Science.gov

Sample records for assisted stress corrosion

  1. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  2. Stress Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes - Failure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Preet M; Pawel, Steven J; Yang, Dong; Mahmood, Jamshad

    2007-01-01

    Stress assisted corrosion (SAC) of carbon steel boiler tubes is one of the major causes of waterside failure in industrial boilers. SAC is a major concern for kraft recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry as any water leak into the furnace can cause a smelt-water explosion in the boiler. Failed carbon steel boiler tubes from different kraft recovery boilers were examined to understand the role of carbon steel microstructure on crack initiation and SAC crack morphology. A number of carbon steel tubes showed a deep decarburized layer on the inner surface (water-touched) and also an unusually large grain size at the inner tube surface. SAC cracks were found to initiate in these areas with large-graineddecarburized microstructure. Tubes without such microstructure were also found to have SAC cracks. It was found that the decarburization and large grained microstructure may facilitate initiation and growth but is not necessary for SAC of carbon steel boiler tubes.

  3. A review of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P.

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this review is to assess from the available data whether irradiation in PWR primary water can adversely affect the properties of stainless steels due to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). The following aspects are examined: (i) Irradiation damage of the material, (ii) The influence of water radiolysis. Since the irradiation damage processes are similar for both PWR and BWR systems, differences observed in the intergranular cracking properties of core components of both systems must be attributable to differences in the synergistic interactions with the coolant chemistry. These aspects are analysed in detail to determine to what extent BWR experience can be used to predict IASCC in PWR core components. Several related potential failure mechanisms are also reviewed such as radiation hardening, radiation creep and helium or hydrogen embrittlement. The probable role of some or all of these failure mechanisms in core component failures observed to date, and in experiments ostensibly designed to observe IASCC, is critically examined.

  4. Initiation stress threshold irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking criterion assessment for core internals in PWR environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguy, Benoit; Stern, Anthony; Bossis, Philippe; Pokor, Cedric

    2012-07-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a problem of growing importance in pressurized water reactors (PWR). An understanding of the mechanism(s) of IASCC is required in order to provide guidance for the development of mitigation strategies. One of the principal reasons why the IASCC mechanism(s) has been so difficult to understand is the inseparability of the different IASCC potential contributors evolutions due to neutron irradiation. The potential contributors to IASCC in PWR primary water are: (i) radiation induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, (ii) radiation induced microstructure (formation and growth of dislocations loops, voids, bubbles, phases), (iii) localized deformation under loading, (iv) irradiation creep and transmutations. While the development of some of the contributors (RIS, microstructure) with increasing doses are at least qualitatively well understood, the role of these changes on IASCC remains unclear. Parallel to fundamental understanding developments relative to IASCC, well controlled laboratory tests on neutron irradiated stainless steels are needed to assess the main mechanisms and also to establish an engineering criterion relative to the initiation of fracture due to IASCC. First part of this study describes the methodology carried out at CEA in order to provide more experimental data from constant load tests dedicated to the study of initiation of SCC on neutron irradiated stainless steel. A description of the autoclave recirculation loop dedicated to SCC tests on neutron irradiated materials is then given. This autoclave recirculation loop has been started on July 2010 with the first SCC test on an irradiated stainless steel (grade 316) performed at CEA. The main steps of the interrupted SCC tests are then described. Second part of this paper reports the partial results of the first test performed on a highly neutron irradiated material. (authors)

  5. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  6. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  7. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water. New data confirms previous results that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Low boron heats show improved IASCC (irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking). Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC. Microstructural, microchemical, and deformation studies were carried out. Irradiation of X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss associated with formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation did not cause segregation in X-750. Irradiation of 625 resulted in formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to loops and precipitates was apparently offset in 625 by partial dissolution of {gamma} precipitates. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in superior IASCC resistance in 625.

  8. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  9. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  10. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of model austenitic stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.; Karlsen, T. M.

    1999-10-26

    Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted on model austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and {approx} 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. At {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, a high-purity heat of Type 316L SS that contains a very low concentration of Si exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. In unirradiated state, Types 304 and 304L SS did not exhibit a systematic effect of Si content on alloy strength. However, at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, yield and maximum strengths decreased significantly as Si content was increased to >0.9 wt.%. Among alloys that contain low concentrations of C and N, ductility and resistance to TGSCC and IGSCC were significantly greater for alloys with >0.9 wt.% Si than for alloys with <0.47 wt.% Si. Initial data at {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} were also consistent with the beneficial effect of high Si content. This indicates that to delay onset of and reduce susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), at least at low fluence levels, it is helpful to ensure a certain minimum concentration of Si. High concentrations of Cr were also beneficial; alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater susceptibility to IASCC than alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  11. Irradiation-Assisted Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Nitinol During eBeam Sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stuart A.; Gause, Brock; Plumley, David; Drexel, Masao J.

    2012-12-01

    Medical device fractures during gamma and electron beam (eBeam) sterilization have been reported. Two common factors in these device fractures were a constraining force and the presence of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). This study investigated the effects of eBeam sterilization on constrained light-oxide nitinol wires in FEP. The goal was to recreate these fractures and determine their root cause. Superelastic nitinol wires were placed inside FEP tubes and constrained with nominal outer fiber strains of 10, 15, and 20%. These samples were then subjected to a range of eBeam sterilization doses up to 400 kGy and compared with unconstrained wires also subjected to sterilization. Fractures were observed at doses of >100 kGy. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the samples failed due to irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC). This same effect was also observed to occur with PTFE at 400 kGy. These results suggest that nitinol is susceptible to IASCC when in the presence of a constraining stress, fluorinated polymers, and irradiation.

  12. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  13. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  14. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water to determine the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct-aged Alloy 625. New data confirm previous results showing that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat variability correlates with boron content, with low boron heats showing improved IASCC properties. Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens. Microstructural, microchemical and deformation studies were performed to characterize the mechanisms responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750 and the lack of an effect in Alloy 625. The mechanisms under investigation are: boron transmutation effects, radiation-induced changes in microstructure and deformation characteristics, and radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation of Alloy X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss that was associated with the formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation levels did not cause significant segregation of alloying or trace elements in Alloy X-750. Irradiation of Alloy 625 resulted in the formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to the loops and precipitates was apparently offset by a partial dissolution of {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates, as Alloy 625 showed no irradiation-induced strengthening or ductility loss. In the nonirradiated condition, an IASCC susceptible HTH heat containing 28 ppm B showed grain boundary segregation of boron, whereas a nonsusceptible HTH heat containing 2 ppm B and Alloy 625 with 20 ppm B did not show significant boron segregation. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in the superior IASCC resistance displayed by Alloy 625.

  15. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  16. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of materials from commercial BWRs: Role of grain-boundary microchemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.

    1993-12-01

    Constant-extension-rate tensile tests and grain-boundary analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy which were conducted on high- and commercial-purity (HP and CP) Type 304 stainless steel (SS) specimens from irradiated boiling-water reactor (BWR) components to determine susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and to identify the mechanisms of intergranular failure. The susceptibility of HP neutron absorber tubes to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was higher than that of CP absorber tubes or CP control blade sheath. Contrary to previous beliefs, susceptibility to intergranular fracture could not be correlated with radiation-induced segregation of impurities such as Si, P, C, N, or S, but a correlation was obtained with grain-boundary Cr concentration, indicating a role for Cr depletion that promotes IASCC. Detailed analysis of grain-boundary chemistry was conducted on neutron absorber tubes that were fabricated from two similar heats of HP Type 304 SS of virtually identical bulk chemical composition but exhibiting a significant difference in susceptibility to IGSCC for similar fluence. Grain-boundary concentrations of Cr, Ni, Si, P, S, and C in the crack-resistant and susceptible HP heats were virtually identical. However, grain boundaries of the cracking-resistant material contained less N and more B and Li (transmutation product from B) than those of the crack-susceptible material, indicating beneficial effects of low N and high B contents.

  17. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  18. Role of Localized Deformation in Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Elaine A.; McMurtrey, Michael D.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular cracking of irradiated austenitic alloys depended on localized grain boundary stress and deformation in both high-temperature aqueous and argon environments. Tensile specimens were irradiated with protons to doses of 1 to 7 dpa and then strained in high-temperature argon, simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry, and supercritical water environments. Quantitative measurements confirmed that the initiation of intergranular cracks was promoted by (1) the formation of coarse dislocation channels, (2) discontinuous slip across grain boundaries, (3) a high inclination of the grain boundary to the tensile axis, and (4) low-deformation propensity of grains as characterized by their Schmid and Taylor factors. The first two correlations, as well as the formation of intergranular cracks at the precise locations of dislocation channel-grain boundary intersections are evidence that localized deformation drives crack initiation. The latter two correlations are evidence that intergranular cracking is promoted at grain boundaries experiencing elevated levels of normal stress.

  19. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Bajaj, R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked compact tension specimens was performed in 360{degree}C water to determine effect of irradiation on the SCC behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct aged Alloy 625. Out-of-flux and autoclave control specimens provided baseline data. Primary test variables were stress intensity factor, fluence, chemistry, processing history, prestrain. Results for the first series of experiments were presented at a previous conference. Data from two more recent experiments are compared with previous results; they confirm that high irradiation levels significantly reduce SCC resistance in HTH Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat differences in IASCC were related to differences in boron content, with low boron heats showing improved SCC resistance. The in-reactor SCC performance of Alloy 625 was superior to that for Alloy X-750, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens even though they were tested at very high K{sub 1} and fluence levels. A preliminary SCC usage model developed for Alloy X-750 indicates that in-reactor creep processes, which relax stresses but also increase crack tip strain rates, and radiolysis effects accelerate SCC. Hence, in-reactor SCC damage under high flux conditions may be more severe than that associated with postirradiation tests. In addition, preliminary mechanism studies were performed to determine the cause of IASCC In Alloy X-750.

  20. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  1. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  2. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  3. Stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Smyrl, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Service experience applications, experimental data generation, and the development of satisfactory quantitative theories relevant to the suppression and control of stress corrosion cracking in titanium are discussed. The impact of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the use of titanium alloys is considered, with emphasis on utilization in the aerospace field. Recent data on hot salt SCC, crack growth in hydrogen gas, and crack growth in liquid environments containing halide ions are reviewed. The status of the understanding of crack growth processes in these environments is also examined.

  4. Degreasing of titanium to minimize stress corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Stress corrosion of titanium and its alloys at elevated temperatures is minimized by replacing trichloroethylene with methanol or methyl ethyl ketone as a degreasing agent. Wearing cotton gloves reduces stress corrosion from perspiration before the metal components are processed.

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  6. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  7. De-alloying and stress-corrosion cracking. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, K.

    1998-09-01

    This research program has had two major areas of focus that are related: (1) alloy corrosion and (2) the role of selective dissolution in the stress corrosion cracking of alloy systems. These interrelated issues were examined using model systems such as Ag-Au and Cu-Au by conventional electrochemical techniques, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultrahigh speed digital photography of fracture events, and computer simulations. The STM and SANS work were specifically aimed at addressing a roughening transition known to occur in alloy systems undergoing corrosion at electrochemical potentials greater than the so-called critical potential. Analytical models of de-alloying processes including the roughening transition were developed that specifically include curvature effects that are important in alloy corrosion processes. Stress-corrosion experiments were performed on the same model systems using rapid optical and electrochemical techniques on 50 {micro}m--250 {micro}m thick sheets and small diameter wires. The primary goal of this work was to develop a fundamental understanding of the corrosion and electrochemistry of alloys and the stress-corrosion cracking processes these alloys undergo. Computer simulations and analytical work identified surface stress and an important parameter in environmentally assisted fracture. The major results of the research on this program since the summer of 1993 are briefly summarized.

  8. On the Problem of Stress Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, L.

    1946-01-01

    The object of the present work is first to investigate accurately the processes during stress corrosion, in particular, for light metal alloys and, as the first part of the investigation, to determine its laws; and secondly to explain its causes for various alloys and thereby find means for its partial or complete elimination and thus make possible the production of light metal alloys free from any stress corrosion. In the present paper some of the results of the investigation are given and the fundamental problems of stress corrosion discussed.

  9. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  10. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  11. Effect of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe integrity and remaining life

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping is often exposed to corrosive fluids. During service, such exposure may cause localized corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking that affects structural integrity. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines. It accounts for both axial and hoop stress. Cracks are modeled using inelastic fracture mechanics. Both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes are addressed. Corrosion and crack-growth rates are used to predict remaining service life.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    POH-SANG, LAM

    2005-01-13

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the role of weld residual stress on stress corrosion cracking in welded carbon steel plates prototypic to those used for nuclear waste storage tanks. Carbon steel specimen plates were butt-joined with Gas Metal Arc Welding technique. Initial cracks (seed cracks) were machined across the weld and in the heat affected zone. These specimen plates were then submerged in a simulated high level radioactive waste chemistry environment. Stress corrosion cracking occurred in the as-welded plate but not in the stress-relieved duplicate. A detailed finite element analysis to simulate exactly the welding process was carried out, and the resulting temperature history was used to calculate the residual stress distribution in the plate for characterizing the observed stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that the cracking can be predicted for the through-thickness cracks perpendicular to the weld by comparing the experimental KISCC to the calculated stress intensity factors due to the welding residual stress. The predicted crack lengths agree reasonably well with the test data. The final crack lengths appear to be dependent on the details of welding and the sequence of machining the seed cracks, consistent with the prediction.

