huei; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2013-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections have increased significantly in the past few decades because of the increase in high-risk populations. To investigate the distribution and drug susceptibilities of such infections, we analyzed all 152 Candida isolates causing candidemia from 2004 to 2006 at the China Medical University Hospital, a medical center in central Taiwan. Candida albicans was the most common species, accounting for 52.6% of the isolates, followed by C. tropicalis (19.7%), C. parapsilosis (14.5%), C. glabrata (8.6%), C. guilliermondii (3.9%), and C. pelliculosa (0.7%). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, anidulafungin, micafungin, and voriconazole according to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) after a 24-h incubation; 0.7%, 6.6%, and 7.9% of isolates were resistant to amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, after 48-h incubation. Both C. albicans and C. parapsilosis had high degrees of agreement for azoles between 24- and 48-h incubation periods, whereas C. glabrata (38.5-46.2%) and C. tropicalis (56.7-63.3%) did not. The majority of the isolates with high azole MICs displayed a trailing growth phenotype. Hence, the MICs of different drugs after 24-h incubation may be considered for prognosis of candidemia. PMID:23732308

  15. Drug quality assessment methods. I. Gas-liquid chromatographic assay and identification of seven barbiturates.

    PubMed

    Black, D B; Kolasinski, H; Lovering, E G; Watson, J R

    1982-09-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) procedure has been developed for the assay and identification of amobarbital, butabarbital, heptabarbital, mephobarbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, and secobarbital in single component capsule, elixir, injectable, suppository, and tablet formulations. After extraction into chloroform from an acidified aqueous mixture of the product, the drug is eluted isothermally from a methylphenylsilicone GLC column at 210 or 240 degrees C and quantitated relative to thiamylal internal standard. Results were in good agreement with those obtained using pharmacopeial assay methods. The method is suitable for the rapid assessment of commercial formulations. PMID:7130075

  16. Drug Courts Work, but How? Preliminary Development of a Measure to Assess Drug Court Structure and Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blake Barrett

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of substance use disorders is well-documented among criminal offenders. Drug courts are specialty judicial programs designed to: 1) improve public safety outcomes; 2) reduce criminal recidivism and substance abuse among offenders with substance use disorders; and 3) better utilize scarce criminal justice and treatment resources. Drug courts operate through partnerships between the criminal justice, behavioral health and

  17. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions among Renal Failure Patients of Nephrology Ward in a South Indian Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rama, Mylapuram; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Acharya, Leelavathi D; Attur, R P; Reddy, P N; Raghavan, S V

    2012-01-01

    Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010) was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%), clonidine and metoprolol (3.80%) respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%), decreased drug efficacy (29.11%) and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%), were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52%) constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic. PMID:23204624

  18. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions among Renal Failure Patients of Nephrology Ward in a South Indian Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Mylapuram; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Acharya, Leelavathi D; Attur, R. P.; Reddy, P. N.; Raghavan, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010) was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%), clonidine and metoprolol (3.80%) respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%), decreased drug efficacy (29.11%) and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%), were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52%) constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic. PMID:23204624

  19. Spatial distribution of theobromine--a low MW drug--in tissues via matrix-free NALDI-MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Montemurro, Chiara; Porcari, Andreia M; Silva, Kamila C; Lopes de Faria, José B; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2014-09-01

    The ability of nano-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry imaging (NALDI-IMS) to provide selective chemical monitoring with appropriate spatial distribution of a low molecular drug in a biological tissue was investigated. NALDI-IMS is a matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI) protocol based on imprinting of tissue constituents on a nanostructured surface. Using the accumulation of theobromine in rat kidney as a model, NALDI-IMS was found to provide well-resolved images of the special distribution of this low molecular weight (MW) drug in tissue. PMID:25066957

  20. Performance Assessment of OVERFLOW on Distributed Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Rizk, Yehia M.

    2000-01-01

    The aerodynamic computer code, OVERFLOW, with a multi-zone overset grid feature, has been parallelized to enhance its performance on distributed and shared memory paradigms. Practical application benchmarks have been set to assess the efficiency of code's parallelism on high-performance architectures. The code's performance has also been experimented with in the context of the distributed computing paradigm on distant computer resources using the Information Power Grid (IPG) toolkit, Globus. Two parallel versions of the code, namely OVERFLOW-MPI and -MLP, have developed around the natural coarse grained parallelism inherent in a multi-zonal domain decomposition paradigm. The algorithm invokes a strategy that forms a number of groups, each consisting of a zone, a cluster of zones and/or a partition of a large zone. Each group can be thought of as a process with one or multithreads assigned to it and that all groups run in parallel. The -MPI version of the code uses explicit message-passing based on the standard MPI library for sending and receiving interzonal boundary data across processors. The -MLP version employs no message-passing paradigm; the boundary data is transferred through the shared memory. The -MPI code is suited for both distributed and shared memory architectures, while the -MLP code can only be used on shared memory platforms. The IPG applications are implemented by the -MPI code using the Globus toolkit. While a computational task is distributed across multiple computer resources, the parallelism can be explored on each resource alone. Performance studies are achieved with some practical aerodynamic problems with complex geometries, consisting of 2.5 up to 33 million grid points and a large number of zonal blocks. The computations were executed primarily on SGI Origin 2000 multiprocessors and on the Cray T3E. OVERFLOW's IPG applications are carried out on NASA homogeneous metacomputing machines located at three sites, Ames, Langley and Glenn. Plans for the future will exploit the distributed parallel computing capability on various homogeneous and heterogeneous resources and large scale benchmarks. Alternative IPG toolkits will be used along with sophisticated zonal grouping strategies to minimize the communication time across the computer resources.

  1. Are Drug Companies Living Up to Their Human Rights Responsibilities? Moving Toward Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Raad, Zyde

    2010-01-01

    Background to the debate The human rights responsibilities of drug companies have been considered for years by nongovernmental organizations, but were most sharply defined in a report by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health, submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in August 2008. The “Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in relation to Access to Medicines” include responsibilities for transparency, management, monitoring and accountability, pricing, and ethical marketing, and against lobbying for more protection in intellectual property laws, applying for patents for trivial modifications of existing medicines, inappropriate drug promotion, and excessive pricing. Two years after the release of the Guidelines, the PLoS Medicine Debate asks whether drug companies are living up to their human rights responsibilities. Sofia Gruskin and Zyde Raad from the Harvard School of Public Health say more assessment is needed of such responsibilities; Geralyn Ritter, Vice President of Global Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility at Merck & Co. argues that multiple stakeholders could do more to help States deliver the right to health; and Paul Hunt and Rajat Khosla introduce Mr. Hunt's work as the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, regarding the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies and access to medicines. PMID:20927356

  2. Dendrimer, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and PLGA nanoparticles: one platform assessment of drug delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Mody, Nishi; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Chopdey, Prashant; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Liposomes (LIP), nanoparticles (NP), dendrimers (DEN), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), represent eminent classes of drug delivery devices. A study was carried out herewith by employing docetaxel (DTX) as model drug to assess their comparative drug delivery potentials. Under optimized conditions, highest entrapment of DTX was observed in CNT-based formulation (DTX-CNTs, 74.70?±?4.9%) followed by nanoparticles (DTX-NP, 62.34?±?1.5%), liposome (49.2?±?1.51%), and dendrimers (28.26?±?1.74%). All the formulations were found to be of nanometric size. In vitro release studies were carried out in PBS (pH 7.0 and 4.0), wherein all the formulations showed biphasic release pattern. Cytotoxicity assay in human cervical cancer SiHa cells inferred lowest IC50 value of 1,235.09?±?41.93 nM with DTX-CNTs, followed by DTX-DEN, DTX-LIP, DTX-NP with IC50 values of 1,571.22?±?151.27, 1,653.98?±?72.89, 1,922.75?±?75.15 nM, respectively. Plain DTX showed higher hemolytic toxicity of 22.48?±?0.94%, however loading of DTX inside nanocarriers drastically reduced its hemolytic toxicity (DTX-DEN, 17.22?±?0.48%; DTX-LIP, 4.13?±?0.19%; DTX-NP, 6.43?±?0.44%; DTX-CNTs, 14.87?±?1.69%). PMID:24431104

  3. Literature based drug interaction prediction with clinical assessment using electronic medical records: novel myopathy associated drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Duke, Jon D; Han, Xu; Wang, Zhiping; Subhadarshini, Abhinita; Karnik, Shreyas D; Li, Xiaochun; Hall, Stephen D; Jin, Yan; Callaghan, J Thomas; Overhage, Marcus J; Flockhart, David A; Strother, R Matthew; Quinney, Sara K; Li, Lang

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a common cause of adverse drug events. In this paper, we combined a literature discovery approach with analysis of a large electronic medical record database method to predict and evaluate novel DDIs. We predicted an initial set of 13197 potential DDIs based on substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism enzymes identified from published in vitro pharmacology experiments. Using a clinical repository of over 800,000 patients, we narrowed this theoretical set of DDIs to 3670 drug pairs actually taken by patients. Finally, we sought to identify novel combinations that synergistically increased the risk of myopathy. Five pairs were identified with their p-values less than 1E-06: loratadine and simvastatin (relative risk or RR?=?1.69); loratadine and alprazolam (RR?=?1.86); loratadine and duloxetine (RR?=?1.94); loratadine and ropinirole (RR?=?3.21); and promethazine and tegaserod (RR?=?3.00). When taken together, each drug pair showed a significantly increased risk of myopathy when compared to the expected additive myopathy risk from taking either of the drugs alone. Based on additional literature data on in vitro drug metabolism and inhibition potency, loratadine and simvastatin and tegaserod and promethazine were predicted to have a strong DDI through the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively. This new translational biomedical informatics approach supports not only detection of new clinically significant DDI signals, but also evaluation of their potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:22912565

  4. Applying Linear and Non-Linear Methods for Parallel Prediction of Volume of Distribution and Fraction of Unbound Drug

    PubMed Central

    del Amo, Eva M.; Ghemtio, Leo; Xhaard, Henri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Urtti, Arto; Kidron, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Volume of distribution and fraction unbound are two key parameters in pharmacokinetics. The fraction unbound describes the portion of free drug in plasma that may extravasate, while volume of distribution describes the tissue access and binding of a drug. Reliable in silico predictions of these pharmacokinetic parameters would benefit the early stages of drug discovery, as experimental measuring is not feasible for screening purposes. We have applied linear and nonlinear multivariate approaches to predict these parameters: linear partial least square regression and non-linear recursive partitioning classification. The volume of distribution and fraction of unbound drug in plasma are predicted in parallel within the model, since the two are expected to be affected by similar physicochemical drug properties. Predictive models for both parameters were built and the performance of the linear models compared to models included in the commercial software Volsurf+. Our models performed better in predicting the unbound fraction (Q2 0.54 for test set compared to 0.38 with Volsurf+ model), but prediction accuracy of the volume of distribution was comparable to the Volsurf+ model (Q2 of 0.70 for test set compared to 0.71 with Volsurf+ model). The nonlinear classification models were able to identify compounds with a high or low volume of distribution (sensitivity 0.81 and 0.71, respectively, for test set), while classification of fraction unbound was less successful. The interrelationship between the volume of distribution and fraction unbound is investigated and described in terms of physicochemical descriptors. Lipophilicity and solubility descriptors were found to have a high influence on both volume of distribution and fraction unbound, but with an inverse relationship. PMID:24116008

  5. The use of 2D fingerprint methods to support the assessment of structural similarity in orphan drug legislation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the European Union, medicines are authorised for some rare disease only if they are judged to be dissimilar to authorised orphan drugs for that disease. This paper describes the use of 2D fingerprints to show the extent of the relationship between computed levels of structural similarity for pairs of molecules and expert judgments of the similarities of those pairs. The resulting relationship can be used to provide input to the assessment of new active compounds for which orphan drug authorisation is being sought. Results 143 experts provided judgments of the similarity or dissimilarity of 100 pairs of drug-like molecules from the DrugBank 3.0 database. The similarities of these pairs were also computed using BCI, Daylight, ECFC4, ECFP4, MDL and Unity 2D fingerprints. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated a strong relationship between the human and computed similarity assessments, with the resulting regression models having significant predictive power in experiments using data from submissions of orphan drug medicines to the European Medicines Agency. The BCI fingerprints performed best overall on the DrugBank dataset while the BCI, Daylight, ECFP4 and Unity fingerprints performed comparably on the European Medicines Agency dataset. Conclusions Measures of structural similarity based on 2D fingerprints can provide a useful source of information for the assessment of orphan drug status by regulatory authorities. PMID:24485002

  6. DMAS: a web-based distributed mathematics assessment system (abstract only)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saleh Al-shomrani; Paul Wang

    2008-01-01

    Assessing student performance and understanding is very important in education generally and in Mathematics education in particular. DMAS is a Web-based Distributed Mathematics Assessment system that can be of great value to teachers and students of Mathematics. Features of DMAS include: DMAD (the core Distributed Mathematics Assessment database), test authoring tool for teachers, online taking of tests, grading and results

  7. Personalized Risk Assessment of Drug-Related Harm Is Associated with Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrea A.; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Panenka, William J.; Leonova, Olga; Strehlau, Verena; Lang, Donna J.; Thornton, Allen E.; Wong, Hubert; Barr, Alasdair M.; Procyshyn, Ric M.; Smith, Geoffrey N.; Buchanan, Tari; Krajden, Mel; Krausz, Michael; Montaner, Julio S.; MacEwan, G. William; Nutt, David J.; Honer, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs (ISCD) assigned quantitative scores for harm to 20 drugs. We hypothesized that a personalized, ISCD-based Composite Harm Score (CHS) would be associated with poor health outcomes in polysubstance users. Methods A prospective community sample (n=293) of adults living in marginal housing was assessed for substance use. The CHS was calculated based on the ISCD index, and the personal substance use characteristics over four weeks. Regression models estimated the association between CHS and physical, psychological, and social health outcomes. Results Polysubstance use was pervasive (95.8%), as was multimorbid illness (median 3, possible range 0–12). The median CHS was 2845 (interquartile range 1865–3977). Adjusting for age and sex, every 1000-unit CHS increase was associated with greater mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–2.01, p = 0.02), and persistent hepatitis C infection (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.02–1.67, p = 0.04). The likelihood of substance-induced psychosis increased 1.39-fold (95% CI 1.13–1.67, p = 0.001). The amount spent on drugs increased 1.51-fold (1.40–1.62, p < 0.001) and the odds of having committed a crime increased 1.74-fold (1.46–2.10, p < 0.001). Multimorbid illness increased 1.43-fold (95% CI 1.26–1.63, p < 0.001). Conclusions Greater CHS predicts poorer physical, psychological, and social health, and may be a useful quantitative, personalized measure of risk for drug-related harm. PMID:24223192

  8. HoughFeature, a novel method for assessing drug effects in three-color cDNA microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-color microarray experiments can be performed to assess drug effects on the genomic scale. The methodology may be useful in shortening the cycle, reducing the cost, and improving the efficiency in drug discovery and development compared with the commonly used dual-color technology. A visualization tool, the hexaMplot, is able to show the interrelations of gene expressions in normal-disease-drug samples in three-color microarray data. However, it is not enough to assess the complicated drug therapeutic effects based on the plot alone. It is important to explore more effective tools so that a deeper insight into gene expression patterns can be gained with three-color microarrays. Results Based on the celebrated Hough transform, a novel algorithm, HoughFeature, is proposed to extract line features in the hexaMplot corresponding to different drug effects. Drug therapy results can then be divided into a number of levels in relation to different groups of genes. We apply the framework to experimental microarray data to assess the complex effects of Rg1 (an extract of Chinese medicine) on Hcy-related HUVECs in details. Differentially expressed genes are classified into 15 functional groups corresponding to different levels of drug effects. Conclusion Our study shows that the HoughFeature algorithm can reveal natural cluster patterns in gene expression data of normal-disease-drug samples. It provides both qualitative and quantitative information about up- or down-regulated genes. The methodology can be employed to predict disease susceptibility in gene therapy and assess drug effects on the disease based on three-color microarray data. PMID:17634089

  9. Evaluation of stability and size distribution of sunflower oil-coated micro bubbles for localized drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Micro bubbles were initially introduced as contrast agents for ultrasound examinations as they are able to modify the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging, thus improving the assessment of clinical information on human tissue. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of using these bubbles as drug carriers in localized delivery. In micro fluidics devices for generation of micro bubbles, the bubbles are formed at interface of liquid gas through a strangulation process. A device that uses these features can produce micro bubbles with small size dispersion in a single step. Methods A T-junction micro fluidic device constructed using 3D prototyping was made for the production of mono dispersed micro bubbles. These micro bubbles use sunflower oil as a lipid layer. Stability studies for micro bubbles with diameters different generated from a liquid phase of the same viscosity were conducted to evaluate whether micro bubbles can be used as drug carriers. The biocompatibility of coating layer, the ability to withstand environmental pressure variations combined with echogenicity, are key factors that they can safely play the role of drug transporters. Results The normal distribution curve with small dispersion of the diameter of bubbles validates the process of generating micro bubbles with low value of variation coefficient, i.e., 0.381 at 1.90%. The results also showed the feasibility of using sunflower oil as the lipid matrix with stable population of bubbles over 217 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 313.04 ?m and 121 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 73.74 ?m, considering bubbles with air as gaseous phase. Conclusion The results indicate that the micro fluidic device designed can be used for producing micro bubbles with low variation coefficient using sunflower oil as a coating of micro bubbles. These carriers were stable for periods of time that are long enough for clinical applications even when regular air is used as the gas phase. Improved stability can be achieved when biocompatible gas with lower permeability is used. PMID:22995578

  10. Intracellular drug distribution-based targeting: Exploiting lysosomes to enhance the selectivity of drugs towards cancer cells

    E-print Network

    Ndolo, Rosemary A.

    2012-08-31

    mechanism of action [14]. For instance, it was due to the toxic effects of the chemical weapon sulfur mustard, originally synthesized in 1854 and used in World War I that anticancer drugs were discovered [15]. In World War II soldiers accidentally exposed... to sulfur mustard at Bari Harbor, Italy suffered from severe irritation of the respiratory tract and eye, and it was soon recognized that the toxic effects of sulfur mustard targeted the rapidly dividing cells of the gastrointestinal tract and blood...

  11. Phospholipid Vesicle-Based Permeation Assay and EpiSkin(®) in Assessment of Drug Therapies Destined for Skin Administration.

    PubMed

    Engesland, André; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-03-01

    Cost-effective and efficient methods for permeability screening are crucial during early development of drugs, drug formulations, and cosmeceuticals. Alternatives to animal experiments are impelled for both economical and ethical reasons. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay (PVPA) to assess the effect of different formulations on drug permeability and thus establish its utility in formulation development. Three model drugs were tested in solutions and as liposomal formulations. The permeability results for the PVPA models were compared with the results for the reconstructed human skin model, EpiSkin(®) . The drugs were ranked based on their estimated penetration potentials, and the results were in accordance with what was expected considering the physicochemical properties of the drugs. PVPAs (E-80, ceramide, cholesterol, cholesteryl sulfate, and palmitic acid) was able to distinguish between drug solutions and liposomal formulations; however, EpiSkin(®) detected only small differences between the drugs in solution and formulations. In contrast with EpiSkin(®) , which is limited by a 3-day testing window, PVPA barriers can be stored frozen for up to 2 weeks or even up to 16 months, depending on their compositions. The PVPA models are thus more cost effective and efficient than the EpiSkin(®) model for permeability screening during early drug development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:1119-1127, 2015. PMID:25558045

  12. Evaluation of higher distribution and/or utilization voltages. Fourth interim report (August 1980): assessment of optimum distribution configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This interim report provides documentation on the fourth task, Assessment of Optimum Distribution Configuration, of DOE Contract No. ET-78-C-01-2866, Evaluation of Higher Distribution and/or Utilization Voltages. The work performed under this task includes the development of a computer model for assessment of life cycle costs for the distribution and utilization systems, the development of an optimization algorithm to enable distribution system configuration optimization and a net energy analysis to determine potential net energy savings. Input data for this task derive from Task 3. The major output of this task is a documented computer code.

  13. Dear Colleagues, The following is the UM Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy, which is being distributed to all faculty, staff and

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    Dear Colleagues, The following is the UM Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy, which is being distributed a student's alcohol or other drug use, please refer them to Counseling and Psychological Services, which System University of Michigan Health System University of Michigan Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Policy

  14. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF TWO DISTRIBUTED WATERSHED MODELS WITH APPLICATION TO A SMALL WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributed watershed models are beneficial tools for assessment of management practices on runoff and water-induced erosion. This paper evaluates, by application to an experimental watershed, two promising distributed watershed-scale sediment models in detail: The Kinematic Runo...

  15. Assessment of a candidate marker constituent predictive of a dietary substance-drug interaction: case study with grapefruit juice and CYP3A4 drug substrates.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Garrett R; Wolf, Kristina K; Li, Yingxin; Connolly, Elizabeth A; Scarlett, Yolanda V; Hull, J Heyward; Paine, Mary F

    2014-12-01

    Dietary substances, including herbal products and citrus juices, can perpetrate interactions with conventional medications. Regulatory guidances for dietary substance-drug interaction assessment are lacking. This deficiency is due in part to challenges unique to dietary substances, a lack of requisite human-derived data, and limited jurisdiction. An in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach to help address some of these hurdles was evaluated using the exemplar dietary substance grapefruit juice (GFJ), the candidate marker constituent 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB), and the purported victim drug loperamide. First, the GFJ-loperamide interaction was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers. Loperamide (16 mg) was administered with 240 ml of water or GFJ; plasma was collected from 0 to 72 hours. Relative to water, GFJ increased the geometric mean loperamide area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) significantly (1.7-fold). Second, the mechanism-based inhibition kinetics for DHB were recovered using human intestinal microsomes and the index CYP3A4 reaction, loperamide N-desmethylation (KI [concentration needed to achieve one-half kinact], 5.0 ± 0.9 µM; kinact [maximum inactivation rate constant], 0.38 ± 0.02 minute(-1)). These parameters were incorporated into a mechanistic static model, which predicted a 1.6-fold increase in loperamide AUC. Third, the successful IVIVE prompted further application to 15 previously reported GFJ-drug interaction studies selected according to predefined criteria. Twelve of the interactions were predicted to within the 25% predefined criterion. Results suggest that DHB could be used to predict the CYP3A4-mediated effect of GFJ. This time- and cost-effective IVIVE approach could be applied to other dietary substance-drug interactions to help prioritize new and existing drugs for more advanced (dynamic) modeling and simulation and clinical assessment. PMID:25253884

  16. Upper Missouri River Basin Aquatic GAP Fish Distribution Model Accuracy Assessment

    E-print Network

    , Catostomus commersonii, Population Characteristics in the Upper Missouri River Basin BY Ryan M. Sylvester Basin Aquatic GAP Fish Distribution Model Accuracy Assessment and White Sucker, Catostomus commersonii

  17. A pharmacy too far? Equity and spatial distribution of outcomes in the delivery of subsidized artemisinin-based combination therapies through private drug shops

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Millions of individuals with malaria-like fevers purchase drugs from private retailers, but artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), the only effective treatment in regions with high levels of resistance to older drugs, are rarely obtained through these outlets due to their relatively high cost. To encourage scale up of ACTs, the Affordable Medicines Facility – malaria is being launched to subsidize their price. The Government of Tanzania and the Clinton Foundation piloted this subsidized distribution model in two Tanzanian districts to examine concerns about whether the intervention will successfully reach poor, rural communities. Methods Stocking of ACTs and other antimalarial drugs in all retail shops was observed at baseline and in four subsequent surveys over 15 months. Exit interviews were conducted with antimalarial drug customers during each survey period. All shops and facilities were georeferenced, and variables related to population density and proximity to distribution hubs, roads, and other facilities were calculated. To understand the equity of impact, shops stocking ACTs and consumers buying them were compared to those that did not, according to geographic and socioeconomic variables. Patterning in ACT stocking and sales was evaluated against that of other common antimalarials to identify factors that may have impacted access. Qualitative data were used to assess motivations underlying stocking, distribution, and buying disparities. Results Results indicated that although total ACT purchases rose from negligible levels to nearly half of total antimalarial sales over the course of the pilot, considerable geographic variation in stocking and sales persisted and was related to a variety of socio-spatial factors; ACTs were stocked more often in shops located closer to district towns (p<0.01) and major roads (p<0.01) and frequented by individuals of higher socioeconomic status (p<0.01). However, other antimalarial drugs displayed similar patterning, indicating the existence of underlying disparities in access to antimalarial drugs in general in these districts. Conclusions As this subsidy model is scaled up across multiple countries, these results confirm the potential for increased ACT usage but suggest that additional efforts to increase access in remote areas will be needed for the scale-up to have equitable impact. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN39125414. PMID:20594372

  18. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile?

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (? 10 ?M) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23707769

  19. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: a study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licensed as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (? 10 ?M) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23707769

  20. An assessment of the use of drug and non-drug interventions in the treatment of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876, a protozoan parasite of freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Picón-Camacho, S M; Marcos-Lopez, M; Bron, J E; Shinn, A P

    2012-02-01

    Infection by the ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 causes significant economic losses in freshwater aquaculture worldwide. Following the ban on the use of malachite green for treating food fish, there has been extensive research aimed at identifying suitable replacements. In this paper we critically assess drug and non-drug interventions, which have been tested for use or have been employed against this parasite and evaluate possibilities for their application in farm systems. Current treatments include the administration of formaldehyde, sodium chloride (salt), copper sulphate and potassium permanganate. However, purportedly more environmentally friendly drugs such as humic acid, potassium ferrate (VI), bronopol and the peracetic acid-based products have recently been tested and represent promising alternatives. Further investigation, is required to optimize the treatments and to establish precise protocols in order to minimize the quantity of drug employed whilst ensuring the most efficacious performance. At the same time, there needs to be a greater emphasis placed on the non-drug aspects of management strategies, including the use of non-chemical interventions focusing on the removal of free-swimming stages and tomocysts of I. multifiliis from farm culture systems. Use of such strategies provides the hope of more environmentally friendly alternatives for the control of I. multifiliis infections. PMID:22078025

  1. [New system for diagnosing acute circulatory disorders and assessing drug choice and dosage].

    PubMed

    Burakovski?, V I; Lishchuk, V A; Gazizova, D Sh

    1993-01-01

    The assessment of the status of a patient and diagnosis are first made strictly algorithmically. At the same time the procedure is monitored by a physician in terms of his experience and knowledge. The dialogue is made on the basis of a model and images which reflect the pattern of blood circulation. The diagnosis is made by isolating the key pathophysiological link and interpreting it by means of a clinico-mathematical classification. The usual wording based on the evaluation of the severity and stage of a pathological process is supplemented with assessments of compensatory, protective, and other adaptive changes which greatly influence the choice of a therapy. The action of drugs is evaluated by their cumulative effects on the changes in physiological functions determining their properties, direction and magnitude of alterations of the weakest link. The clinical experience has shown that the procedure is beneficial for rapid detection of clinically significant changes, choice and assessment of therapeutical efforts just during an operation and in the early postoperative period. PMID:8148177

  2. Imaging the distribution of individual platinum-based anticancer drug molecules attached to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bhirde, Ashwin A; Sousa, Alioscka A; Patel, Vyomesh; Azari, Afrouz A; Gutkind, J Silvio; Leapman, Richard D; Rusling, James F

    2009-01-01

    Aims To image the distribution of drug molecules attached to single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Materials & methods Herein we report the use of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) for atomic scale visualization and quantitation of single platinum-based drug molecules attached to SWNTs designed for targeted drug delivery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used for characterization of the SWNT drug conjugates. Results Z-contrast STEM imaging enabled visualization of the first-line anticancer drug cisplatin on the nanotubes at single molecule level. The identity and presence of cisplatin on the nanotubes was confirmed using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. STEM tomography was also used to provide additional insights concerning the nanotube conjugates. Finally, our observations provide a rationale for exploring the use of SWNT bioconjugates to selectively target and kill squamous cancer cells. Conclusion Z-contrast STEM imaging provides a means for direct visualization of heavy metal containing molecules (i.e., cisplatin) attached to surfaces of carbon SWNTs along with distribution and quantitation. PMID:19839812

  3. Clustered distribution of natural product leads of drugs in the chemical space as influenced by the privileged target-sites.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Shangying; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Cunlong; Tan, Chunyan; Gao, Chunmei; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-01-01

    Some natural product leads of drugs (NPLDs) have been found to congregate in the chemical space. The extent, detailed patterns, and mechanisms of this congregation phenomenon have not been fully investigated and their usefulness for NPLD discovery needs to be more extensively tested. In this work, we generated and evaluated the distribution patterns of 442?NPLDs of 749 pre-2013 approved and 263 clinical trial small molecule drugs in the chemical space represented by the molecular scaffold and fingerprint trees of 137,836 non-redundant natural products. In the molecular scaffold trees, 62.7% approved and 37.4% clinical trial NPLDs congregate in 62 drug-productive scaffolds/scaffold-branches. In the molecular fingerprint tree, 82.5% approved and 63.0% clinical trial NPLDs are clustered in 60 drug-productive clusters (DCs) partly due to their preferential binding to 45 privileged target-site classes. The distribution patterns of the NPLDs are distinguished from those of the bioactive natural products. 11.7% of the NPLDs in these DCs have remote-similarity relationship with the nearest NPLD in their own DC. The majority of the new NPLDs emerge from preexisting DCs. The usefulness of the derived knowledge for NPLD discovery was demonstrated by the recognition of the new NPLDs of 2013-2014 approved drugs. PMID:25790752

  4. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model.

    PubMed

    Small, Dan; Glickman, Andrea; Rigter, Galen; Walter, Thia

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV. PMID:20047690

  5. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV. PMID:20047690

  6. Outpatient antihypertensive drug utilization in Canton Sarajevo during five years period (2004-2008) and adherence to treatment guidelines assessment

    PubMed Central

    ?ati?, Tarik; Begovi?, Begler

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is chronic disease with high prevalence, which can successfully be treated with antihypertensive drugs. Previous researches have shown that existing hypertension treatment guidelines are not fully implemented in practice. We have analysed antihypertensive drug utilization in Canton Sarajevo during five-year period (2004-2008). Research findings are discussed in relation to expected drug utilization according to Canton Sarajevo treatment guidelines. Objective of this research is to examine prescription patterns of antihypertensive drugs in primary health care in Canton Sarajevo during five-year period. Based on study findings we did an estimation of adherence to local treatment guidelines, which are similar to those published globally. Drug utilization data were collected from the largest pharmacy (retail) chain, representing more than 80% of pharmacies in Canton Sarajevo. Following drug groups have been analyzed: diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium- channel-blockers, ACE-Inhibitors (plain and combinations), Angiotensin-II-antagonists and alpha-blockers. Drug utilization is expressed in number of defined daily dose (DDDs), defined daily dose per thousand inhabitants per day (DDD/TID), drug utilization 90% (DU90%) and value in euros. ACE-Inhibitors are most prescribed drug class; combination of ACE-Inhibitors and diuretics account 46% of total antihypertensive budget spending. ACEIs are followed by calcium-channel-blockers. Diuretics utilization is decreasing from 2006 and being replaced with beta-blockers. Diuretics, recommended as first line therapy, are ranked as third in total antihypertensive drug utilization. It is necessary to introduce follow-up and enforce adherence to developed treatment guideline. Drug utilization studies can be used as tool for assessment of treatment guidelines adherence in primary health care. PMID:21619556

  7. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hilber, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hilber@meduniwien.ac.at [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sandtner, Walter [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (? 10 ?M) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias. • 18-Methoxycoronaridine has a lower affinity for cardiac ion channels than ibogaine.