  13. A rapid stress-corrosion test for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Stressed alloy specimens are immersed in a salt-dichromate solution at 60 degrees C. Because of the minimal general corrosion of these alloys in this solution, stress corrosion failures are detected by low-power microscopic examination.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  15. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  16. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  18. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in coal liquefaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V. B.; Keiser, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The liquefaction of coal to produce clean-burning synthetic fuels has been demonstrated at the pilot plant level. However, some significant materials problems must be solved before scale-up to commercial levels of production can be completed. Failures due to inadequate materials performance have been reported in many plant areas: in particular, stress corrosion cracking has been found in austenitic stainless steels in the reaction and separation areas and several corrosion has been observed in fractionation components. In order to screen candidate materials of construction, racks of U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions and unstressed surveillance coupons were exposed in pilot plant vessels and evaluated. Failed components were analyzed on-site and by subsequent laboratory work. Laboratory tests were also performed. From these studies alloys have been identified that are suitable for critical plant locations. 19 figures, 7 tables.

  19. Stress corrosion of high strength aluminum alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.; Brummer, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out to examine the relationship of the observed chemical and mechanical properties of Al-Cu and Al-Zn-Mg alloys to the stress corrosion mechanisms which dominate in each case. Two high purity alloys and analogous commercial alloys were selected. Fundamental differences between the behavior of Al-Cu and of Al-Zn-Mg alloys were observed. These differences in the corrosion behavior of the two types of alloys are augmented by substantial differences in their mechanical behavior. The relative cleavage energy of the grain boundaries is of particular importance.

  20. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  1. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  2. Aircraft crash caused by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kolkman, H.J.; Kool, G.A.; Wanhill, R.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An aircraft crash in the Netherlands was caused by disintegration of a jet engine. Fractography showed that the chain of events started with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a pin attached to a lever arm of the compressor variable vane system. Such a lever arm-pin assembly costs only a few dollars. Investigation of hundreds of pins from the accident and a number of identical engines revealed that this was not an isolated case. Many pins exhibited various amounts of SCC. The failed pin in the accident engine happened to be the first fractured one. SCC requires the simultaneous presence of tensile stress, a corrosive environment, and a susceptible material. In this case the stress was a residual stress arising from the production method. There was a clear correlation between the presence of salt deposits on the levers and SCC of the pins. It was shown that these deposits were able to reach the internal space between the pin and lever arm, thereby initiating SCC in this space. The corrosive environment in Western Europe explains why the problem manifested itself in the Netherlands at a relatively early stage in engine life. The main point is, however, that the manufacturer selected an SCC-prone material in the design stage. The solution has been to change the pin material.

  3. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  4. Residual stress effects in stress-corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a wide variety of residual stress effects in stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of metallic materials on the basis of previous research of the author on high-strength steel in the form of hot-rolled bars and cold-drawn wires for prestressed concrete. It is seen that internal residual stress fields in the material play a very important -- if not decisive -- role in the SCC behavior of any engineering material, especially residual stresses generated near the free surface or in the vicinity of a crack tip.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking and intergranular corrosion of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, K.; Shima, S.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.

    1992-09-01

    The effects of irradiation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility were investigated in solution-treated Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys and JPCA irradiated to 5.3×1024 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV) at 573 K. In Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys, the irradiation enhanced IGC i n boiling HNO3 + Cr6+ solution when the alloys contained phosphorus and silicon and induced SCC in all the alloys with strain rate tensile tests in 571 K water containing 32 ppm oxygen. With increasing phosphorus and silicon contents. IGC was promoted but IGSCC was suppressed after irradiation. The results indicated that these elements are not the main contributors to irradiation-assisted SCC, although they affect SCC behavior. The Japanese Prime Candidate Alloy (JPCA) had better SCC resistance than Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys under the present irradiation condition.

  6. Sulfide stress corrosion cracking of line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kimuro, M.; Totsuka, N.; Kurisu, T.; Amano, K.; Matsuyama, J.; Nakai, Y. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper reports the sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) behavior of line pipe steel investigated using the SSC test method in NACE Standard TMO177-77, Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking at Ambient Temperatures. SSC of base metal can be classified into two types, depending on microstructures. In ferrite-perlite steel, the first crack initiates parallel to the pipe surface and propagates perpendicularly to the axis of stress. In ferrite-bainite steel or low C-bainite steel, the crack initiates at the interface between the bainite particle and the ferrite. With decreasing carbon content, the threshold stress of SSC ({sigma}{sub th}) increases, but in low-carbon steel, the {sigma}{sub th} value of weld seam is lower than that of base metal. SSC of weld seams occurs at the softening zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) about 2 to 4 mm away from the fusion line.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  8. Design Criteria for Controlling Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    This document sets forth the criteria to be used in the selection of materials for space vehicles and associated equipment and facilities so that failure resulting from stress corrosion will be prevented. The requirements established herein apply to all metallic components proposed for use in space vehicles and other flight hardware, ground support equipment, and facilities for testing. These requirements are applicable not only to items designed and fabricated by MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) and its prime contractors, but also to items supplied to the prime contractor by subcontractors and vendors.

  9. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  10. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture under random loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Mathematical formulation is based on cumulative-damage hypothesis and experimentally-determined stress-corrosion characteristics. Under both stationary random loadings, mean value and variance of cumulative damage are obtained. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture is then evaluated, using principle of maximum entropy.

  11. Resistance of Some Steels to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluations of stress-corrosion cracking resistance of five high-strength low-alloy steels described in report now available. Steels were heat-treated to various tensile strengths and found to be highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking in the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two fundamental concepts of fracture mechanics are used to develop a theory of the earthquake mechanism which specifically predicts observed time-dependent rupture phenomena such as slow earthquakes, postseismic rupture growth and afterslip, multiple events, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory also predicts that there must be a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may trigger another. Investigations show that all earthquakes must be preceded by a quasi-static slip over a portion of the rupture surfaces, although it may be difficult to detect in practice, and a study of delayed multiple events characterizes the strength of some barriers in the earth as having a stress corrosion index of about 24.

  13. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.; Syrett, B.C.

    1980-03-01

    The overall aim has been to develop an improved understanding of the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism considered to be responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failures of nuclear fuel rods. The objective of the present phase of the project was to investigate the potential for improving the resistance of Zircaloy to iodine-induced SCC by modifying the manufacturing techniques used in the commercial production of fuel cladding. Several aspects of iodine SCC behavior of potential relevance to cladding performance were experimentally investigated. It was found that the SCC susceptibility of Zircaloy tubing is sensitive to crystallographic texture, surface condition, and residual stress distribution and that current specifications for Zircaloy tubing provide no assurance of an optimum resistance to SCC. Additional evidence was found that iodine-induced cracks initiate at local chemical inhomogeneities in the Zircaloy surface, but laser melting to produce a homogenized surface layer did not improve the SCC resistance. Several results were obtained that should be considered in models of PCI failure. The ratio of axial to hoop stress and the temperature were both shown to affect the SCC resistance whereas the difference in composition between Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 had no detectable effect. Damage accumulation during iodine SCC was found to be nonlinear: generally, a given life fraction at low stress was more damaging than the same life fraction at higher stress. Studies of the thermochemistry of the zirconium-iodine system (performed under US Department of Energy sponsorship) revealed many errors in the literature and provided important new insights into the mechanism of iodine SCC of Zircaloys.

  15. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  16. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  17. Effects of Stress on Corrosion in a Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdzis, Samuel; Manos, Dennis; Cooke, William

    Molten salt is often used as a heat transfer and energy storage fluid in concentrating solar power plants. Despite its suitable thermal properties, molten salt can present challenges in terms of corrosion. Previous studies have focused extensively on mass loss due to molten salt-induced corrosion. In contrast, we have investigated how corrosion begins and how it changes the surface of stainless steel. Samples of alloys including 304 and 316 stainless steel were exposed to the industry-standard NaNO3-KNO3 (60%-40% by weight) mixture at temperatures over 500°C and then analyzed using Hirox, SEM, and TOF-SIMS. We compare the corrosion at grain boundaries to that within single grain surfaces, showing the effect of the increased internal stresses and the weakened passivation layer. Also, we have examined the enhanced corrosion of samples under mechanical stress, simulating the effects of thermal stresses in a power plant.

  18. Grease Inhibits Stress-Corrosion Cracking In Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, Robert F.; Mcvey, Scott E.

    1991-01-01

    Coating with suitable grease found to inhibit stress-corrosion cracking in bore of inner race of ball-bearing assembly operating in liquid oxygen. Protects bore and its corner radii from corrosion-initiating and -accelerating substances like moisture and contaminants, which enter during assembly. Operating life extended at low cost, and involves very little extra assembly time.

  19. An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory test method that is only mildly corrosive to aluminum and discriminating for use in classifying the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys is presented along with the method used in evaluating the media selected for testing. The proposed medium is easier to prepare and less expensive than substitute ocean water.

  20. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  1. Titanium alloy stress corrosion cracking in presence of dinitrogen tetroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, A. Z.; Clarke, J. F. G., Jr.; Gailey, J. A.; Orr, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study resulting in a satisfactory stress corrosion cracking test with extremely consistent results produced six new analytical methods. Methods detect and determine differences in the minor constituent composition of different types of dinitrogen tetroxide.

  2. Stress-corrosion-induced property changes in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, B. F.; Clotfelter, W. N.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of electrical conductivity, ultrasonic surface wave attenuation, and internal friction loss were made on aluminum alloys 7079-T6, 2219-T31, and 2219-T81 as a function of the onset of stress corrosion.

  3. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in Zr-1% Nb claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibilashvily, Yu. K.; Dolgov, Yu. N.; Nesterov, B. I.; Novikov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental results on iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are analyzed. The studies were performed at 350°C using Zr-1% Nb tubular specimens. Fatigue crack at internal surface served as an initial defect. The relationship was derived between crack propagation rate and stress intensity factor; the threshold stress intensity factor of 4.8 MPa m{1}/{2} was determined.

  4. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion. PMID:11211846

  5. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  6. Proceedings: 1984 Workshop on Secondary-Side Stress Corrosion Cracking and Intergranular Corrosion of PWR Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-01

    During 1984, research investigating intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in PWR steam generators provided data to formulate a corrosion-product transport theory. In addition, the research showed that changing the pH of liquids in generator crevices will retard and sometimes arrest the corrosion process.

  7. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  8. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  9. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  10. A Milder Solution for Stress-Corrosion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Coston, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    In search for mild corrosive, 14 different salt solutions screened in alternate-immersion tests on 3 aluminum alloys. Best results were obtained with NaCl/MgCl2 solution and with synthetic seawater (contains nearly same proportions of NaCl and MgCl2 along with precise, minute amounts of eight other salts). Because solution is less expensive than artificial seawater, it is probably preferred for future stress-corrosion-cracking (SCC) testing.

  11. Application of new experimental methods to pipeline stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Crocker, J. E.; Kanazawa, C. H.; Kempf, J. A.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the investigation is to develop a physically based understanding of the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pipeline steels by applying advanced fracture surface and electrochemical characterization techniques to samples taken from fielded pipeline and to laboratory corrosion test specimens. SCC is a well-known concern of the gas industry that occasionally affects natural gas treatment plants, gathering lines, and transmission lines. The research program is designed to increase the understanding of pipeline degradation by identifying the specific mechanisms that control SCC. From the results, the authors expect to improve the ability to identify features in the metallurgy of pipeline steel, the environmental conditions that affect the susceptibility to SCC. The effect of overloads (possibly from hydrotests or pressure fluctuations) on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks was readily evident from an analysis of the topographies of conjugate fracture surfaces. Crack branching usually resulted from overloads. Corrosion products were removed from the fracture surfaces of a stress corrosion crack in a pipeline specimen recovered from service. The topography of the underlying metal surface appears to be preserved with little corrosion damage after crack formation. This allowed the cracking process to be reconstructed and details to be investigated.

  12. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture under random loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the probability of stress-corrosion fracture of structures under random loadings. The formulation is based on the cumulative damage hypothesis and the experimentally determined stress-corrosion characteristics. Under both stationary and nonstationary random loadings, the mean value and the variance of the cumulative damage are obtained. The probability of stress-corrosion fracture is then evaluated using the principle of maximum entropy. It is shown that, under stationary random loadings, the standard deviation of the cumulative damage increases in proportion to the square root of time, while the coefficient of variation (dispersion) decreases in inversed proportion to the square root of time. Numerical examples are worked out to illustrate the general results.

  13. Mechanism of hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R.; Ferreira, M.G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Based on the mass transport in the stress corrosion crack, a mathematical expression of potential distribution along the stress corrosion crack is deduced. From this mathematical expression and the E-pH diagram for H{sub 2}O, a new mechanism for hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack i.e. H{sup +} partial potential drop mechanism, is proposed. Following this mechanism, the relationship between hydrogen generation and affecting factors, such as current density of anodic dissolution inside the crack, pH value, partial resistivity of H{sup +} ion, dimension of the crack and potential of the metal, is discussed. The mechanism is verified by experimental measurement results of the H{sup +} partial potential drop with microelectrodes placed in an artificial crack on AISI 410 stainless steel in 3%NaCl solution.