  8. Assessing the FDA via the Anomaly of Off-Label Drug Prescribing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEXANDER T. TABARROK

    t is commonly thought that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the use of all pharmaceutical drugs in the United States. In fact, most hospital patients are given drugs that are not FDA-approved for the prescribed use. The FDA does require that drugs undergo extensive testing before they are re- leased onto the market and, if it concludes

  9. Assessing the Effects of the Drug Court Intervention on Offender Criminal TrajectoriesA Research Note

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cary Heck; Aaron Roussell; Scott E. Culhane

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of NCIC and local police data from Wyoming, this study focuses on the short-term effects of the drug court intervention on offender criminal trajectories. Wyoming's drug courts operate in a manner consistent with most drug courts around the nation by focusing on offender supervision, judicial oversight, frequent and random drug testing, and intensive substance abuse treatment. The

  10. Causes and consequences of increasing club drug use in China: a descriptive assessment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiushi; Xia, Guomei

    2010-01-01

    Club drugs have quickly become the most widespread "drugs of abuse" in China. Using data from a convenience sample of 730 club drug users in Shanghai in 2006 , we explored the causes and consequences of club drug use. Descriptive analyses suggest that club drug use is typically polydrug use. Polydrug use is strongly associated with weakened social control, drug use social influences, and a sensation-seeking personality; in addition, it is associated with more negative health and social consequences. Both polydrug and single-club-drug users are at high risk of sexually acquiring and/or transmitting HIV. The study's limitations are noted, and future research is suggested. PMID:20025450

  11. Landslide Probability Assessment by the Derived Distributions Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, E.; Ochoa, A.; Martínez, H.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are potentially disastrous events that bring along human and economic losses; especially in cities where an accelerated and unorganized growth leads to settlements on steep and potentially unstable areas. Among the main causes of landslides are geological, geomorphological, geotechnical, climatological, hydrological conditions and anthropic intervention. This paper studies landslides detonated by rain, commonly known as "soil-slip", which characterize by having a superficial failure surface (Typically between 1 and 1.5 m deep) parallel to the slope face and being triggered by intense and/or sustained periods of rain. This type of landslides is caused by changes on the pore pressure produced by a decrease in the suction when a humid front enters, as a consequence of the infiltration initiated by rain and ruled by the hydraulic characteristics of the soil. Failure occurs when this front reaches a critical depth and the shear strength of the soil in not enough to guarantee the stability of the mass. Critical rainfall thresholds in combination with a slope stability model are widely used for assessing landslide probability. In this paper we present a model for the estimation of the occurrence of landslides based on the derived distributions technique. Since the works of Eagleson in the 1970s the derived distributions technique has been widely used in hydrology to estimate the probability of occurrence of extreme flows. The model estimates the probability density function (pdf) of the Factor of Safety (FOS) from the statistical behavior of the rainfall process and some slope parameters. The stochastic character of the rainfall is transformed by means of a deterministic failure model into FOS pdf. Exceedance probability and return period estimation is then straightforward. The rainfall process is modeled as a Rectangular Pulses Poisson Process (RPPP) with independent exponential pdf for mean intensity and duration of the storms. The Philip infiltration model is used along with the soil characteristic curve (suction vs. moisture) and the Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria in order to calculate the FOS of the slope. Data from two slopes located on steep tropical regions of the cities of Medellín (Colombia) and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) where used to verify the model's performance. The results indicated significant differences between the obtained FOS values and the behavior observed on the field. The model shows relatively high values of FOS that do not reflect the instability of the analyzed slopes. For the two cases studied, the application of a more simple reliability concept (as the Probability of Failure - PR and Reliability Index - ?), instead of a FOS could lead to more realistic results.

  12. Drug release-modulating mechanism of hydrophilic hydroxypropylmethylcellulose matrix tablets: distribution of atoms and carrier and texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Bom; Lim, Jisung; Kang, Chin-Yang; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-12-01

    Although release profiles of drug from hydrophilic matrices have been well recognized, the visual distribution of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and atoms inside of internal structures of hydrophilic HPMC matrices has not been characterized. In this paper, drug release mechanism from HPMC matrix tablet was investigated based on the release behaviors of HPMC, physical properties of gelled HPMC tablet and atomic distributions of formulation components using diverse instruments. A matrix tablet consisting of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC 6, 4,000 and 100,000 mPa·s), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) as a model and fumed silicon dioxide (Aerosil(®) 200) was prepared via direct compression. The distribution of atoms and HPMC imaging were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM)/ energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and near-infrared (NIR) analysis, respectively as a function of time. A texture analyzer was also used to characterize the thickness and maintenance of gel layer of HPMC matrix tablet. The HPMC matrix tablets showed Higuchi release kinetics with no lag time against the square root of time. High viscosity grades of HPMC gave retarded release rate because of the greater swelling and gel thickness as characterized by texture analyzer. According to the NIR imaging, low-viscosity-grade HPMC (6 mPa·s) quickly leached out onto the surface of the tablet, while the high-viscosity-grade HPMC (4000 mPa·s) formed much thicker gel layer around the tablet and maintained longer via slow erosion, resulting in retarded drug release. The atomic distribution of the drug (chlorine, carbon, oxygen), HPMC (carbon, oxygen) and silicon dioxide (silica, oxygen) and NIR imaging of HPMC corresponded with the dissolution behaviors of drug as a function of time. The use of imaging and texture analyses could be applicable to explain the release- modulating mechanism of hydrophilic HPMC matrix tablets. PMID:23855499

  13. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cros, C., E-mail: caroline.cros@hotmail.co.uk [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Skinner, M., E-mail: Matthew.Skinner@astrazeneca.com [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Moors, J. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Lainee, P. [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France)] [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France); Valentin, J.P. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ? We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ? We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ? At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ? At high heart rate the effects of two out of three antiarrhythmics were enhanced. ? Detection of a drug-induced prolongation of QRS was improved at high heart rate.

  14. Assessing depression in drug- and alcohol-dependent subjects: the utility of a cognitive-based approach.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, O; Parker, G; Hadzi-Pavlovic, D; Bell, J

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to report the development of a measure designed to assess depression severity in those with drug and or alcohol problems not confounded by somatic items that may more reflect the impact of drug and alcohol problems rather than depression itself. A questionnaire was derived with 49 items, each assessing cognitive aspects of depression. Subjects with drug and or alcohol problems completed the measure and a standard self-report depression inventory and were assessed for depression presence and severity by a psychiatrist, who used a structured case-finding measure to complement a semi-structured clinical assessment. A high percentage of the sample was found to be depressed. Total scores on the new measure correlated highly with scores on the two other depression reference measures, supporting its validity as a measure of depression severity. A refined set of 14 items was also identified as a valid measure of depression severity, whereas a determined cut-off established high assignment accuracy when examined against the clinical judgement of caseness. In conclusion, the refined 14-item set has been validated as a depression measure in those with drug and alcohol disorders, whereas the item content may assist clinicians to frame screening questions in assessing such patients. PMID:11839134

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Kato-Katz and FLOTAC for Assessing Anthelmintic Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Stefanie; Speich, Benjamin; Hattendorf, Jan; Rinaldi, Laura; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Khamis, I. Simba; Mohammed, Alisa S.; Albonico, Marco; Rollinson, David; Marti, Hanspeter; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    Background Sensitive diagnostic tools are required for an accurate assessment of prevalence and intensity of helminth infections in areas undergoing regular deworming, and for monitoring anthelmintic drug efficacy. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of the Kato-Katz and FLOTAC techniques in the frame of a drug efficacy trial. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool samples from 343 Zanzibari children were subjected to duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears and the FLOTAC basic technique in a baseline screening in early 2009. The FLOTAC showed a higher sensitivity than the Kato-Katz method for the diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura (95% vs. 88%, p?=?0.012) and Ascaris lumbricoides (88% vs. 68%, p?=?0.098), but a lower sensitivity for hookworm diagnosis (54% vs. 81%, p?=?0.006). Considering the combined results from both methods as ‘gold’ standard, the prevalences of T. trichiura, hookworm and A. lumbricoides were 71% (95% confidence interval (CI): 66–75%), 22% (95% CI: 17–26%) and 12% (95% CI: 8–15%), respectively. At follow-up, 3–5 weeks after 174 among the 269 re-examined children were administered anthelmintic drugs, we observed cure rates (CRs) against A. lumbricoides, hookworm and T. trichiura of 91% (95% CI: 80–100%), 61% (95% CI: 48–75%) and 41% (95% CI: 34–49%), respectively, when using the Kato-Katz method. FLOTAC revealed lower CRs against A. lumbricoides (83%, 95% CI: 67–98%) and T. trichiura (36%, 95% CI: 29–43%), but a higher CR against hookworm (69%, 95% CI: 57–82%). These differences, however, lacked statistical significance. Considerable differences were observed in the geometric mean fecal egg counts between the two methods with lower egg reduction rates (ERRs) determined by FLOTAC. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that the FLOTAC technique, following further optimization, might become a viable alternative to the Kato-Katz method for anthelmintic drug efficacy studies and for monitoring and evaluation of deworming programs. The lower CRs and ERRs determined by FLOTAC warrant consideration and could strategically impact future helminth control programs. PMID:21532740

  16. VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA

    E-print Network

    Churchman, C.W.

    2011-01-01

    Geothermal Resources Impact and'Planning Study) LAKE COUNTY Supervisors Planning Commission Environmental AssessmentResource Assessment and Conversion Technology What is the extent, nature and location of geothermal

  17. A qualitative study to assess community barriers to malaria mass drug administration trials in the Gambia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA) is a strategy widely used in the control of human parasitic diseases but has been rarely attempted with malaria, the most common and dangerous parasitic disease in humans. MDA is an intervention strategy that involves simultaneously dispensing treatment to an entire population in a given geographic area. With some areas in sub-Saharan Africa documenting a decline in malaria transmission, the feasibility of MDA to further reduce malaria transmission is being considered. Understanding community perceptions of such an activity is vitally important for the design of the study and gaining the support of participants in order to maximize compliance and adherence. Methods A qualitative study to assess factors likely to influence community acceptance of MDA in the seasonal and low malaria transmission setting of The Gambia was conducted. Using in-depth interviews, the perceptions, knowledge and attitudes of medical personnel and community members who have undergone MDA trials in The Gambia were investigated. Results Several major themes emerged, namely: 1) the importance of timing of rounds of MDA doses for maximum participation; 2) the need to educate the target population with accurate information on the procedures, drug regimen, and possible side effects to enhance adherence; 3) the need for continuous sensitization meetings to maintain and increase uptake of MDA; and, 4) the importance for defining roles in the delivery and assessment of MDA, including existing healthcare structures. Discussion To increase the likelihood of participation in MDA trials in this setting, activities should be undertaken just before and during the rainy season when community members are less mobile. Importantly, fears regarding blood sampling and side effects of the drug regimen need to be addressed prior to the start of the trial and repeated throughout the study period. Accurate and frequent communication is essential, and village leaders should consistently be included in sensitization meetings to enhance community participation. Additionally, village healthcare workers should be included in training and implementation, with supervision by a fieldworker permanently posted in every few villages during the trial. Future collaboration with Senegal may prove important for enhanced elimination efforts in The Gambia. PMID:24495715

  18. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ? 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. PMID:24967688

  19. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPD and C hardware. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA worksheets.

  20. Hazard analysis and risk assessment in the development of biomedical drug formulation equipment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David H; Bidez, Martha W; Delucas, Lawrence J

    2012-04-01

    Hazard analysis and risk assessment techniques are utilized within many private sector industries and government agencies, including the medical device and pharmaceutical industry, within a structured process to control human injuries and environmental and property damage. In the U.S. the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires a hazard analysis be performed on all medical devices. While there are biomedical engineering applications reported which deal with human hazards in clinical, patient care environment, no previous studies extend these traditional techniques to a university-based, research environment. This study applies a tiered approach to hazard analysis and risk assessment to a biomedical, university-based, research environment in the design of a high throughput platform that screens chemical excipients (additives) for their ability to increase protein solubility. Each design stage (conceptual, preliminary, system, and detailed) requires a unique hazard analysis technique based on available information. The analysis techniques applied here are evaluated for their use in a biomedical research environment where experiment accuracy is a primary concern. PMID:22068884

  1. Clinical drug-drug interaction assessment of ivacaftor as a potential inhibitor of cytochrome P450 and P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sarah M; Luo, Xia; Dubey, Neeraj; Li, Chonghua; Chavan, Ajit B; Gilmartin, Geoffrey S; Higgins, Mark; Mahnke, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Ivacaftor is approved in the USA for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) in patients with a G551D-CFTR mutation or one of eight other CFTR mutations. A series of in vitro experiments conducted early in the development of ivacaftor indicated ivacaftor and metabolites may have the potential to inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8, CYP2C9, CYP3A, and CYP2D6, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Based on these results, a series of clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of ivacaftor on sensitive substrates of CYP2C8 (rosiglitazone), CYP3A (midazolam), CYP2D6 (desipramine), and P-gp (digoxin). In addition, a DDI study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ivacaftor on a combined oral contraceptive, as this is considered an important comedication in CF patients. The results indicate ivacaftor is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A and P-gp, but has no effect on CYP2C8 or CYP2D6. Ivacaftor caused non-clinically significant increases in ethinyl estradiol and norethisterone exposure. Based on these results, caution and appropriate monitoring are recommended when concomitant substrates of CYP2C9, CYP3A and/or P-gp are used during treatment with ivacaftor, particularly drugs with a narrow therapeutic index, such as warfarin. PMID:25103957

  2. Drug Use Prevention Data, Missing Assessments and Survival Jennifer M. Bacik1, Susan A. Murphy1, AND James C. Anthony2

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Susan A.

    Drug Use Prevention Data, Missing Assessments and Survival Analysis Jennifer M. Bacik1, Susan A. Murphy1, AND James C. Anthony2 1Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, 326 Thomas of interest to investigate the incidence of initial drug experimentation or other drug use milestones

  3. Drug Use Prevention Data, Missing Assessments and Survival Jennifer M. Bacik 1 , Susan A. Murphy 1 , AND James C. Anthony 2

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Susan A.

    Drug Use Prevention Data, Missing Assessments and Survival Analysis Jennifer M. Bacik 1 , Susan A. Murphy 1 , AND James C. Anthony 2 1 Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, 326 Thomas of interest to investigate the incidence of initial drug experimentation or other drug use milestones

  4. Computational modeling of drug distribution in the posterior segment of the eye: effects of device variables and positions.

    PubMed

    Jooybar, Elaheh; Abdekhodaie, Mohammad J; Farhadi, Fatolla; Cheng, Yu-Ling

    2014-09-01

    A computational model was developed to simulate drug distribution in the posterior segment of the eye after intravitreal injection and ocular implantation. The effects of important factors in intravitreal injection such as injection time, needle gauge and needle angle on the ocular drug distribution were studied. Also, the influences of the position and the type of implant on the concentration profile in the posterior segment were investigated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations were conducted to describe the 3D convective-diffusive transport. The geometrical model was constructed based on the human eye dimensions. To simulate intravitreal injection, unlike previous studies which considered the initial shape of the injected drug solution as a sphere or cylinder, the more accurate shape was obtained by level-set method in COMSOL. The results showed that in intravitreal injection the drug concentration profile and its maximum value depended on the injection time, needle gauge and penetration angle of the needle. Considering the actual shape of the injected solution was found necessary to obtain the real concentration profile. In implant insertion, the vitreous cavity received more drugs after intraocular implantation, but this method was more invasive compared to the periocular delivery. Locating the implant in posterior or anterior regions had a significant effect on local drug concentrations. Also, the shape of implant influenced on concentration profile inside the eye. The presented model is useful for optimizing the administration variables to ensure optimum therapeutic benefits. Predicting and quantifying different factors help to reduce the possibility of tissue toxicity and to improve the treatment efficiency. PMID:24946303

  5. Comparative Dynamics and Distribution of Influenza Drug Resistance Acquisition to Protein M2 and Neuraminidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Vanessa; Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Although efficient influenza vaccines are designed on a regular basis, the only protection of human populations against an unforeseen virus such as during the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 might be antiviral drugs. Adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors (Oseltamivir) represent two classes of such drugs that target the viral matrix protein 2 and neuraminidase, respectively. Although the emergence of resistance to both drugs has been described, the timing and spread of the acquisition of either single or dual resistances by different hosts is still unclear. Using a multilayered phylogenetic approach based on relaxed molecular clocks and large-scale maximum likelihood approaches, we show that Adamantane resistance evolved multiple times in various subtypes and hosts, possibly in breeding contexts (swine); and Oseltamivir resistance was also found in different subtypes and hosts, but its transmission is only sustained in humans. Furthermore, the dynamics of the emergence of antiviral resistance were examined for each drug. This showed that although the first mutations conferring resistance to Adamantanes precede US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, general resistance emerged 15–38 years post-drug approval. This is in contrast to Oseltamivir resistance mutations that emerged at most 7 years after FDA approval of the drug. This study demonstrates the power of large-scale analyses to uncover and monitor the emergence dynamics of drug resistance. PMID:24214415

  6. Assessing spatiotemporal patterns of multidrug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis in a South American setting

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ted

    TB) is an additional challenge for global TB control efforts. The World Health Organization estimated (MDR TB; resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin, the two most important antibiotics used againstAssessing spatiotemporal patterns of multidrug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis in a South

  7. Relevance of Campus Climate for Alcohol and Other Drug Use among LGBTQ Community College Students: A Statewide Qualitative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Patricia; Pring, Lauren; Glider, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Literature suggests that individuals who identify as LGBTQ may engage in more alcohol and other drug (AOD) use/abuse than others. Little data is available about these populations on college campuses where AOD use may be seen as part of the general campus climate and culture. This article will describe a qualitative needs assessment conducted on 10…

  8. Initial Validation of a Subtle Trauma Symptom Screening Scale Embedded in a Needs Assessment Given to Women Entering Drug Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melinda Hohman; Lori Roads; Rosalind Corbett

    2010-01-01

    Trauma-informed treatment suggests that all women entering alcohol and other drug treatment be screened for past exposure to violence and current trauma symptoms, but sometimes clients are reluctant to reveal this information. The purpose of this study was to validate a subgroup of items from a needs assessment given to women upon admission to residential substance use disorder treatment. These

  9. The assessment of renal function in relation to the use of drugs in elderly in nursing homes; a cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara Modig; Christina Lannering; Carl Johan Östgren; Sigvard Mölstad; Patrik Midlöv

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal function decreases with age. Dosage adjustment according to renal function is indicated for many drugs, in order to avoid adverse reactions of medications and\\/or aggravation of renal impairment. There are several ways to assess renal function in the elderly, but no way is ideal. The aim of the study was to explore renal function in elderly subjects in

  10. Entropy-based assessment and zoning of rainfall distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingjun; Chen, Xiaohong; Lian, Yanqing; Wu, Lili

    2013-05-01

    Rainfall distribution has become highly erratic due to climate change and intensive human activities. Hence, the estimation of rainfall distribution has an extraordinary significance in understanding the hydrological cycle and is crucial for water resources management. This paper presents a study on the large-scale spatial rainfall distribution in the Pearl River Basin of China using the information entropy theory and the fuzzy cluster analysis. The Directional Information Transfer Index (DITI) was used to describe the similarity between rainfall gaging stations, and the fuzzy cluster analysis was utilized to classify rainfall gaging stations into distribution zones with the proximity relation defined by the DITI. This research shows that the DITI integrates the rainfall feature at respective stations and the mutual influences among them. Further, the DITI-based fuzzy cluster analysis has a great advantage over the conventional pattern recognition method. Considering the unique temporal and spatial distribution characteristics, the DITI-based model combined with the fuzzy cluster analysis method provided more accurate classification of the rainfall distribution zones. Based on the monthly average rainfall data from 1959 to 2009 at 62 stations, the rainfall distribution in the Pearl River Basin is classified into 10 zones with their unique temporal and spatial distribution characteristics. The correct classification of rainfall distribution zones is crucial for the management and allocation of water resources in the Pearl River Delta to meet the increasing demand of domestic and industrial usage not only within the basin but also as a complementary source for Hong Kong.

  11. Development of an Adverse Drug Reaction Risk Assessment Score among Hospitalized Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saheb Sharif-Askari, Fatemeh; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Saheb Sharif-Askari, Narjes; Al Sayed Hussain, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent a major burden on the healthcare system. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are particularly vulnerable to ADRs because they are usually on multiple drug regimens, have multiple comorbidities, and because of alteration in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic parameters. Therefore, one step towards reducing this burden is to identify patients who are at increased risk of an ADR. Objective To develop a method of identifying CKD patients who are at increased risk for experiencing ADRs during hospitalisation. Materials and Methods Factors associated with ADRs were identified by using demographic, clinical and laboratory variables of patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 10–59 ml/min/1.73 m2) who were admitted between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, to the renal unit of Dubai Hospital. An ADR risk score was developed by constructing a series of logistic regression models. The overall model performance for sequential models was evaluated using Akaike Information Criterion for goodness of fit. Odd ratios of the variables retained in the best model were used to compute the risk scores. Results Of 512 patients (mean [SD] age, 60 [16] years), 62 (12.1%) experienced an ADR during their hospitalisation. An ADR risk score included age 65 years or more, female sex, conservatively managed end-stage renal disease, vascular disease, serum level of C-reactive protein more than 10 mg/L, serum level of albumin less than 3.5 g/dL, and the use of 8 medications or more during hospitalization. The C statistic, which assesses the ability of the risk score to predict ADRs, was 0.838; 95% CI, 0.784–0.892). Conclusion A score using routinely available patient data can be used to identify CKD patients who are at increased risk of ADRs. PMID:24755778

  12. Transmission Assessment Surveys (TAS) to Define Endpoints for Lymphatic Filariasis Mass Drug Administration: A Multicenter Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Brian K.; Deming, Michael; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Bougma, Windtaré R.; Dorkenoo, Améyo M.; El-Setouhy, Maged; Fischer, Peter U.; Gass, Katherine; Gonzalez de Peña, Manuel; Mercado-Hernandez, Leda; Kyelem, Dominique; Lammie, Patrick J.; Flueckiger, Rebecca M.; Mwingira, Upendo J.; Noordin, Rahmah; Offei Owusu, Irene; Ottesen, Eric A.; Pavluck, Alexandre; Pilotte, Nils; Rao, Ramakrishna U.; Samarasekera, Dilhani; Schmaedick, Mark A.; Settinayake, Sunil; Simonsen, Paul E.; Supali, Taniawati; Taleo, Fasihah; Torres, Melissa; Weil, Gary J.; Won, Kimberly Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA). Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached a level low enough that it cannot be sustained even in the absence of drug intervention. Guidelines advanced by WHO call for a transmission assessment survey (TAS) to determine if MDA can be stopped within an LF evaluation unit (EU) after at least five effective rounds of annual treatment. To test the value and practicality of these guidelines, a multicenter operational research trial was undertaken in 11 countries covering various geographic and epidemiological settings. Methodology The TAS was conducted twice in each EU with TAS-1 and TAS-2 approximately 24 months apart. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) formed the basis of the TAS survey design but specific EU characteristics defined the survey site (school or community), eligible population (6–7 year olds or 1st–2nd graders), survey type (systematic or cluster-sampling), target sample size, and critical cutoff (a statistically powered threshold below which transmission is expected to be no longer sustainable). The primary diagnostic tools were the immunochromatographic (ICT) test for W. bancrofti EUs and the BmR1 test (Brugia Rapid or PanLF) for Brugia spp. EUs. Principal Findings/Conclusions In 10 of 11 EUs, the number of TAS-1 positive cases was below the critical cutoff, indicating that MDA could be stopped. The same results were found in the follow-up TAS-2, therefore, confirming the previous decision outcome. Sample sizes were highly sex and age-representative and closely matched the target value after factoring in estimates of non-participation. The TAS was determined to be a practical and effective evaluation tool for stopping MDA although its validity for longer-term post-MDA surveillance requires further investigation. PMID:24340120

  13. Cortical EEG oscillations and network connectivity as efficacy indices for assessing drugs with cognition enhancing potential.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Huysmans, H; Jacobs, T; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2014-11-01

    Synchronization of electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations represents a core mechanism for cortical and subcortical networks, and disturbance in neural synchrony underlies cognitive processing deficits in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of cognition enhancers (donepezil, rivastigmine, tacrine, galantamine and memantine), which are approved for symptomatic treatment of dementia, on EEG oscillations and network connectivity in conscious rats chronically instrumented with epidural electrodes in different cortical areas. Next, EEG network indices of cognitive impairments with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine were modeled. Lastly, we examined the efficacy of cognition enhancers to normalize those aberrant oscillations. Cognition enhancers elicited systematic ("fingerprint") enhancement of cortical slow theta (4.5-6 Hz) and gamma (30.5-50 Hz) oscillations correlated with lower activity levels. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a compact cluster that corresponds to shared underlying mechanisms as compared to different drug classes. Functional network connectivity revealed consistent elevated coherent slow theta activity in parieto-occipital and between interhemispheric cortical areas. In rats instrumented with depth hippocampal CA1-CA3 electrodes, donepezil elicited similar oscillatory and coherent activities in cortico-hippocampal networks. When combined with scopolamine, the cognition enhancers attenuated the leftward shift in coherent slow delta activity. Such a consistent shift in EEG coherence into slow oscillations associated with altered slow theta and gamma oscillations may underlie cognitive deficits in scopolamine-treated animals, whereas enhanced coherent slow theta and gamma activity may be a relevant mechanism by which cognition enhancers exert their beneficial effect on plasticity and cognitive processes. The findings underscore that PCA and network connectivity are valuable tools to assess efficacy of novel therapeutic drugs with cognition enhancing potential. PMID:25181033

  14. Assessing the impact of tumor evolution on oncology drug development and commercialization

    E-print Network

    Sterk, Joseph P. (Sterk, Joseph Phillip)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the commercial viability of developing and commercializing targeted oncology drugs directed at a specific tumor mutation instead of all forms and mutations of a single target. While oncologic drugs ...

  15. Assessing the long-term impact of drug court participation on recidivism with generalized estimating equations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher P. Krebs; Christine H. Lindquist; Willem Koetse; Pamela K. Lattimore

    2007-01-01

    Drug courts are one of the most common strategies for dealing with the large proportion of criminal offenders who are drug-involved, yet methodological limitations limit the conclusions that can be drawn from many existing evaluations of their effectiveness. The current study examined the long-term impact of drug court participation compared to regular probation on the recidivism of 475 drug-involved offenders

  16. Using Stages of Change to Assess Intervention Readiness and Outcome in Modifying Drug-Related and Sexual HIV Risk Behaviors of IDUs and Crack Users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fen Rhodes; C. Kevin Malotte

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the utility of the stages-of-change model in assessing intervention readiness and measuring the outcome of targeted interventions in modifying eight drug-related and sexual risk behaviors of active drug users. Injection drug and crack cocaine users (N = 560) recruited through street outreach were administered questionnaires measuring intentions, behaviors, and beliefs pertaining to eight drug-related and sexual strategies

  17. Drug and herb induced liver injury: Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale for causality assessment

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Causality assessment of suspected drug induced liver injury (DILI) and herb induced liver injury (HILI) is hampered by the lack of a standardized approach to be used by attending physicians and at various subsequent evaluating levels. The aim of this review was to analyze the suitability of the liver specific Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale as a standard tool for causality assessment in DILI and HILI cases. PubMed database was searched for the following terms: drug induced liver injury; herb induced liver injury; DILI causality assessment; and HILI causality assessment. The strength of the CIOMS lies in its potential as a standardized scale for DILI and HILI causality assessment. Other advantages include its liver specificity and its validation for hepatotoxicity with excellent sensitivity, specificity and predictive validity, based on cases with a positive reexposure test. This scale allows prospective collection of all relevant data required for a valid causality assessment. It does not require expert knowledge in hepatotoxicity and its results may subsequently be refined. Weaknesses of the CIOMS scale include the limited exclusion of alternative causes and qualitatively graded risk factors. In conclusion, CIOMS appears to be suitable as a standard scale for attending physicians, regulatory agencies, expert panels and other scientists to provide a standardized, reproducible causality assessment in suspected DILI and HILI cases, applicable primarily at all assessing levels involved. PMID:24653791

  18. Pervasive Technology in Distributed Healthcare: Simultaneous Assessment of Multiple Individuals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamara L. Hayes; Misha Pavel; Andre Adami; Nicole Larimer; Ann Tsay

    2006-01-01

    The current paradigm of clinic-focused healthcare is challenged by growing numbers of aging baby boomers and the concomitant cost of managing chronic health conditions. We have begun investigating an alternative to clinic-based health assessments, in which pervasive technologies are used to enable continuous monitoring and assessment of patients in a variety of settings outside of hospitals. There are many outstanding

  19. Does mass drug administration for the integrated treatment of neglected tropical diseases really work? Assessing evidence for the control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Less is known about mass drug administration [MDA] for neglected tropical diseases [NTDs] than is suggested by those so vigorously promoting expansion of the approach. This paper fills an important gap: it draws upon local level research to examine the roll out of treatment for two NTDs, schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, in Uganda. Methods Ethnographic research was undertaken over a period of four years between 2005-2009 in north-west and south-east Uganda. In addition to participant observation, survey data recording self-reported take-up of drugs for schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminths and, where relevant, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis was collected from a random sample of at least 10% of households at study locations. Data recording the take-up of drugs in Ministry of Health registers for NTDs were analysed in the light of these ethnographic and social survey data. Results The comparative analysis of the take-up of drugs among adults revealed that although most long term residents have been offered treatment at least once since 2004, the actual take up of drugs for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths varies considerably from one district to another and often also within districts. The specific reasons why MDA succeeds in some locations and falters in others relates to local dynamics. Issues such as population movement across borders, changing food supply, relations between drug distributors and targeted groups, rumours and conspiracy theories about the 'real' purpose of treatment, subjective experiences of side effects from treatment, alternative understandings of affliction, responses to social control measures and historical experiences of public health control measures, can all make a huge difference. The paper highlights the need to adapt MDA to local circumstances. It also points to specific generalisable issues, notably with respect to health education, drug distribution and more effective use of existing public health legislation. Conclusion While it has been an achievement to have offered free drugs to so many adults, current standard practices of monitoring, evaluation and delivery of MDA for NTDs are inconsistent and inadequate. Efforts to integrate programmes have exacerbated the difficulties. Improved assessment of what is really happening on the ground will be an essential step in achieving long-term overall reduction of the NTD burden for impoverished communities. PMID:21211001

  20. The Effect of Antihypertensive Drugs on Endothelial Function as Assessed by Flow-Mediated Vasodilation in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Michiaki; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Ishibashi, Shun; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is found in hypertensive patients and may serve as a prognostic marker of future cardiovascular events. Endothelial function can be assessed noninvasively by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). The goal of this paper is to summarize comprehensively the clinical trials that investigated the effects of antihypertensive drugs on endothelial function assessed by FMD in hypertensive patients. A PubMed-based search found 38 clinical trial papers published from January 1999 to June 2011. Significant improvement of FMD after antihypertensive treatment was shown in 43 of 71 interventions (among 38 clinical trial papers). Angiotensin II receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors appeared to improve FMD more than other drug types. Antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD, although there are conflicting data that require further research. PMID:22489272

  1. 10 CFR 32.72 - Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of radioactive drugs containing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...abbreviation; and the quantity of radioactivity at a specified date and time. For...use instrumentation to measure the radioactivity of radioactive drugs. The licensee...measurements and calculations, the amount of radioactivity in dosages of alpha-, beta-,...

  2. 10 CFR 32.72 - Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of radioactive drugs containing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...abbreviation; and the quantity of radioactivity at a specified date and time. For...use instrumentation to measure the radioactivity of radioactive drugs. The licensee...measurements and calculations, the amount of radioactivity in dosages of alpha-, beta-,...

  3. 10 CFR 32.72 - Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of radioactive drugs containing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...abbreviation; and the quantity of radioactivity at a specified date and time. For...use instrumentation to measure the radioactivity of radioactive drugs. The licensee...measurements and calculations, the amount of radioactivity in dosages of alpha-, beta-,...

  4. 10 CFR 32.72 - Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of radioactive drugs containing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...abbreviation; and the quantity of radioactivity at a specified date and time. For...use instrumentation to measure the radioactivity of radioactive drugs. The licensee...measurements and calculations, the amount of radioactivity in dosages of alpha-, beta-,...

  5. 10 CFR 32.72 - Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of radioactive drugs containing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...abbreviation; and the quantity of radioactivity at a specified date and time. For...use instrumentation to measure the radioactivity of radioactive drugs. The licensee...measurements and calculations, the amount of radioactivity in dosages of alpha-, beta-,...

  6. Preclinical assessment of CNS drug action using eye movements in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Hugh; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The drug development process for CNS indications is hampered by a paucity of preclinical tests that accurately predict drug efficacy in humans. Here, we show that a wide variety of CNS-active drugs induce characteristic alterations in visual stimulus–induced and/or spontaneous eye movements in mice. Active compounds included sedatives and antipsychotic, antidepressant, and antiseizure drugs as well as drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, morphine, and phencyclidine. The use of quantitative eye-movement analysis was demonstrated by comparing it with the commonly used rotarod test of motor coordination and by using eye movements to monitor pharmacokinetics, blood-brain barrier penetration, drug-receptor interactions, heavy metal toxicity, pharmacologic treatment in a model of schizophrenia, and degenerative CNS disease. We conclude that eye-movement analysis could complement existing animal tests to improve preclinical drug development. PMID:21821912

  7. Assessment of surface concentrations in resorbable ocular implants: controlled drug delivery devices for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Peter J.; Gautier, Sandrine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Jallet, Valerie

    1997-05-01

    The antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-fluoro- 2,4,(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione; 5-FU) has been used to control proliferation of penetrating fibroblasts and to prevent channel closure following glaucoma filtration surgery (trabeculectomy) or laser sclerectomy. Because of the toxicity of the drug, administration of low dosages slowly over time, at the site of the desired treatment, is indicated for optimum efficacy. Repeated injections of low dosages of the drug represent an undesirable intervention and may also result in unwanted toxicity to the corneal epithelium. A suitable biocompatible and resorbable polymer matrix composed of a poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid: PLGA) has been admixed with varying amounts of 5-FU and cast as shapes suitable for intracorneal implantation. Slow biodegradation of this polymer over a one to two week period has been shown to result in an acceptably slow drug release mechanism. An issue arising during the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this drug delivery system was how best to quantify the concentration of 5-FU and its distribution spatially in the solid implant. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies distinguishes between the drug and the polymer matrix and were used to differentiate and quantitate the 5-FU concentration of the implants.

  8. Measuring topology of low-intensity DNA methylation sites for high-throughput assessment of epigenetic drug-induced effects in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gertych, Arkadiusz, E-mail: gertycha@cshs.org [Translational Cytomics Group, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States) [Translational Cytomics Group, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Bioinformatics, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Farkas, Daniel L., E-mail: dlfarkas@gmail.com [Translational Cytomics Group, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tajbakhsh, Jian, E-mail: tajbakhshj@cshs.org [Translational Cytomics Group, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Translational Cytomics Group, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Epigenetic anti-cancer drugs with demethylating effects have shown to alter genome organization in mammalian cell nuclei. The interest in the development of novel epigenetic drugs has increased the demand for cell-based assays to evaluate drug performance in pre-clinical studies. An imaging-based cytometrical approach that can measure demethylation effects as changes in the spatial nuclear distributions of methylated cytosine and global DNA in cancer cells is introduced in this paper. The cells were studied by immunofluorescence with a specific antibody against 5-methylcytosine (MeC), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) for delineation of methylated sites and global DNA in nuclei. In the preprocessing step the segmentation of nuclei in three-dimensional images (3-D) is followed by an automated assessment of nuclear DAPI/MeC patterns to exclude dissimilar entities. Next, low-intensity MeC (LIM) and low-intensity DNA (LID) sites of similar nuclei are localized and processed to obtain specific nuclear density profiles. These profiles sampled at half of the total nuclear volume yielded two parameters: LIM{sub 0.5} and LID{sub 0.5}. The analysis shows that zebularine and 5-azacytidine-the two tested epigenetic drugs introduce changes in the spatial distribution of low-intensity DNA and MeC signals. LIM{sub 0.5} and LID{sub 0.5} were significantly different (p < 0.001) in 5-azacytidine treated (n = 660) and zebularine treated (n = 496) vs. untreated (n = 649) DU145 human prostate cancer cells. In the latter case the LIM sites were predominantly found at the nuclear border, whereas treated populations showed different degrees of increase in LIMs towards the interior nuclear space, in which a large portion of heterochromatin is located. The cell-by-cell evaluation of changes in the spatial reorganization of MeC/DAPI signals revealed that zebularine is a more gentle demethylating agent than 5-azacytidine. Measuring changes in the topology of low-intensity sites can potentially be a valuable component in the high-throughput assessment of demethylation and risk of chromatin reorganization in epigenetic-drug screening tasks.

  9. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nannemann, David P; Birmingham, William R; Scism, Robert A; Bachmann, Brian O

    2011-01-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. ‘Directed evolution’ is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaigns in generating enzymes with improved catalytic parameters for new substrates from the last decade, excluding studies that aimed to select for only improved physical properties and those that lack kinetic characterization. An analysis of the trends of methodologies and their success rates from 81 qualifying examples in the literature reveals the average fold improvement for kcat (or Vmax), Km and kcat/Km to be 366-, 12- and 2548-fold, respectively, whereas the median fold improvements are 5.4, 3 and 15.6. Further analysis by enzyme class, library-generation methodology and screening methodology explores relationships between successful campaigns and the methodologies employed. PMID:21644826

  10. A criterion for assessing homogeneity distribution in hyperspectral images. Part 1: homogeneity index bases and blending processes.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Juan G; Blanco, Marcelo

    2012-11-01

    The Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) initiative of the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has established a framework for the development of imaging techniques to determine the real-time distribution of mixture components during the production of solid dosage forms. This study, which is the first in a series of two parts, uses existing mixing indices and a new criterion called the "percentage of homogeneity" (H%) to assess image homogeneity. Image analysis techniques use feature extraction procedures to extract information from images subjected to treatments including colour segmentation and binarization. The surface distribution of components was determined by macropixel analysis, which splits an image into non-overlapping blocks of a preset size and calculates several statistical parameters for the resulting divisional structure. Such parameters were used to compute mixing indices. In this work, we explored the potential of image processing in combination with mixing indices and H% for assessing blending end-point and component distribution on images. As a simplified test, an arrangement of binary and ternary systems of coloured particles was mixed collecting at-line multispectral (MSI) and non-invasive RGB pictures at preset intervals. PMID:22818029

  11. The effect of the drying temperature on the properties of wet-extruded calcium stearate pellets: Pellet microstructure, drug distribution, solid state and drug dissolution.

    PubMed

    Schrank, S; Kann, B; Saurugger, E; Hainschitz, M; Windbergs, M; Glasser, B J; Khinast, J; Roblegg, E

    2015-01-30

    Although drying is widely applied during the manufacturing of solid dosage forms, its potential effect on the product's (key) properties is often underestimated. Hence, the present study addresses drying related modifications of wet-extruded pellets comprising calcium stearate (CaSt, matrix former) and ibuprofen (model drug). After spheronization, the pellets were tray dried at different temperatures. The dried pellets were evaluated regarding their microstructure, the ibuprofen distribution, solid state modifications and the resulting in-vitro dissolution profiles. The ibuprofen distribution profiles along the pellets' cross-sections varied for the different drying conditions. The profiles turned from inhomogeneous to uniform with increasing drying temperature. Temperatures above 20°C yielded solid state modifications, including ibuprofen transition into the amorphous state and the formation of eutectic compositions. As none of the batches exhibited a high specific surface area associated with an open, well-interconnected pore system, the dissolution profiles were a function of the ibuprofen distribution. Differences in the solid state did not contribute to the dissolution behavior, since the CaSt matrix did not swell or dissolve in the dissolution medium. These findings show that drying may considerably affect the final product properties even for moderate drying conditions. PMID:25526671

  12. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power distribution and control subsystem, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPD and C hardware. The IOA product for the EPD and C analysis consisted of 1671 failure mode analysis worksheets that resulted in 468 potential critical items being identified. Comparison was made to the proposed NASA Post 51-L baseline which consisted of FMEAs and 158 CIL items. Volume 1 contains the EPD and C subsystem description, analysis results, ground rules and assumptions, and some of the IOA worksheets.

  13. Usefulness of charge-transfer complexation for the assessment of sympathomimetic drugs: Spectroscopic properties of drug ephedrine hydrochloride complexed with some ?-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Ibrahim, Omar B.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, ephedrine (Eph) assessment in food products, pharmaceutical formulations, human fluids of athletes and detection of drug toxicity and abuse, has gained a growing interest. To provide basic data that can be used to assessment of Eph quantitatively based on charge-transfer (CT) complexation, the CT complexes of Eph with 7?,8,8?-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB) or tetrabromothiophene (TBT) were synthesized and spectroscopically investigated. The newly synthesized complexes have been characterized via elemental analysis, IR, Raman, 1H NMR, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The formation constant (KCT), molar extinction coefficient (?CT) and other spectroscopic data have been determined using the Benesi-Hildebrand method and its modifications. The sharp, well-defined Bragg reflections at specific 2? angles have been identified from the powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Thermal decomposition behavior of these complexes was also studied, and their kinetic thermodynamic parameters were calculated with Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations.

  14. Monthly spatial distributed water resources assessment: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhui; Lei, Xiaohui; Liao, Weihong; Jiang, Yunzhong; Huang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jianshe; Song, Xinshan; Wang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    Water resource conservation is of utmost importance, especially for agriculture in developing countries. Frequent occurrences of water shortage have driven more social efforts in researching on water resources spatial distribution, as the land cover changes recently have shown positive influences. For the purpose of efficient water resources management, hydrological processes under different types of land covers and soil textures are supposed to be accurately analyzed and evaluated. Recently developed distributed hydrological mode (DHM) has been a strong hydro-cycle simulation tool for inferring variability and heterogeneity of water resources distribution. In this paper, a spatially distributed Water and Energy Transfer between Soil, Plants and Atmosphere under quasi Steady State (WetSpass) model was introduced in the distributed hydro-cycle simulation on upstream Han river basin. The simulation time-step of WetSpass model was modified from originally one season to currently one month. In addition, an experiential non-linear routing algorithm was integrated into WetSpass for discharge confluence. The study area was delineated into 12 upstream to downstream routing related catchments whose land covers and soil textures were investigated and illustrated. Model verification was completed through the calibration of simulated hydrograph against observation using eleven years of continuous precipitation and meteorological data. Moreover, four criteria were used to evaluate the model performance and the calibrated results of routing parameters were discussed. Furthermore, the distribution of surface runoff generation, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge were illustrated and analyzed considering the spatial heterogeneity of land cover and soil texture. Results showed that water resource spatial distribution and hydrological processes were closely related to land cover and soil texture and the model had achieved a success in hydro-cycle modeling of upstream Han river basin.

  15. Illicit Drug Use Among South Korean Offenders: Assessing the Generality of Social Learning Theory.

    PubMed

    Yun, Minwoo; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-21

    Since the mid-1990s, illicit drug use has become a problem in Korean society. This trend is likely due to the rapid globalization and expansion that occurred with the Internet revolution, which led to greater numbers of people socially learning about drug culture. The current study attempts to uncover criminogenic causality of such social learning about drug use by studying adult felony drug offenders in South Korea. The data used for the study were obtained from self-reported surveys, originally collected by the Korean Institution of Criminology (KIC). The final sample comprised 1,452 felony offenders convicted of illicit drug use, and their responses were analyzed with a set of multiple logistic regression tests. The current study found supportive evidence for the generalizability of social learning theory from the sample of the South Korean adult drug offenders. We argue that the current study provides additional empirical evidence that supports the generalizability of social learning theory. PMID:24752638

  16. Drug use assessment and risk evaluation in pregnancy--the PEGASUS-project.

    PubMed

    Irl, C; Kipferler, P; Hasford, J

    1997-10-01

    Since the thalidomide tragedy it is well accepted that drugs can have adverse effects on the unborn child. Although numerous studies show that drug use during pregnancy is widespread, there still is a serious lack of comprehensive and valid data on the risks of drug use during pregnancy. One objective of the PEGASUS-project, which focuses on Munich, is to enlarge the knowledge on embryo- and fetotoxic properties of drugs by prospectively recording information on drug exposure during pregnancy and analysing these data with regard to untoward fetal outcome. First results of PEGASUS confirm that drug utilization during pregnancy is rather common-85% of women use at least one preparation. The most frequent groups are haematologicals, minerals, iodide, and vitamins. Randomized studies have shown that periconceptional folic acid supplementation considerably reduces the risk of neural tube defects. However, only very few women in the PEGASUS-project recorded folic acid intake during the critical period or in sufficient dosage. PMID:15073753

  17. Risk assessment of distribution coefficient from 137Cs measurements.

    PubMed

    Külahci, Fatih; Sen, Zekai

    2009-02-01

    Classically distribution coefficient is defined as the ratio of solid total element concentration to surface water total concentration. This coefficient is obtained from the ion measurements in the Keban Dam, Turkey, which supplies water for domestic, irrigation and hydroelectric energy generation purposes. The measurements of 137Cs are carried out in 40 different sites and the general risk formulation and application is achieved for the distribution coefficient. The models are of exponential type and the spatial independence of the data is considered. Various charts are prepared for a set of risk levels as 5%, 10%, 20%, 25%, and 50%. PMID:18274870

  18. COMMENT ON: APPLYING SPECIES-SENSITIVITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ASSUMPTION OF DISTRIBUTION TYPE AND SUFFICIENT NUMBER OF SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newman et al. (2000) addressed some important issues regarding the characterization of species-sensitivity distributions (SSDs) used in ecological risk assessments. A common assumption is that SSDs are log-normal, and this allows data sets to be analyzed by standard parametric me...

  19. Establishment of an In Vitro Assay for Assessing the Effects of Drugs on the Liver Stages of Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Rana; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Chakiath, Chinnamma; Andrews Donkor, Lucy; Milhous, Wilbur; Barnwell, John W.; Collins, William E.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax (Pv) is the second most important human malaria parasite. Recent data indicate that the impact of Pv malaria on the health and economies of the developing world has been dramatically underestimated. Pv has a unique feature in its life cycle. Uninucleate sporozoites (spz), after invasion of human hepatocytes, either proceed to develop into tens of thousands of merozoites within the infected hepatocytes or remain as dormant forms called hypnozoites, which cause relapses of malaria months to several years after the primary infection. Elimination of malaria caused by Pv will be facilitated by developing a safe, highly effective drug that eliminates Pv liver stages, including hypnozoites. Identification and development of such a drug would be facilitated by the development of a medium to high throughput assay for screening drugs against Pv liver stages. We undertook the present pilot study to (1) assess the feasibility of producing large quantities of purified, vialed, cryopreserved Pv sporozoites and (2) establish a system for culturing the liver stages of Pv in order to assess the effects of drugs on the liver stages of Pv. We used primaquine (PQ) to establish this assay model, because PQ is the only licensed drug known to clear all Pv hepatocyte stages, including hypnozoites, and the effect of PQ on Pv hepatocyte stage development in vitro has not previously been reported. We report that we have established the capacity to reproducibly infect hepatoma cells with purified, cyropreserved Pv spz from the same lot, quantitate the primary outcome variable of infected hepatoma cells and demonstrate the inhibitory activity of primaquine on the infected hepatoma cells. We have also identified small parasite forms that may be hypnozoites. These data provide the foundation for finalizing a medium throughput, high content assay to identify new drugs for the elimination of all Pv liver stages. PMID:21151554

  20. Condition Assessment Modeling for Distribution Systems Using Shared Frailty Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Condition Assessment (CA) modeling is drawing increasing interest as a methodology for managing drinking water infrastructure. This paper develops a Cox Proportional Hazard (PH)/shared frailty model and applies it to the problem of investment in the repair and replacement of dri...

  1. 7 CFR 1230.72 - Distribution of assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...such State pursuant to the pork promotion program in existence in such State from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, had the porcine animals subject to assessment, been produced from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, and been subject to the rates...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.72 - Distribution of assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...such State pursuant to the pork promotion program in existence in such State from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, had the porcine animals subject to assessment, been produced from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, and been subject to the rates...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.72 - Distribution of assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...such State pursuant to the pork promotion program in existence in such State from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, had the porcine animals subject to assessment, been produced from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, and been subject to the rates...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.72 - Distribution of assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...such State pursuant to the pork promotion program in existence in such State from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, had the porcine animals subject to assessment, been produced from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, and been subject to the rates...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.72 - Distribution of assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...such State pursuant to the pork promotion program in existence in such State from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, had the porcine animals subject to assessment, been produced from July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1985, and been subject to the rates...

  6. ASSESSMENT AND IMPLICATIONS OF BACTERIAL REGROWTH IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two water distribution systems were studied over a 1-year period. Temporal fluctuations in a number of physical, chemical and biological parameters were examined. Total and pigmented bacterial counts, total coliforms, and fecal coliforms were determined at four locations within e...

  7. Morphology, drug distribution, and in vitro release profiles of biodegradable polymeric microspheres containing protein fabricated by double-emulsion solvent extraction\\/evaporation method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-Yan Yang; Tai-Shung Chung; Ngee Ping Ng

    2001-01-01

    The surface and internal morphology, drug distribution and release kinetics at 22°C of polyesters such as PCL (polycaprolactone) and PLGA (poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid)) 65:35 microspheres containing BSA (bovine serum albumin) have been investigated in order to understand the relationship amongst morphology, drug distribution and in vitro release profiles and to develop controlled release devices for marine fishes in tropical area. CLSM

  8. In vitro, in vivo and pharmacokinetic assessment of amikacin sulphate laden polymeric nanoparticles meant for controlled ocular drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Verma, Amita; Prajapati, Sunil Kuamr; Pandey, Himanshu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-02-01

    The rationale of current exploration was to formulate positively charged amikacin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles providing a controlled release attribute. Amikacin sulphate-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by w/o/w emulsification solvent evaporation approach succeeded by high-pressure homogenization. Two bioadhesive positively charged polymers, Eudragit® RS 100 and Eudragit® RL 100, were used in the blend, with variable ratios of drug and polymer. The formulations were assessed in terms of particle size and zeta potential. Thermal gravimetric analysis was brought out on the samples of drug, polymer and drug polymer complex. Drug loading and release attributes of the nanoparticles were scrutinized and antimicrobial activity in contrast to Staphylococcus aureus was appraised. Ocular irritation test, in vivo ocular retention study, in vivo release profile (permeation study) and in vivo antibacterial activity of polymeric nanosuspensions were executed. No rupture consequence but a lengthened drug release was contemplated from all formulations. Amikacin sulphate release from the polymeric nanoparticles reflected a better fit with Korsmeyer-Peppas model. In the course of the antibacterial activity of nanoparticles against S. aureus, formulation AE1 displays the most prominent inhibitory effect as compared with marketed formulation of amikacin sulphate.

  9. Assessing the potential impact of non-proprietary drug copies on quality of medicine and treatment in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: the experience with fingolimod

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Jorge; Chiquete, Erwin; Milojevic, Snezana; Frider, Nadina; Bajusz, Imre

    2014-01-01

    Background Fingolimod is a once-daily oral treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis, the proprietary production processes of which are tightly controlled, owing to its susceptibility to contamination by impurities, including genotoxic impurities. Many markets produce nonproprietary medicines; assessing their efficacy and safety is difficult as regulators may approve nonproprietary drugs without bioequivalence data, genotoxic evaluation, or risk management plans (RMPs). This assessment is especially important for fingolimod given its solubility/bioavailability profile, genotoxicity risk, and low-dose final product (0.5 mg). This paper presents an evaluation of the quality of proprietary and nonproprietary fingolimod variants. Methods Proprietary fingolimod was used as a reference substance against which eleven nonproprietary fingolimod copies were assessed. The microparticle size distribution of each compound was assessed by laser light diffraction, and inorganic impurity content by sulfated ash testing. Heavy metals content was quantified using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and levels of unspecified impurities by high-performance liquid chromatography. Solubility was assessed in a range of solvents at different pH values. Key information from the fingolimod RMP is also presented. Results Nonproprietary fingolimod variants exhibited properties out of proprietary or internationally accepted specifications, including differences in particle size distribution and levels of impurities such as heavy metals. For microparticle size and heavy metals, all tested fingolimod copies were out-of-specification by several-fold magnitudes. Proprietary fingolimod has a well-defined RMP, highlighting known and potential mid- to long-term safety risks, and risk-minimization and pharmacovigilance procedures. Conclusion Nonproprietary fingolimod copies produced by processes less well controlled than or altered from proprietary production processes may reduce product reproducibility and quality, potentially presenting risks to patients. Safety data and risk-minimization strategies for proprietary fingolimod may not apply to the nonproprietary fingolimod copies evaluated here. Market authorization of nonproprietary fingolimod copies should require an appropriate RMP to minimize risks to patients. PMID:25028537

  10. OBJECTIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT AND CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF ANXIETY IN ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra Ong; Sandra R. Knowles; Neil H. Shear; Karen E. Binkley

    2004-01-01

    Background A confounding factor in the diagnosis of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is the psychological state of the patient. Patients with underlying anxiety and related disorders may present with psychogenic reactions, which involve physiologic responses originating from psychological, rather than organic factors. Objective To examine the contribution of anxiety and related disorders to adverse drug events. Methods Participants from an

  11. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu (Finland)]. E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Vaehaekangas, Kirsi [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  12. Drug court implementation: An empirical assessment of court procedure on offender program completion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Scott Senjo

    2001-01-01

    Drug court program implementation is accomplished according to the principles of Therapeutic Jurisprudence theory. Procedures such as the judicial monitoring of cases are designed to assist offenders by keeping them engaged in drug treatment rather than to punish them for program noncompliance or slips in treatment. This study empirically identifies the court's consensus over Therapeutic Jurisprudence implementation practices and quantitatively

  13. Use of Recombinant Inbred Strains to Assess Vulnerability to Drug Abuse at the Genetic Level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamara J. Phillips; John K. Belknap; John C. Crabbe

    1991-01-01

    The use of Recombinant Inbred mouse Strains (RIS) to derive information about the complexity of the genetic architecture underlying various traits is increasing in popularity. Behaviors measured to index sensitivity to drug effects and vulnerability to drug abuse are considered here. Potential uses of RIS are identification of major gene effects, mapping of traits to particular chromosomal sites, determining genetic

  14. Use of three-color cDNA microarray experiments to assess the therapeutic and side effect of drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongya Zhao; Ricky N. S. Wong; Kai-Tai Fang; Patrick Y. K. Yue

    2006-01-01

    A novel microarray strategy, three-color cDNA microarray experiment, is originally applied to assess drug effects on gene expression patterns of “target disease.” By adding Alexa 594 as a dye-label for the third target sample, it is made possible to monitor changes in gene expression in response to disease and generate clues to gene function with therapeutic intervention only on one

  15. A distributed, collaborative intelligent agent system approach for proactive postmarketing drug safety surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanqing Ji; Hao Ying; Margo S. Farber; John Yen; Peter Dews; Richard E. Miller; R. Michael Massanari

    2010-01-01

    Discovering unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in postmarketing surveillance as early as possible is of great importance. The current approach to postmarketing surveillance primarily relies on spontaneous reporting. It is a passive surveillance system and limited by gross underreporting (<10% reporting rate), latency, and inconsistent reporting. We propose a novel team-based intelligent agent software system approach for proactively monitoring and

  16. Assessing a Sparse Distributed Memory Using Different Encoding Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mateus Mendes; A. Paulo Coimbra; Manuel Crisostomo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—A Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) is a kind of associative memory,suitable to work with high-dimensional vectors of random data. This mem- ory model is attractive for Robotics and Artificial In- telligence, for it is able to mimic many characteristics of the human long-term memory. However, sensorial data is not always random: most of the times it is based on the

  17. Generalized Systematic Approach to Assess Distribution System Reliability With Renewable Distributed Generators and Microgrids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Conti; R. Nicolosi; S. A. Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative generalized systematic approach and related analytical formulation to evaluate distribution system reliability in smart grids where islanded operation of microgrids helps to improve local and overall reliability. In order to do this, the analytical formulation involves the adequacy calculation of conventional and renewable distributed generators supplying microgrids by using probabilistic models. Adequacy is computed by

  18. Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in JapaneseBuildings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida,Masaru

    2005-05-25

    To meet growing energy demands, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and on-site generation coupled with effective utilization of exhaust heat will all be required. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems (or microgrids). This research investigates a method of choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at the Berkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds the optimal combination of installed equipment from available DER technologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and thermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads can be served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, and cooling. Five prototype Japanese commercial buildings are examined and DER-CAM applied to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Based on the optimization results, energy and emission reductions are evaluated. Furthermore, a Japan-U.S. comparison study of policy, technology, and utility tariffs relevant to DER installation is presented. Significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the DER-CAM results. Savings were most noticeable in the sports facility (a very favourable CHP site), followed by the hospital, hotel, and office building.

  19. Problematizing ‘drugs’: A cultural assessment of recreational pharmaceutical use among young adults in the US

    PubMed Central

    QUINTERO, GILBERT

    2013-01-01

    Recent trends in the recreational use of pharmaceuticals among young adults in the United States highlight a number of issues regarding the problematization of drugs. Two constructions of recreational pharmaceutical use are analyzed. On the one hand, categorical frameworks based upon epidemiological data are created by institutions and media and depict recreational pharmaceutical use as illicit in unqualified, absolute terms. This is done through discourses that equate nonmedical pharmaceutical use with culturally established forms of illicit drug use. On the other hand, users’ multi-dimensional constructions of recreational pharmaceutical use emphasise social context, personal experience, and individual risk perceptions. The problematization of recreational pharmaceutical use points to intergenerational conflicts, as well as to struggles over definitions of “drug abuse” and “hard drugs”, and highlights the impact of pharmaceuticalization on recreational drug use among young people. PMID:24431478

  20. A Modified Marple-Type Cascade Impactor for Assessing Aerosol Particle Size Distributions in Workplaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-Hsuan Wu; James H. Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the particle size distributions for workplace aerosols is invaluable in the assessment of aerosol-related health effects. Cascade impactors have been widely used for obtaining such information, including a small number that have been developed as personal samplers of the type that can be used for the assessment of the exposures of individual workers. Common limitations for most samplers

  1. Vertical distribution of phytoplankton communities in open ocean: An assessment based on surface chlorophyll

    E-print Network

    Claustre, Hervé

    Vertical distribution of phytoplankton communities in open ocean: An assessment based on surface. Morel, and S. B. Hooker (2006), Vertical distribution of phytoplankton communities in open ocean- ward in order to encompass the entire depth range where algae can live and grow. For instance

  2. Condition Assessment of Ferrous Water Transmission and Distribution Systems State of Technology Review Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This White Paper was developed to serve as the basis for discussion at a Technology Forum on Condition Assessment of Water Transmission and Distribution Systems that was held on September 9 and 10, 2008, at Edison, NJ. It was distributed to the Forum participants for review in a...

  3. Assessment of Distributed Generation Based on Voltage Profile Improvement and Line Loss Reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Iyer; S. Ray; R. Ramakumar

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a combined voltage profile improvement and line loss reduction index (VILRI) to assess the impact of distributed generation (DG) on a distribution system. Two different voltage profile improvement indices are employed to arrive at two alternatives for the combined index. Results of simulation studies carried out on a 33-bus radial system in MATLAB are presented and discussed.

  4. A method for the assessment of specific energy distribution in a model tumor system

    SciTech Connect

    Noska, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the calculation of dose from internally deposited alpha emitters requires a detailed analysis of the microscopic distribution of the radionuclide in order to determine the spatial distribution of energy emission events and, from this, the spatial distribution of dose. In the present study, the authors used quantitative autoradiography (QAR) to assess the microdistribution of a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment in human glioma xenografts in mice.

  5. Environmental justice, impact assessment and the politics of knowledge: The implications of assessing the social distribution of environmental outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gordon, E-mail: g.p.walker@lancaster.ac.u [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Claims of environmental injustice have increasingly become part of environmental conflicts, both explicitly through the work of environmental justice campaigning groups and implicitly through the arguments deployed about the rights and wrongs of a given situation. Such claims can centre on different notions of justice, including those concerned with questions of distribution and procedure. This paper focuses on distributional or outcome justice and explores what implications follow when the distributional concerns of environmental justice are included in the practice of impact assessment processes, including through social impact assessment (SIA). The current use of impact assessment methods in the UK is reviewed showing that although practices are evolving there is a little routine assessment of distributional inequalities. It is argued that whilst this should become part of established practice to ensure that inequalities are revealed and matters of justice are given a higher profile, the implications for conflict within decision making processes are not straightforward. On the one hand, there could be scope for conflict to be ameliorated by analysis of inequalities informing the debate between stakeholders, and facilitating the implementation of mitigation and compensation measures for disadvantaged groups. On the other hand, contestation over how evidence is produced and therefore what it shows, and disagreement as to the basis on which justice and injustice are to be determined, means that conflict may also be generated and sustained within what are essentially political and strategic settings.

  6. Assessing human vulnerability: Daytime residential distribution as a vulnerability indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokesch, Karin; Promper, Catrin; Papathoma-Köhle, Maria; Glade, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Natural hazard risk management is based on detailed information on potential impacts of natural hazards. Especially concerning fast onset hazards such as flash floods, earthquakes but also debris flows and landslides, knowing potential hotspots of impact to both, assets and human lives is essential. This information is important for emergency management and decision making in the response phase of the disaster management cycle. Emergency managers are in need of information regarding not only the number of humans being potentially affected but also the respective vulnerability of the group affected based on characteristics such as age, income, health condition, mobility, etc. regarding a certain hazard. The analysis presented focuses on the distribution of the population, assuming a certain pattern of people in a certain radius of action. The method applied is based on a regular pattern of movement of different groups of people and a pattern of presence in certain units, e.g. schools, businesses or residential buildings. The distribution is calculated on a minimum of available data including the average household size, as well as information on building types. The study area is located in the Southwest of Lower Austria, Austria. The city of Waidhofen/Ybbs can be regarded as a regional center providing basic infrastructure, shops and schools. The high concentration of buildings combining shops and residential units leads to a high damage potential throughout the whole study area. The presented results indicate the population distribution within the study area on an average working day. It is clear that explicitly high numbers of people are located in specific buildings (e.g. schools and hospitals) which also include highly vulnerable groups especially to fast onset hazards. The results provide emergency services with the information that they need in order to intervene directly where large numbers of victims or people that need to be evacuated are located. In this way, emergency services can focus and prioritize their actions in order to save lives and reduce the number of potential victims.

  7. Assessing the distribution of sedimentary C40 carotenoids through time.

    PubMed

    French, K L; Rocher, D; Zumberge, J E; Summons, R E

    2015-03-01

    A comprehensive marine biomarker record of green and purple sulfur bacteria (GSB and PSB, respectively) is required to test whether anoxygenic photosynthesis represented a greater fraction of marine primary productivity during the Precambrian than the Phanerozoic, as current models of ocean redox evolution suggest. For this purpose, we analyzed marine rock extracts and oils from the Proterozoic to the Paleogene for C40 diagenetic products of carotenoid pigments using new analytical methods. Gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry provides a new perspective on the temporal distributions of carotenoid biomarkers for phototrophic sulfur bacteria, specifically okenane, chlorobactane, and paleorenieratane. According to conventional paleoredox interpretations, this revised stratigraphic distribution of the GSB and PSB biomarkers implies that the shallow sunlit surface ocean (<24 m) became sulfidic more frequently in the geologic past than was previously thought. We reexamine whether there is evidence supporting a planktonic source of GSB and PSB pigments in marine systems or whether additional factors are required to explain the marine phototrophic sulfur bacteria record. To date, planktonic GSB and PSB and their pigments have been identified in restricted basins and lakes, but they have yet to be detected in the unrestricted, transiently sulfidic, marine systems. Based on modern observations, additional environmental factors, including basin restriction, microbial mats, or sediment transport, may be required to fully explain GSB and PSB carotenoids in the geologic record. PMID:25631735

  8. Characterisation of neutron fields: challenges in assessing the directional distribution.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    The SCK·CEN has carried out neutron field characterisation campaigns at several nuclear reactors. The main goal of these measurement campaigns was to evaluate the performance of different neutron personal dosemeters. To be able to evaluate the performance of neutron personal dosemeters in terms of Hp(10), knowledge of the directional distribution is indispensable. This distribution was estimated by placing several personal dosemeters on all six sides of a slab phantom. The interpretation and conversion of this information into a reliable value for Hp(10) requires great care. The data were analysed using three methods. In the first approach, a linear interpolation was performed on three perpendicular axes. In the other two approaches, an icosahedron was used to model the angle of incidence of the neutrons and a linear interpolation or a Bayesian analysis was performed. This study describes the limitations and advantages of each of these methods and provides recommendations for their use to estimate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) for neutron dosimetry. PMID:24966340

  9. The Valley of Death in anticancer drug development: a re-assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in our understanding of cancer biology and with it many new potential disease targets. Yet our ability to translate these advances into therapies is poor, with a failure rate approaching 90%. Much discussion has been devoted to this so-called ‘Valley of Death’ in anticancer drug development, but the problem persists. Could we have overlooked some straight-forward explanations to this highly complex problem? Important aspects of tumor physiology, drug pharmacokinetics, preclinical models, drug delivery, and clinical translation are not often emphasized and could be critical. This perspective summarizes current views on the problem and suggests feasible alternatives. PMID:22410081

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring for triazoles: A needs assessment review and recommendations from a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Laverdiere, Michel; Bow, Eric J; Rotstein, Coleman; Autmizguine, Julie; Broady, Raewyn; Garber, Gary; Haider, Shariq; Hussaini, Trana; Husain, Shahid; Ovetchkine, Philippe; Seki, Jack T; Théorêt, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients with concomitant underlying immunosuppressive diseases. The recent addition of new triazoles to the antifungal armamentarium has allowed for extended-spectrum activity and flexibility of administration. Over the years, clinical use has raised concerns about the degree of drug exposure following standard approved drug dosing, questioning the need for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Accordingly, the present guidelines focus on TDM of triazole antifungal agents. A review of the rationale for triazole TDM, the targeted patient populations and available laboratory methods, as well as practical recommendations based on current evidence from an extended literature review are provided in the present document. PMID:25587296

  11. 10 CFR 32.21 - Radioactive drug: Manufacture, preparation, or transfer for commercial distribution of capsules...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...commercial distribution of capsules containing carbon-14 urea each for âin vivoâ diagnostic...commercial distribution of capsules containing carbon-14 urea each for “in vivo” diagnostic...capsules containing 37 kBq (1 µCi) carbon-14 urea (allowing for nominal...

  12. Water distribution studies within cellulose ethers using differential scanning calorimetry. 1. Effect of polymer molecular weight and drug addition.