  14. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  16. The effects of radiolysis on the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of 316 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Duquette, D.J.; Steiner, D.

    1993-09-01

    This program is focused on the corrosion, stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel (316SS) at 50, 90, and 130 C in high-purity water. Irradiated solution tests are performed using high-energy photon radiation. Purpose of this work is to determine the effects of radiolysis products on the environmental stability of 316SS in support of the ITER first wall/shield/blanket design. Preliminary results suggest that irradiation of pure water at 50 C results in a shift in the electrochemical potential for 316SS of approximately 100mV in the active direction and nearly an order of magnitude increase in the passive current density as compared to non-irradiated conditions. This proposal outlines a three-year program to develop corrosion design criteria for the use of 316SS in an ITER environment.

  17. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 5454

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, G.S.; Xia, Z.

    1999-02-01

    The susceptibility of welded and unwelded samples of Al 5454 (UNS A95454) in the -O and -H34 tempers to pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride solutions was studied. Welded samples were fabricated using the relatively new friction stir welding (FSW) process as well as a standard gas-tungsten arc welding process for comparison. Pitting corrosion was assessed through potentiodynamic polarization experiments. U-bend and slow strain rate tests were used to determine SCC resistance. The FSW samples exhibited superior resistance to pitting corrosion compared to the base metal and arc-welded samples. U-bend tests indicated adequate SCC resistance for the FSW samples. However, the FSW samples exhibited discontinuities that probably were associated with remnant boundaries of the original plates. These defects resulted in intermittent increased susceptibility to pitting and, particularly for Al 5454-H34 samples, poor mechanical properties in general.

  18. Microstructure Instability of Candidate Fuel Cladding Alloys: Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yinan; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, David; Kish, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses some of the overarching aspects of microstructure instability expected from both high temperature and radiation exposure that could affect the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the candidate austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys being considered for the fuel cladding of the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) concept. An overview of the microstructure instability expected by both exposures is presented prior to turning the focus onto the implications of such instability on the corrosion and SCC resistance. Results from testing conducted using pre-treated (thermally-aged) Type 310S stainless steel to shed some light on this important issue are included to help identify the outstanding corrosion resistance assessment needs.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  20. Assessment of Stress in Physician Assistant Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Lisa; Kranz, Peter L.; Koo, Felix; Cossio, Griselda; Lund, Nick L.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven full-time students within the Physician Assistant Studies Program at The University of Texas--Pan American were anonymously surveyed to determine their levels of stress while enrolled in their first semester. The majority of respondents reported that their stress levels at this point in the program tell within the moderate to…

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium used in the reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Chiaki; Motooka, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2007-07-01

    We investigated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium by constant load test and the small-scale mock-up test simulated the fuel dissolve. These tests operated in the simulated solution, which substituted non-radioactive elements, i.e. V with radioactive elements such as Pu and Np. From the results of constant load test, the cracks were not observed on 150 MPa after 908 hours in approximately 3 % strain. However a lot of cracks caused by SCC were observed over 20 % strain under high tensile stress in the simulated solution and the heat-transfer condition having more corrosive circumstance and noble potential accelerated the susceptibility of SCC. The cracking behavior would be caused by the creep phenomena. The small-scale mock-up test had been operated for about 50000 hours during 7 year. From the results, zirconium showed excellent corrosion resistance and no SCC was observed during these long-term operations. (authors)

  2. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  3. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  4. Stress corrosion susceptibility of stress-coined fastener holes in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, A. E.; Hanagud, S.

    1975-01-01

    The cold working process of stress coining is used to provide fatigue improvement of fastener holes in aircraft structures. The cold working produces a radial flow of the metal. The residual stresses resulting from stress coining provide protection against fatigue damage by opposing the applied tensile stresses in service at the edge of the fastener hole. However, it is shown in this paper that in addition to the compressive stresses surrounding the stress coined hole, there are tensile stresses that result from the coining operation and that these residual tensile stresses can have a deleterious effect on the stress corrosion susceptibility of the postcoined structure.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  6. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of admiralty brass condenser tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, A.G. ); Kendall, D. )

    1993-12-01

    Sodium sulfite is used routinely for removing traces of oxygen from the water in low- and moderate-pressure boilers. Sodium sulfite is unacceptable for use in higher pressure boilers because it will decompose, which will release acidic gases into the steam and increase corrosion of after-boiler components. However, even in moderate-pressure boilers, one of the products of sulfite decomposition, moist sulfur dioxide, can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper alloys. Monitoring the degree of sulfite decomposition in a specific boiler and controlling the factors that promote decomposition will reduce the likelihood and severity of SCC.

  8. Laboratory stress corrosion cracking studies in polythionic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Newsome, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Stress corrosion cracking caused by polythionic acid and/or chlorides is a problem in coal liquefaction pilot plants. This problem is also common in refineries and has been the subject of extensive research. This study examines (1) the relationship of the ASTM standard ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test for determining sensitization to resistance to polythionic stress corrosion cracking, (2) the cracking resistance of higher-alloy Fe-Ni-Cr materials in addition to the common austenitic stainless steels, and (3) the effect of chloride concentrations up to 1% in polythionic acid solutions on cracking behavior. We found that the ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test can be used as an acceptance test for materials resistant to polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking because of its severity. The more highly alloyed materials were more resistant to sensitization than most of the austenitic stainless steels and were virtually unattacked in polythionic acid solutions containing up to 1% chloride. Chloride increased the corrosion rate and caused localized pitting, but it did not affect significantly the number of failures or the failure mode.

  9. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  10. Effects of hot-salt stress corrosion on titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Susceptibility of titanium alloys to hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking increased as follows: Ti-2Al-11Sn-5Zr-1Mo-0.2Si (679), Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (6242), Ti-6Al-4V (64), Ti-6Al-4V-3Co (643), Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V (811), and Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al (13-11-3). The Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.25Si (5621S) alloy was both the least and most susceptible, depending on heat treatment. Such rankings can be drastically altered by heat-to-heat variations and processing conditions. Residual compressive stresses reduce susceptibility to stress-corrosion. Detection of substantial concentrations of hydrogen in all corroded alloys confirmed the generality of a previously proposed hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  11. Experiments and models of general corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of materials in nuclear reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, William Gordon

    Corrosion and material degradation issues are of concern to all industries. However, the nuclear power industry must conform to more stringent construction, fabrication and operational guidelines due to the perceived additional risk of operating with radioactive components. Thus corrosion and material integrity are of considerable concern for the operators of nuclear power plants and the bodies that govern their operations. In order to keep corrosion low and maintain adequate material integrity, knowledge of the processes that govern the material's breakdown and failure in a given environment are essential. The work presented here details the current understanding of the general corrosion of stainless steel and carbon steel in nuclear reactor primary heat transport systems (PHTS) and examines the mechanisms and possible mitigation techniques for flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) in CANDU outlet feeder pipes. Mechanistic models have been developed based on first principles and a 'solution-pores' mechanism of metal corrosion. The models predict corrosion rates and material transport in the PHTS of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the influence of electrochemistry on the corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of carbon steel in the CANDU outlet feeders. In-situ probes, based on an electrical resistance technique, were developed to measure the real-time corrosion rate of reactor materials in high-temperature water. The probes were used to evaluate the effects of coolant pH and flow on FAC of carbon steel as well as demonstrate of the use of titanium dioxide as a coolant additive to mitigated FAC in CANDU outlet feeder pipes.

  12. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Bäker, M.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  13. Early stages in the development of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-12-01

    Processes in growth of short cracks and stage I of long stress corrosion cracks were identified and evaluated. There is evidence that electrochemical effects can cause short stress corrosion cracks to grow at rates faster or slower than long cracks. Short cracks can grow at faster rates than long cracks for a salt film dissolution growth mechanism or from reduced oxygen inhibition of hydrolytic acidification. An increasing crack growth rate with increasing crack length could result from a process of increasing crack tip concentration of a critical anion, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, with increasing crack length in a system where the crack velocity is dependent on the Cl{sup {minus}} or some other anion concentration. An increasing potential drop between crack tip and mouth would result in an increased anion concentration at the crack tip and hence an increasing crack velocity. Stage I behavior of long cracks is another early development stage in the life of a stress corrosion crack which is poorly understood. This stage can be described by da/dt = AK{sup m} where da/dt is crack velocity, A is a constant, K is stress intensity and m ranges from 2 to 24 for a variety of materials and environments. Only the salt film dissolution model was found to quantitatively describe this stage; however, the model was only tested on one material and its general applicability is unknown.

  14. Proper PWHT can stop stress-induced corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, C.; Hill, J.; Connell, D.

    1997-05-01

    Postweld heat treatment of welded joints to improve the ductility of welds susceptible to cracking due to metal composition or wall thickness has become an essential component of standards generated by professional organizations. When properly applied, these procedures have proven to be quite effective in preventing premature weld-related failures. Recently, the welding industry has recognized that weld-induced stress also plays a role in certain localized corrosion phenomena. To address the cause of these long-term corrosion failures, it has become common practice to specify postweld heat treatment for thin-walled piping and vessels that would otherwise be exempt from code procedures. Corrosion often continues to be a problem even after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is performed on these relatively thin-walled weldments. The results of the extensive tests performed for the preparation of this paper indicate that surprisingly large through-wall radial temperature gradients often exist during the application of common PWHT practices. As a result of these radial temperature gradients, the standard application of heating elements to the pipe exterior does not always provide assurance that the interior surfaces at the edge of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) will achieve the temperatures necessary to adequately reduce weld-induced hardness. It is on these interior surfaces that the stress-induced corrosion phenomena is initiated.

  15. Laser surface melting of aluminium alloy 6013 for improving stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Long

    Laser surface treatment of aluminium alloy 6013, a relatively new high strength aluminium alloy, was conducted with the aim of improving the alloy's resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. In the first phase of this research, laser surface melting (LSM) of the alloy was conducted using an excimer laser. The microstructural changes induced by the laser treatment were studied in detail and characterised. The results showed that excimer LSM produced a relatively thin, non-dentritic planar re-melted layer which is largely free of coarse constituent particles and precipitates. The planar growth phenomenon was explained using the high velocity and high temperature gradient absolute stability criteria. The structure of the oxide and/or the nitride bearing film at the outmost surface of the re-melted layer was also characterised. The results of the electrochemical tests showed that the pitting corrosion resistance of the alloy could be greatly increased by excimer laser melting, especially when the alloy was treated in nitrogen gas: the corrosion current density of the N2-treated specimen was some two orders of magnitude lower than that of the air-treated specimen which was one order of magnitude lower than that of the untreated specimen. The effect of the outer surface oxide and/or nitride bearing film per se on pitting corrosion resistance was determined. The results of a Mott - Schottky analysis strongly suggest that the outer surface film, which exhibited the nature of an n-type semiconductor was responsible for the significant improvement of the corrosion resistance of the laser-treated material. Furthermore, the corrosion response of the surface film was modelled using equivalent circuits. Based on the results of the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) and corrosion fatigue tests, the stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion fatigue behaviour of the excimer laser treated material was evaluated. The results of the SSRT test showed that, in

  16. ZERODUR®: new stress corrosion data improve strength fatigue prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Kleer, Günter; Rist, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    The extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® finds more and more applications as sophisticated light weight structures with thin ribs or as thin shells. Quite often they will be subject to higher mechanical loads such as rocket launches or modulating wobbling vibrations. Designing such structures requires calculation methods and data taking into account their long term fatigue. With brittle materials fatigue is not only given by the material itself but to a high extent also by its surface condition and the environmental media especially humidity. This work extends the latest data and information gathered on the bending strength of ZERODUR® with new results concerning its long term behavior under tensile stress. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which combines the influences of time and environmental media is the stress corrosion constant n. Results of the past differ significantly from each other. In order to obtain consistent data the stress corrosion constant has been measured with the method comparing the breakage statistical distributions at different stress increase rates. For better significance the stress increase rate was varied over four orders of magnitude from 0.004 MPa/s to 40 MPa/s. Experiments were performed under normal humidity for long term earth bound applications and under nitrogen atmosphere as equivalent to dry environment occurring for example with telescopes in deserts and also equivalent to vacuum for space applications. As shown earlier the bending strength of diamond ground surfaces of ZERODUR® can be represented with a three parameter Weibull distribution. Predictions on the long term strength change of ZERODUR® structures under tensile stress are possible with reduced uncertainty if Weibull threshold strength values are considered and more reliable stress corrosion constant data are applied.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of metal matrix composites: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1990-10-01

    The stress corrosion crack growth ate of metal matrix composites has been described by a model which is dependent on the length-to- diameter ({ell}/d) ratio and volume fraction of the reinforcing phase and matrix creep component. The model predicts a large dependence of the stress corrosion crack growth rate of a metal matrix composite on {ell}/d and matrix creep component and a small dependence on the volume fraction of reinforcement. Experimentally determined crack growth rates for 7090 Al/SiC tested in 3.5% NcCl solution, 6061 Al/SiC tested in moist air with NaCl and immersed in NaCl solution, and Mg/Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} tested in a chloride/chromate solution are all consistent with the model. The close correspondence between the model and experiment for a matrix creep stress exponent of 3 suggest that there is little corrosion damage to the reinforcing phase in these systems. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Alloy 22 in Multi-Ionic Aqueous Environments

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. King; J.C. Estill; R.B. Rebak

    2002-07-15

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing a potential repository site for nuclear waste in Yucca Mountain (NV). In its current design, the nuclear waste containers consist of a double metallic layer. The external layer would be made of NO6022 or Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In general, Alloy 22 is extremely resistant to SCC, especially in concentrated chloride solutions. Current results obtained through slow strain rate testing (SSRT) shows that Alloy 22 may suffer SCC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub rr}).