    PubMed

    McCrystal, C B; Ford, J L; Rajabi-Siahboomi, A R

    1999-08-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed to characterize the distribution of water in gels produced from a series of hydroxypropylmethylcelluloses (HPMC, Methocel K-series) of different molecular weights (i.e., different viscosity grades). The presence of loosely bound water was characterized as pre-endothermic events occurring at temperatures below the main melting endotherm of free water. Both the magnitude and occurrence of these pre-endothermic events were affected by polymer molecular weight and gel storage time. In addition, the amount of water bound to the polymer depended on polymer molecular weight and gel storage time. The temperature at which frozen water melted within the gels was dependent on polymer concentration, with a depression of extrapolated endothermic melting peak onset occurring with an increase in polymer concentration. The addition of propranolol hydrochloride or diclofenac sodium, as model drugs, affected both the occurrence of pre-endothermic events and the distribution of water within the gels. PMID:10430544

  13. Computational assessment of drug-induced effects on the electrocardiogram: from ion channel to body surface potentials

    PubMed Central

    Zemzemi, Nejib; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Saiz, Javier; Cooper, Jonathan; Pathmanathan, Pras; Mirams, Gary R; Pitt-Francis, Joe; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Understanding drug effects on the heart is key to safety pharmacology assessment and anti-arrhythmic therapy development. Here our goal is to demonstrate the ability of computational models to simulate the effect of drug action on the electrical activity of the heart, at the level of the ion-channel, cell, heart and ECG body surface potential. Experimental Approach We use the state-of-the-art mathematical models governing the electrical activity of the heart. A drug model is introduced using an ion channel conductance block for the hERG and fast sodium channels, depending on the IC50 value and the drug dose. We simulate the ECG measurements at the body surface and compare biomarkers under different drug actions. Key Results Introducing a 50% hERG-channel current block results in 8% prolongation of the APD90 and 6% QT interval prolongation, hERG block does not affect the QRS interval. Introducing 50% fast sodium current block prolongs the QRS and the QT intervals by 12% and 5% respectively, and delays activation times, whereas APD90 is not affected. Conclusions and Implications Both potassium and sodium blocks prolong the QT interval, but the underlying mechanism is different: for potassium it is due to APD prolongation; while for sodium it is due to a reduction of electrical wave velocity. This study shows the applicability of in silico models for the investigation of drug effects on the heart, from the ion channel to the ECG-based biomarkers. PMID:22946617

  14. Risk assessment of drug interaction potential and concomitant dosing pattern on targeted toxicities in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Patel, Dimple; Dombrowsky, Erin; Bajaj, Gaurav; Skolnik, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    This investigation evaluated the impact of potential drug interactions on the incidence of reported toxicities seen with common dosing patterns in children with cancer, with the intent of being able to screen and reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the future. Toxicity reported in pediatric cancer patients treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2004 to 2010 were abstracted from a cancer tumor registry and merged with drug order profiles from the medical record system. Analysis datasets were created in SAS and permutation algorithms were used to identify pairwise drug combinations associated with specific toxicity occurrence. Relative risk of toxicity based on dosing pattern was assessed via comparison to control patients. A total of 326 of 1,713 patients (19%) had reportable toxicities. Neutrophil count decreases and alanine aminotransferase increases represented the highest occurring, corresponding to 28.8% and 31.9% prevalence among patients reporting toxicity, respectively. Of coadministered drug pairs, acetaminophen-diphenhydramine occurred most frequently; however, methotrexate-vincristine was the highest occurring pair linked to a single toxicity (hepatotoxicity). Toxicity was highly associated with the diagnoses of leukemia (52.1%) or neuroblastoma (28.5%). Comparison of the dosing interval (?30 versus >30 min) suggested that risk of toxicity can be associated with the timing of coadministration, with ?30 min increasing the risk of hepatotoxicity with fentanyl-midazolam and methotrexate-midazolam combinations. Knowledge of drug interactions in children with cancer may help reduce the incidence of ADRs by providing pharmacotherapy options that may reduce the likelihood of toxicity. PMID:23595361

  15. Use of Toxoplasma gondii expressing beta-galactosidase for colorimetric assessment of drug activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, D C; Seeber, F; Boothroyd, J C

    1997-01-01

    A microtiter assay for drug evaluation has been developed with a strain of Toxoplasma gondii that expresses bacterial beta-galactosidase. By using chlorophenol red-beta-D-galactopyranoside (CPRG) as the substrate for beta-galactosidase, the efficacy of a drug against the parasite can be determined with a colorimetric readout. Drugs known to have activity against T. gondii (specifically, pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, atovaquone, and clindamycin) were tested, and efficacies were determined by CPRG cleavage. The 50% inhibitory concentrations determined by the CPRG-based colorimetric assay were similar to those determined by the traditional radiolabelled uracil incorporation assay. Since CPRG is nontoxic to the parasite, viable drug-treated parasites can be obtained at the conclusion of the assay for further evaluation if desired. This assay provides a high-throughput and nonradioactive alternative for the identification of anti-T. gondii compounds. PMID:9303372

  16. PRECLINICAL DRUG TRIALS IN THE mdx MOUSE: ASSESSMENT OF RELIABLE AND SENSITIVE OUTCOME MEASURES

    PubMed Central

    SPURNEY, CHRISTOPHER F.; GORDISH-DRESSMAN, HEATHER; GUERRON, ALFREDO D.; SALI, ARPANA; PANDEY, GOURI S.; RAWAT, RASHMI; VAN DER MEULEN, JACK H.; CHA, HEE-JAE; PISTILLI, EMIDIO E.; PARTRIDGE, TERENCE A.; HOFFMAN, ERIC P.; NAGARAJU, KANNEBOYINA

    2014-01-01

    The availability of animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has led to extensive preclinical research on potential therapeutics. Few studies have focused on reliability and sensitivity of endpoints for mdx mouse drug trials. Therefore, we sought to compare a wide variety of reported and novel endpoint measures in exercised mdx and normal control mice at 10, 20, and 40 weeks of age. Statistical analysis as well as power calculations for expected effect sizes in mdx preclinical drug trials across different ages showed that body weight, normalized grip strength, horizontal activity, rest time, cardiac function measurements, blood pressure, total central/peripheral nuclei per fiber, and serum creatine kinase are the most effective measurements for detecting drug-induced changes. These data provide an experimental basis upon which standardization of preclinical drug testing can be developed. PMID:19260102

  17. Assessment of ion-selective optical nanosensors for drug screening applications

    E-print Network

    Yun, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels represent an important category of drug targets. They play a significant role in numerous physiological functions, from membrane excitation and signaling to fluid absorption and secretion. An ion-channel assay ...

  18. On the Use of the Beta Distribution in Probabilistic Resource Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Olea, Ricardo A., E-mail: olea@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The triangular distribution is a popular choice when it comes to modeling bounded continuous random variables. Its wide acceptance derives mostly from its simple analytic properties and the ease with which modelers can specify its three parameters through the extremes and the mode. On the negative side, hardly any real process follows a triangular distribution, which from the outset puts at a disadvantage any model employing triangular distributions. At a time when numerical techniques such as the Monte Carlo method are displacing analytic approaches in stochastic resource assessments, easy specification remains the most attractive characteristic of the triangular distribution. The beta distribution is another continuous distribution defined within a finite interval offering wider flexibility in style of variation, thus allowing consideration of models in which the random variables closely follow the observed or expected styles of variation. Despite its more complex definition, generation of values following a beta distribution is as straightforward as generating values following a triangular distribution, leaving the selection of parameters as the main impediment to practically considering beta distributions. This contribution intends to promote the acceptance of the beta distribution by explaining its properties and offering several suggestions to facilitate the specification of its two shape parameters. In general, given the same distributional parameters, use of the beta distributions in stochastic modeling may yield significantly different results, yet better estimates, than the triangular distribution.

  19. Analysis of rapid heart rate variability in the assessment of anticholinergic drug effects in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jani Penttilä; Tom Kuusela; Harry Scheinin

    2005-01-01

    Anticholinergic agents have widespread therapeutic indications in clinical medicine. In addition, certain other drug groups–such as neuroleptics, antidepressants and antihistamines–possess distinct anticholinergic properties that reduce tolerance and compliance. Especially in patients with heart disease, attention should be paid to cardiac anticholinergic drug effects. The analysis of short-term heart rate variability (HRV) provides a noninvasive tool to estimate vagal cholinergic outflow.

  20. Variability in P-Glycoprotein Inhibitory Potency (IC50) Using Various in Vitro Experimental Systems: Implications for Universal Digoxin Drug-Drug Interaction Risk Assessment Decision Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, Joe; O’Connor, Michael P.; Bednarczyk, Dallas; Coleman, JoAnn; Lee, Caroline; Palm, Johan; Pak, Y. Anne; Perloff, Elke S.; Reyner, Eric; Balimane, Praveen; Brännström, Marie; Chu, Xiaoyan; Funk, Christoph; Guo, Ailan; Hanna, Imad; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Hillgren, Kate; Li, Libin; Hollnack-Pusch, Evelyn; Jamei, Masoud; Lin, Xuena; Mason, Andrew K.; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Patel, Aarti; Podila, Lalitha; Plise, Emile; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Salphati, Laurent; Sands, Eric; Taub, Mitchell E.; Taur, Jan-Shiang; Weitz, Dietmar; Wortelboer, Heleen M.; Xia, Cindy Q.; Xiao, Guangqing; Yabut, Jocelyn; Yamagata, Tetsuo; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    A P-glycoprotein (P-gp) IC50 working group was established with 23 participating pharmaceutical and contract research laboratories and one academic institution to assess interlaboratory variability in P-gp IC50 determinations. Each laboratory followed its in-house protocol to determine in vitro IC50 values for 16 inhibitors using four different test systems: human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2; eleven laboratories), Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (MDCKII-MDR1; six laboratories), and Lilly Laboratories Cells—Porcine Kidney Nr. 1 cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (LLC-PK1-MDR1; four laboratories), and membrane vesicles containing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp; five laboratories). For cell models, various equations to calculate remaining transport activity (e.g., efflux ratio, unidirectional flux, net-secretory-flux) were also evaluated. The difference in IC50 values for each of the inhibitors across all test systems and equations ranged from a minimum of 20- and 24-fold between lowest and highest IC50 values for sertraline and isradipine, to a maximum of 407- and 796-fold for telmisartan and verapamil, respectively. For telmisartan and verapamil, variability was greatly influenced by data from one laboratory in each case. Excluding these two data sets brings the range in IC50 values for telmisartan and verapamil down to 69- and 159-fold. The efflux ratio-based equation generally resulted in severalfold lower IC50 values compared with unidirectional or net-secretory-flux equations. Statistical analysis indicated that variability in IC50 values was mainly due to interlaboratory variability, rather than an implicit systematic difference between test systems. Potential reasons for variability are discussed and the simplest, most robust experimental design for P-gp IC50 determination proposed. The impact of these findings on drug-drug interaction risk assessment is discussed in the companion article (Ellens et al., 2013) and recommendations are provided. PMID:23620485

  1. A Review of Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease: Part 2: Issues in Assessing Drug Effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sam S. Salek; Melvyn D. Walker; Antony J. Bayer

    1998-01-01

    There are numerous methods available for assessing patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other forms of dementia. Quality-of-life (QOL) assessment is unique among these methods. The subjective nature of quality of life provides healthcare professionals with the opportunity of incorporating the value systems of patients and their carers into their assessments. A systematic review was carried out to assess the

  2. Off-label use of drugs in pain medicine and palliative care: an algorithm for the assessment of its safe and legal prescription

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Constans C. A. H. H. V. M. Verhagen; Anne G. H. Niezink; Yvonne Y Engels; Yechiel Y. A. Hekster; Joan J. Doornebal; Kris C. P. Vissers

    2008-01-01

    Off-label medication use is common practice, particularly in difficult to treat patients who have already tried commonly accepted medication unsuccessfully. Health authorities try to regulate this practice to protect the patient's safety and to prevent over consumption of new and more expensive drugs. Justified off-label drug use requires a thorough assessment. Physicians, in cooperation with formulary committees, need tools to

  3. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO METHODS AND THE IN VIVO METABOLISM OF LINDANE FOR ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF REPEATED ADMINISTRATION OF ETHANOL ON HEPATIC DRUG METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro methods of assessing alterations in drug metabolism and the measurement of lindane metabolites in urine were compared for their ability to determine the influence of ethanol on drug metabolism. Ethanol was administered to young adult female rats daily for seven days at d...

  4. BSEP inhibition: in vitro screens to assess cholestatic potential of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kis, Emese; Ioja, Enik?; Rajnai, Zsuzsa; Jani, Márton; Méhn, Dóra; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Krajcsi, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABC11) is a membrane protein that is localized in the cholesterol-rich canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Its function is to eliminate unconjugated and conjugated bile acids/salts from hepatocyte into the bile. In humans there is no compensatory mechanism for the loss of this transporter. Mutations of BSEP result in a genetic disease, called progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), that is characterized with decreased biliary bile salt secretion, leading to decreased bile flow and accumulation of bile salts inside the hepatocyte, inflicting damage. BSEP inhibitor drugs produce similar bile salt retention that may lead to severe cholestasis and liver damage. Drug-induced liver injury is a relevant clinical issue, in severe cases ending in liver transplantation. Therefore, measurement of BSEP inhibition by candidate drugs has high importance in drug discovery and development. Although several methods are suitable to detect BSEP-drug interactions, due to interspecies differences in bile acid composition, differences in hepatobiliary transporter modulation, they have limitations. This review summarizes appropriate in vitro methods that could be able to predict BSEP-drug candidate interactions in humans before the start of clinical phases. PMID:22120137

  5. Interobserver variation in assessment of gastroduodenal lesions associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, N; Everitt, S; Hawkey, C J

    1994-01-01

    Video endoscopic images were used to investigate whether gastroenterologists could agree on the definition of lesions within the stomach seen at endoscopy, with particular reference to those seen in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Seven experienced endoscopists, unaware of the patients' clinical history or drug consumption, recorded their classification for 93 randomised video images of gastric lesions. There was complete agreement in the diagnosis of ulceration for nine images from patients who were not taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; eight of nine were classified as deep ulcers, with 86% agreement for this subclassification. By contrast, the overall agreement for lesions in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was only 55%. Only nine of 44 ulcers were subclassified as deep, and there was considerable cross classification of non-haemorrhagic erosions and ulcers. In conclusion, ulcers that occur in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs differ from those in patients who are not taking these drugs in that they are often more superficial and difficult to distinguish from erosions. The prognostic importance of these lesions is, therefore, uncertain. PMID:7926900

  6. Safety assessment considerations and strategies for targeted small molecule cancer therapeutics in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Westhouse, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Less than 10% of all experimental drugs introduced into clinical trials ever achieve the approval of regulatory agencies for marketing. For experimental small molecule oncology therapeutics, the approval rate is even less (5%). Clinical safety and efficacy are the two main causes of failure for oncologic drugs in development. Because these failures of experimental drugs are tremendously expensive for pharmaceutical companies, strategies have been developed and refined for reducing this attrition. While these strategic activities can take place in drug development, more benefit may be gained by increasing efforts in drug discovery in the form of (1) target validation; (2) compound selectivity analysis from the perspective of balancing efficacy and toxicity; and (3) investigation of ancillary means to abrogate toxicity, especially with respect to undesirable target-related effects. Most pharmaceutical companies recognize the benefit of lead compound optimization, but the degree to which it is applied seems to vary greatly. This article presents concepts and strategies to reduce the attrition of small molecule oncology therapeutic drug candidates due to toxicity. PMID:19907054

  7. Noninvasive in vivo optical assessment of blood brain barrier permeability and brain tissue drug deposition in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Aysegul; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Jane; Bigio, Irving; Joshi, Shailendra

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Osmotic disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) by intraarterial mannitol injection is sometimes the key step for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to brain tissue. BBB disruption (BBBD) with mannitol, however, can be highly variable and could impact local drug deposition. We use optical pharmacokinetics, which is based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG), an optical reporter used to monitor BBBD, and mitoxantrone (MTX), a chemotherapy agent that does not deposit in brain tissue without BBBD, in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits. Results show a significant increase in the tissue ICG concentrations with BBBD, and our method is able to track the animal-to-animal variation in tissue ICG and MTX concentrations after BBBD. The tissue concentrations of MTX increase with barrier disruption and are found to be correlated to the degree of disruption, as assessed by the ICG prior to the injection of the drug. These findings should encourage the development of tracers and optical methods capable of quantifying the degree of BBBD, with the goal of improving drug delivery. PMID:22612147

  8. Noninvasive in vivo optical assessment of blood brain barrier permeability and brain tissue drug deposition in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Aysegul; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Jane; Bigio, Irving; Joshi, Shailendra

    2012-05-01

    Osmotic disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) by intraarterial mannitol injection is sometimes the key step for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to brain tissue. BBB disruption (BBBD) with mannitol, however, can be highly variable and could impact local drug deposition. We use optical pharmacokinetics, which is based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG), an optical reporter used to monitor BBBD, and mitoxantrone (MTX), a chemotherapy agent that does not deposit in brain tissue without BBBD, in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits. Results show a significant increase in the tissue ICG concentrations with BBBD, and our method is able to track the animal-to-animal variation in tissue ICG and MTX concentrations after BBBD. The tissue concentrations of MTX increase with barrier disruption and are found to be correlated to the degree of disruption, as assessed by the ICG prior to the injection of the drug. These findings should encourage the development of tracers and optical methods capable of quantifying the degree of BBBD, with the goal of improving drug delivery.

  9. Rapid Assessment Response (RAR) study: drug use, health and systemic risks—Emthonjeni Correctional Centre, Pretoria, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Correctional centre populations are one of the populations most at risk of contracting HIV infection for many reasons, such as unprotected sex, violence, rape and tattooing with contaminated equipment. Specific data on drug users in correctional centres is not available for the majority of countries, including South Africa. The study aimed to identify the attitudes and knowledge of key informant (KI) offender and correctional centre staff regarding drug use, health and systemic-related problems so as to facilitate the long-term planning of activities in the field of drug-use prevention and systems strengthening in correctional centres, including suggestions for the development of appropriate intervention and rehabilitation programmes. Method A Rapid Assessment Response (RAR) methodology was adopted which included observation, mapping of service providers (SP), KI interviews (staff and offenders) and focus groups (FGs). The study was implemented in Emthonjeni Youth Correctional Centre, Pretoria, South Africa. Fifteen KI staff participants were interviewed and 45 KI offenders. Results Drug use is fairly prevalent in the centre, with tobacco most commonly smoked, followed by cannabis and heroin. The banning of tobacco has also led to black-market features such as transactional sex, violence, gangsterism and smuggling in order to obtain mainly prohibited tobacco products, as well as illicit substances. Conclusion HIV, health and systemic-related risk reduction within the Correctional Service sector needs to focus on measures such as improvement of staff capacity and security measures, deregulation of tobacco products and the development and implementation of comprehensive health promotion programmes. PMID:24708609

  10. Hp-?-CD-Voriconazole In Situ Gelling System for Ocular Drug Delivery: In Vitro, Stability, and Antifungal Activities Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Pravin; Kashyap, Heena; Malhotra, Sakshi; Sindhu, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to design ophthalmic delivery systems based on polymeric carriers that undergo sol-to-gel transition upon change in temperature or in the presence of cations so as to prolong the effect of HP-?-CD Voriconazole (VCZ) in situ gelling formulations. The in situ gelling formulations of Voriconazole were prepared by using pluronic F-127 (PF-127) or with combination of pluronic F-68 (PF-68) and sodium alginate by cold method technique. The prepared formulations were evaluated for their physical appearance, drug content, gelation temperature (Tgel), in vitro permeation studies, rheological properties, mucoadhesion studies, antifungal studies, and stability studies. All batches of in situ formulations had satisfactory pH ranging from 6.8 to 7.4, drug content between 95% and 100%, showing uniform distribution of drug. As the concentration of each polymeric component was increased, that is, PF-68 and sodium alginate, there was a decrease in Tgel with increase in viscosity and mucoadhesive strength. The in vitro drug release decreased with increase in polymeric concentrations. The stability data concluded that all formulations showed the low degradation and maximum shelf life of 2 years. The antifungal efficiency of the selected formulation against Candida albicans and Asperigillus fumigatus confirmed that designed formulation has prolonged effect and retained its properties against fungal infection. PMID:23762839

  11. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept.

    PubMed

    Mabit, L; Bernard, C

    2007-01-01

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 ((137)Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a (137)Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of (137)Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This (137)Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R(2)=0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of (137)Cs. The spatial redistribution of (137)Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 10(7)Bq of (137)Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution. PMID:17673340

  12. GWAMAR: Genome-wide assessment of mutations associated with drug resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of drug resistance in bacteria causes antibiotic therapies to be less effective and more costly. Moreover, our understanding of the process remains incomplete. One promising approach to improve our understanding of how resistance is being acquired is to use whole-genome comparative approaches for detection of drug resistance-associated mutations. Results We present GWAMAR, a tool we have developed for detecting of drug resistance-associated mutations in bacteria through comparative analysis of whole-genome sequences. The pipeline of GWAMAR comprises several steps. First, for a set of closely related bacterial genomes, it employs eCAMBer to identify homologous gene families. Second, based on multiple alignments of the gene families, it identifies mutations among the strains of interest. Third, it calculates several statistics to identify which mutations are the most associated with drug resistance. Conclusions Based on our analysis of two large datasets retrieved from publicly available data for M. tuberculosis, we identified a set of novel putative drug resistance-associated mutations. As a part of this work, we present also an application of our tool to detect putative compensatory mutations. PMID:25559874

  13. Electrophysiologic assessment of antiarrhythmic drug efficacy for ventricular tachyarrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rae, A P; Spielman, S R; Kutalek, S P; Kay, H R; Horowitz, L N

    1987-02-01

    To determine the benefit of serial electrophysiologic drug testing in patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias related to dilated cardiomyopathy, programmed ventricular stimulation was performed in 38 patients. In the baseline study, sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) was induced in 18 patients, ventricular fibrillation in 7 and nonsustained VT in 13. The patients underwent a total of 84 trials of drug therapy (mean 2.3 +/- 1.4 trials/patient). Complete success (induction of fewer than 6 repetitive responses) was recorded in 19 trials and partial success (induction of at least 6 but no more than 15 repetitive responses) in 7. Potential proarrhythmic effects were observed in 9 trials. Overall, at least 1 successful regimen was identified for 20 patients (53%). During a mean follow-up of 21 +/- 13 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences or episodes of sudden death among patients discharged with a drug regimen determined to be effective by serial drug testing. In comparison, among patients taking regimens that failed to prevent arrhythmia induction, there were 3 arrhythmia recurrences and 2 sudden deaths (p less than 0.05). Serial electrophysiologic drug testing provides an effective method of identifying successful medical therapy for patients with ventricular arrhythmia related to dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:3544793

  14. 21 CFR 809.40 - Restrictions on the sale, distribution, and use of OTC test sample collection systems for drugs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 809.40 Section...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. (a) Over-the-counter...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing (§ 864.3260 of...

  15. 21 CFR 809.40 - Restrictions on the sale, distribution, and use of OTC test sample collection systems for drugs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 809.40 Section...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. (a) Over-the-counter...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing (§ 864.3260 of...

  16. 21 CFR 809.40 - Restrictions on the sale, distribution, and use of OTC test sample collection systems for drugs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 809.40 Section...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. (a) Over-the-counter...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing (§ 864.3260 of...

  17. 21 CFR 809.40 - Restrictions on the sale, distribution, and use of OTC test sample collection systems for drugs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 809.40 Section...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. (a) Over-the-counter...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing (§ 864.3260 of...

  18. 21 CFR 809.40 - Restrictions on the sale, distribution, and use of OTC test sample collection systems for drugs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 809.40 Section...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. (a) Over-the-counter...sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing (§ 864.3260 of...

  19. Zebrafish: an emerging technology for in vivo pharmacological assessment to identify potential safety liabilities in early drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Barros, T P; Alderton, W K; Reynolds, H M; Roach, A G; Berghmans, S

    2008-01-01

    The zebrafish is a well-established model organism used in developmental biology. In the last decade, this technology has been extended to the generation of high-value knowledge on safety risks of novel drugs. Indeed, the larval zebrafish appear to combine advantages of whole organism phenotypic assays and those (rapid production of results with minimal resource engagement) of in vitro high-throughput screening techniques. Thus, if appropriately evaluated, it can offer undeniable advantages in drug discovery for identification of target and off-target effects. Here, we review some applications of zebrafish to identify potential safety liabilities, particularly before lead/candidate selection. For instance, zebrafish cardiovascular system can be used to reveal decreases in heart rate and atrial–ventricular dissociation, which may signal human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel blockade. Another main area of interest is the CNS, where zebrafish behavioural assays have been and are further being developed into screening platforms for assessment of locomotor activity, convulsant and proconvulsant liability, cognitive impairment, drug dependence potential and impaired visual and auditory functions. Zebrafish also offer interesting possibilities for evaluating effects on bone density and gastrointestinal function. Furthermore, available knowledge of the renal system in larval zebrafish can allow identification of potential safety issues of drug candidates on this often neglected area in early development platforms. Although additional validation is certainly needed, the zebrafish is emerging as a versatile in vivo animal model to identify off-target effects that need investigation and further clarification early in the drug discovery process to reduce the current, high degree of attrition in development. PMID:18552866

  20. An assessment of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Calfee, J E

    2007-10-01

    Advertising is widely seen by economists and regulators as beneficial to markets and consumers. The prescription drug market offers exceptional opportunities for direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) to provide new-product information, improve compliance, alleviate widespread underdiagnosis and undertreatment, and motivate new-product development.5 DTCA can also induce excess or even dangerous prescribing, however, partly because patients are poorly informed and usually pay far less than the full cost of drugs. Empirical research can help resolve these issues. PMID:17851572

  1. Network Capacity Assessment of CHP-based Distributed Generation on Urban Energy Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianjun

    The combined heat and power (CHP)-based distributed generation (DG) or dis-tributed energy resources (DERs) are mature options available in the present energy market, considered to be an effective solution to promote energy efficiency. In the urban environment, the electricity, water and natural gas distribution networks are becoming increasingly interconnected with the growing penetration of the CHP-based DG. Subsequently, this emerging interdependence leads to new topics meriting serious consideration: how much of the CHP-based DG can be accommodated and where to locate these DERs, and given preexisting constraints, how to quantify the mutual impacts on operation performances between these urban energy distribution networks and the CHP-based DG. The early research work was conducted to investigate the feasibility and design methods for one residential microgrid system based on existing electricity, water and gas infrastructures of a residential community, mainly focusing on the economic planning. However, this proposed design method cannot determine the optimal DG sizing and siting for a larger test bed with the given information of energy infrastructures. In this context, a more systematic as well as generalized approach should be developed to solve these problems. In the later study, the model architecture that integrates urban electricity, water and gas distribution networks, and the CHP-based DG system was developed. The proposed approach addressed the challenge of identifying the optimal sizing and siting of the CHP-based DG on these urban energy networks and the mutual impacts on operation performances were also quantified. For this study, the overall objective is to maximize the electrical output and recovered thermal output of the CHP-based DG units. The electricity, gas, and water system models were developed individually and coupled by the developed CHP-based DG system model. The resultant integrated system model is used to constrain the DG's electrical output and recovered thermal output, which are affected by multiple factors and thus analyzed in different case studies. The results indicate that the designed typical gas system is capable of supplying sufficient natural gas for the DG normal operation, while the present water system cannot support the complete recovery of the exhaust heat from the DG units.

  2. Assessment of cytochrome P450-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of orteronel and exposure changes in patients with renal impairment using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuang; Suri, Ajit; Shyu, Wen Chyi; Prakash, Shimoga

    2014-12-01

    Orteronel is a nonsteroidal, selective inhibitor of 17,20-lyase that was recently in phase 3 clinical development as a treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer. In humans, the primary clearance route for orteronel is renal excretion. Human liver microsomal studies indicated that orteronel weakly inhibits CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9 and 2C19, with IC50 values of 17.8, 27.7, 30.8 and 38.8 µm, respectively, whereas orteronel does not inhibit CYP2B6, 2D6 or 3A4/5 (IC50 ?>?100 µm). Orteronel also does not exhibit time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 or 3A4/5. The results of a static model indicated an [I]/Ki ratio >0.1 for CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9 and 2C19. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to assess the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between orteronel and theophylline, repaglinide, (S)-warfarin and omeprazole, which are sensitive substrates of CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9 and 2C19, respectively. Simulation of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of these four CYP substrates in the presence and absence of orteronel revealed geometric mean AUC ratios <1.25. Therefore, in accordance with the 2012 US FDA Draft Guidance on DDIs, orteronel can be labeled a 'non-inhibitor' and further clinical DDI evaluation is not required. In PBPK models of moderate and severe renal impairment, the AUC of orteronel was predicted to increase by 52% and 83%, respectively. These results are in agreement with those of a clinical trial in which AUC increases of 38% and 87% were observed in patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively. PMID:25264242

  3. Assessment of stability of drug biomarkers in municipal wastewater as a factor influencing the estimation of drug consumption using sewage epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Senta, Ivan; Krizman, Ivona; Ahel, Marijan; Terzic, Senka

    2014-07-15

    Stability of the selected urinary biomarkers of six illicit drugs and two therapeutic opioids in municipal wastewater was studied in order to determine errors associated with their possible transformation in the sewer. The stability was assessed in experiments conducted at 10°C and 20°C in order to simulate typical winter and summer temperature conditions in the sewer system. Among fourteen substances tested, the most unstable compounds were morphine-3-?-D glucuronide (MG), 6-acetyl morphine (6-AM), cocaine (COC) and 6-acetyl codeine (6-AC), while all other investigated compounds appeared to be relatively stable over a period of 72 h. The transformation of all degradable compounds followed pseudo-first order kinetics with significantly longer half-times (t1/2) at winter conditions. At 20°C, t1/2 of MG, 6-AM, COC and 6-AC was 7h, 87 h, 35 h and 58 h, respectively, while the corresponding t1/2 values at 10°C were 18 h, 139 h, 173 h and 87 h. The main transformation mechanism of MG, 6-AM and 6-AC was most probably their enzymatic hydrolysis to morphine (MOR) and codeine (COD), while COC transformation to benzoylecgonine (BE) was primarily governed by chemical hydrolysis. The results indicate that the effect of the observed transformation of urinary biomarkers of COC and 6-AM on the estimates of COC and heroin consumption are relatively small (<10%) if the in-sewer hydraulic retention time is lower than 12h. Acidification of the wastewater samples proved to be the good way to stabilise the wastewater samples for the analysis of all selected compounds, except for 11-nor-9-carboxy-?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH). This finding should be taken into account when selecting the preservation technique for multiresidual analyses of different groups of illicit drugs. PMID:24411995

  4. Bioavailability assessment of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor utilizing pulsatile drug delivery system: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Taha, Ehab I

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Chronotherapy or pulsatile drug delivery system could be achieved by increasing drug plasma concentration exactly at the time of disease incidence. Cholesterol synthesis shows a circadian rhythm being high at late night and early in the morning. Simvastatin (SIM) inhibits hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is responsible for cholesterol synthesis. In this study, SIM lipid-based formulation filled in gelatin capsules and coated with aqueous Eudragit® S100 dispersion was prepared for chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The pharmacokinetic parameters of SIM capsules were studied in human volunteers after a single oral dose and compared with that of Zocor® tablets as a reference in a randomized cross-over study. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC0-?, Cmax, Tmax, t1/2 and elimination rate constant were determined from plasma concentration-time profile for both formulations. The tested formulation had the ability to delay drug absorption and provide higher drug concentrations from 3 up to 10?h after oral administration compared to that of commercial tablets. The data in this study revealed that the prepared formulation could be effective in chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, the tested formulation was found to enhance SIM bioavailability by 29% over the reference tablets. PMID:25101831

  5. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  6. Humanized mouse lines and their application for prediction of human drug metabolism and toxicological risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Connie; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are important enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, particularly clinically used drugs, and are also responsible for metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens and toxins. Many xenobiotics can activate nuclear receptors that in turn induce the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters. Marked species differences in the expression and regulation of cytochromes P450 and xenobiotic nuclear receptors exist. Thus obtaining reliable rodent models to accurately reflect human drug and carcinogen metabolism is severely limited. Humanized transgenic mice were developed in an effort to create more reliable in vivo systems to study and predict human responses to xenobiotics. Human P450s or human xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors were introduced directly or replaced the corresponding mouse gene, thus creating “humanized” transgenic mice. Mice expressing human CYP1A1/CYP1A2, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CY3A7, PXR, PPAR? were generated and characterized. These humanized mouse models offers a broad utility in the evaluation and prediction of toxicological risk that may aid in the development of safer drugs. PMID:18682571

  7. Assessing dose-region profile of drug efficacy: a multiregional trial strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hau; Wang, Mey

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we try to address the optimal dosing issue using a multiregional trial. In this trial, in addition to the treatment group using a globally promising dose of study drug, we have another treatment group using a lower dose treatment with which the drug also shows substantial treatment effect in some of the regions, and both treatment groups share the same placebo (control) group. The incorporation of an additional low-dose treatment group in the multiregional trial can provide the following advantages: (i) The multiregional trial can establish the whole treatment effect profile over different regions as well as drug doses; (ii) the multiregional trial allows for sharing drug efficacy information across different regions; and (iii) the use of a common placebo (control) group for the high- and low-dose treatment groups in the multiregional trial results in logistical convenience. We also examine the regional sample size allocation in the proposed multiregional trial for ensuring a desired power in a local region, using the Bayesian approach we proposed previously for analyzing the multiregional trial data. PMID:22946938

  8. A General Causal Model to Guide Alcohol, Tobacco, and Illicit Drug Prevention: Assessing the Research Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Johanna D.; Holder, Harold D.; Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Friend, Karen B.

    2004-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD) extract a significant health, social, and economic toll on American society. While the field of substance abuse prevention has made great strides during the past decade, two major challenges remain. First, the field has been disorganized and fragmented with respect to…

  9. Niche markets and evidence assessment in transition: a critical review of proposed drug reforms.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Shannon G; Lemmens, Trudo

    2014-01-01

    In response to rising demands and treatment costs, and the need to achieve better value for money in the face of tight fiscal constraints, both the National Health Service and the public drug reimbursement system are undergoing important reforms. Concurrently, the pharmaceutical sector itself is also alleged to be experiencing significant changes, perhaps most notably, a decline of the blockbuster model of drug development and a growing focus on niche market products. As pharmaceutical development strategies evolve and the resulting drug products become more complex, regulatory and policy responses must be able to evolve along with them. We explore how in numerous jurisdictions, including the UK, proposals for 'adaptive licensing' on the regulatory side and 'performance-based risk sharing agreements' on the funding side are shifting the focus of drug regulation and reimbursement towards more incremental access to new therapies and more post-market evidence generation. However, serious questions remain about how such reforms can be successfully implemented and whether they can balance demands for earlier access to promising new therapies with the need for robust evidence on safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24841527

  10. Rapid dynamic R1 /R2 */temperature assessment: a method with potential for monitoring drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Cyril; Oerlemans, Chris; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Ries, Mario; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Moonen, Chrit; Bos, Clemens

    2014-11-01

    Local drug delivery by hyperthermia-induced drug release from thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs) may reduce the systemic toxicity of chemotherapy, whilst maintaining or increasing its efficacy. Relaxivity contrast agents can be co-encapsulated with the drug to allow the visualization of the presence of liposomes, by means of R2 *, as well as the co-release of the contrast agent and the drug, by means of R1, on heating. Here, the mathematical method used to extract both R2 * and R1 from a fast dynamic multi-echo spoiled gradient echo (ME-SPGR) is presented and analyzed. Finally, this method is used to monitor such release events. R2 * was obtained from a fit to the ME-SPGR data. Absolute R1 was calculated from the signal magnitude changes corrected for the apparent proton density changes and a baseline Look-Locker R1 map. The method was used to monitor nearly homogeneous water bath heating and local focused ultrasound heating of muscle tissue, and to visualize the release of a gadolinium chelate from TSLs in vitro. R2 *, R1 and temperature maps were measured with a 5-s temporal resolution. Both R2 *and R1 measured were found to change with temperature. The dynamic R1 measurements after heating agreed with the Look-Locker R1 values if changes in equilibrium magnetization with temperature were considered. Release of gadolinium from TSLs was detected by an R1 increase near the phase transition temperature, as well as a shallow R2 * increase. Simultaneous temperature, R2 * and R1 mapping is feasible in real time and has the potential for use in image-guided drug delivery studies. PMID:25208052

  11. Assessment of drug-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical practice: A challenge for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Raúl J; Robles, Mercedes; Fernández-Castañer, Alejandra; López-Ortega, Susana; López-Vega, M Carmen; Lucena, M Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical preparations are serious contributors to liver disease; hepatotoxicity ranking as the most frequent cause for acute liver failure and post-commercialization regulatory decisions. The diagnosis of hepatotoxicity remains a difficult task because of the lack of reliable markers for use in general clinical practice. To incriminate any given drug in an episode of liver dysfunction is a step-by-step process that requires a high degree of suspicion, compatible chronology, awareness of the drug’s hepatotoxic potential, the exclusion of alternative causes of liver damage and the ability to detect the presence of subtle data that favors a toxic etiology. This process is time-consuming and the final result is frequently inaccurate. Diagnostic algorithms may add consistency to the diagnostic process by translating the suspicion into a quantitative score. Such scales are useful since they provide a framework that emphasizes the features that merit attention in cases of suspected hepatic adverse reaction as well. Current efforts in collecting bona fide cases of drug-induced hepatotoxicity will make refinements of existing scales feasible. It is now relatively easy to accommodate relevant data within the scoring system and to delete low-impact items. Efforts should also be directed toward the development of an abridged instrument for use in evaluating suspected drug-induced hepatotoxicity at the very beginning of the diagnosis and treatment process when clinical decisions need to be made. The instrument chosen would enable a confident diagnosis to be made on admission of the patient and treatment to be fine-tuned as further information is collected. PMID:17230599

  12. Development of Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micellar formation for docetaxel and assessment of its in vivo distribution in animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hua; Geng, Hongquan; Ruan, Jing; Wang, Kan; Bao, Chenchen; Wang, Juan; Peng, Xia; Zhang, Xueqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-04-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is a very important member of taxoid family. Despite several alternative delivery systems reported recently, DTX formulated by Polysorbate 80 and alcohol (Taxotere®) is still the most frequent administration in clinical practice. In this study, we incorporated DTX into Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles and compared its structural characteristics, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and blood compatibility with its conventional counterparts. Results showed that the mixed micelles loaded DTX possessed a mean size of approximately 13 nm with narrow size distribution and a rod-like micelle shape. In the pharmacokinetics assessment, there was no significant difference between the two preparations ( P > 0.05), which demonstrated that the DTX in the two preparations may share a similar pharmacokinetic process. However, the Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles can increase the drug residence amount of DTX in kidney, spleen, ovary and uterus, heart, and liver. The blood compatibility assessment study revealed that the mixed micelles were safe for intravenous injection. In conclusion, Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelle is safe, can improve the tumor therapeutic effects of DTX in the chosen organs, and may be a potential alternative dosage form for clinical intravenous administration of DTX.

  13. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  14. A first assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and drug-resistance patterns in twelve Caribbean territories.

    PubMed

    Millet, Julie; Baboolal, Shirematee; Streit, Elisabeth; Akpaka, Patrick E; Rastogi, Nalin

    2014-01-01

    With the exception of some French-speaking islands, data on tuberculosis (TB) in the Caribbean are scarce. In this study, we report a first assessment of genetic diversity of a convenience sample of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains received from twelve Caribbean territories by spoligotyping and describe their drug-resistance patterns. Of the 480 isolates, 40 (8.3%) isolates showed resistance to at least one anti-TB drug. The proportion of drug-resistant strains was significantly higher in The Bahamas (21.4%; P = 0.02), and Guyana (27.5%; P < 0.0001), while it was significantly lower in Jamaica (2.4%; P = 0.03) than in other countries of the present study. Regarding genetic diversity, 104 distinct spoligotype patterns were observed: 49 corresponded to clustered strains (2 to 93 strains per cluster), while 55 remained unclustered among which 16 patterns were not reported previously. Combining the study results with regional data retrieved from the international SITVIT2 database underlined a connection between frequency of certain M. tuberculosis phylogenetic lineages and the language spoken, suggesting historical (colonial) and ongoing links (trade, tourism, and migratory flows) with European countries with which they shared a common past. PMID:24795893

  15. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumatic oro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoor, P A Fazal; Rafeeq, Mohammed; Dubey, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with unpredictably recurring seizure. Uncontrolled attacks can put patients at risk of suffering oro-facial trauma. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) provide satisfactory control of seizures in most of the patients with epilepsy. However use of AED has been found to cause many side effects inclusive of side effects in the oral cavity also. Materials & Methods: This study was conducted on 150 epileptic children, who were on anti epileptic medication for one year. Results: Gingival over growth was seen as common side effect of the AED drugs. Lip and cheek biting were the most common soft tissue injury, while tooth fracture was the most common hard tissue dental injury. Conclusion: General physicians, physicians & dentists should be well aware of the potential side effects of AED. A Dentist should be well versed and trained to manage oro-facial injuries in the emergency department. How to cite the article: Ghafoor PA, Rafeeq M, Dubey A. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumaticoro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):126-8. PMID:24876713

  16. Distributive Fluvial Systems of the Chaco Plain - Satellite Image Assessment of Fluvial Form and Facies Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, G. S.; Hartley, A. J.; Scuderi, L.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Buehler, H.; Leleu, S.; Mather, A.

    2009-12-01

    Distributive fluvial systems (DFS) dominate fluvial deposition inside modern continental sedimentary basins and are particularly extensive in modern foreland basins. The largest of these DFS are found in the Chaco Plain, Andean Foreland Basin, South America. We use published literature, field and satellite data (Landsat, Modis, and SRTM) to construct preliminary hypotheses about the geomorphic form and fluvial facies distributions on the DFSs in this basin. The Pilcomayo River DFS extends over 700 km from apex to toe. The river enters the DFS apex as a large braided river with a bankfull channel width of 2500 m. Gravels and cobbles occur in terraces cut through the apex. At ~70-km downstream the bankfull channel width is ~2000 m and the channel is dominated by fine sand with cut banks 2-3 m high. The proximal channel belt is surrounded by floodplain sediments, however many sandy abandoned channel belts are present across the DFS, indicating a mobile channel system. Abandoned channels have a similar form to the modern channel, with minor reworking by underfit meandering streams. At ~75-km downfan, the river system diminishes in size (bankfull channel width up to 2 km but generally <1.5 km) and becomes increasingly sinuous in planform. This point appears to serve as a node for a series of recently abandoned meander belts and splays associated with discrete channels surrounded by floodplain material. At 100 km downstream the planform is highly sinuous and bankfull width has decreased to 1500 m or less. Downstream of this area abandoned meander belts dominate along the flanks of the modern channel with oxbow lakes present adjacent to the active channel. At 150 km downstream the bankfull channel belt width is 500 m or less and the river bifurcates into splays and multiple active channels which extend downstream for a further 200 km. Vegetation maps derived from Modis imagery indicate an increase in tree density around the DFS at this elevation (230 m). Along the distal portion of the DFS, a springline at ~150 m elevation separates the upper, well drained, aridisol dominated dry Chaco area of the DFS from the poorly drained wet Chaco at the toe. Channels below this line remain wet, are mud-dominated, and associated soils are hydromorphic. At the termination of the DFS the main Pilcomayo channel has a bankfull width of 120 m with sediments consisting of interbedded fine sand and mudstone. The observations from the Pilcomayo can serve as important analogues for the development of DFS in ancient foreland basin successions, particularly the recognition of the radial distribution of distinct facies types and the downstream changes in soil types associated with the spring line.

  17. Supporting the Loewenstein occupational therapy cognitive assessment using distributed user interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tesoriero, Ricardo; Gallud Lazaro, Jose A; Altalhi, Abdulrahman H

    2014-08-12

    Abstract Purpose: Improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from traditional Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment Battery systems to monitor the evolution of patients' rehabilitation process as well as to compare different rehabilitation therapies. Methods: The system replaces traditional artefacts with virtual versions of them to take advantage of cutting edge interaction technology. The system is defined as a Distributed User Interface (DUI) supported by a display ecosystem, including mobile devices as well as multi-touch surfaces. Due to the heterogeneity of the devices involved in the system, the software technology is based on a client-server architecture using the Web as the software platform. Results: The system provides therapists with information that is not available (or it is very difficult to gather) using traditional technologies (i.e. response time measurements, object tracking, information storage and retrieval facilities, etc.). Conclusions: The use of DUIs allows therapists to gather information that is unavailable using traditional assessment methods as well as adapt the system to patients' profile to increase the range of patients that are able to take this assessment. Implications for Rehabilitation Using a Distributed User Interface environment to carry out LOTCAs improves the quality of the information gathered during the rehabilitation assessment. This system captures physical data regarding patient's interaction during the assessment to improve the rehabilitation process analysis. Allows professionals to adapt the assessment procedure to create different versions according to patients' profile. Improves the availability of patients' profile information to therapists to adapt the assessment procedure. PMID:25113572

  18. drug discovery drug discovery

    E-print Network

    drug discovery at Purdue #12;drug discovery 2 #12;drug discovery 3 Introduction The drug discovery and innovative drug candidates to treat chronic and acute illnesses. Our researchers also continue to be invested in various approaches to drug discovery, which include understanding of drug targets for future drug

  19. Drug binding affinities and potencies are best described by a log-normal distribution and use of geometric means

    SciTech Connect

    Stanisic, D.; Hancock, A.A.; Kyncl, J.J.; Lin, C.T.; Bush, E.N.

    1986-03-05

    (-)-Norepinephrine (NE) is used as an internal standard in their in vitro adrenergic assays, and the concentration of NE which produces a half-maximal inhibition of specific radioligand binding (affinity; K/sub I/), or half-maximal contractile response (potency; ED/sub 50/) has been measured numerous times. The goodness-of-fit test for normality was performed on both normal (Gaussian) or log /sub 10/-normal frequency histograms of these data using the SAS Univariate procedure. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-prazosin to rat liver (..cap alpha../sub 1/-), /sup 3/H rauwolscine to rat cortex (..cap alpha../sub 2/-) and /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to rat ventricle (..beta../sub 1/-) or rat lung (..beta../sub 2/-receptors) was inhibited by NE; the distributions of NE K/sub I/'s at all these sites were skewed to the right, with highly significant (p < 0.01) deviations from normality. However, these data were better described by log-normal distributions. Similar results were obtained with ED/sub 50/'s of NE in isolated rabbit aorta (..cap alpha../sub 1/), phenoxybenzamine-treated dog saphenous vein (..cap alpha../sub 2/) and guinea pig atrium (..beta../sub 1/). The vasorelaxant potency of atrial natriuretic hormone in histamine-contracted rabbit aorta also was better described by a log-normal distribution, indicating that log-normalcy is probably a general phenomenon of drug-receptor interactions. Because data of this type appear to be log-normally distributed, geometric means should be used in parametric statistical analyses.

  20. Assessment of species diversity from species abundance distributions at different localities

    E-print Network

    Engen, Steinar

    by analysing similarities of communities of rare and endangered species of oak-living beetles in southAssessment of species diversity from species abundance distributions at different localities for Conservation Biology, Dept of Mathematical Sciences, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, NOÁ7491

  1. Development of Risk Assessment Methodology for Land Application and Distribution and Marketing of Municipal Sludge

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by this series include land application practices, distribution a...

  2. Study on hydraulic vulnerability and risk assessment of water distribution system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuan Zhao; Baoyu Zhuang; Guangyu Zhou; Xinhua Zhao

    2010-01-01

    The factors that impacted hydraulic vulnerability of water distribution system are discussed, and a quantitative hydraulic vulnerability and risk assessment model is presented in this paper. In this model, EPANET is employed as the hydraulic solver of water networks and Monte-Carlo stochastic simulation is incorporated for randomly generating failure scenarios of both pipes and water plants. Finally, the proposed methodology

  3. EFFECTS OF PRESSURE DEPENDENT ANALYSIS ON QUALITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF WATER DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. TABESH; A. DOLATKHAHI

    Water network performance is defined as the ability to deliver a required quantity of water under sufficient pressure and an acceptable level of quality. A sound performance indicator is a powerful tool for more efficient management of water systems. This paper introduces a methodology for performance assessment of water distribution networks based on quality parameters (such as residual chlorine, water

  4. A re-assessment of aerosol size distributions from Masaya volcano (Nicaragua)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A re-assessment of aerosol size distributions from Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) R.S. Martinab E humidity in 2010. These results indicate that aerosol emissions from a volcano can vary in ionic; Cascade impactor 1. Aerosol emissions from quiescently degassing volcanoes Active volcanoes are a major

  5. MODELING OF SPECIES GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION FOR ASSESSING PRESENT NEEDS FOR THE ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Doko; F A. Kooiman; A. G. Toxopeus

    In Japan, attention is currently focused on designing ecological networks for wildlife animals. However there is an obvious lack of the species spatial information. This study aims (a) to acquire the potential spatial distribution of Asiatic black bear and Japanese se- row to identify core areas, and (b) to propose a methodology for assessing needs for ecological networks. 1836 species'

  6. Health effects of gasoline exposure. I. Exposure assessment for U.S. distribution workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Smith; S. K. Hammond; Otto Wong

    1993-01-01

    Personal exposures were estimated for a large cohort of workers in the U.S. domestic system for distributing gasoline by trucks and marine vessels. This assessment included development of a rationale and methodology for extrapolating vapor exposures prior to the availability of measurement data, analysis of existing measurement data to estimate task and job exposures during 1975-1985, and extrapolation of truck

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OR RANGES OF STANDARD FACTORS USED IN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is intended to support EPA's Exposure Assessment Guidelines by providing data and information on standard factors that are used to calculate human exposure to toxic substances. tatistical distributions or ranges of values were developed for body weight, skin surface...

  8. USING GIS TO ASSESS URBAN TREE CANOPY BENEFITS AND SURROUNDING GREENSPACE DISTRIBUTIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark C. Dwyer; Robert W. Miller

    CITYgreen®, a geographic information system (GIS)-based program, was used to evaluate selected benefits provided by the tree canopy in the city of Stevens Point, Wisconsin. We assessed the distribution of open space in and around the greater Stevens Point area, energy savings from lowered air-conditioning costs, and the reductions in stormwater runoff as a partial function of existing tree canopy.

  9. Assessment of Student Work on Geographically Distributed Information Technology Project Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles C. Tappert; Allen Stix

    2009-01-01

    There are issues in assessing the contributions of individual students on geographically distributed student teams working on information technology projects. At Pace University we have been using real-world student projects in capstone computing courses for about ten years. While the courses were conducted in a classroom environment during the early years, the current course has been essentially online for the

  10. The World Health Organization's global strategy for prevention and assessment of HIV drug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane E Bennett; Silvia Bertagnolio; Donald Sutherland; Charles F Gilks

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV is being scaled up rapidly in resource-limited countries. Treatment options are simplified and standardized, generally with one potent first-line regimen and one potent alternate first-line regimen recommended. Widespread HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) was initially feared, but reports from resource- limited countries suggest that initial ART programmes are as effective as in resource-rich countries, which should

  11. Performance of an In-House Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genotyping System for Assessment of Drug Resistance in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays. PMID:25671421

  12. X-ray crystallography: Assessment and validation of protein-small molecule complexes for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David R.; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crystallography is the key initial component for structure-based and fragment-based drug design and can often generate leads that can be developed into high potency drugs. Therefore, huge sums of money are committed based on the outcome of crystallography experiments and their interpretation. Areas covered This review discusses how to evaluate the correctness of an X-ray structure, focusing on the validation of small molecule-protein complexes. Various types of inaccuracies found within the PDB are identified and the ramifications of these errors are discussed. The reader will gain an understanding of the key parameters that need to be inspected before a structure can be used in drug discovery efforts, as well as an appreciation of the difficulties of correctly interpreting electron density for small molecules. The reader will also be introduced to methods for validating small molecules within the context of a macromolecular structure. Expert opinion One of the reasons that ligand identification and positioning, within a macromolecular crystal structure, is so difficult is that the quality of small molecules widely varies in the PDB. For this reason, the PDB can not always be considered a reliable repository of structural information pertaining to small molecules, and this makes the derivation of general principles that govern small molecule-protein interactions more difficult. PMID:21779303

  13. Fundus pulsation measurement by laser interferometry: a noninvasive technique for the assessment of hemodynamic drug effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmetterer, Leopold F.; Wolzt, M.; Lexer, Franz; Unfried, Christian J.; Fassolt, A.; Fercher, Adolf F.; Eichler, Hans-Georg

    1995-05-01

    The pulse-synchronous pulsations of the eye fundus are measured by laser interferometry. The eye is illuminated by the beam of a single mode laser diode. The light is reflected at the front side of the cornea and the retina. The two remitted waves product interference fringes, from which the distance changes between cornea and retina can be determined. The interferometer is coupled to a fundus camera, so that fundus pulsations can be measured at preselected points on the retina with high transversal resolution. This technique was used to study the influence of phenylephrine (a peripherally vasoconstricting drug), isoproterenol (a predominantly positive inotropic drug), sodium nitroprusside (a peripherally vasocilating drug) on fundus pulsations in healthy volunteers. The effect of isoproterenol to increase pulse pressure amplitude was detectable even at low doses. Neither sodium nitroprusside nor phenylephrine had a significant influence on ocular fundus pulsations. These results show that measurement of fundus pulsations in the macula estimates the pressure pulse amplitude in choroidal vessels. Measurements of fundus pulsations at preselected points of the retina, show that fundus pulsations in the macular region are larger than in peripheral parts of the retina but smaller than in the optic disc region under baseline conditions.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the encapsulation capability of a PCL-PEO based block copolymer for hydrophobic drugs with different spatial distributions of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarthak K; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Choi, Phillip

    2010-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to study the potential of using a block copolymer containing three poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) blocks of equal length connected to one end of a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) block, designated as PEO-b-3PCL, to encapsulate two classes of hydrophobic drugs with distinctively different molecular structures. In particular, the first class of drugs consisted of two cucurbitacin drugs (CuB and CuI) that contain multiple hydrogen bond donors and acceptors evenly distributed on their molecules while the other class of drugs (fenofibrate and nimodipine) contain essentially only clustered hydrogen bond acceptors. In the case of cucurbitacin drugs, the results showed that PEO-b-3PCL lowered the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (chi) considerably (i.e., increased the drug solubility) compared to the linear di-block copolymer PEO-b-PCL with the same PCL/PEO (w/w) ratio of 1.0. However, the opposite effect was observed for fenofibrate and nimodipine. Analysis of the intermolecular interactions indicates that the number of hydrogen bonds formed between the three PCL blocks and cucurbitacin drugs is significantly higher than that of the linear di-block copolymer. On the other hand, owing to the absence of hydrogen bond donors and the clustering of the hydrogen bond acceptors on the fenofibrate and nimodipine molecules, this significantly reduces the number of hydrogen bonds formed in the multi-PCL block environment, leading to unfavourable chi values. The findings of the present work suggest that multi-hydrophobic block architecture could potentially increase the drug loading for hydrophobic drugs with structures containing evenly distributed multiple hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. PMID:19962756

  15. The NIfETy Method for Environmental Assessment of Neighborhood-level Indicators of Violence, Alcohol, and Other Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Smart, M. J.; Pokorni, J. L.; Ialongo, N. S.; Leaf, P. J.; Holder, H. D.; Anthony, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    There are limited validated quantitative assessment methods to measure features of the built and social environment that might form the basis for environmental preventive interventions. This study describes a model approach for epidemiologic assessment of suspected environmental determinants of violence, alcohol and other drug (VAOD) exposure and fills this gap in current research. The investigation sought to test the feasibility of a systematic and longitudinal assessment of residential block characteristics related to physical and social disorder and indicators of VAOD exposure. Planometric data were used to establish a stratified random sample of street segments within defined neighborhoods of an urban metropolitan area. Field rater assessments of these neighborhood street segments were conducted using the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology (NIfETy). This report provides a detailed description of the NIfETy Method, including metric properties of the NIfETy Instrument and outcomes of training procedures and quality control measures. Also presented are block-level characteristics and estimates of observable signs of VAOD activity. This work is a first step toward developing future community-level environmental preventive interventions geared to reduce community VAOD exposure among youthful urban populations and may prove to be useful to other public health research groups as well. PMID:18931911

  16. The NIfETy method for environmental assessment of neighborhood-level indicators of violence, alcohol, and other drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Furr-Holden, C D M; Smart, M J; Pokorni, J L; Ialongo, N S; Leaf, P J; Holder, H D; Anthony, J C

    2008-12-01

    There are limited validated quantitative assessment methods to measure features of the built and social environment that might form the basis for environmental preventive interventions. This study describes a model approach for epidemiologic assessment of suspected environmental determinants of violence, alcohol and other drug (VAOD) exposure and fills this gap in current research. The investigation sought to test the feasibility of a systematic and longitudinal assessment of residential block characteristics related to physical and social disorder and indicators of VAOD exposure. Planometric data were used to establish a stratified random sample of street segments within defined neighborhoods of an urban metropolitan area. Field rater assessments of these neighborhood street segments were conducted using the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology (NIfETy). This report provides a detailed description of the NIfETy Method, including metric properties of the NIfETy Instrument and outcomes of training procedures and quality control measures. Also presented are block-level characteristics and estimates of observable signs of VAOD activity. This work is a first step toward developing future community-level environmental preventive interventions geared to reduce community VAOD exposure among youthful urban populations and may prove to be useful to other public health research groups as well. PMID:18931911

  17. Distribution of nanoparticles throughout the cerebral cortex of rodents and non-human primates: Implications for gene and drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Streeter, Hillary; Dube, Nikhil; Hadaczek, Piotr; Samaranch, Lluis; Kells, Adrian P.; San Sebastian, Waldy; Zhai, Yuying; Bringas, John; Xu, Ting; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2014-01-01

    When nanoparticles/proteins are infused into the brain, they are often transported to distal sites in a manner that is dependent both on the characteristics of the infusate and the region targeted. We have previously shown that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is disseminated within the brain by perivascular flow and also by axonal transport. Perivascular distribution usually does not depend strongly on the nature of the infusate. Many proteins, neutral liposomes and AAV particles distribute equally well by this route when infused under pressure into various parenchymal locations. In contrast, axonal transport requires receptor-mediated uptake of AAV by neurons and engagement with specific transport mechanisms previously demonstrated for other neurotropic viruses. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents yet another way in which brain anatomy may be exploited to distribute nanoparticles broadly in the central nervous system. In this study, we assessed the distribution and perivascular transport of nanoparticles of different sizes delivered into the parenchyma of rodents and CSF in non-human primates. PMID:24672434

  18. The mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model: application to the assessment of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained. PMID:25866901

  19. Methods for assessment of the effect of drugs on cerebral blood flow in man.

    PubMed Central

    James, I M

    1979-01-01

    The cerebral circulation is not an unimportant vascular bed but it is difficult one to investigate. Methodological difficulties are the main reasons for the paucity of clinical pharmacology studies to date. Of the methods currently available those of the McHenry (1964) and Wyper et al. (1976) appear to be the most useful to the clinical investigator. Increasing use of multiple detectors even with inhalation techniques may give evidence of regional drug effects upon the cerebral circulation. Improvements in methodology in the last few years, particularly the development of atraumatic methods are likely to act as an important spur to research in this field. PMID:367409

  20. Three-dimensional human arterial wall models for in vitro permeability assessment of drug and nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Chetprayoon, Paninee; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Monolayers of endothelial cells (1L-ECs) have been generally used as in vitro vascular wall models to study the vascular mechanisms and transport of substances. However, these two-dimensional (2D-) system cannot represent the properties of native vascular walls which have a 3D-structure and are composed of not only ECs, but also smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and other surrounding tissues. Here in, 5-layered (5L) 3D-arterial wall models (5L-AWMs) composed of EC monolayer and 4-layered SMCs were constructed by hierarchical cell manipulation. We applied the 5L-AWMs to evaluate their barrier function and permeability to nano-materials in order to analyze drug, or drug nanocarrier permeability to the blood vessel in vitro. Barrier property of the 3D-AWMs was confirmed by Zonula occludens (ZO-1) staining and their transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), which was comparable to 1L-ECs, while the SMCs showed close to zero. The effect of substance size to permeability across the 5L-AWMs was clearly observed from dextrans with various molecular weights, which agreed well with the known phenomena of the in vivo blood vessels. Importantly, transport of nano-materials could be observed across the depth of 5L-AWMs, suggesting the advantage of 3D-AWMs over general 2D-systems. By using this system, we evaluate the transport of 35 nm phenylalanine-modified poly(?-Glutamic Acid) nanoparticles (?-PGA-Phe NPs) as a candidate of biodegradable drug carrier. Interestingly, despite of having comparable size to dextran-2000 k (28 nm), the ?-PGA-Phe NPs distinctly showed approximately 20 times faster transport across the 5L-AWMs, suggesting the effect of intrinsic properties of the substance on the transport. This in vitro evaluation system using the 3D-AWMs is therefore useful for the design and development of nano-drug carriers for treatment of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25475732

  1. Development and evaluation of an ITS1 "Touchdown" PCR for assessment of drug efficacy against animal African trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao; Napier, Grant; Rowan, Tim; Cordel, Claudia; Labuschagne, Michel; Delespaux, Vincent; Van Reet, Nick; Erasmus, Heidi; Joubert, Annesca; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-05-28

    Animal African trypanosomoses (AAT) are caused by flagellated protozoa of the Trypanosoma genus and contribute to considerable losses in animal production in Africa, Latin America and South East Asia. Trypanosoma congolense is considered the economically most important species. Drug resistant T. congolense strains present a threat to the control of AAT and have triggered research into discovery of novel trypanocides. In vivo assessment of trypanocidal efficacy relies on monitoring of treated animals with microscopic parasite detection methods. Since these methods have poor sensitivity, follow-up for up to 100 days after treatment is recommended to increase the chance of detecting recurrent parasitaemia waves. Molecular techniques are more amendable to high throughput processing and are generally more sensitive than microscopic detection, thus bearing the potential of shortening the 100-day follow up period. The study presents a "Touchdown" PCR targeting the internal transcribed spacer 1 of the ribosomal DNA (ITS1 TD PCR) that enables detection and discrimination of different Trypanosoma taxa in a single run due to variations in PCR product sizes. The assay achieves analytical sensitivity of 10 parasites per ml of blood for detection of T. congolense savannah type and T. brucei, and 100 parasites per ml of blood for detection of T. vivax in infected mouse blood. The ITS1 TD PCR was evaluated on cattle experimentally infected with T. congolense during an investigational new veterinary trypanocide drug efficacy study. ITS1 TD PCR demonstrated comparable performance to microscopy in verifying trypanocide treatment success, in which parasite DNA became undetectable in cured animals within two days post-treatment. ITS1 TD PCR detected parasite recrudescence three days earlier than microscopy and had a higher positivity rate than microscopy (84.85% versus 57.58%) in 66 specimens of relapsing animals collected after treatments. Therefore, ITS1 TD PCR provides a useful tool in assessment of drug efficacy against T. congolense infection in cattle. As the assay bears the potential for detection of mixed infections, it may be applicable for drug efficacy studies and diagnostic discrimination of T. vivax and T. congolense against other pathogenic trypanosomes, including T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum. PMID:24685024

  2. A formalism to generate probability distributions for performance-assessment modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.

    1990-12-31

    A formalism is presented for generating probability distributions of parameters used in performance-assessment modeling. The formalism is used when data are either sparse or nonexistent. The appropriate distribution is a function of the known or estimated constraints and is chosen to maximize a quantity known as Shannon`s informational entropy. The formalism is applied to a parameter used in performance-assessment modeling. The functional form of the model that defines the parameter, data from the actual field site, and natural analog data are analyzed to estimate the constraints. A beta probability distribution of the example parameter is generated after finding four constraints. As an example of how the formalism is applied to the site characterization studies of Yucca Mountain, the distribution is generated for an input parameter in a performance-assessment model currently used to estimate compliance with disposal of high-level radioactive waste in geologic repositories, 10 CFR 60.113(a)(2), commonly known as the ground water travel time criterion. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Prevention of Drug Carryover Effects in Studies Assessing Antimycobacterial Efficacy of TMC207?