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking Study of Aluminum Alloys Using Electrochemical Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, R. C.; Sapate, S. G.; Raman, R.; Rathod, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking studies of aluminum alloys AA2219, AA8090, and AA5456 in heat-treated and non heat-treated condition were carried out using electrochemical noise technique with various applied stresses. Electrochemical noise time series data (corrosion potential vs. time) was obtained for the stressed tensile specimens in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at room temperature (27 °C). The values of drop in corrosion potential, total corrosion potential, mean corrosion potential, and hydrogen overpotential were evaluated from corrosion potential versus time series data. The electrochemical noise time series data was further analyzed with rescaled range ( R/ S) analysis proposed by Hurst to obtain the Hurst exponent. According to the results, higher values of the Hurst exponents with increased applied stresses showed more susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking as confirmed in case of alloy AA 2219 and AA8090.

  2. Stress corrosion of fiberglass-reinforced (FRP) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sapalidis, S.N.; Hogg, P.J.; Kelley, D.H.; Youd, S.J.

    1997-12-01

    The stress corrosion characteristics of uniaxial glass fiber reinforced thermosetting resin composites have been examined in Hydrochloric acid at room temperature and 80 C. A simple technique based on linear elastic fracture mechanisms (LEFM) is presented for characterizing crack growth in these materials subjected to hostile acidic environments. The environmental stress corrosion cracking is investigated both for different types of resin and different types of glass fiber reinforcements. Two matrices were used: Bis-A epoxy vinyl ester resin (based on Bisphenol-A epoxy resin) and novolac epoxy vinyl ester resin (based on epoxidized novolac resin). Two glass fiber types were employed: standard E-glass fiber and R, a special type of E-glass with superior acid resistance. Model experiments using a modified double cantilever beam test with static loading have been carried out on unidirectional composite specimens in 1M Hydrochloric acid solution at room temperature and 80 C. The rate of rack growth in the specimens depends on the applied stress, the temperature and the environment. Consequently, the lifetime of a component or structure made from GRP, subjected to stress corrosion conditions, could be predicted provided the dependence of crack growth rate on stress intensity at the crack tip is known. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the specimen fracture surfaces have identified the characteristic failure mechanisms. The most thing findings of this work is that the selection of epoxy vinyl ester resins reinforced with R fiber exhibited superior resistance to crack growth at 80 C compared to similar E-glass reinforced composites at room temperatures.

  3. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  4. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in amine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, J.P.; Bagdasarian, A.J.; Shargay, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    NACE Task Group T-8-14 was formed by Group Committee T-8 on Refining Industry Corrosion to conduct a survey on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of existing amine units. The main purpose of the survey was to determine the extent of cracking problems in such units and to examine possible correlations between cracked and noncracked locations to establish possible cause(s) for cracking. A total of 294 completed survey forms were received and analyzed. Cracking was reported in monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine, methyldiethanolamine, and diisopropanolamine solutions but was most prevalent in MEA units. Cracking occurs in all types of equipment and piping operating at all common temperatures. Cracking has been reported in all typical refinery streams containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/, or a combination of the two. The use of corrosion inhibitors, soda ash, caustic, filters, or reclaimers has no indicated effect on cracking tendencies. The survey results confirmed that stress relieving is a highly effective means of preventing amine SCC.

  6. A probabilistic model of intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, R.J.; Jones, W.B. ); Scully, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a model which utilizes a probabilistic failure criterion to describe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). A two-dimensional array of elements representing a section of a pipe wall is analyzed, with each element in the array representing a segment of grain boundary. The failure criterion is applied repetitively to each element of the array that is exposed to the interior of the pipe (i.e. the corrosive fluid) until that element dissolves, thereby exposing the next element. A number of environmental, mechanical, and materials factors have been incorporated into the model, including: (1) the macroscopic applied stress profile, (2) the stress history, (3) the extent and grain-to- grain distribution of carbide sensitization levels, which can be applied to a subset of elements comprising a grain boundary, and (4) a data set containing IGSCC crack growth rates as function of applied stress intensity and sensitization level averaged over a large population of grains. The latter information was obtained from the literature for AISI 304 stainless steel under light water nuclear reactor primary coolant environmental conditions. The resulting crack growth simulations are presented and discussed. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Stress-corrosion cracking studies in coal-liquefaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Coal liquefaction plants with 6000 ton/d capacity are currently being planned by DOE as a step toward commercial production of synthetic fossil fuels. These plants will demonstrate the large-scale viability of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process, which has been used since 1974 in two operating pilot plants: a 50-ton/d unit at Fort Lewis, Washington, and a 6-ton/d plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. Experience in these plants has shown that austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking associated with residual stresses from cold working or welding. The corrodants responsible for the cracking have not yet been positively identified but are suspected to include polythionic acids and chlorides. To screen candidate materials of construction for resistance to stress corrosion cracking, racks of stressed U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions have been exposed at the Wilsonville and Fort Lewis SRC pilot plants. These studies have identified alloys that are suitable for critical plant applications.

  8. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H/sub 2/S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs.

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking Issues in Light Metals for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.; Danielson, Michael J.; Baer, Donald R.; Windisch, Charles F.; Vetrano, John S.; Edwards, Daniel J.

    2000-12-31

    The Partnership for New Generation Vehicle has the goal of producing lightweight automobiles that achieve 80 mpg. To accomplish this will require liberal use of Al and Mg alloys such as AA5083 and AZ91D. The corrosion and stress corrosion of alloy AA5083 is controlled by the precipitation of the b-phase (Al3Mg2) at grain boundaries and by the precipitation of the g-phase (Mg17Al12) in AZ91D. The b-phase is anodic to the Al matrix while the g-phase is cathodic to the Mg matrix. The effects of crack propagation along grain boundaries with electrochemically active particles is a key factor in the SCC performance of these materials.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in hot nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, H.; Nagano, H. )

    1992-05-01

    Zirconium (Zr) has excellent general corrosion resistance in nitric acid. However, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been reported in concentrated nitric acid. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of Zr as a function of HNO[sub 3] concentration, from 6 to 94%, and temperature. The SCC mechanism was also investigated in relation to the electrochemical behavior. The slow strain rate test technique, under constant potential conditions, was mainly adopted for SCC testing. SCC did not occur in the boiling HNO[sub 3] at concentrations less than 70% unless an anodic potential was applied. The critical SCC potential, which coincides with the transient potential from passive to transpassive behavior in the polarization curve, decreased with an increase in HNO[sub 3] concentration. In boiling 94% HNO[sub 3] Zr exhibited SCC even under open-circuit potential conditions.

  11. Hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys as related to turbine engine operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that the major variables influencing hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys are alloy processing conditions, heat-to-heat variations and composition, surface condition, and cyclic exposures. Under simulated compressor environmental conditions the commonly used 64 alloy is creep limited and not stress-corrosion limited. Cyclic exposures to stress-corrosion conditions are not as detrimental as continuous exposures for equivalent total times.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  13. Factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of zirconium in 90% nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    U-bend, C-ring, and slow strain-rate tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of texture, stress, surface conditions, heat treatment, electrochemical potential, and strain rate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium in 90% nitric acid at room temperatures. It has been shown that careful control of texture, surface condition (scratching, cleaning and oxide coating), and/or applied stress can effectively lead to the prevention of SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/. Heat treating at 760/sup 0/C, 880/sup 0/C, or 1000/sup 0/C does not seem to improve the SCC resistance. However, if the potential of zirconium is maintained at 500 mV/sub SCE/ or lower, or 200 ppm of HF is added, zirconium's SCC susceptibility in 90% HNO/sub 3/ is eliminated. In the case of adding HF, zirconium sponge must also be added in order to avoid high corrosion rates. The mechanism for SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/ appears to be stress assisted local anodic dissolution, since the highest susceptibility is observed at strain rate = 7.5 x 10/sup -7//sec, and, at a higher or lower strain rate the susceptibility decreases. There is additional evidence to support this mechanism.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking in canistered waste package containers: Welds and base metals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    The current design of waste package containers include outer barrier using corrosion allowable material (CAM) such as A516 carbon steel and inner barrier of corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as alloy 625 and C22. There is concern whether stress corrosion cracking would occur at welds or base metals. The current memo documents the results of our analysis on this topic.

  15. Stress Corrosion Crack Detection on HU-25 Guardian Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmon, R.; Huffman, J.; Mello, C.W.; Moore, D.G.; Walkington, P.D.

    1999-02-17

    Several ultrasonic inspection methods were developed at the Federal Aviation Administration's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to easily and rapidly detect hidden stress corrosion cracks in all vertical windshield posts on the US Coast Guard (USCG) HU-25 Guardian aircraft. The inspection procedure locates cracks as small as 2.0 millimeters emanating from internal fastener holes and determines their length. A test procedure was developed and a baseline assessment of the USCG fleet was conducted. Inspection results on twenty-five aircraft revealed a good correlation with results made during subsequent structural disassembly and visual inspection.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J A; Griess, J C; Boyd, W K

    1980-01-01

    The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 25/sup 0/C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking.

  17. Overview of corrosion, corrosion protection, and stress-corrosion cracking of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, J.W.

    1981-12-14

    This paper covers some basic definitions and provides some data. The 51 slides illustrates these definitions, crack initiation and propagation, sources of stress, types of specimens used for SCC, potentiostatic polarization, data for Mulberry and U-Nb alloys, effects of environment, and data for U-0.75 Ti and U-Mo alloys. (DLC)

  18. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  19. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  20. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  1. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  2. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  3. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels.

  4. Susceptibility of Inconel X-750 to stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.

    1986-01-01

    High strength, age hardenable Ni-base superalloy Inconel X-750 in susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when used in the triple heat treated condition. In this research, constant strain rate technique was employed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy X-750 under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions in a nuclear power plant using an automated autoclave system at 8 x 10/sup 6/ N/m/sup 2/ pressure and 289/sup 0/C temperature. The alloy produced via ESR and VAR processing routes containing .004% and .011% sulfur, respectively, were solution annealed at 1075 and 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging in the 704 to 871/sup 0/C temperature range up to 200 hours and cooled in air as well as the furnace. Complete grain boundary chemistry and precipitation morphology was studied, supported by observations made using Charpy impact and modified Huey tests. Results showed Inconel X-750 processed through electroslag refining, solution annealed at 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging at 871/sup 0/C for 200 hours and furnace cooling, provides the best combination of strength, ductility, and resistance to SCC.

  5. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  6. Cause of stress-corrosion cracking in pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, T.K.; Beavers, J.A.

    1987-01-05

    Carbonate-bicarbonate has been identified as the environmental species responsible for stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in the majority of studied field failures of natural-gas pipelines. Battelle Columbus Division, Columbus, Ohio, studied approximately 30 SCC field failures of natural-gas pipelines form a 20-year period beginning in 1965. The results of the study also reject hydroxide (caustic) as a significant factor in these failures. Stress-corrosion cracking in natural-gas transmission pipelines has been recognized as a serious problem for a number of years. But there remains considerable controversy concerning the environmental species responsible for the cracking. One opinion has held that carbonate-bicarbonate promotes cracking, while another attributes the cracking to hydroxide (caustic). This issue is important because the feasibility of mitigation procedures based on potential control depend upon the chemical species responsible for the cracking. Moreover, it is important for the laboratory studies aimed at SCC mitigation to simulate closely the field failures. Both carbonate/bicarbonate and caustic environments can result from application of cathodic protection to a pipeline. The cathodic current applied to the pipeline accelerates the rate of the reduction reactions occurring on the pipe surface, promoting generation of hydroxide.

  7. Role of Slip Mode on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, A. K.; Sadananda, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we examine the effect of aging treatment and the role of planarity of slip on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior in precipitation-hardened alloys. With aging, the slip mode can change from a planar slip in the underage (UA) to a wavy slip in the overage (OA) region. This, in turn, results in sharpening the crack tip in the UA compared to blunting in the OA condition. We propose that the planar slip enhances the stress concentration effects by making the alloys more susceptible to SCC. In addition, the planarity of slip enhances plateau velocities, reduces thresholds for SCC, and reduces component life. We show that the effect of slip planarity is somewhat similar to the effects of mechanically induced stress concentrations such as due to the presence of sharp notches. Aging treatment also causes variations in the matrix and grain boundary (GB) microstructures, along with typical mechanical and SCC properties. These properties include yield stress, work hardening rate, fracture toughness K IC , thresholds K Iscc, and steady-state plateau velocity ( da/ dt). The SCC data for a wide range of ductile alloys including 7050, 7075, 5083, 5456 Al, MAR M steels, and solid solution copper-base alloys are collected from the literature. Our assertion is that slip mode and the resulting stress concentration are important factors in SCC behavior. This is further supported by similar observations in many other systems including some steels, Al alloys, and Cu alloys.

  8. Assessment of chances for external stress corrosion cracking in submarine pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mollan, R.; Eliassen, S.; Holt, T.; Ratkje, S.K.