    PubMed Central

    Lounis, Nacer; Gevers, Tom; Van Den Berg, Joke; Verhaeghe, Tom; van Heeswijk, Rolf; Andries, Koen

    2008-01-01

    The levels of TMC207 (R207910) that can be reached in mouse organs and the sputa of treated patients easily exceed the MIC of the compound and can therefore interfere with in vitro bacterial titrations. We studied the usefulness of protein-enriched media for the prevention of such drug carryover effects. The average MIC of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was determined on three different media: unsupplemented 7H11 agar (MIC = 0.03 ?g/ml), 7H11 agar supplemented with 5% bovine serum albumin (BSA; MIC = 1 ?g/ml), and Lowenstein-Jensen medium (MIC = 14.33 ?g/ml). In a second stage of the study, the maximal noninhibitory concentrations (MNICs) of TMC207 were determined by adding TMC207 to the bacterial inoculum rather than to the culture medium. These MNICs were 0.97 ?g/ml for 7H11 agar, 32.33 ?g/ml for 7H11 agar with 5% BSA, and 96.33 ?g/ml for Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Both protein-enriched media were able to prevent drug carryover effects, but the use of 7H11 medium supplemented with 5% BSA is preferred for practical reasons. PMID:18480227

  4. An in vitro approach to assessing a potential drug interaction between MDMA (ecstasy) and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Downey, C; Daly, F; O'Boyle, K M

    2014-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular recreational drug which causes long-term neurotoxicity and increased risk of fatality. In rats, MDMA toxicity is exacerbated by co-administration of caffeine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine altered the effects of MDMA in a battery of in vitro tests selected to model some of the known actions of MDMA in vivo. In cytotoxicity studies, caffeine modestly enhanced the effect of MDMA on neuronal N2a cell viability but not that of liver, intestinal or kidney cells. MDMA inhibited the formation of fluorescent metabolites by CYP2D6?CYP3A4>CYP1A2 but this was not altered by caffeine. Similarly, the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was not affected by the presence of caffeine. Thus, these in vitro tests failed to detect any substantial interaction between caffeine and MDMA, highlighting the difficulty of modelling in vivo drug interactions using in vitro tests. However, the results show that the inhibition of synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake by MDMA was greater at 41°C and 25°C than at 37°C which raises the possibility that MDMA's effect on SERT in vivo may be increased as body temperature increases, contributing to its harmful effects in users. PMID:24211539

  5. Just another drug? A philosophical assessment of randomised controlled studies on intercessory prayer

    PubMed Central

    Turner, D D

    2006-01-01

    The empirical results from recent randomised controlled studies on remote, intercessory prayer remain mixed. Several studies have, however, appeared in prestigious medical journals, and it is believed by many researchers, including apparent sceptics, that it makes sense to study intercessory prayer as if it were just another experimental drug treatment. This assumption is challenged by (1) discussing problems posed by the need to obtain the informed consent of patients participating in the studies; (2) pointing out that if the intercessors are indeed conscientious religious believers, they should subvert the studies by praying for patients randomised to the control groups; and (3) showing that the studies in question are characterised by an internal philosophical tension because the intercessors and the scientists must take incompatible views of what is going on: the intercessors must take a causation?first view, whereas the scientists must take a correlation?first view. It therefore makes no ethical or methodological sense to study remote, intercessory prayer as if it were just another drug. PMID:16877631

  6. Determination of the distribution of light, optical properties, drug concentration, and tissue oxygenation in-vivo in human prostate during motexafin lutetium-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy C. Zhu; Jarod C. Finlay; Stephen M. Hahn

    2005-01-01

    It is desirable to quantify the distribution of the light fluence rate, the optical properties, the drug concentration, and the tissue oxygenation for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of prostate cancer. We have developed an integrated system to determine these quantities before and after PDT treatment using motorized probes. The optical properties (absorption (?a), transport scattering (?s?), and effective attenuation (?eff) coefficients)

  7. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  8. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    of electric power systems are pushing the boundaries of reliability assessment to consider distribution-function of the mechanical condition of one renewable generator, Random variable representing the power output of a solar1 A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via

  9. Religiosity and HIV-related drug risk behavior: a multidimensional assessment of individuals from communities with high rates of drug use

    PubMed Central

    Billioux, Veena G.; Sherman, Susan G.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between religiosity and HIV-related drug risk behavior among individuals from communities with high rates of drug use who participated in the SHIELD (Self-Help in Eliminating Life Threatening Disease) study. This analysis examined the dimensions of religious ideation, religious participation and religious support separately to further understand the relationship with risk taking. Results indicate that greater religious participation appeared to be the dimension most closely associated with drug behaviors. Specifically, we found that those with greater religious participation are significantly less likely to report recent opiates or cocaine use; injection drug use; crack use; needle, cotton or cooker sharing. Future work to understand the nature of these associations will assist in the development of interventions in communities with high rates of drug use. PMID:22399161

  10. Information on new drugs at market entry: retrospective analysis of health technology assessment reports versus regulatory reports, journal publications, and registry reports

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Michael; Haag, Susanne; Biester, Katharina; Brockhaus, Anne Catharina; McGauran, Natalie; Grouven, Ulrich; Kölsch, Heike; Seay, Ulrike; Hörn, Helmut; Moritz, Gregor; Staeck, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background When a new drug becomes available, patients and doctors require information on its benefits and harms. In 2011, Germany introduced the early benefit assessment of new drugs through the act on the reform of the market for medicinal products (AMNOG). At market entry, the pharmaceutical company responsible must submit a standardised dossier containing all available evidence of the drug’s added benefit over an appropriate comparator treatment. The added benefit is mainly determined using patient relevant outcomes. The “dossier assessment” is generally performed by the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and then published online. It contains all relevant study information, including data from unpublished clinical study reports contained in the dossiers. The dossier assessment refers to the patient population for which the new drug is approved according to the summary of product characteristics. This patient population may comprise either the total populations investigated in the studies submitted to regulatory authorities in the drug approval process, or the specific subpopulations defined in the summary of product characteristics (“approved subpopulations”). Objective To determine the information gain from AMNOG documents compared with non-AMNOG documents for methods and results of studies available at market entry of new drugs. AMNOG documents comprise dossier assessments done by IQWiG and publicly available modules of company dossiers; non-AMNOG documents comprise conventional, publicly available sources—that is, European public assessment reports, journal publications, and registry reports. The analysis focused on the approved patient populations. Design Retrospective analysis. Data sources All dossier assessments conducted by IQWiG between 1 January 2011 and 28 February 2013 in which the dossiers contained suitable studies allowing for a full early benefit assessment. We also considered all European public assessment reports, journal publications, and registry reports referring to these studies and included in the dossiers. Data analysis We assessed reporting quality for each study and each available document for eight methods and 11 results items (three baseline characteristics and eight patient relevant outcomes), and dichotomised them as “completely reported” or “incompletely reported (including items not reported at all).” For each document type we calculated the proportion of items with complete reporting for methods and results, for each item and overall, and compared the findings. Results 15 out of 27 dossiers were eligible for inclusion and contained 22 studies. The 15 dossier assessments contained 28 individual assessments of 15 total study populations and 13 approved subpopulations. European public assessment reports were available for all drugs. Journal publications were available for 14 out of 15 drugs and 21 out of 22 studies. A registry report in ClinicalTrials.gov was available for all drugs and studies; however, only 11 contained results. In the analysis of total study populations, the AMNOG documents reached the highest grade of completeness, with about 90% of methods and results items completely reported. In non-AMNOG documents, the rate was 75% for methods and 52% for results items; journal publications achieved the best rates, followed by European public assessment reports and registry reports. The analysis of approved subpopulations showed poorer complete reporting of results items, particularly in non-AMNOG documents (non-AMNOG versus AMNOG: 11% v 71% for overall results items and 5% v 70% for patient relevant outcomes). The main limitation of our analysis is the small sample size. Conclusion Conventional, publicly available sources provide insufficient information on new drugs, especially on patient relevant outcomes in approved subpopulations. This type of information is largely available in AMNOG documents, albeit only partly in English. The AMNOG approach could be used internationally to dev

  11. Assessment of dopamine receptor blockade by neuroleptic drugs in the living human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Coyle, J.; Snyder, S.; Dannals, R.; LaFrance, N.; Bice, A.; Pearlson, G.; Links, J.; Paulos, M.

    1985-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) makes it possible to attempt to relate directly the antipsychotic effect of neuroleptic drugs and their blocking effect on dopamine receptors (D2) in vivo. The authors have examined the ability of haloperidol (HAL) and molindone (MOL) to block the binding of C-11 n-methylspiperone (NMSP) in 6 normal subjects. A dose of 0.05 mg/kg of HAL resulted in a 68% drop in the slope of the caudate/cerebellum (Ca/Cb) vs. time. This slope is related to the rate of specific binding of NMSP to the receptor. A dose response was seen with both drugs. With increasing doses of HAL from .05 to 0.082 mg/kg, CA/Cb vs. time slope fell from .235 to .156/min. (N=4), progressively. Similarly with increasing doses of MOL of .16-.44 mg/kg slopes decreased from .0335 to .0155/min. (N=4). Similar degrees of post injection Ca/Cb ratio were produced with quantities of MOL and HAL administered in the oral dose ratio of doses 3-5:1 times greater than HAL. This is also the dose ratio at which we found similar dopamine receptor blockade by PET in vivo. A question that arises is why the in vitro affinity of HAL for D2 is 30 times greater than that of MOL in the human brain. The results raise the possibility that MOL metabolites are not only active in blocking D2 but indeed may possibly be more potent than MOL itself. It also helps confirm the site of action of MOL and its in vivo metabolites.

  12. Comparative risk assessment of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drugs using the margin of exposure approach

    PubMed Central

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A comparative risk assessment of drugs including alcohol and tobacco using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach was conducted. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Median lethal dose values from animal experiments were used to derive the benchmark dose. The human intake was calculated for individual scenarios and population-based scenarios. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations. The benchmark dose values ranged from 2?mg/kg bodyweight for heroin to 531?mg/kg bodyweight for alcohol (ethanol). For individual exposure the four substances alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and heroin fall into the “high risk” category with MOE < 10, the rest of the compounds except THC fall into the “risk” category with MOE < 100. On a population scale, only alcohol would fall into the “high risk” category, and cigarette smoking would fall into the “risk” category, while all other agents (opiates, cocaine, amphetamine-type stimulants, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines) had MOEs > 100, and cannabis had a MOE > 10,000. The toxicological MOE approach validates epidemiological and social science-based drug ranking approaches especially in regard to the positions of alcohol and tobacco (high risk) and cannabis (low risk). PMID:25634572

  13. Analysis of drugs of abuse by online SPE-LC high resolution mass spectrometry: Communal assessment of consumption.

    PubMed

    Heuett, Nubia V; Ramirez, Cesar E; Fernandez, Adolfo; Gardinali, Piero R

    2015-04-01

    An online SPE-LC-HRMS method was developed to monitor the consumption of 18 drugs of abuse (DOAs) including amphetamines, opioids, cocainics, cannabinoids, lysergics, and their corresponding metabolites in a well characterized college campus setting via wastewater analysis. Filtered and diluted (10×) sewage water samples (5mL inj.) were automatically pre-concentrated and analyzed in 15min using a Thermo EQuan MAX online SPE system equipped with a HyperSep™ Retain PEP (20×2.1mm×12?m) SPE column and a Hypersil Gold™ aQ (150×2.1mm×3?m) analytical column. A Q Exactive™ Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap HRMS was used in full scan mode (R=140,000) for positive identification, and quantitation of target compounds. Method detection limits for all analytes ranged between 0.6 and 1.7ng/L in sewage. A total of 14 DOAs were detected from two different locations (dorms and main college campus) within a one-year period. Most frequently detected drugs throughout the entire study were amphetamine (>96%) and THC's metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-?-9-THC (>100%) with maximum concentrations of 5956 and 2413ng/L respectively. Daily doses per 1000 people were determined in order to assess consumption of THC, amphetamine, heroin and cocaine, in both dorms and main campus. PMID:25553546

  14. Comparative risk assessment of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drugs using the margin of exposure approach.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A comparative risk assessment of drugs including alcohol and tobacco using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach was conducted. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Median lethal dose values from animal experiments were used to derive the benchmark dose. The human intake was calculated for individual scenarios and population-based scenarios. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations. The benchmark dose values ranged from 2?mg/kg bodyweight for heroin to 531?mg/kg bodyweight for alcohol (ethanol). For individual exposure the four substances alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and heroin fall into the "high risk" category with MOE < 10, the rest of the compounds except THC fall into the "risk" category with MOE < 100. On a population scale, only alcohol would fall into the "high risk" category, and cigarette smoking would fall into the "risk" category, while all other agents (opiates, cocaine, amphetamine-type stimulants, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines) had MOEs > 100, and cannabis had a MOE > 10,000. The toxicological MOE approach validates epidemiological and social science-based drug ranking approaches especially in regard to the positions of alcohol and tobacco (high risk) and cannabis (low risk). PMID:25634572

  15. Assessment of multiparametric MRI in a human glioma model to monitor cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic drug effects

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, Benjamin; Christen, Thomas; Tizon, Xavier; Farion, Régine; Fondraz, Nadège; Provent, Peggy; Segebarth, Christoph; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Genne, Philippe; Duchamp, Olivier; Remy, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Early imaging or blood biomarkers of tumor response are needed to customize anti-tumor therapy, on an individual basis. This study evaluates the sensitivity and the relevance of five potential MRI biomarkers. Sixty Nude rats were implanted with human glioma cells (U-87 MG) and randomized into 3 groups: one group received an anti-angiogenic treatment (Sorafenib), a second a cytotoxic drug (BCNU) and the third group no treatment. Tumor volume, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water, blood volume fraction (BVf), microvessel diameter (VSI) and vessel wall integrity (CE) were monitored before and during treatment. Sorafenib reduced tumor contrast enhancement as early as one day after treatment onset. By four days post treatment onset, tumor BVf was reduced and tumor VSI had increased. By fourteen days after treatment onset ADC was increased and tumor growth rate was reduced. With BCNU, ADC was increased and tumor growth rate was reduced 14 days after treatment onset. Thus, estimated MRI parameters were sensitive to treatment, at different times after treatment onset and in a treatment dependent way. This study suggests that multiparametric MR monitoring could allow the assessment of new anti-tumor drugs and the optimization of combined therapies. PMID:21674650

  16. Assessment of the effects of sterilization methods on protein drug stability by elucidating decomposition mechanism and material analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Kiminami, Hideaki; Yamashita, Arisa; Abe, Yoshihiko; Yoshino, Keisuke; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2015-04-30

    The effects of different sterilization methods on the stability of highly sensitive protein drugs were assessed by elucidating mechanism involved in the process of protein decomposition. Results demonstrated that the steam sterilized syringes produced less protein oxidation compared with sterilization by the electron beam method. Electron spin resonance analysis showed that while considerably high levels of radicals were observed in the electron beam-sterilized syringes, no radicals were detected with steam sterilization. To identify the factor involved in protein oxidation, stability of the chemical composition of the syringe material was investigated using various analytical methods. Results showed that the syringe material itself was oxidized and two forms of oxidation products were identified with electron beam sterilization. Protein oxidation was shown to increase over time, and this was thought to be as a result of persistent exposure to the oxidized syringe barrel surface, which induced further protein oxidation. These results suggest that compared to electron beam sterilization, steam sterilization is a preferable method for the plastic prefilled syringe system, particularly for biopharmaceutical drug products that are highly sensitive to oxidization. PMID:25681722

  17. Assessment of soil organic carbon distribution in Europe scale by spatio-temporal data and geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Ece; Panagos, Panos; Montanarella, Luca

    2013-04-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because SOC is an important soil component that plays key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. The SOC content varies from place to place and it is strongly related with climate variables (temperature and rainfall), terrain features, soil texture, parent material, vegetation, land-use types, and human management (management and degradation) at different spatial scales. Geostatistical techniques allow for the prediction of soil properties using soil information and environmental covariates. In this study, assessment of SOC distribution has been predicted using combination of LUCAS soil samples with local soil data and ten spatio-temporal predictors (slope, aspect, elevation, CTI, CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, WRB soil classification, average temperature and precipitation) with Regression-Kriging method in Europe scale. Significant correlation between the covariates and the organic carbon dependent variable was found.

  18. Radiation safety assessment of a system of small reactors for distributed energy.

    PubMed

    Odano, N; Ishida, T

    2005-01-01

    A passively safe small reactor for a distributed energy system, PSRD, is an integral type of light-water reactor with a thermal output of 100 or 300 MW aimed to be used for supplying district heat, electricity to small grids, and so on. Candidate locations for the PSRD as a distributed energy source are on-ground, deep underground, and in a seaside pit in the vicinity of the energy consumption area. Assessments of the radiation safety of a PSRD were carried out for three cases corresponding to normal operation, shutdown and a hypothetical postulated accident for several siting candidates. Results of the radiation safety assessment indicate that the PSRD design has sufficient shielding performance and capability and that the exposure to the general public is very low in the case of a hypothetical accident. PMID:16381690

  19. Analysis of doxorubicin distribution in MCF-7 cells treated with drug-loaded nanoparticles by combination of two fluorescence-based techniques, confocal spectral imaging and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Juliette; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Chourpa, Igor; Douziech Eyrolles, Laurence

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular distribution of the antiancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was followed qualitatively by fluorescence confocal spectral imaging (FCSI) and quantitatively by capillary electrophoresis (CE). FCSI permits the localization of the major fluorescent species in cell compartments, with spectral shifts indicating the polarity of the respective environment. However, distinction between drug and metabolites by FCSI is difficult due to their similar fluorochromes, and direct quantification of their fluorescence is complicated by quantum yield variation between different subcellular environments. On the other hand, capillary electrophoresis with fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) is a quantitative method capable of separating doxorubicin and its metabolites. In this paper, we propose a method for determining drug and metabolite concentration in enriched nuclear and cytosolic fractions of cancer cells by CE-LIF, and we compare these data with those of FCSI. Significant differences in the subcellular distribution of DOX are observed between the drug administered as a molecular solution or as a suspension of drug-loaded iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol. Comparative analysis of the CE-LIF vs FCSI data may lead to a tentative calibration of this latter method in terms of DOX fluorescence quantum yields in the nucleus and more or less polar regions of the cytosol. PMID:25749791

  20. Psychosocial predictors of current drug use, drug problems, and physical drug dependence in homeless women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisha R Galaif; Adeline M Nyamathi; Judith A Stein

    1999-01-01

    We examined risk and protective factors associated with three qualitatively different drug use constructs describing a continuum of drug use among a sample of 1,179 homeless women. Relationships among positive and negative sources of social support, positive and negative coping strategies, depression, and the drug constructs of current drug use, drug problems, and physical drug dependence were assessed using structural

  1. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. PMID:25301826

  2. Distribution of Drug Resistance Genotypes in Plasmodium falciparum in an Area of Limited Parasite Diversity in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Bin Dajem, Saad M.; Al-Farsi, Hissa M.; Al-Hashami, Zainab S.; Al-Sheikh, Adel Ali H.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Babiker, Hamza A.

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and three Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Jazan area, southwest Saudi Arabia, were typed for Pfcrt, Pfmdr1, dhps, and dhfr mutations associated with resistance to chloroquine, mefloquine, halofantrine, artemisinin, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and the neutral polymorphic gene Pfg377. A large proportion (33%) of isolates harbored double mutant dhfr genotype (51I,59C,108N). However, only one isolate contained mutation dhps-437G. For Pfcrt, almost all examined isolates (163; 99%) harbored the mutant genotype (72C,73V,74I,75E,76T), whereas only 49 (31%) contained the mutant Pfmdr1 genotype (86Y,184F,1034S,1042N), 109 (66%) harbored the single mutant genotype (86N,184F,1034S,1042N), and no mutations were seen in codons 1034, 1042, and 1246. Nonetheless, three new single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected at codons 182, 192, and 102. No differences were seen in distribution of drug resistance genes among Saudis and expatriates. There was a limited multiplicity (5%), mean number of clones (1.05), and two dominant multilocus genotypes among infected individuals in Jazan. A pattern consistent with limited cross-mating and recombination among local parasite was apparent. PMID:22556074

  3. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  4. A novel QSAR model of Salmonella mutagenicity and its application in the safety assessment of drug impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, Antoni; Prous, Josep; Mora, Oscar [Prous Institute for Biomedical Research, Rambla de Catalunya, 135, 3-2, Barcelona 08008 (Spain); Sadrieh, Nakissa [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States); Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    As indicated in ICH M7 draft guidance, in silico predictive tools including statistically-based QSARs and expert analysis may be used as a computational assessment for bacterial mutagenicity for the qualification of impurities in pharmaceuticals. To address this need, we developed and validated a QSAR model to predict Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of pharmaceutical impurities using Prous Institute's Symmetry?, a new in silico solution for drug discovery and toxicity screening, and the Mold2 molecular descriptor package (FDA/NCTR). Data was sourced from public benchmark databases with known Ames assay mutagenicity outcomes for 7300 chemicals (57% mutagens). Of these data, 90% was used to train the model and the remaining 10% was set aside as a holdout set for validation. The model's applicability to drug impurities was tested using a FDA/CDER database of 951 structures, of which 94% were found within the model's applicability domain. The predictive performance of the model is acceptable for supporting regulatory decision-making with 84 ± 1% sensitivity, 81 ± 1% specificity, 83 ± 1% concordance and 79 ± 1% negative predictivity based on internal cross-validation, while the holdout dataset yielded 83% sensitivity, 77% specificity, 80% concordance and 78% negative predictivity. Given the importance of having confidence in negative predictions, an additional external validation of the model was also carried out, using marketed drugs known to be Ames-negative, and obtained 98% coverage and 81% specificity. Additionally, Ames mutagenicity data from FDA/CFSAN was used to create another data set of 1535 chemicals for external validation of the model, yielding 98% coverage, 73% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 81% concordance and 84% negative predictivity. - Highlights: • A new in silico QSAR model to predict Ames mutagenicity is described. • The model is extensively validated with chemicals from the FDA and the public domain. • Validation tests show desirable high sensitivity and high negative predictivity. • The model predicted 14 reportedly difficult to predict drug impurities with accuracy. • The model is suitable to support risk evaluation of potentially mutagenic compounds.

  5. Oral Drug Absorption

    E-print Network

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-10-26

    properties ? membrane permeability ? metabolic stability ? enzyme inhibition or induction ? protein binding ? transporter affinity ?. Chemical Optimization DDS technology 4 Strategy of Drug Delivery Absorption Distribution Metabolism Excretion Improve of drug... absorption absorption enhancement controlled releasecontrolled release new administration route Drug targeting to the tissue to the cell to the organelle Dr. Shinji Yamashita (Setsunan University) Issue: Oral Drug Absorption Dr. Valentino J. Stella...

  6. Trafficking of drug candidates relevant for sports drug testing: detection of non-approved therapeutics categorized as anabolic and gene doping agents in products distributed via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2011-05-01

    Identifying the use of non-approved drugs by cheating athletes has been a great challenge for doping control laboratories. This is due to the additional complexities associated with identifying relatively unknown and uncharacterized compounds and their metabolites as opposed to known and well-studied therapeutics. In 2010, the prohibited drug candidates and gene doping substances AICAR and GW1516, together with the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-2866 were obtained by the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory from Internet suppliers and their structure, quantity, and formulation elucidated. All three compounds proved authentic as determined by liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry and comparison to reference material. While AICAR was provided as a colourless powder in 100 mg aliquots, GW1516 was obtained as an orange/yellow suspension in water/glycerol (150 mg/ml), and MK-2866 (25 mg/ml) was shipped dissolved in polyethylene glycol (PEG) 300. In all cases, the quantified amounts were considerably lower than indicated on the label. The substances were delivered via courier, with packaging identifying them as containing 'amino acids' and 'green tea extract', arguably to circumvent customs control. Although all of the substances were declared 'for research only', their potential misuse in illicit performance-enhancement cannot be excluded; moreover sports drug testing authorities should be aware of the facile availability of black market copies of these drug candidates. PMID:21538997

  7. Thermography as potential real-time technique to assess changes in flow distribution in hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Unger, J K; Lemke, A-J; Grosse-Siestrup, C

    2006-02-01

    Flow distributions are critical determinants in the function of hemofilters. Despite their importance, however, flow distributions cannot currently be measured in filters during experimental or clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conduction properties of extracorporeal circuits may provide a tool to overcome this limitation. More specifically, we show that thermography provides an indirect approach to visualize differences in regional perfusion rates through temperature profiles on the filter surface. Thermograms were recorded using a TVS700 system (Ca. Goratec) during recirculating in vitro hemofiltration of porcine blood. Different test protocols were executed to characterize the contribution of thermal conduction and convection to the measurable changes in the temperature at the surface of the filter housing. For comparison and validation, these experiments were supplemented by computer tomography (CT) of filters after dye injection. Thermography enabled real-time visualization of the flow distributions in a hemofilter. Moreover, 'point' trends taken from different regions of the filter provided quantitative information about changes of flow distributions in response to changing experimental conditions. Our preliminary data suggest that thermography is a promising new approach for assessing the principles and time-related changes in flow distributions in hemofiltration. As expected, resolution is lower than that in CT measurements and further studies will be necessary to determine the smallest temperature gradient that still identifies differences in regional perfusion rates. Given its potential to develop into an inexpensive tool for the 'bedside' level monitoring of flow distributions during clinical studies, further investigation of thermography is highly desirable. PMID:16514434

  8. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 1: National assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [6714 Norway Road, Dallas, TX (United States); Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

  9. Assessment of size-dependent mercury distribution in King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, E.O. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Dept. of Biometry and Epidemiology; Balthis, W.L. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Dept. of Biometry and Epidemiology]|[National Marine Fisheries Service, Charleston, SC (United States). Southeast Fisheries Science Center

    1994-12-31

    The assessment of health risks from fish contamination and the issuance of advisories require accurate characterizations of the actual contaminant concentrations in fish of every relevant size. Such characterizations should not only contain statistical measures of location and variation, but provide a complete parameterization of the contaminant distribution for each given size class. This paper proposes two methods for determining such distributions from scatter diagrams of contaminant concentration versus fish length and illustrates them with an analysis of mercury contaminant in king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. The first method consists of fitting contamination data with a family of S-distributions. This family shows trends in its defining parameter values, and these trends provide a comprehensive characterization of the measured contaminant concentrations. Each S-distribution has a rather simple mathematical structure from which one readily obtains secondary characteristics like quantiles, which are necessary for advanced simulation purposes. The second method takes into account that contaminant accumulation is the outcome of a metabolic process. When this process is modeled as a system of differential equations, it can be reformulated in such a way that it describes how the contaminant distribution changes over a given period of time. The resulting distributions have a more complicated structure than those obtained with the first method, but they allow them to bridge the gap between individual metabolic accumulation processes and trends in populations.

  10. Effect of sampling and diagnostic effort on the assessment of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis and drug efficacy: a meta-analysis of six drug efficacy trials and one epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Levecke, Bruno; Brooker, Simon J; Knopp, Stefanie; Steinmann, Peter; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose Carlos; Stothard, J Russell; Utzinger, Jürg; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2014-12-01

    It is generally recommended to perform multiple stool examinations in order to improve the diagnostic accuracy when assessing the impact of mass drug administration programmes to control human intestinal worm infections and determining efficacy of the drugs administered. However, the collection and diagnostic work-up of multiple stool samples increases costs and workload. It has been hypothesized that these increased efforts provide more accurate results when infection and drug efficacy are summarized by prevalence (proportion of subjects infected) and cure rate (CR, proportion of infected subjects that become egg-negative after drug administration), respectively, but not when these indicators are expressed in terms of infection intensity and egg reduction rate (ERR). We performed a meta-analysis of six drug efficacy trials and one epidemiological survey. We compared prevalence and intensity of infection, CR and ERR based on collection of one or two stool samples that were processed with single or duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears. We found that the accuracy of prevalence estimates and CR was lowest with the minimal sampling effort, but that this was not the case for estimating infection intensity and ERR. Hence, a single Kato-Katz thick smear is sufficient for reporting infection intensity and ERR following drug treatment. PMID:24725546

  11. Soil texture distribution simulation and risk assessment using transition probability-based geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Jiabao; Wang, Weipeng; Xin, Wenwen

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional soil textural structure in a township was conditionally simulated using a transition probability- based indicator geostatistical method based on 270 soil texture samples from 27 profiles. Additionally the distribution of soil profiles lacking clay interlayers (indicating high irrigation water and nutrient leaching risk) was analyzed using 500 realizations from the simulation. The results indicated that the simulation could predict the soil texture distribution with low uncertainties using the existing data, and the predicted soil map (0-10 cm) formed by the maximum probable soil textures also exhibited a good agreement with the legacy soil survey map. For water and nutrient leaching risk analysis, the areas lacking clay interlayer could be located; however, their distribution was still highly uncertain if based only on the existing sampling data. That means supplementary sampling in future is required for the risk assessment, and the existing study can help to optimise the sampling points and their distribution. Generally, the transition probability-based geostatistical simulation, as a stochastic conditional simulation method, exhibited its potential in soil texture spatial reproduction and related risk assessment.

  12. Photochemical fate and eco-genotoxicity assessment of the drug etodolac.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Lavorgna, Margherita; Iesce, Maria Rosaria; DellaGreca, Marina; Brigante, Marcello; Criscuolo, Emma; Cermola, Flavio; Isidori, Marina

    2015-06-15

    The photochemical behavior of etodolac was investigated under various irradiation conditions. Kinetic data were obtained after irradiation of 10(-4)M aqueous solutions by UVB, UVA and direct exposure to sunlight. The Xenon lamp irradiation was used in order to determine the photodegradation quantum yield under sun-simulated condition (?sun). The value was determined to be=0.10±0.01. In order to obtain photoproducts and for mechanistic purposes, experiments were carried out on more concentrated solutions by exposure to sunlight and to UVA and UVB lamps. The drug underwent photooxidative processes following an initial oxygen addition to the double bond of the five membered ring and was mainly converted into a spiro compound and a macrolactam. Ecotoxicity tests were performed on etodolac, its photostable spiro derivative and its sunlight irradiation mixture on two different aquatic trophic levels, plants (algae) and invertebrates (rotifers and crustaceans). Mutagenesis and genotoxicity were detected on bacterial strains. The results showed that only etodolac had long term effects on rotifers although at concentrations far from environmental detection values. A mutagenic and genotoxic potential was found for its derivative. PMID:25765378

  13. Toward oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals: an assessment of the gastrointestinal stability of 17 Peptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-03-01

    A major barrier to successful oral delivery of peptide and protein molecules is their inherent instability in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to determine the stability of 17 disparate peptide drugs (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, [Arg(8)]-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [d-Ser](4)-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in gastric and small intestinal fluids from both humans and pigs, and in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. In human gastric fluid, the larger peptides including somatostatin, calcitonin, secretin, glucagon, and insulin were metabolized rapidly, while the smaller peptides showed good stability. In human small intestinal fluid, however, both small and large peptides degraded rapidly with the exception of the cyclic peptide ciclosporin and the disulfide-bridge containing peptides octreotide and desmopressin, which showed good stability. The stability of peptides in both simulated gastric fluid and pig gastric fluid correlated well with stability in human gastric fluid. However, it was not possible to establish such a correlation with the small intestinal fluids because of the rapid rate of peptide degradation. This work has identified the molecular features in the structure of a wide range of peptides that influence their stability in the environment of the gastrointestinal tract, which in turn will allow for better selection of peptide candidates for oral delivery. PMID:25612507

  14. ECG in neonate mice with spinal muscular atrophy allows assessment of drug efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; DiDonato, Christine J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular technologies have produced diverse arrays of animal models for studying genetic diseases and potential therapeutics. Many have neonatal phenotypes. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder primarily affecting children, and is of great interest in translational medicine. The most widely used SMA mouse models require all phenotyping to be performed in neonates since they do not survive much past weaning. Pre-clinical studies in neonate mice can be hindered by toxicity and a lack of quality phenotyping assays, since many assays are invalid in pups or require subjective scoring with poor inter-rater variability. We find, however, that passive electrocardiography (ECG) recording in conscious 11-day old SMA mice provides sensitive outcome measures, detecting large differences in heart rate, cardiac conduction, and autonomic control resulting from disease. We find significant drug benefits upon treatment with G418, an aminoglycoside targeting the underlying protein deficiency, even in the absence of overt effects on growth and survival. These findings provide several quantitative physiological biomarkers for SMA preclinical studies, and will be of utility to diverse disease models featuring neonatal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:25553367

  15. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  16. Drug-protein interactions assessed by fluorescence measurements in the real complexes and in model dyads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayá, Ignacio; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2010-02-01

    In the present work, a systematic fluorescence study on supramolecular systems using two serum albumins (HSA or BSA) as hosts and the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs carprofen (CPF) or naproxen (NPX) as guests has been undertaken. In parallel, model dyads containing Tyr or Trp covalently linked to CPF or NPX have also been investigated. In HSA/(S)-CPF and BSA/(S)-CPF ( ?exc = 266 nm), at 1:1 M ratio, an important degree (more than 40%) of singlet-singlet energy transfer (SSET) was observed to take place. The distance ( r) calculated for energy transfer from the SAs to (S)-CPF through a FRET mechanism was found to be ca. 21 Å. In the case of HSA/(S)-NPX and BSA/(S)-NPX, energy transfer occurred to a lower extent (ca. 7%), and r was determined as ca. 24 Å. In order to investigate the possible excited state interactions between bound ligands and the relevant amino acids present in the protein binding sites, four pairs of model dyads were designed and synthesised, namely ( S, S)-TyrCPF, ( S, R)-TyrCPF, ( S, S)-TrpCPF, ( S, R)-TrpCPF, ( S, S)-TyrNPX, ( S, R)-TyrNPX, ( S, S)-TrpNPX and ( S, R)-TrpNPX. A complete SSET was observed from Tyr or Trp to CPF, since no contribution from the amino acids was present in the emission of the dyads. Likewise, a very efficient Tyr or Trp to NPX energy transfer was observed. Remarkably, in ( S, S)-TrpNPX and ( S, R)-TrpNPX a configuration-dependent reduction in the emission intensity was observed, revealing a strong and stereoselective intramolecular quenching. This effect can be attributed to exciplex formation and is dynamic in nature, as the fluorescence lifetimes were much shorter in ( S, R)- and ( S, S)-TrpNPX (1.5 and 3.1 ns, respectively) than in (S)-NPX (11 ns).