    1982-11-08

    The possibility for stress corrosion cracking due to external environments to occur in submarine pipelines can not be excluded. The probability for stress corrosion to occur in submarine pipelines, however, considered to be for onshore pipelines mainly because calcareous deposits are expected to prevent buildup of the corrosive environment. Also the fact that the quality of surface preparation prior to coating for submarine pipelines normally is of a relatively high standard, contributes to reduce the probability for stresscorrosion cracking to occur.

  9. Validation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Model for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S; Gordon, G; Andresen, P

    2004-04-22

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. SCC is one form of environmentally assisted cracking resulting from the presence of three factors: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and tensile stresses. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is the highly corrosion-resistant Alloy UNS-N06022, the environment is represented by the water film present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the stress is principally the weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into 'initiation' and 'propagation' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding). To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulae for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, it can be used by the performance assessment (not in the scope of this paper) to determine the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package. This paper presents the development and validation of the SDFR crack growth rate model based on technical information in the literature as well as experimentally determined crack growth rates developed specifically for Alloy UNS- N06022 in environments relevant to high level radioactive-waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository.

  10. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  11. Critical stress for stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in sour environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, A.; Kanamaru, T.; Ogawa, H.

    1996-08-01

    The critical stress for initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a duplex stainless steel (DSS) in a sour environment was investigated using three stress application techniques: constant-strain, constant-load, and slow strain rate testing (SSRT). The critical stresses for SCC initiation as determined by detailed observation of the alloy surface after the three tests were in good agreement when a newly proposed index was adopted to express the SSRT results combined with crack observations for each test. The effect of cold work (CW) on SCC and pitting resistance of the DSS also was studied. CW did not accelerate SCC when initiation was controlled by pitting. The critical stress for SCC initiation increased with increasing CW and the resultant increase in yield stress.

  12. Radiation enhancement of stress-corrosion cracking of Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shann, S.H.

    1981-09-01

    In order to examine the cause of the reactor fuel pin pellet-cladding interaction phenomenon (PCI), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments of Zircaloy under iodine, iron iodide, aluminum iodide, cesium iodide, and cadmium were undertaken. Radiation enhancement tests with CsI were also performed. Iodine, iron iodide, and aluminum iodide can reduce the failure times. Fractography is of cleavage type and is completely different from the ductile dimple type failure for control specimens. There exists a critical stress of 379 MPa for iodine and iron iodide above which burst type failure occurs. Pinhole type failure predominates for lower stresses. Both types showed brittle fracture surfaces. The presence of CsI did not have any influence on failure time of zircaloy. The failure is burst-type, and the fractography is ductile. Radiation enhancement tests with cesium iodide did not cause reduction in failure time either. Failure times were decreased for the tests under cadmium. All specimens failed under cadmium vapor by a burst mode, and fractography showed cleavage brittle characteristics. Chemical parameters such as reaction order, activation energy, and minimum pressure required for SCC were determined. A crack propagation more originally designed for brittle solids for the SCC experimental data well. Variable stresses and surface roughness test results can be correlated quantitatively by the model. 80 figures.

  13. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  14. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis on the role of hydrogen in anodic stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1995-11-01

    A synergistic effect of hydrogen and stress on a corrosion rate was analyzed with thermodynamics. The results showed that an interaction of stress and hydrogen could increase the corrosion rate remarkably. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was investigated in boiling chloride solution to confirm the analysis. Hydrogen could be introduced into the specimen concentrated at the crack tip during SCC in boiling LiCl solution (143 C). The concentrating factor is about 3 which is consistent with calculated results according to stress induced diffusion.

  16. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  17. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  18. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2004-12-01

    A research program on primary stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is being investigated with objectives that include compling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel based materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing NDE methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and using mockups to quantify the detection sizing and characterization of tight cracks, and determining the role of welding processes in degradation. In this paper, the resuts of the initial literature searchs are presented. The relevant data on crack properties such as shape and orientation are presented and their impace on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 18 Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of 18Ni maraging steel (grades 200, 250, 300, and 350) was determined in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) solution, synthetic sea water, high humidity, and outside MSFC atmosphere. All grades of the maraging steel were found to be susceptible to SCC in varying degrees according to their strengths, with the lowest strength steel (grade 200) being the least susceptible and the highest strength steel (grade 350), the most susceptible to SCC. The SCC resistance of 250 grade maraging steel was also evaluated in salt and salt-chromate solutions using fracture mechanics techniques. The threshold value, K sub SCC, was found to be approximately 44 MN/sq m square root m, (40 ksi square root in.) or 40 percent of the K sub Q value.

  20. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  1. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B. )

    1991-09-01

    This report describes experimental application of the RFEC technique for crack detection in gas transmission pipelines. Crack data from three pipe samples are presented. A total of eight stress corrosion cracks were detected ranging in depth from 25 percent of wall thickness to completely through-wall. An improved defect detection model is presented that explains the interaction of the remote electromagnetic field with axial cracks as well as other defects such as metal loss and circumferential cracks. The investigation of the through-wall crack helps illustrate this model and also indicates RFEC has potential for detection and location of leaks from cracks. Many regions with crack depths less than 25 percent and lengths less than one inch were investigated, but dejection was unsuccessful. Data from artificial defects are presented to describe the relative sensitivity and characterization capability of the RFEC technique to longitudinal and circumferential planar (crack-like) defects as well as volumetric (metal loss) defects.

  2. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  3. Effects of surface preparation on pitting resistance, residual stress, and stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhouma, A. Ben; Sidhom, H.; Braham, C.; Lédion, J.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    Surface finishing treatments such as shot blasting and wire brushing can be beneficial in improving the integrity of machined surfaces of austenitic stainless steels. These operations optimize in-service properties such as resistance to pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In this study, ground steel surfaces were subjected to a series of sand blasting and wire brushing treatments. The surfaces were then characterized by their hardness, surface residual stress state, and resistance to stress corrosion and pitting corrosion. Some samples were selected for depth profiling of residual stress. It is found that surface hardening and the generation of near-surface compressive residual stress are the benefits that can be introduced by sand blasting and brushing operations.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  5. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel in Caustic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya; Singh, Preet M.

    2009-06-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have generally performed very well in caustic environments. However, some corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs have been reported in different pulp mill environments employing caustic solutions. Studies have shown that the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of DSSs depend on the alloy composition and microstructure of the steel. In this study, the effect of a sulfide-containing caustic environment (pulping liquor) and material properties (DSS alloy composition and microstructure) on the corrosion and SCC of DSSs was evaluated. During metal fabrication processes, localized areas of DSSs may be exposed to different temperatures and cooling rates, which may lead to changes in the microstructure in these regions. This change in microstructure, in turn, may affect the general and localized corrosion or SCC susceptibility of the affected area as compared to the rest of the metal. Hence, the effect of different annealing and aging temperatures as well as cooling rates on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of S32205 DSSs in caustic environment was evaluated. The results showed that changes in the microstructure of S32205 DSSs due to selected heat treatments did not have a significant effect on the general corrosion susceptibility of the steel in caustic environment, but its SCC susceptibility varied with changes in microstructures.

  6. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  7. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  8. Elastomer-induced crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel heat exchanger plates in sour amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.G.; Baron, J.J.; Moffat, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    Types S31600 and S31254 stainless steel heat exchanger plates have suffered crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking under gaskets in rich amine service in a sour gas plant. The gasket material, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), has been used successfully for many years at other sour gas plants. Laboratory testing has duplicated the corrosion observed and shown that the mechanism is synergistic sulfide-halide attack. The use of a bromine plus chlorine-activated curing system for the EPDM rubber gaskets provided the necessary halides. Laboratory testing identified some nickel-based superalloys which were resistant to this corrosion and also demonstrated that essentially halogen-free, peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets do not cause attack of S31600 or S31254. The heat exchanger packs were replaced with S31600 plates and peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets having a specified total halogen concentration of 200 ppm maximum. Field operating experience has been excellent.

  9. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Peened Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Singh, Preet M.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2009-06-01

    The surface treatment techniques of laser and shot peening were used to investigate their effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum alloy joints. The investigation consisted of two parts: the first part explored the peening effects on slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in a 3.5% NaCl solution, while the second part investigated the effects of peening on corrosion while submerged in a 3.5% NaCl solution with no external loads applied. For the SSRT, the laser-peened samples demonstrated superior properties to the other samples, but no signs of corrosion pitting or SCC were evident on any of the samples. For the second part of the study, the FSW plates were inspected periodically for signs of corrosion. After 60 days there were signs of corrosion pitting, but no stress corrosion cracking was noticed in any of the peened and unpeened samples.

  11. Effects of texture and microstructure on the propagation of iodine stress corrosion cracks in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Failure of some fuel elements in light water nuclear reactors has been attributed to stress corrosion cracking of the fuel cladding. Mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and cladding tube generates a tensile hoop stress. Release of volatile fission products, most likely iodine, provides a corrosive environment. An investigation of stress corrosion crack propagation is performed at 300/degree/C in four Pa flowing iodine environment. By varying the orientation of fracture mechanics specimens, the effect of crystallographic texture, heat treatment, and microstructure on K/sub I/(SCC) is studied. 27 refs.

  12. The role of stress in self-ordered porous anodic oxide formation and corrosion of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capraz, Omer Ozgur

    The phenomenon of plastic flow induced by electrochemical reactions near room temperature is significant in porous anodic oxide (PAO) films, charging of lithium batteries and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). As this phenomenon is poorly understood, fundamental insight into flow from our work may provide useful information for these problems. In-situ monitoring of the stress state allows direct correlation between stress and the current or potential, thus providing fundamental insight into technologically important deformation and failure mechanisms induced by electrochemical reactions. A phase-shifting curvature interferometry was designed to investigate the stress generation mechanisms on different systems. Resolution of our curvature interferometry was found to be ten times more powerful than that obtained by state-of-art multiple deflectometry technique and the curvature interferometry helps to resolve the conflicting reports in the literature. During this work, formation of surface patterns during both aqueous corrosion of aluminum and formation of PAO films were investigated. Interestingly, for both cases, stress induced plastic flow controls the formation of surface patterns. Pore formation mechanisms during anodizing of the porous aluminum oxide films was investigated . PAO films are formed by the electrochemical oxidation of metals such as aluminum and titanium in a solution where oxide is moderately soluble. They have been used extensively to design numerous devices for optical, catalytic, and biological and energy related applications, due to their vertically aligned-geometry, high-specific surface area and tunable geometry by adjusting process variables. These structures have developed empirically, in the absence of understanding the process mechanism. Previous experimental studies of anodizing-induced stress have extensively focused on the measurement of average stress, however the measurement of stress evolution during anodizing does not provide

  13. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  14. Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel and corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Toor, Ihsan-ul-Haq; Malik, Jahanzaib; Patel, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel surface is carried out and the electrochemical response of the laser treated surface is investigated. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the treated layer are examined using a scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Potentiodynamic polarization tests are carried out for untreated and laser treated specimen in 0.2 M NaCl solution at room temperature. It is found that the laser treated AISI H12 workpiece surfaces exhibit higher corrosion resistance as compared to untreated specimen as confirmed by lower corrosion rate, higher pitting potential, and lower passive current density.

  15. Novel methods and self-reinforced composite materials for assessment and prevention of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Eric S.

    Novel methods for assessing the electrochemical and micromechanical performance of modular tapers were evaluated, and self-reinforced composite materials were developed for their potential to prevent the onset of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular taper devices. A study of the seating and taper locking mechanics of modular taper samples was conducted, and the effect on taper engagement strength of seating load, loading rate, taper moisture, and taper design/material combination was studied. The load-displacement behavior was captured during seating, and the subsequent pull off load was correlated to seating displacement, seating energy, and seating load. The primary factor affecting taper engagement strength was seating load, and loading rate and design/material factors did not have a significant impact on the quality of the taper engagement. Next, the effect of variation of 7 different design, material, and surgical factors on the fretting corrosion and micromechanical behavior during incremental cyclic fretting corrosion testing was examined using a design of experiments matrix. Seating load and head offset length were the most influential factors affecting fretting corrosion, with low seating loads and high head offsets giving rise to increased currents during sequentially incremented cyclic loads. Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) fibers were produced, and the effects of varying draw down ratio, molecular weight, and post-spinning treatment on the structural and mechanical properties of the fibers were studied. Highly drawn fibers showed the highest increase in molecular orientation and mechanical properties. PEEK fibers were then utilized in the design and fabrication of self-reinforced composite PEEK (SRC-PEEK) thin film composites, and self-reinforced composite ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (SRC-PE) produced from Spectra fiber was also introduced. Pin on disk studies were employed to understand the potential of both of these SRC materials to

  16. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  17. Effect of Surface Stress Mitigation on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, D V; Yilmaz, A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2004-11-10

    When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 (N06022) plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both general and localized corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied.