  17. Gold nanoprobes for multi loci assessment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis, still one of the leading human infectious diseases, reported 8.7 million new cases in 2011 alone. Also, the increasing rate of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) and its treatment difficulties pose a serious public health threat especially in developing countries. Resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, first line antibiotics, is commonly associated with point mutations in katG, inhA and rpoB genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Therefore, the development of cheap, fast and simple molecular methods to assess susceptibility profiles would have a huge impact in the capacity of early diagnosis and treatment of MDRTB. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiol-modified oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) have shown the potential to provide a rapid and sensitive detection method for MTBC and single base mutations associated with antibiotic resistance, namely the characterization of the three most relevant codons in rpoB gene associated to rifampicin resistance. Here we extend the Au-nanoprobe approach towards discriminating specific mutations within inhA and rpoB genes in PCR amplified DNA from isolates. Using a multiplex PCR reaction for these two genes, it is possible to assess both loci in parallel, and extend the potential of the Au-nanoprobe method to MDRTB molecular characterization with special application in the most frequent Portuguese genotypes. PMID:24461544

  18. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  19. Schistosomiais and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Control in Niger: Cost Effectiveness of School Based and Community Distributed Mass Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jacqueline; Garba, Amadou; Oliva, Elisa Bosque; Barkire, Arouna; Tinni, Amadou Aboubacar; Djibo, Ali; Mounkaila, Idrissa; Fenwick, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2004 Niger established a large scale schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths control programme targeting children aged 5–14 years and adults. In two years 4.3 million treatments were delivered in 40 districts using school based and community distribution. Method and Findings Four districts were surveyed in 2006 to estimate the economic cost per district, per treatment and per schistosomiasis infection averted. The study compares the costs of treatment at start up and in a subsequent year, identifies the allocation of costs by activity, input and organisation, and assesses the cost of treatment. The cost of delivery provided by teachers is compared to cost of delivery by community distributers (CDD). The total economic cost of the programme including programmatic, national and local government costs and international support in four study districts, over two years, was US$ 456,718; an economic cost/treatment of $0.58. The full economic delivery cost of school based treatment in 2005/06 was $0.76, and for community distribution was $0.46. Including only the programme costs the figures are $0.47 and $0.41 respectively. Differences at sub-district are more marked. This is partly explained by the fact that a CDD treats 5.8 people for every one treated in school. The range in cost effectiveness for both direct and direct and indirect treatments is quantified and the need to develop and refine such estimates is emphasised. Conclusions The relative cost effectiveness of school and community delivery differs by country according to the composition of the population treated, the numbers targeted and treated at school and in the community, the cost and frequency of training teachers and CDDs. Options analysis of technical and implementation alternatives including a financial analysis should form part of the programme design process. PMID:22022622

  20. The cumulative plot of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability assesses the kinetics of action of cholinergic drugs in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Perlstein; A. Hoffman

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and its response to drug action is presented. The authors' approach is based on using a cumulative plot of data obtained by power spectral analysis (PSA) of heart rate variability (HRV), in defined frequency bands, during short time epochs in rats. The substantial temporal variability in power evolving from the

  1. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles.

    PubMed

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Gao, Xin; Huang, Jianhua Z

    2013-11-01

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence-structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/?madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. PMID:22926831

  2. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence–structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/?madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. PMID:22926831

  3. Microneurography: a technique for assessing central neural effects of adrenergic drugs on sympathetic outflow in humans.

    PubMed

    Mark, A L; Wallin, B G

    1985-01-01

    Alpha-2 receptor agonists may act to decrease sympathetic influences through central neural actions that inhibit sympathetic outflow and peripheral adrenergic effects that inhibit release of norepinephrine. Direct intraneural recordings using microneurography of postganglionic sympathetic nerve activity in humans permit assessment of effects of alpha-2 agonists on central sympathetic outflow. Microneurographic studies during administration of clonidine suggest that alpha-2 agonists produce a dose-related modulation of central sympathetic nerve discharge, but that other mechanisms presumably involving stimulation of inhibitory peripheral presynaptic alpha-2 receptors are also involved in the antihypertensive action of these agents. This suggests that alpha-2 agonists exert combined central and peripheral effects on sympathetic influences in humans. PMID:2417051

  4. Assessing the Spatial Scale Effect of Anthropogenic Factors on Species Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mangiacotti, Marco; Scali, Stefano; Sacchi, Roberto; Bassu, Lara; Nulchis, Valeria; Corti, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Patch context is a way to describe the effect that the surroundings exert on a landscape patch. Despite anthropogenic context alteration may affect species distributions by reducing the accessibility to suitable patches, species distribution modelling have rarely accounted for its effects explicitly. We propose a general framework to statistically detect the occurrence and the extent of such a factor, by combining presence-only data, spatial distribution models and information-theoretic model selection procedures. After having established the spatial resolution of the analysis on the basis of the species characteristics, a measure of anthropogenic alteration that can be quantified at increasing distance from each patch has to be defined. Then the distribution of the species is modelled under competing hypotheses: H0, assumes that the distribution is uninfluenced by the anthropogenic variables; H1, assumes the effect of alteration at the species scale (resolution); and H2, H3 … Hn add the effect of context alteration at increasing radii. Models are compared using the Akaike Information Criterion to establish the best hypothesis, and consequently the occurrence (if any) and the spatial scale of the anthropogenic effect. As a study case we analysed the distribution data of two insular lizards (one endemic and one naturalised) using four alternative hypotheses: no alteration (H0), alteration at the species scale (H1), alteration at two context scales (H2 and H3). H2 and H3 performed better than H0 and H1, highlighting the importance of context alteration. H2 performed better than H3, setting the spatial scale of the context at 1 km. The two species respond differently to context alteration, the introduced lizard being more tolerant than the endemic one. The proposed approach supplies reliably and interpretable results, uses easily available data on species distribution, and allows the assessing of the spatial scale at which human disturbance produces the heaviest effects. PMID:23825669

  5. Assessing landscape structure and pattern fragmentation in semiarid ecosystems using patch-size distributions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-de Las Heras, Mariano; Saco, Patricia M; Willgoose, Garry R; Tongway, David J

    2011-10-01

    Spatial vegetation patterns are recognized as sources of valuable information that can be used to infer the state and functionality of semiarid ecosystems, particularly in the context of both climate and land use change. Recent studies have suggested that the patch-size distribution of vegetation in drylands can be described using power-law metrics, and that these scale-free distributions deviate from power-law linearity with characteristic scale lengths under the effects of increasing aridity or human disturbance, providing an early sign of desertification. These findings have been questioned by several modeling approaches, which have identified the presence of characteristic scale lengths on the patch-size distribution of semiarid periodic landscapes. We analyze the relationship between fragmentation of vegetation patterns and their patch-size distributions in semiarid landscapes showing different degree of periodicity (i.e., banding). Our assessment is based on the study of vegetation patterns derived from remote sensing in a series of semiarid Australian Mulga shrublands subjected to different disturbance levels. We use the patch-size probability density and cumulative probability distribution functions from both nondirectional and downslope analyses of the vegetation patterns. Our results indicate that the shape of the patch-size distribution of vegetation changes with the methodology of analysis applied and specific landscape traits, breaking the universal applicability of the power-law metrics. Characteristic scale lengths are detected in (quasi) periodic banded ecosystems when the methodology of analysis accounts for critical landscape anisotropies, using downslope transects in the direction of flow paths. In addition, a common signal of fragmentation is observed: the largest vegetation patches become increasingly less abundant under the effects of disturbance. This effect also explains deviations from power-law behavior in disturbed vegetation which originally showed scale-free patterns. Overall, our results emphasize the complexity of structure assessment in dryland ecosystems, while recognizing the usefulness of the patch-size distribution of vegetation for monitoring semiarid ecosystems, especially through the cumulative probability distributions, which showed high sensitivity to fragmentation of the vegetation patterns. We suggest that preserving large vegetation patches is a critical task for the maintenance of the ecosystem structure and functionality. PMID:22073660

  6. Distribution and quantitative assessment of world crude oil reserves and resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masters, Charles D.; Root, David H.; Dietzman, William D.

    1983-01-01

    World Demonstrated Reserves of crude oil are approximately 723 billion barrels of oil (BBO). Cumulative production is 445 BBO and annual production is 20 BBO. Demonstrated Reserves of crude-oil have declined over the past 10 years consistent with discoveries lagging production over the same period. The assessment of Undiscovered Resources shows a 90 percent probability that the amount discoverable lies between 321 and 1,417 BBO, 550 BBO being the most likely value. The most likely value for Ultimate recoverable resources is 1,718 BBO. The distribution of Ultimate Resources of crude oil will remain highly skewed toward the Middle East; no frontier areas that have potentials large enough to significantly affect present distribution are recognized. Rates of discovery have continued to decline over the past 20 years even though exploration activity has increased in recent years. Prudence dictates, therefore, that the low side of the assessment of Undiscovered Resources be responsibly considered and that alternate energy sources be a part of future planning. Extra-heavy oil and bitumen are assessed separately, with Reserves being figured as the annual productive capacity of installed facilities times 25 years. The annual production of extra-heavy oil is about 8 million barrels and of bitumen about 60 million barrels.

  7. Assessment of HIV antiretroviral therapy adherence by measuring drug concentrations in hair among children in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Olds, Peter K; Kiwanuka, Julius P; Nansera, Denis; Huang, Yong; Bacchetti, Peter; Jin, Chengshi; Gandhi, Monica; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-01-01

    Current tools for measuring medication adherence have significant limitations, especially among pediatric populations. We conducted a prospective observational study to assess the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drug levels in hair for evaluating antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-infected children in rural Uganda. Three-day caregiver recall, 30-day visual analog scale (VAS), Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), and unannounced pill counts and liquid formulation weights (UPC) were collected monthly over a one-year period. Hair samples were collected quarterly and analyzed for nevirapine (NVP) levels, and plasma HIV RNA levels were collected every six months. Among children with at least one hair sample collected, we used univariable random intercept linear regression models to compare log transformed NVP concentrations with each adherence measure, and the child's age, sex, and CD4 count percentage (CD4%). One hundred and twenty-one children aged 2-10 years were enrolled in the study; 74 (61%) provided at least one hair sample, and the mean number of hair samples collected per child was 1.9 (standard deviation [SD] 1.0). Three-day caregiver recall, VAS, and MEMS were found to be positively associated with increasing NVP concentration in hair, although associations were not statistically significant. UPC was found to have a nonsignificant negative association with increasing hair NVP concentration. In conclusion, NVP drug concentrations in hair were found to have nonsignificant, although generally positive, associations with other adherence measures in a cohort of HIV-infected children in Uganda. Hair collection in this population proved challenging, suggesting the need for community education and buy-in with the introduction of novel methodologies. PMID:25483955

  8. Assessing the availability of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin outside the pregnancy prevention programme: a survey of e-pharmacies†

    PubMed Central

    Lagan, Briege M; Dolk, Helen; White, Bronagh; Uges, Donald R A; Sinclair, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The increase in online purchasing of medications raises safety concerns regarding teratogenic drugs. The use of the teratogenic drug ‘isotretinoin’ for women of childbearing age requires strict adherence to the Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP), a risk minimisation measure imposed on prescribers and users. We sought to determine how readily consumers can purchase isotretinoin online and the associated safety procedures and information. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted of 50 e-pharmacies identified from commonly used search engines. E-pharmacy characteristics and isotretinoin PPP specific criteria were evaluated. Purchases of isotretinoin from seven e-pharmacies not bearing authentication logos and not requiring a prescription were assessed for PPP policy adherence, purchasing procedures and compound quality. Results Forty-three (86%) of the e-pharmacies did not have an authentication seal/logo. Isotretinoin could be purchased from 42 sites without a valid prescription. Information on isotretinoin causing birth defects was lacking in 25 of the 50 sites, on not taking isotretinoin in pregnancy in 24 sites and not taking isotretinoin if planning or at risk of a pregnancy in 33 sites. Of the eight attempted purchases, seven arrived, all without any patient information leaflet. All were verified as isotretinoin. Conclusion The Internet provides a loophole for purchasing of medications known to cause congenital abnormalities, which needs to be addressed by medicines regulatory agencies worldwide. The current PPP for isotretinoin may be failing to protect mothers and babies from preventable harm—clinicians need to be aware of this, and the public needs to be educated about the potential risks. PMID:24493556

  9. Nanomedicine-nanoemulsion formulation improves safety and efficacy of the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel according to preclinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, King C; Maturo, Claudia; Rodriguez, Robert; Nguyen, Hoang-Lan; Shorr, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Paclitaxel is an important anticancer drug and is currently used to treat a variety of cancers, including ovarian carcinomas, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The objectives of the studies were to assess and compare the safety and efficacy of EmPAC (a newly developed nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel) versus Taxol (the injectable formulation of paclitaxel involving the use of polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil currently used in the clinic). The objectives were also to investigate the mechanism for the improved safety and efficacy of EmPAC over Taxol. These results showed that EmPAC had better anti-tumor efficacy than Taxol, according to in vitro cell culture studies and studies in animal tumor models. EmPAC had improved anti-tumor efficacy even in tumor cell lines that are known to be multi-drug resistant. Part of the mechanism of action for the improved efficacy may be related to EmPAC inducing greater cellular uptake of paclitaxel into tumor cells than Taxol did, according to the in vitro cell culture radioactive-labeled studies and in vitro cell culture antibody studies. It may also partly be because EmPAC delivered more paclitaxel to the tumor mass than Taxol, while the delivery of paclitaxel to other tissues (e.g., blood, muscle, liver, spleen, kidney and lung) were similar between the two formulations of paclitaxel, according to studies in animals with tumor xenograft. EmPAC also had better safety than Taxol according to toxicology studies in rabbits. This may be because EmPAC does not contain the toxic ingredients used in formulating Taxol (such as polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil). These results support the clinical development of the nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel. PMID:22103064

  10. Hospital distribution in a metropolitan city: assessment by a geographic information system grid modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Soo; Moon, Kyeong-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Grid models were used to assess urban hospital distribution in Seoul, the capital of South Korea. A geographical information system (GIS) based analytical model was developed and applied to assess the situation in a metropolitan area with a population exceeding 10 million. Secondary data for this analysis were obtained from multiple sources: the Korean Statistical Information Service, the Korean Hospital Association and the Statistical Geographical Information System. A grid of cells measuring 1 × 1 km was superimposed on the city map and a set of variables related to population, economy, mobility and housing were identified and measured for each cell. Socio-demographic variables were included to reflect the characteristics of each area. Analytical models were then developed using GIS software with the number of hospitals as the dependent variable. Applying multiple linear regression and geographically weighted regression models, three factors (highway and major arterial road areas; number of subway entrances; and row house areas) were statistically significant in explaining the variance of hospital distribution for each cell. The overall results show that GIS is a useful tool for analysing and understanding location strategies. This approach appears a useful source of information for decision-makers concerned with the distribution of hospitals and other health care centres in a city. PMID:24893031

  11. An Oxycodone Conjugate Vaccine Elicits Drug-Specific Antibodies that Reduce Oxycodone Distribution to Brain and Hot-Plate Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Le Naour, M.; Harmon, T. M.; Tucker, A. M.; Portoghese, P. S.; Pentel, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid conjugate vaccines have shown promise in attenuating the behavioral effects of heroin or morphine in animals. The goal of this study was to extend this approach to oxycodone (OXY), a commonly abused prescription opioid. Haptens were generated by adding tetraglycine (Gly)4 or hemisuccinate (HS) linkers at the 6-position of OXY. Immunization of rats with OXY(Gly)4 conjugated to the carrier proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) produced high-titer antibodies to OXY and its metabolite oxymorphone with substantially lower affinities for other structurally related opioid agonists and antagonists. There was no measurable binding of antibody by the (Gly)4 linker alone or off-target opioids methadone and buprenorphine. OXY(HS) conjugates were less immunogenic despite achieving protein haptenation ratios comparable to OXY(Gly)4-BSA. In rats given a single intravenous dose of OXY, immunization with OXY(Gly)4-KLH increased OXY protein binding and retention in serum while decreasing its unbound (free) concentration in plasma and distribution to brain. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum antibody titers, and it was greatest in rats given the lowest OXY dose (0.05 mg/kg) but was significant even after a larger OXY dose (0.5 mg/kg), equivalent to the high end of the therapeutic range in humans. These effects of OXY(Gly)4-KLH on drug disposition were comparable to those of nicotine or cocaine vaccines that are in clinical trials as addiction treatments. Immunization with OXY(Gly)4-KLH also reduced OXY analgesia in a thermal nociception test. These data support further study of vaccination with the OXY(Gly)4-KLH immunogen as a potential treatment option for OXY abuse or addiction. PMID:22262924

  12. Genome-wide assessment of the carriers involved in the cellular uptake of drugs: a model system in yeast.

    E-print Network

    Lanthaler, Karin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Dobson, Paul D; Moss, Harry J; Pir, Pinar; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background The uptake of drugs into cells has traditionally been considered to be predominantly via passive diffusion through the bilayer portion of the cell membrane. The recent recognition that drug uptake is mostly carrier...

  13. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:1508-1521, 2015. PMID:25615572

  14. Mass spectrometry imaging with high resolution in mass and space (HR 2 MSI) for reliable investigation of drug compound distributions on the cellular level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Römpp; Sabine Guenther; Zoltan Takats; Bernhard Spengler

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) imaging is a versatile method to analyze the spatial distribution of analytes in tissue sections. It\\u000a provides unique features for the analysis of drug compounds in pharmacokinetic studies such as label-free detection and differentiation\\u000a of compounds and metabolites. We have recently introduced a MS imaging method that combines high mass resolution and high\\u000a spatial resolution in a

  15. No-reference hair occlusion assessment for dermoscopy images based on distribution feature.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengying; Li, Yang; Meng, Rusong; Jiang, Zhiguo

    2015-04-01

    The presence of hair is a common quality problem for dermoscopy images, which may influence the accuracy of lesion analysis. In this paper, a novel no-reference hair occlusion assessment method is proposed according to the distribution feature of hairs in the dermoscopy image. Firstly, the image is adaptively enhanced by simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) combined with isotropic nonlinear filtering (INF). Then, hairs are extracted from the image by an automatic threshold and meanwhile the postprocessing is used to refine the hair through re-extracting omissive hairs and filtering false hairs. Finally, the degree of hair occlusion is evaluated by an objective metric based on the hair distribution. A series of experiments was carried out on both simulated images and real images. The result shows that the proposed local adaptive hair detection method can work well on both sparse hair and dense hair, and the designed metric can effectively evaluate the degree of hair occlusion. PMID:25701625

  16. Biocides in the Yangtze River of China: Spatiotemporal distribution, mass load and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-05-01

    Nineteen biocides were investigated in the Yangtze River to understand their spatiotemporal distribution, mass loads and ecological risks. Fourteen biocides were detected, with the highest concentrations up to 166 ng/L for DEET in surface water, and 54.3 ng/g dry weight (dw) for triclocarban in sediment. The dominant biocides were DEET and methylparaben, with their detection frequencies of 100% in both phases. An estimate of 152 t/y of 14 biocides was carried by the Yangtze River to the East China Sea. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN), suggesting dominant input sources from domestic wastewater of the cities along the river. Risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by carbendazim in both phases and by triclosan in sediment. Therefore, proper measures should be taken to reduce the input of biocides into the river systems. PMID:25697474

  17. A Phylogeographic Study of the Tiger (Panthera tigris): Using Holocene Distribution Models to Assess Late Pleistocene Range Shifts 

    E-print Network

    Cooper, David Matthew

    2013-11-28

    Assessing tiger distributions through the Late Pleistocene can provide insight to the evolutionary histories of currently recognized tiger subspecies. If global tiger ranges have been continuous, and not sufficiently isolated through glacial...

  18. THE ACQUISITION AND APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION, METABOLISM, AND EXCRETION (ADME) DATA IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL SAFETY ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-sector international group of government, academic, and industry scientists has developed a proposal for an improved testing scheme for assessing the safety of crop protection chemicals. Incorporation of pharmacokinetic studies describing the absorption, distribution, me...

  19. A Network-Based Classification Model for Deriving Novel Drug-Disease Associations and Assessing Their Molecular Actions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Yoon, Youngmi

    2014-01-01

    The growing number and variety of genetic network datasets increases the feasibility of understanding how drugs and diseases are associated at the molecular level. Properly selected features of the network representations of existing drug-disease associations can be used to infer novel indications of existing drugs. To find new drug-disease associations, we generated an integrative genetic network using combinations of interactions, including protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory network datasets. Within this network, network adjacencies of drug-drug and disease-disease were quantified using a scored path between target sets of them. Furthermore, the common topological module of drugs or diseases was extracted, and thereby the distance between topological drug-module and disease (or disease-module and drug) was quantified. These quantified scores were used as features for the prediction of novel drug-disease associations. Our classifiers using Random Forest, Multilayer Perceptron and C4.5 showed a high specificity and sensitivity (AUC score of 0.855, 0.828 and 0.797 respectively) in predicting novel drug indications, and displayed a better performance than other methods with limited drug and disease properties. Our predictions and current clinical trials overlap significantly across the different phases of drug development. We also identified and visualized the topological modules of predicted drug indications for certain types of cancers, and for Alzheimer’s disease. Within the network, those modules show potential pathways that illustrate the mechanisms of new drug indications, including propranolol as a potential anticancer agent and telmisartan as treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25356910

  20. Assessment of the integration capability of system architectures from a complex and distributed software systems perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchter, S.; Reinert, F.; Müller, W.

    2014-06-01

    Procurement and design of system architectures capable of network centric operations demand for an assessment scheme in order to compare different alternative realizations. In this contribution an assessment method for system architectures targeted at the C4ISR domain is presented. The method addresses the integration capability of software systems from a complex and distributed software system perspective focusing communication, interfaces and software. The aim is to evaluate the capability to integrate a system or its functions within a system-of-systems network. This method uses approaches from software architecture quality assessment and applies them on the system architecture level. It features a specific goal tree of several dimensions that are relevant for enterprise integration. These dimensions have to be weighed against each other and totalized using methods from the normative decision theory in order to reflect the intention of the particular enterprise integration effort. The indicators and measurements for many of the considered quality features rely on a model based view on systems, networks, and the enterprise. That means it is applicable to System-of-System specifications based on enterprise architectural frameworks relying on defined meta-models or domain ontologies for defining views and viewpoints. In the defense context we use the NATO Architecture Framework (NAF) to ground respective system models. The proposed assessment method allows evaluating and comparing competing system designs regarding their future integration potential. It is a contribution to the system-of-systems engineering methodology.

  1. Electric Field Distribution Excited by Indoor Radio Source for Exposure Compliance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Junji; Tarusawa, Yoshiaki

    Correction factors are presented for estimating the RF electromagnetic field strength in the compliance assessment of human exposure from an indoor RF radio source in the frequency range from 800MHz to 3.5GHz. The correction factors are derived from the increase in the spatial average electric field strength distribution, which is dependent on the building materials. The spatial average electric field strength is calculated using relative complex dielectric constants of building materials. The relative complex dielectric constant is obtained through measurement of the transmission and reflection losses for eleven kinds of building materials used in business office buildings and single family dwellings.

  2. Characterization of the molecular distribution of drugs in glassy solid dispersions at the nano-meter scale, using differential scanning calorimetry and gravimetric water vapour sorption techniques.

    PubMed

    van Drooge, D J; Hinrichs, W L J; Visser, M R; Frijlink, H W

    2006-03-01

    The molecular distribution in fully amorphous solid dispersions consisting of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-diazepam and inulin-diazepam was studied. One glass transition temperature (T(g)), as determined by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC), was observed in PVP-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by fusion for all drug loads tested (10-80 wt.%). The T(g) of these solid dispersions gradually changed with composition and decreased from 177 degrees C for pure PVP to 46 degrees C for diazepam. These observations indicate that diazepam was dispersed in PVP on a molecular level. However, in PVP-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by freeze drying, two T(g)'s were observed for drug loads above 35 wt.% indicating phase separation. One T(g) indicated the presence of amorphous diazepam clusters, the other T(g) was attributed to a PVP-rich phase in which diazepam was dispersed on a molecular level. With both the value of the latter T(g) and the DeltaC(p) of the diazepam glass transition the concentrations of molecular dispersed diazepam could be calculated (27-35 wt.%). Both methods gave similar results. Water vapour sorption (DVS) experiments revealed that the PVP-matrix was hydrophobised by the incorporated diazepam. TMDSC and DVS results were used to estimate the size of diazepam clusters in freeze dried PVP-diazepam solid dispersions, which appeared to be in the nano-meter range. The inulin-diazepam solid dispersions prepared by spray freeze drying showed one T(g) for drug loads up to 35 wt.% indicating homogeneous distribution on a molecular level. However, this T(g) was independent of the drug load, which is unexpected because diazepam has a lower T(g) than inulin (46 and 155 degrees C, respectively). For higher drug loads, a T(g) of diazepam as well as a T(g) of the inulin-rich phase was observed, indicating the formation of amorphous diazepam clusters. From the DeltaC(p) of the diazepam glass transition the amount of molecularly dispersed diazepam was calculated (12-27 wt.%). In contrast to the PVP-diazepam solid dispersions, DVS-experiments revealed that inulin was not hydrophobised by diazepam. Consequently, the size of diazepam clusters could not be estimated. It was concluded that TMDSC enables characterization and quantification of the molecular distribution in amorphous solid dispersions. When the hygroscopicity of the carrier is reduced by the drug, DVS in combination with TMDSC can be used to estimate the size of amorphous drug clusters. PMID:16427226

  3. Parenting quality in drug-addicted mothers in a therapeutic mother–child community: the contribution of attachment and personality assessment

    PubMed Central

    De Palo, Francesca; Capra, Nicoletta; Simonelli, Alessandra; Salcuni, Silvia; Di Riso, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that attachment is a key risk factor for the diagnosis and treatment of clinical diseases in Axis I, such as drug addiction. Recent literature regarding attachment, psychiatric pathology, and drug addiction demonstrates that there is a clear prevalence of insecure attachment patterns in clinical and drug addicted subjects. Specifically, some authors emphasize that the anxious-insecure attachment pattern is prevalent among drug-addicted women with double diagnosis (Fonagy et al., 1996). The construct of attachment as a risk factor in clinical samples of drug-addicted mothers needs to be studied more in depth though. The present explorative study focused on the evaluation of parenting quality in a therapeutic mother–child community using attachment and personality assessment tools able to outline drug-addicted mothers’ profiles. This study involved 30 drug addicted mothers, inpatients of a therapeutic community (TC). Attachment representations were assessed via the Adult Attachment Interview; personality diagnosis and symptomatic profiles were performed using the Structured Clinical Interview of the DSM-IV (SCID-II) and the Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), respectively. Both instruments were administered during the first six months of residence in a TC. Results confirmed the prevalence of insecure attachment representations (90%), with a high presence of U patterns, prevalently scored for dangerous and/or not protective experiences in infanthood. Very high values (>5) were found for some experience scales (i.e., neglect and rejection scales). Data also showed very low values (1–3) in metacognitive monitoring, coherence of transcript and coherence of mind scales. Patients’ different profiles (U vs. E vs. Ds) were linked to SCID-II diagnosis, providing insightful indications both for treatment planning and intervention on parenting functions and for deciding if to start foster care or adoption proceedings for children. PMID:25309481

  4. Assessment of prescribing, dispensing, and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs for patients attending outpatient department of Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Harar, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Shukrala, Fedila; Gabriel, Tesfaye

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a global concern and is one of the key preventable risk factors for cardiovascular events, resulting in unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prescribing, dispensing and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs among patients attending Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital outpatient department. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital on assessment of the prescribing, dispensing, and patient use pattern of antihypertensive drugs among patients who were above the age of 18 years and attending outpatient department from April 1–May 31, 2013. Data collection was conducted by reviewing the record of patients and direct observation of the dispensing process of randomly selected patients to measure average dispensing time, and direct interview with the patients. Results A total of 400 patients met the inclusion criteria; out of the 400 patients studied, 63.5% were females. Most of the patients had Stage 1 hypertension (69%), followed by Stage 2 hypertension (31%). Out of the total number of patients, 264 were with different comorbid conditions: diabetes mellitus (64.3%), followed by congestive heart failure (15.1%) and ischemic heart disease (2.3%). The most frequently prescribed class of antihypertensive drugs was diuretics, of which hydrochlorothiazide was the most frequently prescribed drug, both in single (55%), followed by enalapril (22.3%), methyl dopa (11.2%), atenolol (6.9%), and nifedipine (4.6%), and in combination with other antihypertensive drugs. The average dispensing time was 1.2 minutes, and 75% of the patients left the counter with inadequate information about the dosage. Conclusion All antihypertensive drugs prescribed were in compliance with the Ethiopian Standard Treatment Guidelines. This study showed that most outpatients with hypertension in our hospital received monotherapy. Diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were the most frequently prescribed classes of antihypertensive drugs in both monotherapy and combination therapy. PMID:25632220

  5. What Matters Most? Assessing the Influence of Demographic Characteristics, College-Specific Risk Factors, and Poly-Drug Use on Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Christina; Farley, Erin J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although prior recent research has revealed a significant relationship between the nonmedical use of prescription drugs, demographic characteristics, college-specific risk factors, and other substance use among college students, there remains a need to conduct a comparative analysis on the differential impact these factors may have on…

  6. Relationship between drug discrimination and ratings of subjective effects: implications for assessing and understanding the abuse potential of D-amphetamine in humans.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Anna R; Bolin, B Levi; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    2013-09-01

    The discriminative and subjective effects of drugs in humans are related, but the full extent of this relationship remains to be determined. To further explore this relationship, a retrospective analysis was conducted on data from six studies completed in our laboratory that used identical procedures. The relationship between the discriminative and subjective effects of a range of doses of D-amphetamine (i.e. 2.5-15 mg) was examined using correlational analyses. Significant correlations with discrimination performance were observed on 15 of 20 items from the Drug-Effect Questionnaire across a range of qualities [e.g. Pay For (a positive effect indicative of abuse potential) and Active (a stimulant-like effect)], but the magnitude of these relationships was modest (r<0.52). The current findings demonstrate that diverse subjective effects contribute to the discriminative effects of D-amphetamine and indicate that the former are a more practical means to assess the abuse potential of drugs. Although these procedures are fundamentally related in that they rely on the presence of an interoceptive drug state, they differ in the dimension(s) of the interoceptive effects that participants must quantify. The simultaneous use of drug discrimination and subjective effects may, therefore, reveal complimentary aspects of drug effects that underlie their potential for abuse. PMID:23851485

  7. A Comprehensive Assessment of Lymphatic Filariasis in Sri Lanka Six Years after Cessation of Mass Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ramakrishna U.; Nagodavithana, Kumara C.; Samarasekera, Sandhya D.; Wijegunawardana, Asha D.; Premakumara, Welmillage D. Y.; Perera, Samudrika N.; Settinayake, Sunil; Miller, J. Phillip; Weil, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Sri Lankan Anti-Filariasis Campaign conducted 5 rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) with diethycarbamazine plus albendazole between 2002 and 2006. We now report results of a comprehensive surveillance program that assessed the lymphatic filariasis (LF) situation in Sri Lanka 6 years after cessation of MDA. Methodology and Principal Findings Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) were performed per WHO guidelines in primary school children in 11 evaluation units (EUs) in all 8 formerly endemic districts. All EUs easily satisfied WHO criteria for stopping MDA. Comprehensive surveillance was performed in 19 Public Health Inspector (PHI) areas (subdistrict health administrative units). The surveillance package included cross-sectional community surveys for microfilaremia (Mf) and circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA), school surveys for CFA and anti-filarial antibodies, and collection of Culex mosquitoes with gravid traps for detection of filarial DNA (molecular xenomonitoring, MX). Provisional target rates for interruption of LF transmission were community CFA <2%, antibody in school children <2%, and filarial DNA in mosquitoes <0.25%. Community Mf and CFA prevalence rates ranged from 0–0.9% and 0–3.4%, respectively. Infection rates were significantly higher in males and lower in people who denied prior treatment. Antibody rates in school children exceeded 2% in 10 study sites; the area that had the highest community and school CFA rates also had the highest school antibody rate (6.9%). Filarial DNA rates in mosquitoes exceeded 0.25% in 10 PHI areas. Conclusions Comprehensive surveillance is feasible for some national filariasis elimination programs. Low-level persistence of LF was present in all study sites; several sites failed to meet provisional endpoint criteria for LF elimination, and follow-up testing will be needed in these areas. TAS was not sensitive for detecting low-level persistence of filariasis in Sri Lanka. We recommend use of antibody and MX testing as tools to complement TAS for post-MDA surveillance. PMID:25393404

  8. Assessment of neurological effects of drugs on oculomotor and visual function in the primate. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, E.G.

    1982-12-10

    A number of cholinergic agents are deemed useful as prophylactics or antidotes to organophosphate poisoning, yet have their own toxic effects. Dosages of these agents which are known to not grossly disrupt behavior may nonetheless degrade performance of sophisticated tasks required of the personnel of a modern mechanized army. The contract uses on animal model (primate) to assess the effects of cholinergic drugs on the performance of visual search and tracking tasks which mimic skills generally used in the field. The eye movements of cynomolgous monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were recorded with the magnetic search coil technique while they searched for camouflaged visual targets. To date the research has defined the normal patterns of eye movements of monkeys engaged in visual search and there are preliminary results describing the effects of physostigmine and pralidoxime. Only at the highest dose did physostigimine consistently degrade eye movements and impair visual search. The deficit was a subtle one and was primarily an oculomotor effect rather than a motivational, visual, or cognitive impairment. Pralidoxime also had no consistent effect at any but the highest dose. Behavioral testing was erratic at this dose but visual search was successful when attempted at all by the monkey, suggesting a motivational rather than specifically oculomotor impairment.

  9. Atmospheric Ozone 1985. Assessment of our understanding of the processes controlling its present distribution and change, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Topics addressed include: assessment models; model predictions of ozone changes; ozone and temperature trends; trace gas effects on climate; kinetics and photchemical data base; spectroscopic data base (infrared to microwave); instrument intercomparisons and assessments; and monthly mean distribution of ozone and temperature.

  10. The Geographical Information System (GIS) based water quality assessment of a drinking water distribution system in the Denizli City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdullah Cem Koc; Fehiman Ciner; Selcuk Toprak; Huseyin Selcuk; Burcu Aktan

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, continuous, healthy water supply and total water quality management have emerged as an important issue in engineering applications. In a wide ranging assessment, the quality of the drinking water is being monitored in the distribution system, until it is supplied to the end user. It includes regular sampling and testing performed for assessing compliance with guideline values. The major

  11. A disjunctive kriging program for assessing point-support conditional distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Xavier

    2006-08-01

    In geostatistical applications, the local distributions of the values of a regionalized attribute at unsampled locations can be assessed by nonlinear methods such as indicator or multigaussian kriging. Disjunctive kriging can also be applied in the framework of bivariate isofactorial models, for which there exists a complete family of functions (factors) with no spatial cross-correlations. This work focuses on the point-support models with polynomial factors and gives practical tips for the modeling of the univariate and bivariate distributions and for the implementation of disjunctive kriging, mainly in what refers to the convergence of the expansions into factors, the post-processing of the estimated statistics and the use of ordinary kriging. The tools and concepts are complemented by a set of computer programs and applied to two case studies. The first one consists of topsoil samples measuring the lead concentration at a smelter site in Dallas, Texas. A gamma isofactorial model is fitted to these data and disjunctive kriging is used to map the local probabilities that the actual concentrations exceed a toxic threshold and to divide the smelter site into a safe and a polluted area. The second case study concerns the infestation of field crops by a caterpillar. A negative binomial model is used to characterize the number of bored stalk internodes and to assess the risk that this number exceeds given values.

  12. [Device to assess in-socket pressure distribution for partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Camacho, Michelín; Urrusti, José Luis; Acero, María Del Carmen; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Mendoza-Cruz, Felipe

    2014-07-01

    A device for dynamic acquisition and distribution analysis of in-socket pressure for patients with partial foot amputation is presented in this work. By using the developed system, we measured and generated pressure distribution graphs, obtained maximal pressure, and calculated pressure-time integral (PTI) of three subjects with partial foot amputation and of a group of Healthy subjects (Hs) (n = 10). Average maximal pressure in the healthy group was 19.4 ± 4.11 PSI, while for the three amputated patients, this was 27.8 ± 1.38, 17.6 ± 1.15, 29.10 ± 3.9 PSI, respectively. Maximal pressure-time integral for healthy subjects was 11.56 ± 2.83 PSI*s, and for study subjects was 19.54 ± 1.9, 12.35 ± 1.48, and 13.17 ± 1.31 PSI*s, respectively. The results of the control group agree with those previously reported in the literature. The pressure distribution pattern showed clear differences between study subjects and those of the control group; these graphs allowed us to identify the pressure in regions-of-interest that could be critical, such as surgical scars. The system presented in this work will aid to assess the effectiveness with which prosthetic systems distribute load, given that the formation of ulcers is highly linked to the pressure exercised at the point of contact; in addition, these results will help to investigate the comfort perception of the prosthesis, a factor directly influenced by the stump's pressure distribution. PMID:25264793

  13. Metabolic Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Macrolactin A and 7-O-Succinyl Macrolactin A Assessed by Evaluating Cytochrome P450 Inhibition and Induction and UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Inhibition In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    Macrolactin A (MA) and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA), polyene macrolides containing a 24-membered lactone ring, show antibiotic effects superior to those of teicoplanin against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MA and SMA are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents in preclinical studies in Korea. We evaluated the potential of MA and SMA for the inhibition or induction of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess their safety as new molecular entities. We demonstrated that MA and SMA are potent competitive inhibitors of CYP2C9, with Ki values of 4.06 ?M and 10.6 ?M, respectively. MA and SMA also weakly inhibited UGT1A1 activity, with Ki values of 40.1 ?M and 65.3 ?M, respectively. However, these macrolactins showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, MA and SMA did not induce CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4/5. On the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that MA and SMA are unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most of the CYPs involved in drug metabolism in vivo, except for the inhibition of CYP2C9 by MA. Similarly, MA and SMA are unlikely to inhibit the activity of UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 enzymes in vivo. Although further investigations will be required to clarify the in vivo interactions of MA with CYP2C9-targeted drugs, our findings offer a clearer understanding and prediction of drug-drug interactions for the safe use of MA and SMA in clinical practice. PMID:24890600

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power generation/power reactant storage and distribution subsystem FMEA/CIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) is presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Generation/Power Reactant Storage and Distribution (EPG/PRSD) subsystem hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baselines with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. The results of that comparison are documented for the Orbiter EPG/PRSD hardware. The comparison produced agreement on all but 27 FMEAs and 9 CIL items. The discrepancy between the number of IOA findings and NASA FMEAs can be partially explained by the different approaches used by IOA and NASA to group failure modes together to form one FMEA. Also, several IOA items represented inner tank components and ground operations failure modes which were not in the NASA baseline.

  15. Uncertainty Assessment of Integrated Distributed Hydrological Models Using GLUE with Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasone, R.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, D.

    2006-12-01

    So far, limited attention has been given to uncertainty assessment (UA) of distributed and integrated hydrological models. The main reasons for this are the high computational burden required by running these models, the potentially huge number of parameters involved and the difficulties in aggregating multi-site and multi-variable objective measures. This work presents a UA application conducted on an integrated, spatially distributed hydrological model in an attempt to overcome these difficulties. The UA of the model response is assessed through a revised version of the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology in which the sampling method is improved by the use of an adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM-UA) algorithm. The use of the SCEM-UA algorithm allows an efficient sampling of the region of the parameter space containing the best solutions. Hereby more reliable posterior distributions of model outputs and parameters can be obtained at a reduced computational cost in comparison to the use of an initial random sampling method. The MIKE SHE modeling software is employed to simulate the runoff and the groundwater responses of a Danish watershed, the Karup catchment. The calibration data consists of observations of groundwater elevation at 17 sites and of runoff measurements at the catchment outlet. An aggregation method based on a distance scale transformation is used to combine groundwater levels and runoff measurements into a single objective function that takes into account the different impact of the two types of data on the global optimized function. An initial sensitivity analysis is applied to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and thus reducing the total number of model runs: the parameters with a limited impact on the model response are fixed to their calibrated value, while the variation of the others, which are affecting the most the model response, is subjected to the UA.

  16. A microcomputer program for energy assessment and aggregation using the triangular probability distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.; Balay, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    A general risk-analysis method was developed for petroleum-resource assessment and other applications. The triangular probability distribution is used as a model with an analytic aggregation methodology based on probability theory rather than Monte-Carlo simulation. Among the advantages of the analytic method are its computational speed and flexibility, and the saving of time and cost on a microcomputer. The input into the model consists of a set of components (e.g. geologic provinces) and, for each component, three potential resource estimates: minimum, most likely (mode), and maximum. Assuming a triangular probability distribution, the mean, standard deviation, and seven fractiles (F100, F95, F75, F50, F25, F5, and F0) are computed for each component, where for example, the probability of more than F95 is equal to 0.95. The components are aggregated by combining the means, standard deviations, and respective fractiles under three possible siutations (1) perfect positive correlation, (2) complete independence, and (3) any degree of dependence between these two polar situations. A package of computer programs named the TRIAGG system was written in the Turbo Pascal 4.0 language for performing the analytic probabilistic methodology. The system consists of a program for processing triangular probability distribution assessments and aggregations, and a separate aggregation routine for aggregating aggregations. The user's documentation and program diskette of the TRIAGG system are available from USGS Open File Services. TRIAGG requires an IBM-PC/XT/AT compatible microcomputer with 256kbyte of main memory, MS-DOS 3.1 or later, either two diskette drives or a fixed disk, and a 132 column printer. A graphics adapter and color display are optional. ?? 1991.

  17. Customer system efficiency improvement assessment: Supply curves for transmission and distribution conservation options

    SciTech Connect

    Tepel, R.C.; Callaway, J.W.; De Steese, J.G.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of Task 6 in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment Project. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for energy conservation in the transmission and distribution (TandD) systems of electric utilities in the BPA service area. The scope of this assessment covers BPA customers in the Pacific Northwest region and all non-federal TandD systems, including those that currently place no load on the BPA system. Supply curves were developed to describe the conservation resource potentially available from TandD-system efficiency improvements. These supply curves relate the levelized cost of upgrading existing equipment to the estimated amount of energy saved. Stated in this form, the resource represented by TandD loss reductions can be compared with other conservation options and regional electrical generation resources to determine the most cost-effective method of supplying power to the Pacific Northwest. The development of the supply curves required data acquisition and methodology development that are also described in this report. 11 refs., 11 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. Affordable non-traditional source data mining for context assessment to improve distributed fusion system robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Christopher; Haith, Gary; Steinberg, Alan; Morefield, Charles; Morefield, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes methods to affordably improve the robustness of distributed fusion systems by opportunistically leveraging non-traditional data sources. Adaptive methods help find relevant data, create models, and characterize the model quality. These methods also can measure the conformity of this non-traditional data with fusion system products including situation modeling and mission impact prediction. Non-traditional data can improve the quantity, quality, availability, timeliness, and diversity of the baseline fusion system sources and therefore can improve prediction and estimation accuracy and robustness at all levels of fusion. Techniques are described that automatically learn to characterize and search non-traditional contextual data to enable operators integrate the data with the high-level fusion systems and ontologies. These techniques apply the extension of the Data Fusion & Resource Management Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture at Level 4. The DNN architecture supports effectively assessment and management of the expanded portfolio of data sources, entities of interest, models, and algorithms including data pattern discovery and context conformity. Affordable model-driven and data-driven data mining methods to discover unknown models from non-traditional and `big data' sources are used to automatically learn entity behaviors and correlations with fusion products, [14 and 15]. This paper describes our context assessment software development, and the demonstration of context assessment of non-traditional data to compare to an intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance fusion product based upon an IED POIs workflow.

  19. [Spatial distribution and risk assessment of insecticides in surface soil from a rapidly urbanizing region].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Zhou; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2014-10-01

    To examine the distribution patterns of organic contaminants in rapidly urbanizing regions, the levels and spatial distributions of 19 overlooked insecticides, i. e., phenyl-pyrazole class (fipronil), chlordane, endosulfan, nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, methoxychlor and their metabolites, were examined in 229 soil samples collected from the Pearl River Delta (PRD) and surrounding areas. The results indicated that higher insecticide levels distributed in the central PRD, while lower levels congested in the surrounding areas. The similar spatial patterns between the levels of insecticides and economic prosperity or population density demonstrated that social-economic factors may have dictated the spatial patterns of insecticides. In addition, the changing of land-use types during urbanization processes, e.g., historical plowlands have been converted into residential landscapes, resulted in high concentrations of banned insecticides in metropolis of the central PRD. Source diagnostics indicated that new inputs of technical chlordane products existed in the PRD and surrounding areas. Fipronil was degraded into fipronil sulfone and fipronil sulfide in most soil samples because of its low half-life in soil. Finally, a risk assessment of 19 insecticides in soil for human health suggested that six samples collected from the major administrative districts with dense population had potential cancer or non-cancer risk to human health. Therefore, these overlooked insecticides should be concerned in future environmental research. PMID:25693389

  20. Discussion on the influence of truncation of ground motion residual distribution on probabilistic seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Gao, Mengtan; Chen, Kun; Huang, Bei

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies on assessment of a very low annual probability of exceeding (APE) ground motions, 10-4 or less, have highlighted the importance of the upper bound of ground motions when very low probability results are acquired. The truncation level adopted in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) should be determined by an aleatory uncertainty model (i.e., distribution model) of ground motions and the possible maximum and minimum ground motion values of a specific earthquake. However, at the present time, it is impossible to establish the upper bound model for ground motions based on the source characteristics and/or ground motion propagation. McGuire suggested a truncation level be fixed at a number of ? = 6, or the distribution of residuals be truncated in such a manner that site intensity cannot be greater than the epicenter intensity. This study aims to find a reasonable and feasible truncation level to be used in PSHA when the physical mechanism is not available to find the extreme ground motion. A mathematical analysis of the influence of the truncation level on PSHA, case studies of sites in different seismotectonic settings, and a distribution analysis of ground motion residuals are conducted in this study. It is concluded that ? = 4 is the minimum acceptable value for engineering applications for APEs within 0.002 to 10-4, and for low APEs, such as 10-5 and 10-6, the value of ? should be no less than 5 in most regions of China.

  1. Assessing sites contaminated with unexploded ordnance: statistical modeling of ordnance spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Jacqueline A; Small, Mitchell J

    2006-02-01

    More than 40,000 km2 of former military land in the United States are contaminated with unexploded ordnance (UXO). Cleanup costs are estimated to total as much as 140 billion dollars. The amount of contaminated acreage and total costs are likely to increase as the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) follows through on recently announced plans to close an additional 22 domestic military bases. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) and DOD disagree on how these sites should be characterized to assess their risks and plan for cleanup. As a result, much potentially valuable land remains idle while remediation decisions are pending. One of the sources of disagreement is how the locations of UXO should be characterized, given that the exact spatial distribution of UXO is unknown in advance of cleanup. In this paper, we propose and test a new model to represent the spatial distribution of UXO. Unlike existing DOD models, the new model accounts for the tendency of UXO to cluster, presumably around targets at which soldiers aimed during training. We fit the cluster model to geographic data on UXO locations at two former military installations and show that it describes key characteristics of the data more accuratelythan the existing DOD model. We discuss how the choice of a UXO spatial distribution model could affect important decisions about cleaning up and reusing UXO-affected property. PMID:16509339

  2. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 – that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein-ligand complex via a hydrogen bonding interaction by aromatic-? contacts, and the ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) analysis of best leads indicate nontoxic in nature with good potential for drug development.

  3. In situ calibration of a passive sampling device for selected illicit drugs and their metabolites in wastewater, and subsequent year-long assessment of community drug usage.

    PubMed

    Harman, Christopher; Reid, Malcolm; Thomas, Kevin V

    2011-07-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were calibrated in situ for selected illicit drugs and their metabolites at a sewage treatment works. Eleven out of 13 target compounds were detected and eight of those exhibited linear uptake kinetics with sampling rates between 0.035 and 0.150 L d(-1). Subsequently POCIS were deployed for 2 week periods over the course of a whole year, in order to examine trends in drug usage. Amphetamine and methamphetamine showed several similar peaks in concentration during the course of the year as did cocaine and two of its metabolites. Low levels of ecstasy were observed, with a prominent peak in May and a steady increase toward the end of the year. The antihistamine Cetirizine showed a clear increase in use during the summer months as expected and back calculation of the yearly dosage from POCIS accumulations yielded very similar results to that registered in the Norwegian prescription database. Estimations of cocaine usage using the parent compound averaged between 0.31 and 2.8 g d(-1) per 1000 inhabitants. POCIS is a cost-effective technique for the long-term monitoring of drug usage of a defined population and may overcome the difficulties of representative sampling associated with autosampling equipment. PMID:21648435

  4. TGI-Simulator: a visual tool to support the preclinical phase of the drug discovery process by assessing in silico the effect of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Nadia; Magni, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents TGI-Simulator, a software tool designed to show, through a 2-D graphical animation, the simulated time effect of an anticancer drug on a tumor mass by exploiting the well-known Tumor Growth Inhibition (TGI) model published by Simeoni et al. [1]. Simeoni TGI model is a mathematical model routinely used by pharma companies and researchers during the drug development process. The application is based on a Java graphical user interface (GUI) including a self installing differential equation solver implemented in Matlab together with an optimization algorithm that performs model identification via Weighted Least Squares (WLS). However, it can graphically show also the simulation results obtained within other scientific software tools, if they are preventively stored into a suitable ASCII file. The tool would be a valid support also for researchers with no specific skills in scientific calculations and in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling but daily involved in pharma companies drug development processes at different levels. The availability of a movie with a temporal varying 2-D iconographic representation is an original instrument to communicate results and learn Simeoni TGI model and its potential application in preclinical studies. PMID:22005012

  5. Anthelmintic drug residues in beef: UPLC-MS/MS method validation, European retail beef survey, and associated exposure and risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K M; Whelan, M; Kennedy, D G; Trigueros, G; Cannavan, A; Boon, P E; Wapperom, D; Danaher, M

    2012-01-01

    Anthelmintic drugs are widely used to control parasitic infections in cattle. The ProSafeBeef project addressed the need for data on the exposure of European consumers of beef to potentially harmful drug residues. A novel analytical method based on matrix solid-phase dispersive extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was validated for 37 anthelmintic drugs and metabolites in muscle (assay decision limits, CC?,?=?0.15-10.2?µg?kg?¹). Seven European countries (France, Spain, Slovenia, Ireland, Italy, Belgium and Portugal) participated in a survey of retail beef purchased in local shops. Of 1061 beef samples analysed, 26 (2.45%) contained detectable residues of anthelmintic drugs (0.2-171?µg?kg?¹), none above its European Union maximum residue limit (MRL) or action level. Residues detected included closantel, levamisole, doramectin, eprinomectin, moxidectin, ivermectin, albendazole and rafoxanide. In a risk assessment applied to mean residue concentrations across all samples, observed residues accounted for less than 0.1% of the MRL for each compound. An exposure assessment based on the consumption of meat at the 99th percentile of consumption of adults in 14 European countries demonstrated that beef accounted for less than 0.02% of the acceptable daily intake for each compound in each country. This study is the first of its kind to apply such a risk-based approach to an extensive multi-residue survey of veterinary drug residues in food. It has demonstrated that the risk of exposure of the European consumer to anthelmintic drug residues in beef is negligible, indicating that regulation and monitoring is having the desired effect of limiting residues to non-hazardous concentrations. PMID:22360146

  6. Nutrients distribution and trophic status assessment in the northern Beibu Gulf, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Junxiang; Jiang, Fajun; Ke, Ke; Xu, Mingben; Lei, Fu; Chen, Bo

    2014-09-01

    Using historical and 2010 field data, the distribution of nutrients in the northern Beibu Gulf of China is described. There was a decreasing trend in the concentration of nutrients from the north coast to offshore waters of the northern Beibu Gulf, reflecting the influence of inputs from land-based sources. High concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphate (PO4-P) occurred mainly at Fangchenggang Bay, Qinzhou Bay, and Lianzhou Bay. Four different methods were used to assess eutrophication. The trophic status of the Beibu Gulf was characterized using the single factor, Eutrophication index (EI), Trophic index (TRIX) and Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) methods. Based on nutrient concentrations, 73.9% of DIN and 26.7% of PO4-P samples exceeded the fourth grade Seawater Quality Standard of China. Eutrophication index values varied widely, but higher levels of eutrophication were generally found in bays and estuaries. TRIX values ranged from 2.61 to 7.27, with an average of 4.98, indicating a mesotrophic and moderately productive system. A positive correlation between TRIX and harmful algal species richness and abundance was observed. The ASSETS model evaluates eutrophication status based on a Pressure-State-Response approach, including three main indices: influencing factors, overall eutrophic condition, and future outlook. The Beibu Gulf was graded as moderate using ASSETS. The single factor and Chinese nutrient index methods were considered inadequate for the assessment of trophic status. TRIX can be used as an indicator of trophic state and ASSETS showed good potential to assess eutrophication. The results of TRIX and ASSETS depend on threshold values. To establish these values, further research is required within the northern Beibu Gulf.

  7. Uncertainty assessment of spatially distributed nitrate reduction potential in groundwater using multiple geological realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. L.; Gunderman, D.; He, X.; Refsgaard, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    Spatially distributed nitrate reduction potential in groundwater was estimated for the clay till dominated Norsminde fjord catchment in Denmark using the distributed hydrological model MIKE SHE. The nitrate transport was simulated using particle tracking and nitrate was assumed to be instantaneously reduced at the redox interface. Spatially distributed depths of the redox interface were estimated based on the spatial patterns in groundwater recharge and sediment redox capacity. Uncertainty of the estimated nitrate reduction due to geological uncertainty was assessed using multiple geological realizations. The geological realizations were generated using the geostatistical software TProGS and either conditioned based on borehole data only or soft conditioned based on both borehole data and geophysical data. Finally an upscaling of the predicted nitrate reduction was done in order to evaluate the change in uncertainty with increasing scale. The study showed that the uncertainty (one standard deviation) of the estimated nitrate reduction potential (in percentage of nitrate input) on the original 100 m model scale was 25% if only using borehole data and 19% if combining the borehole data with geophysical data. The uncertainty on the model predictions decreased with increasing aggregation scale. The decrease in uncertainty was most apparent the first 500 m, where after the uncertainty started to level off. This scale corresponded well to the mean length of the sand units within the clay till. It is concluded that using geophysical data in combination with borehole data in generation of geological realizations can help decrease uncertainty on the estimated nitrate reduction and that the predictive capability of distributed models is constrained by the spatial resolution of key data such as geology.

  8. Adaptivity Assessment of Regional Semi-Parametric VTEC Modeling to Different Data Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmaz, Murat; Onur Karsl?o?lu, Mahmut

    2014-05-01

    Semi-parametric modelling of Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) combines parametric and non-parametric models into a single regression model for estimating the parameters and functions from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations. The parametric part is related to the Differential Code Biases (DCBs), which are fixed unknown parameters of the geometry-free linear combination (or the so called ionospheric observable). On the other hand, the non-parametric component is referred to the spatio-temporal distribution of VTEC which is estimated by applying the method of Multivariate Adaptive Regression B-Splines (BMARS). BMARS algorithm builds an adaptive model by using tensor product of univariate B-splines that are derived from the data. The algorithm searches for best fitting B-spline basis functions in a scale by scale strategy, where it starts adding large scale B-splines to the model and adaptively decreases the scale for including smaller scale features through a modified Gram-Schmidt ortho-normalization process. Then, the algorithm is extended to include the receiver DCBs where the estimates of the receiver DCBs and the spatio-temporal VTEC distribution can be obtained together in an adaptive semi-parametric model. In this work, the adaptivity of regional semi-parametric modelling of VTEC based on BMARS is assessed in different ground-station and data distribution scenarios. To evaluate the level of adaptivity the resulting DCBs and VTEC maps from different scenarios are compared not only with each other but also with CODE distributed GIMs and DCB estimates .

  9. Assessment of the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Ayantika, D. C.; Pandithurai, G.; Niranjan, K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models (excepting HADGEM2-ES, HADGEM2-CC) seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since IGP region is dominated by anthropogenic activities, high population density, and wind driven transport of dust and other aerosol species, MODIS observations reveal high AOD values over this region. Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of the art climate models. As reported in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), the level of scientific understanding (LOSU) of climatic impact of aerosols is medium-low. For better understanding of short and long term implications of changing concentrations of aerosol species on climate, it is imperative to have a realistic representation of aerosol distribution over regions with high aerosol loading.

  10. Genome-based analysis of the nonhuman primate Macaca fascicularis as a model for drug safety assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Martin; Küng, Erich; See, Angela; Broger, Clemens; Steiner, Guido; Berrera, Marco; Heckel, Tobias; Iniguez, Leonardo; Albert, Thomas; Schmucki, Roland; Biller, Hermann; Singer, Thomas; Certa, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The long-tailed macaque, also referred to as cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), is one of the most important nonhuman primate animal models in basic and applied biomedical research. To improve the predictive power of primate experiments for humans, we determined the genome sequence of a Macaca fascicularis female of Mauritian origin using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing approach. We applied a template switch strategy that uses either the rhesus or the human genome to assemble sequence reads. The sixfold sequence coverage of the draft genome sequence enabled discovery of about 2.1 million potential single-nucleotide polymorphisms based on occurrence of a dimorphic nucleotide at a given position in the genome sequence. Homology-based annotation allowed us to identify 17,387 orthologs of human protein-coding genes in the M. fascicularis draft genome, and the predicted transcripts enabled the design of a M. fascicularis–specific gene expression microarray. Using liver samples from 36 individuals of different geographic origin we identified 718 genes with highly variable expression in liver, whereas the majority of the transcriptome shows relatively stable and comparable expression. Knowledge of the M. fascicularis draft genome is an important contribution to both the use of this animal in disease models and the safety assessment of drugs and their metabolites. In particular, this information allows high-resolution genotyping and microarray-based gene-expression profiling for animal stratification, thereby allowing the use of well-characterized animals for safety testing. Finally, the genome sequence presented here is a significant contribution to the global “3R” animal welfare initiative, which has the goal to reduce, refine, and replace animal experiments. PMID:21862625

  11. Neurodevelopmental and Psychological Assessment of Adolescents Born to Drug-Addicted Parents: Effects of SES and Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; Daka, Lulu; Goldzweig, Gil; Gil, Yoni; Mjen, Ludmila; Levit, Shabtai; Shufman, Emi; Bar-Hamburger, Rachel; Greenbaum, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Prenatal exposure to heroin may have long-term consequences for development during early and middle childhood. The present research studied the cognitive, social, and emotional functioning of adolescents exposed to drugs prenatally, and investigated the extent to which the early adoption of children exposed prenatally to drugs would…

  12. This Report is distributed annually to Lehigh faculty, staff and students in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989.

    E-print Network

    Napier, Terrence

    of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol. D. A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989. A Report1 to the Campus Community1 DDRRUUGGSS aanndd AALLCCOOHHOOLL Striving for a Drug-Free Environment for Students

  13. Distribution and assessment of marine debris in the deep Tyrrhenian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Michela; Lorenzo, Bianca di; Farcomeni, Alessio; Bo, Marzia; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Santangelo, Giovanni; Cau, Angelo; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Cau, Alessandro; Sacco, Flavio; Canese, Simonepietro

    2015-03-15

    Marine debris is a recognized global ecological concern. Little is known about the extent of the problem in the Mediterranean Sea regarding litter distribution and its influence on deep rocky habitats. A quantitative assessment of debris present in the deep seafloor (30-300m depth) was carried out in 26 areas off the coast of three Italian regions in the Tyrrhenian Sea, using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). The dominant type of debris (89%) was represented by fishing gears, mainly lines, while plastic objects were recorded only occasionally. Abundant quantities of gears were found on rocky banks in Sicily and Campania (0.09-0.12 debris m(-2)), proving intense fishing activity. Fifty-four percent of the recorded debris directly impacted benthic organisms, primarily gorgonians, followed by black corals and sponges. This work provides a first insight on the impact of marine debris in Mediterranean deep ecosystems and a valuable baseline for future comparisons. PMID:25604749

  14. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity. PMID:25275470

  15. Assessment of herbicide transport and distribution in subsurface environments of an orange field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Ma, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Xia

    2014-08-01

    The demand for assessing both the variability of risk areas and the intensity of pollutant load rates on pesticide transferring to waters in China has been increasingly vigorous in recent decades. Therefore, to explore the transport of linuron with rainfall and irrigation in canopy-soil systems, an integrated pesticide transport modeling system has been selected and verified for simulating the three-phase linuron environmental fate in an orange field of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) area. Results demonstrate that spatio-temporal distributions of linuron in surface soil primarily depend on its properties, rainfall, irrigation, and its applications; the peak levels of linuron in subsurface and deep soil are closely related to the cumulative and delayed effects. The findings may be used for policy supporting of soil-water-crop-pesticide management in an agricultural field of the TGR area. PMID:25306788

  16. Assessing T Cell Clonal Size Distribution: A Non-Parametric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V.; Zorin, Daniil Yu.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity. PMID:25275470

  17. Assessing the occurrence and distribution of pyrethroids in water and suspended sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of pyrethroid insecticides in the environment was assessed by separately measuring concentrations in the dissolved and suspended sediment phases of surface water samples. Filtered water was extracted by HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges, while the sediment on the filter was sonicated and cleaned up using carbon and aluminum cartridges. Detection limits for the 13 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were 0.5 to 1 ng L-1 for water and 2 to 6 ng g for the suspended sediments. Seven pyrethroids were detected in six water samples collected from either urban or agricultural creeks, with bifenthrin detected the most frequently and at the highest concentrations. In spiked water samples and field samples, the majority of the pyrethroids were associated with the suspended sediments.

  18. Ecological risk assessment of nonylphenol in coastal waters of China based on species sensitivity distribution model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pei; Li, Zhengyan; Gibson, Mark; Gao, Huiwang

    2014-06-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an endocrine disruptor and causes feminization and carcinogenesis in various organisms. Consequently, the environmental distribution and ecological risks of NP have received wide concern. China accounts for approximately 10% of the total NP usage in the world, but the water quality criteria of NP have not been established in China and the ecological risks of this pollutant cannot be properly assessed. This study thus aims to determine the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) of NP and to assess the ecological risks of NP in coastal waters of China with the PNEC as water quality criteria. To obtain the HC5 (hazardous concentration for 5% of biological species) and PNEC estimates, the species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) models were built with chronic toxicity data of NP on aquatic organisms screened from the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ECOTOX database. The results showed that the PNEC for NP in freshwater and seawater was 0.48 ?g L(-1) and 0.28 ?g L(-1), respectively. The RQ (risk quotient) values of NP in coastal waters of China ranged from 0.01 to 69.7. About 60% of the reported areas showed a high ecological risk with an RQ value ? 1.00. NP therefore exists ubiquitously in coastal waters of China and it poses various risks to aquatic ecosystems in the country. This study demonstrates that the SSD methodology can provide a feasible tool for the establishment of water quality criteria for emergent new pollutants when sufficient toxicity data is available. PMID:24268347

  19. Toward a unified model of passive drug permeation II: the physiochemical determinants of unbound tissue distribution with applications to the design of hepatoselective glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Avijit; Maurer, Tristan S; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthema V; Rotter, Charles; Scialis, Renato; Feng, Bo; Tu, Meihua; Guimaraes, Cris R W; Scott, Dennis O

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we leverage a mathematical model of the underlying physiochemical properties of tissues and physicochemical properties of molecules to support the development of hepatoselective glucokinase activators. Passive distribution is modeled via a Fick-Nernst-Planck approach, using in vitro experimental data to estimate the permeability of both ionized and neutral species. The model accounts for pH and electrochemical potential across cellular membranes, ionization according to Henderson-Hasselbalch, passive permeation of the neutral species using Fick's law, and passive permeation of the ionized species using the Nernst-Planck equation. The mathematical model of the physiochemical system allows derivation of a single set of parameters governing the distribution of drug molecules across multiple conditions both in vitro and in vivo. A case study using this approach in the development of hepatoselective glucokinase activators via organic anion-transporting polypeptide-mediated hepatic uptake and impaired passive distribution to the pancreas is described. The results for these molecules indicate the permeability penalty of the ionized form is offset by its relative abundance, leading to passive pancreatic exclusion according to the Nernst-Planck extension of Fickian passive permeation. Generally, this model serves as a useful construct for drug discovery scientists to understand subcellular exposure of acids or bases using specific physiochemical properties. PMID:25024402

  20. Drug Nanocarriers Labeled With Near-infrared-emitting Quantum Dots (Quantoplexes): Imaging Fast Dynamics of Distribution in Living Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zintchenko, Arkadi; Susha, Andrei S; Concia, Massimo; Feldmann, Jochen; Wagner, Ernst; Rogach, Andrey L; Ogris, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of the biodistribution of macromolecular drug formulations is a key to their successful development for specific tissue- and tumor-targeting after systemic application. Based on the polyplex formulations, we introduce novel drug nanocarriers, which we denote as “quantoplexes” incorporating near-infrared (IR)-emitting cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs), polyethylenimine (PEI), and a macromolecular model drug [plasmid DNA (pDNA)], and demonstrate the ability of tracking these bioactive compounds in living animals. Intravenous application of bare QD into nude mice leads to rapid accumulation in the liver and peripheral regions resembling lymph nodes, followed by clearance via the liver within hours to days. Quantoplexes rapidly accumulate in the lung, liver, and spleen and the fluorescent signal is detectable for at least a week. Tracking quantoplexes immediately after intravenous injection shows rapid redistribution from the lung to the liver within 5 minutes, depending on the PEI topology and quantoplex formulation used. With polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-modified quantoplexes, blood circulation and passive tumor accumulation was measured in real time. The use of quantoplexes will strongly accelerate the development of tissue and tumor-targeted macromolecular drug carriers. PMID:19707184