  18. The mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Various aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy are discussed. A model is proposed in which the continuous anodic path along which the metal is preferentially attacked consists of two phases which alternate as anodes.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of X-60 line pipe steel in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, A.K.; Lambert, S.B.; Plumtree, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    An experimental system was developed to reproduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X-60 line pipe steels in highly alkaline (pH = 10) carbonate-bicarbonate (1 N sodium carbonate [Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Basalt/Epoxy Composites under Bending Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, Mahmood M.; Memar, Mahdi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the stress corrosion behavior of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in 5% sulfuric acid corrosive medium. There are limited numbers of research in durability of fiber reinforced polymer composites. Moreover, studies on basalt fibers and its composites are very limited. In this research, mechanical property degradation of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in acidic corrosive medium is investigated. Three states of stress, equal to 30%, 50% and 70% of the ultimate strength of composites, are applied on samples. High stress states are applied to the samples to accelerate the testing procedure. Mechanical properties degradation consists of bending strength, bending modulus of elasticity and fracture energy of samples are examined. Also, a normalized strength degradation model for stress corrosion condition is presented. Finally, microscopic images of broken cross sections of samples are examined.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: I. Proximate local SCC testing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnov, A. B.; Belov, V. A.; Nikulin, S. A.; Khanzhin, V. G.

    2010-10-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) methods of testing zirconium cladding tubes are analyzed. A proximate method is proposed for estimating SCC of fuel claddings claddings in a iodine-containing environment with a limited contact zone between a metal and corrosive medium and simultaneous measurement of acoustic emission (AE) from forming corrosion defects. Criteria of estimating the SCC resistance of the tubes are proposed from measured AE and corrosion damage of the tube material. The results of local SCC tests of cladding tubes of E110 and E635 zirconium alloys are presented.

  2. Study on residual stresses in ultrasonic torsional vibration assisted micro-milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zesheng; Hu, Haijun; Sun, Yazhou; Sun, Qing

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that machining induced residual stresses can seriously affect the dimensional accuracy, corrosion and wear resistance, etc., and further influence the longevity and reliability of Micro-Optical Components (MOC). In Ultrasonic Torsional Vibration Assisted Micro-milling (UTVAM), cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank are the main factors which affect residual stresses. A 2D model of UTVAM was established with FE analysis software ABAQUS. Johnson-Cook's flow stress model and shear failure principle are used as the workpiece material model and failure principle, while friction between tool and workpiece uses modified Coulomb's law whose sliding friction area is combined with sticking friction. By means of FEA, the influence rules of cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank on residual stresses are obtained, which provides a basis for choosing optimal process parameters and improving the longevity and reliability of MOC.

  3. Susceptibility of carbon steel to stress corrosion cracking in sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Flis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel and decarburized steel was studied in 8.5 M sodium hydroxide at 100 ?C. Potentiodynamic experiments were performed to determine the potential values to be applied in slow strain rate(ssr) experiments. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the surfaces of corroded samples. Severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed on the carbon steel samples in comparison to the decarburized steel samples.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. PMID:18257055

  5. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin VI The Effect of Corrosion Accompanied by Stress on the Tensile Properties of Sheet Duralumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    The effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of duralumin while stressed is shown in graphical form. According to the test results, duralumin sheet, coated with aluminum, maintains its initial properties unimpaired for corrosion periods as long as 60 days with an applied tensile stress as high as 20,000 lb/sq.in., which is approximately one-half the stress corresponding to the yield point as defined here. In these tests, that material which had been heat-treated by being quenched in cold water, though far inferior to similar material having the aluminum coating, was superior to the sheet material which was heat treated by being quenched in hot water. These results are in excellent agreement with the results of previous laboratory and exposure tests.

  7. Detection of stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgemon, G. L.; Danielson, M. J.; Bell, G. E. C.

    1997-06-01

    Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 253 million liters of high level radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production at the Hanford Site. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported as nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting. In an effort to develop a waste tank corrosion monitoring system, laboratory tests were conducted to characterize electrochemical noise data for both uniform and localized corrosion of mild steel and other materials in simulated waste environments. The simulated waste solutions were primarily composed of ammonium nitrate or sodium nitrate and were held at approximately 97°C. The electrochemical noise of freely corroding specimens was monitored, recorded and analyzed for periods ranging between 10 and 500 h. At the end of each test period, the specimens were examined to correlate electrochemical noise data with corrosion damage. Data characteristic of uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking are presented.

  8. Interference fits and stress-corrosion failure. [aircraft parts fatigue life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Carter, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that any proper design of interference fit fastener, interference fit bushings, or stress coining processes should consider both the stress-corrosion susceptibility and fatigue-life improvement together. Investigations leading to such a methodology are discussed. A service failure analysis of actual aircraft parts is considered along with the stress-corrosion susceptibility of cold-working interference fit bushings. The optimum design of the amount of interference is considered, giving attention to stress formulas and aspects of design methodology.

  9. Effect of stress corrosion cracking on integrity and remaining life of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.; Harle, B.A.

    1996-08-01

    External stress-corrosion cracking of pipelines is a serious problem for the gas transmission industry. Longitudinal cracks initiate on the outside surface of the pipe and link up to form flaws that, in some cases, can lead to pipe rupture. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines and considers both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes. A methodology also is presented to calculate the remaining life of a pipeline containing flaws of known size.

  10. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  11. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  12. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  13. Influence of precracked specimen configuration and starting stress intensity on the stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Since the pioneer work of Brown (1966), precracked specimens and related fracture mechanics analyses have been extensively used to study stress corrosion cracking. Certain questions arose in connection with initial attempts to prepare standardized recommended practices by ASTM Committee G-1 on Corrosion of Metals. These questions were related to adequacy of test control as it pertains to acceptable limits of variability, and to validity of expressions for stress intensity and crack-surface displacements for both specimen configurations. An interlaboratory test program, was, therefore, planned with the objective to examine the validity of KIscc testing for selected specimen configurations, materials,and environmental systems. The results reported in the present paper include details of a single laboratory test program. The program was conducted to determine if the threshold value of stress intensity for onset and arrest of stress corrosion cracking was independent for the two specimen configurations examined.

  14. Environmental stress-corrosion cracking of fiberglass: lessons learned from failures in the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Kytömaa, H K; Smith, T R

    2007-04-11

    Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials are often used to construct tanks, piping, scrubbers, beams, grating, and other components for use in corrosive environments. While FRP typically offers superior and cost effective corrosion resistance relative to other construction materials, the glass fibers traditionally used to provide the structural strength of the FRP can be susceptible to attack by the corrosive environment. The structural integrity of traditional FRP components in corrosive environments is usually dependent on the integrity of a corrosion-resistant barrier, such as a resin-rich layer containing corrosion resistant glass fibers. Without adequate protection, FRP components can fail under loads well below their design by an environmental stress-corrosion cracking (ESCC) mechanism when simultaneously exposed to mechanical stress and a corrosive chemical environment. Failure of these components can result in significant releases of hazardous substances into plants and the environment. In this paper, we present two case studies where fiberglass components failed due to ESCC at small chemical manufacturing facilities. As is often typical, the small chemical manufacturing facilities relied largely on FRP component suppliers to determine materials appropriate for the specific process environment and to repair damaged in-service components. We discuss the lessons learned from these incidents and precautions companies should take when interfacing with suppliers and other parties during the specification, design, construction, and repair of FRP components in order to prevent similar failures and chemical releases from occurring in the future. PMID:16950568

  15. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  16. Investigation into the stress corrosion cracking properties of AA2099, an aluminum-lithium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Barbara Nicole

    Recently developed Al-Li-Cu alloys show great potential for implementation in the aerospace industry because of the attractive mix of good mechanical properties and low density. AA2099 is an Al-Li-Cu alloy with the following composition Al-2.69wt%Cu-1.8wt%Li-0.6wt%Zn-0.3wt%Mg-0.3wt%Mn-0.08wt%Zr. The environmental assisted cracking and localized corrosion behavior of the AA2099 was investigated in this thesis. The consequences of uncontrolled grain boundary precipitation via friction stir welding on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2099 was investigated first. Using constant extension rate testing, intergranular corrosion immersion experiments, and potentiodynamic scans, the heat-affected zone on the trailing edge of the weld (HTS) was determined to be most susceptible of the weld zones. The observed SCC behavior for the HTS was linked to the dissolution of an active phase (Al2CuLi, T1) populating the grain boundary. It should be stated that the SCC properties of AA2099 in the as-received condition were determined to be good. Focus was then given to the electrochemical behavior of precipitate phases that may occupy grain and sub-grain boundaries in AA2099. The grain boundary micro-chemistry and micro-electrochemistry have been alluded to within the literature as having significant influence on the SCC behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Major precipitates found in this alloy system are T1 (Al 2CuLi), T2 (Al7.5Cu4Li), T B (Al6CuLi3), and theta (Al2 Cu). These phases were produced in bulk form so that the electrochemical nature of each phase could be characterized. It was determined T1 was most active electrochemically and theta was least. When present on grain boundaries in the alloy, electrochemical behavior of the individual precipitates aligned with the observed corrosion behavior of the alloy (e.g. TB was accompanied by general pitting corrosion and T 1 was accompanied by intergranular corrosion attack). In addition to the electrochemical behavior of

  17. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  18. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  19. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-07-01

    A specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility on fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material — compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state — can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters.

  20. Nonlinear Rayleigh waves to detect initial damage leading to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y..; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Singh, P. M.

    2012-05-01

    This research experimentally investigates second harmonic generation of Rayleigh waves propagating through carbon steel samples damaged in a stress corrosion environment. Damage from stress corrosion cracking is of major concern in nuclear reactor tubes and in gas and fuel transport pipelines. For example, certain types of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) account for more failures in steam generator tubes than most other damage mechanisms, yet these cracks do not initiate until late in the structure's life. Thus, there is a need to be able to measure the damage state prior to crack initiation, and it has been shown that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter - the parameter associated with second harmonic generation - is sensitive to microstructural evolution. In this work, samples are immersed in a sodium carbonate-bicarbonate solution, which typically forms in the soil surrounding buried pipelines affected by SCC, and held at yield stress for 5-15 days to the onset of stress corrosion cracking. Measurements of second harmonic generation with Rayleigh waves are taken intermittently to relate cumulative damage prior to macroscopic cracking to nonlinear wave propagation. Experimental results showing changes in second harmonic generation due to stress corrosion damage are presented.

  1. Correlation Between Two Types of Surface Stress Mitigation and the Resistance to Corrosion of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, A; Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2005-02-04

    When metallic plates are welded, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 (N06022) plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to compare the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied.

  2. Proceedings: 1983 Workshop on Primary-Side Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1987-11-01

    Utility and vendor representatives from around the world met to share information on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing from the primary side. In 32 presentations, speakers discussed in-plant experience with the phenomenon and related laboratory data. The workshop was the first to present results of remedial stress relief programs.

  3. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation. PMID:27179142

  4. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1990-06-01

    Samples of ultra high purity stainless steel have been fabricated into 2mm {times} 2mm rectangular bars and irradiated to one dpa ({approximately}l {times} 10{sup 19} p{sup +}/cm{sup 2}) using 3.4 MeV protons (>20{mu}A) while controlling the sample temperature at 400{degree}C. Samples are pressed onto a water-cooled and electrically heated copper block with a thin layer of Sn in between to improve thermal conductivity. The irradiation produced a significant prompt radiation field but sample activation was limited to {beta}-decay and this decayed rapidly in less than 48 h. Samples were hydrogen charged and strained at slow rates at {minus}30{degree}C insitu in the Auger electron spectrometer to successfully fracture several samples intergranularly for grain boundary composition analysis. An ultra-high purity (UHP) alloy of Fe-19Cr-9Ni was irradiated to 1 dpa at 400C {plus minus} 5C and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} torr in the tandem accelerator of the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, resulting in a dislocation network density of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} cm{sup 2} and a dislocation loop density of 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} along with the dissolution of small precipitates present in the unirradiated sample. EPR experiments on the UHP irradiated alloy showed no significant increase in charge passed upon reactivation, over an unirradiated sample experiencing the same thermal history. An SCC waterloop and autoclave system has been completed and a sample has been designed to measure the susceptibility of the irradiated microstructure as compared to the unirradiated microstructure.

  5. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  6. Effect of exposure cycle on hot salt stress corrosion of a titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Johnston, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of exposure cycle on the hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking resistance of the Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was determined. Both temperature and stress were cycled simultaneously to simulate turbine-powered aircraft service cycles. Temperature and stress were also cycled independently to determine their individual effects. Substantial increases in crack threshold stresses were observed for cycles in which both temperature and stress or temperature alone were applied for 1 hour and removed for 3 hours. The crack threshold stresses for these cyclic exposures were twice those determined for continuous exposure for the same total time of 96 hours.

  7. Stress intensity estimates by a computer assisted photoelastic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Following an introductory history, the frozen stress photoelastic method is reviewed together with analytical and experimental aspects of cracks in photoelastic models. Analytical foundations are then presented upon which a computer assisted frozen stress photoelastic technique is based for extracting estimates of stress intensity factors from three-dimensional cracked body problems. The use of the method is demonstrated for two currently important three-dimensional crack problems.

  8. On the stress corrosion cracking of lean duplex steel in chloride environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayyaba, Qanita; Farooq, Hina; Shahid, Muhammad; Jadoon, Ammer Khan; Shahzad, M.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2014-06-01

    Duplex stainless steel having attractive combination of austenitic and ferritic properties is being used in industry such as petrochemical, pulp and paper mills. In this study, the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in 3.5% sodium chloride environment was investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical DC testing and slow strain rate test (SSRT). Weight loss data showed no significant corrosion after 1700 hours. Electrochemical polarization test in 3.5% NaCl solution exhibited a uniform corrosion rate of 0.008 mpy (calculated using Tafel analysis) showing passivity in the range of 735-950 mV. A comparison of the slow strain rate test in 3.5% NaCl solution with air shows almost a similar stress strain curve for duplex stainless steel. In comparison, the stress strain curves for 0.15% carbon steel show a loss of about 25% tensile elongation for the same comparison. The excellent corrosion and especially resistance to localized corrosion (pitting) is responsible for no loss of ductility in duplex stainless steel.

  9. Localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel weldments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, W. F.; Duquette, D. J.

    1980-02-01

    Pitting corrosion experiments were conducted on 308L stainless steel as a function of alloy microstructure (% delta ferrite) in acidified water-methanol solutions. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on single-phase and duplex 304 stainless steels as functions of solution chemistry, temperature, and sensitization. (DLC)

  10. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  11. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  12. Effect of initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on susceptibility to hot salt stress corrosion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of the initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on subsequent resistance to hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement and cracking was investigated. A Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was tested in four conditions: mill annealed (70 ppm H), duplex annealed (70 ppm H), vacuum annealed to an intermediate (36 ppm H) and a low (9 ppm H) hydrogen level. Material annealed at 650 C (duplex condition) exhibited resistance to hot salt stress corrosion superior to that exhibited by material in the mill annealed condition. Reduction of the alloy hydrogen content from 70 to as low as 9 ppm did not influence resistance to hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement or cracking.

  13. STUDY OF GRAIN BOUNDARY CHARACTER ALONG INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK PATHS IN AUSTENITIC ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Guertsman, Valery Y.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2001-05-25

    Samples of austenitic stainless alloys were examined by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Misorientations were measured by electron backscattered diffraction. Grain boundary distributions were analyzed with special emphasis on the grain boundary character along intergranular stress-corrosion cracks and at crack arrest points. It was established that only coherent twin S3 boundaries could be considered as "special" ones with regard to crack resistance. However, it is possible that twin interactions with random grain boundaries may inhibit crack propagation. The results suggest that other factors besides geometrical ones play an important role in the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of commercial alloys.

  14. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  15. Stress-corrosion cracking issues related to a water-cooled ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. H.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Henager, C. H.

    1991-03-01

    A review of water impurity and temperature effects on stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel is presented. These results demonstrate that stress-corrosion crack growth can occur at ITER relevant temperatures for certain water chemistries and material conditions. A model developed at PNL to calculate the degree of sensitization was used to estimate the potential for sensitization of Type 316 SS and US PCA. This analysis shows that both materials can be severely sensitized but, with proper processing and fabrication, sensitization should be avoidable.

  16. Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Crack-propagation tests on a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10, were conducted either in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions or in high-purity water under sinusoidal cyclic loading or sustained loading. Although the crack growth rate in high-purity water was almost identical to that in air, the rate in the NaCl solution was much higher than that in air, even in a very low concentration of NaCl such as 0.01 mass pct. In a 3.5 mass pct NaCl solution, the time-based crack growth rate during cyclic loading, da/ dt, was determined by the maximum stress-intensity factor, K max, but was almost independent of the loading frequency and the stress ratio, and the rate was close to that of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a sustained loading.

  17. A simple computer model of pellet/cladding interaction including stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, J.Y.; Okrent, D.; Wazzan, A.R.

    1985-12-01

    Many unexpected failures, below design criteria, of light water reactor fuel cladding (Zircaloy) have been found during operational power ramps. Such a fuel rod failure can result from pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) assisted by fission product stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the Zircaloy tubing. A deterministic PCMI/SCC model has been coupled with the steady-state fuel behavior code, FRAPCON-2. The resulting code has been benchmarked (against few test cases but comprising many data points) but not fully verified. It is used to simulate two important occurrences: preramp (base) and power ramp irradiation. Because of the limitations of FRAPCON-2, the code is best suited to the simulation of mild power ramps with rates that do not exceed 0.02%/s. Computations with the code for greater power ramp rates, however, gave results which are not inconsistent with some overpower ramp experimental test results. Limited sensitivity studies are performed on the operational parameters and some fuel rod design parameters.

  18. The relationship between observed stress corrosion cracking fracture morphology and microstructure in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.; Burke, M.G.; Foster, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructure is known to influence the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 600 in both hydrogenated water and steam environments. This study evaluated the relative SCC response of a single heat of Alloy 600 as a function of microstructure in a hydrogenated doped-steam environment. The 400 C doped-steam environment was selected for the SCC tests to accelerate cracking. The material was evaluated in three conditions: (1) as-received (2) as-annealed, and (3) as-annealed + 26% deformation. Microstructural characterization was performed using analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques for the evaluation of carbide type and morphology, and general structure. Constant displacement (bolt-loaded) compact tension specimens were used to induce SCC. The as-annealed and as-annealed plus cold worked samples had two fracture morphologies: a rough intergranular SCC fracture morphology and a smooth intergranular fracture morphology. The SCC fracture in the as-received specimens was characterized by a classic intergranular morphology at low magnification, consistent with the microstructural evaluation of cross-sectional metallographic samples. More detailed examination revealed a pseudo-intergranular fracture morphology. This pseudo-intergranular morphology appears to be comprised of very fine cleavage-like microfacets. These observations may assist in understanding the difference in SCC fracture morphologies as reported in the open literature.

  19. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless-steel canister for concrete cask storage of spent fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Jun-ichi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Hara, Nobuyoshi

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) and crevice corrosion were examined for various candidate canister materials in the spent fuel dry storage condition using concrete casks. A constant load ESCC test was conducted on the candidate materials in air after deposition of simulated sea salt particles on the specimen gage section. Highly corrosion resistant stainless steels (SS), S31260 and S31254, did not fail for more than 46 000 h at 353 K with relative humidity of 35%, although the normal stainless steel, S30403 SS failed within 500 h by ESCC. Crevice corrosion potentials of S31260 and S31254 SS became larger than 0.9 V (SCE) in synthetic sea water at temperatures below 298 K, while those of S30403 and S31603 SS were less than 0 V (SCE) at the same temperature range. No rust was found on S31260 and S31254 SS specimens at temperatures below 298 K in the atmospheric corrosion test, which is consistent with the temperature dependency of crevice corrosion potential. From the test result, the critical temperature of atmospheric corrosion was estimated to be 293 K for both S31260 and S31254 SS. Utilizing the ESCC test result and the critical temperature, together with the weather station data and the estimated canister wall temperature, the integrity of canister was assessed from the view point of ESCC.

  1. Evaluation of shuttle solid rocket booster case materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion susceptibility of several high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Garland, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Candidate alloys for the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case were tested under simulated service conditions to define subcritical flaw growth behavior under both sustained and cyclic loading conditions. The materials evaluated were D6AC and 18 Ni maraging steel, both heat treated to a nominal yield strength of 1380 MN/sq m (200 ksi). The sustained load tests were conducted by exposing precracked, stressed specimens of both alloys to alternate immersion in synthetic sea water. It was found that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of the 18 Ni maraging steel were superior to that of the D6AC steel under these test conditions. It was also found that austenitizing temperature had little influence on the threshold stress intensity of the D6AC. The cyclic tests were conducted by subjecting precracked surface-flawed specimens of both alloys to repeated load/thermal/environmental profiles which were selected to simulate the SRB missions. It was found that linear removal operations that involve heating to 589 K (600 F) cause a decrease in cyclic life of D6AC steel relative to those tests conducted with no thermal cycling.

  2. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. PMID:25063163

  3. On the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy in an iodine containing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsing-Tyan, Yang; Chuen-Horng, Tsai

    1989-08-01

    The role of iodine and zirconium iodide in the process of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy is studied by an internal pressurization SCC test and independent corrosion and creep tests, using iodine and zirconium tetraiodide crystals as the attacking species. Measurement of the critical values of iodine potential reveals that irradiated fuel rods should possess enough iodine potential to induce SCC failure of Zircaloy cladding. The difference between tests with I 2 and ZrI 4, and the morphology of microcraks at the site of corrosion pits suggest that the quantity of free iodine may play an important role in the crack initiation stage. Although the thick surface oxide can protect Zircaloy from iodine attack, it will rupture under sustaining a tensile stress, and then the iodine-bearing carrier will penetrate through the cracks to supply the necessary iodine potential and to proceed the propagation.

  4. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  5. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined.

  6. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  7. Corrosion resistance of stressed NiTi and stainless steel orthodontic wires in acid artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of stressed NiTi and stainless steel orthodontic wires using cyclic potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests in acid artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. An atomic force microscope was used to measure the 3-D surface topography of as-received wires. Scanning electron microscope observations were carried out before and after the cyclic potentiodynamic tests. The surface chemical analysis was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy after the potentiostatic tests. The cyclic potentiodynamic test results showed that the pH had a significant influence on the corrosion parameters of the stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires (p < 0.05). The pitting potential, protection potential, and passive range of stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires decreased on decreasing pH, whereas the passive current density increased on decreasing pH. The load had no significant influence on the above corrosion parameters (p > 0.05). For all pH and load conditions, stainless steel wire showed higher pitting potential and wider passive range than NiTi wire (p < 0.001), whereas NiTi wire had lower passive current density than stainless steel wire (p < 0.001). The corrosion resistance of the stressed NiTi and stainless steel wires was related to the surface characterizations, including surface defect and passive film. PMID:12926035

  8. Proceedings: 1985 Workshop on Primary-Side Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1987-06-01

    To date, more than 30 PWRs have reported stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing from the primary water side. In 32 presentations, this report offers in-plant and laboratory data on the contributing factors, as well as discussing some promising remedial measures.

  9. Proceedings: 1987 EPRI Workshop on Mechanisms of Primary Water Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    Representatives from utilities, vendors, universities, government agencies, and EPRI reviewed recent research on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing in primary water. Participants agreed that, although the mechanism involved in cracking is uncertain, identifying the rate-limiting step is more important than understanding the complete mechanism.

  10. Proceedings: Workshop on Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Under LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    1988-05-01

    Participants at this 1986 workshop discussed methods, such as electrochemical monitoring, for determining stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation and for identifying variables involved in initiation. A survey of field occurrences of SCC revealed a correlation between fabrication-related defects and crack initiation.

  11. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking is described. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  12. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  13. Use of intelligent pigs to detect stress corrosion cracking in gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    To ensure the integrity and serviceability of gas pipelines, operators periodically utilize intelligent pigging. This inspection technique has proven to be a cost effective approach for determining the condition of operating pipelines. Recent advancements in intelligent pigging technology are now aiding the pipeline industry in the detection of stress corrosion cracking.

  14. Effects of crystal defects on stress-corrosion susceptibility in aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentle, G. G.; Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Point defects were introduced into specimens of three heat-treated tempers of alloy 7075 by neutron irradiation. Continuous ultrasonic monitoring allowed crack growth to be observed. Effects on stress-corrosion susceptibility, elongation, hardness, and yield strength are noted and compared for the three tempers.

  15. Effects of shot peening on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behaviors of sensitized Alloy 600 in thiosulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, W.T.; Chang, C.S.; Lee, J.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    Effects of shot peening on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of sensitized alloy 600 (UNSN06600) were studied. Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests in 0.01 M sulfuric acid (H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) + 0.001 M potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) solution and immersion tests in boiling 25% nitric acid (HNO[sub 3]) solution were used to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the degree of sensitization of alloy 600. Potentiodynamic polarization tests in 0.01 M sodium thiosulfate (Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 3]) solution at 95 C revealed shot peening increased the anodic current density (CD) of the alloy. However, SCC tests using U-bend specimens indicated shot peening substantially increased the crack initiation time in the same environment. The delayed crack initiation of SCC for shot-peened alloy 600, which is potentially dependent, was attributed to the presence of compressive residual stresses and the severely deformed surface microstructure.

  16. Employee Assistance Programmes: The Emperor's New Clothes of Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the employee assistance program (EAP), a benefit increasingly provided by United Kingdom employers that claims to reduce the effects of stress on individuals and organizations, provide a management tool to improve workplace performance and productivity, and respond to critical incidents. Describes EAPs, their history, development and…

  17. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  18. Stress-corrosion crack growth of Si-Na-K-Mg-Ca-P-O bioactive glasses in simulated human physiological environment

    PubMed Central

    Bloyer, D. R.; McNaney, J. M.; Cannon, R. M.; Saiz, E.; Tomsia, A. P.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes research on the stress-corrosion crack growth (SCCG) behavior of a new series of bioactive glasses designed to fabricate coatings on Ti and Co-Cr-based implant alloys. These glasses should provide improved implant fixation between implant and exhibit good mechanical stability in vivo. It is then important to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control environmentally-assisted crack growth in this new family of glasses and its effect on their reliability. Several compositions have been tested in both static and cyclic loading in simulated body fluid. These show only small dependences of stress-corrosion crack growth behavior on the composition. Traditional SCCG mechanisms for silicate glasses appear to be operative for the new bioactive glasses studied here. At higher velocities, hydrodynamic effects reduce growth rates under conditions that would rarely pertain for small natural flaws in devices. PMID:17714778

  19. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    A meeting on PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs.

  20. Effect of Nitrogen on Stress Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic Stainless Steels Using Electrochemical Noise Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppo, Anita; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R. K.

    2015-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) studies were conducted on austenitic stainless steels with two different nitrogen contents (0.07 and 0.22 wt.% N) in boiling acidified sodium chloride medium using constant load technique. Progress of SCC was monitored using electrochemical noise (EN) technique to understand the effect of nitrogen addition on SCC initiation and propagation. With increase in nitrogen content, the characteristic frequency of corrosion events, f n increased, whereas the characteristic charge, q decreased simultaneously indicating the increased stability of passive film resulting in higher resistance to SCC.

  1. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  2. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous salt environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg; two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  3. Hot-salt stress-corrosion of titanium alloys as related to turbine operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    In an effort to simulate typical compressor operating conditions of current turbine engines, special test facilities were designed. Air velocity, air pressure, air dewpoint, salt deposition temperature, salt concentration, and specimen surface condition were systematically controlled and their influence on hot-salt stress-corrosion evaluated. The influence of both continuous and cyclic stress-temperature exposures was determined. The relative susceptibility of a variety of titanium alloys in commonly used heat-treated conditions was determined. The effects of both environmental and material variables were used to interpret the behavior of titanium alloys under hot-salt stress-corrosion conditions found in jet engines and to appraise their future potential under such conditions.

  4. The Studies of Thiosulfate and Lead-induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liang

    Scratch test and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were applied to study the effects of thiosulfate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 800 in simulated crevice solutions. The results showed that thiosulfate cathodically shifted the pitting potential of Alloy 800 significantly and the pitting morphology on the electrode surface was also different from that formed in the absence of thiosulfate. The synergistic effect between thiosulfate and stress was also observed, which was mainly promoting enhanced anodic dissolution at active sites. In the lead-induced stress corrosion crackings (PbSCC) work, the crack propagation rate (CPR) of Alloy 800 double cantilever specimen were estimated in neutral crevice chemistries solutions at 300 degree Celsius. The PbSCC of alloy 800 at high temperature were investigated by comparing the CPR rate of Pb-contaminated and Pb-free conditions. A repetitive behavior of crack advance was observed from the measurement. This observation is consistent with the film rupture model.

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Interstitial Free Steel Via Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murkute, Pratik; Ramkumar, J.; Mondal, K.

    2016-07-01

    An interstitial free steel is subjected to slow strain rate tests to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior at strain rates ranging from 10-4 to 10-6s-1 in air and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The ratios of time to failure, failure strain, and ultimate tensile stress at different strain rates in air to that in corrosive were considered as SCC susceptibility. Serrated stress-strain curve observed at lowest strain rate is explained by the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Maximum susceptibility to SCC at lowest strain rate is attributed to the soluble γ-FeOOH in the rust analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy. Mechanism for SCC relates to the anodic dissolution forming the groove, where hydrogen embrittlement can set in and finally fracture happens due to triaxiality.

  6. Factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of zirconium in 90% nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    U-band, C-ring, and slow strain rate tests were performed to evaluate the effects of texture, stress, surface condition, heat treatments electrochemical potential, and strain rate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium in 90% nitric acid at room temperature. Careful control of texture, surface condition (scratching, cleaning, and oxide coating), and/or applied stress was shown to effectively lead to the prevention of SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/. Heat treating at 760, 880, or 1000 C does not seem to improve the SCC resistance. However, if the potential of zirconium is maintained at 500 mV/sub SCE/ or lower, or 200 ppm of HF is added, zirconium's SCC susceptibility in 90% HNO/sub 3/ is eliminated. When adding HF, zirconium sponge must also be added to avoid corrosion rates.

  7. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of 431 stainless steel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of type 431 stainless steel in two conditions: annealed bar and hardened and tempered bar are presented. Test specimens, manufactured from approximately 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) diameter bar stock, were tested at temperatures of 80 F (+26.7 C), 0 F (-17.8 C), -100 F (-73 C), and -200 F (-129 C). The test data indicated excellent tensile strength, notched/unnotched tensile ratio, ductility, shear, and impact properties at all testing temperatures. Results of the alternate immersion stress corrosion tests on stressed and unstressed longitudinal tensile specimens 0.1250 inch (0.3175 cm) diameter and transverse C-ring specimens, machined from 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) diameter bar stock, indicated that the material is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking when tested in a 3.5 percent NaCl solution for 180 days.

  8. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  9. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  10. A critical evaluation of the stress-corrosion cracking mechanism in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Min; Pyun, Su-Il; Chun, Young-Gab

    1991-10-01

    Attempts have been made to elucidate the mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high-strength Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys exposed to aqueous environments by considering the temperature dependence of SCC susceptibility based upon the anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement models. A quantitative correlation which involves the change of threshold stress intensity, K ISCC, with temperature on the basis of anodic dissolution has been developed with the aid of linear elastic fracture mechanics. From the derived correlation, it is concluded that the threshold stress intensity decreases as the test temperature increases. This suggestion is inconsistent with that predicted on the basis of hydrogen embrittlement. It is experimentally observed from the Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys that the threshold stress intensity, K,ISCC, decreases and the crack propagation rate, da/dt, over the stress intensity increases with increasing test temperature. From considering the change in SCC susceptibility with temperature, it is suggested that a gradual transition in the mechanism for the stress-corrosion crack propagation occurs from anodic dissolution in stage I, where the crack propagation rate increases sharply with stress intensity, to hydrogen embrittlement in stage II, where the crack propagation rate is independent of stress intensity.

  11. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  12. Corrosion properties of aluminium coatings deposited on sintered NdFeB by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shoudong; Yang, Hengxiu; Li, Jinlong; Huang, Feng; Song, Zhenlun

    2011-04-01

    Pure Al coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering to protect sintered NdFeB magnets. The effects of Ar+ ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on the structure and the corrosion behaviour of Al coatings were investigated. The Al coating prepared by DC magnetron sputtering with IBAD (IBAD-Al-coating) had fewer voids than the coating without IBAD (Al-coating). The corrosion behaviour of the Al-coated NdFeB specimens was investigated by potentiodynamic polarisation, a neutral salt spray (NSS) test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting corrosion of the Al coatings always began at the voids of the grain boundaries. Bombardment by the Ar+ ion-beams effectively improved the corrosion resistance of the IBAD-Al-coating.

  13. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  14. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  15. Effects of surface condition on the stress corrosion cracking of line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.; Parkins, R.N.

    1988-04-01

    The relationship between surface properties of line pipe steels and external stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is reviewed. Surface factors discussed include mill scale, surface pitting, decarburization, surface residual stresses, and near-surface stress state. Recent research results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of a line pipe steel to SCC initiation is dependent on complicated interaction among these properties. However, these studies also show that relatively simple surface preparation procedures such as grit blasting can be effective in reducing the susceptibility of pipelines to crack initiation.

  16. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  17. Improvement of the resistance to stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels by cyclic prestraining

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Magnin, T.

    1999-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are known to be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride solutions. The aim of the present study is to find improvements in the SCC behavior of 316L-type austenitic stainless steels in 117 C MgCl{sub 2} solutions. Previously, the authors have proposed the corrosion-enhanced plasticity model (CEPM) to describe the discontinuous cracking process which occurs in SCC. This model is based on localized corrosion (anodic dissolution, and hydrogen absorption)-deformation (dislocations) interactions (CDI). From the framework of this model, it is proposed that a prestraining in fatigue at saturation decreases the SCC sensitivity. This idea is experimentally confirmed for both crack initiation and crack propagation, through the analysis of the SCC behavior by slow-strain-rate tests of single and polycrystals after different prestraining conditions.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue on 316L stainless steel in boric acid concentrated media at 320 C

    SciTech Connect

    Herms, E.; Olive, J.M.; Puiggali, M.; Boursier, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion-Fatigue (CF) tests were performed in autoclave at 320 C in concentrated boric acid chlorinated media in presence of oxygen or hydrogen on type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Crack Growth Rates (CGR) are higher in non deaerated solutions for both SCC and CF than in hydrogenated solutions. CGR are relatively similar in CF and in SCC, excepted for high load ratio in CF where CGR are higher than in SCC. Detailed analysis of the fracture surface shows some distinct features between SCC and CF. Intergranular and transgranular mode of fracture are observed on SCC and CF. Fracture modes depend on the chemistry of solution in SCC and on frequency in CF. Traces of slip bands and crack front marking associated with oxide scale present on fracture surfaces exist in SCC and CF. Fatigue striations appear for low load ratio and high frequency. Secondary intergranular and transgranular cracking is observed only on SCC fracture surfaces and ligament morphology can be different in SCC relative to FC.

  19. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  20. Monitoring of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel weldments by acoustic and electrochemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Takemoto, Mikio

    2006-09-01

    A new hybrid monitoring technique for chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is proposed. It uses both the acoustic emission (AE) and corrosion potential fluctuation (CPF) techniques. This paper discusses the results of SCC tests on butt-welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes. The weld pipe suffered transgranular (TG)-SCC in a concentrated magnesium chloride solution (40 mass%), but suffered intergranular (IG) attack and falling-off of grains in a heat-affected zone (HAZ) in a dilute chloride solution (35 mass%). SCC initiations in both concentrated and dilute corrodants were successfully monitored using a CPF technique. However, the CPF technique could not monitor the propagation of the SCC. This propagation could be detected using an AE technique. Secondary AE was produced by hydrogen gas evolution and by the cracking of corrosion products, and the primary AE was produced by the falling-off of grains due to the mutual actions of anodic dissolution and the mechanical fracture along a chromium-depleted zone in the grain boundary. The volume of metal loss by the dissolution was predicted from the local anodic current due to the fluctuation of the corrosion potential, and was found to correspond to the volume of the grain boundary attack. The fact that the primary AE was detected just after rapid drop (RD)-type CPF suggested that the grain boundary corrosion caused the falling-off of the grain that produced the primary AE.

  1. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  2. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-11-04

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

    1999-10-26

    Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

  6. Failure Pressure and Leak Rate of Steam Generator Tubes With Stress Corrosion Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.; Park, J.Y.; Bakhitiari, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an 'equivalent rectangular crack' approach to predict leak rates through laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks. A comparison between predicted and observed test data on rupture and leak rate from laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks are provided. Specimen flaws were sized by post-test fractography in addition to pre-test advanced eddy current technique. The test failure pressures and leak rates are shown to be closer to those predicted on the basis of fractography than on NDE. However, the predictions based on NDE results are encouraging, particularly because they have the potential to determine a more detailed geometry of ligamentous cracks from which more accurate predictions of failure pressure and leak rate can be made in the future. (authors)

  7. Caustic stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in continuous kraft digesters due to process loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Leinonen, H.

    1999-07-01

    Loads of the continuous kraft digester have been determined during the start-up of the digester house. Loading was caused by the pressure of the proof test, the start-up pressures of the digester and, finally, the normal working pressure. The apparent threshold stress level in the base metal was greater than that achieved during the normal continuous cooking process but the level in the weld of the impregnation zone were exceeded due to the superposition of the tensile residual stresses. This two-axial tension is considered as the precondition for stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which was confirmed by fractography studies. The results showed, that SCC in the impregnation zone is possible only in the welds during the normal continuous cooking process. During the refill and blow phase of the digester the measured loading stress changes corresponded to the stresses of the proof test and increased the risk for SCC. Some procedures to avoid or minimize SCC are discussed.

  8. Research on mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    The results of internal gas pressurization tests, primarily at 320/sup 0/C, on cladding tubes from two suppliers, Supplier A and Supplier B, are presented. The two lots show a substantial difference in iodine SCC susceptibility so a test matrix is used to resolve the relative contributions of surface condition, residual stress, and texture. Additional tests with constant deflection split-ring specimens and with unstressed cladding segments are used to understand crack initiation and the early crack growth stages of SCC. The difference in SCC susceptibility is due to crystallographic texture. Other variables such as surface finish, stress relief temperature, and residual stress have little or no effect. Mechanical properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation all depend on texture. Both initiation and propagation features are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism for crack initiation consistent with most observations in this study and with the work of other investigators is proposed. At 320/sup 0/C, lifetime is crack initiation limited while several tests at 390/sup 0/C indicate that lifetime is less initiation limited at higher temperature. 31 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry on corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys and welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    Reactor vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 and their welds, such as Alloys 82, 182, 52, and 152, to EAC in simulated light water reactor environments. The existing crack growth rate (CGR) data for these alloys under cyclic and constant loads have been evaluated to establish the effects of alloy chemistry, cold work, and water chemistry. The experimental fatigue CGRs are compared with CGRs that would be expected in air under the same mechanical loading conditions to obtain a qualitative understanding of the degree and range of conditions for significant environmental enhancement in growth rates. The existing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data on Alloys 600 and 690 and Alloy 82, 182, and 52 welds have been compiled and analyzed to determine the influence of key parameters on growth rates in simulated PWR and BWR environments. The SCC data for these alloys have been evaluated with correlations developed by Scott and by Ford and Andresen.

  10. Electrochemical aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in. cap alpha. -brass

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, G T; Newman, R C

    1981-01-01

    This paper considers a number of aspects of the stress-corrosion cracking of brass from the point of view of the localized electrochemical processes occurring at the tip of a propagating crack. The principal system examined is the intergranular SCC of 70-30 brass in near-neutral ammoniacal solutions, for which a detailed mechanism is developed. In addition, the effects of nitrite ions in promoting SCC of both brass and copper are considered.